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1

DOE/EA-1449; Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash, King George County, Virginia (August 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash, King George County, Virginia United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2002 Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray-dryer Ash, King George County, Virginia ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 2 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The proposed action is for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide cost- shared financial support to Universal Aggregates, LLC, for the design, construction, and operation of a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Mirant-Birchwood Power Plant Facility (Mirant-Birchwood Facility) in King George County, Virginia.

2

Evelyn King  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coordinates LPP Evelyn King Contact Information contact contact us Evelyn King Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) Coordinator ...

3

BNL | George Goode  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George Goode George Goode Assistant Laboratory Director for Environment, Safety & Health photo of George Goode George Goode is responsible for environmental protection and...

4

George W. Arnold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

George W. Arnold. Dr. Arnold joined the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in September 2006 as Deputy ...

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

5

King Jet Tseng  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

King Tseng School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering - Head, Division of Power Engineering & Dir., Centre for Smart Energy Systems Nanyang Technological University, Singapore...

6

King George County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2863°, -77.1485163° 2863°, -77.1485163° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.2372863,"lon":-77.1485163,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

George Andrew Olah - Patents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Patents - George Andrew Olah Patents - George Andrew Olah Olah Page · Resources with Additional Information US 4,394,247 LIQUEFACTION OF COALS USING RECYCLABLE SUPERACID CATALYST - Olah, George A.; July 19, 1983 This invention discloses a process for the liquefaction of coals and other predominantly hydrocarbonaceous materials by treating the same with a superacidic catalyst system consisting of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride and boron trifluoride in the presence of super-atmospheric hydrogen. US 4,433,192 CONDENSATION OF NATURAL GAS OR METHANE INTO GASOLINE RANGE HYDROCARBONS - Olah, George A.; February 21, 1984 This invention relates to a new process for the direct conversion of natural gas or methane into gasoline-range hydrocarbons (i.e., synthetic transportation fuels or lower olefins) via catalytic condensation using superacid catalysts.

8

Burger King: Better Choices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burger King: Better Choices: BK Veggie Burger w/o mayo 310 Calories, 7g fat, 1g sat* fat BK Chicken Whopper w/o mayo 420 Calories, 9g fat, 3 g sat fat Chicken Caesar w/o dressing & croutons 160 Calories, 6g: Extra Crispy, 1 Breast 470 Calories, 28g fat, 8g sat fat Popcorn Chicken, 1 Large Order 620 Calories, 40

de la Torre, José R.

9

Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear Nature Bulletin No. 649-A October 1, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRICKLY ASH AND PRICKLY PEAR In the plant kingdom, as among people, there are so-me that we avoid. They have few virtues, if any, and our experiences with them are painful or have unpleasant after effects. Poison ivy is a notorious example. Prickly Ash, a shrub, is another. Although not poisonous it is thickly armed with wicked thorns and has no ornamental, economic or wildlife value. In 1821 when the first section lines were established in Cook County, the surveyor recorded -- for the benefit of land buyers -- the principal kinds of trees and other vegetation observed along each mile. He frequently encountered prickly ash in thickets near the Little Calumet River and also the north and south branches of the Chicago River.

10

Deborah Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deborah Rebecca Ash Deborah Ash Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Energy Efficiency Standards Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS...

11

George Malosh | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

George Malosh George Malosh About Us George Malosh - Deputy Director for Field Operations George Malosh has served as the Deputy Director for Field Operations in the Office of Science at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) since May 2006. In this capacity, Mr. Malosh serves as the line manager responsible for ensuring that the infrastructure and management systems are in place at 10 National Laboratories to enable the science missions to succeed. As the Deputy Director for Field Operations, Mr. Malosh provides leadership in the strategic planning, management, oversight, and coordination of the Office of Science (SC) field operations at the Site Offices, as well as the operations support provided by the SC Integrated Support Center and Headquarters Offices. Mr. Malosh came to the Office of Science in 1998 as the DOE Site Office

12

Polar King: Order (2013-CE-5328)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered Polar King International Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Polar King had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

13

NETL: PPII - Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash - Project Brief PDF-72KB Universal Aggregates, LLC, King George County, VA...

14

Elizabeth Maria King Curriculum Vitae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Thesis: Oxygen isotope study of igneous rocks from the Superior Province, Canada B.A. Geology (Magna CumElizabeth Maria King Curriculum Vitae Address: Department of Geography-Geology Illinois State-5310 Email: emking@ilstu.edu Education: Ph.D. Geology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (2001) Minor

King, Elizabeth M.

15

Kings River Conservation Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kings River Conservation Dist Place California Utility Id 10325 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity...

16

George W. Arnold George Arnold was appointed National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

George W. Arnold George Arnold was appointed National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability the development of standards underpinning the nation's Smart Grid. Dr. Arnold joined NIST in September 2006

Magee, Joseph W.

17

NREL: Energy Sciences - Paul W. King  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paul W. King Paul W. King Scientist IV Photo of Paul King Phone: (303) 384-6277 Email: Paul.King@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2004 Dr. Paul King joined NREL in 2001 as a postdoctoral associate to study the [FeFe]-hydrogenases of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Recently his group identified in this organism the proteins that function in the biosynthesis of the unique catalytic FeS-cluster, known as the H-cluster, of [FeFe]-hydrogenases. This discovery has led to the development of a biosynthetic system for production of [FeFe]-hydrogenases from both algal and bacterial organisms. Current areas of investigation include: 1) enzyme structure and function, 2) 3D-structure determination (in collaboration with Juan Fontecilla-Camps at CEA-Grenoble), 3) biophysical characterization of the catalytic H-cluster (in collaboration with Steve

18

Director's Perspective by George Miller | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Perspective by George Miller Director's Perspective by George Miller Miller-LLNL-SEAB.10.11.pdf More Documents & Publications Computational Advances in Applied Energy...

19

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Today, Dr. King is memorialized on the National Mall where he once spoke, a symbol of how far our Nation has come and a testament to the quiet heroes whose names may never appear in history books,...

20

Polar King: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5328)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Polar King International Inc. failed to certify a variety of walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry Resources with Additional Information · Patents George A. Olah Courtesy Rand Larson, Morningstar Productions George Olah received the 1994 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his contribution to carbocation chemistry" and his 'role in the chemistry of hydrocarbons. In particular, he developed superacids ... that are much stronger than ordinary acids, are non-nucleophilic, and are fluid at low temperatures. In such media ... carbocations are stable and their physical properties ... can be observed, thus allowing details of their structures to be determined. Besides trivalent ions ... Olah demonstrated the existence of higher coordinate carbocations ... . These species do not violate the octet rule, but involve 2-electron 3-center bonding. '1

22

Georges Charpak, Particle Detectors, and Multiwire Chambers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Georges Charpak, Particle Detectors, and Multiwire Chambers Georges Charpak, Particle Detectors, and Multiwire Chambers Resources with Additional Information · Patents Georges Charpak Courtesy of CERN Nobel laureate Georges Charpak [was] a pioneer in the art and science of particle detection ... . [He] developed a host of particle detectors used throughout experimental particle physics. In 1968, he invented and developed the first multiwire proportional chamber, for which he won the [Physics] Nobel Prize in 1992 ... . The multiwire chamber differed from earlier detectors in the speed with which it could record particle tracks from a collision-millions per second, rather than one or two per second for bubble chambers. The speed of the multiwire chamber and its successor technologies, along with their extraordinary precision, led to a revolution in particle physics ... . The technology that Charpak pioneered also finds applications in medicine and industry.

23

City of St. George- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The St. George City Council adopted a [http://www.sgcity.org/wp/power/NetMeteringPolicy.pdf net-metering program for area utilities], including interconnection procedures, in October 2005.* The...

24

White Ash Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

White Ash Biology Name: blondi Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: 1. Is the white ash tree endangered or is it a protected variety? 2. How does the white ash tree...

25

George H Neilson | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George H Neilson George H Neilson Head, Advanced Projects Department George "Hutch" Neilson manages PPPL's international stellarator and tokamak collaborations. In that context, he is program manager and national point-of-contact for U.S. collaborations with the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator experiment in Germany, and a project manager for coil-design collaborations with the JET tokamak experiment in Oxfordshire, UK. Neilson also is the responsible manager for PPPL advanced design activities, and for planning for a next-generation experimental fusion facility, or DEMO, that is to precede a commercial fusion reactor. Interests Research and design management Fusion experiment design and construction Stellarator physics and engineering Contact Information Phone: 609-243-2726

26

Prince George Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prince George Electric Coop Prince George Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Prince George Electric Coop Place Virginia Utility Id 15410 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Curtailable Service Rider Net Metering Rider SCHEDULE A-7 RESIDENTIAL SERVICE Multi Phase Residential SCHEDULE A-7 RESIDENTIAL SERVICE Single Phase Residential SCHEDULE C-6 CHURCH SERVICE Multi Phase Commercial SCHEDULE C-6 CHURCH SERVICE Single Phase Commercial SCHEDULE GS-4 GENERAL SERVICE Multi Phase 15kVA or less Industrial

27

Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Program | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Program Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Program January 22, 2013 11:00AM EST Forrestal Main Auditorium Simulcast to Germantown Room E301...

28

George Michael Memorial HPC Fellowship now accepting applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George Michael Memorial HPC Fellowship now accepting applications Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Abhinav Bhatele, a 2009 George...

29

Ambiguity in portfolio selection Georg Pflug  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambiguity in portfolio selection Georg Pflug David Wozabal Abstract In this paper, we consider- cess, not just a single optimization task. It comprises of the selection of a statistical model the ambiguity in choosing the probability model and therefore is robust in following sense: The selected

Pflug, Georg

30

GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITT Computer Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSIT?T G?TTINGEN Computer Security Overview and Introduction Computer Security Security @ Göttingen » Research group for comuter security » Prof. Dr. Konrad Rieck » 4 PhD students (+ 2 security » Research on analysis, detection and prevention of threats » Development of intelligent security

Grabowski, Jens

31

The Global Energy Challenge George Crabtree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an Energy Carrier coal gas heat mechanical motion electricity hydro wind fuel cells solar communication://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/abstracts.html#SC pre 1986 post 1986 # Tc 24 Hydrogen as an Energy Carrier solar wind hydro fossil fuel reformingThe Global Energy Challenge George Crabtree Argonne National Laboratory Kansas Energy Symposium

Peterson, Blake R.

32

The George Washington University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The George Washington University The George Washington University Place Washington, District of Columbia Zip 20052 Coordinates 38.8991756°, -77.0470916° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8991756,"lon":-77.0470916,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

Dr. George Wignall | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dr. George D. Wignall Dr. George D. Wignall Consultant: General-Purpose SANS Instrument (CG-2), HFIR Education Ph.D. in Physics, Sheffield University, England Description of Research Dr. Wignall uses small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to study the structure of homo-polymers, block-copolymers and polymer blends, using deuterium labeling techniques to "color" polymer molecules and make them "visible" in the condensed state. He makes SANS techniques and instrumentation available to the scientific community through the operation of user-friendly facilities. Selected Publications (from over 240) Y. B. Melnichenko and G. D. Wignall, "Small Angle Neutron Scattering in Materials Science: Recent Practical Applications," Journal of Applied Physics 102 021102 (2007)

34

Dr. Georg Ehlers - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Georg Ehlers Georg Ehlers Lead Instrument Scientist: Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer (CNCS), SNS Education PhD in Experimental Condensed Matter Physics, the Hahn Meitner Institut, in Berlin, Germany Description of Research Dr. Ehlers joined the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in 2003 as the lead instrument scientist for beam line 5, the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer (CNCS). CNCS is a high-resolution, direct geometry, cold neutron, inelastic multi-chopper spectrometer, designed to make use of neutrons with an energy of <50 meV. Before joining the SNS, Dr. Ehlers worked at the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL), a leading European neutron research facility situated in Grenoble, France for six years. At the ILL, he was instrument-responsible for the spin-echo spectrometers IN11 and IN15, and established a strong research

35

Ash Static Liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This laboratory study was focused on assessing fundamental geotechnical engineering properties of fly ash. It involved the testing of fly ash recovered from the existing ash ponds and from dry fly ash silos operated by 5 participating utilities. Materials from 22 different sites were involved in the testing program. To provide comprehensive fundamental understanding of the similarities and differences between the samples, a series of basic geotechnical engineering characterization ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Program Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Program Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Program January 22, 2014 11:00AM to 1:00PM EST Department of Energy Washington DC FORRESTAL MAIN AUDITORIUM Simulcast to Germantown Auditorium All employees are invited to the Department's 2014 Commemorative Program honoring the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on January 22, 2014 at 11 am. January 20, 2014 will mark the celebration of Dr. King's 85th birthday when the U.S. will also commemorate the 28th anniversary of the national holiday established in his honor. Dr. King once said, "all life is interconnected, that somehow we are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality tied in a single garment of destiny." The legacy of his vision of diversity and inclusion is a tribute to everyone.

37

King County - Green Building Initiative (Washington) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

King County - Green Building Initiative (Washington) King County - Green Building Initiative (Washington) King County - Green Building Initiative (Washington) < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider King County Solid Waste Division The King County Green Building Initiative started in 2001, and was included in the King Code Code with the Green Building and Sustainable Development Ordinance in 2008. The ordinance requires that all county-owned facilities and financial capital projects be built to LEED Gold standards, including new construction, major renovations, and projects using alternative funding. Major renovations are defined in the statutes as work that affects

38

A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy January 9, 2013 - 11:27am Addthis A Shining Example of Dr. King’s legacy Kathy Chambers Senior Science and Technical Information Specialist, OSTI Editor's Note: This blog was originally posted on OSTI's blog. As America celebrates Martin Luther King's birthday and focuses on how far this nation has come for all people, the Energy Department's .EDUconnections is pleased to honor Delaware State University (DSU). DSU is a shining example of Dr. King's extraordinary legacy of progress and education. Founded in 1891, DSU became one of the country's first land-grant educational institutions and is now a Historically Black College and University. DSU has a proud heritage of research, and today focuses on

39

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Battelle Laboratories-King Avenue, Former Construction Workers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Construction Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Battelle Laboratories-King Avenue Worker...

42

Optimizing Ash Handling - SmartAshTM System Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High ash levels in electrostatic precipitator (ESP) hoppers are notorious for increasing particulate matter (PM) emissions and plume opacity. Conventional means of monitoring hopper ash levels and fly ash handling system performance have been time-consuming and problematic. Neundorfer, Inc., has developed a fly ash conveying system-monitoring package (SmartAshSystem) that provides improved monitoring of fly ash removal process parameters and provides graphical depictions of ash system performance. Additi...

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

43

Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Lake George Park Commission

44

Prince George's County- Solar and Geothermal Residential Property Tax Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2008 Prince George's County enacted legislation offering a property tax credit on residential structures equipped with solar and geothermal systems. As originally devised, the credit could only...

45

Prince George's County - Solar Zoning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Program Information Maryland Program Type Siting & Permitting Prince George's County has created special provisions for solar panels in their zoning codes. Maryland...

46

Prescribed Burning in the Kings River Ecosystems Project Area: Lessons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prescribed Burning in the Kings River Ecosystems Project Area: Lessons Learned1 David S. Mc burning was initiated in 1994 in two 32,000-acre watersheds in the Kings River District of the Sierra various effects of these fires. Approximately 11,900 acres of prescription burns were completed by the end

Standiford, Richard B.

47

Charging Up in King County, Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Charging Up in King County, Washington Charging Up in King County, Washington Charging Up in King County, Washington Addthis Description King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development. Speakers Dow Constantine, LeAnn Oliver, Jay Inslee, Sheda Sahandy Duration 2:38 Topic Alternative Fuel Vehicles Clean Cities Credit Energy Department Video It's not so much gears and oil anymore as computers and laptops. King County is working with our regional partners, governments, utilities to push electrical infrastructure out into the community so that we can provide the basis for a new market for electric cars in our region.

48

GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITT CHEMIE unser Leben, unsere Zukunft!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSIT?T G?TTINGEN CHEMIE ­ unser Leben, unsere Zukunft! © 2011 Georg der Chemie in Göttingen wird unterstützt von 12. April 2011 Chemie im Alltag ­ Kaffee, Tee, Wein und geht es nicht Prof. Dr. Franc Meyer, Universität Göttingen 24. Mai 2011 Innovationsmotor Chemie Prof

Grabowski, Jens

49

Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash  

SciTech Connect

Universal Aggregates LLC (UA) was awarded a cost sharing Co-operative Agreement from the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Power Plant Improvement Initiative Program (PPII) to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia in October 2001. The Agreement was signed in November 2002. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the UA share is $12.3 million (63%). The original project team consists of UA, SynAggs, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc. and P. J. Dick, Inc. Using 115,000 ton per year of spray dryer ash (SDA), a dry FGD by-product from the power station, UA will produce 167,000 tons of manufactured lightweight aggregate for use in production of concrete masonry units (CMU). Manufacturing aggregate from FGD by-products can provide an economical high-volume use and substantially expand market for FGD by-products. Most of the FGD by-products are currently disposed of in landfills. Construction of the Birchwood Aggregate Facility was completed in March 2004. Operation startup was begun in April 2004. Plant Integration was initiated in December 2004. Integration includes mixing, extrusion, curing, crushing and screening. Lightweight aggregates with proper size gradation and bulk density were produced from the manufacturing aggregate plant and loaded on a stockpile for shipment. The shipped aggregates were used in a commercial block plant for CMU production. However, most of the production was made at low capacity factors and for a relatively short time in 2005. Several areas were identified as important factors to improve plant capacity and availability. Equipment and process control modifications and curing vessel clean up were made to improve plant operation in the first half of 2006. About 3,000 tons of crushed aggregate was produced in August 2006. UA is continuing to work to improve plant availability and throughput capacity and to produce quality lightweight aggregate for use in commercial applications.

Milton Wu; Paul Yuran

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

City of St. George - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of St. George - Net Metering City of St. George - Net Metering City of St. George - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Utah Program Type Net Metering Provider City of St. George The St. George City Council adopted a [http://www.sgcity.org/wp/power/NetMeteringPolicy.pdf net-metering program for area utilities], including interconnection procedures, in October 2005.* The interconnection procedures include different requirements, based on system size, for systems up to 10 megawatts (MW). Net metering is available to residential and commercial customers that generate electricity using photovoltaic (PV) systems. The net metering agreements currently available on the utility's web site only pertain to

51

Fly Ash Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

..., ASM International, 2006, p 499??500ASM Handbook, Vol 13C, Corrosion: Environments and IndustriesCorrosion and Erosion of Ash-Handling

52

Wet Bottom Ash Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

..., ASM International, 2006, p 499??500ASM Handbook, Vol 13C, Corrosion: Environments and IndustriesCorrosion and Erosion of Ash-Handling

53

Dancing in the ashes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The following novel is the third draft of my creative thesis entitled Dancing in the Ashes . It is an exploration of the Detroit rave (more)

Malesh, Vytautas Adolph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Final Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington. The evaluation lasted 12 months.

Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Prince George's County Underground Storage Act (Maryland) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prince George's County Underground Storage Act (Maryland) Prince George&#039;s County Underground Storage Act (Maryland) Prince George's County Underground Storage Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Retail Supplier Tribal Government Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment A gas storage company may invoke eminent domain to acquire property in Prince George's County for underground gas storage purposes. The area acquired must lie not less than 800 feet below the surface of a maximum of 12,000 acres of land, and may be owned by a public body. A permit from the Department of the Environment, along with an order from the Public Service Commission, is required prior to the use of eminent domain. The Act contains further information on eminent domain, landowner, and property

56

George Hoyt Whipple and the Impact of Liver on Anemia  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

George Hoyt Whipple and the Impact of Liver on Anemia George Hoyt Whipple and the Impact of Liver on Anemia Resources with Additional Information · Named After Him George Hoyt Whipple ... was an American physician, pathologist, biomedical researcher, and medical school educator and administrator. Whipple shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1934 ... "for their discoveries concerning liver therapy in cases of anemia". George Hoyt Whipple Courtesy of University of Rochester Medical Center Whipple's main research was concerned with anemia and with the physiology and pathology of the liver. He won the Nobel Prize for his discovery that liver fed to anemic dogs reverses the effects of the anemia. This remarkable discovery led directly to successful liver treatment of pernicious anemia.

57

City of St. George - Net Metering (Utah) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of St. George has also developed interconnection rules for net metered systems. Inverter-based systems up to 10kW in capacity can qualify for Level 1 interconnection, which...

58

Ash cloud aviation advisories  

SciTech Connect

During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S. [EG and G, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1992-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

59

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

King County Metro Transit King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler Battelle K. Walkowicz National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39742 April 2006 King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler Battelle K. Walkowicz National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. FC06.3000 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39742 April 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

60

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! February 20, 2012 - 5:00am Addthis Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs For many of us, particularly those living east of the Mississippi river, President's Day weekend is not just a time to honor the birthday of our country's founding father, it's also the final escape from dreadfully cold and snowy days. However, those of us with pestering consumerist habits to feed always ensure our return to the metropolis by Monday, as the day is quickly taking on a new reputation: Second best shopping day of the year, after Black Friday. By now you're asking, "What does any of this have to do with energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! February 20, 2012 - 5:00am Addthis Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs For many of us, particularly those living east of the Mississippi river, President's Day weekend is not just a time to honor the birthday of our country's founding father, it's also the final escape from dreadfully cold and snowy days. However, those of us with pestering consumerist habits to feed always ensure our return to the metropolis by Monday, as the day is quickly taking on a new reputation: Second best shopping day of the year, after Black Friday. By now you're asking, "What does any of this have to do with energy

62

Ash Handling System Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Ash Handling System Maintenance Guide provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system. This guide will assist plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability and reducing the maintenance costs for the ash handling system.

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

Honoring the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Honoring the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. Honoring the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. Honoring the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. January 19, 2012 - 1:32pm Addthis Honoring the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. Karissa Marcum Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Employees across the Department honored Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on Tuesday, saluting the civil rights legend during a lively ceremony at Department headquarters. Secretary Chu joined Lynn Cothren, former personal assistant to Coretta Scott King, and Reverend C.T. Vivian, a rider on the first Freedom Bus into Jackson Mississippi and member of Dr. King's executive staff during the event. Secretary Chu spoke about the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. and how we can best remember him. He said, "There's no doubt that we have accomplished much, but we also

64

Black Swans, Dragons-Kings and Prediction Black Swan (Cygnus atratus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black Swans, Dragons-Kings and Prediction Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) www.er.ethz.ch Didier;12 2008 FINANCIAL CRISIS #12;Crises are not but "Dragon-kings" Dragon-king hypothesis #12;Black Swan story;17 Traditional emphasis on Daily returns do not reveal any anomalous events Financial crashes as "Black swans

65

Recent Observations of the Mean Circulation on Georges Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clockwise circulation around Georges Bank was measured by means of moored current meters, aircraft-tracked surface drifters, and satellite-tracked drifters drogued at 10 m. The strongest flow was in a narrow jetlike current (30 cm s?1) along ...

B. Butman; R. C. Beardsley; B. Magnell; D. Frye; J. A. Vermersch; R. Schlitz; R. Limeburner; W. R. Wright; M. A. Noble

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Energetics of the Internal Tide on Northern Georges Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the energetics of the internal waves generated by the tide on the northern edge of Georges Bank in the outer Gulf of Maine-a region of strong tidal flow, a density/temperature front, and abrupt topography. A series of bank-...

David Brickman; John W. Loder

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

University of Applied Sciences Georg-Simon-Ohm Fachhochschule Nurnberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) an der Georg-Simon-Ohm Fachhochschule N¨urnberg C++-Programmiertechniken f¨ur High Performance Computing Access), aber auch manche Multi-Core-Systeme geh¨oren, sind im High Performance Computing (HPC) weit-Optimierung von C++-Code f¨ur High Performance Computing 26 3.1 C

Sanderson, Yasmine

68

Chemical Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

110 Chemical Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Kyriacos Zygourakis of study leading to the nonthesis Master of Chemical Engineering (M.Ch.E.) degree. A joint M, and biomedical engineering. #12;Chemical Engineering 111 Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

69

Chemical Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

117 Chemical Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Kyriacos Zygourakis,studentsmayapplyforafifthyearofstudyleadingtothenonthesis Master of Chemical Engineering (M.Ch.E.) degree. A joint M.B.A./M.Ch.E. degree is also available, and biomedical engineering. #12;Chemical Engineering 119118 DEPARTMENTS / Chemical Engineering For CENG 301 Math

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

70

Chemical Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

120 Chemical Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Kyriacos Zygourakis,studentsmayapplyforafifthyearofstudyleadingtothenonthesis Master of Chemical Engineering (M.Ch.E.) degree. A joint M.B.A./M.Ch.E. degree is also available, and biomedical engineering. #12;Chemical Engineering 121 Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

71

PARABOLIC RAYNAUD BUNDLES INDRANIL BISWAS AND GEORG HEIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PARABOLIC RAYNAUD BUNDLES INDRANIL BISWAS AND GEORG HEIN Abstract. Let X be an irreducible smooth and N 2 a fixed integer. For any pair (r, d) N ? 1 N Z, there exists a parabolic vector bundle Rr,d, on X, with parabolic structure over S and all parabolic weights in 1 N Z, that has the following

Hein, Georg

72

Microslot NMR Probe for Metabolomics Studies Hans Georg Krojanski,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microslot NMR Probe for Metabolomics Studies Hans Georg Krojanski, Jo¨ rg Lambert,, Yilmaz Dortmund, Germany A NMR microprobe based on microstrip technology suit- able for investigations of volume-limited samples in the low nanoliter range was designed. NMR spectra of sample quantities in the 100 pmol range

Suter, Dieter

73

Kings County, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kings County, New York: Energy Resources Kings County, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.6528762°, -73.959494° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.6528762,"lon":-73.959494,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

74

Kings River Conservation District (KRCD) Solar Farm Solar Power Plant |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

KRCD) Solar Farm Solar Power Plant KRCD) Solar Farm Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Kings River Conservation District (KRCD) Solar Farm Solar Power Plant Facility Kings River Conservation District (KRCD) Solar Farm Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Cleantech America Location San Joachin Valley, California Coordinates 34.0787104°, -117.8660029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0787104,"lon":-117.8660029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

75

Microsoft Word - KingEstate_LaneElectric_CX_RCT.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Robert C. Trismen Robert C. Trismen Project Manager - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: King Estate Solar Project Integration Budget Information: Work Order 00218289, Task Number 1 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 - Additions/modifications to electric power transmission facilities within previously developed area. Location: Lane County, Oregon, southwest of Eugene, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to provide a meter and associated equipment to Lane Electric Cooperative (LEC) for installation at the King Estate Solar Photovoltaic Generation plant. BPA would pre-configure the meter and test, energize, commission, and calibrate the metering equipment. LEC would fund the proposed project; BPA

76

Continuing disposal of coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large volume of power-plant coal ash produced and stricter Federal water pollution controls are making ash disposal increasingly difficult for utilities. The protection of surface and ground water quality required in the Resource conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act's Clean Water Act (CWA) amendments of 1977 have raised the cost of disposal to a level where an acceptable method must be found. The Electric Power Research Institute's Coal Ash Disposal Manual (EPRI-FM--1257) describes-ash chemistry, disposal site selection, site monitoring and reclamation, and other information of interest to utilities that are making cost estimates and procedure evaluations. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Golden, D.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

King County Carbonate Fuel Cell Demonstration Project: 2005 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the ongoing demonstration experiences of a 1-MW carbonate fuel cell system operating on anaerobic digester gas at a wastewater treatment plant in King County, Washington. This is a follow-up to a previous EPRI report on the same project, 1011472, and summarizes operational experience and performance data obtained in 2005. The case study is one of several fuel cell project case studies under research by the EPRI Distributed Energy Resources Program. This case study is designed to...

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Village St. George, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

St. George, Louisiana: Energy Resources St. George, Louisiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.3621371°, -91.0673259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.3621371,"lon":-91.0673259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

79

George County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

George County, Mississippi: Energy Resources George County, Mississippi: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.8431226°, -88.6723578° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.8431226,"lon":-88.6723578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

80

Prince George's County, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

George's County, Maryland: Energy Resources George's County, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.7849211°, -76.8720961° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.7849211,"lon":-76.8720961,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology Place Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Zip 11442 Sector Solar Product Saudi Arabia-based national science and technology research agency. The agency is involved in solar project development. Coordinates 24.647325°, 46.714585° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":24.647325,"lon":46.714585,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

82

Operational Implications of Airborne Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcanic ash clouds pose a real threat to aircraft safety. The ash is abrasive and capable of causing serious damage to aircraft engines, control surfaces, windshields, and landing lights. In addition, ash can clog the pitotstatic systems, which ...

Gary L. Hufford; Leonard J. Salinas; James J. Simpson; Elliott G. Barske; David C. Pieri

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Comparison between MSW Ash and RDF Ash from Incineration Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the unwashed incineration ash were tested and analyzed for TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure of auxiliary air. The flue gases are PEER-REVIEW 963 #12;eventually led through air pollution control system to prevent visible flue gas emissions due to higher moisture content. TCLP ANALYSIS Samples of fly ash

Columbia University

84

Incineration and incinerator ash processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallel small-scale studies on the dissolution and anion exchange recovery of plutonium from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash were conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and at the Rocky Flats Plant. Results from these two studies are discussed in context with incinerator design considerations that might help to mitigate ash processing related problems. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Blum, T.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Coal Ash Carbon Removal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market resistance to the use of ash containing elevated levels of carbon and/or ammonia has become a major concern for coal-fired facilities in recent years as a result of increased use of nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction environmental control technologies. EPRI initiated this state of practice assessment to help power producers evaluate alternatives for ash beneficiation.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Front Row (left to right): Bryan Reed, Wayne King, Nigel Browning ...  

DTEM Team Members: Front Row (left to right): Bryan Reed, Wayne King, Nigel Browning, Judy Kim, Michael Armstrong Back Row (left to right): Thomas LaGrange ...

87

Symposium on the Nature of Science?George Lisensky, Amy Payne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology into the Curriculum George Lisensky, Amy Payne, and Cynthia Widstrand "Nano-" means a thousandth of a thousandth of a thousandth. Nanotechnology involves the...

88

Dr. George Spanos to Join TMS Staff in Technical Leadership Role  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2010 ... 03/15 - Dr. George Spanos to Join TMS Staff in Technical Leadership Role. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Patti Dobranski

89

Geochemical interpretation of Kings Mountain, North Carolina, orientation area  

SciTech Connect

An orientation study has been made of uranium occurrences in the area of Kings Mountain, North Carolina. This is one of the orientation studies of known uranium occurrences that are being conducted in several geologic provinces and under various climatic (weathering) conditions to provide the technical basis for design and interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance programs. The Kings Mountain area was chosen for study primarily because of the reported presence of high-uranium monazite. This 750-mi/sup 2/ area is in the deeply weathered southern Appalachian Piedmont and spans portions of the Inner Piedmont, Kings Mountain, and Charlotte geologic belts. Uranium concentration maps for ground and surface water samples clearly outline the outcrop area of the Cherryville Quartz Monzonite with highs up to 10 ppb uranium near the reported uraninite. Several surface water samples appear to be anomalous because of trace industrial contamination. Uranium concentration maps for -100 to +200 mesh stream sediments indicate the area of monazite abundance. Several samples with >100 ppM uranium content appear to be high in uranium-rich resistate minerals. When the uranium content of sediment samples is ratioed to the sum of Hf, Dy, and Th, the anomaly pattern shifts to coincide with uranium highs in ground and surface water samples. False anomalies from concentrations of monazite (Ce,ThPO/sub 4/), xenotime (Y,DyPO/sub 4/), and zircon (Zr,HfSiO/sub 4/) in stream sediment samples can thus be eliminated. Residual anomalies should be related to unusual uranium enrichment of these common minerals or to the presence of an uncommon uranium-rich mineral. Tantalum, beryllium, and tin in stream sediments correspond to high concentrations of uranium in stream and ground water but not to uranium in sediments. In an initial reconnaissance, several media should be sampled, and it is essential to correct uranium in sediments for the sample mineralogy.

Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Insurance coverage for coal ash liabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses how liability insurance can be a valuable tool for limiting coal ash liabilities.

Elkind, D.L. [Dickstein Shapiro LLP (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report focuses on identifying ash deposit materials and mounting them to a heat transfer surface for further study. A group of synthetic slag of various compositions was also produced using a sodium silicate binder, Powder River Basin (PRB) bottom ash, and ash cenospheres for porosity to test the effects of pulse detonation techniques on the removal of ash deposits.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

92

King Mountain Wind Ranch I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ranch I Ranch I Jump to: navigation, search Name King Mountain Wind Ranch I Facility King Mountain Wind Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Cielo Wind Power/Renewable Energy Systems Energy Purchaser Texas-New Mexico Power- Reliant Energy- Austin Energy Location Upton County TX Coordinates 31.280873°, -102.195861° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.280873,"lon":-102.195861,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

93

Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Program T. J. King, Jr., Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Program T. J. King, Jr., Director Renewables Smart. Jackson · Commercial Integration ­ N. Durfee FEMP J. S. Kelley · ESPC ­ J. A. Shonder Industrial. Hughes · Enhanced Geothermal ­ T. J. King Electricity Delivery Research and Development Infrastructure

94

The King County Solid Waste Division handles 100 % of the mixed solid waste generated in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(PSAPCA)) Regulation I, Article 7. Unlike the permit, this document is not a legally enforceable document. It includes references to the applicable statutory or regulatory provisions that relate to King County Solid Waste Divisions air emissions, and provides a description of King County Solid Waste Divisions activities, including a short compliance history. Statement of Basis January 4, 2001

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Integrated Fly Ash Pond Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is directed toward solving new challenges to meeting U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge limits for ammonia and selected metals from coal-fired power plants. Based on the field and laboratory study of fly ash ponds at five operating coal-fired power plants, the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur in fly ash sluicing systems are discussed and recommendations are made as to how to best manage the pond...

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Genetic Transformation and Regeneration of Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) for Resistance to the Emerald Ash Borer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bats, tool handles, furniture, and firewood. However, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) develop an efficient regeneration and genetic transformation system for green ash, (2) regenerateGenetic Transformation and Regeneration of Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) for Resistance

97

Beep Beep! King County, Washington Is Charging Up Savings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beep Beep! King County, Washington Is Charging Up Savings Beep Beep! King County, Washington Is Charging Up Savings Beep Beep! King County, Washington Is Charging Up Savings April 12, 2011 - 5:48pm Addthis April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? King County used a $6.1 million grant to conduct energy efficiency upgrades. Upgrades included the installation of electric vehicle charging stations, county vehicle fleet upgrades and senior housing energy improvements. The county is helping lead a regional effort to install electric vehicle charging stations at strategic locations across the Puget Sound area. Residents of King County, Washington, are seeing several improvements in their community thanks to a $6.1 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG). The grant, which is funded by the

98

Long duration ash probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

Hurley, John P. (Grand Forks, ND); McCollor, Don P. (Grand Forks, ND); Selle, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, MN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Science Showcase: George F. Smoot and Roger D. Kornberg | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Showcase: George F. Smoot and Roger D. Kornberg Science Showcase: George F. Smoot and Roger D. Kornberg Feature Archive George Smoot George F. Smoot won the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics. George F. Smoot and Roger D. Kornberg have joined the growing list of Nobel Laureates associated with DOE. Smoot won the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in blackbody and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. Smoot is an astrophysicist at DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and a UC Berkeley physics professor. He shared the award with John C. Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Roger D. Kornberg of Stanford University won the 2006 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his studies of the molecular basis of eukaryotic transcription. A significant portion of Kornberg's research leading to this prize was performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

100

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

King George Prince Edward York Cumberland King William Prince George Windows Insulation Foundation Fenestration U-Factor Skylight U-Factor Glazed Fenestration SHGC Ceiling...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fly ash chemical classification based on lime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, total lime content (CaO) of fly ash is shown in fly ash reports, but its significance is not addressed in US specifications. For certain applications a low lime ash is preferred. When a class C fly ash must be cementitious, lime content above 20% is required. A ternary S-A-C phase diagram pilot is given showing the location of fly ash compositions by coal rank and source in North America. Fly ashes from subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin usually contain sufficient lime to be cementitious but blending with other coals may result in calcium being present in phases other than tricalcium aluminate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

Fox, J. [BASF Construction Chemicals, LLC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Gov. King's stance against utilities upsets both camps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Massachusetts utilities and utility detractors all object to Governor King's position stated at a March press conference and urging regulators to deny rate increases that he claimed would be paying for utility mistakes. Boston Edison's request for a $291 million rate increase would recover the money lost when the utility abandoned its Pilgrim II nuclear plant. Boston Gas is seeking $46 million to recover money lost during last winter's shortage of natural gas. The governor's timing and mode of intervention prompted most of the criticism because of their political ramifications during an election year. Most of his statements drew upon materials from a consumer group called Fair Share, but were stated in a way that the governor's re-election is necessary to secure the desired effects. (DCK)

Not Available

1982-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

103

City of Kings Mountain, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain, North Carolina (Utility Company) Mountain, North Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Kings Mountain Place North Carolina Utility Id 10324 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Housing Authority Industrial Large General Service (>500kW) Commercial Large Industrial Service (>500kW) Industrial Medium General Service (100-500kW) Commercial Medium Industrial Service (100-500kW) Industrial Outdoor Lighting Service- 150W High Pressure Sodium- Urban, Existing Pole

104

The Honorable'George Kubin City Hall Dear Mayor Kubin:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

_ Department of Energy _ Department of Energy Washington. QC 20% APR 0 3 1995 The Honorable'George Kubin City Hall Dear Mayor Kubin: Secretary.of Energy.Wazel O'Leary has.announced a new approach to openness in the Department of,Energy [DOE) and its communications with the public. In support'of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed information related to the former Mtchigan Chemical Corporation site in your jurisdiction that performed work for DOE's predecessor agencies. This information is provided for your information, use, and retention. DOE's Formerly'Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program is responsible for identification of sites used by DOE's predecessor agencies, determining their current radiological condition and, where it has authority, performing

105

City of St George, Utah (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah (Utility Company) Utah (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of St George Place Utah Utility Id 17874 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Agricultural service Commercial Large General service Industrial Residential Residential Small General service Industrial

106

Super Models, Old King Coal II, & Civil Disobedience For fellow technocrats: "Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE", to appear soon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Super Models, Old King Coal II, & Civil Disobedience Model: For fellow technocrats: "Climate" was a guise, using prurient interest to gain attention. Sorry! "Old King Coal II" and "Civil Disobedience" are accurate headings. Old King Coal II: Thanks for comments/suggestions re my "Old King Coal" e-mail. Main

Hansen, James E.

107

Water Management in Ash-Handling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1980, EPA proposed revisions to the effluent standards and guidelines for fly ash and bottom ash transport systems. This review of utility practices provides a comprehensive account of the operation of and problems experienced in wet handling of bottom and fly ash and suggests areas for further research.

1987-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interim technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington.

Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Recent Changes in Downward Longwave Radiation at King Sejong Station, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of cloud, air temperature, and specific humidity on downward longwave irradiance and their long-term variabilities are examined by analyzing the measurements made at the King Sejong Station in the Antarctic Peninsula during the period of ...

Hi Ku Cho; Jhoon Kim; Yeonjin Jung; Yun Gon Lee; Bang Yong Lee

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

111

Bottom Ash System Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to personnel involved in the bottom ash system and its components, including good maintenance practices, condition monitoring, predictive and preventive maintenance techniques, probable failure modes, and troubleshooting guidance. The guide was developed primarily to provide detailed maintenance and troubleshooting information but also includes basic system information.

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

LANL Medal recipient George Cowan, 90, presents memoirs at talk, book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George Cowan presents memoirs at talk George Cowan presents memoirs at talk LANL Medal recipient George Cowan, 90, presents memoirs at talk, book signing February 25 in Los Alamos Scientist, businessman, and philanthropist George Cowan will talk about his new book, Manhattan Project to the Santa Fe Institute. February 17, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

113

George T. Basabilvazo Named Assistant Manager for Development and Research at Carlsbad Field Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George T. Basabilvazo Named Assistant Manager George T. Basabilvazo Named Assistant Manager For Development and Research at Carlsbad Field Office CARLSBAD, N.M., October 4, 2000 - George T. Basabilvazo has been named Assistant Manager for Development and Research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office. "I am delighted to have George in this position," said Dr. Inés Triay, Manager of the Carlsbad Field Office. "He has the experience to ensure that we move forward in developing new technologies to dispose of waste in an environmentally safe manner." Basabilvazo will manage, develop and implement program activities that focus on economic development, technology transfer, international programs and the deployment of new technology for transuranic waste characterization, transportation and disposal.

114

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - George Walton High School |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

George Walton High School George Walton High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - George Walton High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and the George Walton High School Science

115

Depth-Dependent Studies of Tidally Induced Residual Currents on the Sides of Georges Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a depth-dependent tidal model, the tidally induced residual currents on the northern and southern sections of Georges Bank are computed and the effects of various physical parameters on the current are examined. Because of significant on-...

Kim-Tai Tee

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

George B. Zimmerman, 1983 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

George B. Zimmerman, 1983 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The...

117

A Numerical Study of Stratified Tidal Rectification over Finite-Amplitude Banks. Part II: Georges Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal rectification over an idealized two-dimensional cross section of Georges Bank, which is a large, shallow, elongated submarine bank in the Gulf of Maine, is studied using a primitive equation coastal ocean circulation model. In the ...

Changsheng Chen; Robert C. Beardsley; Richard Limeburner

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

June 25, 2012 Dr. George W. Arnold, Eng.Sc.D. Director ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... regarding the SGIP 2.0 value proposition, budgets, and funding ... to scale back to a budget plan which ... 5 Dr. George W. Arnold, Eng.Sc.D. June 25 ...

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

Topographic Rectification of Tidal Currents on the Sides of Georges Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rectification of M2 tidal currents on the sloping sides of Georges Bank is predicted to make an important year-round contribution to its observed mean clockwise circulation. A rectification mechanism involving continuity and Coriolis effects, ...

John W. Loder

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A Model of the Tidally Induced Residual Circulation in the Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional nonlinear numerical hydrodynamic model using Legendre polynomials to represent the vertical structure of the horizontal currents has been used to study the tidally induced residual flows in the Gulf of MaineGeorges Bank study ...

Tatsusaburo Isaji; Malcolm L. Spaulding

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Comparison of Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine and New England Shelf Tidal Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The semidiurnal tidal currents associated with the near-resonant response of the Gulf of Maine-Bay of Fundy system are amplified over the relatively shallow depths of Georges Bank, thus leading to enhanced energy dissipation, vertical mixing and ...

Wendell S. Brown

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

123

Compositional Analysis of Beneficiated Fly Ashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fly ash is a byproduct of combustion of coal in coal-fired powerplants through ... to be disposed of at a significant cost to power plant companies, and ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Steel Foundries Elmes-King  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Steel Foundries Elmes-King Steel Foundries Elmes-King Div - OH 36 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Steel Foundries Elmes-King Div (OH.36 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Cincinnati , Ohio OH.36-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 OH.36-2 OH.36-3 Site Operations: Briquette operations on green salt/uranium oxide on a hydraulic press in the mid-1950s. OH.36-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantities of material handled OH.36-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Oxide OH.36-1 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring during operations only OH.36-4 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

125

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

George F. Chapline, Jr., 1982 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

George F. Chapline, Jr., 1982 George F. Chapline, Jr., 1982 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: lawrence.award@science.doe.gov 1980's George F. Chapline, Jr., 1982 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page National Security: For outstanding basic contributions in high energy and nuclear physics, in high energy density astrophysics and cosmology, and in the highly creative and effective application of atomic, nuclear, and statistical physics to important national security problems

127

George A. Cowan, 1990 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

George A. Cowan, 1990 George A. Cowan, 1990 The Enrico Fermi Award Fermi Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's 1950's Ceremony The Life of Enrico Fermi Contact Information The Enrico Fermi Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: fermi.award@science.doe.gov 1990's George A. Cowan, 1990 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Citation For accomplishments in the development of radiochemical techniques and their application to the solution of a broad range of scientific problems -- including the migration of radioactive waste products from the Oklo natural reactors, the distribution of atmospheric pollution, the flux of solar neutrinos -- and for extensive contributions to nuclear weapons

128

Use of Class C Fly Ash in High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of fly ash in concrete is a well-established practice, the volume of high-calcium Class C ash used lags behind that of low-calcium Class F ash. Because Class C may be the only type of ash produced in some western states, this disparity can significantly limit its use potential. The literature results presented in this report represent the first phase of a longer term research effort to provide technical information supporting the increased use of Class C ash in concrete applications.

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17-acre...

130

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a...

131

George Gollin, Investigation of TESLA Damping Ring Kickers using the A0 Photoinjector Beam 1 Investigation of TESLA Damping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

George Gollin, Investigation of TESLA Damping Ring Kickers using the A0 Photoinjector Beam 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . IPhysicsP Illinois Investigation of TESLA Damping Ring Kickers using the A0 Photoinjector Beam George, Investigation of TESLA Damping Ring Kickers using the A0 Photoinjector Beam 2

Gollin, George

132

Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine innocent alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT); Akash, Akash (Salt lake City, UT); Zhao, Qiang (Natick, MA)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

134

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

135

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Wash King Laundry, Baldwin, MI, March 1993  

SciTech Connect

This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Wash King Laundry Superfund site in Baldwin, Pleasant Plains Township, Michigan. The groundwater remedial action consists of the following: groundwater monitoring; deed restrictions; and groundwater extraction with physical/chemical treatment. The lagoon remedial action consists of the following: excavation of contaminated sediments and soils and off-site disposal.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Age and Growth of King Mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla, From the U.S. Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Age and Growth of King Mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla, From the U.S. Gulf of Mexico CHARLES S and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the United States has been thor oughly documented (Manooch et aI., 1978 resources (mackerels) in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic region. final amendment I 1985 Gulf of Mexico

137

Peter Cruz and Gaetan Georges Power Systems Analysis, E4511 Spring 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under the U.S. Department of Energy responsible for the collection, analysis and propagation of energy, and wind, to list a few) to extract mechanical energy and convert it to #12;2 electrical energy. Increasing1 Peter Cruz and Gaetan Georges Power Systems Analysis, E4511 Spring 2013 A survey of wind

Lavaei, Javad

138

Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman Division and planetary materials easier and faster down to nano-scales. Small but new minerals with important geological significance are being discovered. Nano-features are being discovered in many common minerals and gems, which

Ma, Chi

139

Update on Modal Analysis George Guthrie 0 Steven Aoki, Marcia K McNutt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Markowsky" "Anthony Cugini" ~GeorgeCC' ' , , . Guthrie" History: This message has been replied to. -'--- Mar uncertainty · preliminary data needs have been assessed (and include oil composition , gas composit ion, gas/oil f raction (over time), density/viscosity of oil and gas, surface tension of oi l and salt water

140

Microbial and Enzymatic Biofuel Cells G. Tayhas R. Palmore and George M. Whitesides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 14 Microbial and Enzymatic Biofuel Cells G. Tayhas R. Palmore and George M. Whitesides the literaturepublished after 1985relevant to microbial and enzymatic biofuel cells. It tabulates the experimental conditions used in operation, the characteristics,and the performance of the reported biofuel cells

Prentiss, Mara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Policy-basiertes Metering fr IP-Netze Georg Carle, Sebastian Zander, Tanja Zseby  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy-basiertes Metering für IP-Netze Georg Carle, Sebastian Zander, Tanja Zseby GMD FOKUS-basierte Architektur für verteiltes Metering zur Erbringung der geforderten Messaufgaben vorgestellt. Messaufgaben Verteilung sowie Umsetzung auf spezifische Meter-Konfigurationen für unterschiedliche Meter unterstützt

Carle, Georg

142

APPLICATION OF MICROECONOMIC METRICS IN COMPETITIVE ELECTRICITY Pedro Correia and George Gross  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for managing the grid usage. The commercial transactions take place using the electric network or grid, a factAPPLICATION OF MICROECONOMIC METRICS IN COMPETITIVE ELECTRICITY MARKETS Pedro Correia and George Gross Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana

Gross, George

143

Opening Remarks by George W. Arnold, National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Opening Remarks by George W. Arnold, National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability Conference on Smart Grid Interoperability Standards January 31, 2011 Introduction Chairman Wellinghoff the opportunity to escribe NIST's and our partners efforts to develop standards for an interoperable d smart grid

Magee, Joseph W.

144

A Client-centric Grid Knowledgebase George Kola, Tevfik Kosar and Miron Livny  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it to redesign the application. Adaptation. Smart grid application deployers can come up with easy triggersA Client-centric Grid Knowledgebase George Kola, Tevfik Kosar and Miron Livny Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison {kola,kosart,miron}@cs.wisc.edu Abstract Grid computing brings

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

145

A Clientcentric Grid Knowledgebase George Kola, Tevfik Kosar and Miron Livny  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it to redesign the application. Adaptation. Smart grid application deployers can come up with easy triggersA Client­centric Grid Knowledgebase George Kola, Tevfik Kosar and Miron Livny Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin­Madison {kola,kosart,miron}@cs.wisc.edu Abstract Grid computing brings

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

146

Rocky Flats ash test procedure (sludge stabilization)  

SciTech Connect

Rocky Flats Ash items have been identified as the next set of materials to be stabilized. This test is being run to determine charge sizes and soak times to completely stabilize the Rocky Flats Ash items. The information gathered will be used to generate the heating rampup cycle for stabilization. This test will also gain information on the effects of the glovebox atmosphere (moisture) on the stabilized material. This document provides instructions for testing Rocky Flats Ash in the HC-21C muffle furnace process.

Winstead, M.L.

1995-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fusibility and sintering characteristics of ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The temperature characteristics of ash fusibility are studied for a wide range of bituminous and brown coals, lignites, and shales with ratios R{sub B/A} of their alkaline and acid components between 0.03 and 4. Acritical value of R{sub B/A} is found at which the fusion temperatures are minimal. The sintering properties of the ashes are determined by measuring the force required to fracture a cylindrical sample. It is found that the strength of the samples increases sharply at certain temperatures. The alkali metal content of the ashes has a strong effect on their sintering characteristics.

Ots, A. A., E-mail: aots@sti.ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Investigation of Ammonia Adsorption on Fly Ash and Potential Impacts of Ammoniated Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Problems associated with ammoniated fly ash have become a major concern for coal-fired facilities in recent years due to the increased use of ammonia-based environmental control technologies. Of particular note is more frequent use of ammonia-based NOx control systems and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) conditioning with ammonia. To help power producers evaluate and mitigate the impacts of ammoniated ash, this project provides crucial information in the areas of fly ash characterization, adsorption test...

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

Proceedings: Tenth International Ash Use Symposium, Volume 2: Ash Use R&D and Clean Coal By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics discussed at the tenth symposium on coal ash use included fundamental ash use research, product marketing, applied research, ash management and the environment, and commercial applications. Intense international research interest continues in coal ash use due to the prospects of avoiding disposal costs and generating revenue from by-product sales.

1993-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Case Studies in Ash Pond Management, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Toward Developing Integrated Strategies for Managing Multiple Constituents in Ash Pond Discharges," EPRI's second workshop on Ash Pond Management, was hosted by TVA on May 16, 2006, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The presentations in this workshop reflected specific research challenges identified by participants in the first Ash Pond Management workshop, held in 2004. Among the presentations given in this second workshop were the following: Ash Pond Limnology Optimizing Ash Pond Treatment of Ammonia Predic...

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

NETL: PPII - Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Project Documents - Industrial Applications Demonstration Project Documents - Industrial Applications Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash - Project Brief [PDF-72KB] Universal Aggregates, LLC, King George County, VA PROJECT FACT SHEET Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash [PDF-412KB] (Feb 2008) PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Report Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Absorber Ash [PDF-4.5MB] (Nov 2007) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash: A DOE Assessment [PDF-170KB] (Mar 2008)

154

Winter'04Ash4-5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

process, fly ash is used as a raw material to substitute for part of the clay and shale, which are the two main raw materials of a conventional brick. Test bricks produced...

155

The 1983 Ash Wednesday Fires in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Australia experienced the most disastrous bushfires in over 40 years on Ash Wednesday, 16 February 1983. This article describes the meteorological conditions prior to, during and after these fires, and includes photographs from GMS-2. It also ...

M. E. Voice; F. J. Gauntlett

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Coal Ash Contaminants in Wetlands | SREL Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracey Tuberville, and Bill Hopkins The ash plume wetland (APW). The APW received coal combustion wastes from a breach in a receiving basin in the 1970s. Several trace metals...

157

Airborne Volcanic Ash Forecast Area Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of aircraft flight safety operations, daily comparisons between modeled, hypothetical, volcanic ash plumes calculated with meteorological forecasts and analyses were made over a 1.5-yr period. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian ...

Barbara J. B. Stunder; Jerome L. Heffter; Roland R. Draxler

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Ashe County- Wind Energy System Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2007 Ashe County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in unincorporated areas of the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a...

159

NETL: Events - World of Coal Ash 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(WOCA) 2007 conference, jointly sponsored by the American Coal Ash Association and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, will be held May 7-10, 2007 at...

160

Carbon-in-Ash Monitor Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the lack of publicly available performance and operational data for the current carbon-in-ash monitor (CIAM) commercial offerings, EPRI and Southern Company initiated a demonstration of several commercial technologies on Southern Company's coal-fired units.

2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) ongoing Boiler Tube Failure Reduction (BTFR) program, this report has been compiled to discuss chemical and mechanical mechanisms that lead to the formation of ash deposits. Ash deposits are a known cause of several boiler tube failure mechanisms, which can not only impact plant performance, but also lead to millions of dollars in lost revenue due to forced outages.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Coal Ash: Characteristics, Management, and Environmental Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants in the United States produce more than 92 million tons of coal ash per year. About 40% is beneficially used in a variety of applications, and about 60% is managed in storage and disposal sites. This technical update summarizes information and data on the physical and chemical characteristics of coal ash, beneficial use applications, disposal practices, and management practices to mitigate environmental concerns.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) ongoing Boiler Tube Failure Reduction (BTFR) program, this report has been compiled to discuss chemical and mechanical mechanisms that lead to the formation of ash deposits. Ash deposits are a known cause of a number of boiler tube failure mechanisms, which can not only impact plant performance, but lead to millions of dollars in lost revenue due to forced outages.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

164

Densification of pond ash by blasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash from thermal power plants is disposed, in huge quantities in ash ponds, which occupy large land areas otherwise useful for agriculture, housing, or other development. For effective rehabilitation of ash ponds, densification of the slurry deposit is essential to increase the bearing capacity and to improve its resistance to liquefaction. Extensive field trials were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of deep blasting for densification of deposited fly ash. Ninety explosions comprising 15 single blasts, with varying depths and quantities of charges, and 3 group blasts, each having 25 charges placed at various spacings, were carried out. The compaction achieved in terms of an increase in relative density was evaluated from surface settlement measurements. Extensive field monitoring was undertaken through pore-water pressure measurements, vibration measurements, penetration tests, and block vibration tests. For the average charge of 2--4 g of explosive per cubic meter of untreated deposit, the average relative density was found to improve from 50% to 56--58%. Analysis of the test results indicates that deep blasting may be an effective technique for modest compaction of loose fly ash deposits. The field testing program presented in this paper provides valuable information that can be used for planning blast densification of fly ash deposits.

Gandhi, S.R.; Dey, A.K.; Selvam, S. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge  

SciTech Connect

Investigates the selling of by-products of coal-fired power generation--fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and scrubber sludge--by utilities for use in highways, parking lots, cement, roofing, bricks, and blocks. Points out that the EPA has drafted tough new regulations for solid-waste storage, transportation, and disposal that may soon cost power plants $25-$40 a ton to dispose of wastes. Reports that the EPRI is studying high-volume by-product applications that have low technology requirements (e.g. fly ash for use in highways, parking lots, and utility construction) and medium-volume, medium-technology applications (e.g. by-products used for cement manufacture, asphalt, blocks, bricks, roofing granules, and wallboards). Reveals that EPRI plans to eventually identify a representative set of perhaps half a dozen basic fly ashes, characterize them, do proportion studies of existing concrete mixes (including those with fly ash in them), and then develop guidelines for fly ash proportions in concrete.

Lihach, N.; Golden, D.; Komai, R.; Maulbetsch, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

NETL: News Release - New Recycling Technology to be Tested at Virginia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Recycling Technology to be Tested At Virginia Coal-Fired Power Plant New Recycling Technology to be Tested At Virginia Coal-Fired Power Plant Universal Aggregates Plans to Turn Coal Combustion Waste Into Useful Products KING GEORGE, VA - Each year Mirant's Birchwood Power Facility in King George, VA, pays to have more than 100,000 tons of coal combustion ash disposed of in a municipal landfill. A new Department of Energy project may soon demonstrate that this ash has significantly more value than as the daily cover material for a community's solid waste. - The proposed site of the Universal Aggregates plant next to the Birchwood Power Plant in Virginia - Universal Aggregates will build the "ash-to-aggregate" recycling plant in the outlined area adjacent to Mirant's Birchwood Power Facility. The department recently signed a cooperative agreement with Universal

167

Microsoft Word - CX-SnoKingSubstationExpansionFY12_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michael Marleau Michael Marleau Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Sno-King Substation Expansion Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): Appendix B4.11 Electric power substations and interconnection facilities Location: Bothell, Snohomish County, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to expand its Sno-King Substation's fenced electrical yard by approximately 0.2 acres to accommodate new equipment. The substation expansion is necessary to make room for the addition of a back-up 500/230-kV power transformer, which BPA can energize in the event of a primary transformer failure. The additional transformer will increase the safety and reliability of the system.

168

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Diagnosis of physical and biological controls on phytoplankton distribution in the Gulf of Maine-Georges Bank region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The linkage between physics and biology is studied by applying a one-dimensional model and a two-dimensional model to the Sargasso Sea and the Gulf of Maine- Georges Bank region, respectively. The first model investigates ...

Wang, Caixia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-060 George Washington EC B3-6.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60 60 SECTION A. Project Title: Validation Data for Depressurized and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown - George Washington University SECTION B. Project Description George Washington University proposes to study the behavior of a Very High Temperature Gas Reactor during a Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) event and during a Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) event during normal operations. Both of these phenomena will be studied by a combination of in-situe velocity field, pressure, and temperature measurements, coupled with computational fluid dynamic simulation. Five tests will be conducted using an integral effect test loop (IETL). SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact The research would involve using a tracer to evaluate velocities in the IETL. The action would not create additional environmental

171

The George Bush Presidential Library Center at Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This was the first comprehensive doctoral dissertation on the George Bush Presidential Library Center at Texas A&M University. The Bush Presidential Library and Museum was the focal point. The purpose was to describe the global significance, work and educational contributions of the Bush Presidential Library while exploring its partnership with Texas A&M University. The primary data sources were: archival records, museum exhibits, interviews and my field work experiences. Beyond being a descriptive dissertation, this study offered unique hypotheses and conclusions. It examined the higher educational aspects of the Bush Presidential Library Center's operating context within Texas A&M University. These included the educational value of George Bush's career, the Bush Presidential Library's contents, and its benefits and technology use in educational programming. This study answered two unique hypotheses: how President Bush's liberation of Kuwait increased the Middle Eastern funding of presidential libraries and the Corps of Cadets' influence on President Bush's selection of Texas A&M University. George Bush's global presidency, distinguished international public service career and his world-changing, historical presidential achievements gave the Bush Presidential Library and Museum an extraordinary educational value. The data showed the educational value of, benefits of and technology's role in educational programming at the Bush Presidential Library and Museum. The global changes mirrored President Bush's career and his effort to combat terrorism. China's emergence as a world power was attributed to President Bush's career. The Bush Presidential Library and Museum is the core asset of the center. The data showed President Bush's liberation of Kuwait directly influenced the funding of his presidential library and the subsequent ones. The data showed the Texas A&M University Corps of Cadets' influence on President Bush's selection of Texas A&M University as the site for his presidential library. Texas A&M University is the best place for the George Bush Presidential Library Center. A university environment is the best place to host a presidential library.

Frink, Julia Susan

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase in coal-fired power plants and tighter environmental problems have put utilities in the position of marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge by turning waste products into a resource. Many utilities are looking beyond road and structural fill uses in their marketing efforts. Slag can be made into sandblasting grit, aggregate, and roofing granules, or used for soil stabilization or the chemical fixation of municipal wastes. Composition and collection variations discourage many utilities from marketing their by-products, while availability can be a problem for customers if the power plant should shut down. Other problems include storage and transportation, competition, and institutional barriers. Documentation of the fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and scrubber waste markets by the Electric Power Research Institute considers these factors and develops a marketing method to help utilities evaluate and promote their product. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Golden, D.; Komai, R.; Maulbetsch, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 27, 2011 ... Upon cooling, the molten ash forms a brittle glass that flakes off, taking the coating with it. Like sand, ash is made mostly of silica and poses a...

176

Development of High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement can be produced either by intergrinding fly ash with portland cement clinker or by blending dry fly ash with portland cement. Production of HVFA cement using the intergrinding method may be the most cost-effective and practical of the two approaches. This report documents the results of commercial-scale production of HVFA blended cements using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

177

Use of Coal Ash in Highway Construction: Michigan Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3000-ft-length fly ash base under a highway shoulder will help demonstrate the impact of reused ash on structural integrity and groundwater. This report provides valuable design details for utilities seeking to increase ash reuse and for state highway design engineers responsible for preparing construction specifications.

1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

ASH VITRIFICATION -A TECHNOLOGY READY FOR TRANSFER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methods for treating ash in the near future [1]. The lack of specific rules by RCRA has led to confusion the Toxic Characterization Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extraction tests conducted on slag samples which were(ml!!l) in TCLP Extract Arsenic BQL · Barium 0.8 Cadmium 0.010 Chromium BOL Lead 0.43 Mercury 0.0007 Selenium BOL

Columbia University

179

The impact of King James II on the departments of the royal household  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Society, 1886. Bodleian Library, Oxford Bramston, J., The Autobiography of Sir John Bramston. Lord Braybrooke (ed.), Camden Society, XXXII, 1845. Browning, A., Thomas Osborne, Earl of Danby and Duke of Leeds, 1632-1712. 3 vols., Glasgow, 1951... Osborne, Earl of Danby and Duke of Leeds, 1632-1712, Glasgow, (1951),11, pp. 76-7, 'Notes upon which my Lord Bathe spoke to the King', 23 Mar 1679; HMC Ormonde, n.s. IV, p. 500, Southwell to Ormond, 22 Mar 1679; HMC Ormonde, n.s. V, Arran to Ormond, 7...

Barclay, Andrew Peter

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

180

GENERAL REACTOR ANALYSIS COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR THE IBM 704, PROGRAM GEORGE  

SciTech Connect

Program George is an IBM 704 ccde that combines standard ANPD reactor analysis methcds for computing multiplication constant and spatial distribution of flux and power, as well as other nuclear parameters, in aircraft (heterogeneous) reactors. The elapsed time and the chance for human error between initial input and final output are greatly reduced in Program George. A matched set of reflector savings for a reflected, cylindrical core, which was formerly obtained by hand, is now computed by the program. In the C/sub 2/ pcrtion of Program George, the ccde computes the neutron slowingdown density and flux at 19 lethargy levels plus a thermal group in bare, homogeneous compositions with normal mode, ene ngy-dependent bucklings. The diffusion coefficient contains a transport correction as well as a Behrens correction for heterogeneous structure. Flux-depression factors at thermal and two epithermal levels are computed in annular, cylindrical geometry by one-energy, P/sub 3/ transport theory approximation in the I/sub 2/ pontion of the program, or they may be given as input. Flux weighting of various cross sections, transmission factors, and other parameters are computed in a multigroup representation. Two-energy-group constants from the regional compositions are supplied in the F/sub 2/ portion of the program, in which a two-energy group, one-space-dimensional, multiregion diffusion calculation yields multiplication constant, normalized fission density, fast flux, and slow flux in each onedimensional reactor pontrayed. If a reactivity match is requested, the reflector savings of the specified compositions are adjusted until the multiplication constant i n the radial F/sub 2/, longitudinal F/sub 2/, and the reference bare equivalent core of a cylindrical reflected reactor converge to the same value. (auth)

Hoffman, T.A.; Henderson, W.B.

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Plutonium dissolution from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash  

SciTech Connect

Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) soon will commence recovery of plutonium from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash. In preparation for this processing, Rockwell undertook literature and laboratory studies to identify, select and optimize plutonium dissolution methods for treating the ash. Ash reburning, followed by dissolution in nitric acid containing calcium fluoride, was selected as the processing method for the ash. Recommended values of process parameters were identified. Using the selected process, 99.5% plutonium recovery was achieved, leaving about 12.7 wt % heel residue for an equal weight composite of the three ashes tested. 15 refs., 26 figs.

Delegard, C.H.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

King Coal vs. Reclamation: federal regulation of mountaintop removal mining in Appalachia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research focuses on the regulatory politics of mountaintop removal mining for coal within the Appalachian states of West Virginia and Kentucky. Based on Administrative Presidency concepts suggesting that chief executives seek more control and influence over agency program decisions, this article analyzes President George W. Bush's efforts to promote the development of coal resources within these states despite statutory constraints posed by federal environmental laws. The analysis demonstrates that President Bush effectively achieved his energy production goals by combining the use of discretionary authority with staff controls, executive orders, and regulatory initiatives to lessen industry compliance costs with environmental regulatory requirements.

Davis, C.E.; Duffy, R.J. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Political Science

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

George Harman  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Harman is widely considered to be the world's foremost authority on wire bonding. He has published more than 60 papers ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

184

Doug King  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Consultant to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Homes (LEED for Homes) Program. This Speaker's Seminars Greening the Residential Sector: Efforts to...

185

George Washington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

But we are reminded of him most often as a man on a monument or by his face on a dollar bill or a postage stamp. Fortunately, a sifting of his diaries and voluminous writings...

186

Microsoft Word - Chemetall Foote_Kings Mountain and Silver Peak Final EA 9-15-10-1 _3_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Final Environmental Assessment For Chemetall Foote Corporation Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Kings Mountain, NC and Silver Peak, NV September 2010 Prepared for: Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory This page intentionally left blank. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and DOE/EA-1715 Component Manufacturing Initiative Project Environmental Assessment Chemetall Foote Corporation, Kings Mountain, NC and Silver Peak, NV September 2010 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes, through a cooperative agreement with Chemetall Foote Corporation (Chemetall) to partially fund: (1) the establishment of a new 5,000 metric ton per year lithium

187

Fly ash and concrete: a study determines whether biomass, or coal co-firing fly ash, can be used in concrete  

SciTech Connect

Current US national standards for using fly ash in concrete (ASTM C618) state that fly ash must come from coal combustion, thus precluding biomass-coal co-firing fly ash. The co-fired ash comes from a large and increasing fraction of US power plants due to rapid increases in co-firing opportunity fuels with coal. The fly ashes include coal fly ash, wood fly ash from pure wood combustion, biomass and coal co-fired fly ash SW1 and SW2. Also wood fly ash is blended with Class C or Class F to produce Wood C and Wood E. Concrete samples were prepared with fly ash replacing cement by 25%. All fly ash mixes except wood have a lower water demand than the pure cement mix. Fly ashes, either from coal or non coal combustion, increase the required air entraining agent (AEA) to meet the design specification of the mixes. If AEA is added arbitrarily without considering the amount or existence of fly ash results could lead to air content in concrete that is either too low or too high. Biomass fly ash does not impact concrete setting behaviour disproportionately. Switch grass-coal co-fired fly ash and blended wood fly ash generally lie within the range of pure coal fly ash strength. The 56 day flexure strength of all the fly ash mixes is comparable to that of the pure cement mix. The flexure strength from the coal-biomass co-fired fly ash does not differ much from pure coal fly ash. All fly ash concrete mixes exhibit lower chloride permeability than the pure cement mixes. In conclusion biomass coal co-fired fly ash perform similarly to coal fly ash in fresh and hardened concrete. As a result, there is no reason to exclude biomass-coal co-fired fly ash in concrete.

Wang, Shuangzhen; Baxter, Larry

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization  

SciTech Connect

This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

Hnat, James G. (Collegeville, PA); Mathur, Akshay (Tampa, FL); Simpson, James C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

191

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: King Faisal University. Design and analysis study. Volume 2. Appendixes I-VI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Documents supporting the proposed construction of a passively cooled house at King Faisal University in Saudi Arabia are presented. The papers include the following topics: comfort measurements; cooling methods and strategies for hot/arid climates; ventilation design; solar hot water heaters; backup HVAC equipment specifications; and computer printouts for design review and analysis. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: King Faisal University. Design analysis study. Volume 3. Appendixes VII-X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Documentation supporting the proposed construction of a passively cooled house at King Faisal University in Saudi Arabia is presented. The documents include: computer printouts for comparisons of design; landscapes analysis; field station study for Al Batin, Saudi Arabia; data acquisition systems; and performance evaluation. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: King Abdulaziz University. Solar cooling systems design report. Phase 1 report  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the performance and adaptability of solar cooling systems to the Saudi Arabian environment was studied at King Abdulaziz University. Development of a solar research laboratory and the hardware and software available for installation are considered. The university's facilities for solar energy research are briefly described. A budget for the research project is proposed. (BCS)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol ubility_Paper.doc Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash Ann G. Kim 1 and Karl Schroeder 2 1 ORISE Research Fellow, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Research Group Leader, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 KEYWORDS Coal Utilization By-Products, leaching, activated carbon, pH ABSTRACT It is expected that increased controls on Hg emissions will shift the environmental burden from the flue gas to the solid coal utilization by-products (CUB), such as fly ash and flue-gas

195

In-Plant Ash-Handling Reference Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite problems with ash-handling systems that have led to failures in electrostatic precipitators, there has been no extensive reference manual for specifying, operating, and maintaining such systems. The comprehensive manual compiled in this study serves as a reference for every phase of boiler bottom ash- and fly ash-handling systems design and operation as well as a primer for those unfamiliar with these systems.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention described herein relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

McDowell, William J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seeley, Forest G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Effect of Ammonia on Mercury Partitioning in Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management options and environmental assessments for fly ash are driven primarily by their physical and chemical characteristics. This report describes the results of a laboratory study on the leaching of mercury from several paired fly ash samples from facilities employing powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for mercury control. While previous EPRI research has shown that mercury leaching from ash with PAC is negligible, it has also been found that ammonia complexes can increase the mobility of so...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

199

Identification of Arsenic Species in Coal Ash Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of the chemical species and compounds of arsenic in individual coal fly ash particles will help provide a scientifically sound basis for assessing health risks from inhalation of these particles. This report presents the results of an analytical chemistry study of coal-combustion ash, with some work also completed on oil-combustion ash and copper smelter dust collected from several sources in the United States and Europe. Results showed that most arsenic is present on the surface of coal a...

1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

200

Of Mice and Men: Evolution and the Socialist Utopia. William Morris, H.G. Wells, and George Bernard Shaw*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of Mice and Men: Evolution and the Socialist Utopia. William Morris, H.G. Wells, and George Bernard, and imagined a non-Malthusian future. H.G. Wells, an enthusiastic admirer of Morris in the early days of change he called ``creative evolution.'' Keywords: William Morris, H.G. Wells, G.B. Shaw, Malthus, August

Hale, Piers J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3-02_ King_Alternative Chemical Cleaning.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

725 725 EM-31 Alternative and Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Program Bill King, Mike Hay, Bruce Wiersma, Frank Pennebaker SRNL Environmental and Chemical Process Technology November 16, 2010 EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange Meeting Print Close 2 SRNL-STI-2010-00725 Introduction Numerous SRS tanks scheduled for closure (contract commitments) Cannot remove all sludge by mechanical means due to obstructions Chemical removal technology needed (likely oxalic acid) Post-dissolution neutralization required prior to transfer to compliant tanks Sodium oxalate salts precipitate on neutralization and have negative downstream impacts Currently three SRS chemical cleaning programs Baseline: 8 wt. % OA batch contact (Tanks 5 and 6) ECC: 1-3 wt. % OA with oxalate destruction

202

Microsoft Word - CX-AccessRoads-KingCoWA-FY13_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2013 22, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Covington SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Rick Ross Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Covington District Culvert Replacements Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): Appendix B1.3, Routine Maintenance Location: King County, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to replace existing culverts at 12 access road stream crossings that present barriers to fish passage. These improvements will be made on BPA easement access roads within DNR owned and managed lands. BPA will make these improvements by installing new fish friendly culverts and/or bridges at each stream crossing. The current stream crossings do not meet DNR fish passage standards that will be in

203

Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers; Field Activities Conducted on Clear and Pete King Creeks, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2001 the Idaho Fisheries Resource Office continued as a cooperator on the Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers (ISS) project on Pete King and Clear creeks. Data relating to supplementation treatment releases, juvenile sampling, juvenile PIT tagging, brood stock spawning and rearing, spawning ground surveys, and snorkel surveys were used to evaluate project data points and augment past data. Due to low adult spring Chinook returns to Kooskia National Fish Hatchery (KNFH) in brood year 1999 there was no smolt supplementation treatment release into Clear Creek in 2001. A 17,014 spring Chinook parr supplementation treatment (containing 1000 PIT tags) was released into Pete King Creek on July 24, 2001. On Clear Creek, there were 412 naturally produced spring Chinook parr PIT tagged and released. Using juvenile collection methods, Idaho Fisheries Resource Office staff PIT tagged and released 320 naturally produced spring Chinook pre-smolts on Clear Creek, and 16 natural pre-smolts on Pete King Creek, for minimum survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam. There were no PIT tag detections of brood year 1999 smolts from Clear or Pete King creeks. A total of 2261 adult spring Chinook were collected at KNFH. Forty-three females were used for supplementation brood stock, and 45 supplementation (ventral fin-clip), and 45 natural (unmarked) adults were released upstream of KNFH to spawn naturally. Spatial and temporal distribution of 37 adults released above the KNFH weir was determined through the use of radio telemetry. On Clear Creek, a total of 166 redds (8.2 redds/km) were observed and data was collected from 195 carcasses. Seventeen completed redds (2.1 redds/km) were found, and data was collected data from six carcasses on Pete King Creek.

Gass, Carrie; Olson, Jim M. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

NETL: Utilization Projects - Managing High-Carbon Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing High-Carbon Ash Managing High-Carbon Ash Task 1: Effect of Coal Quality The objective of this task is to assess if fuel selection is an important factor determining ash quality. Work on this task will involve each of the three participating organizations. Ash samples from three coals will be generated under identical firing conditions in the pilot furnace at the University of Utah, and the matching ash and coal samples sent to Brown. Additional matching sets of coal and ash will be obtained from commercial-scale firing at Southern Company. The ashes will be characterized for LOI and surfactant adsorption activity under standard conditions and trends with fuel type identified. At the same time, chars will be prepared from the matching coal set under standard conditions in a laboratory furnace and also characterized for surfactant adsorptivity. A variety of standard conditions may need to be explored. The combined data set will be analyzed to determine cross correlations between ash behavior, standard laboratory char behavior, and parent coal properties. Our goal is to be able to anticipate ash behavior either (a) from coal properties directly, or (b) from the properties of chars made by a simple laboratory procedure. Either could be the basis for a coal quality index -- one based on fuel properties and the other based on a simple screening test.

205

Embankment Loading on Saturated Coal Ash: Centrifuge Demonstration Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an embankment of coal combustion residuals or soil is built over a coal ash pond, pore water pressures can accumulate in the underlying saturated ash deposits and trigger a rapid slope failure. This report documents a scale model test completed to obtain data on the conditions that may lead to a slope failure. A 6.5-inch tall sand embankment was built on top of a 6-inch thick deposit of saturated fly ash. The strength of the fly ash was characterized using consolidated undrained triaxial ...

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

Data Summary Report for Hanford Site Coal Ash Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present data and findings from sampling and analysis of five distinct areas of coal ash within the Hanford Site River Corridor

Sulloway, H. M.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

207

Coal Fly Ash as Alternative Source of Smelter Grade Alumina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, COM 2011. Symposium, COM 2011 (held with the World Gold Conference), POSTER SESSION. Presentation Title, Coal Fly Ash as

208

HIGH STRENGTH PHOSPHATE CEMENT USING INDUSTRIAL BYPRODUCT ASHES ...  

industries that use fossil fuels. Approximately one third of this ash is recycled in the cement based products as an additive. Typically, ...

209

Kinetics of beneficiated fly ash by carbon burnout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called Loss On Ignition (LOI). The concrete producers` day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

Okoh, J.M.; Dodoo, J.N.D.; Diaz, A. [Univ. of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD (United States). Dept. of Natural Sciences; Ferguson, W.; Udinskey, J.R. Jr.; Christiana, G.A. [Delmarva Power, Wilmington, DE (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mechanical Activation of Deposited Fly Ash by Grinding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... According to laboratory experience the breaking of fly ash particles is required to increase its hydraulic potential (Opoczky, 2001). Aim of the...

211

NETL: News Release - Novel Treatment of Fly Ash Yields Safer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

successfully tested at near full-scale levels. Easily integrated with existing ash handling equipment, the simple-to-operate, cost-efficient technology can be retrofitted to...

212

Study on Aluminum Foam with Fly Ash Increase Viscosity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Study on Aluminum Foam with Fly Ash Increase Viscosity by Yong Wang, Guang- chun Yao, and Bing Li. Publisher: TMS. Product Format: PDF.

213

Proportioning CLSM Using Fly Ash and GGBS - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Proportioning CLSM Using Fly Ash and GGBS. Author(s), Udayashankar B C, Raghavendra T. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Udayashankar ...

214

Rebound characteristics for ash particles impacting a planar surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of ash deposition on the heat transfer tubes in a boiler reduces the heat transfer coefficient by about 25%. Because of these fouling layers

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Georg de Buquoy - Founder of Mathematical Economy with South Bohemian Roots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Georg de Buquoy, Lord de Vaux, lived in Nove Hrady, Prague and Cerveny Hradek for most of his productive life. From his extensive scientific contributions, both theoretical and experimental, we expand here the discussion of his contributions to mathematical economy. He is mainly celebrated as the first persons to define correctly net yield and describe method for its optimization, which was considered "strikingly modern" still in 1950. Buquoy's program was "systematic overview of all theorems which affect maintenance and increase of national wealth" for which he correctly defined and mathematically expressed many economic terms. The most striking feature of Buquoy's writing is that he was also a very influential economic practitioner. He governed one of the wealthiest possessions in Bohemia, and perhaps in Austria, of his time. Thus his economical thinking expands from the "political part", which is economy in modern sense, to "...sources of national wealth, or the technical part of national economy ...". The...

Stys, Dalibor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwaterusing iron?oxidecoatedcoalbottomash JohannaL. using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

218

Environmental Performance Assessment of Coal Ash Use Sites: Waukegan Ash Embankment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive database on the environmental effects of reusing coal combustion residues is essential to increased application of these products. This report discusses changes in soils, vegetation, and groundwater quality around an embankment containing coal fly ash and develops an approach for building a statistically sound environmental performance database.

1991-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

219

Long-Range Forecast Trajectories of Volcanic Ash from Redoubt Ash from Redoubt Volcano Eruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Redoubt Volcano in Alaska began a series of eruptions on 14 December 1989. Volcanic ash was often reported to reach heights where, as it moved with the upper-level flow, it could affect aircraft operations thousands of km from the eruption. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder; Glenn D. Rolph

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Environmental Performance Assessment of Coal Ash Use Sites: Little Canada Structural Ash Fill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An insufficient database on the environmental effects of reusing coal combustion residues hampers increased utilization of these products. This report discusses the changes in soils, vegetation, and groundwater quality around a structural fill containing coal fly ash and develops an approach for building a statistically sound environmental performance database.

1990-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluation of Leachate Chemistry from Coal Refuse Blended and Layered with Fly Ash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Alkaline fly ash has been studied as a liming agent within coal refuse fills to reclaim acid-forming refuse. Previous studies focused on bulk blending ash (more)

Hunt, Joseph Edward

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hazards Associated with the Use of Bone Ash in Contact with Molten ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bone ash itself is non-toxic and environmentally benign. However recent evidence indicates that bone ash can be reduced upon contact with aluminum alloys to...

223

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers Americans And Their Environment 2010 Thirty-nine New Damage Cases of Contamination from Improperly Disposed Coal Combustion Waste, Editor and Contributing Author #12;IN HARM'S WAY: Lack of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers

Short, Daniel

224

Characterization of Ammonia Leaching from Coal Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report presents the results of a preliminary laboratory assessment of the leaching of ammonia from coal ashes that have been ammoniated by pollution control devices installed on power plants to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. This laboratory assessment project was designed to measure the leaching rates of ammonia from ashes in a disposal environment.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Infiltration Processing of Metal Matrix-Fly Ash Particle Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal Matrix composites can provide improved functional properties compared to solid metal castings while saving production energy and raw material costs. Ash-derived metal matrix composites, in particular, can provide high value-added use to coal fly ash. This report describes research on use of pressure infiltration techniques to produce composites for automotive component applications.

1997-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

226

Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

Murtha, M.J.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

227

Use of Coal Ash in Highway Construction: Michigan Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the construction and performance testing of a 3000-ft length of fly ash base under a highway shoulder. Following three years of service, the road shoulder shows no signs of premature deterioration. This report should aid utilities seeking to increase ash-use rates in highway-related projects, as well as state highway design engineers responsible for preparing construction specifications.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

Manganese Occurrence Near Three Coal Ash Impoundments in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes research performed to better understand the cause of elevated manganese concentrations sometimes found in groundwater near coal ash management facilities. Three impoundments in Illinois were selected for detailed field and laboratory studies of conditions conducive to manganese release from coal ash as well as natural soils.

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

229

The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State Government Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Ashe County Planning Department In 2007 Ashe County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in unincorporated areas of the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a system may be obtained. This policy was adopted in the context of an ongoing debate over

231

Purple traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer The question of whether or not DOE's forests are infested with Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been answered. On May 10, a trap on Highway 95 at the Highway 58 interchange produced the first instance of the destructive non-native insect in Roane County. Five days later, a second trap on Bethel Valley Road near the East Portal turned up the first capture in Anderson County. "Unfortunately, these finds signal the beginning of a decline of ash species throughout the reservation" according to Greg Byrd, forester with the ORNL Natural Resources Program. "Dieback will become more prominent as the insect populations expand. Native ash trees have little defense against this pest, which was

232

Element associations in ash from waste combustion in fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

The incineration of MSW in fluidized beds is a commonly applied waste management practice. The composition of the ashes produced in a fluidized bed boiler has important environmental implications as potentially toxic trace elements may be associated with ash particles and it is therefore essential to determine the mechanisms controlling the association of trace elements to ash particles, including the role of major element composition. The research presented here uses micro-analytical techniques to study the distribution of major and trace elements and determine the importance of affinity-based binding mechanisms in separate cyclone ash particles from MSW combustion. Particle size and the occurrence of Ca and Fe were found to be important factors for the binding of trace elements to ash particles, but the binding largely depends on random associations based on the presence of a particle when trace elements condensate in the flue gas.

Karlfeldt Fedje, K., E-mail: karinka@chalmers.s [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Division of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 10, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Rauch, S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Division of Water Environment Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Sven Hultins Gata 8, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Cho, P.; Steenari, B.-M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Division of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 10, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

Atencio, B.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS  

SciTech Connect

The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Behavior of Ammoniated Fly Ash: Effects of Ammonia on Fly Ash Handling, Disposal, and End-Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The implementation of ammonia-based nitrogen oxides (NOx) control technologies has had the undesired side effect of creating potential problems for operating units due to ammonia-contaminated fly ash. The work described in this report is a continuation of long-term EPRI efforts to address various industry concerns associated with ammoniated fly ash.

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

Cloud Liquid Water Measurements on the Armored T-28: Intercomparison between JohnsonWilliams Cloud Water Meter and CSIRO (King) Liquid Water Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between liquid water concentration (LWC) readings obtained from a JohnsonWilliams (JW) cloud water meter and a King (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) liquid water probe, both mounted on the ...

Rand E. Feind; Andrew G. Detwiler; Paul L. Smith

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Medical waste management in Jordan: A study at the King Hussein Medical Center  

SciTech Connect

As in many other developing countries, the generation of regulated medical waste (RMW) in Jordan has increased significantly over the last few decades. Despite the serious impacts of RMW on humans and the environment, only minor attention has been directed to its proper handling and disposal. This study was conducted in the form of a case study at one of Jordan's leading medical centers, namely, the King Hussein Medical Center (KHMC). Its purpose was to report on the current status of medical waste management at KHMC and propose possible measures to improve it. In general, it was found that the center's administration was reasonably aware of the importance of medical waste management and practiced some of the measures to adequately handle waste generated at the center. However, it was also found that significant voids were present that need to be addressed in the future including efficient segregation, the use of coded and colored bags, better handling and transfer means, and better monitoring and tracking techniques, as well as the need for training and awareness programs for the personnel.

Oweis, Rami [Biomedical Engineering Department, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan)]. E-mail: oweis@just.edu.jo; Al-Widyan, Mohamad [Biosystems Engineering Department, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan)]. E-mail: widyan@just.edu.jo; Al-Limoon, Ohood [Biomedical Engineering Department, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110 (Jordan)]. E-mail: oweis@just.edu.jo

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Categorical Exclusion 4566, Ash Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOrnI FOrnI Project Title: Ash Removal Project (4566) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to split, containerize, package, transport and disposition one hundred and two (102) cans of mixed waste. General Administration/Management OA I - Routine business actions OA2 * Administrative contract amendments OA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations OA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect OA6 - Procedural rule makings upgrade OA 7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged OA8 . Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts OA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training OA 10 - Reports on non-DOE legislation OA II -

240

Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic [Institute for Biological Research 'Sinisa Stankovic,' Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Department of Ecology

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power color from pulp mill effluent using coal ash. Prevent coal ash adsorbent from leaching arsenic, chromium, lead, and zinc. Define a treatment procedure using coal ash that will result in the maximum

Hutcheon, James M.

242

Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

Hopkins, William A.

243

Coal- and Ash-Handling Systems Reliability Conference and Workshop Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents papers, discussion summaries, and conclusions from an EPRI workshop on reliability problems with coal- and ash-handling systems in power plants. Held in October 1980 in St. Louis, the workshop covered yard and in-plant coal handling, frozen coal, fugitive dust, fly ash handling, bottom ash handling, and ash disposal.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Proceedings: Tenth International Ash Use Symposium, Volume 1: High-Volume Uses/Concrete Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics discussed at the tenth symposium on coal ash use included fundamental ash use research, product marketing, applied research, ash management and the environment, and commercial applications. Intense international research interest continues in coal ash use due to the prospects of avoiding disposal costs and generating revenue from by-product sales.

1993-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

245

High Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements: Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, the production of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete involves the addition of large volumes of fly ash as a separate ingredient at a ready-mixed concrete batch plant. This necessitates additional storage silos and quality control at the job site. In order to resolve these issues, CANMET, in partnership with Electric Power Research Institute, U.S.A., undertook a major research project to develop blended cements incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class fly ash. The blended cements are made by ...

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

Dobbins, Michael S. (Ames, IA); Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Arsenic and Selenium Speciation in Fly Ash and Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the work is to predict As and Se behavior in pond wastewater based on coal and power plant characteristics so that utilities will have tools for selection of coals (and blends) that will allow them to meet applicable water quality regulations in the ash pond discharge. Arsenic and selenium were chosen as the focus of this work because the behavior of arsenic and selenium is not well correlated with pH in ash pond water, but with speciation of these oxyanions in the fly ash. Furthermore, ...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

248

Scale-up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is the first large pilot scale test of a new process to passivate the carbon in ash so that it can be used in concrete without physically removing the carbon from the ash. The tests were conducted at PPL's Montour SES, sponsored by DOE and supported by EPRI. Near full-scale industrial equipment was used to expose fly ash, carbon mixtures to ozone to see if ozone would passivate the surface of carbon so that it would not react with air entraining agents that are used by concrete manufacturers...

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

249

Adsorption of Trace Elements on Fresh and Weathered Coal Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of trace elements are associated with fly ash produced by coal combustion. These trace elements are potentially of concern for human health if they are released to the environment, and thus it is important to understand their mobility in coal fly ash management settings. In the fly ash management environment, the ash may react with meteoric fluid to release trace elements into groundwater or surface water. However, fly ash particles also have a relatively high surface area and have the ability ...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

250

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 4/27/2011 12:00:00 AM... Concerns about the damage that volcanic ash clouds can inflict on aircraft engines resulted in last year's $2 billion...

251

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

253

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

255

Guideline for Control and Prevention of Fly Ash Erosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler tube failures (BTFs) represent the largest portion of availability loss in the fossil boiler industry at about 4%. Approximately 25% of all tube failures are due to fly ash erosion (FAE).

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

256

Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) has developed a Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) model for emergency response use focusing on hazards to aircraft flight operations. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

Self, S.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Recoverable immobilization of transuranic elements in sulfate ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of reversibly immobilizing sulfate ash at least about 20% of which is sulfates of transuranic elements. The ash is mixed with a metal which can be aluminum, cerium, samarium, europium, or a mixture thereof, in amounts sufficient to form an alloy with the transuranic elements, plus an additional amount to reduce the transuranic element sulfates to elemental form. Also added to the ash is a fluxing agent in an amount sufficient to lower the percentage of the transuranic element sulfates to about 1% to about 10%. The mixture of the ash, metal, and fluxing agent is heated to a temperature sufficient to melt the fluxing agent and the metal. The mixture is then cooled and the alloy is separated from the remainder of the mixture.

Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

KINETICS OF FLY ASH BENEFICIATION BY CARBON BURNOUT  

SciTech Connect

Surface area analyses performed on fly ash samples reveal that the surface area is controlled by carbon content. The higher surface areas found in large particles are due to the presence of highly porous carbonaceous particles. Adsorption-desorption isotherms and t-plots of fly ash samples indicate that fly ash is porous. BJH Adsorption/Desorption pore size analysis reveal that pore diameters are independent of sieve size. They appear to be dependent only on the nature of the material which confers porosity. Based on the results of Brown and Dykstra (41) it is reasonable to assume that calculations of reaction rates at temperatures above 550 C were confounded by weight losses from processes other than carbon oxidation and, therefore, are not useful in determination of the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. The results of the present study indicate that temperatures below 550 C should be used for future studies in order to satisfactorily assess the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. Furthermore, it is also advisable that percent carbon determinations be performed on fly ash samples after the oxidation reactions to determine whether all carbon present in fly ash is oxidized. This will ensure that reaction rates are representative of the complete oxidation of carbon. An inverse relationship was determined between reaction rates and oxygen concentration for this study. As discussed, this may be due to volatilization of volatiles from fly ash and ease of transport of products away from the reaction sites by the action of the vacuum applied to the samples. A more accurate determination of oxygen dependence of carbon oxidation can be accomplished by the use of specialty gases containing different concentrations of oxygen which could eliminate the need to apply vacuum to the samples.

Dr. Joseph N.D. Dodoo; Dr. Joseph M. Okoh

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Triboelectric Fly Ash Beneficiation: Summary Report, Phase IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) at the University of Kentucky has devised new approaches for extracting marketable fly ash from high carbon combustion ashes. Dry beneficiation technology based on pneumatic transport, triboelectric principles has emerged with the potential for high efficiency removal of carbon at low cost and with no secondary waste products. (EPRI Interim Report TR-109016, November, 1997; EPRI Interim Report TR-111647, November 1998; EPRI Report TE-113673, September 1999; E...

2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which utilizes the known ash level temperature profile to monitor the ash bed level. A bed stirrer which travels up and down through the extent of the bed ash level is modified by installing thermocouples to measure the bed temperature as the stirrer travels through the stirring cycle. The temperature measurement signals are transmitted to an electronic signal process system by an FM/FM telemetry system. The processing system uses the temperature signals together with an analog stirrer position signal, taken from a position transducer disposed to measure the stirrer position to compute the vertical location of the ash zone upper boundary. The circuit determines the fraction of each total stirrer cycle time the stirrer-derived bed temperature is below a selected set point, multiplies this fraction by the average stirrer signal level, multiplies this result by an appropriate constant and adds another constant such that a 1 to 5 volt signal from the processor corresponds to a 0 to 30 inch span of the ash upper boundary level. Three individual counters in the processor store clock counts that are representative of: (1) the time the stirrer temperature is below the set point (500.degree. F.), (2) the time duration of the corresponding stirrer travel cycle, and (3) the corresponding average stirrer vertical position. The inputs to all three counters are disconnected during any period that the stirrer is stopped, eliminating corruption of the measurement by stirrer stoppage.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

EA-1449: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1449: Final Environmental Assessment Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash, King George County, Virginia The proposed action is for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide cost- shared financial support to Universal Aggregates, LLC, for the design, construction, and operation of a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Mirant-Birchwood Power Plant Facility (Mirant-Birchwood Facility) in King George County, Virginia. DOE would provide approximately 37% of the $19.6 million cost of the project (about $7.2 million), with the industrial participant providing the remainder of the cost. The project, which includes 15 months of operation and testing,

264

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that, due to excessive wastage, certain tube samples needed to be removed and replaced in order to ensure that Test Sections B and C would have a chance of remaining in the boiler for their intended exposure period. These suspect tube samples were replaced and the two remaining test sections were put back into service. The tube samples that were removed from Test Sections B and C were set aside for later analysis at the end of the planned exposure period. Test Sections B and C were again examined approximately six months later. At that time, measured wall thickness losses raised concerns about additional tube samples. These suspect samples were also removed, set aside for later analysis, and replaced. The test sections then went back into service until the end of the second exposure period, which was concluded in May 2003 when, due to evidence of excessive wastage, the valves were opened increasing cooling steam flow and thereby effectively stopping corrosion. In August 2003, Test Sections B and C were removed for closer examination. Section C had experienced about 42 months of service at the desired team temperature set point with 28.5 months at temperature at full temperature. Additional suspect samples were removed from Test Section B, then, it was re-installed into the boiler (at the location originally occupied by Section C), where it remained in service until the end of the program. Due to this removal history, the samples from Test Section B had a total service duration that varied from a minimum of 15.5 months (for samples that performed poorly) to 37 months for samples the survived for the full intended service exposure for Section B. The figure below shows a schematic of Test Section B and indicates the length of service exposure for different locations. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section B, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. This report also is intended to compare and summarize the results for all three test sections. The analysis of T

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. George Voelz, M.D., November 29, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Dr. George Voelz was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). This oral history covers Dr. Voelz`s research on Manhattan Engineering District plutonium workers, the acute and long term effects of radiation, his inhalation studies, and his activities at the 1961 INL reactor accident (SL-1 Reactor). After a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Voelz his remembrances on tissue studies of plutonium workers, the plutonium injection studies of 1945-1946, the controlled environmental radioiodine tests of 1963-1968, and tracer studies with human volunteers at Los Alamos. Dr. Voelz states his opinions concerning misconceptions about the Los Alamos Human Radiation Experiments.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Leaching of Mixtures of Biochar and Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect

Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments.2, 5, 6 Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis7-9, 12 (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion1, 13, 14 have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations.10, 11, 16 Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and reduces available aluminum.3, 17 Combinations of these benefits likely lead to the observed increased yields for crops including corn and sugarcane.17 with biochar addition to soil. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) 8, 17 than do unammended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way.18 Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes.15 Here, we are examining the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluating leaching of organic carbon and metals from the mixtures.

Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Porat, Iris [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Amonette, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Fine ash formation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, 15 pulverized coal samples were burnt in a drop-tube furnace to investigate the formation of fine particulates and the influence of coal ash properties on their emission. Coal combustion was carried out at 1673 K in air. Fine particles were collected by a cyclone and a low-pressure impactor. The elemental compositions of the collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We examined the chemical compositions of the fine particles as a function of particle diameter and examined the proportions of the elements in the parent coal samples. We determined that almost all particles less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter were formed by means of volatilization-condensation of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the coal. We also demonstrated that the amount of SiO{sub 2} in particle size less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter was related to the amount of fine included quartz and clay minerals in the parent coal. The primary components of particles greater than 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and as the diameter of the particles decrease, the mass fractions of iron, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus increased. However, the particle diameter at which this tendency commenced differed depending on the element. Particles between 0.22 and 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were thought to have been formed by the fragmentation and coalescence of particles in the coal and by the simultaneous condensation of volatilized elements onto other particles. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Tsuyoshi Teramae; Takayuki Takarada [Idemitsu Kosan Company, Limited, Chiba (Japan). Coal and Environmental Research Laboratory

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash 2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash October 28, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Participants List [PDF-31KB] Papers and Presentations Control Measures Predictive Performance Tools (Including Instrumentation) Processing and Utilization of High-LOI Fly Ash Beneficiation of High-LOI Fly Ash Characterization of High-LOI Fly Ash Poster Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

269

LOW-TEMPERATURE ASH SINTERING AND STRENGTH DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop fundamental sintering-viscosity relationships for coal-type ash at relatively low temperatures, with the end result being a simplified soot-blowing index for power systems. This involves correlating several important factors which control the ease of deposit removal, including deposit strength, deposit porosity, chemical composition, and temperature. Testing was performed on ashes derived from three coals and two biomass materials along with a standard soda-lime glass. The coals were selected because detailed analyses as well as ash samples were already available. Sintering characteristics of the ashes were to be determined by observation using an HSM and video recording system, with a stainless steel microscope stage chamber constructed to allow the use of corrosive gas atmospheres. The measurements would allow calculation of the viscosity of liquid phases as the sintering progressed, using the Frenkel and other sintering models. The sintering behavior and viscosity would be correlated with ash mineralogy and chemistry and information on bench-scale deposit strength and porosity to develop an initial relationship to predict deposit removability.

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; John P. Kay

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: ? Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature. ? Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined. ? Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (Tcv ) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt. ? Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles. ? Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems. ? Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

CHRISTOPHER J. ZYGARLICKE; DONALD P. MCCOLLOR; JOHN P. KAY; MICHAEL L. SWANSON

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: ? Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature. ? Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined. ? Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (Tcv ) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt. ? Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles. ? Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems. ? Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

CHRISTOPHER J. ZYGARLICKE; DONALD P. MCCOLLOR; JOHN P. KAY; MICHAEL L. SWANSON

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION FOR UTILIZATION OF ASH IN SOIL STABILIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) approved the use of coal ash in soil stabilization, indicating that environmental data needed to be generated. The overall project goal is to evaluate the potential for release of constituents into the environment from ash used in soil stabilization projects. Supporting objectives are: (1) To ensure sample integrity through implementation of a sample collection, preservation, and storage protocol to avoid analyte concentration or loss. (2) To evaluate the potential of each component (ash, soil, water) of the stabilized soil to contribute to environmental release of analytes of interest. (3) To use laboratory leaching methods to evaluate the potential for release of constituents to the environment. (4) To facilitate collection of and to evaluate samples from a field runoff demonstration effort. The results of this study indicated limited mobility of the coal combustion fly ash constituents in laboratory tests and the field runoff samples. The results presented support previous work showing little to negligible impact on water quality. This and past work indicates that soil stabilization is an environmentally beneficial CCB utilization application as encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This project addressed the regulatory-driven environmental aspect of fly ash use for soil stabilization, but the demonstrated engineering performance and economic advantages also indicate that the use of CCBs in soil stabilization can and should become an accepted engineering option.

David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Fly ash as a liming material for corn production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash produced as a by-product of subbituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as an alternative liming material without negatively affecting corn (Zea mays L.) production in areas where use of conventional liming materials can be uneconomical due to transportation costs. A study was conducted to determine if fly ash produced from the Nebraska Public Power District Gerald Gentleman Power Station located in Sutherland, NE could be used as an alternative liming material. Combinations of dry fly ash (DFA), wet fly ash (WFA), beet lime (by-product of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing) (BL), and agricultural lime (AGL) were applied at rates ranging from 0.43 to 1.62 times the recommended lime rate to plots on four acidic soils (Anselmo fine sandy loam, Hord fine sandy loam, Holdrege sandy loam, and Valentine fine sand). Soil samples were collected to a depth of 0.2 m from plots and analyzed for pH before lime applications and twice periodically after lime application. The Hord and Valentine soils were analyzed for exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na,and Al for determination of percent Al saturation on selected treatments and sampling dates. Corn grain yields were determined annually. It is concluded that the fly ash utilized in this study and applied at rates in this study, increases soil pH comparable to agricultural lime and is an appropriate alternative liming material.

Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Stevens, W.B.; McCallister, D.L.; Kackman, S.D. [University of Nebraska, North Platte, NE (US)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ash bed level control system for a fixed-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ash level control system is provided which incorporates an ash level meter to automatically control the ash bed level of a coal gasifier at a selected level. The ash level signal from the ash level meter is updated during each cycle that a bed stirrer travels up and down through the extent of the ash bed level. The ash level signal is derived from temperature measurements made by thermocouples carried by the stirrer as it passes through the ash bed and into the fire zone immediately above the ash bed. The level signal is compared with selected threshold level signal to determine if the ash level is above or below the selected level once each stirrer cycle. A first counter is either incremented or decremented accordingly. The registered count of the first counter is preset in a down counter once each cycle and the preset count is counted down at a selected clock rate. A grate drive is activated to rotate a grate assembly supporting the ash bed for a period equal to the count down period to maintain the selected ash bed level. In order to avoid grate binding, the controller provides a short base operating duration time each stirrer cycle. If the ash bed level drops below a selected low level or exceeds a selected high level, means are provided to notify the operator.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Rotunda, John R. (Fairmont, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Big George to Carter Mountain 115-kV transmission line project, Park and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to rebuild, operate, and maintain a 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Big George and Carter Mountain Substations in northwest Wyoming (Park and Hot Springs Counties). This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The existing Big George to Carter Mountain 69-kV transmission line was constructed in 1941 by the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, with 1/0 copper conductor on wood-pole H-frame structures without an overhead ground wire. The line should be replaced because of the deteriorated condition of the wood-pole H-frame structures. Because the line lacks an overhead ground wire, it is subject to numerous outages caused by lightning. The line will be 54 years old in 1995, which is the target date for line replacement. The normal service life of a wood-pole line is 45 years. Under the No Action Alternative, no new transmission lines would be built in the project area. The existing 69-kV transmission line would continue to operate with routine maintenance, with no provisions made for replacement.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Cementitious binder from fly ash and other industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, investigations were undertaken to formulate cementitious binder by judicious blending of fly ash with Portland cement as well as by admixing fly ash with calcined phosphogypsum, fluorogypsum, lime sludge, and chemical activators of different finenesses. The effect of addition of calcined clay in these types of binders was studied. Data showed that cementitious binders of high compressive strength and water retentivity can be produced. The strength of masonry mortars increased with the addition of chemical activators. The strength development of binders takes place through formation of ettringite. C-S-H, and C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}. The binders are eminently suitable for partial replacement (up to 25%) of the cement in concrete without any detrimental affect on the strength. The results showed that fly ash can be used in the range from 45% to 70% in formulating these binders along with other industrial wastes to help in mitigating environmental pollution.

Singh, M.; Garg, M. [Central Building Research Inst., Roorkee (India)] [Central Building Research Inst., Roorkee (India)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Activation Of Fly Ash-Lime Reactions By Curing At Elevated Temperature And By Addition Of Phosphogypsum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pozzolanic reactions play a key role in improving the compressive strengths of compacted fly ash-lime specimens. Based on studies performed with cement amended fly ash (more)

Asha, K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Testing the ecological stability of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: effects of heat, ash and mycorrhizal colonization on Pinus muricata seedling performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal pan and heating it in a soil drying oven. During thesoil heating and ash addition, using a drying oven and ash

Peay, Kabir G.; Bruns, Thomas D.; Garbelotto, Matteo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

280

Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash Using Acid Sintering-Leaching ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash Using Acid ... Coal fly- ash from coal-fired power plants is rich in Al2O3 content with potential use as a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions and increased the international consensus to improve volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low volcanic ash ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

282

Continuous air Agglomeration Method for high Carbon fly ash Beneficiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carbon-free mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

Ash reduction system using electrically heated particulate matter filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for reducing ash comprises a temperature estimator module that estimates a temperature of an electrically heated particulate matter (PM) filter. A temperature and position estimator module estimates a position and temperature of an oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter. An ash reduction control module adjusts at least one of exhaust flow, fuel and oxygen levels in the electrically heated PM filter to adjust a position of the oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter based on the oxidation wave temperature and position.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; He, Yongsheng [Sterling Heights, MI

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahon L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Monongahela, PA); Finseth, Dennis H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

FLY ASH GENERATION AND UTILIZATION -AN OVERVIEW* Tarun R. Naik, Ph.D., P.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a sodium-based sorbent such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

286

Evaluation of an Ecolotree TM CAP for Closure of Coal Ash Disposal Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Once they are filled or become inactive, coal ash disposal ponds at power plant sites must meet state and federal regulations for permanent closure. In-place closure of ash ponds typically requires an impermeable cover to protect groundwater from leachate generated by stormwater infiltration through the ash. This report documents the construction, maintenance, and performance of the EcolotreeTM Cap (Tree Cap) -- an ash pond closure alternative consisting of poplar trees, grasses, and surface soil amendme...

1999-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

287

Using Zeolites Synthesized from Fly Ash to Reduce Ammonia Loss to the Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes studies using zeolites synthesized from fly ash to reduce ammonia loss to the environment.

2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

288

Mercury Leachability From Concretes That Contain Fly Ashes and Activated Carbon Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents new laboratory data on the leaching of mercury from concrete that contains fly ash and powdered activated carbon (PAC) sorbents used to capture mercury. The concretes studied during this project were made with fly ashes from lignite and subbituminous coal, including fly ashes containing PAC. Only very low levels of mercuryless than 5 parts per trillionwere leached from the fly ash concretes in both 18-hour and 7-day laboratory leach tests.

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

289

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M. Sulloway

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M Sulloway

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

Freidin, C. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fly Ash Construction Manual for Road and Site Applications, Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume construction manual details the use of fly ash in high-volume road construction and site development, covering all project elements from ash procurement to finishing. It addresses the use of fly ash in fills, embankments, backfills, subgrade stabilization, pavement base course, and slurried backfills, as well as its application as a soil amendment.

1988-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

293

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater Reyad; available online 29 October 2003 Abstract A by-product fly ash from oil shale processing was converted shale; Ash; Zeolite; Cadmium and lead removal 1. Introduction Oil shale exists in Jordan with large

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

294

Swirling Melting Characteristics of Fly Ashes from Co-Firing of MSWI in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melting treatment is an efficient for heavy metal stabilization in MSW fly ash. The fly ashes from co-firing of municipal solid waste and coal incinerator were melted in the swirling melting furnace system under various temperatures. The melting characteristics ... Keywords: fly ash, co-firing, melting, melting temperature, heavy metals, fixation rate

Wang Xue-tao; Jiao You-zhou; Xu Bin; Jin Bao-sheng

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hydrogen From Bio-Derived LiquidsHydrogen From BioHydrogen From Bio--Derived LiquidsDerived Liquids Dave King, Yong Wang, PNNL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dave King, Yong Wang, PNNL BILIWIG Meeting Laurel, Maryland November 6, 2007 #12;Innovation / Overview Brian James) #12;10/25/07: PNNL Complex with 8:1 Steam/Eth molar ratio and 75% PSA Recovery and 400C WGS

296

Aluminum - Fly Ash Metal Matrix Composites as Advanced Automobile Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites such as silicon carbide-aluminum, alumina-aluminum, and graphite-aluminum represent a class of emerging materials with significant potential for commercial use in the auto and aerospace industries. In industrial foundry trials, a joint industry and Department of Energy project demonstrated a promising new process for producing a low cost aluminum metal matrix composite containing fly ash particles.

2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

297

Novel Ash Beneficiation Processes for Managing Unburned Carbon and Ammonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes new fly ash beneficiation concepts for managing deleterious effects of unburned carbon and ammonia contamination associated with low nitrogen oxides (low-NOx) combustion systems. The report contains technical data, scientific discussion, and a description of ongoing development and scale-up activities.

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

Thermal analysis and characterization of Elephant grass ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... Here, ashes from incineration of elephant grass are characterized and its incorporation into clay to produce ... Moreover, thermal analysis was performed including gas emission ... Differential characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron sandstone deposit.

299

Long-Term Observations on the Southern Flank of Georges Bank. Part I: A Description of the Seasonal Cycle of Currents, Temperature, Stratification, and Wind Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nearly continuous current measurements at 45 and 75 m were made from May 1975 to March 1979 at 4051?N, 6724?W on the southern flank of Georges Bank in water 85 m deep. Measurements at 15 and 84 m were made less often. The mean flow at 45 and 75 ...

Bradford Butman; Robert C. Beardsley

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 8. Gasification of River King Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the eighth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of River King Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The period of gasification test was July 28 to August 19, 1983. 6 refs., 23 figs., 25 tabs.

Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Spectroscopic research on infrared emittance of coal ash deposits  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits on a pulverized coal combustion boiler of an electric power plant. Normal emittance spectra in the near to medium infrared (2.5-25 {mu}m) region and total normal emittances were measured on four kinds of ground ash deposits. Measurements were conducted in the 570-1460 K temperature range which is common for boiler furnaces, by both heating and cooling the ash samples, with the aim to study the effect of their thermal history. Dependence of emittance on wavelength, temperature and chemical composition was studied, too. Samples were tested for transparency (opacity) to verify the accuracy of results. It was determined that the thicknesses used for the ash powders are opaque for infrared radiation for thicknesses in the order of a millimeter. Tests have shown that spectral emittance increases with an increase of wavelength with a characteristic pattern common for all samples. Spectral normal emittance increases strongly with temperature at shorter wavelengths and remains high and unchanged at longer ones. Emittance spectra are not very sensitive to chemical composition of ashes especially beyond {lambda} {approx} 5 {mu}m. With an increase of temperature, total emittance of the powdered sample decreases to a minimum value around 1200 K. Further temperature rise induces an increase of total emittance due to sintering in the ash. On cooling, the emittance increases monotonically following the hysteresis. Quantitative directions for evaluating thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits for the merits of the safety design of boiler furnaces were proposed. That comprises correlating the experimentally obtained emittance spectra with curves of simple analytical form, i.e., a continuous function of minimum emittance vs. wavelength. The proposed method can be extended to other specimens from the same furnace and used to determine correlations for thermal calculation of old and design of new furnaces - with similar geometry and combusting similar coal. The method is potentially applicable to completely different boiler furnaces combusting different coal, and the authors recommend running the tests with new deposit samples. The data will then be applicable to the thermal design of a whole new class of furnaces, having similar geometry and combusting similar coal. This is expected to greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of thermal calculation as well as the efficiency of thermal design of steam boilers. (author)

Saljnikov, Aleksandar; Komatina, Mirko; Gojak, Milan [Department of Thermomechanics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS); Vucicevic, Biljana [Laboratory for Thermal Engineering, Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (RS); Goricanec, Darko [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Smetanova 17, Maribor 2000 (Slovenia); Stevanovic, Zoran [Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, Dusina 7, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Limnological Approach to the Management of Fly Ash Disposal Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash disposal ponds are found at half of the U.S. coal burning power plants and receive a mixture of fly ash and water used to sluice the ash from the power plant to the pond. Leaching of metals, notably Cu, As, and Se, from fly ash can be decreased by control of inflow pH, but their release through the discharge to surface waters remains a problem, particularly for Se. Comanagement of low volume wastes of varying chemical composition and volume with fly ash make the management of water quality at the...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

303

Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas fired furnances or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, A.H.

1982-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

Evaluation of Concrete Containing Fly Ash With High Carbon Content and/or Small Amounts of Wood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive database of information on the impacts of the use of high carbon coal ashes and concretes with small amounts of wood ash on the performance of concretes. It is expected these data will support easing the restrictions on the use of high carbon ashes and any wood ash products in concrete in the ASTM standards.

1998-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Physical and Chemical Properties of Fly Ash from Coal Gasification and Study on Its Recycling Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aiming at the difficulties in utilization of fly ash from coal gasification, the physical and chemical properties of fly ash were investigated. This research studied recycling utilization on using fly ash as one of cement raw materials for cement clinker. ... Keywords: fly ash, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), recycling utilization

Guohua Qiu; Weiqiang Zeng; Zhenglun Shi; Mengxiang Fang; Zhongyang Luo

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

To be published in Waste Management (2010) Bodnan et al. MINERALOGY AND PORE WATER CHEMISTRY OF A BOILER ASH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF A BOILER ASH FROM A MSW FLUIDIZED-BED INCINERATOR F. Bodénan* , D. Guyonnet, P. Piantone, P. Blanc BRGM presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from to as "boiler ash", is analogous to what Abbas et al. (2003) refer to as "hopper ash" (see Fig. 1 of Abbas et al

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

309

Leaching of mixtures of biochar and fly ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments. Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations. Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and decreases available aluminum. A combination of these benefits likely is responsible for observed increases in yields for crops such as corn and sugarcane. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) than do unamended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way. Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil. Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes. In the present study, we examined the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluated the leaching of organic carbon and metals from these mixtures. The carbon sorption experiments showed release of carbon from biochar, rather than sorption, except at the highest concentrations in the Biochar HW sample. Similar results were obtained by others for oxidative leaching of bituminous coal, in which more C was released as dissolved C than was oxidized to CO2 by the oxygen in water. We confirmed that both fly ash and two types of biochar (oak char [OKEB], and hardwood [HW] char) exhibited minimal leaching of heavy metals including Cr, Ni, Zn, Ga, and Ag, and no detectable leaching of Pb or Cd (data not shown) under the conditions tested. The Biochar HW had a slightly higher C/N ratio (334) and pH (7.7) than did the Biochar OKEB (284 and 6.5). There was no toxicity exhibited by the fly ash (not shown) or biochar leachates as measured by the Microtox assay under the conditions tested. In previous results no toxicity was reported in testing the fly ash samples except for one high-pH sample. The most notable leachate component from both types of biochar, but not the fly ash, was organic carbon with the HW biochar leaching less organic carbon than the OKEB biochar (5.71 ppm vs. 59.3 ppm). Alone (in batch sorption experiments), or in mixtures of 90% soil and 10% biochar (column studies), we noted significant loss of carbon from the biochar into soluble components. However, when we added fly ash to the column experiments (80% soil, 10% fly ash, and 10% biochar) we observed significant decreases in the amounts of C leached (20% for HW, and 47% for OKEB). The results indicate that applying a combination of fly ash and biochar may result in maximizing the amount of carbon sequestration in soil while also increasing beneficial soil properties and fertility. The lower amount of carbon leached from the HW biochar compared to the OKEB biochar is likely due to the more recalcitrant form of the carbon in the HW char, due to its preparation at a higher temperature (600 C) than the OKEB biochar (450 C). High heat treatment temperatures during biochar preparation increase both the total carbon content of the biochar and the proportion of the carbon that is present in fused aromatic rings resistant to chemical and physical degradation.

Palumbo, Anthony V.; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana R.; Amonette, James E.; Drake, Meghan M.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

310

JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition, development of expanded information on the environmental performance of CCBs in utilization settings included the following: (1) Development of information on physical properties and engineering performance for concrete, soil-ash blends, and other products. (2) Training of students through participation in CARRC research projects. (3) Participation in a variety of local, national, and international technical meetings, symposia, and conferences by presenting and publishing CCB-related papers.

Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with CuO and CuCl2 catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 {micro}g/m3 using a diffusion tube as the source of Hg0(g). All experiments were conducted using 4% O2 in nitrogen mix as a reaction gas, and other reactants (HCl, H2O and SO2, NO2, Br2) were added as required. The fixed bed reactor was operated over a temperature range of 200 to 400 C. In each experiment, the reactor effluent was analyzed using the modified Ontario-Hydro method. After each experiment, fly ash particles were also analyzed for mercury. The results show that the ability of fly ash to adsorb and/or oxidize mercury is primarily dependent on its carbon, iron and calcium content. There can be either one or more than one key component at a particular temperature and flue gas condition. Surface area played a secondary role in effecting the mercury transformations when compared to the concentration of the key component in the fly ash. Amount of carbon and surface area played a key important role in the adsorption of mercury. Increased concentration of gases in the flue gas other than oxygen and nitrogen caused decreased the amount of mercury adsorbed on carbon surface. Mercury adsorption by iron oxide primarily depended on the crystalline structure of iron oxide. {alpha}-Iron oxide had no effect on mercury adsorption or oxidation under most of the flue gas conditions, but ?-iron oxide adsorbed mercury under most of the flue gas conditions. Bromine is a very good oxidizing agent for mercury. But in the presence of calcium oxide containing fly ashes, all the oxidized mercury would be reduced to elemental form. Among the catalysts, it was observed that presence of free lattice chlorine in the catalyst was very important for the oxidation of mercury. But instead of using the catalyst alone, using it along with carbon may better serve the purpose by providing the adsorption surface for mercury and also some extra surface area for the reaction to occur (especially for fly ashes with low surface area).

Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part of the System to Inject Limestone Sorbent for SO, Control. Nucla, CO Nucla...continued Before being repowered, the plant consisted of three 12 MWe coal stoker- fired units built in 1959, which were taken out of service in 1984 due to low efficiency and high fuel cost. Antici- pating a need for additional power in the early 1990s. and after review of many power generation alternatives, CUEA started constmction of the re- powered Nucla CFB plant in Novem- ber 1984 and completed the project in May 1987. The original boilers were replaced with a new Fympower Corp. CFB bailer, a new high pressure 74 MWe steam turbine generator was installed, the three original 12 MWe steam turbines were

313

Microsoft Word - CX-Ashe-CGSFiberInstallation_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2011 5, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Debbie Ruckwardt Electrical Engineer - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Installing fiber optic cables between Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Ashe Substation and Energy Northwest's Columbia Generating Station (CGS). Budget Information: Work Order # 00261540 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1864 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights of way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: The project takes place between BPA's Ashe Substation and Energy Northwest's

314

Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2250114°, -112.4840675° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2250114,"lon":-112.4840675,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

315

Blue Ash, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Ash, Ohio: Energy Resources Blue Ash, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.2320029°, -84.3782734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2320029,"lon":-84.3782734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration Y. Roh (rohy@ornl.gov; 865-576-9931) T. J. Phelps (phelpstj1@ornl.gov; 865-574-7290) Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6036 A. D. McMillan (mcmillanad@ornl.gov; 865-241-4554) R. J. Lauf (laufrj@ornl.gov; 865-574-5176) Metal and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6085 *Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration estimates atmospheric greenhouse gas releases may exceed 8 billion metric tons by the year 2010 heightening its international environmental concern. Carbon dioxide will dominate the

317

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- acre basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project was safely completed at a cost of $8.9 million, $2.9 million under budget. The manmade earthen basin received ash from the former R Area Pow- erhouse operations, which ended in 1964. The first of five reactors con- structed at SRS, the R Reactor produced nuclear materials for national defense. Recovery Act funding allowed SRS to accelerate cleanup of the basin and complete the project five years earlier than the target set in a regu- latory schedule. In late 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control determined the closure met all regulatory requirements after inspection

318

Preventing ash agglomeration during gasification of high-sodium lignite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various additives were evaluated to assess their ability to prevent ash agglomeration during the gasification of high-sodium lignite. Additives that showed promise in simple muffle furnace tests included meta-kaolin, vermiculite, two types of silica fume, and one type of bauxite. Additives that were tested and rejected included dolomite, calcite, sand flour, kaolinite, fine kaolin, and calcined bauxite. Based on the muffle furnace test results, the meta-kaolin was selected for a follow-on demonstration in a pilot-scale coal gasifier. Pilot-scale testing showed that the addition of coarse (minus 14-mesh, 920-{mu}m mean size) meta-kaolin at a feed rate roughly equivalent to the ash content of the lignite (10 wt %) successfully prevented agglomeration and deposition problems during gasification of high-sodium lignite at a maximum operating temperature of 927{sup o}C (1700{sup o}F). 13 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

Robert S. Dahlin; Johnny R. Dorminey; WanWang Peng; Roxann F. Leonard; Pannalal Vimalchand [Southern Research Institute and Southern Company Services, Wilsonville, AL (USA). Power Systems Development Facility

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

Two recent large-scale spills of coal combustion waste have highlighted the old problem of handling the enormous quantity of solid waste produced by coal. Both spills happened at power plants run by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). In December 2008 a holding pond for coal ash collapsed at a power plant in Kingstom, Tenn., releasing coal-ash sludge onto farmland and into rivers: in January 2009 a break in a pipe removing water from a holding pond for gypsum caused a spill at Widows Creek Fossil Plant in Stevenson, Ala. The article discusses the toxic outcome of such disasters on ecosystems, quoting work by Willaim Hopkins at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and recommendations and reports of the US EPA. 2 photos.

Chatterjee, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A Laboratory Method for Ash Particle Size Determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing stringent particulate emissions limits are putting more pressure on power producers to improve electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance. In an effort to select the most cost effective upgrade option, many power plant engineers are using ESP computer models to estimate the impact of the available options. These models are sensitive to the fly ash particle size distribution used in the calculations, but the actual distribution is rarely known. Furthermore, measuring this distribution has, in...

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ash Properties Analysis from Co-Firing Biomass and Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant interest in renewable energy has been increasing, especially in response to legislative requirements to include renewables in the generation mix. One promising renewable strategy is co-firing biomass with coal, in pulverized coal- (PC-) fired units. The objective of this research is to provide quantitative data on full-scale test burn samples to demonstrate changes in ash characteristics and to identify anomalies affecting particulate material (PM) collection efficiency that result from co-fi...

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

322

A new way to stabilize fly ash from municipal incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy metals and toxic chlorinated organics, added to very low grain-size distributions, make fly ashes from municipal incinerators a very hazardous waste. For their disposal, the present general trend is, not only to stabilize chemically the ashes, i.e., to reduce the leachability of the toxic substances, but also to stabilize them mechanically, i.e., to convert them into massive, resistant, and unleachable solids. This paper describes various stabilization methods used on representative European fly ash samples, which led to the development of a new stabilization technique taking place in four stages: elimination of the alkali chlorides by dissolution; addition of a moderate quantity of phosphoric acid; calcination; and solidification with Portland clinker or cement. The principal advantages of the process are as follows: the polychlorodibenzodioxins-polychlorodibenzofurans are destroyed, the reactivity of the heavy metals is reduced drastically, the final solids have satisfactory mechanical properties, and the increase in weight of the waste to be disposed of does not exceed one fourth. Comparative results of TCLP extraction tests are presented.

Derie, R. [Free Univ. of Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Ore Dressing

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

King County Carbonate Fuel Cell Demonstration Project: Case Study of a 1MW Fuel Cell Power Plant Fueled by Digester Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the first-year demonstration experiences of a 1-MW carbonate fuel cell system operating on anaerobic digester gas at a wastewater treatment plant in King County, Washington. The case study is one of several fuel cell project case studies under research by the EPRI Distributed Energy Resources Program. This case study is designed to help utilities and other interested parties understand the early applications of fuel cell systems to help them in their resource planning efforts an...

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Superheater Tube Corrosion in Wood Gasifier Ash Deposits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The upper operating temperature of tubes in heat exchangers/steam generators is strongly influenced by the degradation that can occur because of the reaction of the exchanger/generator tubing with the deposits that accumulate on the surface of the tubes. In fact, severe corrosion has been observed in some biomass fired systems, particularly with elevated potassium and chlorine concentrations in the deposits. Wood gasifiers have recently been and are currently being constructed at several sites in North America. In these systems, the syngas is burned to produce steam and the performance of the heat exchanger tubes under ash deposits is of great concern. As temperatures of the heat exchangers are increased in an effort to increase their operating efficiency, the performance of the tubes is of greater interest. The corrosion behavior of alloy steel tubes as a function of temperature has been investigated by exposing samples of selected alloys to ash collected from the steam generator fired by syngas produced in wood gasifiers. This study compares corrosion rates from laboratory exposures of synthesis gas and ash at 500 C and 600 C. This study investigated the material performance of four ferritic steels and one austenitic steel exposed to conditions expected on the fireside of a wood gasifier. The purpose of this study was to identify an effective method for determining material performance for samples exposed to both the process gas and the fly ash that is typically observed within the steam generator for times up to 1000 hours. Mass changes were measured for all of the samples, but this information can be misleading concerning material performance due to the difficulty in sufficiently cleaning the samples after exposure in the ash. Therefore, small cross sections of the samples were collected and imaged using optical microscopy. Oxide thicknesses were measured along with metal losses. The metal loss information provides a clear indication of material performance. The metal loss rates for the ferritic steels at 500 C were almost half of those observed at 600 C and the rates decreased with increasing exposure time. It was also reported that the metal loss rates generally decrease with increasing chromium concentration.

Bestor, Michael A [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

326

Electrostatic Precipitator Performance Modeling of High Carbon Ash Using EPRI's ESPM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet reduced nitrogen oxide (NOX) emission limits, many power producers installed low-NOX combustion systems that raised the level of carbon in the ash. However, carbon can be difficult to collect in an electrostatic precipitator and, consequently, the particulate emissions from many affected units increased. EPRI initiated this study to better understand carbon capture in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), improve collection of high carbon ashes, and predict the collection of such ashes with its ESP...

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

327

Development of New Industrial Ashalloy Material Using Fly-Ash Cenospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites can provide improved functional properties compared to solid metal castings, while saving production energy and raw material costs in the process. In particular, ash-derived metal matrix composites can provide utilities a high value-added market for their coal fly ash. This report describes research on a promising manufacturing process for one such application -- pressure infiltration techniques to produce lead-ash composites for automotive battery applications.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Mercury Emissions from Curing Concretes that Contain Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents new laboratory data on the release of mercury from concrete containing fly ash and powdered activated carbon sorbents used to capture mercury. The concretes studied in this project were made with fly ashes from lignite and subbituminous coal, including fly ashes containing powdered activated carbon (PAC). Minute quantities of mercury were emitted from five concretes during the standard 28-day curing process and throughout an additional 28 days of curing for two of these concretes. Ge...

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Fly Ash Carbon Burn-Out at TVA's Colbert and Shawnee Stations: Site Specific Application Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash beneficiation using Carbon Burn-Out (CBO) technology offers the opportunity to market fly ash that was previously landfilled. This site application study of beneficiating pulverized coal boiler fly ash at Tennessee Valley Authority's Colbert and Shawnee Stations indicates this process is a cost effective solution for decreasing solid waste disposal, increasing landfill life, improving boiler heat rate, and generating a positive revenue stream.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

330

Assessment of Impacts of NOx Reduction Technologies on Coal Ash Use: Volume 1: North American Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume report provides documentation about physical and chemical effects combustion and post-combustion low-NOx technologies have on coal fly ash. U.S., European, and, to a lesser degree, Japanese experience is discussed. The report assesses the effect of low-NOx technologies on fly ash markets in a general manner. Options for beneficiating fly ash for specific markets also appear.

1997-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Use of High Carbon Fly Ash as a Component of Raw Mix for Cement Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the production of concrete, fly ash often serves as a supplementary cementing material, but some fly ashes may not be suitable for this use due to excess unburned carbon. This report presents the results of a literature investigation, bench-scale laboratory study, and pilot-scale tests of the feasibility of using such high carbon fly ashes in the manufacture of portland cement.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Geochemical Investigation of Pyrite Codisposal with Sluiced Fly Ash and Implications for Selecting Remedial Actions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidation of pyrite results in acid generation as well as the release of sulfate, iron, and other metals to solution. When pyritic coal mill rejects are codisposed with coal ash, pyrite oxidation and the subsequent interaction of oxidation products with the ash primarily control leachate quality. The geochemistry of the pyrite/ash system has implications for management and remediation actions at codisposal facilities. Utilities can use the results of this research to make decisions regarding such facilit...

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in Integrated Gas Combined Cycle Turbine Engines. Author(s), Andrew D.

334

INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Optimum Condition of Vanadium Recovery from Power Plant Fly-ash ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In this study, recovery of vanadium from power plant fly-ash was developed using a hydro metallurgical process consisted of acidic leaching...

336

The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash by Carbonation Reaction with Diffeent Water Content by Nam-Il Um, Kwang-Suk...

337

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

338

Removal of Thiosalts using Biomass Ash from Pulp and Paper Mill ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass ash used in this study is collected from Corner Brook Pulp and Paper Mill, NL and Zellstoff Celgar Mill, BC and is characterized to understand the...

339

and Se(VI) Ions onto Biomass Ash - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass ash used in this study is collected from Zellstoff Celgar Mill, British Columbia, Canada and is characterized to determine the physico-chemical...

340

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VA King George Greenhouse Heat Capture Install heat recovery steam generator on existing gas fired turbine at landfill, and convey resulting steam through existing piping to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

342

Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect

To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO{sub 2} assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Murray, B.R.; Nissanka, S.P. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Development of an ash particle deposition model considering build-up and removal mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

Slagging and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in power boilers fired with fossil fuels and fuel mixtures has a significant influence on boiler efficiency and availability. Mathematical modelling has long been considered a suitable method to assist boiler operators to determine optimized operating conditions for an existing furnace. The ultimate goal in ash deposition prediction is hereby the determination of the total amount of material deposited and hence the determination of the total reduction in efficiency. Depending on the fuels fired the total deposited mass is a combination of ash particle deposition and ash particle erosion due to non-sticky particles. The novel ash particle deposition model presented in this work considers deposition of sticky ash particles, cleansing of deposit by non-sticky sand particles and sticking of sand due to contact with sticky ash. The steady-state modelling results for the total amount of ash deposited on the deposition probe of an entrained flow reactor presented in this work agree well with the experimental data. Only at very high fractions of sand added as non-sticky material, a significant influence of the sand on the overall mass deposited was found. Since the model considers sticking of non-sticking sand due to contact with sticky ash, the fraction of sand deposited on the probe was especially studied. Using a correction factor to consider the influence of operating time on the steady-state simulations led to good agreement between simulations and experimental data. 12 refs., 10 figs.

Kjell Strandstroem; Christian Muellera; Mikko Hupa [Abo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Abo (Finland)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Release of Mercury During Curing of Concrete Containing Fly Ash and Mercury Sorbent Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides laboratory data on mercury release during the initial curing stage of concrete made with fly ash or mixtures of fly ash and activated carbon containing mercury. These experiments suggest that mercury is not released from these concretes during initial curing.

2002-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

345

Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Herzegovina; UBAL University of Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina; FAZ University of Zagreb, Croatia; BTUC risks of farmed and barren alkaline coal ash landfills in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Environmental its research on the thermo-electric plant (TEP) and associated coal ash sites at Tuzla, Bosnia

346

Quantifying the availability and the stability of trace cationic elements in fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Products Associated with Coal Mining Interactive Forum: Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL in this paper to deter- mine these parameters for model elements Cu(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) in fly ash 50 mM EDTA extraction. ? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Coal fly ash has

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

347

Use of High-Calcium Fly Ash in Cement-Based Construction Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in blended cements with minimum (less than 10%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly ash; concrete impact assessments. INTRODUCTION #12;3 Coal is the most widely used source of energy for power production, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which 100 million tons

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

348

Use of Ash from the Incineration of Urban Garbage into Clayey ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The waste is a type of fly-ash resulting from the incineration of a selected part of urban ... Analysis of Carbon Fiber Recovered from Optimized Processes of ... Clayey Ceramic Incorporated with Powder from the Sintering Plant of a ... Influence of Fly Ash and Fluorgypsum on Hydration Heat and Mortar Strength of Cement.

349

Resuspension of Relic Volcanic Ash and Dust from Katmai: Still an Aviation Hazard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northwest winds were strong enough to continuously resuspend relic volcanic ash from the Katmai volcano cluster and the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes on 2021 September 2003. The ash cloud reached over 1600 m and extended over 230 km into the ...

David Hadley; Gary L. Hufford; James J. Simpson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Rapid response to the Chaiten eruption, Chile, May 2008: ash fallout and impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid response to the Chaiten eruption, Chile, May 2008: ash fallout and impact David Pyle AGU, 90 (24), 205-7, 16 June 2009. #12;Satellite imagery records widespread ash fallout across central eruption of rhyolite since Katmai (1912). #12;Thick fallout deposits near Chaiten volcano (January 2009

351

Fly Ash Design Manual for Road and Site Applications: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume design manual describes the use of fly ash as a construction material in high-volume applications like structural fills, highway embankments, grouting, roller-compacted concrete, and land reclamation. The engineering data and construction procedures presented should help coal ash managers and power plant managers incorporate such applications in by-product management plans.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Fly Ash Design Manual for Road and Site Applications: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume design manual describes the use of fly ash as a construction material in high-volume applications like structural fills, highway embankments, grouting, roller-compacted concrete, and land reclamation. The engineering data and construction procedures presented should help coal ash managers and power plant managers incorporate such applications in by-product management plans.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Separation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil shale ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordanian oil shale ash was used as an adsorbent for the removal of copper and zinc from aqueous solution.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Oil shale; Ash; Adsorption; Copper and zinc removal 1. IntroductionSeparation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251­257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

354

Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particles. In addition, the composites filled with 20% fly ash became softer. These samples showed lower, composites, tensile properties 1. INTRODUCTION Fly ash, a waste by-product generated abundantly in electric processibility of the filled materials5 . Furthermore, as a waste by-product, its usage decreases the overall

Nemat-Nasser, Sia

355

High-Volume Fly Ash Utilization Projects in the United States and Canada: Second Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash--an increasing disposal problem for utilities operating coal-fired power plants--has considerable unrealized potential as a construction material. In a wide-ranging survey, this study documented more than 250 U.S. and Canadian construction projects employing fly ash in high volume for backfill, landfill, hydraulic fill, embankments, pavement base courses, soil amendment, subgrade stabilization, and grout.

1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

356

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Characterization of Slag, Fly Ash and Portland Cement for Saltstone  

SciTech Connect

Batch-to-batch variability in the chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, slag and portland cement (binders) will be an ongoing concern over the many years that salt waste from Tank 50 will be processed into grout at the Saltstone Processing Facility. This batch-to-batch variability in the properties of the binder materials translates to variability in the fresh and cured properties of Saltstone. Therefore, it is important to quantify the batch-to-batch variability of the binder materials and the resultant variation in grout properties. This report is the starting point for that process by providing the baseline (reference point) binder properties to which future batches of binder materials can be compared. For this characterization effort, properties of fly ash, slag and portland cement were obtained and documented in this report. These properties included particle size distribution by laser light scattering and dry sieving, particle size and morphology by scanning electron microscopy, true, aerated and tapped densities, chemical composition, rheological properties of the water based slurries made from individual binder material, and volatility through thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The properties presented in this report also provide a baseline data set to assist in problem solving efforts when or if unanticipated and/or unwanted processing events occur at the Saltstone Processing Facility.

Harbour, J

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Use of ash from municipal solid waste combustion. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the results of efforts to integrate municipal solid waste combustion ash into a high strength portland cement concrete matrix comprised of multiple waste materials. The material developed by this research was to be used to construct a large underground storage vault to house the Friendly Mobile Barrier, a safety barrier system for use at highway crossings for the high speed rail system. The subcontractor, Environmental Solutions, Inc., of Richmond, Virginia, worked with researchers at Pennsylvania State University and the State University of New York--Stony Brook to develop and test the material. The result of this work is a portland cement concrete matrix which utilizes 80.01% recycled materials, and a field-applicable method for incorporating MSW ash as a component at volumes up to 9.78%. Twenty-eight day strengths of over 4000 psi were achieved, with 315 day strengths of 6500 psi. All structural, chemical and environmental testing showed the material to be competitive with conventional concrete.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

Bernath, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sinquefield, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Oregon State Univ., Eugene, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Barfield, M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications EIS-0220: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0220: Final Environmental Impact Statement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Argonne CNM HighlightL Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Calcium Map Calcium map of an activated fly ash geopolymer displays regions of high calcium concentration (circled). Their distribution suggests localization as a discrete calcium-rich phase within the lower-calcium aluminosilicate geopolymer gel. Use of the Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) has provided the first access to the nature of heterogeneity in real fly ash-derived geopolymers at the nanoscale. Direct evidence of the formation of discrete high-calcium nanometer-sized particles within a hydroxide-activated geopolymer synthesized from a low-calcium fly ash has been obtained using HXN fluorescence characterization. Additionally, the team of CNM users from the University of Melbourne, the Universidad del Valle of Colombia, and the

362

pH-dependent leaching of dump coal ash - retrospective environmental analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trace and major elements in coal ash particles from dump of 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant in Obrenovac near Belgrade (Serbia) can cause pollution, due to leaching by atmospheric and surface waters. In order to assess this leaching potential, dump ash samples were subjected to extraction with solutions of decreasing pH values (8.50, 7.00, 5.50, and 4.00), imitating the reactions of the alkaline ash particles with the possible alkaline, neutral, and acidic (e.g., acid rain) waters. The most recently deposited ash represents the greatest environmental threat, while 'aged' ash, because of permanent leaching on the dump, was shown to have already lost this pollution potential. On the basis of the determined leachability, it was possible to perform an estimation of the acidity of the regional rainfalls in the last decades.

Popovic, A.; Djordjevic, D. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Mercury retention by fly ashes from coal combustion: Influence of the unburned carbon content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of unburned carbon particles present in fly ashes produced by coal combustion on mercury retention. To achieve this objective, the work was divided into two parts. The aim of the first part of the study was to estimate the amount of mercury captured by the fly ashes during combustion in power stations and the relationship of this retention to the unburned carbon content. The second part was a laboratory-scale study aimed at evaluating the retention of mercury concentrations greater than those produced in power stations by fly ashes of different characteristics and by unburned carbon particles. From the results obtained it can be inferred that the unburned carbon content is not the only variable that controls mercury capture in fly ashes. The textural characteristics of these unburned particles and of other components of fly ashes also influence retention.

Lopez-Anton, M.A.; Diaz-Somoano, M.; Martinez-Tarazona, M.R. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Gypsum treated fly ash as a liner for waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash has potential application in the construction of base liners for waste containment facilities. While most of the fly ashes improve in the strength with curing, the ranges of permeabilities they attain may often not meet the basic requirement of a liner material. An attempt has been made in the present context to reduce the hydraulic conductivity by adding lime content up to 10% to two selected samples of class F fly ashes. The use of gypsum, which is known to accelerate the unconfined compressive strength by increasing the lime reactivity, has been investigated in further improving the hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic conductivities of the compacted specimens have been determined in the laboratory using the falling head method. It has been observed that the addition of gypsum reduces the hydraulic conductivity of the lime treated fly ashes. The reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the samples containing gypsum is significantly more for samples with high amounts of lime contents (as high as 1000 times) than those fly ashes with lower amounts of lime. However there is a relatively more increase in the strengths of the samples with the inclusion of gypsum to the fly ashes at lower lime contents. This is due to the fact that excess lime added to fly ash is not effectively converted into pozzolanic compounds. Even the presence of gypsum is observed not to activate these reactions with excess lime. On the other hand the higher amount of lime in the presence of sulphate is observed to produce more cementitious compounds which block the pores in the fly ash. The consequent reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of fly ash would be beneficial in reducing the leachability of trace elements present in the fly ash when used as a base liner.

Sivapullaiah, Puvvadi V., E-mail: siva@civil.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Baig, M. Arif Ali, E-mail: reach2arif@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

18 2010 Proceedings Symposium on Ash in North America GTR-NRS-P-72 GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF FRAXINUS SPP. FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

handles, and for fiber in the manufacture of fine papers. White ash is the primary commercial hardwood protocol for green ash. We are also investigating an adventitious shoot regeneration system using leaf18 2010 Proceedings Symposium on Ash in North America GTR-NRS-P-72 GENETIC TRANSFORMATION

367

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of fly ash as amendment to compost is presented. Plant growth/yields of corn collard greens, mustard greens, and sorgum is described. The treatment parameters such as fly ash to compost ratio, fly ash-amended compost to soil ratio, type of compost used for treatment etc. are discussed. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs. (CBS)

Menon, M.P.

1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

368

Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members. Special projects provide an opportunity for non-CARRC members to sponsor specific research or technology transfer consistent with CARRC goals. This report covers CARRC activities from January 2007 through March 2009. These activities have been reported in CARRC Annual Reports and in member meetings over the past 2 years. CARRC continues to work with industry and various government agencies with its research, development, demonstration, and promotional activities nearing completion at the time of submission of this report. CARRC expects to continue its service to the coal ash industry in 2009 and beyond to work toward the common goal of advancing coal ash utilization by solving CCP-related technical issues and promoting the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable management of these complex and changing materials.

Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

2009-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

370

Apparatus and method for direct measurement of coal ash sintering and fusion properties at elevated temperatures and pressures  

SciTech Connect

A high-pressure microdilatometer is provided for measuring the sintering and fusion properties of various coal ashes under the influence of elevated pressures and temperatures in various atmospheres. Electrical resistivity measurements across a sample of coal ash provide a measurement of the onset of the sintering and fusion of the ash particulates while the contraction of the sample during sintering is measured with a linear variable displacement transducer for detecting the initiation of sintering. These measurements of sintering in coal ash at different pressures provide a mechanism by which deleterious problems due to the sintering and fusion of ash in various combustion systems can be minimized or obviated.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Apparatus and method for direct measurement of coal ash sintering and fusion properties at elevated temperatures and pressures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-pressure microdilatometer is provided for measuring the sintering and fusion properties of various coal ashes under the influence of elevated pressures and temperatures in various atmospheres. Electrical resistivity measurements across a sample of coal ash provide a measurement of the onset of the sintering and fusion of the ash particulates while the contraction of the sample during sintering is measured with a linear variable displacement transducer for detecting the initiation of sintering. These measurements of sintering in coal ash at different pressures provide a mechanism by which deleterious problems due to the sintering and fusion of ash in various combustion systems can be minimized or obviated. 7 figs.

Khan, M.R.

1989-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas for further combustion in modified oil or gas fired furnaces or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion volume within the inner shell and a plenum between them through which combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, Albert H. (Huntington, NY)

1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

373

Reduction of carbon content in waste-tire combustion ashes by bio-thermal treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of bio-catalyst (NOE-7F) in thermal treatment can adequately dispose dark-black fly ashes from co-combustion of both waste tires and coal. After thermal treatment of fly ashes by adding 10% NOE-7F, the carbon contents reduced by 37.6% and the weight losses increased by 405%, compared with the fly ashes without mixing with NOE-7F. The combustion behaviors of wasted tires combustion fly ashes with NOE-7F were also investigated by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results verify that NOE-7F has positive effects on the combustion of residual carbon and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the energy release and reduce the toxicity during the process of thermal treatment. Furthermore, using NOE-7F to dispose high-carbon content fly ashes did improve the compressive strength of fly ashes and concrete mixtures. Therefore, NOE-7F is a promising additive which could decrease treatment cost of high-carbon content fly ashes and reduce the amount of survival toxic PAHs.

Chen, C.C.; Lee, W.J.; Shih, S.I.; Mou, J.L. [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (Taiwan). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

King Jet Tseng  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Electronic Engineering - Head, Division of Power Engineering & Dir., Centre for Smart Energy Systems Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Lawrence Berkeley...

375

Dr. George E. Kelly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... was project leader in charge of a team of engineers and technicians that developed testing and rating procedures for furnaces, boilers, central air ...

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

376

George Fenske resume  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fenske Fenske Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 212 Argonne, IL 60439-4837 phone: 630/252-5190, fax: 630/252-5568 e-mail: fenske@anl.gov Professional Experience  Present. Argonne National Laboratory o Coating Development  Developed program to develop hard coatings for tribological applications  Developed and applied state-of-the-art electron- and ion-beam micro-analytical techniques  Analyzed microstructural properties of thin coatings  Designed facilities to produce multilayered optical coatings o Surface Modification  Developed program to improve tribological properties of components by ion implantation processes  Designed facilities for research on advanced coating/implantation

377

George Ban-Weiss  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson. "Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an...

378

George B. Pegram Lectures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

regions of empty space) presents us with a profound challenge, at the interface between gravity and quantum mechanics. This "Dark Energy" problem is arguably the most pressing...

379

George DW Smith  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2012 ... Miller's first contact with Smith was during his interview process at ... in the development and commercialization of the techniques of atom probe...

380

Chee Yuen (George) Chan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

More Search Research & Development Batteries and Fuel Cells Li-Ion and Other Advanced Battery Technologies Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Honorable George Livingston  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to respond to any concerns you may have. If you have any questions, please feel free to call me at 301-427-1721 or Dr. W. Alexander Williams (301-427-1719) of my staff....

382

Dr. George Anitescu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the lab, he enjoys reducing his dependence on fossil fuels by green and ... on his own house to diminish its energy/fuel consumption (eg, designed ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

NREL Response to the Report 'Study of the Effects on Employment of Public Aid to Renewable Energy Sources' from King Juan Carlos University (Spain) (White Paper)  

SciTech Connect

Job generation has been a part of the national dialogue surrounding energy policy and renewable energy (RE) for many years. RE advocates tout the ability of renewable energy to support new job opportunities in rural America and the manufacturing sector. Others argue that spending on renewable energy is an inefficient allocation of resources and can result in job losses in the broader economy. The report, Study of the Effects on Employment of Public Aid to Renewable Energy Sources, from King Juan Carlos University in Spain, is one recent addition to this debate. This report asserts that, on average, every renewable energy job in Spain 'destroyed' 2.2 jobs in the broader Spanish economy. The authors also apply this ratio to the U.S. context to estimate expected job loss from renewable energy development and policy in the United States. This memo discusses fundamental and technical limitations of the analysis by King Juan Carlos University and notes critical assumptions implicit in the ultimate conclusions of their work. The memo also includes a review of traditional employment impact analyses that rely on accepted, peer-reviewed methodologies, and it highlights specific variables that can significantly influence the results of traditional employment impact analysis.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Development of New Industrial Ashalloy Material Using Fly Ash Cenospheres "Lead-Lite" Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One potential high-value utilization method for power plant fly ash is to mix it with an alloy to make a metal matrix composite. In the case of this project, the fly ash is mixed with lead to make a composite with low density and improved hardness. This new material can be used in the auto industry to make lighter battery components. This report describes the results of corrosion tests of several lead samples and lead-fly ash composite samples at room temperature for more than 1500 days. This long-term d...

1999-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3 to a temperature in the range 700.degree.-900.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acid-soluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

McDowell, William J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seeley, Forest G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Devolatilization and ash comminution of two different sewage sludges under fluidized bed combustion conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different wet sewage sludges have been characterized under fluidized bed combustion conditions with reference to their devolatilization behavior and ash comminution with the aid of different and complementary experimental protocols. Analysis of the devolatilization process allowed to determine the size of fuel particle able to achieve effective lateral spreading of the volatile matter across the cross-section of medium-scale combustors. Primary fragmentation and primary ash particle characterization pointed out the formation of a significant amount of relatively large fragments. The mechanical properties of these fragments have been characterized by means of elutriation/abrasion tests using both quartz and sludge ash beds. (author)

Solimene, R.; Urciuolo, M.; Cammarota, A.; Chirone, R. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione (IRC) - CNR, Napoli (Italy); Salatino, P. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione (IRC) - CNR, Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Damonte, G.; Donati, C.; Puglisi, G. [ECODECO Gruppo A2A, Giussago (PV) (Italy)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Apparatus having inductively coupled coaxial coils for measuring buildup of slay or ash in a furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The buildup of slag or ash on the interior surface of a furnace wall is monitored by disposing two coils to form a transformer which is secured adjacent to the inside surface of the furnace wall. The inductive coupling between the two coils of the transformer is affected by the presence of oxides of iron in the slag or ash which is adjacent to the transformer, and the application of a voltage to one winding produces a voltage at the other winding that is related to the thickness of the slag or ash buildup on the inside surface of the furnace wall. The output of the other winding is an electrical signal which can be used to control an alarm or the like or provide an indication of the thickness of the slag or ash buildup at a remote location.

Mathur, Mahendra P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ekmann, James M. (Bethel Park, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Diverse latest Pliocene volcanic and plutonic rocks in the north-central Caucasus Mountains of southern Russia are newly interpreted as components of a large caldera system that erupted a compositionally zoned rhyolite-dacite ash-flow sheet at 2.83 ± 0.02 Ma (sanidine and biotite 40Ar/39Ar). Despite its location within a cratonic collision zone, the Chegem system is structurally and petrologically similar to typical

389

Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hunt's Ash Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Hiko, Nevada Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

390

Treated bottom ash medium and method of arsenic removal from drinking water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

391

Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, October 1996--December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called {open_quotes}Loss On Ignition{close_quotes} (LOI). The concrete producer`s day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Diaz, A. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

STATE-OF-THE-ART: FLY ASH, SILICA FUME AND SLAG UTILIZATION IN USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Backfill. 1.0 Introduction At the present time, coal fired electric power plants in the USA produce, ease of handling, and moisture insensitivity, etc. [2,11]. 2.1.2 Backfills Fly ash is used

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

393

Smyrna's Ashes: Humanitarianism, Genocide, and the Birth of the Middle East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

burning of the city of Izmir, Smyrnas Ashes is an importantof Smyrna came a new city, Izmir, and a new Turkish nation.Gardens (Kensington), 165 Izmir, 1 Index / 249 Jerusalem, 67

Tusan, Michelle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

M-2: Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash with Ammonium Sulfate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The whole process of extracting alumina from coal fly ash ... Decrease of Heat Consumption at Nepheline Processing to Alumina and By- Products ... Flash -and CFB Calciners, History and Difficulties of Development of Two...

395

The potential for use of waste-to-energy facility ash: Executive summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This executive summary presents an overview of the investigations, findings, conclusions, and recommendations of the Long Island Regional Planning Board (LIRPB) study of the Potential for Beneficial Use of Waste-to-Energy Facility Ash. The full report consists of the following volumes: Executive Summary; Volume 1: Long Island Ash Management Status; Volume 2: Sampling and Testing Procedures; Volume 3: Environmental Properties; Volume 4: Engineering Properties; Volume 5: Environmental Assessment; Volume 6: Engineering and Economic Evaluation; and Volume 7: Legal and Institutional Issues. Volumes one through seven are briefly summarized in this executive summary with the exception of Volume 2 of the report, which serves as the documentation of the sampling conditions and testing methods used in measuring chemical and physical properties of the ash tested. The study investigated the feasibility of the use of incinerator ash as a substitute for natural aggregate in construction applications.

Koppelman, L.E.; Tanenbaum, E.G. [Long Island Regional Planning Board, Hauppauge, NY (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Recovery of Metal Oxides From Fly Ash, Volumes 1-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By processing fly ash to obtain metal oxides and other commercial products, utilities can realize both sales revenues and reduced disposal costs. A commercial-scale processing plant could be ready for demonstration by 1992.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Application of advanced technologies to ash-related problems in boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prediction of ash behavior in boilers has, for many years, been based on relatively simple relationships involving the composition of inorganic material in fuels. In recent years, advanced analyses for both fuels and deposits have seen increasing use in the solid fuel combustion community. The combination of the standard and advanced analyses, together with a knowledge of boiler design and operating conditions, allow better interpretation of ash behavior in boilers than has previously been possible. This paper discusses several case histories where advanced technologies have been applied to interpret ash behavior in boilers where standard techniques were insufficient. Included in the discussion are: (1) the behavior of blends of fuels; (2) explanations for markedly different behavior between fuels with similar ASTM characteristics; and (3) effects of boiler operating conditions on ash deposit formation.

Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility); Richards, G.; Harb, J. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

Scheitlin, Frank M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The use of oil shale ash in the production of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale ash obtained from combustion of local oil shale deposits was used in this study as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from waste vegetable oil (WVO). Two alcohols with high and low boiling points

A. Al-Otoom; M. Allawzi; A. Ajlouni; F. Abu-Alrub; M. Kandah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Utilizing fly ash particles to produce low-cost metal matrix composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are a blend of fine ceramic particles mixed with metals such as aluminium or magnesium. Fly ash is considerably cheaper than ceramics; aluminium-fly ash composites cost less than 60% of conventional aluminium-SiC composites making them attractive to automakers striving for lower weight and cheaper materials for brake rotors or brake drums. Ultalite.com has consulted with US researchers to to find the optimum requirements of the fly ash needed to make MMCs. Particle size 20-40 microns, low calcium oxide content and spherical particles were identified. The desired particles once extracted are stirred into molten aluminum and the resulting composite is into ingots for shipment to a casting facility. Dynamometer testing has shown that aluminium-fly ash composite brake drums have better performance and wear than cast iron drums. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Withers, G. [Ultalite.com, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Lubricant-derived ash : in-engine sources and opportunities for reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are an effective means for meeting increasingly stringent emissions regulations that limit particulate matter. Over time, ash primarily derived from metallic additives in the engine oil ...

Watson, Simon A. G. (Simon Andrew Glean)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions about and increased the international consensus toward improving volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The use of sulfer modified bottom ash (SMBA) as an aggregate in asphaltic mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of the 20 million tons of bottom ash and boiler slag generated annually in the United States less than 40 percent is used. The eastern half of Texas is served by 18 coal burning electric power generating plants which produce approximately 3.8 million tons of bottom ash each year. This is also the section of the state in which the sources of quality aggregates are either few. dwindling or nonexistent. While a small fraction of the bottom ash is utilized, the rest is delegated to landfills or on-site disposal areas. Increasing attention is being given to development of new, high-volume uses for this safe and readily available by-product. One such use is as an aggregate in road construction. The use of bottom ash as an aggregate for both roadway surfaces and base courses has been limited due to its absorbency and friability. The former tends to increase asphalt binder demand while the latter adversely affects its ability to withstand the crushing effects of traffic loads. On the other hand, bottom ash is lighter in weight and generally much cheaper than conventional quality aggregates such as limestone, sand and gavel. This research was designed to up-firade the load-bearing characteristics of bottom ash and maximize its use 'in asphaltic concrete roadway mixtures through the use of sulfur. The process essentially coats the ash with liquid sulfur which upon cooling fills the voids on the surface of the particles while increasing their crush resistance. The results of this investigation indicate that asphaltic concrete mix designs in which bottom ash represents from 5 0 to I 00 percent of the aggregate fraction can be achieved.

Chimakurthy, Harshavardhan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Mitigation of SCR-Ammonia Related Aqueous Effects in a Fly Ash Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated fly ash resulting from secondary injection of ammonia to mitigate SO3 produced by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system altered the water quality of a fly ash pond at a coal-fired power generation station. This project attempted to improve water quality by encouraging the growth of algae in the pond to remove ammonia, while keeping other important parameters (pH, total suspended solids, Biological Oxygen Demand, and metals) within allowable limits.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

Field Test of a Semi-Continuous Fly Ash Unburned Carbon Monitor: Cyclone Boiler Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unburned carbon (UBC) is the measure of the carbon level in the fly ash of a coal-fired boilerwith increased carbon indicating less-complete and less-efficient combustion. Boiler design is one important factor that affects UBC levels. Cyclone boilers burn coal at high combustion temperatures (ca. 1650C) and exhibit relatively high, but quite variable, fly ash UBC levels. Recently, because of competitive fuel pricing and reduced SO2 and NOX emissions, cyclone boilers ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

406

Program on Technology Innovation: Formation of Large Particle Ash in Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to obtain a better understanding of the process that underlies the formation of large particle ash (LPA) in coal-fired boilers. As an approach, sample sets of coal, fireside ash deposits, and LPA were collected from selected boilers identified by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray microanalysis techniques. The coals were characterized to determine the abundance, size, and composition of t...

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

407

Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes  

SciTech Connect

There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Laconia, New Hampshire bottom ash paving project: Volume 3, Physical Performance Testing Report  

SciTech Connect

Bottom ash is the principal waste stream from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system, and grate sifting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (@) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Evaluation of potential risks from ash disposal site leachate  

SciTech Connect

A risk-based approach is used to evaluate potential human health risks associated with a discharge from an ash disposal site into a small stream. The RIVRISK model was used to estimate downstream concentrations and corresponding risks. The modeling and risk analyses focus on boron, the constituent of greatest potential concern to public health at the site investigated, in Riddle Run, Pennsylvania. Prior to performing the risk assessment, the model is validated by comparing observed and predicted results. The comparison is good and an uncertainty analysis is provided to explain the comparison. The hazard quotient (HQ) for boron is predicted to be greater than 1 at presently regulated compliance points over a range of flow rates. The reference dose (RfD) currently recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) was used for the analyses. However, the toxicity of boron as expressed by the RfD is now under review by both the U.S. EPA and the World Health Organization. Alternative reference doses being examined would produce predicted boron hazard quotients of less than 1 at nearly all flow conditions.

Mills, W.B.; Loh, J.Y.; Bate, M.C.; Johnson, K.M. [Tetra Tech, Lafayette, CA (United States)] [Tetra Tech, Lafayette, CA (United States)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fibrous Fillers to Manufacture Ultra High Ash/Performance Paper  

SciTech Connect

The paper industry is one of the largest users of energy and emitters of CO2 in the US manufacturing industry. In addition to that, it is facing tremendous financial pressure due to lower cost imports. The fine paper industry has shrunk from 15 million tons per year production to 10 million tons per year in the last 5 years. This has resulted in mill closures and job loses. The AF&PA and the DOE formed a program called Agenda 2020 to help in funding to develop breakthrough technologies to provide help in meeting these challenges. The objectives of this project were to optimize and scale-up Fibrous Fillers technology, ready for commercial deployment and to develop ultra high ash/high performance paper using Fibrous Fillers. The goal was to reduce energy consumption, carbon footprint, and cost of manufacturing paper and related industries. GRI International (GRI) has been able to demonstrate the techno - economic feasibility and economic advantages of using its various products in both handsheets as well as in commercial paper mills. GRI has also been able to develop sophisticated models that demonstrate the effect of combinations of GRI's fillers at multiple filler levels. GRI has also been able to develop, optimize, and successfully scale-up new products for use in commercial paper mills.

Dr. VIjay K. Mathur

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

EA-1449: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1449: Finding of No Significant Impact Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash, King George County, Virgina The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment to analyze the potential environmental consequences of participating in a cooperative agreement with Universal Aggregates, LLC, for the design, construction, and operation of a plant to manufacture lightweight aggregates. Finding of No Significant Impact Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash More Documents & Publications EA-1449: Final Environmental Assessment Special Environmental Analysis For Actions Taken under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating

413

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: King Faisal University. Design analysis study. Volume 1. Design review report, data acquisition plan and experimental plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four preliminary passive solar dwelling design concepts were developed based upon previously established climatic design criteria and an identification of applicable passive cooling strategies was made. These were quantitatively compared for their thermal performance based upon a computer program. The selected concept was optimized and preliminary construction drawings and details were submitted for review by SOLERAS. This report deals with the further refinement and development of the design concept and improvements of the performance of the selected passive elements. The final design has been detailed for actual construction and monitoring at the King Faisal University Dammam Campus. In addition this report addresses the comparative evaluation of the previous design concepts utilizing more rigorous computer simulation methods.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Trophic structure and metal bioaccumulation differences in multiple fish species exposed to coal ash-associated metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008 a dike containing coal fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant near Kingston Tennessee USA failed and resulted in the largest coal ash spill in U.S. history. Coal ash, the by-product of coal combustion, is known to contain multiple contaminants of concern, including arsenic and selenium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioaccumulation of arsenic and selenium and to identify possible differences in trophic dynamics in feral fish at various sites in the vicinity of the Kingston coal ash spill. Elevated levels of arsenic and selenium were observed in various tissues of largemouth bass, white crappie, bluegill and redear sunfish from sites associated with the Kingston coal ash spill. Highest concentrations of selenium were found in redear sunfish with liver concentrations as high as 24.83 mg/kg dry weight and ovary concentrations up to 10.40 mg/kg dry weight at coal ash-associated sites. To help explain the elevated selenium levels observed in redear sunfish, investigations into the gut pH and trophic dynamics of redear sunfish and bluegill were conducted which demonstrated a large difference in the gut physiology between these two species. Redear sunfish stomach and intestinal pH was found to be 1.1 and 0.16 pH units higher than in bluegill, respectively. In addition, fish from coal ash-associated sites showed enrichment of 15N & 13C compared to no ash sites, indicating differences in food web dynamics between sites. These results imply the incorporation of coal ash-associated compounds into local food webs and/or a shift in diet at ash sites compared to the no ash reference sites. Based on these results, further investigation into a broader food web at ash-associated sites is warranted.

Otter, Ryan [Middle Tennessee State University; Bailey, Frank [Middle Tennessee State University; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Risk ranking of bioaccessible metals from fly ash dissolved in simulated lung and gut fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant fly ash from two fuels, coal and a mixture of coal and shredded tires were evaluated for trace metal solubility in simulated human lung and gut fluids (SLF and SGF, respectively) to estimate bioaccessibility. The proportion of bioaccessible to total metal ranged from zero (V) to 80% (Zn) for coal-derived ash in SLF and from 2 (Th) to 100% (Cu) for tire-derived fly ash in SGF. The tire-derived ash contained much more Zn. However, Zn ranked only 5th of the various toxic metals in SGF compared with international regulations for ingestion. On the basis of total concentrations, the metals closest to exceeding limits based on international regulations for inhalation were Cr, Pb, and Al. On dissolution in SLF, the most limiting metals were Pb, Cu, and Zn. For metals exposed to SGF there was no relative change in the top metal, Al, before and after dissolution but the second-ranked metal shifted from Pb to Ni. In most cases only a proportion of the total metal concentrations in either fly ash was soluble, and hence bioaccessible, in either biofluid. When considering the regulatory limits for inhalation of particulates, none of the metal concentrations measured were as hazardous as the fly ash particulates themselves. However, on the basis of the international ingestion regulations for Al, the maximum mass of fly ash that could be ingested is only 1 mg per day (10 mg based on bioaccessibility). It is possible that such a small mass could be consumed by exposed individuals or groups. 39 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

John Twining; Peter McGlinn; Elaine Loi; Kath Smith; Reto Giere [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

TREATMENT OF CYANIDE SOLUTIONS AND SLURRIES USING AIR-SPARGED HYDROCYCLONE (ASH) TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-year Department of Energy (DOE) project ''Treatment of Cyanide Solutions and Slurries Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Technology'' (ASH/CN) has been completed. This project was also sponsored by industrial partners, ZPM Inc., Elbow Creek Engineering, Solvay Minerals, EIMCO-Baker Process, Newmont Mining Corporation, Cherokee Chemical Co., Placer Dome Inc., Earthworks Technology, Dawson Laboratories and Kennecott Minerals. Development of a new technology using the air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) as a reactor for either cyanide recovery or destruction was the research objective. It was expected that the ASH could potentially replace the conventional stripping tower presently used for HCN stripping and absorption with reduced power costs. The project was carried out in two phases. The first phase included calculation of basic processing parameters for ASH technology, development of the flowsheet, and design/adaptation of the ASH mobile system for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) recovery from cyanide solutions. This was necessary because the ASH was previously used for volatile organics removal from contaminated water. The design and modification of the ASH were performed with the help from ZPM Inc. personnel. Among the modifications, the system was adapted for operation under negative pressure to assure safe operating conditions. The research staff was trained in the safe use of cyanide and in hazardous material regulations. Cyanide chemistry was reviewed resulting in identification of proper chemical dosages for cyanide destruction, after completion of each pilot plant run. The second phase of the research consisted of three field tests that were performed at the Newmont Mining Corporation gold cyanidation plant near Midas, Nevada. The first field test was run between July 26 and August 2, 2002, and the objective was to demonstrate continuous operation of the modified ASH mobile system. ASH units were applied for both stripping and absorption, to recover cyanide, using the acidification-volatilization-reabsorption chemistry. Plant barren cyanide solution was used during the field tests. The original ASH system used for the field tests had been designed and fabricated by ZPM Inc. to remove volatile organic compounds from ground water. The system, even with a number of modifications, could not operate at optimum conditions for cyanide recovery. Reactors and pumps installed in the mobile system only allowed for the treatment of clear solutions, not slurries. Also the original mobile system was limited with respect to Q, the relative air flow rate, and the extent of recovery in a single stage. Due to the lack of automatic controls, the system required constant supervision of the University of Utah (U/U) team. In spite of these difficulties, application of the ASH mobile system was particularly attractive due to compactness of the apparatus and less than 1 second residence time of the aqueous phase in the cyclones. The performance of the ASH system was evaluated by comparison with theoretical predictions.

Jan D. Miller; Terrence Chatwin; Jan Hupka; Doug Halbe; Tao Jiang; Bartosz Dabrowski; Lukasz Hupka

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

SciTech Connect

In December 2008, an ash dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured, releasing over one billion gallons of coal fly ash into the Emory and Clinch Rivers. Coal fly ash may contain several contaminants of concern, but of these selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) have been highlighted because of their toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic food chains. To assess the potential impact of the spilled fly ash on humans and the environment, a comprehensive biological and environmental monitoring program was established, for which resident aquatic organisms (among other sample media) are collected to determine contaminant exposure and evaluate the risk to humans and wildlife. Studies on bioaccumulation and fish health are major components of the TVA Biological Monitoring Program for the Kingston fly ash project. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure (to metals) and effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information regarding other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash, not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report summarizes the bioaccumulation results from the first two years of study after the fly ash spill, including four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation, selenium and arsenic were the only two metals consistently elevated above background levels in fish. E

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Fly ash properties and mercury sorbent affect mercury release from curing concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of mercury from concrete containing fly ashes from various generator boilers and powdered activated carbon sorbent used to capture mercury was measured in laboratory experiments. Release of gaseous mercury from these concretes was less than 0.31% of the total quantity of mercury present. The observed gaseous emissions of mercury during the curing process demonstrated a dependency on the organic carbon content of the fly ash, with mercury release decreasing with increasing carbon content. Further, lower gaseous emissions of mercury were observed for concretes incorporating ash containing activated carbon sorbent than would be expected based on the observed association with organic carbon, suggesting that the powdered activated carbon more tightly binds the mercury as compared to unburned carbon in the ash. Following the initial 28-day curing interval, mercury release diminished with time. In separate leaching experiments, average mercury concentrations leached from fly ash concretes were less than 4.1 ng/L after 18 h and 7 days, demonstrating that less than 0.02% of the mercury was released during leaching. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; William E. Wolfe [State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash, a relatively abundant and inexpensive material, is currently being investigated as an adsorbent for the removal of various organic pollutants from wastewater. The wastewater contains various types of phenolic compounds, such as chloro, nitro, amino, and other substituted compounds. Various types of pesticides, such as lindane, malathion, carbofuran, etc., and dyes, such as, methylene blue, crystal violet, malachite green, etc., are also present in the wastewater. These contaminants pollute the water stream. These organic pollutants, such as phenolic compounds, pesticides, and dyes, etc., can be removed very effectively using fly ash as adsorbent. This article presents a detailed review on the role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater. Adsorption of various pollutants using fly ash has been reviewed. The adsorption mechanism and other influencing factors, favorable conditions, and competitive ions, etc., on the adsorption process have also been discussed in this paper. It is evident from the review that fly ash has demonstrated good removal capabilities for various organic compounds. 171 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Ahmaruzzaman [National Institute of Technology, Silchar (India). Department of Chemistry

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Tensile strength of ash cake beds at high-temperature conditions  

SciTech Connect

The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is working with Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and a consortium of companies in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform the research necessary to determine the factors that cause hot-gas cleanup filters to be blinded by ash or to develop deposits that can bridge the filters and cause them to fail. The primary deliverable will be a graphics-driven computer model that can be used as an engineering tool to help predict ash-related hot-gas filter problems based on analyses of coal and sorbent, as well as system operating parameters. This paper presents preliminary testing data on determining the tensile strengths of coal ash particles at elevated temperatures and simulated combustor gas conditions. The range in temperatures for tensile testing is ambient to 900 C. The simulated gas atmosphere includes carbon dioxide, water vapor, oxygen, sulfur dioxide, sodium chloride, hydrochloric acid, and nitrogen. At present, all testing has been performed using ash from the Westinghouse advanced particle filter (APF) at the American Electric Power Service Corporation (AEP) Tidd pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) demonstration plant in Ohio. Other sources of filter ashes, including several from non-American PFBC systems, will also be evaluated.

Dockter, B.A.; Hurley, J.P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Use of Brazilian sugarcane bagasse ash in concrete as sand replacement  

SciTech Connect

Sugarcane today plays a major role in the worldwide economy, and Brazil is the leading producer of sugar and alcohol, which are important international commodities. The production process generates bagasse as a waste, which is used as fuel to stoke boilers that produce steam for electricity cogeneration. The final product of this burning is residual sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA), which is normally used as fertilizer in sugarcane plantations. Ash stands out among agroindustrial wastes because it results from energy generating processes. Many types of ash do not have hydraulic or pozzolanic reactivity, but can be used in civil construction as inert materials. The present study used ash collected from four sugar mills in the region of Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil, which is one of the world's largest producers of sugarcane. The ash samples were subjected to chemical characterization, sieve analysis, determination of specific gravity, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and solubilization and leaching tests. Mortars and concretes with SBA as sand replacement were produced and tests were carried out: compressive strength, tensile strength and elastic modulus. The results indicated that the SBA samples presented physical properties similar to those of natural sand. Several heavy metals were found in the SBA samples, indicating the need to restrict its use as a fertilizer. The mortars produced with SBA in place of sand showed better mechanical results than the reference samples. SBA can be used as a partial substitute of sand in concretes made with cement slag-modified Portland cement.

Sales, Almir, E-mail: almir@ufscar.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Lima, Sofia Araujo, E-mail: sofiaalima@yahoo.com.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Leaching and toxicity behavior of coal-biomass waste cocombustion ashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land disposal of ash residues, obtained from the cocombustion of Greek lignite with biomass wastes, is known to create problems due to the harmful constituents present. In this regard, the leachability of trace elements from lignite, biomass, and blends cocombustion ashes was investigated by using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). In this work, the toxicity of the aqueous leachates and the concentrations of the metals obtained from the leaching procedure were measured using the Microtox test (Vibrio fischen) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), respectively. The toxic effects of most leachates on Vibrio fischeri were found to be significantly low in both 45% and 82% screening test protocols. However, the liquid sample originating from olive kernels fly ash (FA4) caused the highest toxic effect in both protocols, which can be attributed to its relatively high concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn.

Skodras, G.; Prokopidou, M.; Sakellaropoulos, G.P. [Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Mechanical Properties and Durability of Concrete Made with High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cement Produced in a Cement Plant: Commercial -Scale Trial Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report documents the preliminary results of the commercial-scale production of a high-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement, using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

Crystal structure of the N-terminal region of human Ash2L shows a winged-helix motif involved in DNA binding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ash2L is a core component of the MLL family histone methyltransferases and has an important role in regulating the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Ash2L and reveal a new function of Ash2L. The structure shows that Ash2L contains an atypical PHD finger that does not have histone tail-binding activity. Unexpectedly, the structure shows a previously unrecognized winged-helix motif that directly binds to DNA. The DNA-binding-deficient mutants of Ash2L reduced Ash2L localization to the HOX locus. Strikingly, a single mutation in Ash2L{sub WH} (K131A) breaks the chromatin domain boundary, suggesting that Ash2L also has a role in chromosome demarcation.

Chen, Yong; Wan, Bingbing; Wang, Kevin C.; Cao, Fang; Yang, Yuting; Protacio, Angeline; Dou, Yali; Chang, Howard Y.; Lei, Ming (Michigan-Med); (HHMI)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

425

Virtual Globe visualization of ash-aviation encounters, with the special case of the 1989 Redoubt-KLM incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of natural hazards on the local environment causes major issues for those agencies responsible for warning and understanding of the risks. Analysis of past events can assist and improve future warning capabilities. Here, volcanic ash-aviation ... Keywords: Dispersion modeling and Virtual Globes, Puff, Volcanic ash

P. W. Webley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The role of ammonia on mercury leaching from coal fly ash Jianmin Wang a,*, Tian Wang a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of fly ash disposal in mined areas. In: Proceedings of the 12th International Symposium on CoalThe role of ammonia on mercury leaching from coal fly ash Jianmin Wang a,*, Tian Wang a , Harmanjit, 2005). CAIR permanently caps emissions of NOx and SOx from large stationary sources including coal

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

427

Direct seeding of ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.): The effects of sowing date,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct seeding of ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.): The effects September 2006 Abstract Direct seeding is an alternative method to conventional planting for woodland-emergent herbicides, and cultivation and protection on the emergence and survival of direct-sown ash (Fraxinus

428

Proceedings, World Of Coal Ash, April 11-15, 2005, Lexington, KY, USA Pultrusion of Fabric Reinforced High Flyash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings, World Of Coal Ash, April 11-15, 2005, Lexington, KY, USA Pultrusion of Fabric Reinforced High Flyash Blended Cement Composites Barzin Mobasher(1) , Alva Peled (2) , and Jitendra of elasticity. #12;Proceedings, World Of Coal Ash, April 11-15, 2005, Lexington, KY, USA In addition to ease

Mobasher, Barzin

429

Volcanic Ash Transport from Mount Asama to the Tokyo Metropolitan Area Influenced by Large-Scale Local Wind Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eruption of the Mount Asama volcano on 16 September 2004 produced an ash cloud and led to ashfall in the Tokyo metropolitan area that lies on the Kanto Plain. Satellite images showed the ash cloud drifting toward the south in the morning but ...

Nobumitsu Tsunematsu; Tomohiro Nagai; Toshiyuki Murayama; Ahoro Adachi; Yasuhiro Murayama

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

(A small-scale study of Rocky Flats uncalcined incinerator ash dissolution and filtrate anion exchange)  

SciTech Connect

Small scale experimentation was conducted with incinerator ash in the nitric/hydrofluoric acid cascade dissolver and the anion exchange systems at Rocky Flats and Los Alamos National Laboratories for the purpose of determining the following: to determine the relationship between calcium fluoride dissolution feed levels and plutonium dissolution yields. To determine the relationship between calcium fluoride feed levels to dissolution, and the performance of anion exchange when processing dissolution filtrate. To determine the effect of carbonaceous materials on the dissolution and anion exchange when recovering plutonium from incinerator ash.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Effects of Trona Use in Flue Gas on Fly Ash Pond Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, researchers analyzed the effect of the use of trona on the dynamics of a fly ash pond (FAP) at a plant in Ohio, using both field and laboratory measurements. They compared the chemical concentrations and biological dynamics in the FAP from four years before the onset of trona use with those from two years after trona use was implemented. They compared the chemical composition of fly ash from two generating units with trona injection systems with that from a generating unit without trona. T...

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

432

Leaching Assessment of Fly Ash, Flue Gas Desulfurization Filter Cake, and Fixated Scrubber Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The by-products of coal combustion (for example, fly ash and flue gas desulfurization filter cake) are an important environmental concern due to potential leaching of trace constituents and the large volume of residues produced. About 40% of these by-products may be utilized as raw materials outside of the energy sector; the remaining 60% of the coal combustion products (CCPs) are disposed of as waste. At Plant 14090, the subject of this report, fly ash and scrubber sludge are blended with quicklime ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

433

Radiolytic gas generation in concrete made with incinerator ash containing transuranium nuclides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of various factors on H/sub 2/ generation by alpha radiolysis of concrete containing TRU incinerator ash were studied. Methods for reducing H/sub 2/ generation were investigated. Samples of Portland and high-alumina cement containing up to 30% calcined ash (dry basis) were doped with /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. Gas pressures were measured as a function of radiation dose; gas compositions were determined. Gas yields were calculated in terms of G values (molecules produced per 100 eV of alpha energy absorbed). These yields were used to estimate pressures in containers of radioactive concrete waste during storage. 4 figures.

Bibler, N.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Entrained-flow dry-bottom gasification of high-ash coals in coal-water slurries  

SciTech Connect

It was shown that the effective use of dry ash removal during entrained-flow gasification of coal-water slurries consists in simplification of the ash storage system and utilization of coal ash, a decrease in the coal demand, a reduction in the atmospheric emissions of noxious substances and particulate matter, and abandonment of the discharge of water used for ash slurry. According to the results of gasification of coal-water slurries (5-10 {mu}m) in a pilot oxygen-blow unit at a carbon conversion of >91%, synthesis gas containing 28.5% CO, 32.5% H{sub 2}, 8.2% CO{sub 2}, 1.5% CH{sub 4}, the rest being nitrogen, was obtained. The fly ash in its chemical composition, particle size, and density meets the requirements of the European standard EN 450 as a cement additive for concrete manufacture.

E.G. Gorlov; V.G. Andrienko; K.B. Nefedov; S.V. Lutsenko; B.K. Nefedov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Prevention of trace and major element leaching from coal combustion products by hydrothermally-treated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most important structural components of coal ash obtained by coal combustion in 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant located near Belgrade (Serbia) are amorphous alumosilicate, alpha-quartz, and mullite. The phase composition of coal ash can be altered to obtain zeolite type NaA that crystallizes in a narrow crystallization field (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Na{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2}; H{sub 2}O/Na{sub 2}O ratios). Basic properties (crystallization degree, chemical composition, the energy of activation) of obtained zeolites were established. Coal ash extracts treated with obtained ion-exchange material showed that zeolites obtained from coal ash were able to reduce the amounts of iron, chromium, nickel, zinc, copper, lead, and manganese in ash extracts, thus proving its potential in preventing pollution from dump effluent waters.

Adnadjevic, B.; Popovic, A.; Mikasinovic, B. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 106 SnoKing Tap to Monroe-Samamish Line 9/30/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 30, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 106 SnoKing Tap to Monroe-Samamish Line Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the SnoKing Tap to the Monroe-Samamish transmission line from structure 8/1 through structure 20/6. Right of way width is 150 feet. Location: The project area is located within Snohomish County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 12 miles of access roads

439

Characteristics of ashes from different locations at the MSW incinerator equipped with various air pollution control devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of ashes from different locations at a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) equipped with a water spray tower (WST) as a cooling system, and a spray dryer adsorber (SDA), a bag filter (BF) and a selective catalytic reactor (SCR) as air pollution control devices (APCD) was investigated to provide the basic data for further treatment of ashes. A commercial MSWI with a capacity of 100 tons per day was selected. Ash was sampled from different locations during the normal operation of the MSWI and was analyzed to obtain chemical composition, basicity, metal contents and leaching behavior of heavy metals. Basicity and pH of ash showed a broad range between 0.08-9.07 and 3.5-12.3, respectively. Some major inorganics in ash were identified and could affect the basicity. This could be one of the factors to determine further treatment means. Partitioning of hazardous heavy metals such as Pb, Cu, Cr, Hg and Cd was investigated. Large portions of Hg and Cd were emitted from the furnace while over 90% of Pb, Cu and Cr remained in bottom ash. However 54% of Hg was captured by WST and 41% by SDA/BF and 3.6% was emitted through the stack, while 81.5% of Cd was captured by SDA/BF. From the analysis data of various metal contents in ash and leach analysis, such capturing of metal was confirmed and some heavy metals found to be easily released from ash. Based on the overall characteristics of ash in different locations at the MSWI during the investigation, some considerations and suggestions for determining the appropriate treatment methods of ash were made as conclusions.

Song, Geum-Ju; Kim, Ki-Heon; Seo, Yong-Chil; Kim, Sam-Cwan

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil. Technical terminal report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

Menon, M.P.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

Menon, M.P.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Part of something larger than ourselves: George H.W. Bush and the rhetoric of the first U.S. war in the Persian Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, George H.W. Bush achieved the rhetorical success that had escaped his prior speaking endeavors. If the aforementioned assessments regarded Bushs Gulf War rhetoric as a rhetorical triumph, in light of prior damning criticism of his rhetorical abilities, then an explanation for that triumph is in order. Bushs rhetoric differed from his Presidential predecessors by virtue of two factors. First, as the first U.S. president of the Post-Cold War era, Bushs rhetoric faced different rhetorical constraints than those faced by his predecessors, as he no longer had the narrative framework of the Cold War to explain U.S. foreign policy action. Second, Bush rhetorically juxtaposed American exceptionalism and realism within his rhetoric itself. This differed from the rhetoric of his immediate predecessor, Ronald Reagan, whose rhetoric employed American exceptionalism without reference to realism, although that rhetoric was strategically geared toward achieving realist foreign policy ends. Bushs success was also considerable in that he faced significant rhetorical constraints created or exacerbated by Reagan. Reagans reputation as the Great Communicator, contrasted with Bushs less-than-stellar reputation as an orator, makes Bushs rhetorical success particularly worth understanding. President George H.W. Bush relied on three particular arguments to facilitate a U.S. military victory during the 1991 Persian Gulf War. These arguments differed considerably from foreign policy arguments offered by the Reagan administration with respect to the manner in which they addressed issues concerning the United Nations and the Vietnam War. First, Bush promoted U.N. diplomacy as a subsidiary of U.S. foreign policy. For Bush, the U.N. served as a venue where world opinion could be galvanized and action serving United States interests would not be constrained so much as legitimized. Second, he compared and contrasted U.S. action in the Gulf to the Vietnam War. In doing so, he combined the moral urgency of prior foreign policy efforts with the hindsight necessary to avoid a repeat of the American experience in Vietnam. Third, in retrospectively assessing the Gulf War, Bush depicted the conflict as a discrete foreign policy event in which he narrowly defined victory. Bush defined victory as the removal of Iraqi forces from Kuwait, in an attempt to shape a historical consensus on the significance of U.S. action.

Rangel, Nicolas , Jr.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

TRACE METAL CONTENT OF COAL AND ASH AS DETERMINED USING SCANNINGELECTRON MICROSCOPYWITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRACE METAL CONTENT OF COAL AND ASH AS DETERMINED USING SCANNINGELECTRON MICROSCOPYWITE WAVELENGTH Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Keywords: scanning electron microscopy, trace metals, coal analysis ABSTRACT Scanningelectron microscopy with wavelength-dispersive spectrometry has been used to measure trace metals in coal

Laughlin, Robert B.

444

Low-Cost Ash-Derived Construction Materials: State-of-the-Art Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing technologies have been successfully applied in the manufacturing of construction materials that incorporate coal combustion byproducts. This report describes an extensive literature review on coal ash use in low-cost building materials, including information on technical and economic feasibility.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

New Air-Entraining Admixtures for Concrete Using High-Carbon Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A promising new air-entraining admixture has been developed by the leading North American admixture producer. Independent, EPRI-sponsored testing indicated the admixture was suitable for use with concretes that contain fly ashes with levels of unburned carbon higher than the typical 3-4 percent allowed in the concrete industry.

2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

446

Investigation on the Parameters Affecting the De-Icing Salt Scaling Resistance of Fly Ash Concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In scaling of concrete by de-icing salts, the mortar near the surface flakes or peels away. This report presents the results of an R&D laboratory study to examine the scaling of high ash content concrete from the use of salts used routinely in cold climates to melt ice and snow on roads and sidewalks.

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

447

BENEFICIAL USE OF ASH AND CHAR FROM BIOMASS GASIFICATION Naomi Klinghoffer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 BENEFICIAL USE OF ASH AND CHAR FROM BIOMASS GASIFICATION Naomi Klinghoffer Columbia University in the future. A common way to recover energy from biomass is through gasification where synthesis gas gasification conditions. Specifically, it is desired to produce a porous char which could be used as a catalyst

Columbia University

448

Fly ash-amended compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homemade organic compost prepared from lawn grass clippings was amended with fine fly ash collected from a coal-fired power plant (SRS 484.D. Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC) to investigate its usefulness as a manure in enhancing nutrient uptake and increasing dry matter yield in selected agricultural crops. Three treatments were compared: five crops (mustard, collard, string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant) were each grown on three kinds of soil: soil alone, soil amended with composted grass clippings, and soil amended with the mixed compost of grass clippings and 20% fly ash. The fly ash-amended compost was found to be effective in enhancing the dry matter yield of collard greens and mustard greens by 378% and 348%, respectively, but string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant did not show any significant increase in dry matter yield. Analysis of the above-ground biomass of these last three plants showed they assimilated high levels of boron, which is phytotoxic; and this may be the reason for their poor growth. Soils treated with fly ash-amended compost often gave higher concentrations than the control for K, Ca, Mg, S, Zn, and B in the Brassica crops. 18 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Menon, M.P.; Sajwan, K.S.; Ghuman, G.S.; James, J.; Chandra, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Effect of coal fly ash-amended organic compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired electric power plants generate large quantities of fly ash as a byproduct. In continuation of previous studies on the utilization of fly ash as an amendment to organic compost for use as a manure for agricultural crops, the authors have now determined the effects of this manure on the yield and uptake of selected elements by several plants including collard green, corn, mustard green, bell pepper, egg plant, and climbing beans. An amended compost containing 30-40% fly ash with a compost:soil ratio of 1:3 was found to be most effective to enhance the yield and nutrient uptake of most of the plants. At 20% fly ash level, no increase in yield of any of the above crops was observed. The uptake of K, Mg, Mn, and P was increased in most plants. Boron which is known to be detrimental to the growth of plants above certain level was also found to be increased in plants nourished with the manure.

Ghuman, G.S.; Menon, M.P.; James, J.; Chandra, K.; Sajwan, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Mercury Control Research: Effects of Fly Ash and Flue Gas Parameters on Mercury Speciation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fly ash parameters on the oxidation of HgOin simulated flue gases containing hydrogen chloride (Hel-combustion region are unknown, and the major reaction pathways for Hg oxidation in combustion flue gases remain in the oxidation ofHgo in flue gases containingHC!. Thus, an important parameter that influences the oxidation of

Columbia University

451

The Road to Reuse: York County's Ash Management Program David E. Vollero  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery Center (York County RRC) commenced operations in 1989 and has since processed all County RRC is complemented by other components of York County's integrated solid waste management system-combustible wastes and York County RRC ash residue, and public education programs emphasizing waste minimization

Columbia University

452

9th Annual North American Waste to Energy Conference Ash Recycling: Partnering for Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Townships as the host municipalities, PennDOT as a potential major end-user, MYRES as the RRC opaator the RRC's ash. After exhaustive research, YCSWA selected AAR's technology and commWlicated those benefits Center (RRC) in Manchester Township, Pennsylvania; and owns and operates the Yard Waste Compot Site

Columbia University

453

Interpretation of Accurate UV Polarization Lidar Measurements: Application to Volcanic Ash Number Concentration Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, accurate UV polarization measurements are performed on a volcanic ash cloud after long-range transport at Lyon, France (45.76N, 4.83E). The volcanic particles are released from the mid-April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajkull ...

A. Miffre; G. David; B. Thomas; M. Abou Chacra; P. Rairoux

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Long-Term Leaching Tests With High Ash Fusion Maryland Coal Slag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction-procedure toxicity tests showed that the solid residue materials resulting from the Texaco coal gasification process using fluxed high ash fusion Maryland coal were nonhazardous. Contaminant concentration in the leachate was below or only slightly above the primary maximum contaminant limits (PMCL) established for public drinking water supplies.

1991-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

455

How carbon-based sorbents will impact fly ash utilization and disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The injection of activated carbon flue gas to control mercury emissions will result in a fly ash and activated carbon mixture. The potential impact of this on coal combustion product disposal and utilization is discussed. The full paper (and references) are available at www.acaa-usa.org. 1 tab., 2 photos.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Hassett, D.J.; Buckley, T.D.; Heebink, L.V.; Pavlish, J.H. [Energy and Environmental Research Center (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Surface tension measurements of coal ash slags under reducing conditions at atmospheric pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global demand for reduced CO{sub 2} emission from power plants can be answered by coal gasification techniques. To develop integrated gasification combined cycles that incorporate hot syngas cleaning facilities, detailed knowledge of the thermophysical properties of coal ashes is imperative. Currently, the surface tension of liquid coal ash slags in a reducing environment was studied by means of the sessile drop method. Three different algorithms were employed to analyze the acquired drop images. The slags under consideration were obtained from black and brown coals as well as from an experimental gasification reactor. Typically, a sharp surface tension decrease with temperature was found in the melting interval of the ashes. This was followed by a temperature range of smooth drop contours during which a slight rise of the surface tension could mostly be observed. Bubbles at the circumference of the drops started to appear when approaching the measurement temperature limit of 1550{sup o}C. With regard to the temperature regime of uncorrugated drop profiles, coal ash slags exhibited surface tension values between 400 and 700 mN/m. 32 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Tobias Melchior; Gunther Putz; Michael Mueller [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany). Institute of Energy Research

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Comments on ``Failures in detecting volcanic ash from a satellite-based technique''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of active vol- canism (pp. 45­64). Washington, DC: American Geophysical Union. Davies, M. A., & Rose, W. I inter- national symposium on volcanic ash and aviation safety, Seattle, WA. Washington, DC: US GPO. US, causing severe restrictions to air traffic for many hours. This cloud was tracked without any split-window

Bluth, Gregg

458

Factors Influencing Volcanic Ash Dispersal from the 1995 and 1996 Eruptions of Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prediction of the dispersal of volcanic ash from events such as the Ruapehu eruptions of 1995 and 1996 is important, not only for civil-defense authorities who need to warn people in downwind areas, but for airline companies that have to ...

Richard Turner; Tony Hurst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Evaluation of leaching and ecotoxicological properties of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this work were the evaluation of sewage sludge stabilization by mixing with fly ash, the examination of the physicochemical properties of the produced materials and their leachates and the assessment of their environmental impact by the evaluation of the ecotoxic characteristics. Different ratios of fly ash and sewage sludge (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:6, and 1:9) were mixed for 48 and 72 h. After mixing, the liquid phase of the produced materials was analyzed for total coliforms and Escherichia coli, while the solid residue was dried and tested for the leaching characteristics by the application of TCLP and EN 12457-2 standard leaching methods. Furthermore, the produced leachates were analyzed for their content of specific metals, while their ecotoxicological characteristics were determined by the use of toxicity bioassays, using the marine photobacterium Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia magna. The phytotoxicity of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures was also determined by utilizing seeds of three higher plants (one monocotyl and two dicotyls). The mixtures exhibited low metal leaching in all cases, while the ecotoxic properties increased with the increase of fly ash/sewage sludge ratio. The phytotoxicity testing showed increased root length growth inhibition.

C.A. Papadimitriou; I. Haritou; P. Samaras; A.I. Zouboulis [Technological Educational Institute of West Macedonia, Kozani (Greece)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Paper No. P-30 A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF ASH RESIDUE CHARACTERISTICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment of ash to reduce the solubility of lead and cadmium was explored: this research led and the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) , which also has not been found to simulate of data from weekly composite tests, These unsatisfactory results led to comprehensive research

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash king george" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Vitrification of simulated radioactive Rocky Flats plutonium containing ash residue with a Stir Melter System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demonstration trial has been completed in which a simulated Rocky Flats ash consisting of an industrial fly-ash material doped with cerium oxide was vitrified in an alloy tank Stir-Melter{trademark} System. The cerium oxide served as a substitute for plutonium oxide present in the actual Rocky Flats residue stream. The glass developed falls within the SiO{sub 2} + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{Sigma}Alkali/B{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The glass batch contained approximately 40 wt% of ash, the ash was modified to contain {approximately} 5 wt% CeO{sub 2} to simulate plutonium chemistry in the glass. The ash simulant was mixed with water and fed to the Stir-Melter as a slurry with a 60 wt% water to 40 wt% solids ratio. Glass melting temperature was maintained at approximately 1,050 C during the melting trials. Melting rates as functions of impeller speed and slurry feed rate were determined. An optimal melting rate was established through a series of evolutionary variations of the control variables` settings. The optimal melting rate condition was used for a continuous six hour steady state run of the vitrification system. Glass mass flow rates of the melter were measured and correlated with the slurry feed mass flow. Melter off-gas was sampled for particulate and volatile species over a period of four hours during the steady state run. Glass composition and durability studies were run on samples collected during the steady state run.

Marra, J.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Kormanyos, K.R.; Overcamp, T.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Exposing the Nuclear Burning Ashes of Radius Expansion Type I X-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve for the evolution of the vertical extent of the convective region of a neutron star atmosphere during a Type I X-ray burst. The convective region is well-mixed with ashes of nuclear burning and its extent determines the rise time of the burst light curve. Using a full nuclear reaction network, we show that the maximum vertical extent of the convective region during photospheric radius expansion (RE) bursts can be sufficiently great that: (1) some ashes of burning are ejected by the radiation driven wind during the RE phase and, (2) some ashes of burning are exposed at the neutron star surface following the RE phase. We find that ashes with mass number A ~ 30 - 60 are mixed in with the ejected material. We calculate the expected column density of ejected and surface ashes in hydrogen-like states and determine the equivalent widths of the resulting photoionization edges from both the wind and neutron star surface. We find that these can exceed 100 eV and are potentially detectable. A detection would probe the nuclear burning processes and might enable a measurement of the neutron star gravitational redshift. In addition, we find that in bursts with pure helium burning layers, protons from (alpha, p) reactions cause a rapid onset of the 12C(p, gamma)13N(alpha, p)16O reaction sequence. The sequence bypasses the relatively slow 12C(alpha, gamma)16O reaction and leads to a sudden surge in energy production that is directly observable as a rapid (~ ms) increase in flux during burst rise.

Nevin N. Weinberg; Lars Bildsten; Hendrik Schatz

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

464

Hot-gas desulfurization. II. Use of gasifier ash in a fluidized-bed process. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three gasifier coal ashes were used as reactant/sorbents in batch fluidized-beds to remove hydrogen sulfide from hot, made-up fuel gases. It is predominantly the iron oxide in the ash that reacts with and removes the hydrogen sulfide; the sulfur reappears in ferrous sulfide. Sulfided ashes were regenerated by hot, fluidizing streams of oxygen in air; the sulfur is recovered as sulfur dioxide, exclusively. Ash sorption efficiency and sulfur capacity increase and stabilize after several cycles of use. These two parameters vary directly with the iron oxide content of the ash and process temperature, but are independent of particle size in the range 0.01 - 0.02 cm. A western Kentucky No. 9 ash containing 22 weight percent iron as iron oxide sorbed 4.3 weight percent sulfur at 1200/sup 0/F with an ash sorption efficiency of 0.83 at ten percent breakthrough. A global, fluidized-bed, reaction rate model was fitted to the data and it was concluded that chemical kinetics is the controlling mechanism with a predicted activation energy of 19,600 Btu/lb mol. Iron oxide reduction and the water-gas-shift reaction were two side reactions that occurred during desulfurization. The regeneration reaction occurred very rapidly in the fluid-bed regime, and it is suspected that mass transfer is the controlling phenomenon.

Schrodt, J.T.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Elmore, Logan R [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part II: Simulation of Current GOES and GOES-M Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were analyzed using principal component image analysis for volcanic ash signals. The analyses performed determined that several of the thermal ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part I: Most Important Bands and Implications for Future GOES Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper, the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are analyzed for volcanic ash signals using principal component image analysis. Target volcanoes included Popocatepetl volcano near Mexico ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Quantitative Analysis of Mt. St. Helens Ash by X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quantitative study by x-ray diffraction, optical polarizing microscopy, and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry of fallout and ambient ash from three Mt. St. Helens eruptions has revealed a consistent picture of the mineralogical and elemental ...

Briant L. Davis; L. Ronald Johnson; Dana T. Griffen; William Revell Phillips; Robert K. Stevens; David Maughan

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Lubricant oil consumption effects on diesel exhaust ash emissions using a sulfur dioxide trace technique and thermogravimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed experimental study was conducted targeting lubricant consumption effects on ,diesel exhaust ash levels using a model year 2002 5.9L diesel engine, high and low Sulfur commercial lubricants, and clean diesel ...

Plumley, Michael J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

The nature of lubricant-derived ash-related emissions and their impact on diesel aftertreatment system performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have seen widespread use in on- and off-road applications as an effective means for meeting increasingly stringent particle emissions regulations. Over time, incombustible material or ash, ...

Sappok, Alexander G. (Alexander Georg)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21, 2011 21, 2011 Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin AIKEN, S.C. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers re- cently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. The bulk of that cleanup involves deactivating and decommissioning a nuclear materials production reactor that occu- pies more than 300,000 square feet of space. The P Area cleanup will reduce the Cold War footprint by 31 square

472

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic Elements In Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic Elements in Fly Ash Ann G. Kim 1 1 ORISE Research Fellow, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 KEYWORDS: Coal Utilization By-Products, leaching, pH ABSTRACT In the US, over 100 million tons of coal utilization by-products (CUB) are generated annually. To determine if exposure of these materials to aqueous fluids poses an environmental threat, researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have conducted extensive leaching tests. Five 1 kg samples of 35 PC fly ashes have been leached with acid, neutral and alkaline solutions at an approximate rate of 130 mL/d for 1 to 3 months. The leachates are

473

Formation processes and main properties of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres in fly ash from thermal power stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main parameters of aluminosilicate microspheres formed at thermal power stations in Russia were studied. These parameters are responsible for the prospective industrial application of these microspheres. A comparative analysis of the properties of mineral coal components, the conditions of coal combustion, and the effects of chemical and phase-mineralogical compositions of mineral impurities in coals from almost all of the main coal deposits on the formation of microspheres was performed. The effects of thermal treatment conditions on gas evolution processes in mineral particles and on the fraction of aluminosilicate microspheres in fly ash were considered. It was found that the yield of microspheres was higher in pulverized coal combustion in furnaces with liquid slag removal, all other factors being equal. The regularities of microsphere formation were analyzed, and the mechanism of microsphere formation in fly ash during the combustion of solid fuels was considered.

V.S. Drozhzhin; M.Ya. Shpirt; L.D. Danilin; M.D. Kuvaev; I.V. Pikulin; G.A. Potemkin; S.A. Redyushev [Russian Federal Nuclear Center VNIIEF, Nizhegorodskaya oblast (Russia)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Program on Technology Innovation: Formation of Large-Particle Ash in Coal-Fired Boilers Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is a follow-on study of large particle ash (LPA) formation mechanisms in combustion systems equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst systems for nitrogen oxide reduction. In an earlier study, the chemical and physical properties of LPA were examined, and potential origins were identified. LPA samples, along with fireside deposits and coals from selected utility boilers, were characterized in order to find the root cause or the origin of the LPA ...

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

476

Incinerator ash dissolution model for the system: Plutonium, nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research accomplished two goals. The first was to develop a computer program to simulate a cascade dissolver system. This program would be used to predict the bulk rate of dissolution in incinerator ash. The other goal was to verify the model in a single-stage dissolver system using Dy/sub 2/O/sub 3/. PuO/sub 2/ (and all of the species in the incinerator ash) was assumed to exist as spherical particles. A model was used to calculate the bulk rate of plutonium oxide dissolution using fluoride as a catalyst. Once the bulk rate of PuO/sub 2/ dissolution and the dissolution rate of all soluble species were calculated, mass and energy balances were written. A computer program simulating the cascade dissolver system was then developed. Tests were conducted on a single-stage dissolver. A simulated incinerator ash mixture was made and added to the dissolver. CaF/sub 2/ was added to the mixture as a catalyst. A 9M HNO/sub 3/ solution was pumped into the dissolver system. Samples of the dissolver effluent were analyzed for dissolved and F concentrations. The computer program proved satisfactory in predicting the F concentrations in the dissolver effluent. The experimental sparge air flow rate was predicted to within 5.5%. The experimental percentage of solids dissolved (51.34%) compared favorably to the percentage of incinerator ash dissolved (47%) in previous work. No general conclusions on model verification could be reached. 56 refs., 11 figs., 24 tabs.

Brown, E V

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477