Sample records for ash king george

  1. King George County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington:Kimble County, Texas: EnergyCity,George

  2. EA-1449: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash, King George County, Virginia

  3. George W

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    George W. Huber is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at University of Wisconsin- Madison. George's research focus is on developing new processes for the production of renewable...

  4. Ash pelletization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodall, M.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ash pelletization is outlined under the following topics: projects with CSX involvement; US Generating (Cedar Bay), Jacksonville, FL; Hydra-Co (Salt City Project), Solvay, NY; Virginia Power, Yorktown Plant; US Generating; Indiantown, FL; Future Projects; Development of ash disposal site;s Reuse of ash product; and Utility Survey.

  5. CURRICULUM VITAE ANDREW KING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Steven K.

    CURRICULUM VITAE ANDREW KING Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology University of Colorado. Advisors BA: Norman J. Fashing (College of William and Mary) PhD: Steven K. Schmidt (University of Colorado

  6. George Rupert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey CampbelllongApplying GeochemistryGeorge HGeorge

  7. Environmental aspects of the Brandywine ash site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simek, E.; Potera, G.; Schuller, R.; Herritt, M.; Wagner, R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brandywine ash site, located in Prince Georges County, Maryland, is owned and operated by the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO). This site was designed specifically for the storage of the large quantities of coal ash produced at PEPCO's nearby Chalk Point Generating Station. Environmental Resources Management, Inc. (ERM), with assistance from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Tidewater Administration, conducted a study of this site for the Maryland Power Plant Siting Program (PPSP) to determine if ash constituents are adversely affecting the environment. Section 1 of this report is an introduction to coal ash and its physical/chemical characteristics. Section 2 describes the environment at the site and in adjacent areas. Within this setting, a description of the facility is presented as Section 3. Section 4 relies on the previous sections to point out any likely effects of the facility on the environment and to discount unlikely interactions. Key conclusions are presented in Section 5.

  8. George Washington Carver Recognition Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In commemoration of George Washington Carver’s life and work, Congress declared January 5 as George Washington Carver Recognition Day.

  9. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Summer Training Report 2010 Abdul-Aziz Al ...........................................................................................13 #12;2 1. Introduction King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) give an opportunity

  10. King County- Green Building Initiative (Washington)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The King County Green Building Initiative started in 2001, and was included in the King Code Code with the Green Building and Sustainable Development Ordinance in 2008. The ordinance requires that...

  11. George Scott Goff The Dissertation Committee for George Scott Goff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    Copyright by George Scott Goff 2005 #12;The Dissertation Committee for George Scott Goff certifies that this is the approved version of the following dissertation: Oxidative Degradation of Aqueous Monoethanolamine in CO22 Mass Transfer by George Scott Goff, B.S. Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate

  12. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  13. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  14. KING'S COLLEGE 30 June 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    John Dunn Professor George Efstathiou Dr Alexander Etkind Professor James Fawcett Professor Iain Fenlon Dr Timothy Flack Professor Robert Foley Dr Jayant Ganguli (to 30.09.10) Lord Giddens Professor.12.10) Dr James Laidlaw Professor Richard Lambert Dr Yanki Lekili (from 01.01.11) Dr Katherine Lewis (to 30

  15. George F. Smoot III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGeneGenomeGeoffreyGeorge A. Cowan,George

  16. A comparative analysis of operational codes for King Hussein I and King Abdullah II 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparling, Dwain Leland

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    After King Abdullah II inherited the throne from King Hussein I at a very critical transition point in 1999, it became necessary for a study to rigorously examine the fundamental characteristics of each leaders' outlooks on the political realm...

  17. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  18. Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All employees are invited to the Department’s 2014 Commemorative Program honoring the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on January 22, 2014 at 11 am.

  19. Richard King | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -DepartmentRetail DemandEnergy RewardingKing About Us

  20. King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Collage of Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Collage of Electrical Engineering Summer Training King Fahd university of Petroleum and Minerals OMVG Gambia River Basin Development Organization PLCs

  1. Upholding Dr. King's Dream and Inspiring the Next Generation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Upholding Dr. King's Dream and Inspiring the Next Generation Through STEM Education Upholding Dr. King's Dream and Inspiring the Next Generation Through STEM Education January 27,...

  2. Clinical Trials Unit King's College London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applebaum, David

    Clinical Trials Unit King's College London Caroline Murphy, CTU Manager History of the Clinical's · The Clinical Trials Unit has been awarded full registration by the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) and is the only fully UKCRC registered Clinical Trials Unit across King's Health Partners (KHP) UKCRC Registration

  3. Sandia Energy - George Wang

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46Energy StorageFirst-EverHigh-EfficiencyGeorge

  4. George Andrew Olah - Patents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options GaryandEnergy,science, and technology forandGeorge

  5. Charging Up in King County, Washington

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Constantine, Dow; Oliver, LeAnn; Inslee, Jay; Sahandy, Sheida; Posthuma, Ron; Morrison, David;

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

  6. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, Dr. King is memorialized on the National Mall where he once spoke, a symbol of how far our Nation has come and a testament to the quiet heroes whose names may never appear in history books,...

  7. Charging Up in King County, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a...

  8. DR. MARTIN L. KING, JR. BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The MLK Day of Service is a way to transform Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s life and teachings into community action that helps solve social problems. Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a vital figure of the modern era and a pivotal figure in the Civil Rights Movement. His lectures and dialogues stirred the concern and sparked the conscience of a generation.

  9. 01-NIF Dedication: George Miller

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Miller

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by Lab Director George Miller.

  10. Ashing properties of coal blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, D.L.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion properties of sulfur materials present in coals were investigated. The treatment of the samples of eleven different coals is described. Thermal treatment of low temperature ashing (LTA) concentrates of eight of the coals was performed, and raw and wash ashing curves were examined to determine what quantitative correlations, if any, exist between ashing parameters and rank of coal. The actual form of the function which describes the ashing curve is derived.

  11. Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton Wu; Paul Yuran

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Universal Aggregates LLC (UA) was awarded a cost sharing Co-operative Agreement from the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Power Plant Improvement Initiative Program (PPII) to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia in October 2001. The Agreement was signed in November 2002. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the UA share is $12.3 million (63%). The original project team consists of UA, SynAggs, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc. and P. J. Dick, Inc. Using 115,000 ton per year of spray dryer ash (SDA), a dry FGD by-product from the power station, UA will produce 167,000 tons of manufactured lightweight aggregate for use in production of concrete masonry units (CMU). Manufacturing aggregate from FGD by-products can provide an economical high-volume use and substantially expand market for FGD by-products. Most of the FGD by-products are currently disposed of in landfills. Construction of the Birchwood Aggregate Facility was completed in March 2004. Operation startup was begun in April 2004. Plant Integration was initiated in December 2004. Integration includes mixing, extrusion, curing, crushing and screening. Lightweight aggregates with proper size gradation and bulk density were produced from the manufacturing aggregate plant and loaded on a stockpile for shipment. The shipped aggregates were used in a commercial block plant for CMU production. However, most of the production was made at low capacity factors and for a relatively short time in 2005. Several areas were identified as important factors to improve plant capacity and availability. Equipment and process control modifications and curing vessel clean up were made to improve plant operation in the first half of 2006. About 3,000 tons of crushed aggregate was produced in August 2006. UA is continuing to work to improve plant availability and throughput capacity and to produce quality lightweight aggregate for use in commercial applications.

  12. USDOE's Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Program

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Secretary Steven Chu; Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman; Dot Harris; Congressman John Lewis; Clay Middleton; Neile Miller

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Video presentation of the Department of Energy?s 2013 commemorative program honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

  13. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399 Summer Tra Advisor Examiner King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399-Shafie ID: 200669580 King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals #12;2 · TAPLE OF CONNTENT - Introduction

  14. TTTTThe Academic Fhe Academic Fhe Academic Fhe Academic Fhe Academic Family Tamily Tamily Tamily Tamily Treereereereeree Dean Robert George JahnDean Robert George JahnDean Robert George JahnDean Robert George JahnDean Robert George Jahn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamily Treereereereeree ofofofofof Dean Robert George JahnDean Robert George JahnDean Robert George JahnDean Robert George JahnDean Robert George Jahn Bob JM Corr *65 M.S. ES Wright *65 M.S. GA Rowell *65 M.S. C Corey - M.S. P Gessini - M.S. D Heimerdinger - (on Ph.D. committee) JR Beattie - Ph.D. JE Graf - M.S. G

  15. Coal ash utilization in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalski, S.R.; Brendel, G.F.; Gray, R.E. [GAI Consultants, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes methods of coal combustion product (CCP) management successfully employed in the US and considers their potential application in India. India produces about 66 million tons per year (mty) of coal ash from the combustion of 220 mty of domestically produced coal, the average ash content being about 30--40 percent as opposed to an average ash content of less than 10 percent in the US In other words, India produces coal ash at about triple the rate of the US. Currently, 95 percent of this ash is sluiced into slurry ponds, many located near urban centers and consuming vast areas of premium land. Indian coal-fired generating capacity is expected to triple in the next ten years, which will dramatically increase ash production. Advanced coal cleaning technology may help reduce this amount, but not significantly. Currently India utilizes two percent of the CCP`s produced with the remainder being disposed of primarily in large impoundments. The US utilizes about 25 percent of its coal ash with the remainder primarily being disposed of in nearly equal amounts between dry landfills and impoundments. There is an urgent need for India to improve its ash management practice and to develop efficient and environmentally sound disposal procedures as well as high volume ash uses in ash haulback to the coalfields. In addition, utilization should include: reclamation, structural fill, flowable backfill and road base.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash bottom ash Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: of bottom ash, 3 million tons of boiler slag, and 28 million tons of clean-coal ash materials) were produced... CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By...

  17. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  18. GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    BR IN KH O U S- BU LLITT CHILLER BUILDING F KENAN STADIUM GEORGE WATTS HILL ALUMNI CENTER EHRINGHAUS FIELD DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY C AR PEN TRY SH O P CHILLER BUILDING NEURO SCIENCES WATER TOWER ITS MANNING CHILLER BUILDING PUBLIC SAFETY BLDG. MORRISON RIDGEROAD EHRINGHAUS BOSHAMER BASEBALL STADIUM

  19. Ash deposit workshop: Class outline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatt, R. [Commercial Testing & Engineering Co., Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ash deposits formed from the combustion of coal and other fuels have plagued the steam production industry from the start. The ash fusion test has been around for over eighty years. As steam plant size increased, so have the problems associated with ash deposits. This workshop is designed to cover: (1) The basic types of deposits. (2) Causes of deposits. (3) Analytical procedures for resolving, or at least providing information about deposits and fuels, and (4) Deposit removal and reduction techniques.

  20. GEORGE H.W. BUSH PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................. 8 George H.W. Bush Presidential Records................................................................................................ 49 Management and Administration, Office of......................................................................... 51 Management and Budget, Office of (OMB

  1. Cynewulf the Poet, Alfred the King, and the Nature of Anglo-Saxon Duty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, Donna

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    linking of one CYNEWULF THE POET , ALFRED THE KING communityn. 18 above) 533. CYNEWULF THE POET , ALFRED THE KING TheCYNEWULF THE POET, ALFRED THE KING, AND THE NATURE OF ANGLO-

  2. Columbia University 1754 Royal Charter establishes King's College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Junfeng

    Columbia University FACTS 2013 1 Timeline 1754 Royal Charter establishes King's College under King an affiliate of Columbia. 1896 Trustees formally designate Columbia as a university. 1897 The University moves of Social Work, est. 1898, Dean Jeanette C. Takamura #12;Columbia University FACTS 2013 2 Affiliated

  3. Columbia University 1754 Royal Charter establishes King's College under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazar, Aurel A.

    Columbia University FACTS 2011 TIMELINE 1754 Royal Charter establishes King's College under King Trustees formally designate Columbia as a university. 1897 The University moves from 49th and Madison Seminary LIBRARIES The Columbia University Libraries/Information Service, comprised of 22 libraries, is one

  4. SAN JOS STATE UNIVERSITY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    ­ digital, audio, video, print and beyond. As the library's role as a repository for the print book the King Library also support Spartan Pride and Helping and Caring. San José State University is a national1 SAN JOSÉ STATE UNIVERSITY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. LIBRARY VISION-STRATEGY STATEMENT

  5. Risk management for CAT events Georg Ch. Pflug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pflug, Georg

    Outline Risk management for CAT events Georg Ch. Pflug 20.5.2005 Georg Ch. Pflug Risk management billion in reconstruction lending. Georg Ch. Pflug Risk management for CAT events #12;Outline Fundamentals, budget reallocation, additional taxation) Georg Ch. Pflug Risk management for CAT events #12;Outline

  6. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY INVESTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    SCHOOL OF BUSINESS THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY INVESTORS REPORT2011 #12;#12;SCHOOL OF BUSINESS THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY INVESTORS REPORT2011 #12;4 | THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS |2011INVESTORSREPORT 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS | 2011 INVESTORS REPORT

  7. Long duration ash probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurley, J.P.; McCollor, D.P.; Selle, S.J.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during soot blowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon. 8 figs.

  8. Long duration ash probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurley, John P. (Grand Forks, ND); McCollor, Don P. (Grand Forks, ND); Selle, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, MN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

  9. ash dispersion utilizing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the USA for all coal ashes was approximately 34% in the year products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much...

  10. Prince George's County Underground Storage Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gas storage company may invoke eminent domain to acquire property in Prince George's County for underground gas storage purposes. The area acquired must lie not less than 800 feet below the...

  11. Cosmology on the Beach - George Smoot

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  12. City of St. George- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The St. George City Council adopted a [http://www.sgcity.org/wp/power/NetMeteringPolicy.pdf net-metering program for area utilities], including interconnection procedures, in October 2005.* The...

  13. Cosmology on the Beach - George Smoot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  14. SUMMER TRAINING REPORT KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    SUMMER TRAINING REPORT KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS COLLEGE OF SCIENCE ENGINEERING ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Summer Training Report by Ahmed ALgahtani 200651040 Advisor Dr. Ahmed Yamani #12;SUMMER TRAINING REPORT INTRODUCTION: The college of science engineering gives a chance

  15. Upholding Dr. King's Dream and Inspiring the Next Generation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    uphold their strength of character-all values at the center of Dr. King's dream. Chris Smith, the Department's Assistant Secretary for the Office of Fossil Energy, also encouraged...

  16. King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Final Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington. The evaluation lasted 12 months.

  17. King, Feirstine, Hohnstadt 1 25th Annual AIAA/USU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Lyon B.

    Lyon B. King and Philip Hohnstadt Michigan Technological University Department of Mechanical that would render them useless. Therefore, it is beneficial for the space community to have an accurate

  18. Advanced Characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste Ashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste Ashes Preparatory thesis Randi Skytte Pedersen is to investigate Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) ashes with respect to particle sizes, structures and composition with characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) ashes from the Danish power plant M°abjergværket, Holstebro. MSW

  19. Measuring the Impact of CDBG Spending on Urban Neighborhoods George Galster* [George_Galster@Wayne.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskaran, Mark

    Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program spending in census tracts in 17 large cities. RegressionMeasuring the Impact of CDBG Spending on Urban Neighborhoods George Galster* [George, suite 800, Silver Spring, MD 20910 This research was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department

  20. Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A. [University of Porto, Oporto (Portugal). Center of Geology

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  1. ACAA fly ash basics: quick reference card

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is a fine powdery material created when coal is burned to generate electricity. Before escaping into the environment via the utility stacks, the ash is collected and may be stored for beneficial uses or disposed of, if necessary. The use of fly ash provides environmental benefits, such as the conservation of natural resources, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and eliminating the needed for ash disposal in landfills. It is also a valuable mineral resource that is used in construction and manufacturing. Fly ash is used in the production of Portland cement, concrete, mortars and stuccos, manufactured aggregates along with various agricultural applications. As mineral filler, fly ash can be used for paints, shingles, carpet backing, plastics, metal castings and other purposes. This quick reference card is intended to provide the reader basic source, identification and composition, information specifically related to fly ash.

  2. Lake George Park Commission: Stormwater Management (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lake George Park Commission is a quasi-independent commission within the Department of Environmental Protection that is responsible for environmental conservation in the Lake George Park area....

  3. Naval submarine base Kings Bay and Bangor soil evaluations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, David Joseph; Patteson, Raymond; Wesenberg, Donald L.; Attaway, Stephen W.

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides soil evaluation and characterization testing for the submarine bases at Kings Bay, Georgia, and Bangor, Washington, using triaxial testing at high confining pressures with different moisture contents. In general, the samples from the Bangor and Kings Bay sites appeared to be stronger than a previously used reference soil. Assuming the samples of the material were representative of the material found at the sites, they should be adequate for use in the planned construction. Since soils can vary greatly over even a small site, a soil specification for the construction contractor would be needed to insure that soil variations found at the site would meet or exceed the requirements. A suggested specification for the Bangor and Kings Bay soils was presented based on information gathered from references plus data obtained from this study, which could be used as a basis for design by the construction contractor.

  4. Combustion with reduced carbon in the ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, III, Lawrence E.

    2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion of coal in which oxygen is injected into the coal as it emerges from burner produces ash having reduced amounts of carbon.

  5. George Spanogiannopoulos CSE 5431 Mobile Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlajic, Natalija

    cents per tag Supports read and/or write Active Uses battery as power source Has dedicated/2/2008 George Spanogiannopoulos 9 #12;· Near Field Coupling · Short range communication · Induction provides by a capacitor to accumulate a charge · The tag uses this charge to create variations in the magnetic field

  6. GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITT Computer Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grabowski, Jens

    GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITÄT GÖTTINGEN Computer Security Overview and Introduction Computer Security Security @ Göttingen » Research group for comuter security » Prof. Dr. Konrad Rieck » 4 PhD students (+ 2 security » Research on analysis, detection and prevention of threats » Development of intelligent security

  7. The Variable Selection Problem Edward I. George

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    The Variable Selection Problem Edward I. George Journal of the American Statistical Association-1459%28200012%2995%3A452%3C1304%3ATVSP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-1 Journal of the American Statistical Association is currently published by American Statistical Association. Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance

  8. CURRICULUM VITAE GEORGE A. O'CONNOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    ). 2. Israel, 1980. Invited guest to discuss salinity and heavy metal problems (two weeks). 3. Germany keynote speaker, COST 869 meeting: "Mitigation Options for Nutrient Reduction in Surface and Ground Waters1 CURRICULUM VITAE GEORGE A. O'CONNOR Personal Data Office Address: Soil and Water Science

  9. David Hume Tower George Square, Edinburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    David Hume Tower George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JX 0131 650 8295 http://www.ed.ac.uk/maps THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH DAVID HUME TOWER A GUIDE TO ACCESS AND FACILITIES #12;If you require this document the evacuation arrangements". #12;Disabled Access Guide for David Hume Tower Introduction DAVID HUME TOWER

  10. UCSF School of Pharmacy and King's College London embark on international partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soloveichik, David

    UCSF School of Pharmacy and King's College London embark on international partnership March 21, 2014 The UC San Francisco School of Pharmacy and the King's College London Institute of Pharmaceutical at the UCSF School of Pharmacy · Professor Clive Page at the King's College London Institute of Pharmaceutical

  11. ash leachate generation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72 Key To Ash Sources FGD-1 MPU 8 Materials Science Websites Summary: Key To Ash Sources FGD-1 MPU 8 FGD-2 Alliant Energy FGD-3 WPS Pulliam Ash 12;Center for By-Products...

  12. ash quality characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78 Key To Ash Sources FGD-1 MPU 8 Materials Science Websites Summary: Key To Ash Sources FGD-1 MPU 8 FGD-2 Alliant Energy FGD-3 WPS Pulliam Ash 12;Center for By-Products...

  13. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  14. ash blended cement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass blends Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: , low ash partially composted manure LAPC, high ash raw manure HARM, and high ash partially composted manure HAPC)...

  15. Development of dredged ash disposal area, Paradise fossil plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paradise Steam-Electric Plant coal-fired facility in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. This project is to construct a dredge pond near the Jacobs Creek ash pond capable of storing fly ash dredged from the ash pond. This will provide approximately 10 years of additional fly ash storage in the fly ash pond. Effluent from the dredge pond will be returned to the Jacobs Creek ash pond for discharge to Jacobs Creek. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Fractal and Chaotic Dynamics in Nervous Systems Chris C. King

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Chris

    Fractal and Chaotic Dynamics in Nervous Systems Chris C. King Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Auckland. Abstract : This paper presents a review of fractal and chaotic dynamics distributed processing models and their relation to chaos and overviews reasons why chaotic and fractal

  17. KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    Rocks By Dr. Sidqi A. Abu-Khamsin Professor, Department of Petroleum Engineering © Copyright by Dr;1. INTRODUCTION 1.1: The nature of petroleum All chemical compounds found in nature are classified as eitherKING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Basic Properties of Reservoir

  18. ashes oral biotillgaenglighet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ash 1. Halima Hadiahmetovi?; D. D. Sarajevo; M. Sc; Raza Sunulahpai?; Bosnia Herzegovina 97 Leachate Geochemical Results for Ash Samples from the June 2007 Angora...

  19. Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel Particulate Filters Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel Particulate Filters Poster presentation at the 2007...

  20. Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribal Government Utility Program Info State North Carolina Program Type SolarWind Permitting Standards Provider Ashe County Planning Department In 2007 Ashe County...

  1. Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties Affecting Fuel Economy and Engine Wear Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties Affecting Fuel Economy and...

  2. ash intranasal instillation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    there is no mixing of insufficiently thermally treated material with bottom ash. Good fire control Columbia University 17 Characteristics and Uses for Ash Environmental...

  3. ash deposition propensities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environments (>3.5 km), banded iron, volcanic ashes Summary diagrams available Clastic depositional environments Harbor, David 57 Ash Dump Site Manager: EHS&RM Biology and...

  4. Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Ash Formation and Transport Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy Non-Destructive X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash,...

  5. Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreatment Systems via an Oil Conditioning Filter Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission...

  6. Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants: Advanced Characterization and Thermodynamic Introduction to Municipal Solid Waste Incineration 2 Chapter 2 Plants Considered and Samples Collected 5 Chapter 3 Mapping of Ash Chemistry in MSWI Plants 8 Chapter 4 Advanced Characterization Methods 12 4

  7. Fly Ash Amendments Catalyze Soil Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amonette, James E.; Kim, Jungbae; Russell, Colleen K.; Palumbo, A. V.; Daniels, William L.

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We tested the effects of four alkaline fly ashes {Class C (sub-bituminous), Class F (bituminous), Class F [bituminous with flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) products], and Class F (lignitic)} on a reaction that simulates the enzyme-mediated formation of humic materials in soils. The presence of FGD products completely halted the reaction, and the bituminous ash showed no benefit over an ash-free control. The sub-bituminous and lignitic fly ashes, however, increased the amount of polymer formed by several-fold. The strong synergetic effect of these ashes when enzyme is present apparently arises from the combined effects of metal oxide co-oxidation (Fe and Mn oxides), alkaline pH, and physical stabilization of the enzyme (porous silica cenospheres).

  8. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  9. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT); Akash, Akash (Salt lake City, UT); Zhao, Qiang (Natick, MA)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  10. George Mason University Center for Air Transportation Systems Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management System IFR Instrument Flight Rules MTOW Maximum certified Takeoff Weight FAA Federal Aviation Administration PRM Precision Runway Monitor System ICAO International Civil Aviation Organization #12;George

  11. Prince George's County- Solar and Geothermal Residential Property Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2008 Prince George's County enacted legislation offering a property tax credit on residential structures equipped with solar and geothermal systems. As originally devised, the credit could only...

  12. King Air flight RICO 2004/12/13 page 1 King Air N2UW flight report for December 13, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vali, Gabor

    repair of the air conditioner on the aircraft, a test flight was needed and was to be transformedKing Air flight ­ RICO ­ 2004/12/13 page 1 King Air N2UW flight report for December 13, 2004 Crew: Drew, Vali, Oolman, Glover After

  13. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

    1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  14. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

    1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  15. Fly ash enhanced metal removal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nonavinakere, S. [Plexus Scientific Corp., Annapolis, MD (United States); Reed, B.E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fly ashes from local thermal power plants in the removal of cadmium, nickel, chromium, lead, and copper from aqueous waste streams. Physical and chemical characteristics of fly ashes were determined, batch isotherm studies were conducted. A practical application of using fly ash in treating spent electroless nickel (EN) plating baths by modified conventional precipitation or solid enhanced metal removal process (SEMR) was investigated. In addition to nickel the EN baths also contains completing agents such as ammonium citrate and succinic acid reducing agents such as phosphate and hypophosphite. SEMR experiments were conducted at different pHs, fly ash type and concentrations, and settling times.

  16. CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE: RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE: RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY DIGESTED/DEWATERED BIOSOLIDS/DEWATERED BIOSOLIDS FINAL REPORT SUMMARY The City of Prince George recently proposed to investigate the possibility of applying radio frequency (RF) technology to partially digested/dewatered biosolids from domestic wastewater

  17. Stabilization/solidification of TSCA incinerator ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, R.D.; Trotter, D.R.; Francis, C.L.; Morgan, I.L.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stabilization/solidification is a well-known waste treatment technique that utilizes different additives and processes. The Phoenix Ash Technology of the Technical Innovation Development Engineering Company is such a technique that uses Cass C fly ash and mechanical pressure to make brick waste forms out of solid wastes, such as the bottom ash from the Toxic Substances Control Act incinerator at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. One advantage of this technique is that no volume increase over the bulk volume of the bottom ash occurs. This technique should have the same high pH stabilization for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals as similar techniques. Also, consolidation of the bottom ash minimizes the potential problems of material dispersion and container corrosion. The bottom ash was spiked with {sup 99}{Tc} to test the effectiveness of the bricks as a physical barrier. The {sup 99}{Tc} leachability index measured for these bricks was 6.8, typical for the pertechnetate anion in cementitious waste forms, indicating that these bricks have accessible porosity as high as that of other cementitious waste forms, despite the mechanical compression, higher waste form density, and water resistant polymer coating.

  18. Utilization of pulverized fuel ash in Malta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camilleri, Josette [Department of Building and Civil Engineering, Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Malta, Msida (Malta); Sammut, Michael [Department of Pathology, St. Luke's Hospital, G'Mangia (Malta); Montesin, Franco E. [Department of Building and Civil Engineering, Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Malta, Msida (Malta)]. E-mail: franco.montesin@um.edu.mt

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Malta all of the waste produced is mixed and deposited at various sites around the island. None of these sites were purpose built, and all of the waste is above groundwater level. The landfills are not engineered and do not contain any measures to collect leachate and gases emanating from the disposal sites. Another waste, which is disposed of in landfills, is pulverized fuel ash (PFA), which is a by-product of coal combustion by the power station. This has been disposed of in landfill, because its use has been precluded due to the radioactivity of the ashes. The aim of this study was to analyze the chemical composition of the pulverized fuel ash and to attempt to utilize it as a cement replacement in normal concrete mixes in the construction industry. The levels of radiation emitted from the ashes were measured by gamma spectrometry. The results of this study revealed that although at early ages cement replacement by PFA resulted in a reduction in compressive strength (P = 0), when compared to the reference concrete at later ages the strengths measured on concrete cores were comparable to the reference concrete (P > 0.05). The utilization of PFA up to 20% cement replacement in concrete did not raise the radioactivity of the concrete. In conclusion, utilization of PFA in the construction industry would be a better way of disposing of the ashes rather than controlling the leachate and any radioactivity emitted by the landfilled ashes.

  19. The clerical characters in George Eliot's novels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combs, John Raymond

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CLERICAL CHARACTERS IN GEORGE ELIOT'S NOVELS A Thesis John Raymond Combs 3?haitt?4 to the Cwulaat? College ef the %exes k%? Using city in ~i?i felfillaent ef the reqeireaeate fer the 4?gree?f ~ 0F ARTS &~e i~ ~eg Sob)eet jheglieh... in American Literature and for his words of encouragement; Nx ~ Robert k3. vin House and the Gushing Nemorial Library staff for theix help in locating materials for this thesis; Ny wife axld childrexx for their patienoee TABLE GP CONTENTS XNTRODUCTIGN...

  20. The George Washington University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheasternInformationPolicy |Environmental BuildingThe George

  1. George H Neilson | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey CampbelllongApplying GeochemistryGeorge H Neilson

  2. George Rojas | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey CampbelllongApplying GeochemistryGeorge H

  3. George Samuel Hurst | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey CampbelllongApplying GeochemistryGeorge

  4. George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options GaryandEnergy,science, and technology forandGeorge A.

  5. Georges Charpak, Particle Detectors, and Multiwire Chambers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options GaryandEnergy,science, and technologyGeorges Charpak,

  6. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Department of Computer Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almulhem, Ahmad

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Department of Computer Engineering the state of the system, and as such may contaminate the evidence ¤ The inves

  7. Reflections on Cambridge: Inside the roof of King's College Chapel - 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macfarlane, Alan

    Alan Macfarlane, a Fellow of King's College, Cambridge, visits the roof above the famous Chapel and explains some of its features. Filmed in summer 2009 by Xu Bei....

  8. Microsoft Word - CX-SnoKingSubstationExpansionFY12_WEB.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Michael Marleau Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Sno-King Substation Expansion Categorical...

  9. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

  10. King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Final Evaluation Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015JustKateKent5 B O N N EKim DavisKing

  11. Kings County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington:Kimble County, Texas:and QueenKingmanKings

  12. City of King Cove, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCityJonesville, Louisiana (Utility Company)City ofKing

  13. Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, P.W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

  14. Approaches to the petrographic characterization of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Rathbone, R.F.; Graham, U.M. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enhanced understanding of fly ash properties provided by petrographic analysis, a level of detail chemical analysis cannot provide, will be essential in the upgrading and utilization of fly ash produced in boilers retrofitted to meet clean air standards. Howe et al estimated that over 25% of the fly ash produced in Kentucky in 1992 would not have met the Kentucky Department of Transportation limit of 3% loss-on-ignition (LOI) for class F fly ash used as a Portland cement admixture. The conversion of boilers to low-NO{sub x} emission units increases fly ash carbon, hence LOI, by 150-200% rendering the fly ash unsuitable for highway construction use in concrete. The preservation of fly ash`s market share will require increased attention to the removal of excess carbon from the fly ash. In this paper, we will discuss the basic components of fly ash. An example of the petrographic analysis of fly ash from a Kentucky power plant will be used to illustrate the partitioning of fly ash components by size, as well as within the fly ash collection system.

  15. Soft-Input Soft-Output King Decoder for Coded MIMO Wireless Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soft-Input Soft-Output King Decoder for Coded MIMO Wireless Communications Giuseppe PAPA, Domenico,{domenico.ciuonzo,gianmarco.romano,pierluigi.salvorossi}@unina2.it Abstract--This paper presents a Soft-Input Soft-Output (SISO) version of the King Decoder (KD for Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) communication systems. More specifically, four versions of the KD

  16. Mark R. Burge, MD, University of New Mexico Clinical & Translational Science Center "King of the Roadmap"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    of the Roadmap" (Adapted from "King of the Road," by Roger Miller) I got one great big Common Fund, Not quite roadblocks that arise Never fluster or surprise. I'm a man of genes and epi-genes, King of the Roadmap. Big of the Roadmap. Bridge: I know every senator and committee chair, Institute Heads, and Stephen Colbert. And every

  17. Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Alfy, El-Sayed

    © Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa A Learning-Dong Yao Heffes, H.;Dept. of Comput. Sci., King Fahd Univ. of Pet. & Miner., Dhahran; Wireless & Minerals http://www.kfupm.edu.sa Summary An efficient channel allocation policy that prioritizes handoffs

  18. EECBG Success Story: Beep Beep! King County, Washington Is Charging Up Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of King County, Washington, are seeing several improvements in their community thanks to a $6.1 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG). The grant has allowed King County to conduct a variety of public and commercial energy efficiency upgrades, including the installation of electric vehicle charging stations, county vehicle fleet upgrades and senior housing energy improvements. Learn more.

  19. VIDEO SUMMARIZATION BY SPATIAL-TEMPORAL GRAPH OPTIMIZATION Shi Lu, Michael R. Lyu, Irwin King

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Kuo Chin Irwin

    VIDEO SUMMARIZATION BY SPATIAL-TEMPORAL GRAPH OPTIMIZATION Shi Lu, Michael R. Lyu, Irwin King SAR {slu, lyu, king}@cse.cuhk.edu.hk ABSTRACT In this paper we present a novel approach for video sum-temporal content cov- erage and visual coherence of the video summary. The ap- proach has three stages. First

  20. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  1. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  2. ash utilization symposium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST Report No.CBU-1996-07 July 1996 Presented and Published at the...

  3. Eco-friendly fly ash utilization: potential for land application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, A.; Thapliyal, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increase in demand for power in domestic, agricultural, and industrial sectors has increased the pressure on coal combustion and aggravated the problem of fly ash generation/disposal. Consequently the research targeting effective utilization of fly ash has also gained momentum. Fly ash has proved to be an economical substitute for expensive adsorbents as well as a suitable raw material for brick manufacturing, zeolite synthesis, etc. Fly ash is a reservoir of essential minerals but is deficient in nitrogen and phosphorus. By amending fly ash with soil and/or various organic materials (sewage sludge, bioprocess materials) as well as microbial inoculants like mycorrhizae, enhanced plant growth can be realized. Based on the sound results of large scale studies, fly ash utilization has grown into prominent discipline supported by various internationally renowned organizations. This paper reviews attempts directed toward various utilization of fly ash, with an emphasis on land application of organic/microbial inoculants amended fly ash.

  4. ash solvent extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alessandro 2013-01-01 27 ASH PNEUMATIC TRANSPORT UNDER ELECTROFILTERS OF UNIT 5 THERMAL POWER PLANT TUZLA CiteSeer Summary: Ash pneumatic transport is basic on fact that at...

  5. King Salmon, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington:Kimble County, Texas: EnergyCity,GeorgeSalmon,

  6. ash disposal area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF PRINCE GEORGE: SNOW DISPOSAL AT THE LANSDOWNE ROAD WASTEWATER TREATMENT CENTRE DOE FRAP WASTEWATER TREATMENT CENTRE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Funding for this study was provided...

  7. ash disposal island: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF PRINCE GEORGE: SNOW DISPOSAL AT THE LANSDOWNE ROAD WASTEWATER TREATMENT CENTRE DOE FRAP WASTEWATER TREATMENT CENTRE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Funding for this study was provided...

  8. ash disposal site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF PRINCE GEORGE: SNOW DISPOSAL AT THE LANSDOWNE ROAD WASTEWATER TREATMENT CENTRE DOE FRAP WASTEWATER TREATMENT CENTRE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Funding for this study was provided...

  9. ash disposal sites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF PRINCE GEORGE: SNOW DISPOSAL AT THE LANSDOWNE ROAD WASTEWATER TREATMENT CENTRE DOE FRAP WASTEWATER TREATMENT CENTRE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Funding for this study was provided...

  10. Empathy abstracted : George Fuchs and the Munich Artists' Theater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koss, Juliet, 1968-

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Founded by the art critic Georg Fuchs and built by the architect Max Littmann in 1908, the Munich Artists' Theater is famous for its shallow "relief stage." Reworking the ideas of Friedrich Nietzsche and Richard Wagner in ...

  11. 2007 world of coal ash conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theme of the conference was science, applications and sustainability. Papers are presented under the following topics: aggregates/geotechnology; agriculture; ash facility; management; CCT products; cement and concrete; chemistry and mineralogy; emerging technology; environmental; LOI/beneficiation/handling; mercury; mining and regulations and standards. The poster papers are included as well.

  12. Screening technology reduces ash in spiral circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodzik, P. [Derrick Corp., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, the James River Coal Co. selected the Stack Sizer to remove the minus 100 mesh high ash clay fraction from the clean coal spiral product circuits at the McCoy-Elkhorn Bevins Branch prep plant and at the Blue Diamond Leatherwood prep plant in Kentucky. The Stack Sizer is a multi-deck, high-frequency vibrating screen capable of separations as fine as 75 microns when fitted with Derrick Corp.'s patented high open area urethane screen panels. Full-scale lab tests and more than 10 months of continuous production have confirmed that the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 100 micron urethane screen panels consistently produces a clean coal fraction that ranges from 8 to 10% ash. Currently, each five-deck Stack Sizer operating at the Bevins Branch and Leatherwood prep plants is producing approximately 33 tons per hour of clean coal containing about 9% ash. This represents a clean coal yield of about 75% and an ash reduction of about 11% from the feed slurry. 3 figs. 2 tabs.

  13. Signature of George Miller Signature of George Miller Signature of Alice Williams

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich Signature of RaymondHeldGeorge

  14. Properties of concrete containing wood/coal fly ash mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boylan, D.M.; Larrimore, C.L.; Fouad, F.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities are increasingly interested in co-firing wood with coal in existing pulverized coal units. The co-firing technology is a means of developing a relatively low-cost renewable energy resource, as well as of supporting customers and community by making energy with biomass that might otherwise have been land-filled. However, recent changes in the ASTM C618 standard for fly ash as cement replacement restrict the definition of fly ash that includes non-coal sources. As a result, wood co-firing could affect the market for the fly ash, reducing ash sales revenue, increasing ash disposal costs, and overall substantially increasing the cost of the co-firing technology. In order to address concerns about the effect of wood ash/coal ash mixtures on concrete properties, a study was conducted by University of Alabama at Birmingham, Southern Company, EPRI, and the State of Alabama. This study compared the effects on properties of concrete made with fly ash from coal and made with fly ash from co-firing up to 30% wood with coal. Fly ashes from three plants were used, with two of the ashes from actual co-firing experience and the third an artificial blend of wood and coal ash. Concrete test cylinders were made of several cement/fly ash mixes, and enough were made to allow testing periodically over a one year time period. Test measurements included workability, setting time, air content, compressive and flexural strength, rapid chloride permeability and freeze thaw. It was concluded on the basis of these tests that the wood ash content had no detrimental effect on the plastic and hardened properties of the concrete.

  15. Super Models, Old King Coal II, & Civil Disobedience For fellow technocrats: "Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE", to appear soon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Super Models, Old King Coal II, & Civil Disobedience Model: For fellow technocrats: "Climate" was a guise, using prurient interest to gain attention. Sorry! "Old King Coal II" and "Civil Disobedience" are accurate headings. Old King Coal II: Thanks for comments/suggestions re my "Old King Coal" e-mail. Main

  16. Water quality investigation of Kingston Fossil Plant dry ash stacking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohac, C.E.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing to a dry ash disposal systems at Kingston Fossil Plant (KFP) raises several water quality issues. The first is that removing the fly ash from the ash pond could alter the characteristics of the ash pond discharge to the river. The second concerns proper disposal of the runoff and possibly leachate from the dry ash stack. The third is that dry ash stacking might change the potential for groundwater contamination at the KFP. This report addresses each of these issues. The effects on the ash pond and its discharge are described first. The report is intended to provide reference material to TVA staff in preparation of environmental review documents for new ash disposal areas at Kingston. Although the investigation was directed toward analysis of dry stacking, considerations for other disposal options are also discussed. This report was reviewed in draft form under the title Assessment of Kingston Fossil Plant Dry Ash Stacking on the Ash Pond and Groundwater Quality.'' 11 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. Knowledge-based Specification of Robot Motions Moritz Tenorth and Georg Bartels and Michael Beetz1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowledge-based Specification of Robot Motions Moritz Tenorth and Georg Bartels and Michael Beetz1, Germany E-mail: {tenorth, georg.bartels, beetz}@cs.uni-bremen.de Figure 1. Two views of a pouring task

  18. King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington.

  19. CON'TRI BUTION TO THE BIOLOGY OF THE KING CRAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CON'TRI BUTION TO THE BIOLOGY OF THE KING CRAB ( Paralithodes eam t sehat iea Tilesius during moulting. Classifioat ion of speo iea . Weight of orabs · · · · · · · · ·and their distribution

  20. King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals College of Compute Sciences and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Alfy, El-Sayed

    King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals College of Compute Sciences and Engineering Information and Computer Science Department Software Engineering Student Guide Based on the revised Computer professional careers in computing. The program prepares students to work as requirements engineer, software

  1. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hnat, James G. (Collegeville, PA); Mathur, Akshay (Tampa, FL); Simpson, James C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

  2. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

  3. Market assessment of PFBC ash use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bland, A. E.; Brown, T. H., Western Research Institute

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) of coal is undergoing demonstration in the United States, as well as throughout the world. American Electric Power`s (AEP`s) bubbling PFBC 70 MWe Tidd demonstration program in Ohio and pilot-scale development at Foster Wheeler Energia Oy 10 MWth circulating PFBC at Karhula, Finland, have demonstrated the advantages of PFBC technology. Further technology development in the US is planned with the deployment of the technology at the MacIntosh Clean Coal project in Lakeland, Florida. Development of uses for solid wastes from PFBC coal-fired power systems is being actively pursued as part of the demonstration of PFBC technologies. Ashes collected from Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, operating on (1) low sulfur subbituminous and (2) high sulfur bituminous coal; and ash from the AEP`s high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing at Western Research Institute (WRI).

  4. Coal ash by-product reutilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muncy, J. [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States); Miller, B. [DYNA Corp., Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) has as part of its vision and value statement that, ``We are responsible stewards of environmental and corporate resources.`` With this moral imperative in mind, a project team was charged with initiating the Coal Pile Liner Project--installing a membrane liner under the existing coal storage pile at the Morgantown Generating Station. The existing coal yard facilities were constructed prior to the current environmental regulations, and it became necessary to upgrade the storage facilities to be environmentally friendly. The project team had two objectives in this project: (1) prevent coal pile leachate from entering the groundwater system; (2) test the viability of using coal ash by-products as an aggregate substitute for concrete applications. Both objectives were met, and two additional benefits were achieved as well: (1) the use of coal ash by-products as a coal liner produced significant cost savings to the project directly; (2) the use of coal ash by-products reduced plant operation and maintenance expenses.

  5. SINGLE ELEMENT TEST PREDICTIONS FOR STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF PANKI FLY-ASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    : Fly-ash is a waste product produced by burning of coal at thermal power plants. It is often used. Introduction Fly-ash is a fine powdery material, produced by burning of coal at thermal power plants. Fly-ash need to dispose fly-ash from these ponds. Fly-ash is often used as structural fill in order to dispose

  6. Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

  7. International Electric Propulsion Conference, The George Washington University, USA October 6 10, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    1 The 33rd International Electric Propulsion Conference, The George Washington University, USA Electric Propulsion Conference, The George Washington University · Washington, D.C. · USA October 6 ­ 10.t.yim@nasa.gov. #12;2 The 33rd International Electric Propulsion Conference, The George Washington University, USA

  8. Mercury capture by distinct fly ash carbon forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.; Taulbee, D.N.; Sakulpitakphon, T.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon was separated from the fly ash from a Kentucky power plant using density gradient centrifugation. Using a lithium heterolpolytungstate high-density media, relative concentrations of inertinite (up to 85% vol.), isotropic carbon (up to 79% vol.), and anisotropic carbon (up to 76% vol.) were isolated from the original fly ash. Mercury concentration was lowest in the parent fly ash (which contains non-carbon components); followed by inertinite, isotropic coke, mixed isotropic-anisotropic coke fraction, and, with the highest concentration, the anisotropic coke concentrate. The latter order corresponds to the increase in BET surface area of the fly ash carbons. Previous studies have demonstrated the capture of mercury by fly ash carbon. This study confirms prior work demonstrating the varying role of carbon types in the capture, implying that variability in the carbon content influences the amount of mercury retained on the fly ash.

  9. Numerical study of energy diffusion in King models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Theuns

    1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy diffusion coefficients D_n(E) (n=1,2) for a system of equal mass particles moving self-consistently in an N-body realisation of a King model are computed from the probability per unit time, P(E, Delta E), that a star with initial energy E will undergo an energy change Delta E. In turn, P is computed from the number of times during the simulation that a particle in a state of given energy undergoes a transition to another state. These particle states are defined directly from the time evolution of E by identifying them with the event occuring between two local maxima in the E(t) curve. If one assumes next that energy changes are uncorrelated between different states, one can use diffusion theory to compute D_n(E). The simulations employ N=512, 2048,... , 32768 particles and are performed using an implementation of Aarseth's direct integrator N-body1 on a massively parallel computer. The more than seven million transitions measured in the largest N simulation provide excellent statistics. The numerically determined D(E)'s are compared against their theoretical counterparts which are computed from phase-space averaged rates of energy change due to independent binary encounters. The overall agreement between them is impressive over most of the energy range, notwithstanding the very different type of approximations involved, giving considerable support to the valid usage of these theoretical expressions to simulate dynamical evolution in Fokker-Planck type calculations.

  10. Determination of Ash in Biomass: Laboratory Analytical Procedure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ash in Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 7172005 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, R. Ruiz, C. Scarlata, J. Sluiter, and D. Templeton Technical Report NREL...

  11. Kinetics of beneficiated fly ash by carbon burnout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okoh, J.M.; Dodoo, J.N.D.; Diaz, A. [Univ. of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD (United States). Dept. of Natural Sciences; Ferguson, W.; Udinskey, J.R. Jr.; Christiana, G.A. [Delmarva Power, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called Loss On Ignition (LOI). The concrete producers` day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

  12. ash transportation distance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ash 1. Halima Hadiahmetovi?; D. D. Sarajevo; M. Sc; Raza Sunulahpai?; Bosnia Herzegovina 4 Dimensional contraction via Markov transportation distance Francois...

  13. Data Summary Report for Hanford Site Coal Ash Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulloway, H. M.

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present data and findings from sampling and analysis of five distinct areas of coal ash within the Hanford Site River Corridor

  14. ash aqueous carbonation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon content, specific surface area Aydilek, Ahmet 3 Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1* Environmental Management and Restoration Websites...

  15. alkaline coal ash: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from pulverized coal pulverized-coal-fired furnaces, cyclone furnaces, or advanced clean-coal technology furnaces. The ash collected from pulverized-coal-fired furnaces is fly...

  16. Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Species in the Ring Pack and Ash Emissions and Their Dependence on Crankcase Oil Properties Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy...

  17. The variability of fly ash and its effects on selected properties of fresh Portland cement/fly ash mortars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKerall, William Carlton

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the needed quality control of concrete . Another source of concern results from the recent development of lignite and sub-bituminous coal as fuel sources. The ash produced from these coals is of a different chemical composition than traditional bituminous... 50 percent to greater than 200 percent of a control test. An exhaustive literature review has revealed neglig1ble information concerning the PAI of sub- b1tuminous and lignite ashes. Research is greatly needed to determine the ash properties...

  18. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash related problems Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ash related problems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 By-Products Utilization Summary: of clean coal ash will increase. Finding practical solutions to this "ash problem" is essential...

  20. Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

  1. Cell Ashing for Trace Element Analysis: A New Approach Based on Ultraviolet/Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

    : synchrotron spectromicroscopy; micro- chemical analysis; MEPHISTO; ashing; incineration; trace element. Ashing ashing is based on high-temperature incineration or on the exposure to oxygen plasma (1­ 4). We adopted

  2. Interactive Document Processing and Digital Libraries George Nagy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, George

    Interactive Document Processing and Digital Libraries George Nagy Electrical, Computer and Systems explore connections between digital libraries and in- teractive document image analysis. Digital libraries in digital libraries to target problems whose solu- tion would automate, or partially automate, tasks cur

  3. GEORGE E. BROWN, JR. NETWORK FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING SIMULATION (NEES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    , Los Angeles Proposal Writing Guide 1 In he University of California, Los Angeles George E. Brown, Jr that would have occurred for any specified base-level acceleration time history (assuming the properties the completion of testing. Wireless field data acquisition system that efficiently transmits data in wireless

  4. Deprogramming Large Software Systems Yohann Coppel and George Candea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    Deprogramming Large Software Systems Yohann Coppel and George Candea School of Computer, patterns, and designs. Such reverse processes are powerful tools for manipu- lating programs and systems of access to the patterns and designs behind a body of code makes it difficult to maintain large code bases

  5. Collection of Environmental Data From an Airship Platform George Kantora*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Sanjiv

    of a solar powered airship with the capability of extended-duration autonomous environmental samplingCollection of Environmental Data From an Airship Platform George Kantora* , David Wettergreena of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, The Univeristy of Pennsylvania ABSTRACT We believe that solar

  6. The Environmental Studies MAJOR The George Washington University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Conservation Biology 3 Chem 2085 Environmental Chemistry 3 CE 1010** Intro to Civil and EnvironmentalThe Environmental Studies MAJOR The George Washington University To declare as an Environmental-8523 Program Advisor Prof. Melissa Keeley, keeley@gwu.edu, (202) 994-7156 Environmental Studies majors must

  7. Rubber Bandzzles: Three Mathematical Puzzle-Art Challenges George Hart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubber Bandzzles: Three Mathematical Puzzle-Art Challenges George Hart Museum of Mathematics office supplies. Should there be rubber bands lying about on the conference table of your next dreary replicating it hundreds of times over the years. As Fig. 1 indicates, The Worm is a single rubber band very

  8. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    145 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Keith Cooper Professors Robert Chemistry) Professor James Tour #12;146 DEPARTMENTS / Computer Science Computer science is concerned to produce solutions to real-world computational problems. Computer science is the intellectual discipline

  9. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    135 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Moshe Y. Vardi Professors Science Computer science is concerned with the study of computers and computing, focusing on algorithms. Computer science is the intellectual discipline underlying information technology, which is widely accepted

  10. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    139 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, BSCS, MCS, MS, and PhD Computer science is concerned with the study of computers and computing, focusingonalgorithms to real-world computational problems. Computer science is the intellectual discipline underlying

  11. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    145 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Keith Cooper Professors Robert Tour researCh Professor Peter Druschel #12;146 Departments/ Computer Science Eight courses for a total Intermediate Programming COMP 280 Mathematics of Computer Science COMP 314 Applied Algorithms and Data

  12. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    141 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, BSCS, MCS, MS, and PhD Computer science is concerned with the study of computers and computing, focusingonalgorithmsTour #12;142 DEPARTMENTS/ Computer Science body of knowledge can be used to produce solutions to real

  13. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    153 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Joe Warren Professors Robert S'Malley with Chemistry Professor James Tour researCh Professor Peter Druschel #12;154 Departments/ Computer Science Six Matrix Analysis Math and Science Courses Degrees Offered: BA, BSCS, MCS, MS, and PhD Computer science

  14. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Joe D. Warren Professors Robert S researCh Professor Peter Druschel #12;2 Departments/ Computer Science Six courses for a total of 18 hours Degrees Offered: BA, BSCS, MCS, MS, and PhD Computer science is concerned with the study of computers

  15. Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1 Computer Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Joe Warren Professors Robert S #12;2 Departments/ Computer Science Six courses for a total of 18 hours, required for all majors, MS, and PhD Computer science is concerned with the study of computers and computing

  16. Quel avenir hydraulique pour l'Egypte ? Mutin Georges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Quel avenir hydraulique pour l'Egypte ? Mutin Georges Sommaire · Un barrage insuffisant · Egypte et pays d'amont : les positions en présence · Une meilleure gestion des eaux s'impose à l'Egypte Texte intégral Depuis plusieurs décennies, l'Egypte doit faire face à un redoutable défi : nourrir une population

  17. University of Applied Sciences Georg-Simon-Ohm Fachhochschule Nurnberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    ) an der Georg-Simon-Ohm Fachhochschule N¨urnberg C++-Programmiertechniken f¨ur High Performance Computing Access), aber auch manche Multi-Core-Systeme geh¨oren, sind im High Performance Computing (HPC) weit-Optimierung von C++-Code f¨ur High Performance Computing 26 3.1 C

  18. The Apprentice Challenge J. STROTHER MOORE and GEORGE PORTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yuanyuan

    The Apprentice Challenge J. STROTHER MOORE and GEORGE PORTER University of Texas at Austin We and distributed compu- tation, mutual exclusion, operational semantics, theorem proving 1. THE APPRENTICE SYSTEM in the Apprentice class builds an instance of a Container object and then begins creating and starting new threads

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash quarterly technical Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash based geopolymer Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: . CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS 2 The major... large amounts of conventional or...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash penurunan kadar Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash paving demonstration Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AND DEMONSTRATION... Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - ashes Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash ahto lobjakas Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash based gepolymer Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: . CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS 2 The major... large amounts of conventional or...

  7. IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers Americans And Their Environment 2010 Thirty-nine New Damage Cases of Contamination from Improperly Disposed Coal Combustion Waste, Editor and Contributing Author #12;IN HARM'S WAY: Lack of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers

  8. Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murtha, M.J.

    1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

  9. Biological impact studies of the Faulkner ash site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klose, P.N.; Potera, G.T.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) has operated the Faulkner coal ash storage facility in southern Charles County, Maryland since 1970. This site handles all the coal ash produced at the nearby Morgantown Generating Stations. Environmental Resources Management, Inc. (ERM) produced an earlier report (Simek, et al., 1983) for PPSP entitled, Environmental Aspects of the Faulkner Ash Site. That report presented a compilation of existing data and newly-generated field information on the ash site and its influence on the local environment. Several questions remained as a result of the analyses carried out for the above study. These were: (a) Are trees downgradient of the site accumulating metals associated with the ash. (b) Is Zekiah Swamp Run being affected by dissolved or precipitated metals. (c) Are invertebrates in Zekiah Swamp Run accumulating metals from the ash site. The studies described herein present data on each of the three questions. Results indicate that no adverse effects on water quality, invertebrates, or trees are occurring. Elevated levels of aluminum, cadmium, and manganese were found throughout the watershed, both above and below the ash site, but no relationship to the ash site could be established.

  10. COMMERCIAL DEMONSTRATION OF THE MANUFACTURED AGGREGATE PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY UTILIZING SPRAY DRYER ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Scandrol

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Universal Aggregates, LLC proposes to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the Universal Aggregates share is $12.3 (63%). The project team consists of CONSOL Energy Inc., P.J. Dick, Inc., SynAggs, LLC, and Universal Aggregates, LLC. The Birchwood Facility will transform 115,000 tons per year of spray dryer by-products that are currently being disposed of in an offsite landfill into 167,000 tons of a useful product, lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight and medium weight masonry blocks. In addition to the environmental benefits, the Birchwood Facility will create nine (9) manufacturing jobs plus additional employment in the local trucking industry to deliver the aggregate to customers or reagents to the facility. A successful demonstration would lead to additional lightweight aggregate manufacturing facilities in the United States. There are currently twenty-one (21) spray dryer facilities operating in the United States that produce an adequate amount of spray dryer by-product to economically justify the installation of a lightweight aggregate manufacturing facility. Industry sources believe that as additional scrubbing is required, dry FGD technologies will be the technology of choice. Letters from potential lightweight aggregate customers indicate that there is a market for the product once the commercialization barriers are eliminated by this demonstration project.

  11. COMMERCIAL DEMONSTRATION OF THE MANUFACTURED AGGREGATE PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY UTILIZING SPRAY DRYER ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Scandrol

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Universal Aggregates, LLC proposes to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the Universal Aggregates share is $12.3 (63%). The project team consists of CONSOL Energy Inc., P.J. Dick, Inc., SynAggs, LLC, and Universal Aggregates, LLC. The Birchwood Facility will transform 115,000 tons per year of spray dryer by-products that are currently being disposed of in an offsite landfill into 167,000 tons of a useful product, lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight and medium weight masonry blocks. In addition to the environmental benefits, the Birchwood Facility will create eight (8) manufacturing jobs plus additional employment in the local trucking industry to deliver the aggregate to customers or reagents to the facility. A successful demonstration would lead to additional lightweight aggregate manufacturing facilities in the United States. There are currently twenty-one (21) spray dryer facilities operating in the United States that produce an adequate amount of spray dryer by-product to economically justify the installation of a lightweight aggregate manufacturing facility. Industry sources believe that as additional scrubbing is required, dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies will be the technology of choice. Letters from potential lightweight aggregate customers indicate that there is a market for the product once the commercialization barriers are eliminated by this demonstration project.

  12. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

  13. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

  14. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department and Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-E Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  15. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  16. COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

  17. Fluidization characteristics of power-plant fly ashes and fly ash-charcoal mixtures. [MS Thesis; 40 references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, C.T.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the continuing research on aluminum recovery from fly ash by HiChlor process, a plexiglass fluidization column system was constructed for measurement of fluidization parameters for power-plant fly ashes and fly ash-charcoal mixtures. Several bituminous and subbituminous coal fly ashes were tested and large differences in fluidization characteristics were observed. Fly ashes which were mechanically collected fluidized uniformly at low gas flow rates. Most fly ashes which were electrostatically precipitated exhibited channeling tendency and did not fluidize uniformly. Fluidization characteristics of electrostatically collected ashes improve when the finely divided charcoal powder is added to the mixture. The fluidization of the mixture was aided initially by a mechanical stirrer. Once the fluidization had succeeded, the beds were ready to fluidize without the assistance of a mechanical action. Smooth fluidization and large bed expansion were usually observed. The effects of charcoal size and aspect ratio on fluidization characteristics of the mixtures were also investigated. Fluidization characteristics of a fly ash-coal mixture were tested. The mixture fluidized only after being oven-dried for a few days.

  18. Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

  19. Fifth Annual Report: 2008 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Judd, Chaeli; Thom, Ronald M.; Sather, Nichole K.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fifth and final report in a series documenting progress of the pre-construction eelgrass restoration and mitigation activities for the proposed King County Brightwater marine outfall, discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. King County began implementing a multiyear eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions, after construction of the outfall. Major eelgrass mitigation program elements include: a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over a 5 year period prior to construction, b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagation and stockpiling of local plants for post-construction planting, and c) post-construction planting and subsequent monitoring, occurring in 2009 and beyond. The overall program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2008).

  20. Evaluation of Vitrification Processing Step for Rocky Flats Incinerator Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigent, W.L.; Luey, J.K.; Scheele, R.D.; Li, H.

    1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff developed a processing option for incinerator ash at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS). This work was performed with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Safe Sites of Colorado (SSOC). A description of the remediation needs for the RFETS incinerator ash is provided in a report summarizing the recommended processing option for treatment of the ash (Lucy et al. 1998). The recommended process flowsheet involves a calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material followed by a vitrification processing step for a mixture of glass tit and calcined incinerator ash. Using the calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material reduced process upsets for the vitrification step, allowed for increased waste loading in the final product, and improved the quality of the final product. Figure 1.1 illustrates the flow sheet for the recommended processing option for treatment of RFETS incinerator ash. In 1998, work at PNNL further developed the recommended flow sheet through a series of studies to better define the vitrification operating parameters and to address secondary processing issues (such as characterizing the offgas species from the calcination process). Because a prototypical rotary calciner was not available for use, studies to evaluate the offgas from the calcination process were performed using a benchtop rotary calciner and laboratory-scale equipment (Lucy et al. 1998). This report focuses on the vitrification process step after ash has been calcined. Testing with full-scale containers was performed using ash surrogates and a muffle furnace similar to that planned for use at RFETS. Small-scale testing was performed using plutonium-bearing incinerator ash to verify performance of the waste form. Ash was not obtained from RFETS because of transportation requirements to calcine the incinerator ash prior to shipment of the material. Because part of PNNL's work was to characterize the ash prior to calcination and to investigate the effect of calcination on product quality, representative material was obtained from LANL. Ash obtained from LANL was selected based on its similarity to that currently stored at RFETS. The plutonium-bearing ashes obtained from LANL are likely from a RFETS incinerator, but the exact origin was not identified.

  1. *Corresponding authors: Dr. M. Enamul Hossain, Department of Petroleum Engineering, College of Engineering Science, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran 31261, KFUPM Box: 2020, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Tel: + 96638602305 (O), Fax: +966386

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, M. Enamul

    of Engineering Science, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran 31261, KFUPM Box: 2020, Kingdom; King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia Copyright 2013, Society

  2. A Review of "Images Wars: Promoting Kings and Commonwealth in England, 1603-1660" by Kevin Sharpe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nechtman, Tillman

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atlantic studies. Kevin Sharpe. Images Wars: Promoting Kings and Commonwealth in England, 1603-1660. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010. xvii + 665 pp. $55.00. Review by tillman w. nechtman, skidmore college. Kevin Sharpe?s Image Wars: Promoting Kings...

  3. The Rise and Fall of the Dream Schools: Equity and Local Politics in the San Francisco Unified School District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Matthew Merritt

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carver,  Drake,  and  Drew),  two  middle  schools   (King  R.  Davis  Middle  School.    George   Washington  Carver  

  4. A new approach to the semantics of model Johan G. Granstrm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    8002 Zürich, Switzerland georg.granstrom@acm.org Department of Computer Science King's College London

  5. A pillar in our Indian work: Daniel Gookin, the praying Indians, and King Philip's War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, Steven Kirk

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "A PILLAR IN OUR INDIAN WORK": DANIEL GODKIN, THE PRAYING INDIANS, AND KING PHILIP'S WAR A Thesis by STEVEN KIRK BANE Submitted to the Off1ce of Graduate Stud1es of Texas ASM University 1n partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1989 Major Subject: H1story "A PILLAR IN OUR INDIAN WORK": DANIEL GODKIN, THE PRAYING INDIANS, AND KING PHILIP'S WAR A Thesis by STEVEN KIRK BANE Approved as to style and content by: John Canup (Chair...

  6. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, R.; Mukherjee, A. [University of Calcutta, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Botany

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metals - sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significantconcentration-dependent increases in DNA damage in whole blood cells, lymphocytes, and in Nicotiana plants. The comet parameters show increases in tail DNA percentage (%), tail length (mu m), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.

  7. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic [Institute for Biological Research 'Sinisa Stankovic,' Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Department of Ecology

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

  8. Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation of pollution being used for coal ash deposits. Pollutants present in the ash can contaminate water resources and soil its research on the thermo-electric plant (TEP) and associated coal ash sites at Tuzla, Bosnia

  9. Close Out Report for the Ash Pit Operable Unit I Area of Concern 2F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I to the early 1950's. The Ash Pits were also used for disposal of coal ash from various buildingsFinal Close Out Report for the Ash Pit Operable Unit I Area of Concern 2F February 5, 2004..................................................................................................2 Figure 1 - Ash Level Verification Borings

  10. Helium Ash Simulation Studies with Divertor Helium Pumping in JET Internal Transport Barrier Discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helium Ash Simulation Studies with Divertor Helium Pumping in JET Internal Transport Barrier Discharges

  11. Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols Leona incineration fly ash at 200 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Thermodynamic calculations have been carried out ash produced by municipal waste incineration (MWI) have clearly demonstrated that MWI fly ash can

  12. Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    ) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

  13. Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dobbins, Michael S. (Ames, IA); Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

    1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

  14. UF6 overfilling prevention at Eurodif production Georges Besse plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reneaud, J.M. [Eurodif Production, Pierrelatte (France)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk of overfilling exists on different equipments of Georges BESSE Plant: cylinders, desublimers and intermediate tanks. The preventive measures are composed of technical devices: desublimers weighing, load monitoring alarms, automatic controls ... and procedures, training, safety organization. In thirteen years of operation, some incidents have occurred but none of them has caused any personal injuries. They are related and discussed. The main factors involved in the Sequoyah fuel facility accident on 1/4/1986 have been analyzed and taken into account.

  15. Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

    2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine “innocent” alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

  16. Demo Abstract: The SpiderBat Ultrasound Positioning System Georg Oberholzer, Philipp Sommer, Roger Wattenhofer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demo Abstract: The SpiderBat Ultrasound Positioning System Georg Oberholzer, Philipp Sommer, Roger Wattenhofer Computer Engineering and Networks Laboratory ETH Zurich, Switzerland sommer

  17. 2012 NIST Precision Measurement Grants Georg Raithel, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    2012 NIST Precision Measurement Grants Georg Raithel, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI to the transition frequencies. Thomas Stace, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Thermometry

  18. Finite-State Verification for High Performance Computing George S. Avrunin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avrunin, George S.

    Finite-State Verification for High Performance Computing George S. Avrunin Department (top500.org) reveals that high performance computing has become practically synonymous with parallel

  19. On the initial stages of cement hydration S. J. Preece, J. Billingham and A. C. King

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billingham, John

    On the initial stages of cement hydration S. J. Preece, J. Billingham and A. C. King School the initial mixing of cement, an induction period occurs during which its consistency remains constant- stituent of cement, which is believed to be responsible for the initial development of its strength. Our

  20. Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Alfy, El-Sayed

    © Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa A Heuristic. of Pet. & Miner., Dhahran; Advanced Communication Technology, The 9th International conference of Petroleum & Minerals http://www.kfupm.edu.sa Summary A primary goal of this paper is to develop a heuristic

  1. Use of stable isotopes to assess king and Spanish mackerel groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roelke, Lynn Ann

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    species. King and Spanish mackerel were collected at ten sites in the Gulf of Mexico and along the southeast coast of the United States. Stable nitrogen (81,5N) and carbon (613C) isotope measurements were conducted on collagen extracted from the dorsal fin...

  2. Automatic Information Discovery from the "Invisible Web" King-Ip Lin, Hui Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, King-Ip "David"

    that is untouched by the traditional search engines. Known as the "invisible web" or "deep web", it representsAutomatic Information Discovery from the "Invisible Web" King-Ip Lin, Hui Chen Division of Computer@memphis.edu Abstract A large amount of on-line information resides on the invisible web ­ web pages generated

  3. Basics and Advances of Semi-supervised Learning Irwin King1 and Zenglin Xu2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Kuo Chin Irwin

    of Semi-supervised Learning Semi-supervised Learning Types of semi-supervised learning SemiBasics and Advances of Semi-supervised Learning Irwin King1 and Zenglin Xu2 1Computer Science-supervised Learning WCCI 2010 1 / 83 #12;Outline 1 Basics of Semi-supervised Learning Semi-supervised Learning

  4. King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals College of Computer Sciences and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Alfy, El-Sayed

    King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals College of Computer Sciences and Engineering Information and Computer Science Department Software Engineering Student Guide (Based on the revised Software of Information and Computer Science offers a BS in Software Engineering. The current program was revised

  5. KFUPM Library E-Services King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maghrabi, Talal H.

    March 14, 2006 Towards A Digital Library Dr. Talal MaghrabiDr. Talal Maghrabi Dean, Library Affairs1 KFUPM Library E-Services King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Deanship of Library AffairsDean, Library Affairs March 14, 2006March 14, 2006 22 OUTLINE KFUPM Libraries Overview IT Use at KFUPM Libraries

  6. Raven IITM: Open Platform for Surgical Robotics Research H. Hawkeye King1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jacob

    of Cartesian motion and grasping [6]. A unique feature of the tool is a wrist design that eliminates cableRaven IITM: Open Platform for Surgical Robotics Research H. Hawkeye King1 , Lei Cheng1 , Philip In this paper we present a new platform for surgical robotics research: the Raven IITM. The goal of this work

  7. Interferometric velocity analysis using physical and nonphysical energy Simon King1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interferometric velocity analysis using physical and nonphysical energy Simon King1 , Andrew Curtis as apparent energy that could not have propagated between receiver locations -- so-called nonphysical energy. We have developed a novel method of velocity analysis that uses both the physical and nonphysical

  8. ABILITY OF MALE KING CRAB, PARALITHODES CAMTSCHATICA, TO MATE REPEATEDLY, KODIAK, ALASKA, 1973

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Buss'). I Alaska Dept. of Fish & Game. Commercial Fisheries Diy.. Box 686. Kodiak. AK 99615. 2 Bio. Rothschild. and James A. Buss. 1972. A studY of king. PlIrt/IiI/lOd"s C(III/IS/wI/ClI (Tilesius) hrook stocks

  9. Determination of Total Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass: Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: December 2, 2013 S. Van Wychen and L. M. L. Laurens Technical Report NRELTP-5100-60956 December...

  10. ash impact sorbent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aircraft systems 1. Silicate parti- cles in the ash clouds can enter the engines and melt. In the past Oxford, University of First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8...

  11. altered volcanic ash: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    near the volcano. Major eruptions are much rarer. They can eject both ash and gases like sulfur dioxide high into the atmosphere-- 80,000 feet or more. Although much of...

  12. ash upptag av: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1* Environmental Management and Restoration Websites...

  13. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  14. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  15. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  16. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  17. ash particle deposition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coal fly ash by reaction with nitrogen oxides can occur in the smokestack, but with the aging Dutta, Prabir K. 5 Particle deposition in ventilation ducts University of California...

  18. Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    from larger commercial sources such as wood-burning biomass plants which produce heat or electricity in the soil. Wood ash is more soluble and reactive than ground limestone, and brings about a Benefits Recycles

  19. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  20. ash cenospheres composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Composite Material Lab., Central Gupta, Nikhil 3 Journal of Composite Materials, July 2006, Vol. 40 no. 13, 1163-1174 1163 Thermal Expansion of AluminumFly Ash...

  1. Studies of fly ash using thermal analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hanxu; Shen, Xiang-Zhong; Sisk, B. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved thermoanalytical methods have been developed that are capable of quantitative identification of various components of fly ash from a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustion system. The thermogravimetric procedure developed can determine quantities of H{sub 2}O, Ca(OH){sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4} and carbonaceous matter in fly ash with accuracy comparable to more time-consuming ASTM methods. This procedure is a modification of the Mikhail-Turcotte methods that can accurately analyze bed ash, with higher accuracy regarding the greater amount of carbonaceous matter in fly ash. In addition, in conjunction with FTIR and SEM/EDS analysis, the reduction mechanism of CaSO{sub 4} as CaSO{sub 4} + 4H{sub 2} = CaS + 4H{sub 2}O has been confirmed in this study. This mechanism is important in analyzing and evaluating sulfur capture in fluidized-bed combustion systems.

  2. ash leaching methods: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in individualpyrite grains in Illinois6 coal at levels up 6 coal. The same trace metals were detected in pyrite and clay grains from Pittsburgh 8 coal. Ash Laughlin,...

  3. ash technical progress: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ash from the four 43 Technical Brief CiteSeer Summary: ii iiiFOREWARD The Depleted Uranium Technical Brief is designed to convey available information and knowledge about...

  4. ash corrosion resistant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    date: 02.2008 Start date of the consortium (including the Commission Services) 12;2 Handbook on treatment of coal ash disposal sites Preface 162 Nitration of Benzoapyrene...

  5. Recoverable immobilization of transuranic elements in sulfate ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method of reversibly immobilizing sulfate ash at least about 20% of which is sulfates of transuranic elements. The ash is mixed with a metal which can be aluminum, cerium, samarium, europium, or a mixture thereof, in amounts sufficient to form an alloy with the transuranic elements, plus an additional amount to reduce the transuranic element sulfates to elemental form. Also added to the ash is a fluxing agent in an amount sufficient to lower the percentage of the transuranic element sulfates to about 1% to about 10%. The mixture of the ash, metal, and fluxing agent is heated to a temperature sufficient to melt the fluxing agent and the metal. The mixture is then cooled and the alloy is separated from the remainder of the mixture.

  6. Environmental aspects of the faulkner ash site. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simek, E.M.; Hewitt, M.A.; Potera, G.T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) has owned and operated the Faulkner coal ash storage facility in southern Charles County, Maryland since 1970. This site was designed and is operated specifically to handle, in an environmentally sound manner, the large quantities of coal ash produced at the nearby Morgantown Generating Station. This report describes the site, its setting, and its interactions with the local environment.

  7. Ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which utilizes the known ash level temperature profile to monitor the ash bed level. A bed stirrer which travels up and down through the extent of the bed ash level is modified by installing thermocouples to measure the bed temperature as the stirrer travels through the stirring cycle. The temperature measurement signals are transmitted to an electronic signal process system by an FM/FM telemetry system. The processing system uses the temperature signals together with an analog stirrer position signal, taken from a position transducer disposed to measure the stirrer position to compute the vertical location of the ash zone upper boundary. The circuit determines the fraction of each total stirrer cycle time the stirrer-derived bed temperature is below a selected set point, multiplies this fraction by the average stirrer signal level, multiplies this result by an appropriate constant and adds another constant such that a 1 to 5 volt signal from the processor corresponds to a 0 to 30 inch span of the ash upper boundary level. Three individual counters in the processor store clock counts that are representative of: (1) the time the stirrer temperature is below the set point (500.degree. F.), (2) the time duration of the corresponding stirrer travel cycle, and (3) the corresponding average stirrer vertical position. The inputs to all three counters are disconnected during any period that the stirrer is stopped, eliminating corruption of the measurement by stirrer stoppage.

  8. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth

    2001-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. This first project period, experiments were carried out to better understand the fundamental nature of the ozonation effect on ash. Carbon surfaces were characterized by surfactant adsorption, and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy before and after oxidation, both by air at 440 C and by ozone at room temperature. The results strongly suggest that the beneficial effect of ozonation is in large part due to chemical modification of the carbon surfaces.

  9. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen; Indrek Kulaots

    2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the present project was to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific issues addressed included: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity based on pilot-plant studies; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This laboratory data has provided scientific and engineering support and underpinning for parallel process development activities. The development work on the ash ozonation process has now transitioned into a scale-up and commercialization project involving a multi-industry team and scheduled to begin in 2004. This report describes and documents the laboratory and pilot-scale work in the above three areas done at Brown University and the University of Utah during this three-year project.

  10. Ash Reduction of Corn Stover by Mild Hydrothermal Preprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Toufiq Reza; Rachel Emerson; M. Helal Uddin; Garold Gresham; Charles J. Coronella

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass such as corn stover can contain high ash content, which may act as an inhibitor in downstream conversion processes. Most of the structural ash in biomass is located in the cross-linked structure of lignin, which is mildly reactive in basic solutions. Four organic acids (formic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric) were evaluated for effectiveness in ash reduction, with limited success. Because of sodium citrate’s chelating and basic characteristics, it is effective in ash removal. More than 75 % of structural and 85 % of whole ash was removed from the biomass by treatment with 0.1 g of sodium citrate per gram of biomass at 130 °C and 2.7 bar. FTIR, fiber analysis, and chemical analyses show that cellulose and hemicellulose were unaffected by the treatment. ICP–AES showed that all inorganics measured were reduced within the biomass feedstock, except sodium due to the addition of Na through the treatment. Sodium citrate addition to the preconversion process of corn stover is an effective way to reduced physiological ash content of the feedstock without negatively impacting carbohydrate and lignin content.

  11. Clay formation and metal fixation during weathering of coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zevenbergen, C.; Bradley, J.P.; Reeuwijk, L.P. Van; Shyam, A.K.; Hjelmar, O.; Comans, R.N.J.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enormous and worldwide production of coal fly ash cannot be durably isolated from the weathering cycle, and the weathering characteristics of fly ash must be known to understand the long-term environmental impact. The authors studied the weathering of two coal fly ashes and compared them with published data from weathered volcanic ash, it's closest natural analogue. Both types of ash contain abundant aluminosilicate glass, which alters to noncrystalline clay. However, this study reveals that the kinetics of coal fly ash weathering are more rapid than those of volcanic ash because the higher pH of fresh coal fly ash promotes rapid dissolution of the glass. After about 10 years of weathering, the noncrystalline clay content of coal fly ash is higher than that of 250-year-old volcanic ash. The observed rapid clay formation together with heavy metal fixation imply that the long-term environmental impact of coal fly ash disposal may be less severe and the benefits more pronounced than predicted from previous studies on unweathered ash. Their findings suggest that isolating coal fly ash from the weathering cycle may be counterproductive because, in the long-term under conditions of free drainage, fly ash is converted into fertile soil capable of supporting agriculture.

  12. SAINT GEORGES CONTRE LES MAURES SPECIFICITES ET ENJEUX DES REPRESENTATIONS PLASTIQUES DU SAINT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Georges ne pose aucun problème : ce soldat a largement mérité son auréole grâce à la résistance qu'Occident chrétien la popularité de saint Georges atteint un degré maximal au Bas Moyen-�ge, si bien que ce soldat

  13. College of Applied Science and Engineering The George S. Ansell Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .D. or an equivalent degree in Metallurgical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, or related field, and have;College of Applied Science and Engineering The George S. Ansell Department of Metallurgical and MaterialsCollege of Applied Science and Engineering The George S. Ansell Department of Metallurgical

  14. The 33st International Electric Propulsion Conference, The George Washington University, USA October 6 10, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    The 33st International Electric Propulsion Conference, The George Washington University, USA, 30332, USA Abstract: Accurate measurement of ion charge flux in the plume of spacecraft electric.walker@ae.gatech.edu #12;The 33st International Electric Propulsion Conference, The George Washington University, USA

  15. George Feher (Photograph by R.A. Icaacson) Photosynthesis Research 55: 140, 1998.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee "Gov"

    George Feher (Photograph by R.A. Icaacson) #12;Photosynthesis Research 55: 1­40, 1998. © 1998 of research in bacterial photosynthesis and the road leading to it: A personal account George Feher In this minireview I present a very personal account of my life and research in bacterial photosynthesis

  16. INTEGR. COMP. BIOL., 45:231233 (2005) The Academic Genealogy of George A. Bartholomew1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Albert F.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    231 INTEGR. COMP. BIOL., 45:231­233 (2005) The Academic Genealogy of George A. Bartholomew1 ALBERT of the Barthol- omew Award of the Society, we decided to undertake #12;232 ACADEMIC GENEALOGY OF GEORGE A of the large number of individuals in the lineage. Instead, we developed a web-based genealogy to document

  17. THE ODD MOMENTS OF RANKS AND CRANKS GEORGE E. ANDREWS, SONG HENG CHAN, AND BYUNGCHAN KIM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE ODD MOMENTS OF RANKS AND CRANKS GEORGE E. ANDREWS, SONG HENG CHAN, AND BYUNGCHAN KIM Abstract by National Security Agency, NSA grant award 101015. Song Heng Chan was partially supported by Nanyang of Education, Science and Technology (NRF2011-0009199). 1 #12;2 GEORGE E. ANDREWS, SONG HENG CHAN

  18. Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy George Ostrouchov -ostrouchovg@ornl.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy George Ostrouchov - ostrouchovg Scale Systems Center at ORNL 1 #12;Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy George Ostrouchov Laboratory 2 #12;"World's Most Powerful Academic Computer" University of Tennessee Kraken Managed by UT-Battelle

  19. The 33st International Electric Propulsion Conference, The George Washington University, USA October 6 10, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Lyon B.

    The 33st International Electric Propulsion Conference, The George Washington University, USA with FerroTec EFH-1 in a non- uniform magnetic field IEPC-2013-319 Presented at the 33rd International Electric Propulsion Conference, The George Washington University · Washington, D.C. · USA October 6 ­ 10

  20. From the SelectedWorks of George R. Parsons Valuing the Visual Disamenity of Offshore Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    From the SelectedWorks of George R. Parsons May 2011 Valuing the Visual Disamenity of Offshore Wind of Offshore Wind Power Projects at Varying Distances from the Shore: An Application on the Delaware Shoreline Andrew D. Krueger, George R. Parsons, and Jeremy Firestone ABSTRACT. Several offshore wind power projects

  1. Metal recovery from fly ash generated from vitrification process for MSW ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumikawa, Chiaki [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)] [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-bearing wastes have to be carefully treated because heavy metals could be leached out under uncontrolled conditions when disposed of in a landfill. Consequently, heavy metals should be principally recovered and recycled forever. From this standpoint, the author has been trying to develop a technology to recover heavy metals from toxic vitrification fly ash for recycling to smelters. After a number of laboratory-scale experiments, pilot plant tests were successfully carried out and the developed process has been proven to be commercially realized. The main features of the process are that it recovers almost 100% of the heavy metals, simultaneously separating the metals which are recovered in a lead smelter from those in a zinc smelter, and that the output of the process are only metallurgical products recyclable for smelters and the effluent water which can be released into the environment. The process is considered an ideal one for the treatment of toxic fly ash from the viewpoint of not only natural resources but also environmental conservation.

  2. George T. "Rusty" Gray named TMS Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey CampbelllongApplyingGeorge T. "Rusty"

  3. George Hoyt Whipple and the Impact of Liver on Anemia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGeneGenomeGeoffreyGeorge A. Low

  4. Study on the Volatility of Cesium in Dry Ashing Pretreatment and Dissolution of Ash by Microwave Digestion System - 13331

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Kwang-Soon; Lee, Chang Heon; Ahn, Hong-Joo; Park, Yong Joon; Song, Kyuseok [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)] [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the regulation of the activity concentration of Cs-137, Co-58, Co-60, Fe-55, Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90, Nb-94, and Tc-99, and the total alpha from the radioactive waste acceptance criteria, the measurement of the activity concentration of these nuclides in low and intermediate levels of radioactive waste such as in paper, cotton, vinyl and plastic samples was investigated. A dry ashing method was applied to obtain a concentration effect of the samples. Owing to the temperature dependence of the volatility for cesium, the temperature of 300 to 650 deg. C was examined. It was found that 450 deg. C is the optimum dry ashing temperature. After dry ashing, the produced ash was dissolved with HNO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF by a high-performance microwave digestion system. The ash sample, for the most part, was completely dissolved with 10 mL of HNO{sub 3}, 4 mL of HCl, and 0.25 mL of HF by a high-performance microwave digestion system using a nova high temperature rotor at 250 deg. C for 90 min until reaching 0.2 g. To confirm the reliability of cesium loss after the performance of the dry ashing procedure, a cesium standard solution for AAS and a Cs-137 standard solution for gamma spectrometry were added to a paper towel or a planchet of stainless steel, respectively. Cesium was measured by AAS, ICP-MS, and gamma spectrometry. The volatility of cesium did not occur until 450 deg. C ashing. (authors)

  5. Release of Ammonium and Mercury from NOx Controlled Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; Kim, A.G

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the goals of the Department of Energy is to increase the reuse of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) to 50% by 2010. This will require both developing new markets and maintaining traditional ones such as the use of fly ash in concrete. However, the addition of pollution control devices can introduce side-effects that affect the marketability of the CUB. Such can be the case when NOx control is achieved using selective catalytic or non-catalytic reduction (SCR or SNCR). Depending on site-specific details, the ammonia slip can cause elevated levels of NH3 in the fly ash. Disposal of ammoniated fly ash can present environmental concerns related to the amount of ammonia that might be released, the amount of water that might become contaminated, and the extent to which metals might be mobilized by the presence of the ammonia. Ammonia retained in fly ash appears to be present as either an ammonium salt or as a chemisorbed species. Mercury in the leachates correlated to neither the amount of leachable ammonium nor to the total amount of Hg in the ash. The strongest correlation was between the decreases in the amount of Hg leached with increased LOI.

  6. Ash bed level control system for a fixed-bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Rotunda, John R. (Fairmont, WV)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ash level control system is provided which incorporates an ash level meter to automatically control the ash bed level of a coal gasifier at a selected level. The ash level signal from the ash level meter is updated during each cycle that a bed stirrer travels up and down through the extent of the ash bed level. The ash level signal is derived from temperature measurements made by thermocouples carried by the stirrer as it passes through the ash bed and into the fire zone immediately above the ash bed. The level signal is compared with selected threshold level signal to determine if the ash level is above or below the selected level once each stirrer cycle. A first counter is either incremented or decremented accordingly. The registered count of the first counter is preset in a down counter once each cycle and the preset count is counted down at a selected clock rate. A grate drive is activated to rotate a grate assembly supporting the ash bed for a period equal to the count down period to maintain the selected ash bed level. In order to avoid grate binding, the controller provides a short base operating duration time each stirrer cycle. If the ash bed level drops below a selected low level or exceeds a selected high level, means are provided to notify the operator.

  7. A review of "King James I and the Religious Culture of England." by James Doelman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd Berry

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for writing, partly for pursuing peace even at his daughter?s expense. Indeed, the situation of Elizabeth and husband and the effort at the Spanish match sparked complaints about the pacific reign. And again, James? urge to be beati pacifici was replaced...REVIEWS 301 ?exploratory,? given the extraordinary richness of the sources and their only recent accessibility? (2). James Doelman. King James I and the Religious Culture of England. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2000. viii + 194 pp. $75. Review...

  8. Non-Destructive X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash, Washcoat and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash, Washcoat and Regeneration Damage for DPFs Non-Destructive X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash, Washcoat and Regeneration Damage for DPFs New commercially...

  9. Geotechnical properties of fly and bottom ash mixtures for use in highway embankments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, B.; Prezzi, M.; Salgado, R. [Korean Institute for Water & Environment, Taejon (Republic of Korea). Dam Safety Research Center

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Class F fly ash and bottom ash are the solid residue byproducts produced by coal-burning electric utilities. They are usually disposed of together as a waste in utility disposal sites with a typical disposal rate of 80% fly ash and 20% bottom ash. Direct use of these materials in construction projects consuming large volumes of materials, such as highway embankment construction, not only provides a promising solution to the disposal problem, but also an economic alternative to the use of traditional materials. Representative samples of class F fly and bottom ash were collected from two utility power plants in Indiana and tested for their mechanical properties (compaction, permeability, strength, stiffness, and compressibility). Three mixtures of fly and bottom ash with different mixture ratios (i.e., 50, 75, and 100% fly ash content by weight) were prepared for testing. Test results indicated that ash mixtures compare favorably with conventional granular materials.

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - ashing wet Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences and Ecology 4 By-Products Utilization Summary: A3, containing 20% clean coal ash and 5% wet collected Class F ash had compressive strengths... 0 Center for...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - ashing dry Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shrinkage of Non-Air Entrained HRWRA Concrete -0.05% 0.00% 0.05% 0... NS3, 33% Clean Coal Ash, 5% Class F Fly Ash Fig. 15 - ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of -...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash material analisis Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was used in this work. An ASTM Class F fly ash... , and N3) were proportioned with clean coal fly ash containing 22% ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali-activated fly ash Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering ; Materials Science 12 By-Products Utilization Summary: CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique... of...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - activated fly ash Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering ; Materials Science 9 By-Products Utilization Summary: CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique... of...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - ashes total contents Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fly ash content for normal concrete... contained fly ash up to a maximum of 35% of clean-coal ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department of Civil Engineering and...

  16. Tephrochronology and Stratigraphy of Eocene and Oligocene Volcanic Ashes of East and Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heintz, Mindi

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    using neutron activation analysis (NAA) of bulk ash and glass shards, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) of bulk ash, and electron microprobe analysis of both apatite phenocrysts and glass shards to characterize their geochemistry...

  17. In vivo imaging of C. elegans ASH neurons: cellular response and adaptation to chemical repellents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafer, William R.

    Erratum In vivo imaging of C. elegans ASH neurons: cellular response and adaptation to chemical neurons highlighted. From the ASH cell body, the dendrite runs anteriorly until the tip of the head ending

  18. Soil stabilization using optimum quantity of calcium chloride with Class F fly ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hyung Jun

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ash at 90days ............... 38 5-13 Stress Strain Curve of 6% CaCl2+10% Fly Ash at 90days ............... 39 5-14 Stress Strain Curve of 4% CaCl2+15% Fly Ash at 90days ............... 39 5-15 Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy... (E-SEM) of Class F Fly Ash ................................................................................. 40 5-16 Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (E-SEM) of Control Soil after 7 Days of Curing...

  19. High-performance, high-volume fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet offers the construction professional an in-depth description of the use of high-volume fly ash in concrete. Emphasis is placed on the need for increased utilization of coal-fired power plant byproducts in lieu of Portland cement materials to eliminate increased CO{sub 2} emissions during the production of cement. Also addressed is the dramatic increase in concrete performance with the use of 50+ percent fly ash volume. The booklet contains numerous color and black and white photos, charts of test results, mixtures and comparisons, and several HVFA case studies.

  20. Ash reduction system using electrically heated particulate matter filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; He, Yongsheng [Sterling Heights, MI

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system for reducing ash comprises a temperature estimator module that estimates a temperature of an electrically heated particulate matter (PM) filter. A temperature and position estimator module estimates a position and temperature of an oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter. An ash reduction control module adjusts at least one of exhaust flow, fuel and oxygen levels in the electrically heated PM filter to adjust a position of the oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter based on the oxidation wave temperature and position.

  1. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, McMahon L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Monongahela, PA); Finseth, Dennis H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  2. Coal-ash slag attack and corrosion of refractories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonar, J.A. (Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY); Kennedy, C.R.; Swaroop, R.B.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrosion characteristics of a variety of fused-cast refractories in contact with various coal-ash slags were investigated. A fused-cast chrome-spinel refractory exhibited excellent corrosion resistance to both acidic and basic coal-ash slags at 1500/sup 0/C, even in the absence of water cooling. The slag-refractory interaction was limited to the formation of a stable band of recrystallized hercynitic spinel. Alumina-chromia refractories were superior to alumina and magnesia-chrome refractories when exposed to acidic slags.

  3. RESEARCH NEEDS IN MINERAL BY-PRODUCTS UTILIZATION: FLY ASH, SILICA FUME AND SLAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of coal in electric power plants. It is captured by either mechanical separators, electrostatic. 2.0 Research Needs Concerning Fly Ash Utilization 2.1 CLSM Fly Ash Slurry Controlled low strength materials (CLSM), as classified by ACI Committee 229, have been produced using fly ash slurry [9

  4. Correlation relations between mineralogical components in ash from Kaa-Khem coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.N. Yanchat; L.Kh. Tas-ool [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kyzyl (Russia). Tuvinian Institute for Complex Exploration of Natural Resources

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Regression analysis was used to study correlation relations between the mineral components of coals. Regularities in the variability of the concentrations of individual ash-forming elements with changing ash contents of coals and changing seam depth were found. The X-ray diffraction characteristics of coal ashes and the qualitative composition of their mineralogical components are presented.

  5. INCO-WBC-1-509173 Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INCO-WBC-1-509173 RECOAL Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation of pollution of coal ash disposal sites Due date of deliverable: 12.2007 Actual submission date: 02.2008 Start date of the consortium (including the Commission Services) #12;2 Handbook on treatment of coal ash disposal sites Preface

  6. TRACE ELEMENTS LEACHING FROM ORGANIC SOILS STABILIZED WITH HIGH CARBON FLY ASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    and Se for organic soil-HCFA mixtures. Keywords: organic soil, fly ash, coal combustion products, CCPs INTRODUCTION Fly ash is a silt-size particulate collected by air pollution control systems at coal fly ashes (HCFAs) generally are disposed in landfills (Hodges and Keating 1999). However, many HCFAs

  7. Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

    Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater Reyad; available online 29 October 2003 Abstract A by-product fly ash from oil shale processing was converted shale; Ash; Zeolite; Cadmium and lead removal 1. Introduction Oil shale exists in Jordan with large

  8. Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freidin, C. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)] [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

  9. Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. W. Clark and H. M Sulloway

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

  10. Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. W. Clark and H. M. Sulloway

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

  11. Log of a young author's thinking: George W. Cable's "Drop Shot".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinitiere, Autry James

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . t 1974 Major Subject: English LOG OF A YOUNG AUTHOR'S THINKING: GEORGE W CABLE'S "DROP SHOT" A Thesis by AUTRY JAMES SINITIERE Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committe Hea of Department M er ember) August 1974 & s ~~. )$, gg... APSTRACT Log of a Young Author's Thinking: George W. Cable's "Drop Shot" (August 1974) Autry James Sinitiere, B. A. , College of Santa Fe Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr Richard H. Ballinger In February 1870 George W. Cable began writing a * p p...

  12. Volcanic ash: What it is and how it forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.

    1991-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There are four basic eruption processes that produce volcanic ash: (1) decompression of rising magma, gas bubble growth, and fragmentation of the foamy magma in the volcanic vent (magmatic), (2) explosive mixing of magma with ground or surface water (hydrovolcanic), (3) fragmentation of country rock during rapid expansion of steam and/or hot water (phreatic), and (4) breakup of lava fragments during rapid transport from the vent. Variations in eruption style and the characteristics of volcanic ashes produced during explosive eruptions depend on many factors, including magmatic temperature, gas content, viscosity and crystal content of the magma before eruption, the ratio of magma to ground or surface water, and physical properties of the rock enclosing the vent. Volcanic ash is composed of rock and mineral fragments, and glass shards, which is less than 2 mm in diameter. Glass shard shapes and sizes depend upon size and shape of gas bubbles present within the magma immediately before eruption and the processes responsible for fragmentation of the magma. Shards range from slightly curved, thin glass plates, which were broken from large, thin-walled spherical bubble walls, to hollow needles broken from pumiceous melts containing gas bubbles stretched by magma flow within the volcanic vent. Pumice fragments make up the coarser-grained portions of the glass fraction. Particle sizes range from meters for large blocks expelled near the volcanic vent to nanometers for fine ash and aerosol droplets within well-dispersed eruption plumes. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Maintaining and Improving Marketability of Coal Fly Ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is produced when coal is consumed by power plants Fly ash can be used beneficially in numerous applications-fired power plants work to create cleaner skies, they'll likely fill up landfills with millions more tons.05 0.05 #12;6 Challenge: Mercury Controls One approach to reducing mercury emissions from power plants

  14. Soil stabilization and pavement recycling with self-cementing coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual provides design information for self-cementing coal fly ash as the sole stabilizing agent for a wide range of engineering applications. As in any process, the application of sound engineering practices, appropriate testing, and evaluation of fly ash quality and characteristics will lend themselves to successful projects using the guidelines in this manual. Topics discussed include: self-cementing coal fly ash characteristics; laboratory mix design; stabilization of clay soils; stabilisation of granular materials; construction considerations; high sulfate ash; environmental considerations for fly ash stabilization; design considerations; state specification/guidelines/standards; and a sample of a typical stabilization specification.

  15. THE SCALING OF FLUVIAL LANDSCAPES Bjrn Birnir # Terence R. Smith + \\Lambda George E. Merchant +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    THE SCALING OF FLUVIAL LANDSCAPES Björn Birnir # Terence R. Smith + \\Lambda George E. Merchant roughness coefficient of 0:75 and is analogous to an interface driven through random media with quenched

  16. The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Introduction to Engineering Computation · STAT 310 Probability and Statistics · STAT 410 Introduction246 Statistics The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD Course engineering, computational and applied mathematics, managerial studies, mathematics, political science

  17. The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Introduction to Engineering Computation · STAT 310 Probability and Statistics · STAT 410 Introduction253 Statistics The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD Course engineering, computational and applied mathematics, managerial studies, mathematics, political science

  18. GPS radio occultation with CHAMP Jens Wickert, Georg Beyerle, Torsten Schmidt, Christian Marquardt, Rolf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GPS radio occultation with CHAMP Jens Wickert, Georg Beyerle, Torsten Schmidt, Christian Marquardt Positioning System) radio occultation experiment onboard the German CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload sensing of Earth's atmosphere, GPS radio occulta- tion 1 Introduction The CHAMP GPS radio occultation

  19. George Beauchamp and the rise of the electric guitar up to 1939 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Matthew William

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the rise of the electric guitar in the United States – arguably the most iconic and successful musical instrument of the 20th century – and the role of George Beauchamp in its invention and development. ...

  20. Patternable transparent carbon nanotube films for electrochromic devices Liangbing Hu and George Grunera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    Patternable transparent carbon nanotube films for electrochromic devices Liangbing Hu and George nanotube films on polyethylene terephthalate as flexible electrodes in electrochromic devices using. Electrochromic devices attract much interest due to their potential use in applications such as smart windows

  1. A Global Model for Forecasting Political Instability Jack A. Goldstone George Mason University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lien, Jyh-Ming

    of Maryland Michael B. Lustik Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Monty G. Marshall George Mason University Jay Ulfelder Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Mark Woodward. Bates is Eaton Professor of the Science of Government, Harvard University, 1737 Cambridge St., Cambridge

  2. MULTIAGENT DECISION MAKING FOR SME SUPPLY CHAIN Jihene Tounsi Julien Boissire Georges Habchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MULTIAGENT DECISION MAKING FOR SME SUPPLY CHAIN SIMULATION Jihene Tounsi Julien Boissière Georges of autonomous actors and SME networks which collaborate to achieve a given process. Secondly, the studied SMEs

  3. Civil and Environmental Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    ) environmental engineering (air and water quality, transport theory, modeling, and energy) (2) hydrology) urbaninfrastructureandmanagement(transportationsystems,complex urban systems, soil mechanics, engineering economics, management1 Civil and Environmental Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Pedro J. J

  4. Surface and bottom boundary layer dynamics on a shallow submarine bank : southern flank of Georges Bank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner, Sandra R. (Sandra Regina)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis investigates the circulation at a 76-m deep study site on the southern flank of Georges Bank, a shallow submarine bank located between the deeper Gulf of Maine and the continental slope. Emphasis is placed on ...

  5. Stabilize ash using Clemson`s sintering process (Part 1 -- Phase 1 results): Mixed waste fly ash stabilization. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incineration of applicable Department of Energy (DOE) mixed wastes has produced a secondary waste stream of radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous fly ash that also requires treatment before land disposal. Unlike bottom ash, fly ash usually contains constituents making efficient stabilization difficult. For example, fly ash from the DOE Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains volatile metals, metal salts, high concentrations of zinc, and unburned organic residues. All of these constituents can effect the stabilization process. The Department of Energy, and in particular the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) of EM-50, has stated the need for improved stabilization methods would accept a higher ash waste loading while meeting waste form disposal criteria. These alternative stabilization technologies should include delivery systems to minimize worker exposure and minimize secondary waste generation, while maximizing operational flexibility and radionuclide containment. Currently, the standard practice for stabilizing ash is mixing with Portland cement at room temperature. This standard practice produces a significant increase of waste material volume or has difficulty in adequately stabilizing the components in the fly ash to ensure regulatory requirements are consistently satisfied. To address these fly ash stabilization shortcomings, the MWFA, a DOE/EM-50 program, invested in the development of several fly ash stabilization alternatives, including the Clemson University sintering method.

  6. Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    in the United States generate 80 million tons of fly ash as a by-product each year, primarily from coal combustion [1]. Fly ash is typically disposed in landfills, but it is preferred to convert fly ashUse of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung

  7. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

  8. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

  9. Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beaufrere, A.H.

    1982-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas fired furnances or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

  10. Third Annual Report: 2006 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Southard, Susan S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Anderson, Michael G.; Vavrinec, John

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate for these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementation of a multi-year eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements are a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating and stockpiling of local plantstock, and post-construction planting, and c) post-construction monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2006 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. Approximately 1500 additional shoots were harvested from the marine outfall corridor in August 2006 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Washington, bringing the total number of shoots to 4732. Eelgrass densities were monitored in the five experimental harvest plots established in the marine outfall corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. Net eelgrass density decreased from 2004 post-harvest to 2006 in all plots, despite density increases observed in 2005 in some plots and at some harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and the change in density in any interannual period did not correlate to the initial 2004 harvest rate. Continued monitoring should help project managers determine an optimum harvest rate that supports rapid recovery of donor eelgrass beds.

  11. JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition, development of expanded information on the environmental performance of CCBs in utilization settings included the following: (1) Development of information on physical properties and engineering performance for concrete, soil-ash blends, and other products. (2) Training of students through participation in CARRC research projects. (3) Participation in a variety of local, national, and international technical meetings, symposia, and conferences by presenting and publishing CCB-related papers.

  12. DHAHRAN 31261 SAUDI ARABIA www.kfupm.edu.sa/math/ E-mail: mathdept@kfupm.edu.sa King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustafa, M. Tahir

    University of Petroleum & Minerals DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES Technical Report Series TR 360 Oct: Department of Mathematics, Hafr Al-Batin Community College, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P of Mathematical Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia, Email

  13. DHAHRAN 31261 SAUDI ARABIA www.kfupm.edu.sa/math/ E-mail: mathdept@kfupm.edu.sa King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustafa, M. Tahir

    University of Petroleum & Minerals DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES Technical Report Series TR 361 Oct: Department of Mathematics, Hafr Al-Batin Community College, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P of Mathematical Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia, Email

  14. Loreen Meyer, King Philip HS biology teacher. (Staff photo by MARK MONDAY JULY 12, 2010 Last modified: Monday, July 12, 2010 2:15 AM EDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbett, David S.

    Loreen Meyer, King Philip HS biology teacher. (Staff photo by MARK STOCKWELL) Print Page MONDAY-on activities and lab work. So says King Philip Regional High School science teacher Loreen Meyer, who now sits atop the food chain of her peers. Meyer recently became president of the Massachusetts Association

  15. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn A. Norton; Hongqun Yang; Robert C. Brown; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John Erjavec; Joseph M. Okoh

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using fly ash from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was from Blacksville coal. Elemental Hg was injected upstream from samples of fly ash loaded onto filters housed in an oven at 120 or 180 C. Concentrations of oxidized and elemental Hg downstream from the filters were determined using the Ontario Hydro method. The gas stream composition and whether or not ash was present in the gas stream were the two most important variables affecting Hg oxidation. The presence of HCl, NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} were all important with respect to Hg oxidation, with NO{sub 2} and HCl being the most important. The presence of NO suppressed Hg oxidation in these tests. Although the two fly ashes were chemically and mineralogically diverse, there were generally no large differences in catalytic potential (for oxidizing Hg) between them. Similarly, no ash fraction appeared to be highly catalytic relative to other ash fractions. This includes fractions enriched in unburned carbon and fractions enriched in iron oxides. Although some differences of lesser magnitude were observed in the amount of oxidized Hg formed, levels of oxidized Hg generally tracked well with the surface areas of the different ashes and ash fractions. Therefore, although the Blacksville fly ash tended to show slightly more catalytic activity than the PRB fly ash, this could be due to the relatively high surface area of that ash. Similarly, for Blacksville fly ash, using nonmagnetic ash resulted in more Hg oxidation than using magnetic ash, but this again tracked well with the relative surface areas of the two ash fractions. Test results suggest that the gas matrix may be more important in Hg oxidation chemistry than the fly ash composition. Combustion tests were performed in which Blacksville and PRB fly ashes were injected into filtered (via a baghouse with Teflon bags) flue gas obtained while firing PRB coal in a 35 kW combustor. The Ontario Hydro method was used to determine the Hg speciation after fly ash injection. Wall effects in the combustor complicated interpretation of testing data, although a number of observations could still be made. The amount of Hg collected in the Ontario Hydro impingers was lower than anticipated, and is probably due to sorption of Hg by the fly ash. While firing PRB coal without any ash injection, the percent oxidized Hg in the gas stream was fairly high (average of 63%). The high levels of vapor phase oxidized Hg in these base line tests may be due to catalytic effects from the refractory materials in the combustor. When PRB fly ash was injected into a filtered PRB flue gas stream, the percentage of oxidized Hg in the gas stream decreased dramatically. Decreases in the percentage of oxidized Hg were also observed while injecting Blacksville fly ash, but to a lesser extent. Injecting whole Blacksville fly ash into the filtered PRB flue gas appeared to result in greater concentrations of oxidized Hg relative to the tests where whole PRB fly ash was injected. However, because the Blacksville fly ash has a relatively high surface area, this may be only a surface area effect.

  16. A review of "The Poet and the King: Jean de La Fontaine and his Century." by Marc Fumaroli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Joe Johnson

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    understanding of the ways of the steppe peoples allows the reader to learn more about the actions of the Russian government. Last but not least, the book is very well written and is a fascinating read. Marc Fumaroli. The Poet and the King: Jean de La Fontaine...?s articulate expression of his dissent. That trope is at the center of Marc Fumaroli?s detailed, erudite account of the conflict between one of France?s greatest lyric poets, La Fontaine, and its grandest monarch, the Sun King. Louis XIV, ?the last prince...

  17. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using two fly ash samples from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was derived from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was derived from Blacksville coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 seam). The tests were performed at temperatures of 120 and 180 C under different gas compositions using whole fly ash samples as well as magnetic and nonmagnetic concentrates from sized fly ash. Only the Blacksville ash contained magnetic phases. The whole and fractionated fly ash samples were analyzed for morphology, chemical composition, mineralogical composition, total organic carbon, porosity, and surface area. Mineralogically, the Blacksville ash was composed predominantly of magnetite, hematite, quartz, and mullite, while the PRB ash contained mostly quartz with lesser amounts of lime, periclase, and calcium aluminum oxide. The iron oxides in the Blacksville ash were concentrated almost entirely in the largest size fraction. As anticipated, there was not a clean separation of magnetic (Fe-rich) and nonmagnetic (aluminosilicate-rich) phases for the Blacksville ash. The Blacksville ash had a significantly higher surface area and a much higher unburned carbon content than the PRB ash. Elemental mercury (Hg) streams were injected into the simulated flue gas and passed over filters (housed in a convection oven) loaded with fly ash. Concentrations of total, oxidized, and elemental Hg downstream from the ash samples were determined by the Ontario Hydro Method. The gas stream composition and whether or not ash was present in the gas stream were the two most important variables. Based on the statistical analyses, the presence of HCl, NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} and all two-way gas interactions were significant. In addition, it appears that even four-factor interactions between those gases are significant. The HCl, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} were critical gases resulting in Hg oxidation, while the presence of NO appeared to suppress oxidation. The Blacksville fly ash tended to show slightly more catalytic activity than the PRB fly ash, but this could be largely due to the higher surface area of the Blacksville ash. Temperature was not a statistically important factor. The magnetic (Fe-rich) phases did not appear to be more catalytically active than the nonmagnetic phases, and unburned carbon did not appear to play a critical role in oxidation chemistry.

  18. The preservation potential of ash layers in the deep-sea: the example of the 1991-Pinatubo ash in the South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Andreas

    - burrowing animals re-opened their connection to the sea floor to obtain water for respiration and/or food deposited organic fluff with the underlying ash. Consequently, ash deposits thinner than 1 mm have not often of background sedimentation, the availability of benthic food on and within the sediment and pore water oxygen

  19. Construction of an embankment with a fly and bottom ash mixture: field performance study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, S.; Balunaini, U.; Yildirim, I.Z.; Prezzi, M.; Siddiki, N.Z. [Louisiana Transportation Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash and bottom ash are coal combustion by-products (CCBPs) that are generated in large quantities throughout the world. It is often economical to dispose ash as mixtures rather than separately; that notwithstanding, only a few studies have been performed to investigate the behavior of fly and bottom ash mixtures, particularly those with high contents of fly ash. Also, there is very limited data available in the literature on the field performance of structures constructed using ash mixtures. This paper describes the construction and the instrumentation of a demonstration embankment built with an ash mixture (60:40 by weight of fly ash:bottom ash) on State Road 641, Terre Haute, Ind. Monitoring of the demonstration embankment was conducted for a period of 1 year from the start of construction of the embankment. The settlement of the embankment stabilized approximately 5 months after the end of its construction. According to horizontal inclinometer readings, the differential settlement at the top of the embankment is about 5 mm. Results from field quality control tests performed during construction of the demonstration embankment and monitoring data from vertical and horizontal inclinometers and settlement plates indicate that the ash mixture investigated can be considered an acceptable embankment construction material.

  20. Utilization of ash from municipal solid waste combustion. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.M.; Hartman, R.M.; Kort, D.; Rapues, N.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ash study investigates several aspects of Municipal Waste Combustion (MWC) ash utilization to develop an alternative to the present disposal practice of landfilling in a lined monofill. Ash was investigated as a daily or final cover for municipal waste in the landfill to prevent erosion and as a road construction aggregate. Samples of eight mixtures of ash and other materials, and one sample of soil were analyzed for chemical constituents. Biological tests on these mixters were conducted, along with erosion tests and sieve analyses. A chemical analysis of each sieve size was conducted. Geotechnical properties of the most promising materials were made. Findings to this point include: all ash samples take have passed the EPA TCLP testing; chemical analysis of bottom and combined ash samples indicate less than expected variability; selected ash mixtures exhibited very low coefficients of hydraulic conductivity; all but one of the ash mixtures exhibited greater erosion resistance than the currently used landfill cover material; MWC combined analysis indicates this is a viable alternative for landfill cover; MWC ash size reactions and chemical analysis show bottom and combined ash to be a viable alternative for road construction.

  1. Differences in gasification behaviors and related properties between entrained gasifier fly ash and coal char

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Gu; Shiyong Wu; Youqing Wu; Ye Li; Jinsheng Gao [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China). Department of Chemical Engineering for Energy Resources and Key Laboratory of Coal Gasification of Ministry of Education

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the study, two fly ash samples from Texaco gasifiers were compared to coal char and the physical and chemical properties and reactivity of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM-energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption method, and isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The main results were obtained. The carbon content of gasified fly ashes exhibited 31-37%, which was less than the carbon content of 58-59% in the feed coal. The fly ashes exhibited higher Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, richer meso- and micropores, more disordered carbon crystalline structure, and better CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity than coal char. Ashes in fly ashes occurred to agglomerate into larger spherical grains, while those in coal char do not agglomerate. The minerals in fly ashes, especial alkali and alkaline-earth metals, had a catalytic effect on gasification reactivity of fly ash carbon. In the low-temperature range, the gasification process of fly ashes is mainly in chemical control, while in the high-temperature range, it is mainly in gas diffusion control, which was similar to coal char. In addition, the carbon in fly ashes was partially gasified and activated by water vapor and exhibited higher BET surface area and better gasification activity. Consequently, the fact that these carbons in fly ashes from entrained flow gasifiers are reclaimed and reused will be considered to be feasible. 15 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Have you ever wondered about Europe's distant past? Do you want to know more about knights and chiv-alry, about the literature of Robin Hood and King Arthur, or the magnificence of Gothic and Renaissance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    , or the poetry of Chaucer; you can study the troubled reign of King John, or the Cathar heretics of Southern

  3. Fourth Annual Report: 2007 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Southard, Susan S.; Vavrinec, John

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementing a multiyear eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements related to eelgrass are (a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, (b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating, and stockpiling of local plants for post-construction planting, and (c) post-construction planting and subsequent monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2007 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) in Sequim, Washington, and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. In addition, 490 eelgrass shoots were also harvested from the Marine Outfall Corridor in July 2007 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the MSL, bringing the total number of shoots to 1464. Eelgrass densities were monitored in four of five experimental harvest plots established in the Marine Outfall Corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. A net increase in eelgrass density from 2004 post-harvest to 2007 was observed in all plots, despite density decreases observed in 2006 in all plots and at most harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and the change in density in any interannual period was not related to initial 2004 harvest rate. Harvest rates of neighboring subplots did not appear to affect subplot eelgrass density (Woodruff et al. 2007). Three years post-harvest, eelgrass shoot densities were not significantly different from pre-harvest shoot densities at any harvest level. Additional plans are being discussed with King County to harvest all eelgrass from the construction corridor and hold in the propagation tanks at the MSL for post-construction planting. Under this plan, plants that would have been lost to construction will be held offsite until construction is completed. This strategy reduces and possibly eliminates the need to harvest eelgrass from donor beds located south of the construction area, allowing them to remain undisturbed. However, if eelgrass is harvested from donor beds, the monitoring of eelgrass growth at different harvest rates should help determine an optimum harvest rate that supports rapid recovery of donor eelgrass beds.

  4. King Coal vs. Reclamation: federal regulation of mountaintop removal mining in Appalachia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, C.E.; Duffy, R.J. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Political Science

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on the regulatory politics of mountaintop removal mining for coal within the Appalachian states of West Virginia and Kentucky. Based on Administrative Presidency concepts suggesting that chief executives seek more control and influence over agency program decisions, this article analyzes President George W. Bush's efforts to promote the development of coal resources within these states despite statutory constraints posed by federal environmental laws. The analysis demonstrates that President Bush effectively achieved his energy production goals by combining the use of discretionary authority with staff controls, executive orders, and regulatory initiatives to lessen industry compliance costs with environmental regulatory requirements.

  5. Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, R.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two recent large-scale spills of coal combustion waste have highlighted the old problem of handling the enormous quantity of solid waste produced by coal. Both spills happened at power plants run by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). In December 2008 a holding pond for coal ash collapsed at a power plant in Kingstom, Tenn., releasing coal-ash sludge onto farmland and into rivers: in January 2009 a break in a pipe removing water from a holding pond for gypsum caused a spill at Widows Creek Fossil Plant in Stevenson, Ala. The article discusses the toxic outcome of such disasters on ecosystems, quoting work by Willaim Hopkins at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and recommendations and reports of the US EPA. 2 photos.

  6. Ash reduction in clean coal spiral product circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodzik, P.

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The article describes the Derrick Corporation's Stack Sizer{trademark} technology for high capacity fine wet cleaning with long-lasting high open-area urethane screen panels. After field trials, a Stack Sizer fitted with a 100-micron urethane panel is currently processing approximately 40 stph of clean coal spiral product having about 20% ash at McCoy-Elkhorn's Bevin Branch coal preparation plant in Kentucky, USA. Product yield is about 32.5 short tons per hour with 10% ash. The material is then fed to screen bowl centrifuges for further processing. At Blue Diamond Coal's Leatherwood preparation plant similar Stacker Sizers are achieving the same results. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 2 photo.

  7. Effects of Sediment Containing Coal Ash from the Kingston Ash Release on Embryo-Larval Development in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL] [ORNL; Elmore, Logan R [ORNL] [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL] [ORNL; Sherrard, Rick [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)] [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The largest environmental release of coal ash in U.S. history occurred in December 2008 with the failure of a retention structure at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee. A byproduct of coal-burning power plants, coal ash is enriched in metals and metalloids such as selenium and arsenic with known toxicity to fish including embryonic and larval stages. The effects of contact exposure to sediments containing up to 78 % coal ash from the Kingston spill on the early development of fish embryos and larvae were examined in 7-day laboratory tests with the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). No significant effects were observed on hatching success, incidences of gross developmental abnormalities, or embryo-larval survival. Results suggest that direct exposures to sediment containing residual coal ash from the Kingston ash release may not present significant risks to fish eggs and larvae in waterways affected by the spill.

  8. The reactions and ashes of thermonuclear explosions on neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Fisker; E. Brown; M. Liebendoerfer; F. -K. Thielemann; M. Wiescher

    2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the detailed rp-process reaction flow on an accreting neutron star and the resulting ashes of a type I X-ray burst. It is obtained by coupling a 298 isotope reaction network to a self-consistent one-dimensional model calculation with a constant accretion rate of dM/dt=1.0e17g/s (0.09 Eddington).

  9. Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

    1992-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

  10. Modeling the formation and size distribution of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlin, R.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of mathematical models has been developed to predict the size distribution of fly ash particles formed in pulverized coal combustion. The large particle mode of the size distribution, typically centered about 10 to 20 ..mu..m, is predicted by a simple breakup model that is based on the complete coalescence of molten mineral inclusions within fragments of the devolatilized coal char. The ultrafine particle mode, that is typically centered about 0.1 to 0.2 ..mu..m, is modeled in terms of ash volatilization, nucleation, and coagulation. Silica and alumina are reduced to volatile suboxides through reactions at the char surface. The volatile suboxides are transported from the char surface where they are oxidized back to the stable oxides in the bulk gas, and then nucleated in accordance with homogeneous nucleation theory. The ultrafine nuclei coagulate in accordance with Brownian coagulation theory. The predicted particle size spectra have been compared to measured size distributions from a pilot-scale combustor and a full-scale utility boiler. Considering the disproportionate loss of coarse particles in the pilot-scale unit, the agreement between the predicted and measured size distributions was considered reasonably good. Both the predicted ultrafine and large particle modes agreed reasonably well with the measured particle size distribution for the full scale boiler. The validated computer models were used to study the effect of changes in the coal ash content, coal particle size, and the combustion flame temperature.

  11. Fab Four: When John and George play gravitation and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Philippe Bruneton; Massimiliano Rinaldi; Antonin Kanfon; Aurélien Hees; Sandrine Schlögel; André Füzfa

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Scalar-tensor theories of gravitation have recently regained a great interest after the discovery of the Chameleon mechanism and of the Galileon models. The former allows, in principle, to reconcile the presence of cosmological scalar fields with the constraints from experiments at the Solar System scale. The latter open up the possibility of building inflationary models that, among other things, do not need ad hoc potentials. Further generalizations have finally led to the most general tensor-scalar theory, recently dubbed the "Fab Four", with only first and second order derivatives of the fields in the equations of motion and that self-tune to a vanishing cosmological constant. This model has a very rich phenomenology that needs to be explored and confronted with experimental data in order to constrain a very large parameter space. In this paper, we present some results regarding a subset of the theory named "John", which corresponds to a non-minimal derivative coupling between the scalar field and the Einstein tensor in the action. We show that this coupling gives rise to an inflationary model with very unnatural initial conditions. Thus, we include a non-minimal, but non-derivative, coupling between scalar field and Ricci scalar, a term named "George" in the Fab Four terminology. In this way, we find a more sensible inflationary model, and, by performing a post-newtonian expansion of spherically symmetric solutions, we derive the set of equations that constrain the parameter space with data from experiments in the solar system.

  12. Respirable aerosols from fluidized bed coal combustion. 3. Elemental composition of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissman, S.H.; Carpenter, R.L.; Newton, G.J.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized bed coal combustion is a promising technology for using coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Trace elemental constituents in fly ash from an experimental atmospheric pressure fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) are reported and compared with pulverized-coal combustor (PCC) ash data and those from other fluidized bed combustors. Bulk and size-separated particles were collected and analyzed by using spark source mass spectrometry.Fluidized bed combustor ash was similar to PCC ash in minor and trace element composition. However, AFBC ash showed less size dependence of elemental composition than has been reported for PCC ash. Bulk particle elemental composition varied with sampling position within the effluent stream. Penetration of elements through each cleanup stage and elemental enrichment were a function of the cleanup stage and the element under consideration.

  13. Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, C.W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This integrated, multi-product approach for utilizing Illinois coal starts with the production of ultra low-ash coal and then converts it to high-vale, coal-derived, products. The ultra low-ash coal is produced by solubilizing coal in a phenolic solvent under ChemCoal{trademark} process conditions, separating the coal solution from insoluble ash, and then precipitating the clean coal by dilution of the solvent with methanol. Two major products, liquids and low-ash char, are then produced by mild gasification of the low-ash coal. The low ash-char is further upgraded to activated char, and/or an oxidized activated char which has catalytic properties. Characterization of products at each stage is part of this project.

  14. The King's College London HEI project Health, Environment and Reducing air pollution in London, combating cardio-respiratory illness,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applebaum, David

    The King's College London HEI project ­ Health, Environment and Innovation Reducing air pollution & partners London suffers with the worst air pollution in the UK and some of poorest in Europe. Poor air of monitors to detect changes in London's air pollution levels. Having won the contract to operate the LEZ

  15. Neuron PID: A Robust AQM Scheme Jinsheng Sun, Sammy Chan, King-Tim Ko, Guanrong Chen and Moshe Zukerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zukerman, Moshe

    Neuron PID: A Robust AQM Scheme Jinsheng Sun, Sammy Chan, King-Tim Ko, Guanrong Chen and Moshe active queue management (AQM) scheme based on a Proportional-Integral- Derivative (PID) controller, called Neuron PID, that uses an adaptive neuron to tune its parameters. We demonstrate by simulations

  16. A review of ash in conventional and advanced coal-based power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcombe, N.T.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Process conditions are briefly described for conventional and advanced power systems. The advanced systems include both combustion and gasification processes. We discuss problems in coal-based power generation systems, including deposition, agglomeration and sintering of bed materials, and ash attack are discussed. We also discuss methods of mitigating ash problems and anticipated changes anticipated in ash use by converting from conventional to advanced systems.

  17. INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

  18. Respirable aerosols from fluidized bed coal combustion. 3. Elemental composition of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissman, S.H.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace element constituents in fly ash from an experimental atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) are reported and compared with pulverized coal combustor (PCC) data and those from other fluidized bed combustors. Bulk and size-separated particles were collected and analyzed using spark source mass spectrometry. Fluidized bed combustion ash was similar to PCC ash in minor and trace element composition, but AFBC ash showed less size dependence of elemental composition. Bulk particle elemental composition varied with sampling position within the effluent stream. Penetration of elements through each cleanup stage and elemental enrichment were a function of the cleanup stage and the element under consideration.

  19. Coal deposit characterization by gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, David Scott

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density/Ash Relationship . APPLICATION OF THE GAMMA-GAMMA DENSITY/PERCENT DRY ASH RELATIONSHIPS The Density/Ash Relationship of a South Texas Lignite Deposit Characterization of a South Texas Lignite Deposit CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES. 52 53 53 53... 58 64 67 6g 80 87 LIST OF TABLES TABLE I Coal Classification by Rank. 2 Common Minerals in Coal. 3 Results of Linear Regression Analyses for a South Texas Lignite Deposit. 4 Variability of Geophysica11y-Derived Percent Dry Ash Values...

  20. Experimental and numerical analysis of metal leaching from fly ash-amended highway bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetin, Bora [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Aydilek, Ahmet H., E-mail: aydilek@umd.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Li, Lin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 17068 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the evaluation of leaching potential of fly ash-lime mixed soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This objective is met with experimental and numerical analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn leaching decreases with increase in fly ash content while Ba, B, Cu increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu while Zn increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical analysis predicted lower field metal concentrations. - Abstract: A study was conducted to evaluate the leaching potential of unpaved road materials (URM) mixed with lime activated high carbon fly ashes and to evaluate groundwater impacts of barium, boron, copper, and zinc leaching. This objective was met by a combination of batch water leach tests, column leach tests, and computer modeling. The laboratory tests were conducted on soil alone, fly ash alone, and URM-fly ash-lime kiln dust mixtures. The results indicated that an increase in fly ash and lime content has significant effects on leaching behavior of heavy metals from URM-fly ash mixture. An increase in fly ash content and a decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu whereas Zn leaching was primarily affected by the fly ash content. Numerically predicted field metal concentrations were significantly lower than the peak metal concentrations obtained in laboratory column leach tests, and field concentrations decreased with time and distance due to dispersion in soil vadose zone.

  1. George Gollin, Investigation of TESLA Damping Ring Kickers using the A0 Photoinjector Beam 1 Investigation of TESLA Damping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollin, George

    George Gollin, Investigation of TESLA Damping Ring Kickers using the A0 Photoinjector Beam 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . IPhysicsP Illinois Investigation of TESLA Damping Ring Kickers using the A0 Photoinjector Beam George, Investigation of TESLA Damping Ring Kickers using the A0 Photoinjector Beam 2

  2. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--January 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to investigate the kinetics of beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7--2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash beneficiation have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550--750{degrees}C. The P{sub 02} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively.

  3. Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

    2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

  4. A review of "Picturing Religious Experience: George Herbert, Calvin, and the Scriptures" by Daniel W. Doerksen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewton-Brain, Anna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    #16;#17;#15; #29;#28;#27;#28;#26;#25;#28;#28;#26;#25;#24;-#23;#28;#26;#25;#22;#21;#20; #26;#28;#19;#29; Daniel W. Doerksen. Picturing Religious Experience: George Herbert, Calvin, and the Scriptures. Newark: University of Delaware Press, #18... picture of the many spiritual Con?icts that have past betwixt God and my Soul? ( )?holds the key, for Daniel Doerksen, to interpreting Herbert?s poetry in the light of Calvin?s biblical commentary. Indeed, Picturing Religious Experience: George Herbert...

  5. George F. Chapline, Jr., 1982 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) MappingOctober 12,U.S. DOEGas Phase ChemicalGeorge A.George F.

  6. George F. Smoot, 1994 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) MappingOctober 12,U.S. DOEGas Phase ChemicalGeorge A.George

  7. Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrimArkansas County,Minnesota:Arthur,Ascent SolarAscoenergyAsh

  8. Blue Ash, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022 |Bleckley County,Minnesota:Open EnergyAsh, Ohio:

  9. Biomonitoring of the genotoxic potential of aqueous extracts of soils and bottom ash resulting from municipal solid waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    municipal solid waste incineration, using the comet and micronucleus tests on amphibian (Xenopus laevis ash resulting from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWIBA percolate), using amphibian larvae waste incineration bottom ash; Percolate 1. Introduction Environmental management of municipal solid

  10. Determination of Total Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Wychen, S.; Laurens, L. M. L.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure describes the methods used to determine the amount of moisture or total solids present in a freeze-dried algal biomass sample, as well as the ash content. A traditional convection oven drying procedure is covered for total solids content, and a dry oxidation method at 575?C is covered for ash content.

  11. California bearing ratio behavior of soil-stabilized class F fly ash systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leelavathamma, B.; Mini, K.M.; Pandian, N.S. [Indian Institute for Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. for Civil Engineering

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is a finely divided mineral residue resulting from the combustion of coal in power plants that occupies large extents of land and also causes environmental problems. Hence, concerted attempts are being made to effectively use fly ash in an environmentally friendly way instead of dumping. Several studies have been carried out for its bulk utilization, such as its addition to improve the California bearing ratio (CBR) of soil in roads and embankments. But a thorough mixing of fly ash with soil may not be possible in the field. Hence a study has been carried out on the CBR behavior of black cotton soil and Raichur fly ash (which is class F) in layers and compared with the same in mixes. The results show that the CBR values of soil-fly ash mixes are better than layers, as expected. To improve the strength of layers, cement is used as an additive to fly ash. The results show that black cotton soil can be improved with stabilized fly ash, solving its strength problem as well as the disposal problem of fly ash.

  12. Site-specific study on stabilization of acid-generating mine tailings using coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, J.Q.; Wang, H.L.; Kovac, V.; Fyfe, J. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A site-specific study on stabilizing acid-generating mine tailings from Sudbury Mine using a coal fly ash from Nanticoke Generating Station is presented in this paper. The objective of the study is to evaluate the feasibility of codisposal of the fly ash and mine tailings to reduce environmental impacts of Sudbury tailings disposal sites. The study includes three phases, i.e., characterization of the mine tailings, and coal fly ash, oxidation tests on the mine tailings and kinetic column permeation tests. The results of the experiments indicate that when permeated with acid mine drainage, the hydraulic conductivity of Nanticoke coal fly ash decreased more than three orders of magnitude (from 1 x 10{sup -6} to 1 x 10{sup -9} cm/s), mainly due to chemical reactions between the ash solids and acid mine drainage. Furthermore, the hydraulic gradient required for acid mine drainage to break through the coal fly ash is increased up to ten times (from 17 to 150) as compared with that for water. The results also show that the leachate from coal fly ash neutralizes the acidic pore fluid of mine tailings. The concentrations of trace elements in effluents from all kinetic column permeation tests indicated that coplacement of coal fly ash with mine tailings has the benefit of immobilizing trace elements, especially heavy metals. All regulated element concentrations from effluent during testing are well below the leachate quality criteria set by the local regulatory authority.

  13. Market Assessment and Technical Feasibility Study of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Western Research Institute in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy Technology Center (METC), has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) ashes. The assessment is designed to address six applications, including: (1) structural fill, (2) road base construction, (3) supplementary cementing materials in portland cement, (4) synthetic aggregate, and (5) agricultural/soil amendment applications. Ash from low-sulfur subbituminous coal-fired Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, and ash from the high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired American Electric Power (AEP) bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing. This paper addresses the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC unit using low- sulfur coal and limestone sorbent (karhula ash) and high-sulfur coal and dolomite sorbents (AEP Tidd ash).

  14. Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

    Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1* , L. S. Fisher1 , J of the potential for carbon sequestration in degraded mine lands, we have found that based on laboratory and field and its influence on carbon sequestration. Also, addition of fly ash to soil, while generally considered

  15. Emission Control Technology, Performance/Durability -POSTER Effect of Accelerated Ash Loading on Performance of Diesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    on Performance of Diesel Particulate Filters and Morphology of Ash Layers Bruce G. Bunting and Todd J. Toops using a single-cylinder diesel engine has been developed for accelerated ash loading in catalyzed and non- catalyzed diesel particular filters (DPF) made of cordierite, SiC and mullite substrate

  16. MULTIPLE-SCALE DYNAMIC LEACHING OF A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE INCINERATION ASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 MULTIPLE-SCALE DYNAMIC LEACHING OF A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE INCINERATION ASH Waste Management (in source such as municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration ash, requires a knowledge of the so percolating through waste evolve over time, for a given percolation scenario (infiltration rate, waste source

  17. Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    permits. To improve the aesthetic qualities of the effluent, coal ash (from local power plants_mill_discharge.jpg 2. Coal Power Plant http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/images/2008Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power

  18. Soil stabilization using optimum quantity of calcium chloride with Class F fly ash 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hyung Jun

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    in soil to verify the effectiveness and optimum ratio of calcium chloride and Class F fly ash in soil stabilization. Mix design was programmed at pure calcium chloride concentrations at 0% to 6% and Class F fly ash at 10 to 15%. Laboratory tests showed...

  19. Separation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil shale ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jordanian oil shale ash was used as an adsorbent for the removal of copper and zinc from aqueous solution.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Oil shale; Ash; Adsorption; Copper and zinc removal 1. IntroductionSeparation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251­257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil

  20. Canopy, litter and allelopathic effects of Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei, Buchholz) on understory vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yager, Lisa Yvonne

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , subirrigated litter treatment, and surface watered litter treatment. . 87 Figure 12 Drying rates of Ashe juniper litter when watered every 2, 3, and 4 days. . 92 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1 Field treatments to test the influence of Ashe juniper canopy...

  1. Experimental and numerical analysis of metal leaching from fly ash-amended highway bases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    December 2011 Available online xxxx Keywords: Coal combustion by products Fly ash Heavy metals Leaching road materials (URM) mixed with lime activated high carbon fly ashes and to evaluate groundwater is produced in the United States as a by-product of burning coal in electric power plants (ACAA, 2009

  2. Ash, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium content of the metacarpus of hereford cows under different nutritional and physiological conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haque, Mozammel

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ASH, CALCIUM, PHOSPHORUS AND MAGNESIUM CONTENT OF THE METACARPUS OF HEREFORD COWS UNDER DIFFERENT NUTRITIONAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CONDITIONS A Thesis By MOZAMMEL HAQUE Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial... centages of Calcium, Phosphorus snd Magnesium in Bone Ash for Cows Gi;en Different Treatments During Pre- And Post-Partum Periods 22 10 Analysis of Variance oi Calcium in Bone Ash Dun an's )tultiple tvange Test 1'or Calcium in Bone Ash. Analy...

  3. pH-dependent leaching of dump coal ash - retrospective environmental analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovic, A.; Djordjevic, D. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Dept. of Chemistry

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace and major elements in coal ash particles from dump of 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant in Obrenovac near Belgrade (Serbia) can cause pollution, due to leaching by atmospheric and surface waters. In order to assess this leaching potential, dump ash samples were subjected to extraction with solutions of decreasing pH values (8.50, 7.00, 5.50, and 4.00), imitating the reactions of the alkaline ash particles with the possible alkaline, neutral, and acidic (e.g., acid rain) waters. The most recently deposited ash represents the greatest environmental threat, while 'aged' ash, because of permanent leaching on the dump, was shown to have already lost this pollution potential. On the basis of the determined leachability, it was possible to perform an estimation of the acidity of the regional rainfalls in the last decades.

  4. Treatment technologies for hazardous ashes generated from possible incineration of navy waste. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, T.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Navy recognizes that thermal treatment of Navy hazardous wastes (HW) should, under the terms of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, be avoided. Combustion waste disposal may nonetheless become unavoidable in certain cases, even after all possible process enhancements that avoid HW production are implemented. Even then, some toxic constituents that may be present in the waste will not be destroyed by incineration and will persist in the ash residue produced by incineration. Such incinerator ashes will have to be disposed of in HW landfills. The Navy is thus evaluating methods of treatment of such ash to remove or immobilize the toxic constituents that persist following incineration in order to render the waste treatment residue nonhazardous. Appropriate technology identified in this work can be applied to ash produced by HW combuster operated by the Navy, if any, or be required for ash produced by commercial generators handling Navy HWs.

  5. Use of rubber and bentonite added fly ash as a liner material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cokca, Erdal; Yilmaz, Zeka

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many countries regulations require all hazardous waste disposal facilities to be lined with suitable impermeable barriers to protect against contamination. In this study, a series of laboratory tests on rubber and bentonite added fly ash were conducted. The aim of the tests was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash, rubber and bentonite as a low hydraulic conductivity liner material. Type C fly ash was obtained from Soma thermal power plant in Turkey; rubber in pulverized form was waste from the retreading industry. To investigate the properties of rubber and bentonite added fly ash, hydraulic conductivity, leachate analysis, unconfined compression, split tensile strength, one-dimensional consolidation, swell and freeze/thaw cycle tests were performed. The overall evaluation of results have revealed that rubber and bentonite added fly ash showed good promise and a candidate for construction of a liner.

  6. In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernath, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sinquefield, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Oregon State Univ., Eugene, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Barfield, M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Evaluation of rice husk ash as filler in tread compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, M. R. S., E-mail: monica.fernandes@lanxess.com [Lanxess Elastômeros do Brasil S.A., Brasil and Instituto de Química, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ) (Brazil); Furtado, C. R. G., E-mail: russi@globo.com, E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com; Sousa, A. M. F. de, E-mail: russi@globo.com, E-mail: ana.furtado.sousa@gmail.com [Instituto de Química, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ) (Brazil)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rice which is one of the largest agriculture crops produces around 22% of rice rusk during its milling process. This material is mainly used as fuel for energy generation, which results in an ash, which disposal represents an environmental issue. The rice husk ash (RHA) contains over than 70% of silica in an amorphous form and a lot of applications is being developed for it all over the world. The use of silica as a filler in the tire industry is growing since it contributes significantly to the reduction of fuel consumption of the automobiles, allowing at the same time better traction (safety). This paper presents an evaluation of the use of RHA as filler in rubber tread compounds prepared in lab scale and compares its performance with compounds prepared with commercial silica and carbon black, the fillers normally used in tire industry. Mechanical and rheological properties are evaluated, with emphasis for tan delta as an indicator of tread performance related with rolling resistance (fuel consumption) and wet grip/traction (safety)

  8. 488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

  9. THE CHAPEL OF ST HUGH AND ST CHAD IN THE KING'S HALL AND COLLEGE OF BRASENOSE MUSIC LIST, TRINITY TERM 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    THE CHAPEL OF ST HUGH AND ST CHAD IN THE KING'S HALL AND COLLEGE OF BRASENOSE MUSIC LIST, TRINITY Eucharist, 6pm Congregational Setting: Cullen Motet: Lead me, Lord - SS Wesley 6th Week - Trinity Sunday

  10. DHAHRAN 31261 SAUDI ARABIA www.kfupm.edu.sa/math/ E-mail: mathdept@kfupm.edu.sa King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joarder, Anwar H

    University of Petroleum & Minerals DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES Technical Report Series TR 359 Oct@fiu.edu and Anwar H. Joarder Department of Mathematical Sciences King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals

  11. Coal fly ash basins as an attractive nuisance to birds: Parental provisioning exposes nestlings to harmful trace elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    inhabiting settling impoundments receiving slurried ash from a coal-fired power plant located on the U. SCoal fly ash basins as an attractive nuisance to birds: Parental provisioning exposes nestlings Keywords: Coal fly ash basin Common Grackle Contaminants Quiscalus quiscala Selenium a b s t r a c t Birds

  12. Evaluation of the effects of coal fly ash amendments on the toxicity of a contaminated marine sediment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, R.M.; Perron, M.M.; Friedman, C.L.; Suuberg, E.M.; Pennell, K.G.; Cantwell, M.G.; Pelletier, M.C.; Ho, K.T.; Serbst, J.R.; Ryba, S.A. [US EPA, Narragansett, RI (USA). Office for Research and Development

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Approaches for cleaning up contaminated sediments range from dredging to in situ treatment. In this study, we discuss the effects of amending reference and contaminated sediments with coal fly ash to reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of a field sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Six fly ashes and a coconut charcoal were evaluated in 7-d whole sediment toxicity tests with a marine amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). Fly ashes with high carbon content and the coconut charcoal showed proficiency at reducing toxicity. Some of the fly ashes demonstrated toxicity in the reference treatments. It is suspected that some of this toxicity is related to the presence of ammonia associated with fly ashes as a result of postoxidation treatment to reduce nitrous oxide emissions. Relatively simple methods exist to remove ammonia from fly ash before use, and fly ashes with low ammonia content are available. Fly ashes were also shown to effectively reduce overlying water concentrations of several PAHs. No evidence was seen of the release of the metals cadmium, copper, nickel, or lead from the fly ashes. A preliminary 28-d polychaete bioaccumulation study with one of the high-carbon fly ashes and a reference sediment was also performed. Although preliminary, no evidence was seen of adverse effects to worm growth or lipid content or of accumulation of PAHs or mercury from exposure to the fly ash. These data show fly ashes with high carbon content could represent viable remedial materials for reducing the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments.

  13. J. Marshall Ash Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 108, No. 2. (Feb., 1990), p. 571.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ash, J. Marshall

    Erratum J. Marshall Ash Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 108, No. 2. (Feb, February 1990 ERRATUM J. MARSHALL ASH The paper "A new proof of uniqueness for multiple trigonometric series" by J. Marshall Ash, which appeared in 107(2) October 1989, should have been entitled "A new proof

  14. County looks at turning waste ash into money Two companies using grant to investigate ways to recycle incinerator byproduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    in York County generates about 160,000 tons of ash per year, and attempts to dispose of it have caused Technology Inc. will seek to use the ash in synthetic stones called Brixx, which also re-use coal wasteCounty looks at turning waste ash into money Two companies using grant to investigate ways

  15. Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

  16. Metal Bioavailability and Speciation in a Wetland Tailings Repository Amended with Biosolids Compost, Wood Ash, and Sulfate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Compost, Wood Ash, and Sulfate Pam S. DeVolder, Sally L. Brown,* Dean Hesterberg, and Kumi Pandya ABSTRACT tundra swans surface amendments: (i) biosolids compost plus wood ash, (ii) and other animals found in the area have tested positive compost wood ash a low SO2 4 addition as K2SO4, and (iii) for Pb poisoning

  17. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the benefication of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7-2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash benefication have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550-750{degrees}C. The P{sub O{sub 2}} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Chi

    Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman Division and planetary materials easier and faster down to nano-scales. Small but new minerals with important geological significance are being discovered. Nano-features are being discovered in many common minerals and gems, which

  19. On Coxeter's families of group presentations George Havasa,*,1, Derek F. Holtb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Derek

    ). The problem was unsolved for eight groups: (2, 3, 13; 4), (3, 4, 9; 2), (3, 4, * *11; 2), (3, 4, 13; 2), (3 On Coxeter's families of group presentations George Havasa,*,1. ____________________________________________________________________ Abstract In 1939 Coxeter published three infinite families of group presentations (which he called

  20. Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Yannick Degeilh, Justine Descloux, George Gross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Resources Yannick Degeilh, Justine-scale storage [3],[4] to facilitate the improved harnessing of the wind resources by storing wind energy Descloux, George Gross University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA Abstract ­ Utility-scale storage

  1. Fair Blind Signatures without Random Oracles Georg Fuchsbauer and Damien Vergnaud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Fair Blind Signatures without Random Oracles Georg Fuchsbauer and Damien Vergnaud ´Ecole normale. A fair blind signature is a blind signature with revocable anonymity and unlinkability, i requested it. In this paper we first revisit the security model for fair blind signatures given

  2. Receding-horizon Supervisory Control of Green Buildings Truong X. Nghiem, George J. Pappas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    .S. Department of Energy. Consequently, there has been a growing interest in green buildings, i.e., energy]). For this reason, green buildings (i.e., energy-efficient buildings) have been of strong interest not onlyReceding-horizon Supervisory Control of Green Buildings Truong X. Nghiem, George J. Pappas

  3. Drowning in the Data Deluge George E. Andrews (1)(2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drowning in the Data Deluge George E. Andrews (1)(2) Abstract The Data Deluge and its digital, the side effects of the Data Deluge. Pantula's letter provides a nice starting point. Here is the relevant technology revolution is the `DATA DELUGE,' shorthand for the emergence of massive amounts of data

  4. EL Program: Smart Grid Program Manager: George Arnold, Designated Goal Liaison; David Wollman,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    EL Program: Smart Grid Program Manager: George Arnold, Designated Goal Liaison; David Wollman, Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems Program Office, Engineering Laboratory Office, x2433; Dean and power flows, and additional advancements to create a smart grid. In response to a mandate given

  5. Opening Remarks by George W. Arnold, National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Opening Remarks by George W. Arnold, National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability Conference on Smart Grid Interoperability Standards January 31, 2011 Introduction Chairman Wellinghoff the opportunity to escribe NIST's and our partners efforts to develop standards for an interoperable d smart grid

  6. West Virginia Economic Outlook 2012 George W. Hammond, Associate Director, BBER,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia Economic Outlook 2012 George W. Hammond, Associate Director, BBER, and Associate Professor of Economics West Virginia Economic Outlook 2012 is published by the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the College of Business and Economics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6527

  7. West Virginia Economic Outlook 2010 George W. Hammond, Associate Director, BBER,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia Economic Outlook 2010 George W. Hammond, Associate Director, BBER, and Associate Professor of Economics West Virginia Economic Outlook 2010 is published by the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the College of Business and Economics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6025

  8. West Virginia Economic Outlook 2011 George W. Hammond, Associate Director, BBER,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    West Virginia Economic Outlook 2011 George W. Hammond, Associate Director, BBER, and Associate Professor of Economics West Virginia Economic Outlook 2011 is published by the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the College of Business and Economics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6025

  9. Sybil-Resistant Mixing for Bitcoin George Bissias A. Pinar Ozisik Brian N. Levine Marc Liberatore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Sybil-Resistant Mixing for Bitcoin George Bissias A. Pinar Ozisik Brian N. Levine Marc Liberatore}@cs.umass.edu ABSTRACT A fundamental limitation of Bitcoin and its variants is that the movement of coin between propose Xim, a two-party mixing protocol that is compatible with Bitcoin and related virtual currencies

  10. Interactive Rendering using the Render Cache Bruce Waltery, George Drettakisy, Steven Parkerz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Interactive Rendering using the Render Cache Bruce Waltery, George Drettakisy, Steven Parkerz yi. Interactive rendering requires rapid visual feedback. The render cache is a new method for achieving this when using high-quality pixel-oriented renderers such as ray tracing that are usually considered too slow

  11. Flexible Point-Based Rendering on Mobile Devices Florent Duguet and George Drettakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Flexible Point-Based Rendering on Mobile Devices Florent Duguet and George Drettakis REVES/INRIA Sophia-Antipolis, France, http://www-sop.inria.fr/reves Abstract Point-based rendering is a compact and efficient means of displaying complex geometry. Our goal is to enable flexible point-based rendering

  12. The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    211Introduction to Engineering Computation · STAT310Probability and Statistics · STAT410Introduction263 Statistics The George R. Brown School of Engineering Degrees Offered: BA, MStat, MA, PhD Course engineering, computational and applied mathematics, managerial studies, mathematics, political science

  13. Microbial and Enzymatic Biofuel Cells G. Tayhas R. Palmore and George M. Whitesides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Chapter 14 Microbial and Enzymatic Biofuel Cells G. Tayhas R. Palmore and George M. Whitesides the literaturepublished after 1985relevant to microbial and enzymatic biofuel cells. It tabulates the experimental conditions used in operation, the characteristics,and the performance of the reported biofuel cells

  14. On Selffocusing of Short Laser Pulses Vladimir Malkin \\Lambda George Papanicolaou y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Self­focusing of Short Laser Pulses Vladimir Malkin \\Lambda George Papanicolaou y February 14, 1995 Abstract We consider the well­known problem of self­focusing of short laser pulses in media­up. 1 Introduction and background Self­focusing of short laser pulses in media with attracting Kerr

  15. Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    212 Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair. Computer graphics re- #12;Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 213 search involves the cooperation Requirements for B.A., B.S.M.E. in Mechanical Engineering or B.A., B.S.M.S. in Materials Science

  16. Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    190 Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Engineering and Materials Science 191 Work on expert systems and robotics is done in cooperation. Degree Requirements for B.A., B.S.M.E. in Mechanical Engineering or B.A., B.S.M.S. in Materials Science

  17. Addressing equifinality and uncertainty in eutrophication models George B. Arhonditsis,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    Addressing equifinality and uncertainty in eutrophication models George B. Arhonditsis,1 Gurbir of eutrophication processes are commonly used to aid scientific understanding and to guide management decisions of uncertainty in the high-dimensional parameter spaces of mechanistic eutrophication models. We examine

  18. Energy Consumption Tools Pack Leandro Fontoura Cupertino, Georges DaCosta,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, Laurent

    Energy Consumption Library Data Acquisition Tool Data Monitoring Tool Energy Profiler 3 ConclusionsEnergy Consumption Tools Pack Leandro Fontoura Cupertino, Georges DaCosta, Amal Sayah, Jean Consumption Tools Pack 1 / 23 #12;Outline 1 Introduction Motivation Our proposal 2 Energy Consumption Tools

  19. Fluidic Optics George M. Whitesides* and Sindy K.Y. Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Fluidic Optics George M. Whitesides* and Sindy K.Y. Tang Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University 12 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 ABSTRACT Fluidic optics is a new class of optical system with real-time tunability and reconfigurability enabled by the introduction of fluidic

  20. Elastomeric Optics James L. Wilbur, Rebecca J. Jackman, and George M. Whitesides*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Elastomeric Optics James L. Wilbur, Rebecca J. Jackman, and George M. Whitesides* Department, 1995. Revised Manuscript Received April 2, 1996X This paper describes optical components prepared using poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomers and liquid metals as constituent materials. Most optical components

  1. Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    154 Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Don H Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.E.E., M.E.E., M.S., Ph.D. The electrical and computer engineering department, the electrical and computer engineering department's objectives are to provide its undergraduate students with

  2. Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    160 Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering CHAIR Behnaam Offered: BA, BSEE, MEE, MS, PhD The electrical and computer engineering department strives to provide high that will occur during their careers · An in-depth exposure to one area of electrical and computer engineering

  3. Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    162 Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering CHAIR Behnaam. Wise The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) strives to provide high) and the bachelor of science in electrical engineering (BSEE).The BA degree provides a basic foundation

  4. Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    167 Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Don H.E.E., M.S., Ph.D. The electrical and computer engineering department strives to provide high quality of leadership in their chosen careers. In support of this goal, the electrical and computer engineering

  5. Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Behnaam Aazhang in the PraCtiCe Scott Cutler Ray Simar, Jr. Gary Woods The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering) and the bachelor of science in electrical engineering (BSEE). The BA degree #12;2 Departments / Electrical

  6. Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    166 Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Behnaam undergraduate degrees, the bachelor of arts (BA) and the bachelor of science in electrical engineering (BSEE). The BA degree provides a basic foundation in electrical and computer engineering that the student can

  7. Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    174 Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Behnaam, the bachelor of arts (BA) and the bachelor of science in electrical engineering (BSEE). The BA degree provides a basic foundation in electrical and computer engineering that the student can build on to construct

  8. Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1 Electrical and Computer Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Behnaam of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) strives to provide high-quality degree programs that emphasize, the bachelor of arts (BA) and the bachelor of science in electrical engineering (BSEE). The BA degree provides

  9. Optimal Power Management in Wireless Control Systems Konstantinos Gatsis, Alejandro Ribeiro and George J. Pappas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    using approximate dynamic programming and its behavior is validated in simulations and contrasted and George J. Pappas Abstract-- This paper considers the control of a linear plant when a sensor transmits plant state information over a wireless fading channel to a controller physically separated from

  10. John R. Jones and George A. Schier This chapter considers aspen growth as a process,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GROWTH John R. Jones and George A. Schier This chapter considers aspen growth as a process and in chapters in PART 11. ECOLOGY. Aspen growth as it relates to wood production is examined in the WOOD RESOURCE chapter. LIFE-TIME PATTERNS In the West, a stand of aspen may persist for more than 200 years

  11. Copyright George Gross, 2004 1 Evolving Nature of Electricity Market Design in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright George Gross, 2004 1 Evolving Nature of Electricity Market Design in the U.S. G smoothly functioning electricity wholesale markets in the U.S. and the path taken toward the implementation electricity markets is the desire to capture the benefits provided by competitive markets through improved

  12. Electronic properties of carbon nanotube/fabric composites David S. Hecht, Liangbing Hu, George Gruner *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, George

    the mechanical and electronic properties of the polymer matrix. Two dimen- sional networks of conducting by a non- conducting fabric. This composite material has ­ aside from the interest as a model systemElectronic properties of carbon nanotube/fabric composites David S. Hecht, Liangbing Hu, George Gru

  13. GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY FY 2005-06 and FY 2010-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY Comparison FY 2005-06 and FY 2010-11 2005-06 2010-11 Students Enrollment 29 portfolio since the 2005-06 academic year: o Computer game design (BFA) o Global and environmental change 168 Since the 2005-06 academic year, Mason has opened nearly 30 new facilities. Below is a sample

  14. Distributed Connectivity Control of Mobile Networks Michael M. Zavlanos and George J. Pappas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    Distributed Connectivity Control of Mobile Networks Michael M. Zavlanos and George J. Pappas potential fields are used to maintain existing links in the network. Second, distributed coordination and distributed eigenvector computation is considered in [5]. Network connectivity for double integrator agents

  15. Partial Crosstalk Precompensation in Downstream Raphael Cendrillon a,, George Ginis b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partial Crosstalk Precompensation in Downstream VDSL Raphael Cendrillon a,, George Ginis b , Marc than 52 Mbps in the downstream, to the mass consumer market. This is achieved by transmitting and is the primary limitation on performance in VDSL. In downstream transmission several crosstalk precompensation

  16. Pumping based on transverse electrokinetic effects Irina Gitlin, Abraham D. Stroock, and George M. Whitesidesa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Pumping based on transverse electrokinetic effects Irina Gitlin, Abraham D. Stroock, and George M December 2002; accepted 19 June 2003 This work presents a strategy for microfluidic pumping based along the long axis is generated by an electric field applied across the channel. The pump operates

  17. cole Polytechnique Florent Benaych-Georges Anne 2 Stefano De Marco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benaych-Georges, Florent

    �cole Polytechnique Florent Benaych-Georges Année 2 Stefano De Marco Mathématiques Appliquées Monte-Carlo appliquée sous P plus appropriée qu'une méthode de Monte-Carlo naïve. Plus précisément

  18. On Self-focusing of Short Laser Pulses Vladimir Malkin George Papanicolaouy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for \\ultra-short" laser pulses, so that time dispersion may be neglected at least during the early stageOn Self-focusing of Short Laser Pulses Vladimir Malkin George Papanicolaouy February 14, 1995 Abstract We consider the well-known problem of self-focusing of short laser pulses in media with normal

  19. Expressing Realtime Properties in VSE-II Werner Stephan Andreas Nonnengart Georg Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonnengart, Andreas

    Expressing Realtime Properties in VSE-II Werner Stephan Andreas Nonnengart Georg Rock German stephan,nonnengart,rock¡ @dfki.de 1 INTRODUCTION It is well known that in many cases severe errors occur system properties. However, specialized description techniques are needed to treat certain aspects

  20. Morphological barrier island changes and recovery of dunes after Hurricane Dennis, St. George Island, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    of the barrier island are analyzed, along with the short-term post-storm recovery of secondary dunes. ResultsMorphological barrier island changes and recovery of dunes after Hurricane Dennis, St. George September 2009 Keywords: Dune recovery LiDAR Overwash Hurricane Dennis Barrier island During the summer

  1. Constraint-based Movement Representation grounded in Geometric Features Georg Bartels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .bartels@cs.uni-bremen.de Ingo Kresse kresse@cs.tum.edu Michael Beetz beetz@cs.uni-bremen.de Abstract-- Robots that are to master how movements are to be executed Georg Bartels, and Michael Beetz are with the Institute

  2. API Blender: A Uniform Interface to Social Platform APIs Georges Gouriten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senellart, Pierre

    Web, API, REST, data integration 1. INTRODUCTION Interacting with platforms like Facebook, YoutubeAPI Blender: A Uniform Interface to Social Platform APIs Georges Gouriten Institut Télécom; Télécom one social Web platform, which implies studying the related API specifications. These are often only

  3. Civil and Environmental Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    infrastructure and management (transportation systems, urban systems, soil mechanics, engineering economics129 Civil and Environmental Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Pedro. Wiesner adjunCt assistant Professor Karen Duston Professor in the PraCtiCe in Civil engineering management

  4. Civil and Environmental Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    infrastructure and management (transportation systems, urban systems, soil mechanics, engineering economics engineering management Joseph Cibor Ed Segner, III Professor in the PraCtiCe of environmental law James B137 Civil and Environmental Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Pedro

  5. Civil and Environmental Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    : · structural engineering · environmental engineering · engineering management Associate Professors Panos and Watershed Analysis CIVI 451 Introduction to Transportation CIVI 470 Basic Soil Mechanics CIVI 480 Senior119 Civil and Environmental Engineering The George R. Brown School of Engineering Chair Joseph B

  6. Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

  7. JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

    2009-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members. Special projects provide an opportunity for non-CARRC members to sponsor specific research or technology transfer consistent with CARRC goals. This report covers CARRC activities from January 2007 through March 2009. These activities have been reported in CARRC Annual Reports and in member meetings over the past 2 years. CARRC continues to work with industry and various government agencies with its research, development, demonstration, and promotional activities nearing completion at the time of submission of this report. CARRC expects to continue its service to the coal ash industry in 2009 and beyond to work toward the common goal of advancing coal ash utilization by solving CCP-related technical issues and promoting the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable management of these complex and changing materials.

  8. Apparatus and method for direct measurement of coal ash sintering and fusion properties at elevated temperatures and pressures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-pressure microdilatometer is provided for measuring the sintering and fusion properties of various coal ashes under the influence of elevated pressures and temperatures in various atmospheres. Electrical resistivity measurements across a sample of coal ash provide a measurement of the onset of the sintering and fusion of the ash particulates while the contraction of the sample during sintering is measured with a linear variable displacement transducer for detecting the initiation of sintering. These measurements of sintering in coal ash at different pressures provide a mechanism by which deleterious problems due to the sintering and fusion of ash in various combustion systems can be minimized or obviated.

  9. Of Disasters and Dragon Kings: A Statistical Analysis of Nuclear Power Incidents & Accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheatley, Spencer; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide, and perform a risk theoretic statistical analysis of, a dataset that is 75 percent larger than the previous best dataset on nuclear incidents and accidents, comparing three measures of severity: INES (International Nuclear Event Scale), radiation released, and damage dollar losses. The annual rate of nuclear accidents, with size above 20 Million US$, per plant, decreased from the 1950s until dropping significantly after Chernobyl (April, 1986). The rate is now roughly stable at 0.002 to 0.003, i.e., around 1 event per year across the current fleet. The distribution of damage values changed after Three Mile Island (TMI; March, 1979), where moderate damages were suppressed but the tail became very heavy, being described by a Pareto distribution with tail index 0.55. Further, there is a runaway disaster regime, associated with the "dragon-king" phenomenon, amplifying the risk of extreme damage. In fact, the damage of the largest event (Fukushima; March, 2011) is equal to 60 percent of the total damag...

  10. Investigation of Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Obtained from Pulverized Coal Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely; Zheng Yao

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addressed the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addressed the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project has determined the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed have also been determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control have been analyzed in an effort to determine the effects of SCR on the ash.

  11. Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beaufrere, Albert H. (Huntington, NY)

    1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas for further combustion in modified oil or gas fired furnaces or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion volume within the inner shell and a plenum between them through which combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

  12. Petrography and chemistry of sized fly ash from low-sulfur and high-sulfur coal sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Trimble, A.S. [Franklin County High School, Frankfort, KY (United States); Eble, C.F. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States); Palmer, C. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash samples were collected in November and December, 1994, from two units representing high- and low-sulfur feed coals at a Kentucky power station. The ashes were wet screened at 100, 200, 325, and 500 mesh. The dried ({approximately}40 C) fractions were then weighed, split for petrographic and chemical analysis, mounted in epoxy and prepared as polished pellets, and analyzed for ash yield and carbon content. The November ashes had a similar size distribution in the +325 mesh fractions. The low-sulfur hot side and cool side ashes had a similar size distribution in the November ashes. In contrast, the December fly ashes showed the typical trend, the cool-side ash being finer (over 20% more ash in the {minus}500 mesh fraction) than the hot-side ash. Carbon tends to be relatively concentrated in the coarse fractions. The dominance of the {minus}325 mesh fractions in the overall size analysis implies, though, that carbon in the fine sizes is an important consideration in the utilization potential of the fly ash.

  13. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Oxonation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry LaBuz; Rui Afonso

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fifth quarterly report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730. Due a number of circumstances, mostly associated with subcontractor agreements, the actual beginning of the project was delayed from its original award date of March 5, 2003. DOE's Project Manager was kept informed (verbally) by PPL's Project Manager throughout this period. Because of this delay, this is the fifth quarterly report and it refers to the time period from April-July 2005. (An additional month is included in this quarterly report as we have been in a data analyses mode and wanted to provide new data relative to the previous report). During this period, the project team has been reviewing and analyzing data from the onsite ozonation tests, as well as conducting additional laboratory ash and concrete tests. This report summarizes these activities including some preliminary results. No significant issues or concerns are identified.

  14. Sodium and oxygen in Nigerian coals: Possible effects on ash fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewa, I.O.B.; Elegbe, S.B.; Adetunji, J. [Ahmadu Bello Univ., Zaria (Nigeria)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ash fouling during heat transfers in coal power-plants has been known to be an engineering problem caused by high sodium levels of the feed-coals. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used in determining the concentration of some alkali elements (Na, Ca, Mg) associated with ash fouling for eight Nigerian coals mined at Onyeama, Ogbete, Enugu, Gombe, Okaba, Afikpo, Lafia and Asaba. Sodium levels were generally low (0.001-0.036%). Oxygen concentrations considered as an indicative measure of the wettability of each of the coals were determined. The possible effects of the concentration of these elements on ash fouling were discussed. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Big Data Frequent Pattern Mining David C. Anastasiu and Jeremy Iverson and Shaden Smith and George Karypis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karypis, George

    Big Data Frequent Pattern Mining David C. Anastasiu and Jeremy Iverson and Shaden Smith and George with today, the so-called "Big Data". Web log data from social media sites such as Twitter produce over one

  16. Multi-Agent Deterministic Graph Mapping via Robot Rendezvous Chaohui Gong, Stephen Tully, George Kantor, and Howie Choset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choset, Howie

    Multi-Agent Deterministic Graph Mapping via Robot Rendezvous Chaohui Gong, Stephen Tully, George at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. C. Gong, G. Kantor, and H. Choset

  17. Modeling of Bodies and Clothes for Virtual Environments Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann, Frederic Cordier, Hyewon Seo, George Papagianakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordier, Frederic

    , Hyewon Seo, George Papagianakis MIRALab, University of Geneva Centre Universitaire d'Informatique 24 rue du General-Dufour, CH-1211 Genève, Switzerland E-mail: {thalmann, cordier, seo, papagianakis

  18. Aquatic Studies at the Proposed George Parkhouse I Reservoir Site on the South Sulphur River in Northeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelwick, Frances P.; Burgess, Christine C.

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquatic Studies at the Proposed George Parkhouse I Reservoir Site on the South Sulphur River in Northeast Texas December 31, 2002 Submitted to Texas Water Development Board P.O. Box 13231, Capitol Station 1700 N Congress...

  19. The Mechanics of Materials in Contact Problems Georges Cailletaud1,a , Stphanie Basseville2,b , Julian Durand1,c ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Georges.Cailletaud@mines-paristech.fr, bStephanie.Basseville@usvq.fr, cJulian.Durand@mines-paristech.fr, dfeyel@onera.fr, eThe Mechanics of Materials in Contact Problems Georges Cailletaud1,a , Stéphanie Basseville2,b , Julian Durand1,c , Frédéric Feyel3,d , Henry Proudhon1,e , Lingtao Sun1,f, Vladislav Yastrebov1,g 1MINES

  20. Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

  1. Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

  2. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, October 1996--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Diaz, A. [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called {open_quotes}Loss On Ignition{close_quotes} (LOI). The concrete producer`s day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

  3. STATE-OF-THE-ART: FLY ASH, SILICA FUME AND SLAG UTILIZATION IN USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    improvement, land reclamations, slurried flowable ash, water pollution control, etc. The medium technology Backfill. 1.0 Introduction At the present time, coal fired electric power plants in the USA produce

  4. FLY ASH GENERATION AND UTILIZATION -AN OVERVIEW* Tarun R. Naik, Ph.D., P.E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    from conventional as well as advanced coal combustion technologies are addressed. Constructive use improvement, land reclamation, slurried flowable ash, and water pollution control. The medium technology matrix composites, polymer matrix composites, and several other filler applications. INTRODUCTION Coal

  5. PREDICTIONS FOR STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF PANKI FLY-ASH USING MODIFIED CAM CLAY MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    -ash is a fine powdery silty material, produced by burning of coal at thermal power plants. It shows specific by slurry disposal technique. A series of triaxial compression tests have been performed on overconsolidated

  6. ash forming acid-resistant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ash Dieback Update Date: Tuesday 26th March 2013 Time: 1400 - 1700hrs Location: Stirling Management Centre University of Stirling Stirling FK9 4LA To attend please return the...

  7. Iron distribution among phases in high- and low-sulfur coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Graham, U.M.; Rathbone, R.F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Dyar, M.D.; Taylor, M.E. [West Chester Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Astronomy

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Moessbauer spectroscopy, reflected-light optical microscopy, scanning-electron microscopy, wet chemical, and X-ray diffraction studies were conducted on six fly ash samples. The fly ashes, representing the combustion by-products of coals with total sulfur contents of less than 2% to greater than 4%, ranged from 17.6 to 32.0% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by XRF analysis. Wet chemical analysis was used to determine the Fe{sup 3+}/{summation}Fe content of the ashes, which ranged from 72% to 83%. Optical analysis of the ashes indicated that the spinel, encompassing iron oxides of various compositions, ranges from 4.0 to 12.6% (vol.). Moessbauer analyses confirmed the presence of three Fe-bearing phases: magnetite, hematite (possibly of two different compositions), and glass. The variation in the Fe-oxidation state follows the variation in the sulfur, consequently pyrite, content of the feed coal.

  8. Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A. [Center and Department of Geology, Oporto (Portugal)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

  9. Apparatus having inductively coupled coaxial coils for measuring buildup of slay or ash in a furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathur, Mahendra P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ekmann, James M. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The buildup of slag or ash on the interior surface of a furnace wall is monitored by disposing two coils to form a transformer which is secured adjacent to the inside surface of the furnace wall. The inductive coupling between the two coils of the transformer is affected by the presence of oxides of iron in the slag or ash which is adjacent to the transformer, and the application of a voltage to one winding produces a voltage at the other winding that is related to the thickness of the slag or ash buildup on the inside surface of the furnace wall. The output of the other winding is an electrical signal which can be used to control an alarm or the like or provide an indication of the thickness of the slag or ash buildup at a remote location.

  10. Lubricant-derived ash : in-engine sources and opportunities for reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Simon A. G. (Simon Andrew Glean)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are an effective means for meeting increasingly stringent emissions regulations that limit particulate matter. Over time, ash primarily derived from metallic additives in the engine oil ...

  11. Leaching of Metals from Fly ash-Amended Permeable Reactive Barriers Doina L. Morar 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    (Petzrick 2001). Unfortunately, this HCC fly ash cannot be beneficially reused in the construction industry organic and inorganic pollutants. Specific reactive materials such as wood chips, limestone, manure (USEPA

  12. Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheitlin, Frank M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash management regulations Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REGULATOR IN PORTLAND CEMENT 6 Traditionally about 3 to 5% gypsum is inter... of clean-coal ash (CCA) was used to replace gypsum as a setting time regulator and mineral...

  14. Review of WTE ash utilization processes under development in northwest Europe Athanasios Bourtsalas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ferrous and non-ferrous, and also minerals from incinerator bottom ash (IBA). Also, since water systems for the discharged IBA has increased metal extraction efficiency and quality of residues

  15. aluminum-fly ash metal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Journal of Composite Materials, July 2006, Vol. 40 no. 13, 1163-1174 1163 Thermal Expansion of AluminumFly Ash...

  16. Comparison of photosynthetic responses of Ashe juniper and live oak on the Edwards Plateau, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bendevis, Mira Arpe

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    gas exchange and water relations at the leaf level of the two dominant tree species, Ashe juniper and live oak (Quercus virginiana P. Mill. Var. fusiformis), is important to assess the impact of juniper encroachment on the aquifer. Photosynthesis...

  17. Influence of age/size and grazing history on understory relationships of Ashe juniper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuhlendorf, Samuel Dean

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INFLUENCE OF AGE/SIZE AND GRAZING HISTORY ON UNDERSTORY RELATIONSHIPS OF ASHE JUNIPER A Thesis by SAMUEL DEAN FUHLENDORF Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Rangeland Ecology and Management INFLUENCE OF AGE/SIZE AND GRAZING HISTORY ON UNDERSTORY RELATIONSHIPS OF ASHE JUNIPER A Thesis by SAMUEL DEAN FUHLENDORF Approved as to style and content by...

  18. Investigation of the potential of fly ash as an adsorbent for removal of priority pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zardkoohi, Minoo

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Aydin Akgerman Adsorption isotherms for adsorption of phenol, p-chlorophenol, 2, 4, dichlorophenol, cadmium and lead from water onto fly ash were determined. These isotherms were modeled by the Freundlich isotherm. The value of Freundlich isotherm..., parameter n indicated that the adsorption isotherms for contaminants studied were unfavorable. Phenol displayed a much higher aAinity for fly ash than chlorophenol and 2, 4 dichlorophenol Adsorption isotherms for the trace metals studied were slightly...

  19. The use of sulfer modified bottom ash (SMBA) as an aggregate in asphaltic mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chimakurthy, Harshavardhan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , bottom ash is lighter in weight and generally much cheaper than conventional quality aggregates such as limestone, sand and gravel. This research was designed to up-grade the load-bearing charactcnstics of bottom ash and maximize its usc m asphaltic... and gravel. According to a study done by Hafizuddin Ahmad in 1974, sulfur was used extensively in sand-asphalt sulfur to upgrade marginal aggregates for use in asphaltic mixtures, was developed at Texas Transportation Institute (TT1) (JO). TTI's work...

  20. Q&A with Nobelist George Smoot - 2009 BCCP Cosmology Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smoot, George

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 2009: What happens when dark matter and anti-dark mattter collide? If you were in a gravity free environment, what would happen to time? At the annual Cosmology Workshop at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Nobelist George Smoot answers these questions and more from high school students and teachers. Dr. Smoot was co-awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. http://bccp.lbl.gov/

  1. Q&A with Nobelist George Smoot - 2009 BCCP Cosmology Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    July 2009: What happens when dark matter and anti-dark mattter collide? If you were in a gravity free environment, what would happen to time? At the annual Cosmology Workshop at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Nobelist George Smoot answers these questions and more from high school students and teachers. Dr. Smoot was co-awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  2. Q&A with Nobelist George Smoot - 2009 BCCP Cosmology Workshop

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Smoot

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 2009: What happens when dark matter and anti-dark mattter collide? If you were in a gravity free environment, what would happen to time? At the annual Cosmology Workshop at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Nobelist George Smoot answers these questions and more from high school students and teachers. Dr. Smoot was co-awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  3. cole Polytechnique Florent Benaych-Georges Anne 2 Stefano De Marco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benaych-Georges, Florent

    �cole Polytechnique Florent Benaych-Georges Année 2 Stefano De Marco Mathématiques Appliquées'amplitude des sauts ? (2) En utilisant une méthode de Monte-Carlo, tracer une approximation de la densité de la. On utilisera la fonction plot de matplotlib, avec l'option bin=sqrt(M), où M est le nombre de simulations Monte

  4. Toward reflexivity: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and George Washington G'omez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Kerri Ann

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF ARTS Approved as to style and content by: Marco Portales (Chair of Committcc) imberly Brown (Member) Sarah Gatson (Member) Larry Mitchell (Head of Department) December 2001 Major Subject: English ABSTRACT Toward Reflexivity...: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and George Washington Gdmez. (December 2001) Kem Ann Barton, B. A. , Loyola University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Marco Portales Numerous highly esteemed authors and critics have written on Mark Twain's Adventures...

  5. Presented at SRM Annual Conference, OKC, OK 2/5/2013 K.W. Tate, L.M. Roche, M.R. George, UC Davis 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth

    Presented at SRM Annual Conference, OKC, OK 2/5/2013 K.W. Tate, L.M. Roche, M.R. George, UC Davis 1, L.M. Roche, M.R. George, UC Davis 2 · Offstream attractants such as water tanks and supplement in runoff #12;Presented at SRM Annual Conference, OKC, OK 2/5/2013 K.W. Tate, L.M. Roche, M.R. George, UC

  6. Investigation of fly ash carbon by thermal analysis and optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, R. [Boral Material Technologies Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Boral Material Technologies Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States); Rathbone, R.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research] [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A previous study investigated various fly ashes that had comparable loss on ignition values, but significant differences with respect to air entrainment performance. Thermal analysis data suggested that a poorly performing fly ash, with respect to air entrainment, contained a higher proportion of carbon that gasifies (oxidizes) at comparatively low temperatures. A relatively high abundance of isotropic carbon was identified in the poor-performing ash using optical microscopy. The present investigation examined a larger collection of fly ash samples to determine if thermal analysis could be used as a prognostic tool for fly ash performance. An attempt was made to correlate mortar air and foam index values for each sample with differential thermal analysis (DTA) data. Optical microscopy and BET surface area analysis were used as supportive techniques. No clear relationship could be established with the thermal or optical methods, although fly ash performance did correlate well with BET surface area. A low temperature component of the DTA exotherms was considered to be a function of inorganic catalytic species that reside on the carbon surface and lower the ignition temperature.

  7. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschner, Florian, E-mail: florian.deschner@gmail.com [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Neubauer, Jürgen [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

  8. Selenium And Arsenic Speciation in Fly Ash From Full-Scale Coal-Burning Utility Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, F.E.; Senior, C.L.; Chu, P.; Ladwig, K.; Huffman, G.P.; /Kentucky U. /Reaction Engin. Int. /Elect. Power Res. Inst., Palo Alto

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy has been used to determine directly the oxidation states and speciation of selenium and arsenic in 10 fly ash samples collected from full-scale utility plants. Such information is needed to assess the health risk posed by these elements in fly ash and to understand their behavior during combustion and in fly ash disposal options, such as sequestration in tailings ponds. Selenium is found predominantly as Se(IV) in selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) species, whereas arsenic is found predominantly as As(V) in arsenate (AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) species. Two distinct types of selenite and arsenate spectra were observed depending upon whether the fly ash was derived from eastern U.S. bituminous (Fe-rich) coals or from western subbituminous or lignite (Ca-rich) coals. Similar spectral details were observed for both arsenic and selenium in the two different types of fly ash, suggesting that the post-combustion behavior and capture of both of these elements are likely controlled by the same dominant element or phase in each type of fly ash.

  9. The Laconia, New Hampshire bottom ash paving project: Volume 3, Physical Performance Testing Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bottom ash is the principal waste stream from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system, and grate sifting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (@) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

  10. Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn A. Norton

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using two fly ash samples from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was derived from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was derived from Blacksville coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 seam). The tests were performed at temperatures of 120 and 180 C under different gas compositions. Elemental mercury (Hg) streams were injected into the simulated flue gas and passed over filters (housed in a convection oven) loaded with fly ash. The Ontario Hydro method was used to determine the total amount of Hg passing through the filter as well as the percentages of elemental and oxidized Hg collected. Results indicated that substantial amounts of Hg oxidation did not occur with either fly ash, regardless of the temperature used for testing. When oxidation was observed, the magnitude of the oxidation was comparable between the two fly ashes. These results suggest that the gas matrix may be more important than the ash components with respect to the distribution of Hg species observed in gaseous effluents at coal-fired power plants.

  12. BY GEORG ZACHMANN BRUEGEL BLUEPRINT SERIESBRUEGEL BLUEPRINT SERIES Volume XX Electricity without borders: a plan to make the internal market work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Zachmann; Production Michael; T. Harrington; Cover Jean-yves Verdu

    Electricity without borders: a plan to make the internal market work BY GEORG ZACHMANN BRUEGEL BLUEPRINT 20Electricity without borders:aplanto make the internal market work

  13. Models of neutron star atmospheres enriched with nuclear burning ashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nättilä, Joonas; Kajava, Jari J E; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-mass X-ray binaries hosting neutron stars (NS) exhibit thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts, which are powered by unstable nuclear burning of helium and/or hydrogen into heavier elements deep in the NS "ocean". In some cases the burning ashes may rise from the burning depths up to the NS photosphere by convection, leading to the appearance of the metal absorption edges in the spectra, which then force the emergent X-ray burst spectra to shift toward lower energies. These effects may have a substantial impact on the color correction factor $f_c$ and the dilution factor $w$, the parameters of the diluted blackbody model $F_E \\approx w B_E(f_c T_{eff})$ that is commonly used to describe the emergent spectra from NSs. The aim of this paper is to quantify how much the metal enrichment can change these factors. We have developed a new NS atmosphere modeling code, which has a few important improvements compared to our previous code required by inclusion of the metals. The opacities and the internal partition func...

  14. 488-4D ASH LANDFILL CLOSURE CAP HELP MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of Area Completion Projects (ACP) in support of the 488-4D Landfill closure, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) modeling of the planned 488-4D Ash Landfill closure cap to ensure that the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) limit of no more than 12 inches of head on top of the barrier layer (saturated hydraulic conductivity of no more than 1.0E-05 cm/s) in association with a 25-year, 24-hour storm event is not projected to be exceeded. Based upon Weber 1998 a 25-year, 24-hour storm event at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is 6.1 inches. The results of the HELP modeling indicate that the greatest peak daily head on top of the barrier layer (i.e. geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) or high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane) for any of the runs made was 0.079 inches associated with a peak daily precipitation of 6.16 inches. This is well below the SCDHEC limit of 12 inches.

  15. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)] [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); León-Reina, L. [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigación, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)] [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigación, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Aranda, M.A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain) [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona (Spain); Santacruz, I., E-mail: isantacruz@uma.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  16. Characteristics of fly ashes from full-scale coal-fired power plants and their relationship to mercury adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yongqi Lu; Massoud Rostam-Abadi; Ramsay Chang; Carl Richardson; Jennifer Paradis [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine fly ash samples were collected from the particulate collection devices of four full-scale pulverized coal utility boilers burning eastern bituminous coals and three cyclone utility boilers burning either Powder River Basin coals or PRB blends. As-received fly ash samples were mechanically sieved to obtain six size fractions. Unburned carbon content, mercury content, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas of as-received fly ashes and their size fractions were measured. In addition, UBC particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission microscopy, and thermogravimetry to obtain information on their surface morphology, structure, and oxidation reactivity. It was found that the UBC particles contained amorphous carbon, ribbon-shaped graphitic carbon, and highly ordered graphite structures. The mercury contents of the UBCs in raw ash samples were comparable to those of the UBC-enriched samples, indicating that mercury was mainly adsorbed on the UBC in fly ash. The UBC content decreased with a decreasing particle size range for all nine ashes. The mercury content of the UBCs in each size fraction, however, generally increased with a decreasing particle size for the nine ashes. The mercury contents and surface areas of the UBCs in the PRB-CYC ashes were about 8 and 3 times higher than UBCs in the EB-PC ashes, respectively. It appeared that both the particle size and surface area of UBC could contribute to mercury capture. The particle size of the UBC in PRB-CYC ash and thus the external mass transfer was found to be the major factor impacting the mercury adsorption. Both the particle size and surface reactivity of the UBC in EB-PC ash, which generally had a lower carbon oxidation reactivity than the PRB-PC ashes, appeared to be important for the mercury adsorption. 26 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Trophic structure and metal bioaccumulation differences in multiple fish species exposed to coal ash-associated metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otter, Ryan [Middle Tennessee State University; Bailey, Frank [Middle Tennessee State University; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 22, 2008 a dike containing coal fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant near Kingston Tennessee USA failed and resulted in the largest coal ash spill in U.S. history. Coal ash, the by-product of coal combustion, is known to contain multiple contaminants of concern, including arsenic and selenium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioaccumulation of arsenic and selenium and to identify possible differences in trophic dynamics in feral fish at various sites in the vicinity of the Kingston coal ash spill. Elevated levels of arsenic and selenium were observed in various tissues of largemouth bass, white crappie, bluegill and redear sunfish from sites associated with the Kingston coal ash spill. Highest concentrations of selenium were found in redear sunfish with liver concentrations as high as 24.83 mg/kg dry weight and ovary concentrations up to 10.40 mg/kg dry weight at coal ash-associated sites. To help explain the elevated selenium levels observed in redear sunfish, investigations into the gut pH and trophic dynamics of redear sunfish and bluegill were conducted which demonstrated a large difference in the gut physiology between these two species. Redear sunfish stomach and intestinal pH was found to be 1.1 and 0.16 pH units higher than in bluegill, respectively. In addition, fish from coal ash-associated sites showed enrichment of 15N & 13C compared to no ash sites, indicating differences in food web dynamics between sites. These results imply the incorporation of coal ash-associated compounds into local food webs and/or a shift in diet at ash sites compared to the no ash reference sites. Based on these results, further investigation into a broader food web at ash-associated sites is warranted.

  18. This is an electronic version of the article published as Napoleon, M.E. and King, B.H. 1999. Offspring sex ratio response to host size in the parasitoid wasp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Bethia H.

    29 This is an electronic version of the article published as Napoleon, M.E. and King, B.H. 1999 response to host size in the parasitoid wasp Spalangia endius M. E. Napoleon1 and B. H. King M.E. Napoleon1

  19. Predicting the Operating Behavior of Ceramic Filters from Thermo-Mechanical Ash Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemmer, G.; Kasper, G.

    2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable operation, in other words the achievement of a succession of uniform filtration cycles of reasonable length is a key issue in high-temperature gas filtration with ceramic media. Its importance has rather grown in recent years, as these media gain in acceptance due to their excellent particle retention capabilities. Ash properties have been known for some time to affect the maximum operating temperature of filters. However, softening and consequently ''stickiness'' of the ash particles generally depend on composition in a complex way. Simple and accurate prediction of critical temperature ranges from ash analysis--and even more so from coal analysis--is still difficult without practical and costly trials. In general, our understanding of what exactly happens during break-down of filtration stability is still rather crude and general. Early work was based on the concept that ash particles begin to soften and sinter near the melting temperatures of low-melting, often alkaline components. This softening coincides with a fairly abrupt increase of stickiness, that can be detected with powder mechanical methods in a Jenicke shear cell as first shown by Pilz (1996) and recently confirmed by others (Kamiya et al. 2001 and 2002, Kanaoka et al. 2001). However, recording {sigma}-{tau}-diagrams is very time consuming and not the only off-line method of analyzing or predicting changes in thermo-mechanical ash behavior. Pilz found that the increase in ash stickiness near melting was accompanied by shrinkage attributed to sintering. Recent work at the University of Karlsruhe has expanded the use of such thermo-analytical methods for predicting filtration behavior (Hemmer 2001). Demonstrating their effectiveness is one objective of this paper. Finally, our intent is to show that ash softening at near melting temperatures is apparently not the only phenomenon causing problems with filtration, although its impact is certainly the ''final catastrophe''. There are other significant changes in regeneration at intermediate temperatures, which may lead to long-term deterioration.

  20. On-line carbon-in-ash monitors: Survey and demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorge, J.; Larrimore, L.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash unburned carbon (UBC) level is an important consideration for combustion efficiency as well as ash marketing. The presence of unburned carbon in fly ash has been shown to be a function of furnace design, coal quality, the ability of the pulverizer to grind the coal, and heat release rate. Boilers are designed to take these factors into consideration. However, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 drove many utilities to switch coal supplies and install low NO{sub x} burners. Higher carbon-in-ash levels have been the result of these changes in coal quality and the staged combustion characteristics associated with low NO{sub x} burners. Over the past few years, several instruments for the on-line determination and monitoring of the unburned carbon content of ash samples have been developed. However, to date they have not been deployed widely in the U.S. despite potential uses for combustion optimization and as an aid in fly ash marketing. Based on the lack of publicly available performance and operation data available for the current CIAM (carbon-in-ash monitor) commercial offerings, Southern Company initiated a demonstration of several commercial technologies on its coal-fired units. As part of a DOE Clean Coal Project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction on NO{sub x} emissions from coal-fired boilers, the CAM, SEKAM and FOCUS systems were installed at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4. CAM and M&W instruments were also placed at Alabama Power Company`s Plant Gaston Unit 4. The testing of the instruments was conducted from November 1995 through August 1996.

  1. Depositional facies and hydrocarbon reservoir compartmentalization of the Mississippian Aux Vases Formation at King Field, Jefferson County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, H.E. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    King field has produced over 4 million bbl of oil from the Mississippian Aux Vases Formation along a north-south-trending anticlinal structure 3 mi long and 1.5 mi wide. The porous and permeable quartz sandstone, which comprises the principal hydrocarbon reservoir, can grade laterally into nonporous calcareous sandstone, siltstone, shale, or limestone within one well location (660 ft). The Aux Vases Formation at King field was deposited in an intertidal to subtidal, mixed siliciclastic-carbonate environment, and the resulting mosaic of depositional facies significantly affects reservoirs continuity. Impermeable to only slightly permeable siltstones, shales, and limestones of the various offshore facies, and shales and siltstones of the tidal-flat facies separate the producing sandstones of a tidal channel-offshore bar facies into distinct reservoir compartments. This reservoir heterogeneity results in an oil-water contact at various depths across the field. Lateral compartmentalization of the reservoir has allowed large sections of the Aux Vases reservoir to remain unswept by waterflooding. Volumetric analyses suggest that untapped reservoir compartments may contain an additional 1-2 million bbl of oil recoverable by primary and waterflood methods.

  2. TREATMENT OF CYANIDE SOLUTIONS AND SLURRIES USING AIR-SPARGED HYDROCYCLONE (ASH) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jan D. Miller; Terrence Chatwin; Jan Hupka; Doug Halbe; Tao Jiang; Bartosz Dabrowski; Lukasz Hupka

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-year Department of Energy (DOE) project ''Treatment of Cyanide Solutions and Slurries Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Technology'' (ASH/CN) has been completed. This project was also sponsored by industrial partners, ZPM Inc., Elbow Creek Engineering, Solvay Minerals, EIMCO-Baker Process, Newmont Mining Corporation, Cherokee Chemical Co., Placer Dome Inc., Earthworks Technology, Dawson Laboratories and Kennecott Minerals. Development of a new technology using the air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) as a reactor for either cyanide recovery or destruction was the research objective. It was expected that the ASH could potentially replace the conventional stripping tower presently used for HCN stripping and absorption with reduced power costs. The project was carried out in two phases. The first phase included calculation of basic processing parameters for ASH technology, development of the flowsheet, and design/adaptation of the ASH mobile system for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) recovery from cyanide solutions. This was necessary because the ASH was previously used for volatile organics removal from contaminated water. The design and modification of the ASH were performed with the help from ZPM Inc. personnel. Among the modifications, the system was adapted for operation under negative pressure to assure safe operating conditions. The research staff was trained in the safe use of cyanide and in hazardous material regulations. Cyanide chemistry was reviewed resulting in identification of proper chemical dosages for cyanide destruction, after completion of each pilot plant run. The second phase of the research consisted of three field tests that were performed at the Newmont Mining Corporation gold cyanidation plant near Midas, Nevada. The first field test was run between July 26 and August 2, 2002, and the objective was to demonstrate continuous operation of the modified ASH mobile system. ASH units were applied for both stripping and absorption, to recover cyanide, using the acidification-volatilization-reabsorption chemistry. Plant barren cyanide solution was used during the field tests. The original ASH system used for the field tests had been designed and fabricated by ZPM Inc. to remove volatile organic compounds from ground water. The system, even with a number of modifications, could not operate at optimum conditions for cyanide recovery. Reactors and pumps installed in the mobile system only allowed for the treatment of clear solutions, not slurries. Also the original mobile system was limited with respect to Q, the relative air flow rate, and the extent of recovery in a single stage. Due to the lack of automatic controls, the system required constant supervision of the University of Utah (U/U) team. In spite of these difficulties, application of the ASH mobile system was particularly attractive due to compactness of the apparatus and less than 1 second residence time of the aqueous phase in the cyclones. The performance of the ASH system was evaluated by comparison with theoretical predictions.

  3. Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 2008, an ash dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured, releasing over one billion gallons of coal fly ash into the Emory and Clinch Rivers. Coal fly ash may contain several contaminants of concern, but of these selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) have been highlighted because of their toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic food chains. To assess the potential impact of the spilled fly ash on humans and the environment, a comprehensive biological and environmental monitoring program was established, for which resident aquatic organisms (among other sample media) are collected to determine contaminant exposure and evaluate the risk to humans and wildlife. Studies on bioaccumulation and fish health are major components of the TVA Biological Monitoring Program for the Kingston fly ash project. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure (to metals) and effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information regarding other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash, not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report summarizes the bioaccumulation results from the first two years of study after the fly ash spill, including four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation, selenium and arsenic were the only two metals consistently elevated above background levels in fish. E

  4. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  5. Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Laskin, Alexander; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Gorski, Christopher A.; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a significant source of bioavailable iron in the open ocean. Few measurements have been made to compare the solubility of atmospheric iron from anthropogenic aerosols and other sources. We report an investigation of the iron dissolution of three fly ash samples in acidic aqueous solutions and compare the solubilities with that of Arizona test dust, a reference material of mineral dust. The effects of pH, cloud processing, and solar irradiation on Fe solubility were explored. Similar to previously reported results on mineral dust, iron in aluminosilicate phases provide predominant dissolved iron compared with iron in oxides. Iron solubility of fly ash is higher than Arizona test dust, especially at the higher pH conditions investigated. Simulated atmospheric processing elevates iron solubility due to significant changes in the morphology aluminosilicate glass, a dominantly material in fly ash particle. Iron continuously releases into the aqueous solution as fly ash particles break up into smaller fragments. The assessment of dissolved atmospheric iron deposition fluxes, and their effect on the biogeochemistry at ocean surface should be constrained by taking into account the source, environment pH, Fe speciation, and solar radiation.

  6. Investigation of MSWI fly ash melting characteristic by DSC-DTA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Rundong [Institute of Clean Energy and Environmental Engineering, Liaoning Key Laboratory of Clean Energy, Shenyang Institute of Aeronautical Engineering, Shenyang 110136 (China)], E-mail: leerd@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Lei; Yang, Tianhua; Raninger, Bernhard [Institute of Clean Energy and Environmental Engineering, Liaoning Key Laboratory of Clean Energy, Shenyang Institute of Aeronautical Engineering, Shenyang 110136 (China)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The melting process of MSWI (Municipal Solid Waste Incineration) fly ash has been studied by high-temperature DSC-DTA experiments. The experiments were performed at a temperature range of 20-1450 deg. C, and the considerable variables included atmosphere (O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}), heating rates (5 deg. C/min, 10 deg. C/min, 20 deg. C/min) and CaO addition. Three main transitions were observed during the melting process of fly ash: dehydration, polymorphic transition and fusion, occurring in the temperature range of 100-200 deg. C, 480-670 deg. C and 1101-1244 deg. C, respectively. The apparent heat capacity and heat requirement for melting of MSWI fly ash were obtained by DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter). A thermodynamic modeling to predict the heat requirements for melting process has been presented, and it agrees well with the experimental data. Finally, a zero-order kinetic model of fly ash melting transition was established. The apparent activation energy of MSWI fly ash melting transition was obtained.

  7. Sorption of cadmium and lead by clays from municipal incinerator ash-water suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of Cl complexation in extracts of a flue gas-scrubber incinerator fly ash sample on the sorption of Cd and Ph by kaolinite and illite was investigated using batch-sorption methods. In the pH range of 5 to 9, Cl complexation may reduce sorption and thus increase the mobility of these metals. When an ash-water suspension was acidified to pH 6.85, the dissolution of Cl and Ca essentially eliminated Cd sorption because of complexation and cationic competition. Cadmium would be considered as either mobile or very mobile under these conditions. Lead was not soluble in the pH-6.85 suspension. At pH 12, the approximate pH of water in contact with flue gas-scrubber fly ash, Cd was essentially insoluble and Ph occurred as anionic Ph hydroxide. Anionic Ph was sorbed by the two clays, and the extent of sorption was not influenced by Cl or carbonate complexation. Sorption constants, derived from isotherms, suggested that Ph would be relatively immobile in saturated soil-water systems. The recent concern that highly alkaline, flue gas-scrubber fly ash may release environmentally significant concentrations of mobile Ph when placed in an ash-disposal site with a soil liner should be reevaluated in light of this study. 37 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. 20.06.05 georg.hager@rrze.uni-erlangen.de 1PTfS 2005 Introduction to Message Passing andIntroduction to Message Passing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    1 20.06.05 georg.hager@rrze.uni-erlangen.de 1PTfS 2005 Introduction to Message Passing andIntroduction to Message Passing and Parallel Programming With MPIParallel Programming With MPI Georg Hager, Dr. Gerhard.hager@rrze.uni-erlangen.de 2PTfS 2005 Introduction to MPI: Agenda The basics: Introduction to the message passing paradigm

  9. Fly ash-enhanced aluminum composites for automotive parts. [Reports for April to June, 1998, and July to September, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golden, Dean; Rohatgi, Pradeep

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are to produce and evaluate the use of aluminum ''ashalloys''--metal matrix composites that incorporate coal fly ash--in the commercial manufacture of cast automotive parts. Some highlights are: (1) Ashalloy ingot with ''C'' type fly ash was synthesized using stir casting techniques similar to the successful castings of ''F'' type fly ash. Agglomeration was noted. Stirring periods were increased up to 45 minutes compared to the normal 5 minutes to determine whether the shear force of stirring would disagglomerate the clusters noted with this type of fly ash. The resulting sample showed clustering. (2) The ashalloy ingots of ''C'' type fly ash were remelted and poured into permanent molds using a cloth filter to screen out clusters. There was no major reduction in clusters of fly ash particles in the composite since the filter with the mesh size larger than 1 x 1 mm was used. The composite melt would not flow through when filters with smaller openings were used. (3) The fly ash sample from Wisconsin Electric Power Company was sent for classification. (4) A 1 lb. sample of JTM-processed fly ash was sent to Wisconsin Electric Power Company for classification and 10 lb. of same fly ash was sent to The Jet Pulverizer Company for jet milling. (5) Experiments on fly ash pretreatment as well as synthesis of ash alloy are continuing. (6) Attempts are being made to apply high speed shear mixing with selected liquids to disperse the clusters noted in ashalloy with the ''C'' type fly ash base. Stir casting processes have been developed to incorporate type ''F'' fly ash of different sizes and measuring tensile data on cast bars. This data enables selection of the optimum size of fly ash to meet specific property requirements. Attempts are underway to develop stir casting techniques to incorporate ''C'' type fly ash in cast aluminum alloys. It is expected that the next milestone for making trial parts will be completed on schedule by June 1999.

  10. Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Final technical report, September 30, 1992--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramlich, J.C.; Chenevert, B.; Park, Jungsung; Hoffman, D.A.; Butcher, E.K.

    1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal ash, and particularly fine fly ash, remain one of the principal practical and environmental problems in coal-based power generation. In particular, submicron aerosols are identified with direct inhalation risk. Submicron ash is thought to arise from mineral vaporization during char combustion, followed by nucleation, condensation and coagulation to yield an aerosol. While aerosols are predominantly made out of volatile alkali minerals, they also can include refractory oxides that are chemically reduced to more volatile forms within the char particle and vaporized. Most of the ash of size greater than 1 {mu}m is generated by agglomeration of mineral as the char particle bums out. These two principal mechanisms are thought to account for most of the ash generated in coal combustion. Previous research has shown that various forms of coal treatment can influence the yields of fine ash from combustion. The research reported here investigates various forms of treatment, including physical coal cleaning, aerodynamic sizing, degree of grinding, and combinations of these on both aerosol yields and on yields of fine residual ash (1-4 {mu}m). The work also includes results from the combustion of artificial chars that include individual mineral elements. This research shows that these various forms of coal treatment can significantly change ash characteristics. While none of the treatments affected the bulk of the residual ash size distribution significantly, the yield of the ash aerosol mode (d<0.5 {mu}m) and fine residual ash mode (1-4 {mu}m) are changed by the treatments.

  11. Characterization of ash residues from 15 waste-to-energy facilities pursuant to the May, 1994 U.S. EPA ``Sampling and analysis of municipal refuse incineration ash`` guidance document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, J.; Lyons, M. [Wheelabrator Environmental Systems Inc., Hampton, NH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wheelabrator Environmental Systems Inc. (Wheelabrator) currently owns and/or operates 21 power plants, 15 of which are municipal waste combustion (MWC) facilities. In response to a May, 1994 US Supreme Court decision, all MWC facilities are required by the US Environmental Protection (EPA) to determine if the facility ash residues are hazardous waste. This paper presents the results of ash characterizations done at Wheelabrator MWC facilities. All Wheelabrator MWC facilities are equipped with WES-PHix{reg_sign} ash stabilization systems. The ash from these facilities consistently yields test results well below regulatory thresholds. However, installing a state-of-the-art ash stabilization system does not guarantee that ash is accurately characterized. Proper sampling protocols and proper analytical technique are critical to insuring accurate characterization. This paper identifies typical issues encountered during sample collection, sample preparation, an toxicity test extraction procedures. The consistently low toxicity test results for ash from Wheelabrator facilities can be attributed to the effectiveness of the WES-PHix{reg_sign} ash stabilization process. The sample collection protocols developed by Wheelabrator, and proper toxicity test extraction and analytical procedures followed by the laboratories, ensure accurate characterization.

  12. Dr. George N. Maracas | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffrey L Krause ChemicalDr.George N. Maracas

  13. George Vendryes, 1984 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffrey L80's » George Vendryes, 1984 The

  14. George F. Smoot, Giovanni De Amici, Scott D. Friedman, Chris Witebsky

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGeneGenomeGeoffreyGeorge A. Low Frequency

  15. George Neil Named to Lead JLab's Free-Electron Laser Program | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGeneGenomeGeoffreyGeorge A. LowLab

  16. George T. Basabilvazo Named Assistant Manager for Development and Research at Carlsbad Field Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGeneGenomeGeoffreyGeorge A.

  17. George A. Cowan, 1990 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) MappingOctober 12,U.S. DOEGas Phase ChemicalGeorge A. Cowan,

  18. George B. Zimmerman, 1983 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) MappingOctober 12,U.S. DOEGas Phase ChemicalGeorge A.

  19. A review of "King James VI and I and his English Parliaments" by Conrad Russell, edited by Richard Cust and Andrew Thrush

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacey, Jason

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . It is the Duke?s #23; nal speech?the one explaining why things happened the way you thought that they would probably happen?that you really want to hear. Conrad Russell, King James VI and I and his English Parliaments. Edited by Richard Cust and Andrew #22...

  20. Office of the Vice President, Research Simcoe Hall, Room 109, 27 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    Investigator grants from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (Saudi Arabia) for his work. In 2000, Biox Corporation, a U of T spin- off, was formed. Taking technology developed by Chemical Engineering Professor David Boocock, Biox produces biodiesel from waste animal fats, using a process