Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Self-pumping impurity control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for removing impurities from the plasma in a fusion reactor without an external vacuum pumping system. It is also an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for removing the helium ash from a fusion reactor. It is another object of the present invention to provide an apparatus which removes helium ash and minimizes tritium recycling and inventory.

Brooks, J.N.; Mattas, R.F.

1983-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

2

Deborah Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deborah Rebecca Ash Deborah Ash Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Energy Efficiency Standards Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS...

3

Ash cloud aviation advisories  

SciTech Connect

During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S. [EG and G, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1992-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

Removal of iron from impure graphites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iron-impregnated and ash-rich graphites have been purified by leaching with gaseous I/sub 2/ at 900/sup 0/C. With addition of H/sub 2/, the rate of removal of impurity iron can be markedly increased and becomes comparable to that obtained with Cl/sub 2/. I/sub 2/ has an advantage in that it can also volatilize Ca and perhaps Ba and Sr.

Growcock, F.B.; Heiser, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

6

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

7

Coulomb impurity in graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the problem of screening of an electrically charged impurity in a clean graphene sheet. When electron-electron interactions are neglected, the screening charge has a sign opposite to that of the impurity, and is localized near the impurity. Interactions between electrons smear out the induced charge density to give a large-distance tail that follows approximately, but not exactly, an r^{-2} behavior and with a sign which is the same as that of the impurity.

Rudro R. Biswas; Subir Sachdev; Dam T. Son

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

8

White Ash Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

White Ash Biology Name: blondi Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: 1. Is the white ash tree endangered or is it a protected variety? 2. How does the white ash tree...

9

Analysis of the Impurity Flow Reversal Experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments performed on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-A) tokamak have shown that poloidally asymmetric injection of hydrogen gas can alter the inward transport of injected impurity atoms. We have compared the observed transport times and the magnitude of the flow reversal effect with a model based on the neoclassical theory of impurity transport and find that the observations are consistent with the theory. However, uncertainities in the radial profiles and the atomic rate coefficients do not permit a truly definitive test of the theory.

Burrell, K.H.; Wong, S.K.; Amano, T.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Impurity transport in tokamaks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review is given of the principle results of the neoclassical theory of impurity transport in tokamaks, emphasizing those collisionality regimes of most practical interest. Some new results are given for the case where there are several different impurity species present at the same time, with both hydrogenic and impurity ions in the Pfirsch--Schlueter regime. The rate at which an impuritiy ion is transported into a plasma, and the radiation from it, are strongly dependent on the mean level of ionization (Z). An atomic physics code package, based on an ''average ion'' model is used to assess the validity of the ''coronal equilibrium'' assumption commonly made to determine (Z); coronal equilibrium is found to be a poor approximation for heavy metallic impurities in small present-day tokamaks, but its validity is much improved in larger devices, except perhaps in the edge region of the plasma. The computations are compared with the results obtained in an impurity injection experiment in the ATC tokamak. In practice, the most appropriate impurity transport model would be a combination of neoclassical transport and anomalous diffusion, with the magnitude of the anomalous diffusion coefficient chosen to give agreement with observed hydrogenic particle confinement times. Computations of oxygen impurities in the edge region of a tokamak plasma, on the basis of this model, show that only a fraction (typically 0.2 to 0.6) of an incident flux of neutral impurities actually penetrates into the main part of the discharge.

Rutherford, P.H.; Hirshman, S.P.; Jensen, R.; Post, D.E.; Seidl, F.G.P.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Ash Static Liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This laboratory study was focused on assessing fundamental geotechnical engineering properties of fly ash.  It involved the testing of fly ash recovered from the existing ash ponds and from dry fly ash silos operated by 5 participating utilities.  Materials from 22 different sites were involved in the testing program.  To provide comprehensive fundamental understanding of the similarities and differences between the samples, a series of basic geotechnical engineering characterization ...

2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

12

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

Activation of fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Optimizing Ash Handling - SmartAshTM System Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High ash levels in electrostatic precipitator (ESP) hoppers are notorious for increasing particulate matter (PM) emissions and plume opacity. Conventional means of monitoring hopper ash levels and fly ash handling system performance have been time-consuming and problematic. Neundorfer, Inc., has developed a fly ash conveying system-monitoring package (SmartAshSystem) that provides improved monitoring of fly ash removal process parameters and provides graphical depictions of ash system performance. Additi...

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fly Ash Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

..., ASM International, 2006, p 499â??500ASM Handbook, Vol 13C, Corrosion: Environments and IndustriesCorrosion and Erosion of Ash-Handling

16

Wet Bottom Ash Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

..., ASM International, 2006, p 499â??500ASM Handbook, Vol 13C, Corrosion: Environments and IndustriesCorrosion and Erosion of Ash-Handling

17

Dancing in the ashes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The following novel is the third draft of my creative thesis entitled Dancing in the Ashes . It is an exploration of the Detroit rave… (more)

Malesh, Vytautas Adolph

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization  

SciTech Connect

This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities Tobias K be photobleached before final sample preparation. The instrument consists of high power light emitting diodes

Kaufman, Laura

20

Evaluation of an Ecolotree TM CAP for Closure of Coal Ash Disposal Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Once they are filled or become inactive, coal ash disposal ponds at power plant sites must meet state and federal regulations for permanent closure. In-place closure of ash ponds typically requires an impermeable cover to protect groundwater from leachate generated by stormwater infiltration through the ash. This report documents the construction, maintenance, and performance of the EcolotreeTM Cap (Tree Cap) -- an ash pond closure alternative consisting of poplar trees, grasses, and surface soil amendme...

1999-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Optimum Condition of Vanadium Recovery from Power Plant Fly-ash ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, In this study, recovery of vanadium from power plant fly-ash was developed using a hydro metallurgical process consisted of acidic leaching ...

22

State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

Atencio, B.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Ash Handling System Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Ash Handling System Maintenance Guide provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system. This guide will assist plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability and reducing the maintenance costs for the ash handling system.

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

24

Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer.

Myers, Jr., Samuel M. (Albuquerque, NM); Bishop, Dawn M. (Albuquerque, NM); Follstaedt, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer. 4 figs.

Myers, S.M. Jr.; Bishop, D.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

26

Continuing disposal of coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large volume of power-plant coal ash produced and stricter Federal water pollution controls are making ash disposal increasingly difficult for utilities. The protection of surface and ground water quality required in the Resource conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act's Clean Water Act (CWA) amendments of 1977 have raised the cost of disposal to a level where an acceptable method must be found. The Electric Power Research Institute's Coal Ash Disposal Manual (EPRI-FM--1257) describes-ash chemistry, disposal site selection, site monitoring and reclamation, and other information of interest to utilities that are making cost estimates and procedure evaluations. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Golden, D.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

Self, S.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Comparison between MSW Ash and RDF Ash from Incineration Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the unwashed incineration ash were tested and analyzed for TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure of auxiliary air. The flue gases are PEER-REVIEW 963 #12;eventually led through air pollution control system to prevent visible flue gas emissions due to higher moisture content. TCLP ANALYSIS Samples of fly ash

Columbia University

29

Operational Implications of Airborne Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcanic ash clouds pose a real threat to aircraft safety. The ash is abrasive and capable of causing serious damage to aircraft engines, control surfaces, windshields, and landing lights. In addition, ash can clog the pitot—static systems, which ...

Gary L. Hufford; Leonard J. Salinas; James J. Simpson; Elliott G. Barske; David C. Pieri

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Incineration and incinerator ash processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallel small-scale studies on the dissolution and anion exchange recovery of plutonium from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash were conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and at the Rocky Flats Plant. Results from these two studies are discussed in context with incinerator design considerations that might help to mitigate ash processing related problems. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Blum, T.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Coal Ash Carbon Removal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market resistance to the use of ash containing elevated levels of carbon and/or ammonia has become a major concern for coal-fired facilities in recent years as a result of increased use of nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction environmental control technologies. EPRI initiated this state of practice assessment to help power producers evaluate alternatives for ash beneficiation.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear Nature Bulletin No. 649-A October 1, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRICKLY ASH AND PRICKLY PEAR In the plant kingdom, as among people, there are so-me that we avoid. They have few virtues, if any, and our experiences with them are painful or have unpleasant after effects. Poison ivy is a notorious example. Prickly Ash, a shrub, is another. Although not poisonous it is thickly armed with wicked thorns and has no ornamental, economic or wildlife value. In 1821 when the first section lines were established in Cook County, the surveyor recorded -- for the benefit of land buyers -- the principal kinds of trees and other vegetation observed along each mile. He frequently encountered prickly ash in thickets near the Little Calumet River and also the north and south branches of the Chicago River.

33

Self-pumping impurity control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for removing the helium ash from a fusion reactor having a D-T plasma comprises a helium trapping site within the reactor plasma confinement device, said trapping site being formed of a trapping material having negligible helium solubility and relatively high hydrogen solubility; and means for depositing said trapping material on said site at a rate sufficient to prevent saturation of helium trapping.

Brooks, Jeffrey N. (Darien, IL); Mattas, Richard F. (Downers Grove, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Insurance coverage for coal ash liabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses how liability insurance can be a valuable tool for limiting coal ash liabilities.

Elkind, D.L. [Dickstein Shapiro LLP (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report focuses on identifying ash deposit materials and mounting them to a heat transfer surface for further study. A group of synthetic slag of various compositions was also produced using a sodium silicate binder, Powder River Basin (PRB) bottom ash, and ash cenospheres for porosity to test the effects of pulse detonation techniques on the removal of ash deposits.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

36

Impact of Biodiesel Impurities on the Performance and Durability of DOC, DPF and SCR Technologies: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An accelerated durability test method determined the potential impact of biodiesel ash impurities, including engine testing with multiple diesel particulate filter substrate types, as well as diesel oxidation catalyst and selective catalyst reduction catalysts. The results showed no significant degradation in the thermo-mechanical properties of a DPF after exposure to 150,000-mile equivalent biodiesel ash and thermal aging. However, exposure to 435,000-mile equivalent aging resulted in a 69% decrease in thermal shock resistance. A decrease in DOC activity was seen after exposure to 150,000-mile equivalent aging, resulting in higher hydrocarbon slip and a reduction in NO2 formation. The SCR catalyst experienced a slight loss in activity after exposure to 435,000-mile equivalent aging. The SCR catalyst, placed downstream of the DPF and exposed to B20 exhaust suffered a 5% reduction in overall NOx conversion activity over the HDDT test cycle. It is estimated that the additional ash from 150,000 miles of biodiesel use would also result in a moderate increases in exhaust backpressure for a DPF. The results of this study suggest that long-term operation with B20 at the current specification limits for alkali and alkaline earth metal impurities will adversely impact the performance of DOC, DPF and SCR systems.

Williams, A.; McCormick, R.; Luecke, J.; Brezny, R.; Geisselmann, A.; Voss, K.; Hallstrom, K.; Leustek, M.; Parsons, J.; Abi-Akar, H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Integrated Fly Ash Pond Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is directed toward solving new challenges to meeting U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge limits for ammonia and selected metals from coal-fired power plants. Based on the field and laboratory study of fly ash ponds at five operating coal-fired power plants, the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur in fly ash sluicing systems are discussed and recommendations are made as to how to best manage the pond...

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

Soft arc consistency revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Valued Constraint Satisfaction Problem (VCSP) is a generic optimization problem defined by a network of local cost functions defined over discrete variables. It has applications in Artificial Intelligence, Operations Research, Bioinformatics and ... Keywords: Constraint optimization, Graphical model, Local consistency, Soft arc consistency, Soft constraints, Submodularity, Valued constraint satisfaction problem, Weighted constraint satisfaction problem

M. C. Cooper; S. de Givry; M. Sanchez; T. Schiex; M. Zytnicki; T. Werner

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Genetic Transformation and Regeneration of Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) for Resistance to the Emerald Ash Borer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bats, tool handles, furniture, and firewood. However, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) develop an efficient regeneration and genetic transformation system for green ash, (2) regenerateGenetic Transformation and Regeneration of Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) for Resistance

40

Long duration ash probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

Hurley, John P. (Grand Forks, ND); McCollor, Don P. (Grand Forks, ND); Selle, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, MN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Leaching of Mixtures of Biochar and Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect

Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments.2, 5, 6 Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis7-9, 12 (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion1, 13, 14 have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations.10, 11, 16 Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and reduces available aluminum.3, 17 Combinations of these benefits likely lead to the observed increased yields for crops including corn and sugarcane.17 with biochar addition to soil. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) 8, 17 than do unammended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way.18 Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes.15 Here, we are examining the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluating leaching of organic carbon and metals from the mixtures.

Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Porat, Iris [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Amonette, J. E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Impurity ions in a rotating tokamak  

SciTech Connect

It is pointed out that the impurity ions in rotating toroidal plasmas tend to behave like trapped particles. That may explain the observed fact.

Yoshikawa, S.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Transition metals are one of the main culprits in degrading the efficiency of multicrystalline solar...

44

Fly ash chemical classification based on lime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, total lime content (CaO) of fly ash is shown in fly ash reports, but its significance is not addressed in US specifications. For certain applications a low lime ash is preferred. When a class C fly ash must be cementitious, lime content above 20% is required. A ternary S-A-C phase diagram pilot is given showing the location of fly ash compositions by coal rank and source in North America. Fly ashes from subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin usually contain sufficient lime to be cementitious but blending with other coals may result in calcium being present in phases other than tricalcium aluminate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

Fox, J. [BASF Construction Chemicals, LLC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Impact of Biodiesel Impurities on the Performance and Durability of DOC, DPF and SCR Technologies  

SciTech Connect

It is estimated that operating continuously on a B20 fuel containing the current allowable ASTM specification limits for metal impurities in biodiesel could result in a doubling of ash exposure relative to lube-oil derived ash. The purpose of this study was to determine if a fuel containing metals at the ASTM limits could cause adverse impacts on the performance and durability of diesel emission control systems. An accelerated durability test method was developed to determine the potential impact of these biodiesel impurities. The test program included engine testing with multiple DPF substrate types as well as DOC and SCR catalysts. The results showed no significant degradation in the thermo-mechanical properties of cordierite, aluminum titanate, or silicon carbide DPFs after exposure to 150,000 mile equivalent biodiesel ash and thermal aging. However, exposure of a cordierite DPF to 435,000 mile equivalent aging resulted in a 69% decrease in the thermal shock resistance parameter. It is estimated that the additional ash from 150,000 miles of biodiesel use would also result in a moderate increases in exhaust backpressure for a DPF. A decrease in DOC activity was seen after exposure to 150,000 mile equivalent aging, resulting in higher HC slip and a reduction in NO{sub 2} formation. The metal-zeolite SCR catalyst experienced a slight loss in activity after exposure to 435,000 mile equivalent aging. This catalyst, placed downstream of the DPF, showed a 5% reduction in overall NOx conversion activity over the HDDT test cycle.

Williams, A.; McCormick, R.; Luecke, J.; Brezny, R.; Geisselmann, A.; Voss, K.; Hallstrom, K.; Leustek, M.; Parsons, J.; Abi-Akar, H.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

47

Water Management in Ash-Handling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1980, EPA proposed revisions to the effluent standards and guidelines for fly ash and bottom ash transport systems. This review of utility practices provides a comprehensive account of the operation of and problems experienced in wet handling of bottom and fly ash and suggests areas for further research.

1987-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

Influence of Impurities in Hydrogen on Fuel Cell Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

After purification CO CO 2 ppbC Impurities Conc. Sulfur Sulfur Methanol reformation LNG reformation CO CO 2 Impurities Conc. Naphtha reformation Hydrocarbon decomposition HC 2...

49

Bottom Ash System Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to personnel involved in the bottom ash system and its components, including good maintenance practices, condition monitoring, predictive and preventive maintenance techniques, probable failure modes, and troubleshooting guidance. The guide was developed primarily to provide detailed maintenance and troubleshooting information but also includes basic system information.

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes  

SciTech Connect

There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Overview of SOFC Anode Interactions with Coal Gas Impurities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficiencies greater than 50 percent (higher heating value) have been projected for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems fueled with gasified coal, even with carbon sequestration. Multiple minor and trace components are present in coal that could affect fuel cell performance, however, which vary widely depending on coal origin and type. Minor and trace components have been classified into three groups: elements with low volatility that are likely to remain in the ash, elements that will partition between solid and gas phases, and highly volatile elements that are unlikely to condense. Those in the second group are of most concern. In the following, an overview of the results of SOFC anode interactions with phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, antimony, and hydrogen chloride as single contaminants or in combinations is discussed. Tests were performed using both anode- and electrolyte-supported cells in synthetic coal gas. The ultimate purpose of this work is to establish maximum permissible concentrations for impurities in coal gas, to aid in the selection of appropriate coal gas clean-up technologies.

Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Gemmen, Randall; Gerdes, Kirk; Finklea, Harry; Celik, Ismail B.

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Formation processes and main properties of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres in fly ash from thermal power stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main parameters of aluminosilicate microspheres formed at thermal power stations in Russia were studied. These parameters are responsible for the prospective industrial application of these microspheres. A comparative analysis of the properties of mineral coal components, the conditions of coal combustion, and the effects of chemical and phase-mineralogical compositions of mineral impurities in coals from almost all of the main coal deposits on the formation of microspheres was performed. The effects of thermal treatment conditions on gas evolution processes in mineral particles and on the fraction of aluminosilicate microspheres in fly ash were considered. It was found that the yield of microspheres was higher in pulverized coal combustion in furnaces with liquid slag removal, all other factors being equal. The regularities of microsphere formation were analyzed, and the mechanism of microsphere formation in fly ash during the combustion of solid fuels was considered.

V.S. Drozhzhin; M.Ya. Shpirt; L.D. Danilin; M.D. Kuvaev; I.V. Pikulin; G.A. Potemkin; S.A. Redyushev [Russian Federal Nuclear Center VNIIEF, Nizhegorodskaya oblast (Russia)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

54

Quantitative Analysis of Mt. St. Helens Ash by X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quantitative study by x-ray diffraction, optical polarizing microscopy, and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry of fallout and ambient ash from three Mt. St. Helens eruptions has revealed a consistent picture of the mineralogical and elemental ...

Briant L. Davis; L. Ronald Johnson; Dana T. Griffen; William Revell Phillips; Robert K. Stevens; David Maughan

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Compositional Analysis of Beneficiated Fly Ashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fly ash is a byproduct of combustion of coal in coal-fired powerplants through ... to be disposed of at a significant cost to power plant companies, and ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

56

The potential for use of waste-to-energy facility ash: Executive summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This executive summary presents an overview of the investigations, findings, conclusions, and recommendations of the Long Island Regional Planning Board (LIRPB) study of the Potential for Beneficial Use of Waste-to-Energy Facility Ash. The full report consists of the following volumes: Executive Summary; Volume 1: Long Island Ash Management Status; Volume 2: Sampling and Testing Procedures; Volume 3: Environmental Properties; Volume 4: Engineering Properties; Volume 5: Environmental Assessment; Volume 6: Engineering and Economic Evaluation; and Volume 7: Legal and Institutional Issues. Volumes one through seven are briefly summarized in this executive summary with the exception of Volume 2 of the report, which serves as the documentation of the sampling conditions and testing methods used in measuring chemical and physical properties of the ash tested. The study investigated the feasibility of the use of incinerator ash as a substitute for natural aggregate in construction applications.

Koppelman, L.E.; Tanenbaum, E.G. [Long Island Regional Planning Board, Hauppauge, NY (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities Tobias K be photobleached before final sample preparation. The instrument consists of high power light emitting diodes for simple photobleaching pur- poses, we designed a simple but efficient lighting system using light emitting

Kaufman, Laura

59

Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part Limestone and Ash Storage Silos and Lime Preparation Equipment, Part of the System to Inject Limestone Sorbent for SO, Control. Nucla, CO Nucla...continued Before being repowered, the plant consisted of three 12 MWe coal stoker- fired units built in 1959, which were taken out of service in 1984 due to low efficiency and high fuel cost. Antici- pating a need for additional power in the early 1990s. and after review of many power generation alternatives, CUEA started constmction of the re- powered Nucla CFB plant in Novem- ber 1984 and completed the project in May 1987. The original boilers were replaced with a new Fympower Corp. CFB bailer, a new high pressure 74 MWe steam turbine generator was installed, the three original 12 MWe steam turbines were

60

Use of Class C Fly Ash in High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of fly ash in concrete is a well-established practice, the volume of high-calcium Class C ash used lags behind that of low-calcium Class F ash. Because Class C may be the only type of ash produced in some western states, this disparity can significantly limit its use potential. The literature results presented in this report represent the first phase of a longer term research effort to provide technical information supporting the increased use of Class C ash in concrete applications.

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Entrained-flow dry-bottom gasification of high-ash coals in coal-water slurries  

SciTech Connect

It was shown that the effective use of dry ash removal during entrained-flow gasification of coal-water slurries consists in simplification of the ash storage system and utilization of coal ash, a decrease in the coal demand, a reduction in the atmospheric emissions of noxious substances and particulate matter, and abandonment of the discharge of water used for ash slurry. According to the results of gasification of coal-water slurries (5-10 {mu}m) in a pilot oxygen-blow unit at a carbon conversion of >91%, synthesis gas containing 28.5% CO, 32.5% H{sub 2}, 8.2% CO{sub 2}, 1.5% CH{sub 4}, the rest being nitrogen, was obtained. The fly ash in its chemical composition, particle size, and density meets the requirements of the European standard EN 450 as a cement additive for concrete manufacture.

E.G. Gorlov; V.G. Andrienko; K.B. Nefedov; S.V. Lutsenko; B.K. Nefedov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17-acre...

63

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a...

64

Impurity transport in a quiescent tokamak plasma  

SciTech Connect

Short bursts of aluminum were injected into the Adiabatic Toroidal Compressor (ATC) Tokamak, and measured the time evolution of the radial distributions of highly ionized states of aluminum. The results are compared with a computer code describing neoclassical impurity diffusion and good agreement is found. (auth)

Cohen, S.A.; Cecchi, J.L.; Marmar, E.S.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Study of recycling impurity retention in Alcator C-mod  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work was aimed at reproducing experimental results in impurity compression of Ar, as well as the screening of recycling and non-recycling impurities from reaching the core plasma. As part of the study the code was ...

Chung, Taekyun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Formation and Stability of Impurity “Snakes” in Tokamak Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New observations of the formation and dynamics of long-lived impurity-induced helical “snake” modes in tokamak plasmas have recently been carried out on Alcator C-Mod. The snakes form as an asymmetry in the impurity ion ...

Delgado- Aparicio L., Alvaro

67

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT); Akash, Akash (Salt lake City, UT); Zhao, Qiang (Natick, MA)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

68

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

69

Impurities and defects in photovoltaic Si devices: A review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of commercial photovoltaic Si devices is strongly controlled by the impurities and defects present in the substrates. A well-designed solar cell processing sequence can mitigate their effects to yield high efficiency devices. Such a process-design requires a comprehensive knowledge of the properties of defects, impurities, and impurity-defect interactions that can occur during device processing. This paper reviews the recent understanding of the impurity and defect issues in Si-photovoltaics.

Sopori, B.

1999-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Evaluation of diffusion coefficients from nonlinear impurity profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At high concentrations, impurity diffusion in semiconductors is governed by nonlinear diffusion processes. Using similarity analysis, a general expression for evaluation of the diffusion coefficient from experimental impurity profiles derived for the case of redistributive diffusion of implanted impurities. This expression corresponds to the Boltzmann-Matano analysis for the case of diffusion with constant surface concentration.

Anderson, D.; Jeppson, K.O.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Impurity behavior in the ISX-B tokamak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Any discussion of impurity behavior during neutral-beam injection in ISX-B is best formulated in terms of the distinctive differences observed between ohmically heated, co-injection, and counter-injection discharges. In ohmically heated discharges both the production and the transport of impurities depend upon whether the working gas is hydrogen or deuterium. The influx of oxygen is almost the same for both cases, but the influx of metals is about a factor of 3 larger in the deuterium discharges. These results are consistent with the picture that oxygen gets into the plasma mainly through some process of chemical detachment, but that the metals are produced by neutral-particle sputtering at the walls. This conclusion pertains to discharges that are kept centered in the vacuum chamber so that the plasma limiter interactions are minimized. Under this condition the ion temperature near the edge of the current column is apparently low enough that charged particle sputtering of the limiter is a relatively small effect.

Isler, R.C.; Murray, L.E.; Edmonds, P.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Leaching of mixtures of biochar and fly ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments. Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations. Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and decreases available aluminum. A combination of these benefits likely is responsible for observed increases in yields for crops such as corn and sugarcane. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) than do unamended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way. Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil. Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes. In the present study, we examined the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluated the leaching of organic carbon and metals from these mixtures. The carbon sorption experiments showed release of carbon from biochar, rather than sorption, except at the highest concentrations in the Biochar HW sample. Similar results were obtained by others for oxidative leaching of bituminous coal, in which more C was released as dissolved C than was oxidized to CO2 by the oxygen in water. We confirmed that both fly ash and two types of biochar (oak char [OKEB], and hardwood [HW] char) exhibited minimal leaching of heavy metals including Cr, Ni, Zn, Ga, and Ag, and no detectable leaching of Pb or Cd (data not shown) under the conditions tested. The Biochar HW had a slightly higher C/N ratio (334) and pH (7.7) than did the Biochar OKEB (284 and 6.5). There was no toxicity exhibited by the fly ash (not shown) or biochar leachates as measured by the Microtox© assay under the conditions tested. In previous results no toxicity was reported in testing the fly ash samples except for one high-pH sample. The most notable leachate component from both types of biochar, but not the fly ash, was organic carbon with the HW biochar leaching less organic carbon than the OKEB biochar (5.71 ppm vs. 59.3 ppm). Alone (in batch sorption experiments), or in mixtures of 90% soil and 10% biochar (column studies), we noted significant loss of carbon from the biochar into soluble components. However, when we added fly ash to the column experiments (80% soil, 10% fly ash, and 10% biochar) we observed significant decreases in the amounts of C leached (20% for HW, and 47% for OKEB). The results indicate that applying a combination of fly ash and biochar may result in maximizing the amount of carbon sequestration in soil while also increasing beneficial soil properties and fertility. The lower amount of carbon leached from the HW biochar compared to the OKEB biochar is likely due to the more recalcitrant form of the carbon in the HW char, due to its preparation at a higher temperature (600 ºC) than the OKEB biochar (450 ºC). High heat treatment temperatures during biochar preparation increase both the total carbon content of the biochar and the proportion of the carbon that is present in fused aromatic rings resistant to chemical and physical degradation.

Palumbo, Anthony V.; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana R.; Amonette, James E.; Drake, Meghan M.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

Rocky Flats ash test procedure (sludge stabilization)  

SciTech Connect

Rocky Flats Ash items have been identified as the next set of materials to be stabilized. This test is being run to determine charge sizes and soak times to completely stabilize the Rocky Flats Ash items. The information gathered will be used to generate the heating rampup cycle for stabilization. This test will also gain information on the effects of the glovebox atmosphere (moisture) on the stabilized material. This document provides instructions for testing Rocky Flats Ash in the HC-21C muffle furnace process.

Winstead, M.L.

1995-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fusibility and sintering characteristics of ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The temperature characteristics of ash fusibility are studied for a wide range of bituminous and brown coals, lignites, and shales with ratios R{sub B/A} of their alkaline and acid components between 0.03 and 4. Acritical value of R{sub B/A} is found at which the fusion temperatures are minimal. The sintering properties of the ashes are determined by measuring the force required to fracture a cylindrical sample. It is found that the strength of the samples increases sharply at certain temperatures. The alkali metal content of the ashes has a strong effect on their sintering characteristics.

Ots, A. A., E-mail: aots@sti.ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Power radiated from ITER and CIT by impurities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MIST code has been used to model impurity radiation from the edge and core plasmas in ITER and CIT. A broad range of parameters have been varied, including Z{sub eff}, impurity species, impurity transport coefficients, and plasma temperature and density profiles, especially at the edge. For a set of these parameters representative of the baseline ITER ignition scenario, it is seen that impurity radiation, which is produced in roughly equal amounts by the edge and core regions, can make a major improvement in divertor operation without compromising core energy confinement. Scalings of impurity radiation with atomic number and machine size are also discussed. 22 refs., 16 figs.

Cummings, J.; Cohen, S.A.; Hulse, R.; Post, D.E.; Redi, M.H.; Perkins, J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Investigation of Ammonia Adsorption on Fly Ash and Potential Impacts of Ammoniated Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Problems associated with ammoniated fly ash have become a major concern for coal-fired facilities in recent years due to the increased use of ammonia-based environmental control technologies. Of particular note is more frequent use of ammonia-based NOx control systems and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) conditioning with ammonia. To help power producers evaluate and mitigate the impacts of ammoniated ash, this project provides crucial information in the areas of fly ash characterization, adsorption test...

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

77

Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Dennis Papadias and Shabbir Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Presented at the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, CO June 11-13, 2012 Biogas is the product of anaerobic decomposition of organic waste Municipal solid wastes (MSW)  For every 1 million tons of MSW: - 432,000 cubic feet per day of landfill gas (LFG) for a period of 20 years - 1 MW of electricity 1 Sewage sludge/waste water (WWTP or ADG)  A typical WWTP processes 100 gallons per day (GD) for every person served - 1 cubic foot of digester gas can be produced per 100 gallons of wastewater  100 kW of electricity 1 can be generated from 4.5 MGD of waste water Agricultural waste (i.e. dairy waste)  About 70-100 ft 3 /day of digester gas is produced

78

Lifetime and diffusion length measurements on silicon material and solar cells. [Intentionally doped with impurities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental methods were evaluated for the determination of lifetime and diffusion length in silicon intentionally doped with potentially lifetime-degrading impurities found in metallurgical grade silicon, impurities which may be residual in low-cost silicon intended for use in terrestrial flat-plat arrays. Results obtained by these methods were compared for mutual consistency. Lifetime measurements were made using a steady-state photoconductivity method, which was compared with a photoconductivity decay technique. Diffusion length determinations were made using short-circuit current measurements under penetrating illumination. This method was compared with a direct measurement of diffusion length using a scanning electron microscope. Mutual consistency among all experimental methods was verified, but steady-state photoconductivity was found preferable to photoconductivity decay at short lifetimes and in the presence of traps. The effects of a number of impurities on lifetime in bulk material, and on diffusion length in cells fabricated from this material, were determined. Results were compared with those obtained by others on the same material and devices using different techniques. General agreement was found in terms of the hierarchy of impurities which degrade the lifetime.

Othmer, S.; Chen, S.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Proceedings: Tenth International Ash Use Symposium, Volume 2: Ash Use R&D and Clean Coal By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics discussed at the tenth symposium on coal ash use included fundamental ash use research, product marketing, applied research, ash management and the environment, and commercial applications. Intense international research interest continues in coal ash use due to the prospects of avoiding disposal costs and generating revenue from by-product sales.

1993-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

Case Studies in Ash Pond Management, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Toward Developing Integrated Strategies for Managing Multiple Constituents in Ash Pond Discharges," EPRI's second workshop on Ash Pond Management, was hosted by TVA on May 16, 2006, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The presentations in this workshop reflected specific research challenges identified by participants in the first Ash Pond Management workshop, held in 2004. Among the presentations given in this second workshop were the following: Ash Pond Limnology Optimizing Ash Pond Treatment of Ammonia Predic...

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Winter'04Ash4-5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

process, fly ash is used as a raw material to substitute for part of the clay and shale, which are the two main raw materials of a conventional brick. Test bricks produced...

82

The 1983 Ash Wednesday Fires in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Australia experienced the most disastrous bushfires in over 40 years on Ash Wednesday, 16 February 1983. This article describes the meteorological conditions prior to, during and after these fires, and includes photographs from GMS-2. It also ...

M. E. Voice; F. J. Gauntlett

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Coal Ash Contaminants in Wetlands | SREL Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracey Tuberville, and Bill Hopkins The ash plume wetland (APW). The APW received coal combustion wastes from a breach in a receiving basin in the 1970s. Several trace metals...

84

Airborne Volcanic Ash Forecast Area Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of aircraft flight safety operations, daily comparisons between modeled, hypothetical, volcanic ash plumes calculated with meteorological forecasts and analyses were made over a 1.5-yr period. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian ...

Barbara J. B. Stunder; Jerome L. Heffter; Roland R. Draxler

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ashe County- Wind Energy System Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2007 Ashe County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in unincorporated areas of the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a...

86

NETL: Events - World of Coal Ash 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(WOCA) 2007 conference, jointly sponsored by the American Coal Ash Association and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, will be held May 7-10, 2007 at...

87

Carbon-in-Ash Monitor Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the lack of publicly available performance and operational data for the current carbon-in-ash monitor (CIAM) commercial offerings, EPRI and Southern Company initiated a demonstration of several commercial technologies on Southern Company's coal-fired units.

2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) ongoing Boiler Tube Failure Reduction (BTFR) program, this report has been compiled to discuss chemical and mechanical mechanisms that lead to the formation of ash deposits. Ash deposits are a known cause of several boiler tube failure mechanisms, which can not only impact plant performance, but also lead to millions of dollars in lost revenue due to forced outages.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

89

Coal Ash: Characteristics, Management, and Environmental Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants in the United States produce more than 92 million tons of coal ash per year. About 40% is beneficially used in a variety of applications, and about 60% is managed in storage and disposal sites. This technical update summarizes information and data on the physical and chemical characteristics of coal ash, beneficial use applications, disposal practices, and management practices to mitigate environmental concerns.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

90

Ash Deposit Physical and Chemical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) ongoing Boiler Tube Failure Reduction (BTFR) program, this report has been compiled to discuss chemical and mechanical mechanisms that lead to the formation of ash deposits. Ash deposits are a known cause of a number of boiler tube failure mechanisms, which can not only impact plant performance, but lead to millions of dollars in lost revenue due to forced outages.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

91

Densification of pond ash by blasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash from thermal power plants is disposed, in huge quantities in ash ponds, which occupy large land areas otherwise useful for agriculture, housing, or other development. For effective rehabilitation of ash ponds, densification of the slurry deposit is essential to increase the bearing capacity and to improve its resistance to liquefaction. Extensive field trials were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of deep blasting for densification of deposited fly ash. Ninety explosions comprising 15 single blasts, with varying depths and quantities of charges, and 3 group blasts, each having 25 charges placed at various spacings, were carried out. The compaction achieved in terms of an increase in relative density was evaluated from surface settlement measurements. Extensive field monitoring was undertaken through pore-water pressure measurements, vibration measurements, penetration tests, and block vibration tests. For the average charge of 2--4 g of explosive per cubic meter of untreated deposit, the average relative density was found to improve from 50% to 56--58%. Analysis of the test results indicates that deep blasting may be an effective technique for modest compaction of loose fly ash deposits. The field testing program presented in this paper provides valuable information that can be used for planning blast densification of fly ash deposits.

Gandhi, S.R.; Dey, A.K.; Selvam, S. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge  

SciTech Connect

Investigates the selling of by-products of coal-fired power generation--fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and scrubber sludge--by utilities for use in highways, parking lots, cement, roofing, bricks, and blocks. Points out that the EPA has drafted tough new regulations for solid-waste storage, transportation, and disposal that may soon cost power plants $25-$40 a ton to dispose of wastes. Reports that the EPRI is studying high-volume by-product applications that have low technology requirements (e.g. fly ash for use in highways, parking lots, and utility construction) and medium-volume, medium-technology applications (e.g. by-products used for cement manufacture, asphalt, blocks, bricks, roofing granules, and wallboards). Reveals that EPRI plans to eventually identify a representative set of perhaps half a dozen basic fly ashes, characterize them, do proportion studies of existing concrete mixes (including those with fly ash in them), and then develop guidelines for fly ash proportions in concrete.

Lihach, N.; Golden, D.; Komai, R.; Maulbetsch, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase III summary and seventeenth quarterly report, Volume 2: analysis of impurity behavior  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of this phase of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the properties of silicon and on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study encompassed topics including thermochemical (gettering) treatments, base doping concentration, base doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary-impurity interaction, non-uniformity of impurity distribution, long term effects of impurities, as well as synergic and complexing phenomena. The program approach consists in: (1) the growth of doubly and multiply-doped silicon single crystals containing a baseline boron or phosphorus dopant and specific impurities which produce deep levels in the forbidden band gap; (2) assessment of these crystals by chemical, microstructural, electrical and solar cell tests; (3) correlation of the impurity type and concentration with crystal quality and device performance; and (4) delineation of the role of impurities and processing on subsequent silicon solar cell performance. The overall results reported are based on the assessment of nearly 200 silicon ingots. (WHK)

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Blais, P.D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

1980-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

94

Causal consistency in mobile environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Causal consistency stipulates that causally dependent writes to data items should be executed in causal order. Traditionally this has been done by causally ordered message delivery using vector clocks. In a vector clock of size N, each element of the ... Keywords: causal consistency, collaboration, mobility, replication, vector clocks

D. Janaki Ram; M. Uma Mahesh; N. S. K. Chandra Sekhar; Chitra Babu

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Assessment of Embrittlement of VHTR Structural Alloys in Impure Helium Environments  

SciTech Connect

The helium coolant in high-temperature reactors inevitably contains low levels of impurities during steady-state operation, primarily consisting of small amounts of H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} from a variety of sources in the reactor circuit. These impurities are problematic because they can cause significant long-term corrosion in the structural alloys used in the heat exchangers at elevated temperatures. Currently, the primary candidate materials for intermediate heat exchangers are Alloy 617, Haynes 230, Alloy 800H, and Hastelloy X. This project will evaluate the role of impurities in helium coolant on the stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack growth in candidate alloys at elevated temperatures. The project team will: • Evaluate stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack initiation and crack growth in the temperature range of 500-850°C in a prototypical helium environment. • Evaluate the effects of oxygen partial pressure on stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack growth in impure helium at 500°C, 700°C, and 850°C respectively. • Characterize the microstructure of candidate alloys after long-term exposure to an impure helium environment in order to understand the correlation between stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation, creep crack growth, material composition, and impurities in the helium coolant. • Evaluate grain boundary engineering as a method to mitigate stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack growth of candidate alloys in impure helium. The maximum primary helium coolant temperature in the high-temperature reactor is expected to be 850-1,000°C.Corrosion may involve oxidation, carburization, or decarburization mechanisms depending on the temperature, oxygen partial pressure, carbon activity, and alloy composition. These corrosion reactions can substantially affect long-term mechanical properties such as crack- growth rate and fracture toughness, creep rupture, and fatigue. Although there are some studies on the effects of impurities in helium coolant on creep rupture and fatigue strength, very little is known about their effects on creep crack initiation and crack growth rate at elevated temperatures.

Crone, Wendy; Cao, Guoping; Sridhara, Kumar

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The trouble with SMT consistency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SMT typically models translation at the sentence level, ignoring wider document context. Does this hurt the consistency of translated documents? Using a phrase-based SMT system in various data conditions, we show that SMT translates documents remarkably ...

Marine Carpuat; Michel Simard

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Consistent Interaction Of Software Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructing complex software systems by integrating different software components is a promising and challenging approach. With the functionality of software components given by models it is possible to ensure consistency of such models before implementation ...

Gregor Engels; Jochen M. Küuster; Luuk Groenwegen

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ion microprobe U-Pb isotope analyses of zircons from fallout and intercalated ash-flow deposits of the early, most chemically evolved  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Ion microprobe U-Pb isotope analyses of zircons from fallout and intercalated ash, 1996; Lu et al., 1992). One sample, 061498-24-6, consists of pumice lapilli from the Plinian fallout

100

Impurity beam-trapping instability in tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The sensitivity of neutron energy production to the impurity trapping of injected neutral beams is considered. This process is affected by inherent low-Z contamination of the tritium pre-heat plasma, by the species composition of the neutral beam, and by the entrance angle of the beam. The sensitivities of the process to these variables, and to the variation of wall material are compared. One finds that successful use of a low-Z, low-sputtering material can appreciably lengthen the useful pulse length. (auth)

Hogan, J.T.; Howe, H.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Electron Fabry-Perot interferometer with two entangled magnetic impurities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a one-dimensional (1D) wire along which single conduction electrons can propagate in the presence of two spin-1/2 magnetic impurities. The electron may be scattered by each impurity via a contact-exchange interaction and thus a spin-flip generally occurs at each scattering event. Adopting a quantum waveguide theory approach, we derive the stationary states of the system at all orders in the electron-impurity exchange coupling constant. This allows us to investigate electron transmission for arbitrary initial states of the two impurity spins. We show that for suitable electron wave vectors, the triplet and singlet maximally entangled spin states of the impurities can respectively largely inhibit the electron transport or make the wire completely transparent for any electron spin state. In the latter case, a resonance condition can always be found, representing an anomalous behaviour compared to typical decoherence induced by magnetic impurities. We provide an explanation for these phenomena in term...

Ciccarello, F; Palma, G M; Vieira, V R; Zarcone, M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Chemical characterization of transition metal (V, Zr, Nb) impurities in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) Ions onto Biomass Ash ... Tellurium Supply Sensitivity to Growth of Non-Traditional Copper Extraction Techniques - Implications for ...

103

Suppression of heavy impurities in the ST Tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Two different discharges in the ST Tokamak are described: A discharge dominated by high-Z (iron) impurity (Case A), and one dominated by low-Z (oxygen) impurity (Case B). The oxygen-dominated discharge shows higher electron temperature and longer containment time than the iron-dominated discharge. Suppression of Fe and Mo impurities has been achieved by pulsing in air for a few hundred shots. (auth)

Meservey, E.; Bretz, N.; Dimock, D.; Hinnov, E.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

SciTech Connect

In December 2008, an ash dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured, releasing over one billion gallons of coal fly ash into the Emory and Clinch Rivers. Coal fly ash may contain several contaminants of concern, but of these selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) have been highlighted because of their toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic food chains. To assess the potential impact of the spilled fly ash on humans and the environment, a comprehensive biological and environmental monitoring program was established, for which resident aquatic organisms (among other sample media) are collected to determine contaminant exposure and evaluate the risk to humans and wildlife. Studies on bioaccumulation and fish health are major components of the TVA Biological Monitoring Program for the Kingston fly ash project. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure (to metals) and effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information regarding other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash, not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report summarizes the bioaccumulation results from the first two years of study after the fly ash spill, including four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation, selenium and arsenic were the only two metals consistently elevated above background levels in fish. E

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost  

Releasing the pressure in the sorbent chamber then releases the impurities into the gas phase to ... Conceptual diagram of a hydrogen-permeating enrichment

106

Uranium and Thorium Ores and Impurity Reference Materials Price...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety & Health spacer Office of Science Chicago Office - New Brunswick Laboratory Uranium and Thorium Ores and Impurity Reference Materials Price List Return to Price List...

107

Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke. Author(s), Alexandre Gagnon, Hans Darmstadt, Nigel Backhouse, Esme Ryan, Laurence Dyer, David ...

108

TMS2013 Keynote Session Looks at Impurities in the Aluminum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Impacts of Impurities Introduced into the Aluminum Reduction Cell"; "Changes in Global Oil Refining and Its Impact on Anode Quality Petroleum Coke"

109

On the Segregation of Impurities in Solar Silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, On the Segregation of Impurities in Solar Silicon ... Abstract Scope, The exponential increase of the photovoltaic market leads to a shortage of ...

110

Impurity Gettering Effect of Te Inclusions in Cdznte Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The local impurity distribution in Te inclusions of CdZnTe (CZT) crystal was investigated by the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (Tof-SIMS) technique. Direct evidence of impurity gettering in Te inclusions has been observed for the first time. The impurity gettering in Te inclusions originated from the diffusion mechanism during crystal growth and segregation mechanism during crystal cooling. This phenomenon is meaningful, because it reveals how Te inclusions affect CZT properties and provides a possible approach to reduce the impurities in CZT by the way of removing Te inclusions.

Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A; Cui, Y; Camarda, G; Hossain, A; James, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Particle fueling and impurity control in PDX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fueling requirements and impurity levels in neutral-beam-heated discharges in the PDX tokamak have been compared for plasmas formed with conventional graphite rail limiters, a particle scoop limiter, and an open or closed poloidal divertor. Gas flows necessary to obtain a given density are highest for diverted discharges and lowest for the scoop limiter. Hydrogen pellet injection provides an efficient alternate fueling technique, and a multiple pellet injector has produced high density discharges for an absorbed neutral beam power of up to 600 kW, above which higher speeds or more massive pellets are required for penetration to the plasma core. Power balance studies indicate that 30 to 40% of the total input power is radiated while approx. 15% is absorbed by the limiting surface, except in the open divertor case, where 60% flows to the neutralizer plate. In all operating configurations, Z/sub eff/ usually rises at the onset of neutral beam injection. Both open divertor plasmas and those formed on a well conditioned water-cooled limiter have Z/sub eff/ less than or equal to 2 at the end of neutral injection. A definitive comparison of divertors and limiters for impurity control purposes requires longer beam pulses or higher power levels than available on present machines.

Fonck, R.J.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Budny, R.; Couture, P.; Darrow, D.; Dylla, H.; Goldston, R.; Grek, B.; Hawryluk, R.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Archiving the relaxed consistency web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The historical, cultural, and intellectual importance of archiving the web has been widely recognized. Today, all countries with high Internet penetration rate have established high-profile archiving initiatives to crawl and archive the fast-disappearing ... Keywords: consistency, digital preservation, social network, web archiving

Zhiwu Xie, Herbert Van de Sompel, Jinyang Liu, Johann van Reenen, Ramiro Jordan

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase in coal-fired power plants and tighter environmental problems have put utilities in the position of marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge by turning waste products into a resource. Many utilities are looking beyond road and structural fill uses in their marketing efforts. Slag can be made into sandblasting grit, aggregate, and roofing granules, or used for soil stabilization or the chemical fixation of municipal wastes. Composition and collection variations discourage many utilities from marketing their by-products, while availability can be a problem for customers if the power plant should shut down. Other problems include storage and transportation, competition, and institutional barriers. Documentation of the fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and scrubber waste markets by the Electric Power Research Institute considers these factors and develops a marketing method to help utilities evaluate and promote their product. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Golden, D.; Komai, R.; Maulbetsch, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 27, 2011 ... Upon cooling, the molten ash forms a brittle glass that flakes off, taking the coating with it. Like sand, ash is made mostly of silica and poses a ...

117

Surface impurity removal from DIII-D graphite tiles by boron carbide grit blasting  

SciTech Connect

During the latter half of 1992, the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics (GA) underwent several modifications of its interior. One of the major tasks involved the removal of accumulated metallic impurities from the surface of the graphite tiles used to line the plasma facing surfaces inside of the tokamak. Approximately 1500 graphite tiles and 100 boron nitride tiles from the tokamak were cleaned to remove the metallic impurities. The cleaning process consisted of several steps: the removed graphite tiles were permanently marked, surface blasted using boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) grit media (approximately 37 {mu}m. diam.), ultrasonically cleaned in ethanol to remove loose dust, and outgassed at 1000{degrees}C. Tests were done using, graphite samples and different grit blaster settings to determine the optimum propellant and abrasive media pressures to remove a graphite layer approximately 40-50 {mu}m deep and yet produce a reasonably smooth finish. EDX measurements revealed that the blasting technique reduced the surface Ni, Cr, and Fe impurity levels to those of virgin graphite. In addition to the surface impurity removal, tritium monitoring was performed throughout the cleaning process. A bubbler system was set up to monitor the tritium level in the exhaust gas from the grit blaster unit. Surface wipes were also performed on over 10% of the tiles. Typical surface tritium concentrations of the tiles were reduced from about 500 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} to less than 80 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} following the cleaning. This tile conditioning, and the installation of additional graphite tiles to cover a high fraction of the metallic plasma facing surfaces, has substantially reduced metallic impurities in the plasma discharges which has allowed rapid recovery from a seven-month machine opening and regimes of enhanced plasma energy confinement to be more readily obtained. Safety issues concerning blaster operator exposure to carcinogenic metals and radioactive tritium will also be addressed.

Lee, R.L.; Hollerbach, M.A.; Holtrop, K.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Taylor, P.L.; West, W.P.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Development of High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement can be produced either by intergrinding fly ash with portland cement clinker or by blending dry fly ash with portland cement. Production of HVFA cement using the intergrinding method may be the most cost-effective and practical of the two approaches. This report documents the results of commercial-scale production of HVFA blended cements using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

119

TREATMENT OF CYANIDE SOLUTIONS AND SLURRIES USING AIR-SPARGED HYDROCYCLONE (ASH) TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-year Department of Energy (DOE) project ''Treatment of Cyanide Solutions and Slurries Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Technology'' (ASH/CN) has been completed. This project was also sponsored by industrial partners, ZPM Inc., Elbow Creek Engineering, Solvay Minerals, EIMCO-Baker Process, Newmont Mining Corporation, Cherokee Chemical Co., Placer Dome Inc., Earthworks Technology, Dawson Laboratories and Kennecott Minerals. Development of a new technology using the air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) as a reactor for either cyanide recovery or destruction was the research objective. It was expected that the ASH could potentially replace the conventional stripping tower presently used for HCN stripping and absorption with reduced power costs. The project was carried out in two phases. The first phase included calculation of basic processing parameters for ASH technology, development of the flowsheet, and design/adaptation of the ASH mobile system for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) recovery from cyanide solutions. This was necessary because the ASH was previously used for volatile organics removal from contaminated water. The design and modification of the ASH were performed with the help from ZPM Inc. personnel. Among the modifications, the system was adapted for operation under negative pressure to assure safe operating conditions. The research staff was trained in the safe use of cyanide and in hazardous material regulations. Cyanide chemistry was reviewed resulting in identification of proper chemical dosages for cyanide destruction, after completion of each pilot plant run. The second phase of the research consisted of three field tests that were performed at the Newmont Mining Corporation gold cyanidation plant near Midas, Nevada. The first field test was run between July 26 and August 2, 2002, and the objective was to demonstrate continuous operation of the modified ASH mobile system. ASH units were applied for both stripping and absorption, to recover cyanide, using the acidification-volatilization-reabsorption chemistry. Plant barren cyanide solution was used during the field tests. The original ASH system used for the field tests had been designed and fabricated by ZPM Inc. to remove volatile organic compounds from ground water. The system, even with a number of modifications, could not operate at optimum conditions for cyanide recovery. Reactors and pumps installed in the mobile system only allowed for the treatment of clear solutions, not slurries. Also the original mobile system was limited with respect to Q, the relative air flow rate, and the extent of recovery in a single stage. Due to the lack of automatic controls, the system required constant supervision of the University of Utah (U/U) team. In spite of these difficulties, application of the ASH mobile system was particularly attractive due to compactness of the apparatus and less than 1 second residence time of the aqueous phase in the cyclones. The performance of the ASH system was evaluated by comparison with theoretical predictions.

Jan D. Miller; Terrence Chatwin; Jan Hupka; Doug Halbe; Tao Jiang; Bartosz Dabrowski; Lukasz Hupka

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Use of Coal Ash in Highway Construction: Michigan Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3000-ft-length fly ash base under a highway shoulder will help demonstrate the impact of reused ash on structural integrity and groundwater. This report provides valuable design details for utilities seeking to increase ash reuse and for state highway design engineers responsible for preparing construction specifications.

1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Spectroscopic Analysis of Impurity Precipitates in CdS Films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Devices incorporating chemical-bath-deposited (CBD) CdS are comparable in quality to devices incorporating purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this paper, we summarize and review the results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Auger, electron microprobe, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films. We show that these impurities differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. We also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates.

Webb, J. D.; Keane, J.; Ribelin, R.; Gedvilas, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Ramanathan, K.; Albin, D. S.; Noufi, R.

1999-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

ASH VITRIFICATION -A TECHNOLOGY READY FOR TRANSFER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methods for treating ash in the near future [1]. The lack of specific rules by RCRA has led to confusion the Toxic Characterization Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extraction tests conducted on slag samples which were(ml!!l) in TCLP Extract Arsenic BQL · Barium 0.8 Cadmium 0.010 Chromium BOL Lead 0.43 Mercury 0.0007 Selenium BOL

Columbia University

124

Sixth workshop on the role of impurities and defects in silicon device processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sixth Workshop on the Role of Impurities and Defects in Silicon Device Processing was held in Snowmass Village, August 12-14, 1996. The workshop was attended by 87 participants from academic institutions and photovoltaic industry representatives, from the United States, Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Belgium, and The Netherlands. The workshop consisted of nine sessions that addressed different aspects of impurities and defects in silicon and applications to solar-cell processing. Each session opened with some review talks summarizing recent advances in this field and introduced important issues for further discussions during a subsequent panel discussion session. In addition, the latest research results were presented in two poster sessions.

Tan, T.; Swanson, R.; Sopori, B.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Plutonium dissolution from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash  

SciTech Connect

Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) soon will commence recovery of plutonium from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash. In preparation for this processing, Rockwell undertook literature and laboratory studies to identify, select and optimize plutonium dissolution methods for treating the ash. Ash reburning, followed by dissolution in nitric acid containing calcium fluoride, was selected as the processing method for the ash. Recommended values of process parameters were identified. Using the selected process, 99.5% plutonium recovery was achieved, leaving about 12.7 wt % heel residue for an equal weight composite of the three ashes tested. 15 refs., 26 figs.

Delegard, C.H.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Effects of Fuel and Air Impurities on PEM Fuel Cell Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Approach * Fabricate and operate fuel cells under controlled impurity gases - Multi-gas mixing manifolds and FC test stations - Pre-blend impurity gases - Measure performance...

127

The Consistent Vehicle Routing Problem  

SciTech Connect

In the small package shipping industry (as in other industries), companies try to differentiate themselves by providing high levels of customer service. This can be accomplished in several ways, including online tracking of packages, ensuring on-time delivery, and offering residential pickups. Some companies want their drivers to develop relationships with customers on a route and have the same drivers visit the same customers at roughly the same time on each day that the customers need service. These service requirements, together with traditional constraints on vehicle capacity and route length, define a variant of the classical capacitated vehicle routing problem, which we call the consistent VRP (ConVRP). In this paper, we formulate the problem as a mixed-integer program and develop an algorithm to solve the ConVRP that is based on the record-to-record travel algorithm. We compare the performance of our algorithm to the optimal mixed-integer program solutions for a set of small problems and then apply our algorithm to five simulated data sets with 1,000 customers and a real-world data set with more than 3,700 customers. We provide a technique for generating ConVRP benchmark problems from vehicle routing problem instances given in the literature and provide our solutions to these instances. The solutions produced by our algorithm on all problems do a very good job of meeting customer service objectives with routes that have a low total travel time.

Groer, Christopher S [ORNL; Golden, Bruce [University of Maryland; Edward, Wasil [American University

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Observations of low charge state impurities in EBT  

SciTech Connect

Spatially resolved profiles of low charge state carbon and aluminum ion impurity radiation from EBT were obtained in the vacuum ultraviolet. The data shows EBT to be remarkably free from impurities. Loss times in the surface plasma are found to be approximately 300 ..mu..sec. Thus about one fourth of the input power supports the surface plasma. The measurement places an upper limit on the C V density in the core plasma which indicates that the core plasma is shielded from the impurities in the surface plasma.

Warden, E. S.; Moos, H. W.; Lazar, N. H.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, Lamar T. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, L.T.

1987-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

131

Decoherence induced by magnetic impurities in a quantum hall system  

SciTech Connect

Scattering by magnetic impurities is known to destroy coherence of electron motion in metals and semiconductors. We investigate the decoherence introduced in a single act of electron scattering by a magnetic impurity in a quantum Hall system. For this, we introduce a fictitious nonunitary scattering matrix for electrons that reproduces the exactly calculated scattering probabilities. The strength of decoherence is identified by the deviation of eigenvalues of the product from unity. Using the fictitious scattering matrix, we estimate the width of the metallic region at the quantum Hall effect inter-plateau transition and its dependence on the exchange coupling strength and the degree of polarization of magnetic impurities.

Kagalovsky, V. [Shamoon College of Engineering (Israel); Chudnovskiy, A. L., E-mail: alexander.chudnovskiy@gmail.com [Universitat Hamburg, I. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

The impact of impurities on long-term PEMFC performance  

SciTech Connect

Electrochemical experimentation and modeling indicates that impurities degrade fuel cell performance by a variety of mechanisms. Electrokinetics may be inhibited by catalytic site poisoning from sulfur compounds and CO and by decreased local proton activity and mobility caused by the presence of foreign salt cations or ammonia. Cation impurity profiles vary with current density, valence and may change local conductivity and water concentrations in the ionomer. Nitrogen oxides and ammonia species may be electrochemically active under fuel cell operating conditions. The primary impurity removal mechanisms are electrooxidation and water fluxes through the fuel cell.

Garzon, Gernando H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopes, Thiago [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sansinena, Jose - Maria [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kienitz, Brian [LLNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fly ash and concrete: a study determines whether biomass, or coal co-firing fly ash, can be used in concrete  

SciTech Connect

Current US national standards for using fly ash in concrete (ASTM C618) state that fly ash must come from coal combustion, thus precluding biomass-coal co-firing fly ash. The co-fired ash comes from a large and increasing fraction of US power plants due to rapid increases in co-firing opportunity fuels with coal. The fly ashes include coal fly ash, wood fly ash from pure wood combustion, biomass and coal co-fired fly ash SW1 and SW2. Also wood fly ash is blended with Class C or Class F to produce Wood C and Wood E. Concrete samples were prepared with fly ash replacing cement by 25%. All fly ash mixes except wood have a lower water demand than the pure cement mix. Fly ashes, either from coal or non coal combustion, increase the required air entraining agent (AEA) to meet the design specification of the mixes. If AEA is added arbitrarily without considering the amount or existence of fly ash results could lead to air content in concrete that is either too low or too high. Biomass fly ash does not impact concrete setting behaviour disproportionately. Switch grass-coal co-fired fly ash and blended wood fly ash generally lie within the range of pure coal fly ash strength. The 56 day flexure strength of all the fly ash mixes is comparable to that of the pure cement mix. The flexure strength from the coal-biomass co-fired fly ash does not differ much from pure coal fly ash. All fly ash concrete mixes exhibit lower chloride permeability than the pure cement mixes. In conclusion biomass coal co-fired fly ash perform similarly to coal fly ash in fresh and hardened concrete. As a result, there is no reason to exclude biomass-coal co-fired fly ash in concrete.

Wang, Shuangzhen; Baxter, Larry

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

QGESS: CO2 Impurity Design Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q Q U U A A L L I I T T Y Y G G U U I I D D E E L L I I N N E E S S F F O O R R E E N N E E R R G G Y Y S S Y Y S S T T E E M M S S T T U U D D I I E E S S C C O O 2 2 I I m m p p u u r r i i t t y y D D e e s s i i g g n n P P a a r r a a m m e e t t e e r r s s DOE/NETL-2010/???? DOE/NETL-341/011212 August 2013 CO 2 Impurity Design Parameters Quality Guidelines for Energy System Studies Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

135

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

Hnat, James G. (Collegeville, PA); Mathur, Akshay (Tampa, FL); Simpson, James C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

137

Muon spin depolarization in nonmagnetic metals doped with paramagnetic impurities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffusion of muons and their magnetic interactions are treated by describing the physics to be learned from experiments which measure muon depolarization in metallic hosts doped with dilute concentrations of magnetic impurities. (GHT)

Heffner, R.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost  

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have developed two alternative strategies for detecting impurities in the hydrogen used in fuel cells. Both yield highly accurate results and use simpler, less costly equipment. As the United States gradually ...

139

Bremsstrahlung from high Z impurities in hot plasmas  

SciTech Connect

This is a study of the effect of core electron and plasma screening on Bremsstrahlung from high-Z impurities in hot plasmas. 3 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

DeWitt, H.; Rogers, F.; Iglesias, C.

1988-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

140

EVALUATION OF LOW IMPURITY CORE MATERIAL IN THE SM-2  

SciTech Connect

The worth of reduced cobalt and tantalum impurity concentrations of AlSl Type 347 stainless steel in the SM-2 core cladding and structural material was evaluated on the basis of material costs involved and accessibility for maintenance. (auth)

Pancer, G.P.; Zegger, J.L.

1959-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Chromatographic Measurement of Isotopic Hydrogen Impurities in Purified Tritium  

SciTech Connect

A cryogenic gas chromatograph is described that was constructed for dedicated analysis of permanent gas and hydrogen isotopic impurities in tritium and deuterium-tritium mixtures. The operating characteristics of this instrument and some results are presented in order to introduce gas chromatography as an analytical technique for potential application to CTR technology situations that require accurate measurement of parts per million and higher levels of isotopic and permanent gas impurities in tritium, deuterium, or mixtures of the isotopes.

Warner, D. K.; Kinard, C.; Bohl, D. R.

1970-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

142

Absorption of ion Bernstein waves by impurity cyclotron harmonics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the damping of externally-launched ion Bernstein waves by absorption at the cyclotron harmonics of the impurity ions. The inclusion of the non-magnetic energy flux term reduces the damping rate by nearly two orders of magnitude from the previous calculation. Excessive impurity damping can be avoided by launching ion Bernstein waves at a frequency just below the second (or higher) cyclotron harmonic of hydrogen.

Ono, M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Interactions of structural defects with metallic impurities in multicrystalline silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions between structural defects and metallic impurities were studied in multicrystalline silicon for solar cells applications. The objective was to gain insight into the relationship between solar cell processing, metallic impurity behavior and the resultant effect on material/device performance. With an intense synchrotron x-ray source, high sensitivity x-ray fluorescence measurements were utilized to determine impurity distributions with a spatial resolution of {approx} 1{micro}m. Diffusion length mapping and final solar cell characteristics gauged material/device performance. The materials were tested in both the as-grown state and after full solar cell processing. Iron and nickel metal impurities were located at structural defects in as-grown material, while after solar cell processing, both impurities were still observed in low performance regions. These results indicate that multicrystalline silicon solar cell performance is directly related to metal impurities which are not completely removed during typical processing treatments. A discussion of possible mechanisms for this incomplete removal is presented.

McHugo, S.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US). Advanced Light Source; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering; Rosenblum, M.D.; Kalejs, J.P. [ASE Americas Inc., Billerica, MA (US)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members. Special projects provide an opportunity for non-CARRC members to sponsor specific research or technology transfer consistent with CARRC goals. This report covers CARRC activities from January 2007 through March 2009. These activities have been reported in CARRC Annual Reports and in member meetings over the past 2 years. CARRC continues to work with industry and various government agencies with its research, development, demonstration, and promotional activities nearing completion at the time of submission of this report. CARRC expects to continue its service to the coal ash industry in 2009 and beyond to work toward the common goal of advancing coal ash utilization by solving CCP-related technical issues and promoting the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable management of these complex and changing materials.

Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

2009-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

145

Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol ubility_Paper.doc Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash Ann G. Kim 1 and Karl Schroeder 2 1 ORISE Research Fellow, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Research Group Leader, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 KEYWORDS Coal Utilization By-Products, leaching, activated carbon, pH ABSTRACT It is expected that increased controls on Hg emissions will shift the environmental burden from the flue gas to the solid coal utilization by-products (CUB), such as fly ash and flue-gas

146

Vitrification of simulated radioactive Rocky Flats plutonium containing ash residue with a Stir Melter System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demonstration trial has been completed in which a simulated Rocky Flats ash consisting of an industrial fly-ash material doped with cerium oxide was vitrified in an alloy tank Stir-Melter{trademark} System. The cerium oxide served as a substitute for plutonium oxide present in the actual Rocky Flats residue stream. The glass developed falls within the SiO{sub 2} + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{Sigma}Alkali/B{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The glass batch contained approximately 40 wt% of ash, the ash was modified to contain {approximately} 5 wt% CeO{sub 2} to simulate plutonium chemistry in the glass. The ash simulant was mixed with water and fed to the Stir-Melter as a slurry with a 60 wt% water to 40 wt% solids ratio. Glass melting temperature was maintained at approximately 1,050 C during the melting trials. Melting rates as functions of impeller speed and slurry feed rate were determined. An optimal melting rate was established through a series of evolutionary variations of the control variables` settings. The optimal melting rate condition was used for a continuous six hour steady state run of the vitrification system. Glass mass flow rates of the melter were measured and correlated with the slurry feed mass flow. Melter off-gas was sampled for particulate and volatile species over a period of four hours during the steady state run. Glass composition and durability studies were run on samples collected during the steady state run.

Marra, J.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Kormanyos, K.R.; Overcamp, T.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

In-Plant Ash-Handling Reference Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite problems with ash-handling systems that have led to failures in electrostatic precipitators, there has been no extensive reference manual for specifying, operating, and maintaining such systems. The comprehensive manual compiled in this study serves as a reference for every phase of boiler bottom ash- and fly ash-handling systems design and operation as well as a primer for those unfamiliar with these systems.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention described herein relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

McDowell, William J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seeley, Forest G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Effect of Ammonia on Mercury Partitioning in Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management options and environmental assessments for fly ash are driven primarily by their physical and chemical characteristics. This report describes the results of a laboratory study on the leaching of mercury from several paired fly ash samples from facilities employing powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for mercury control. While previous EPRI research has shown that mercury leaching from ash with PAC is negligible, it has also been found that ammonia complexes can increase the mobility of so...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

151

Identification of Arsenic Species in Coal Ash Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of the chemical species and compounds of arsenic in individual coal fly ash particles will help provide a scientifically sound basis for assessing health risks from inhalation of these particles. This report presents the results of an analytical chemistry study of coal-combustion ash, with some work also completed on oil-combustion ash and copper smelter dust collected from several sources in the United States and Europe. Results showed that most arsenic is present on the surface of coal a...

1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

152

Release of impurities from structural defects in polycrystalline silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is critical to understand the behavior of metallic impurities in polycrystalline silicon used for solar cells. These impurities significantly increase the minority carrier recombination rate and, in turn, degrade cell performance. Impurity gettering is a commonly used method to remove these impurities from the material, however, past work has suggested that impurity release from structural defects drastically limits the gettering process. Presently, there is only a limited understanding of impurity release from structural defects. In this work, a correlation between structural defects and the location of metal impurities in as-grown material is established and the release of nickel and copper from structural defects in polycrystalline silicon was studied in as-grown material and after sequential thermal treatments which dissolve the impurities into the silicon matrix. Synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence impurity mapping with spatial resolution of {approx} 1 {micro}m, was used to determine impurity distributions after each thermal treatment.

McHugo, S.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Imaizumi, M. [Toyota Technological Inst., Nagoya (Japan)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Spatially resolved measurements of fully ionized low-Z impurities in the PDX tokamak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fully ionized oxygen and carbon in PDX plasmas are detected via charge-exchange recombination reactions between the impurities and hydrogen atoms from a low-power neutral beam. The C/sup 6 +/ and O/sup 8 +/ ions are observed out to radii beyond the limiter, which is in contrast to expectations based on coronal equilibrium but consistent with a simple diffusive transport model. Central values of Z/sub eff/ obtained with these measurements agree with values obtained from plasma resistivity and visible bremsstrahlung measurements.

Fonck, R.J.; Finkenthal, M.; Goldston, R.J.; Herndon, D.L.; Hulse, R.A.; Kaita, R.; Meyerhofer, D.D.

1982-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

154

NETL: Utilization Projects - Managing High-Carbon Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing High-Carbon Ash Managing High-Carbon Ash Task 1: Effect of Coal Quality The objective of this task is to assess if fuel selection is an important factor determining ash quality. Work on this task will involve each of the three participating organizations. Ash samples from three coals will be generated under identical firing conditions in the pilot furnace at the University of Utah, and the matching ash and coal samples sent to Brown. Additional matching sets of coal and ash will be obtained from commercial-scale firing at Southern Company. The ashes will be characterized for LOI and surfactant adsorption activity under standard conditions and trends with fuel type identified. At the same time, chars will be prepared from the matching coal set under standard conditions in a laboratory furnace and also characterized for surfactant adsorptivity. A variety of standard conditions may need to be explored. The combined data set will be analyzed to determine cross correlations between ash behavior, standard laboratory char behavior, and parent coal properties. Our goal is to be able to anticipate ash behavior either (a) from coal properties directly, or (b) from the properties of chars made by a simple laboratory procedure. Either could be the basis for a coal quality index -- one based on fuel properties and the other based on a simple screening test.

155

Embankment Loading on Saturated Coal Ash: Centrifuge Demonstration Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an embankment of coal combustion residuals or soil is built over a coal ash pond, pore water pressures can accumulate in the underlying saturated ash deposits and trigger a rapid slope failure. This report documents a scale model test completed to obtain data on the conditions that may lead to a slope failure. A 6.5-inch tall sand embankment was built on top of a 6-inch thick deposit of saturated fly ash. The strength of the fly ash was characterized using consolidated undrained triaxial ...

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

156

Data Summary Report for Hanford Site Coal Ash Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present data and findings from sampling and analysis of five distinct areas of coal ash within the Hanford Site River Corridor

Sulloway, H. M.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

157

Coal Fly Ash as Alternative Source of Smelter Grade Alumina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, COM 2011. Symposium, COM 2011 (held with the World Gold Conference), POSTER SESSION. Presentation Title, Coal Fly Ash as

158

HIGH STRENGTH PHOSPHATE CEMENT USING INDUSTRIAL BYPRODUCT ASHES ...  

industries that use fossil fuels. Approximately one third of this ash is recycled in the cement based products as an additive. Typically, ...

159

Kinetics of beneficiated fly ash by carbon burnout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called Loss On Ignition (LOI). The concrete producers` day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

Okoh, J.M.; Dodoo, J.N.D.; Diaz, A. [Univ. of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD (United States). Dept. of Natural Sciences; Ferguson, W.; Udinskey, J.R. Jr.; Christiana, G.A. [Delmarva Power, Wilmington, DE (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Mechanical Activation of Deposited Fly Ash by Grinding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... According to laboratory experience the breaking of fly ash particles is required to increase its hydraulic potential (Opoczky, 2001). Aim of the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NETL: News Release - Novel Treatment of Fly Ash Yields Safer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

successfully tested at near full-scale levels. Easily integrated with existing ash handling equipment, the simple-to-operate, cost-efficient technology can be retrofitted to...

162

Study on Aluminum Foam with Fly Ash Increase Viscosity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Study on Aluminum Foam with Fly Ash Increase Viscosity by Yong Wang, Guang- chun Yao, and Bing Li. Publisher: TMS. Product Format: PDF.

163

Proportioning CLSM Using Fly Ash and GGBS - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Proportioning CLSM Using Fly Ash and GGBS. Author(s), Udayashankar B C, Raghavendra T. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Udayashankar  ...

164

Rebound characteristics for ash particles impacting a planar surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of ash deposition on the heat transfer tubes in a boiler reduces the heat transfer coefficient by about 25%. Because of these fouling layers

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Environmental Performance Assessment of Coal Ash Use Sites: Waukegan Ash Embankment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive database on the environmental effects of reusing coal combustion residues is essential to increased application of these products. This report discusses changes in soils, vegetation, and groundwater quality around an embankment containing coal fly ash and develops an approach for building a statistically sound environmental performance database.

1991-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

Long-Range Forecast Trajectories of Volcanic Ash from Redoubt Ash from Redoubt Volcano Eruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Redoubt Volcano in Alaska began a series of eruptions on 14 December 1989. Volcanic ash was often reported to reach heights where, as it moved with the upper-level flow, it could affect aircraft operations thousands of km from the eruption. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder; Glenn D. Rolph

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Environmental Performance Assessment of Coal Ash Use Sites: Little Canada Structural Ash Fill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An insufficient database on the environmental effects of reusing coal combustion residues hampers increased utilization of these products. This report discusses the changes in soils, vegetation, and groundwater quality around a structural fill containing coal fly ash and develops an approach for building a statistically sound environmental performance database.

1990-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

168

Research in Hydrogen Passivation of Defects and Impurities in Silicon: Final Report, 2 May 2000-2 July 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This subcontract report describes hydrogenating Si samples by different methods such as low-energy implantation, electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma, and thermal diffusion. The samples were provided through NREL. The experimental work, carried out at Penn State, involved the study of hydrogen interaction with defects, trapping, migration, and formation of complexes. The principal vehicle for the latter study was ion implantation, and the intent to understand mechanisms of defect passivation and activation by hydrogen. NREL implemented a study of hydrogen passivation of impurities and defects in silicon solar cells. The work included theoretical and experimental components performed at different universities. The theoretical studies consisted of the calculation of the structure and parameters related to hydrogen diffusion and interactions of hydrogen with transition-metal impurities in silicon. Experimental studies involved measurements of hydrogen and hydrogen-impurity complexes, and diffusion properties of various species of hydrogen in Si. The experimental work at Penn State included introduction of hydrogen in a variety of PV Si by ECR plasma, low-energy ion implantation, and thermal diffusion. The specific tasks were the evaluation of hydrogen interaction with defects engineered by ion implantation; defect passivation, activation, and migration in hydrogenated Si under thermal anneal; and electrical activity of hydrogen-impurity complexes. Electrical characterization entailed I-V and C-V measurements, spreading resistance, and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS).

Ashok, S.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

171

SEPARATION OF PROTEINS BY ION EXCHANGE AND MEMBRANE CHROMATOGRAPHY: BUFFER COMPOSITION, INTERFERING IMPURITIES AND FOULING CONSIDERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient separation of target protein from impurities is crucial in bioseparation for large scale production and purity of the target protein. Two separation process approaches were considered in this study. The first approach focused on identifying major impurity and optimization of solution properties for target protein purification. The second approach consisted of designing an adsorbent that interacted specifically with the target molecule. The first study included modification of protein solution properties (pH, ionic strength, buffer ions) in order to maximize lysozyme purification by a strong cation exchange resin. The interaction of phytic acid, a major impurity, present in transgenic rice extracts, that contributes to decreased lysozyme adsorption capacity on SP Sepharose was evaluated. The target protein was lysozyme, which is used in a purified form as a baby formula additive to reduce gastrointestinal tract infections. At constant ionic strength, lysozyme in pH 4.5 acetate buffer had a higher binding capacity and stronger binding strength than at pH 6.0. Lysozyme in sodium phosphate buffer of pH 6.0 exhibited lower adsorption capacity than in pH 6 Tris buffer. Binding capacity and strength were significantly affected by phytic acid in all studies buffers. The second study consisted of surface modification of microfiltration membranes for protein purification and separation and reduces fouling. This study describes adsorption and fouling of chemically modified microfiltration membranes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG). Least fouling resulted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) membranes when BSA protein was used. Amine-functionalized membranes showed specific interaction with BSA. There was multi-layer deposition of IgG on amine-functionalized membrane. G3 membrane synthesized to selectively bind IgG seemed a noble option to separate IgG from a protein mixture.

Imam, Tahmina

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler-broadened absorption spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10/sup 6/ atoms/cm/sup 3/ with a velocity resolution of 600 m/s (0.1 eV) have been achieved.

Husinsky, W.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

EFFECT OF FUEL IMPURITIES ON FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that produces electricity during the combination of hydrogen and oxygen to produce water. Proton exchange membranes fuel cells are favored for portable applications as well as stationary ones due to their high power density, low operating temperature, and low corrosion of components. In real life operation, the use of pure fuel and oxidant gases results in an impractical system. A more realistic and cost efficient approach is the use of air as an oxidant gas and hydrogen from hydrogen carriers (i.e., ammonia, hydrocarbons, hydrides). However, trace impurities arising from different hydrogen sources and production increases the degradation of the fuel cell. These impurities include carbon monoxide, ammonia, sulfur, hydrocarbons, and halogen compounds. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has set maximum limits for trace impurities in the hydrogen stream; however fuel cell data is needed to validate the assumption that at those levels the impurities will cause no degradation. This report summarizes the effect of selected contaminants tested at SRNL at ISO levels. Runs at ISO proposed concentration levels show that model hydrocarbon compound such as tetrahydrofuran can cause serious degradation. However, the degradation is only temporary as when the impurity is removed from the hydrogen stream the performance completely recovers. Other molecules at the ISO concentration levels such as ammonia don't show effects on the fuel cell performance. On the other hand carbon monoxide and perchloroethylene shows major degradation and the system can only be recovered by following recovery procedures.

Colon-Mercado, H.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for...

175

Evaluation of Leachate Chemistry from Coal Refuse Blended and Layered with Fly Ash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Alkaline fly ash has been studied as a liming agent within coal refuse fills to reclaim acid-forming refuse. Previous studies focused on bulk blending ash… (more)

Hunt, Joseph Edward

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Hazards Associated with the Use of Bone Ash in Contact with Molten ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bone ash itself is non-toxic and environmentally benign. However recent evidence indicates that bone ash can be reduced upon contact with aluminum alloys to ...

177

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers Americans And Their Environment 2010 Thirty-nine New Damage Cases of Contamination from Improperly Disposed Coal Combustion Waste, Editor and Contributing Author #12;IN HARM'S WAY: Lack of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers

Short, Daniel

178

Characterization of Ammonia Leaching from Coal Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report presents the results of a preliminary laboratory assessment of the leaching of ammonia from coal ashes that have been ammoniated by pollution control devices installed on power plants to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. This laboratory assessment project was designed to measure the leaching rates of ammonia from ashes in a disposal environment.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

Infiltration Processing of Metal Matrix-Fly Ash Particle Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal Matrix composites can provide improved functional properties compared to solid metal castings while saving production energy and raw material costs. Ash-derived metal matrix composites, in particular, can provide high value-added use to coal fly ash. This report describes research on use of pressure infiltration techniques to produce composites for automotive component applications.

1997-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

180

Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

Murtha, M.J.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Use of Coal Ash in Highway Construction: Michigan Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the construction and performance testing of a 3000-ft length of fly ash base under a highway shoulder. Following three years of service, the road shoulder shows no signs of premature deterioration. This report should aid utilities seeking to increase ash-use rates in highway-related projects, as well as state highway design engineers responsible for preparing construction specifications.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

182

Manganese Occurrence Near Three Coal Ash Impoundments in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes research performed to better understand the cause of elevated manganese concentrations sometimes found in groundwater near coal ash management facilities. Three impoundments in Illinois were selected for detailed field and laboratory studies of conditions conducive to manganese release from coal ash as well as natural soils.

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

183

The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Removal of fluoride impurities from UF/sub 6/ gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of purifying a UF/sub 6/ gas stream containing one or more metal fluoride impurities composed of a transuranic metal, transition metal or mixtures thereof, is carried out by contacting the gas stream with a bed of UF/sub 5/ in a reaction vessel under conditions where at least one impurity reacts with the UF/sub 5/ to form a nongaseous product and a treated gas stream, and removing the treated gas stream from contact with the bed. The nongaseous products are subsequently removed in a reaction with an active fluorine affording agent to form a gaseous impurity which is removed from the reaction vessel. The bed of UF/sub 5/ is formed by the reduction of UF/sub 6/ in the presence of uv light. One embodiment of the reaction vessel includes a plurality of uv light sources as tubes on which UF/sub 5/ is formed. 2 figures.

Beitz, J.V.

1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

185

Removal of fluoride impurities from UF.sub.6 gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of purifying a UF.sub.6 gas stream containing one or more metal fluoride impurities composed of a transuranic metal, transition metal or mixtures thereof, is carried out by contacting the gas stream with a bed of UF.sub.5 in a reaction vessel under conditions where at least one impurity reacts with the UF.sub.5 to form a nongaseous product and a treated gas stream, and removing the treated gas stream from contact with the bed. The nongaseous products are subsequently removed in a reaction with an active fluorine affording agent to form a gaseous impurity which is removed from the reaction vessel. The bed of UF.sub.5 is formed by the reduction of UF.sub.6 in the presence of UV light. One embodiment of the reaction vessel includes a plurality of UV light sources as tubes on which UF.sub.5 is formed.

Beitz, James V. (Hinsdale, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak  

SciTech Connect

The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low T{sub e} and higher n{sub e} than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase.

Cote, C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Supercritical instability in graphene with two charged impurities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the supercritical instability in gapped graphene with two charged impurities separated by distance R using the two-dimensional Dirac equation for electron quasiparticles. Attention is paid to a situation when charges of impurities are subcritical, whereas their total charge exceeds a critical one. The critical distance R_{cr} in the system of two charged centers is defined as that at which the electron bound state with the lowest energy reaches the boundary of the lower continuum. A variational calculation of the critical distance R_{cr} separating the supercritical (RR_{cr}) regimes is carried out. It is shown that the critical distance R_{cr} increases as the quasiparticle gap decreases. The energy and width of a quasistationary state as functions of the distance between two impurities are derived in the quasiclassical approximation.

E. V. Gorbar; V. P. Gusynin; O. O. Sobol

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

Characterization of the impurities in tungsten/silicon-germanium contacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Secondary ion mass spectrometry and Auger electron spectrometry depth profiling were used to determine impurity distributions in sputter deposited tungsten films over N-type and P-type 80/20 silicon-germanium elements of thermoelectric devices. These analyses showed that silicon, oxygen, sodium, boron, and phosphorous were present as impurities in the tungsten film. All these impurities except oxygen and sodium came from the substrate. Oxygen was gettered by the tungsten films, while sodium was possibly the result of sample handling. Further, the results from this study indicate that an oxide build-up, primarily at the tungsten/silicon-germanium interface of the N-type materials, is the major contributor to contact resistance in thermoelectric devices.

Gregg, H.A. Sr.

1986-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State Government Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Ashe County Planning Department In 2007 Ashe County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in unincorporated areas of the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a system may be obtained. This policy was adopted in the context of an ongoing debate over

190

Purple traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer The question of whether or not DOE's forests are infested with Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been answered. On May 10, a trap on Highway 95 at the Highway 58 interchange produced the first instance of the destructive non-native insect in Roane County. Five days later, a second trap on Bethel Valley Road near the East Portal turned up the first capture in Anderson County. "Unfortunately, these finds signal the beginning of a decline of ash species throughout the reservation" according to Greg Byrd, forester with the ORNL Natural Resources Program. "Dieback will become more prominent as the insect populations expand. Native ash trees have little defense against this pest, which was

191

Element associations in ash from waste combustion in fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

The incineration of MSW in fluidized beds is a commonly applied waste management practice. The composition of the ashes produced in a fluidized bed boiler has important environmental implications as potentially toxic trace elements may be associated with ash particles and it is therefore essential to determine the mechanisms controlling the association of trace elements to ash particles, including the role of major element composition. The research presented here uses micro-analytical techniques to study the distribution of major and trace elements and determine the importance of affinity-based binding mechanisms in separate cyclone ash particles from MSW combustion. Particle size and the occurrence of Ca and Fe were found to be important factors for the binding of trace elements to ash particles, but the binding largely depends on random associations based on the presence of a particle when trace elements condensate in the flue gas.

Karlfeldt Fedje, K., E-mail: karinka@chalmers.s [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Division of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 10, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Rauch, S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Division of Water Environment Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Sven Hultins Gata 8, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Cho, P.; Steenari, B.-M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Division of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 10, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS  

SciTech Connect

The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Role of impurities in magnetically confined high temperature plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is given of the atomic physics concerned with plasma cooling by impurities and the limiting effect that impurities may have on heating of plasmas by neutral injection. A general description is given of the tokamak concept and the present and next generation experiments are described. The time and spatial behavior of O and Mo multicharged ions in present hydrogen plasmas is presented. This is followed by a discussion of the power loss from a plasma containing one percent Fe. Finally, the limitation of plasma heating by energetic H or D injection is summarized. (MOW)

Barnett, C.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Formation and Stability of Impurity "snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

New observations of the formation and dynamics of long-lived impurity-induced helical "snake" modes in tokamak plasmas have recently been carried-out on Alcator C-Mod. The snakes form as an asymmetry in the impurity ion density that undergoes a seamless transition from a small helically displaced density to a large crescent-shaped helical structure inside q < 1, with a regularly sawtoothing core. The observations show that the conditions for the formation and persistence of a snake cannot be explained by plasma pressure alone. Instead, many features arise naturally from nonlinear interactions in a 3D MHD model that separately evolves the plasma density and temperature

L. Delgado-Aparicio, et. al.

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

196

Behavior of Ammoniated Fly Ash: Effects of Ammonia on Fly Ash Handling, Disposal, and End-Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The implementation of ammonia-based nitrogen oxides (NOx) control technologies has had the undesired side effect of creating potential problems for operating units due to ammonia-contaminated fly ash. The work described in this report is a continuation of long-term EPRI efforts to address various industry concerns associated with ammoniated fly ash.

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

197

Role of Ash Deposits in the High Temperature Corrosion of Boiler Tubes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ash deposits cause accelerated corrosion of waterwall boiler tubes in waste to energy (WTE) incinerators. To study this effect, a series of experiments were planned to determine the mechanism of corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes under ash deposits. Results reported here were for carbon steel tubes exposed to an environment consisting of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and water vapor. Future experiments will include HCl and SO{sub 2}. Test procedures included both isothermal and thermal gradient tests. Temperatures ranged from 300 C to 510 C for the isothermal tests and a metal/gas temperature of 450/670 C for the thermal gradient test. Initial results indicated that increasing temperature caused the isothermal corrosion rates of ash-covered samples to increase. A shakedown test of a thermal gradient test apparatus was conducted at a metal/gas temperature of 450/670 C, a more severe environment than normally encountered in WTE waterwalls. Results showed that the corrosion rate under those conditions exceeds the isothermal corrosion rates at the same metal temperature by a factor of 2 or more.

Covino, B.S., Jr.; Russell, J.H.; Cramer, S.D.; Holcomb, G.R.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Matthes, S.A.; White, M.L.

2003-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

198

Categorical Exclusion 4566, Ash Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOrnI FOrnI Project Title: Ash Removal Project (4566) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to split, containerize, package, transport and disposition one hundred and two (102) cans of mixed waste. General Administration/Management OA I - Routine business actions OA2 * Administrative contract amendments OA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations OA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect OA6 - Procedural rule makings upgrade OA 7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged OA8 . Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts OA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training OA 10 - Reports on non-DOE legislation OA II -

199

Research in Hydrogen Passivation of Defects and Impurities in Silicon: Final Subcontract Report, 2 May 2000--2 July 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our work consists of hydrogenating silicon (Si) samples by different methods such as low-energy implantation, electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma, and thermal diffusion. The samples will be provided through NREL. The experimental work carried out at Penn State involves the study of hydrogen interaction with defects, trapping, migration, and formation of complexes. The principal vehicle for the latter study will be ion implantation, and the intent is to understand mechanisms of defect passivation and activation by hydrogen. The theoretical studies will consist of the calculation of the structure and parameters related to hydrogen diffusion and interactions of hydrogen with transition metal impurities in silicon. Experimental studies will involve measurements of hydrogen and hydrogen-impurity complexes, and diffusion properties of various species of hydrogen in Si. The experimental work at Penn State includes introduction of hydrogen in a variety of photovoltaic Si by ECR plasma, low-energy ion implantation, and thermal diffusion. The specific tasks will be the evaluation of hydrogen interaction with defects engineered by ion implantation; defect passivation, activation, and migration in hydrogenated Si under thermal anneal; and electrical activity of hydrogen-impurity complexes. Electrical characterization will entail I-V and C-V measurements, spreading resistance, and deep-level transient spectroscopy.

Ashok, S.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic [Institute for Biological Research 'Sinisa Stankovic,' Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Department of Ecology

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Volatility of Impurities in Water/Steam Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of water and steam is central to ensuring power plant component availability and reliability. A key part of developing cycle chemistry guidelines is an understanding of the impurity distribution between water and steam. This report summarizes EPRI work conducted over the last ten years to understand this partitioning process.

2001-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Zn-impurity effects on quasiparticle scattering in La2-xSrxCuO4 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Angle-resolved photoemission measurements were performed on Zn-doped La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} to investigate the effects of Zn impurities on the low-energy electronic structure. The Zn-impurity-induced increase in the quasiparticle width in momentum distribution curves (MDCs) is approximately isotropic on the entire Fermi surface and energy independent near the Fermi level (EF). The increase in the MDC width is consistent with the increase in the residual resistivity due to the Zn impurities if we assume the carrier number to be 1-x for x=0.17 and the Zn impurity to be a potential scatterer close to the unitarity limit. For x=0.03, the residual resistivity is found to be higher than that expected from the MDC width, and the effects of antiferromagnetic fluctuations induced around the Zn impurities are discussed. The leading edges of the spectra near ({pi},0) for x=0.17 are shifted toward higher energies relative to E{sub F} with Zn substitution, indicating a reduction in the superconducting gap.

Yoshida, T.

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

203

Specifying memory consistency of write buffer multiprocessors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Write buffering is one of many successful mechanisms that improves the performance and scalability of multiprocessors. However, it leads to more complex memory system behavior, which cannot be described using intuitive consistency models, such as Sequential ... Keywords: Memory consistency framework, alpha, coherence, partial store order, relaxed memory order, sequential consistency, sparc multiprocessors, total store order, write-buffer architectures

Lisa Higham; Lillanne Jackson; Jalal Kawash

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Measuring consistency in TTL-based caches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a general modeling framework to evaluate the performance of cache consistency algorithms. In addition to the usual hit rate, we introduce the hit* rate as a consistency measure, which captures the fraction of non-stale downloads ... Keywords: TTL, bounds on the renewal function, cache consistency, renewal theory, stochastic modeling, web caching

Omri Bahat; Armand M. Makowski

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Effect of nonmagnetic impurities on stripes in high-Tc cuprates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform the numerically exact diagonalization study of the t-J model with nonmagnetic impurities to clarify the relation between Zn impurities and the stripes. By examining the hole-hole correlation function for a two-hole

T. Tohyama; M. Takahashi; S. Maekawa A; Si Sj; Jimp S Sj

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

High Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements: Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, the production of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete involves the addition of large volumes of fly ash as a separate ingredient at a ready-mixed concrete batch plant. This necessitates additional storage silos and quality control at the job site. In order to resolve these issues, CANMET, in partnership with Electric Power Research Institute, U.S.A., undertook a major research project to develop blended cements incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class fly ash. The blended cements are made by ...

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

Dobbins, Michael S. (Ames, IA); Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Arsenic and Selenium Speciation in Fly Ash and Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the work is to predict As and Se behavior in pond wastewater based on coal and power plant characteristics so that utilities will have tools for selection of coals (and blends) that will allow them to meet applicable water quality regulations in the ash pond discharge. Arsenic and selenium were chosen as the focus of this work because the behavior of arsenic and selenium is not well correlated with pH in ash pond water, but with speciation of these oxyanions in the fly ash. Furthermore, ...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

209

Scale-up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is the first large pilot scale test of a new process to passivate the carbon in ash so that it can be used in concrete without physically removing the carbon from the ash. The tests were conducted at PPL's Montour SES, sponsored by DOE and supported by EPRI. Near full-scale industrial equipment was used to expose fly ash, carbon mixtures to ozone to see if ozone would passivate the surface of carbon so that it would not react with air entraining agents that are used by concrete manufacturers...

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

210

Effect of inactive impurities on the burning of ICF targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of thermonuclear burning of the spherical deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets in the presence of low-Z impurities (such as lithium, carbon, or beryllium) with arbitrary concentrations is investigated. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied, and the possibility of using solid noncryogenic thermonuclear fuels in ICF targets is analyzed. Analytical dependences of the ignition energy and target thermonuclear gain on the impurity concentration are obtained. The models are constructed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagates into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. Two possible configurations of an inhomogeneous plasma, namely, an isobaric configuration formed in the case of spark ignition of the target and an isochoric configuration formed in the case of fast ignition, are considered. The results of numerical simulations of the burning of the DT plasma of ICF targets in a wide range of impurity concentrations are presented. The simulations were performed using the TEPA one-dimensional code, in which the thermonuclear burning kinetics is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the strongest negative effect related to the presence of impurities is an increase in the energy of target ignition. It is substantiated that the most promising solid noncryogenic fuel is DT hydride of beryllium (BeDT). The requirements to the plasma parameters at which BeDT can be used as a fuel in noncryogenic ICF targets are determined. Variants of using noncryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel are proposed.

Gus'kov, S. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Engineering Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power color from pulp mill effluent using coal ash. Prevent coal ash adsorbent from leaching arsenic, chromium, lead, and zinc. Define a treatment procedure using coal ash that will result in the maximum

Hutcheon, James M.

212

Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

Hopkins, William A.

213

Coal- and Ash-Handling Systems Reliability Conference and Workshop Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents papers, discussion summaries, and conclusions from an EPRI workshop on reliability problems with coal- and ash-handling systems in power plants. Held in October 1980 in St. Louis, the workshop covered yard and in-plant coal handling, frozen coal, fugitive dust, fly ash handling, bottom ash handling, and ash disposal.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Proceedings: Tenth International Ash Use Symposium, Volume 1: High-Volume Uses/Concrete Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics discussed at the tenth symposium on coal ash use included fundamental ash use research, product marketing, applied research, ash management and the environment, and commercial applications. Intense international research interest continues in coal ash use due to the prospects of avoiding disposal costs and generating revenue from by-product sales.

1993-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

215

Hydrometallurgical recovery of germanium from coal gasification fly ash: pilot plant scale evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, a hydrometallurgical method for the selective recovery of germanium from fly ash (FA) has been tested at pilot plant scale. The pilot plant flowsheet comprised a first stage of water leaching of FA, and a subsequent selective recovery of the germanium from the leachate by solvent extraction method. The solvent extraction method was based on Ge complexation with catechol in an aqueous solution followed by the extraction of the Ge-catechol complex (Ge(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup 2-}) with an extracting organic reagent (trioctylamine) diluted in an organic solvent (kerosene), followed by the subsequent stripping of the organic extract. The process has been tested on a FA generated in an integrated gasification with combined cycle (IGCC) process. The paper describes the designed 5 kg/h pilot plant and the tests performed on it. Under the operational conditions tested, approximately 50% of germanium could be recovered from FA after a water extraction at room temperature. Regarding the solvent extraction method, the best operational conditions for obtaining a concentrated germanium-bearing solution practically free of impurities were as follows: extraction time equal to 20 min; aqueous phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5; stripping with 1 M NaOH, stripping time equal to 30 min, and stripping phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5. 95% of germanium were recovered from water leachates using those conditions.

Arroyo, F.; Fernandez-Pereira, C.; Olivares, J.; Coca, P. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

VARIABILITY STUDY TO DETERMINE THE SOLUBILITY OF IMPURITIES IN PLUTONIUM-BEARING, LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE GLASS  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the development of a compositional envelope that describes the retention of various impurities in lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass for vitrification and immobilization of excess, defense-related plutonium. A limited amount of impurity data for the various plutonium sources is available and projections were made through analysis of the available information. These projections were used to define types and concentrations of impurities in the LaBS glass compositions to be fabricated and tested. Sixty surrogate glass compositions were developed through a statistically designed approach to cover the anticipated ranges of concentrations for several impurity species expected in the plutonium feeds. An additional four glass compositions containing actual plutonium oxide were selected based on their targeted concentrations of metals and anions. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory and shielded cells facility to determine the degree of retention of the impurity components, the impact of the impurities on the durability of each glass, and the degree of crystallization that occurred, both upon quenching and slow cooling. Overall, the LaBS glass system appears to be very tolerant of most of the impurity types and concentrations projected in the plutonium waste stream. For the surrogate glasses, the measured CuO, Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, NiO, and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentrations fell very close to their target values across the ranges of concentrations targeted in this study for each of these components. The measured CaO and PbO concentrations were consistently higher than the targeted values. The measured Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations were very close to the targets except for the one highest targeted value for each of these components. A solubility limit may have been approached in this glass system for K{sub 2}O and MgO. The measured Cl{sup -}, F{sup -}, SeO{sub 2} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations were well below their target values for all of the study glasses. This is likely due to volatilization of these species during melting of the glass batch. Note that the degree of volatilization that occurred in this crucible-scale study may differ from the full-scale melter. The measured HfO{sub 2} concentrations were below their target values for all of the surrogate glasses. It is likely that for HfO{sub 2}, the solubility limit in the glass was exceeded and some of the HfO{sub 2} batch material remained in the bottom of the crucibles after pouring the glasses. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results indicated that some crystalline HfO2 remained in some of the surrogate glasses with the lowest concentration of impurities. No other crystalline phases were identified. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results showed that all 60 of the surrogate glass compositions tested were very durable, regardless of thermal history, with the highest normalized release for boron being 0.041 g/L. The pH of the leachate solutions was generally lower than that of conventional waste glasses due to the lack of alkali in the LaBS glass, which likely impacted the PCT results. The normalized release rates for the elements measured were generally too small to attempt to correlate the results with the compositions of the test glasses. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure results showed that no hazardous metals were leached from the surrogate glasses in any measurable concentration. A plutonium-containing crystalline phase with a cross-shaped morphology was identified via SEM in the glasses fabricated with plutonium oxide. This phase was identified in a previous study of plutonium-bearing LaBS glasses and may provide an opportunity to intentionally crystallize some of the plutonium oxide into a highly insoluble form with an intrinsic neutron absorber. Additional work is necessary to better characterize the influence that this phase has on durability of the glass. The PCT results for the plutonium-containing LaBS glasses with impurities were si

Fox, K; Elizabeth Hoffman, E; Charles Crawford, C; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; James Marra, J

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Adsorption of Trace Elements on Fresh and Weathered Coal Fly Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of trace elements are associated with fly ash produced by coal combustion. These trace elements are potentially of concern for human health if they are released to the environment, and thus it is important to understand their mobility in coal fly ash management settings. In the fly ash management environment, the ash may react with meteoric fluid to release trace elements into groundwater or surface water. However, fly ash particles also have a relatively high surface area and have the ability ...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

218

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 4/27/2011 12:00:00 AM... Concerns about the damage that volcanic ash clouds can inflict on aircraft engines resulted in last year's $2 billion ...

219

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

223

Guideline for Control and Prevention of Fly Ash Erosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler tube failures (BTFs) represent the largest portion of availability loss in the fossil boiler industry at about 4%. Approximately 25% of all tube failures are due to fly ash erosion (FAE).

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

224

Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) has developed a Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) model for emergency response use focusing on hazards to aircraft flight operations. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Recoverable immobilization of transuranic elements in sulfate ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of reversibly immobilizing sulfate ash at least about 20% of which is sulfates of transuranic elements. The ash is mixed with a metal which can be aluminum, cerium, samarium, europium, or a mixture thereof, in amounts sufficient to form an alloy with the transuranic elements, plus an additional amount to reduce the transuranic element sulfates to elemental form. Also added to the ash is a fluxing agent in an amount sufficient to lower the percentage of the transuranic element sulfates to about 1% to about 10%. The mixture of the ash, metal, and fluxing agent is heated to a temperature sufficient to melt the fluxing agent and the metal. The mixture is then cooled and the alloy is separated from the remainder of the mixture.

Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

KINETICS OF FLY ASH BENEFICIATION BY CARBON BURNOUT  

SciTech Connect

Surface area analyses performed on fly ash samples reveal that the surface area is controlled by carbon content. The higher surface areas found in large particles are due to the presence of highly porous carbonaceous particles. Adsorption-desorption isotherms and t-plots of fly ash samples indicate that fly ash is porous. BJH Adsorption/Desorption pore size analysis reveal that pore diameters are independent of sieve size. They appear to be dependent only on the nature of the material which confers porosity. Based on the results of Brown and Dykstra (41) it is reasonable to assume that calculations of reaction rates at temperatures above 550 C were confounded by weight losses from processes other than carbon oxidation and, therefore, are not useful in determination of the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. The results of the present study indicate that temperatures below 550 C should be used for future studies in order to satisfactorily assess the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. Furthermore, it is also advisable that percent carbon determinations be performed on fly ash samples after the oxidation reactions to determine whether all carbon present in fly ash is oxidized. This will ensure that reaction rates are representative of the complete oxidation of carbon. An inverse relationship was determined between reaction rates and oxygen concentration for this study. As discussed, this may be due to volatilization of volatiles from fly ash and ease of transport of products away from the reaction sites by the action of the vacuum applied to the samples. A more accurate determination of oxygen dependence of carbon oxidation can be accomplished by the use of specialty gases containing different concentrations of oxygen which could eliminate the need to apply vacuum to the samples.

Dr. Joseph N.D. Dodoo; Dr. Joseph M. Okoh

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Triboelectric Fly Ash Beneficiation: Summary Report, Phase IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) at the University of Kentucky has devised new approaches for extracting marketable fly ash from high carbon combustion ashes. Dry beneficiation technology based on pneumatic transport, triboelectric principles has emerged with the potential for high efficiency removal of carbon at low cost and with no secondary waste products. (EPRI Interim Report TR-109016, November, 1997; EPRI Interim Report TR-111647, November 1998; EPRI Report TE-113673, September 1999; E...

2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which utilizes the known ash level temperature profile to monitor the ash bed level. A bed stirrer which travels up and down through the extent of the bed ash level is modified by installing thermocouples to measure the bed temperature as the stirrer travels through the stirring cycle. The temperature measurement signals are transmitted to an electronic signal process system by an FM/FM telemetry system. The processing system uses the temperature signals together with an analog stirrer position signal, taken from a position transducer disposed to measure the stirrer position to compute the vertical location of the ash zone upper boundary. The circuit determines the fraction of each total stirrer cycle time the stirrer-derived bed temperature is below a selected set point, multiplies this fraction by the average stirrer signal level, multiplies this result by an appropriate constant and adds another constant such that a 1 to 5 volt signal from the processor corresponds to a 0 to 30 inch span of the ash upper boundary level. Three individual counters in the processor store clock counts that are representative of: (1) the time the stirrer temperature is below the set point (500.degree. F.), (2) the time duration of the corresponding stirrer travel cycle, and (3) the corresponding average stirrer vertical position. The inputs to all three counters are disconnected during any period that the stirrer is stopped, eliminating corruption of the measurement by stirrer stoppage.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that, due to excessive wastage, certain tube samples needed to be removed and replaced in order to ensure that Test Sections B and C would have a chance of remaining in the boiler for their intended exposure period. These suspect tube samples were replaced and the two remaining test sections were put back into service. The tube samples that were removed from Test Sections B and C were set aside for later analysis at the end of the planned exposure period. Test Sections B and C were again examined approximately six months later. At that time, measured wall thickness losses raised concerns about additional tube samples. These suspect samples were also removed, set aside for later analysis, and replaced. The test sections then went back into service until the end of the second exposure period, which was concluded in May 2003 when, due to evidence of excessive wastage, the valves were opened increasing cooling steam flow and thereby effectively stopping corrosion. In August 2003, Test Sections B and C were removed for closer examination. Section C had experienced about 42 months of service at the desired team temperature set point with 28.5 months at temperature at full temperature. Additional suspect samples were removed from Test Section B, then, it was re-installed into the boiler (at the location originally occupied by Section C), where it remained in service until the end of the program. Due to this removal history, the samples from Test Section B had a total service duration that varied from a minimum of 15.5 months (for samples that performed poorly) to 37 months for samples the survived for the full intended service exposure for Section B. The figure below shows a schematic of Test Section B and indicates the length of service exposure for different locations. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section B, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. This report also is intended to compare and summarize the results for all three test sections. The analysis of T

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Using CSP to verify sequential consistency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper shows how the theory of Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) can be used to establish that a protocol guarantees sequential consistency. The protocol in question is an accepted design based upon lazy caching; it is an ideal example for ... Keywords: CSP, lazy caching protocol, sequential consistency, specification, verification

Gavin Lowe; Jim Davies

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Automated consistency checking of requirements specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a formal analysis technique, called consistency checking, for automatic detection of errors, such as type errors, nondeterminism, missing cases, and circular definitions, in requirements specifications. The technique ... Keywords: application-independent properties, consistency checking, formal requirements modeling, software cost reduction methodology, tabular notations

Constance L. Heitmeyer; Ralph D. Jeffords; Bruce G. Labaw

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Concordant plutonium-241-americium-241 dating of environmental samples: results from forest fire ash  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the Pu, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 151}Sm isotopic systematics for a set of forest fire ash samples from various locations in the western U.S. including Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and New Mexico. The goal of this study is to develop a concordant {sup 241}Pu (t{sub 1/2} = 14.4 y)-{sup 241}Am dating method for environmental collections. Environmental samples often contain mixtures of components including global fallout. There are a number of approaches for subtracting the global fallout component for such samples. One approach is to use {sup 242}/{sup 239}Pu as a normalizing isotope ratio in a three-isotope plot, where this ratio for the nonglobal fallout component can be estimated or assumed to be small. This study investigates a new, complementary method of normalization using the long-lived fission product, {sup 151}Sm (t{sub 1/2} = 90 y). We find that forest fire ash concentrates actinides and fission products with {approx}1E10 atoms {sup 239}Pu/g and {approx}1E8 atoms {sup 151}Sm/g, allowing us to measure these nuclides by mass spectrometric (MIC-TIMS) and radiometric (liquid scintillation counting) methods. The forest fire ash samples are characterized by a western U.S. regional isotopic signature representing varying mixtures of global fallout with a local component from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Our results also show that {sup 151}Sm is well correlated with the Pu nuclides in the forest fire ash, suggesting that these nuclides have similar geochemical behavior in the environment. Results of this correlation indicate that the {sup 151}Sm/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio for global fallout is {approx}0.164, in agreement with an independent estimate of 0.165 based on {sup 137}Cs fission yields for atmospheric weapons tests at the NTS. {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am dating of the non-global fallout component in the forest fire ash samples yield ages in the late 1950's-early 1960's, consistent with a peak in NTS weapons testing at that time. The age results for this component are in agreement using both {sup 242}Pu and {sup 151}Sm normalizations, although the errors for the {sup 151}Sm correction are currently larger due to the greater uncertainty of their measurements. Additional efforts to develop a concordant {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am dating method for environmental collections are underway with emphasis on soil cores.

Goldstein, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murrell, Michael T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Katzman, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Transition metals are one of the main culprits in degrading the efficiency of multicrystalline solar cells. With a suite of x-ray microprobe techniques, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab studied the distribution of metal clusters in a variety of multicrystalline solar cells before and after processing. Their discovery that the size, spatial distribution, and chemical binding of metals within clusters is just as important as the total metal concentration in limiting the performance of multicrystalline silicon solar cells led to the concept of defect engineering by optimizing growth and processing sequences to trap metals in their least harmful state.

234

A REVIEW OF RECENT IMPURITY MEASUREMENTS OF LANL MATERIAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Applied Computational Engineering and Statistics (ACES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to review recent measurements performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on material from that facility that is being considered for processing through the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). There are specification limits for impurities in the feed to the MOX facility: a maximum limit and an exceptional limit. The limits for an impurity apply to the population of concentration values for that impurity for a class of material that is to be processed through MOX. For the purposes of this report, these limits were defined as follows. The concentration of an elemental impurity, expressed as micrograms of the element per gram of plutonium ({micro}g/g Pu), is to be no more than the maximum limit for that element for 98% of the material coming through MOX; that is, 98% of the material processed at MOX is to have a concentration of the given element less than the maximum limit. In addition, the concentration for a given element is to be no more than the exceptional limit for that element for 99.9% of the material processed through MOX. The measurements evaluated as part of this study included LANL blend lots 1 through 29 and cover carbon (C), chlorine (Cl), fluorine (F), nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and sulfur (S). Note that all of the measurements for each impurity were below their respective maximum (and obviously, therefore, their exceptional) limits. Thus, there is no immediate concern regarding the LANL material being suitable for processing through MOX. Two approaches were used to investigate the quantiles of the impurity populations. The first approach used was a nonparametric approach. While the results from this approach did not indicate any problems for any of the impurities, there was too little data available to lead to confident statements about satisfying the maximum and exceptional limits. Impurity data from additional random samples of the LANL material would be needed to increase the confidence level associated with the results from a nonparametric approach for investigating the population quantiles of interest. For S, F, and Cl, only a nonparametric approach was used. A second approach, a parametric approach, was attempted for C, P, and N. However, the results for the P and N measurements indicated that each of their respective populations was not well modeled by a normal or by a lognormal distribution. Thus, the conclusions for the P and N populations were those provided by the nonparametric approach. From the parametric approach, the results for C indicated no issue in the LANL material meeting the maximum limit for this element assuming that the measurements for this element follow a lognormal distribution.

Edwards, T.

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

235

Impurity scattering from {delta}-layers in giant magnetoresistance systems  

SciTech Connect

The properties of the archetypal Co/Cu giant magnetoresistance (GMR) spin-valve structure have been modified by the insertion of very thin (submonolayer) {delta}-layers of various elements at different points within the Co layers, and at the Co/Cu interface. Different effects are observed depending on the nature of the impurity, its position within the periodic table, and its location within the spin valve. The GMR can be strongly enhanced or suppressed for various specific combinations of these parameters, giving insight into the microscopic mechanisms giving rise to the GMR. In particular, the doping of Fe and Ni into the spin valve close to, but not at the interface, leads to an increase in GMR, as does the introduction of Cu, a nonmagnetic impurity, into the Co layers.

Marrows, C. H.; Hickey, B. J.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Transition metals are one of the main culprits in degrading the efficiency of multicrystalline solar cells. With a suite of x-ray microprobe techniques, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab studied the distribution of metal clusters in a variety of multicrystalline solar cells before and after processing. Their discovery that the size, spatial distribution, and chemical binding of metals within clusters is just as important as the total metal concentration in limiting the performance of multicrystalline silicon solar cells led to the concept of defect engineering by optimizing growth and processing sequences to trap metals in their least harmful state.

237

Trace Impurities and Activation Products in Base Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of research related to the concentrations of trace impurities and activation products in stainless steel alloys used for reactor vessels and internals. While present in extremely low concentrations, these trace elements and radionuclides can impact radioactive waste disposal of the components upon decommissioning.BackgroundThe primary basis of activity in a decommissioning source term is activated metals from the reactor and ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

METHOD FOR REDUCING THE IMPURITY RESISTIVITY OF SODIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The inherent resistivity of sodium, at cryogenic temperatures, can be reduced by clustering the impurity atoms within the crystal latiice structure of the sodium, thereby reducing the effective electron collision cross section and thus reducing the number of collisions between the electrons and such lattice imperfections. The clustering is effected by heating the sodium to a temperature approaching its melting point, and maintaining the temperature for a period of time ranging generally from two to six days. (AEC)

Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

1963-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

239

Chemically Consistent Evolutionary Synthesis Modelling of Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present our chemically consistent GALEV Evolutionary Synthesis models for galaxies and point out differences to previous generations of models and their effects on the interpretation of local and high-redshift galaxy data.

Uta Fritze-von Alvensleben; Thorsten Tepper García

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

240

Network assisted file system consistency checking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports on the design and implementation of Network Assisted NFSCK (or NAN), an extension to NFSCK, a research project about checking file system consistency at NetApp. NFSCK requires disk space to store temporary ...

Zehender, Nicholas (Nicholas G.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fine ash formation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, 15 pulverized coal samples were burnt in a drop-tube furnace to investigate the formation of fine particulates and the influence of coal ash properties on their emission. Coal combustion was carried out at 1673 K in air. Fine particles were collected by a cyclone and a low-pressure impactor. The elemental compositions of the collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We examined the chemical compositions of the fine particles as a function of particle diameter and examined the proportions of the elements in the parent coal samples. We determined that almost all particles less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter were formed by means of volatilization-condensation of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the coal. We also demonstrated that the amount of SiO{sub 2} in particle size less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter was related to the amount of fine included quartz and clay minerals in the parent coal. The primary components of particles greater than 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and as the diameter of the particles decrease, the mass fractions of iron, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus increased. However, the particle diameter at which this tendency commenced differed depending on the element. Particles between 0.22 and 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were thought to have been formed by the fragmentation and coalescence of particles in the coal and by the simultaneous condensation of volatilized elements onto other particles. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Tsuyoshi Teramae; Takayuki Takarada [Idemitsu Kosan Company, Limited, Chiba (Japan). Coal and Environmental Research Laboratory

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash 2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash October 28, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Participants List [PDF-31KB] Papers and Presentations Control Measures Predictive Performance Tools (Including Instrumentation) Processing and Utilization of High-LOI Fly Ash Beneficiation of High-LOI Fly Ash Characterization of High-LOI Fly Ash Poster Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

243

LOW-TEMPERATURE ASH SINTERING AND STRENGTH DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop fundamental sintering-viscosity relationships for coal-type ash at relatively low temperatures, with the end result being a simplified soot-blowing index for power systems. This involves correlating several important factors which control the ease of deposit removal, including deposit strength, deposit porosity, chemical composition, and temperature. Testing was performed on ashes derived from three coals and two biomass materials along with a standard soda-lime glass. The coals were selected because detailed analyses as well as ash samples were already available. Sintering characteristics of the ashes were to be determined by observation using an HSM and video recording system, with a stainless steel microscope stage chamber constructed to allow the use of corrosive gas atmospheres. The measurements would allow calculation of the viscosity of liquid phases as the sintering progressed, using the Frenkel and other sintering models. The sintering behavior and viscosity would be correlated with ash mineralogy and chemistry and information on bench-scale deposit strength and porosity to develop an initial relationship to predict deposit removability.

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; John P. Kay

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: ? Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature. ? Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined. ? Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (Tcv ) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt. ? Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles. ? Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems. ? Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

CHRISTOPHER J. ZYGARLICKE; DONALD P. MCCOLLOR; JOHN P. KAY; MICHAEL L. SWANSON

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: ? Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature. ? Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined. ? Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (Tcv ) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt. ? Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles. ? Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems. ? Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

CHRISTOPHER J. ZYGARLICKE; DONALD P. MCCOLLOR; JOHN P. KAY; MICHAEL L. SWANSON

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION FOR UTILIZATION OF ASH IN SOIL STABILIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) approved the use of coal ash in soil stabilization, indicating that environmental data needed to be generated. The overall project goal is to evaluate the potential for release of constituents into the environment from ash used in soil stabilization projects. Supporting objectives are: (1) To ensure sample integrity through implementation of a sample collection, preservation, and storage protocol to avoid analyte concentration or loss. (2) To evaluate the potential of each component (ash, soil, water) of the stabilized soil to contribute to environmental release of analytes of interest. (3) To use laboratory leaching methods to evaluate the potential for release of constituents to the environment. (4) To facilitate collection of and to evaluate samples from a field runoff demonstration effort. The results of this study indicated limited mobility of the coal combustion fly ash constituents in laboratory tests and the field runoff samples. The results presented support previous work showing little to negligible impact on water quality. This and past work indicates that soil stabilization is an environmentally beneficial CCB utilization application as encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This project addressed the regulatory-driven environmental aspect of fly ash use for soil stabilization, but the demonstrated engineering performance and economic advantages also indicate that the use of CCBs in soil stabilization can and should become an accepted engineering option.

David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fly ash as a liming material for corn production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash produced as a by-product of subbituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as an alternative liming material without negatively affecting corn (Zea mays L.) production in areas where use of conventional liming materials can be uneconomical due to transportation costs. A study was conducted to determine if fly ash produced from the Nebraska Public Power District Gerald Gentleman Power Station located in Sutherland, NE could be used as an alternative liming material. Combinations of dry fly ash (DFA), wet fly ash (WFA), beet lime (by-product of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing) (BL), and agricultural lime (AGL) were applied at rates ranging from 0.43 to 1.62 times the recommended lime rate to plots on four acidic soils (Anselmo fine sandy loam, Hord fine sandy loam, Holdrege sandy loam, and Valentine fine sand). Soil samples were collected to a depth of 0.2 m from plots and analyzed for pH before lime applications and twice periodically after lime application. The Hord and Valentine soils were analyzed for exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na,and Al for determination of percent Al saturation on selected treatments and sampling dates. Corn grain yields were determined annually. It is concluded that the fly ash utilized in this study and applied at rates in this study, increases soil pH comparable to agricultural lime and is an appropriate alternative liming material.

Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Stevens, W.B.; McCallister, D.L.; Kackman, S.D. [University of Nebraska, North Platte, NE (US)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ash bed level control system for a fixed-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ash level control system is provided which incorporates an ash level meter to automatically control the ash bed level of a coal gasifier at a selected level. The ash level signal from the ash level meter is updated during each cycle that a bed stirrer travels up and down through the extent of the ash bed level. The ash level signal is derived from temperature measurements made by thermocouples carried by the stirrer as it passes through the ash bed and into the fire zone immediately above the ash bed. The level signal is compared with selected threshold level signal to determine if the ash level is above or below the selected level once each stirrer cycle. A first counter is either incremented or decremented accordingly. The registered count of the first counter is preset in a down counter once each cycle and the preset count is counted down at a selected clock rate. A grate drive is activated to rotate a grate assembly supporting the ash bed for a period equal to the count down period to maintain the selected ash bed level. In order to avoid grate binding, the controller provides a short base operating duration time each stirrer cycle. If the ash bed level drops below a selected low level or exceeds a selected high level, means are provided to notify the operator.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Rotunda, John R. (Fairmont, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Consistent matter couplings for Plebanski gravity  

SciTech Connect

We develop a scheme for the minimal coupling of all standard types of tensor and spinor field matter to Plebanski gravity. This theory is a geometric reformulation of vacuum general relativity in terms of two-form frames and connection one-forms, and provides a covariant basis for various quantization approaches. Using the spinor formalism we prove the consistency of the newly proposed matter coupling by demonstrating the full equivalence of Plebanski gravity plus matter to Einstein-Cartan gravity. As a by-product we also show the consistency of some previous suggestions for matter actions.

Tennie, Felix; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R. [Zentrum fuer Mathematische Physik und II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Brief announcement: Exploring the Consistency Problem Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study formally the consistency problem, for replicated shared data, in the Action-Constraint framework (ACF). ACF can describe a large range of application semantics and replication protocols, including optimistic and/or partial replication. ACF is used to decompose the consistency problem into simpler sub-problems. Each is easily understood. Existing algorithms from the literature can be explained as combinations of concrete sub-problem implementations. Using ACF, we design a new serialisation algorithm that does not cause aborts and only needs pairwise agreement (not global consensus).

Nishith Krishna; Marc Shapiro; Karthikeyan Bhargavan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Cementitious binder from fly ash and other industrial wastes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, investigations were undertaken to formulate cementitious binder by judicious blending of fly ash with Portland cement as well as by admixing fly ash with calcined phosphogypsum, fluorogypsum, lime sludge, and chemical activators of different finenesses. The effect of addition of calcined clay in these types of binders was studied. Data showed that cementitious binders of high compressive strength and water retentivity can be produced. The strength of masonry mortars increased with the addition of chemical activators. The strength development of binders takes place through formation of ettringite. C-S-H, and C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}. The binders are eminently suitable for partial replacement (up to 25%) of the cement in concrete without any detrimental affect on the strength. The results showed that fly ash can be used in the range from 45% to 70% in formulating these binders along with other industrial wastes to help in mitigating environmental pollution.

Singh, M.; Garg, M. [Central Building Research Inst., Roorkee (India)] [Central Building Research Inst., Roorkee (India)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Entanglement in quantum impurity problems is non perturbative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the entanglement entropy of a region of length 2L with the remainder of an infinite one dimensional gapless quantum system in the case where the region is centered on a quantum impurity. The coupling to this impurity is not scale invariant, and the physics involves a crossover between weak and strong coupling regimes. While the impurity contribution to the entanglement has been computed numerically in the past, little is known analytically about it, since in particular the methods of conformal invariance cannot be applied because of the presence of a crossover length. We show in this paper that the small coupling expansion of the entanglement entropy in this problem is quite generally plagued by strong infrared divergences, implying a non-perturbative dependence on the coupling. The large coupling expansion turns out to be better behaved, thanks to powerful results from the boundary CFT formulation and, in some cases, the underlying integrability of the problem. However, it is clear that this expansion does not capture well the crossover physics. In the integrable case -- which includes problems such as an XXZ chain with a modified link, the interacting resonant level model or the anisotropic Kondo model -- a non perturbative approach is in principle possible using form-factors. We adapt in this paper the ideas of [1,2] to the gapless case and show that, in the rather simple case of the resonant level model, and after some additional renormalizations, the form factors approach yields remarkably accurate results for the entanglement all the way from short to large distances. This is confirmed by detailed comparison with numerical simulations. Both our form factor and numerical results are compatible with a non-perturbative form at short distance.

Hubert Saleur; Peter Schmitteckert; Romain Vasseur

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

253

Instant consistency checking for the UML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inconsistencies in design models should be detected immediately to save the engineer from unnecessary rework. Yet, tools are not capable of keeping up with the engineers' rate of model changes. This paper presents an approach for quickly, correctly, ... Keywords: consistency, design feedback, incremental analysis

Alexander Egyed

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Explaining Activities as Consistent Groups of Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a method for disambiguating uncertain detections of events by seeking global explanations for activities. Given a noisy visual input, and exploiting our knowledge of the activity and its constraints, one can provide a consistent set of events ... Keywords: Activity analysis, Event recognition, Global explanations

Dima Damen; David Hogg

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

EFFECTS OF FUEL IMPURITIES ON PEM FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power generation with polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), particularly those designed for domestic and transportation applications, will likely operate on hydrogen reformed from hydrocarbons. The primary sources of H{sub 2} can be methane (from natural gas), gasoline or diesel fuel. Unfortunately, the reforming process generates impurities that may negatively affect FC performance. The effects of CO impurity have received most of the attention. However, there are other impurities that also may be detrimental to FC: operation. Here we present the effects of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, methane and ethylene. Two structural domains of the membrane and electrode assembly (MEA) are usually affected by the presence of a harmful impurity. First, the impurity may decrease the ionic conductivity in the catalyst layer or in the bulk membrane. Second, the impurity may chemisorb onto the anode catalyst surface, suppressing the catalyst activity for H{sub 2} oxidation. Catalyst poisoning by CO is the best known example of this kind of effect. Fuel reforming processes [1] generally involve the reaction of a fuel source with air. The simultaneous presence of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} may generate NH{sub 3} in concentrations of 30 to 90 ppm [1]. The effect of NH{sub 3} on performance depends on the impurity concentration and the time of anode exposure [2]. Higher concentrations result in more rapid performance decreases. If the cell is exposed to ammonia for about 1 hour and then returned to neat H{sub 2}, it will recover its original performance very slowly (about 12 hrs). This behavior is quite different from that of CO, which can be quickly purged from the anode with pure H{sub 2}, resulting in complete performance restoration within a few minutes. Longer exposure times (e.g. >15 hrs) to ammonia result in severe and irreversible losses in performance. It seems that replacement of H{sup +} ions by NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions, first within the anode catalyst layer and then in the membrane, is the primary reason for cell current losses. H{sub 2}S also adversely affects FC performance. Figure 1 depicts the current density changes in a FC exposed to both 1 and 3 ppm H{sub 2}S while operating at a constant voltage of 0.5 V. As expected, the greater the contamination level the faster the current density drops. Eventually in each case the cell becomes totally disabled. The effect H{sub 2}S appears to be cumulative, because even sub-ppm H{sub 2}S levels will decrease the FC performance if the exposure is long enough. We have recorded slow current droppings to about 20% of the initial value after exposure to concentrations of H{sub 2}S of 200 parts per billion (10{sup 9}) for 650 hours. Exposure to higher concentrations of H{sub 2}S may bring catastrophic consequences. We have exposed cell anodes to H{sub 2}S burps of the order of 8 ppm, and observed that the current at 0.5 V dropped from 1.1 to 0.3 A cm{sup -2} in just few minutes. Figure 2 shows the effect of H{sub 2}S on cell polarization. Curves b and c in this figure were recorded after 4 and 21 hours of exposure to 1 ppm H{sub 2}S, respectively, while keeping the cell at a constant voltage of 0.5 V. Regardless impurity concentration and running time, replacing the contaminated fuel stream with pure H{sub 2} does not allow any recovery as observed with CO poisoning. Cyclic voltammmetry (CV) indicates that H{sub 2}S chemisorbs very strongly onto Pt catalyst surface and high voltages are required for full cleansing of the H{sub 2}S-poisoned active sites. After full anode poisoning with H{sub 2}S (curve c), the electrode was subjected to CV (up to 1.4 V) and then the polarization curve d (with neat H{sub 2}) was recorded. The complete cell performance recovery is apparent from this curve. A more extended discussion on H{sub 2}S catalyst poisoning and cleaning will be presented. We also tested methane (0.5 % by vol.) and ethylene (50 ppm) as potential fuel impurities and we found no effects on performance.

Uribe, F. A. (Francisco A.); Zawodzinski, T. A. (Thomas A.), Jr.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Ni/YSZ Anode Interactions with Impurities in Coal Gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with nickel/zirconia anodes on synthetic coal gas in the presence of low levels of phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, hydrogen chloride, and antimony impurities were evaluated. The presence of phosphorus and arsenic led to the slow and irreversible SOFC degradation due to the formation of secondary phases with nickel, particularly close to the gas inlet. Phosphorus and antimony surface adsorption layers were identified as well. Hydrogen chloride and sulfur interactions with the nickel were limited to the surface adsorption only, whereas selenium exposure also led to the formation of nickel selenide for highly polarized cells.

Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Coffey, Greg W.

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

257

Overview of SOFC Anode Interactions with Coal Gas Impurities  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the results of SOFC anode interactions with phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, antimony, and hydrogen chloride as single contaminants or in combinations is discussed. Tests were performed using both anode- and electrolyte-supported cells in synthetic and actual coal gas for periods greater than 1000 hours. Post-test analyses were performed to identify reaction products formed and their distribution, and compared to phases expected from thermochemical modeling. The ultimate purpose of this work is to establish maximum permissible concentrations for impurities in coal gas, to aid in the selection of appropriate coal gas clean-up technologies.

O. A. Marina; L. R. Pederson; R. Gemmen; K. Gerdes; H. Finklea; I. B. Celik

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Overview of SOFC Anode Interactions with Coal Gas Impurities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the results of SOFC anode interactions with phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, antimony, and hydrogen chloride as single contaminants or in combinations is discussed. Tests were performed using both anode- and electrolyte-supported cells in synthetic and actual coal gas for periods greater than 1000 hours. Post-test analyses were performed to identify reaction products formed and their distribution, and compared to phases expected from thermochemical modeling. The ultimate purpose of this work is to establish maximum permissible concentrations for impurities in coal gas, to aid in the selection of appropriate coal gas clean-up technologies.

Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Gemmen, Randall; Gerdes, Kirk; Finklea, Harry; Celik, Ismail B.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Features of vanadium impurity states in lead telluride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperature dependences of resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and charge-carrier concentration and mobility in single-crystalline PbTe:V samples with a varied impurity content are investigated. It is shown that vanadium forms a donor level located {approx}20 meV below the conduction-band bottom. The electron mobility is as high as 10{sup 5} cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} in the samples with N{sub V} {electron transport in PbTe:V may be caused by a variable vanadium valence and by the effect of interimpurity correlations.

Artamkin, A. I.; Dobrovolsky, A. A.; Vinokurov, A. A.; Zlomanov, V. P. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Gavrilkin, S. Y.; Ivanenko, O. M.; Mitzen, K. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Ryabova, L. I.; Khokhlov, D. R., E-mail: khokhlov@mig.phys.msu.su [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Magnetoplasmons bound to short-range impurities in graphene: Symmetries and optics  

SciTech Connect

We consider a graphene sheet in the presence of a strong perpendicular magnetic field with a single short-range {delta} impurity situated at one of the carbon sites. We study the neutral inter-Landau level collective excitations, magnetoplasmons, which become localized on the impurity. Some of these excitations involve a pseudospin flip (intervalley transitions), since the impurity can scatter electrons between the two valleys. We propose a classification of states of the excitations in graphene and introduce the appropriate quantum numbers. The energies and optical strengths of collective excitations are calculated for a range of integer filling factors and impurity strengths. We establish a set of symmetries matching the energies and absorption strengths of collective excitations for different sublattice locations of the impurity, filling factors, circular light polarizations, and signs of the impurity potential.

Fischer, Andrea M. [Institute of Advanced Study and Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Roemer, Rudolf A. [Department of Physics and Centre for Scientific Computing, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Dzyubenko, Alexander B. [Department of Physics, California State University Bakersfield, Bakersfield, California 93311 (United States); General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Activation Of Fly Ash-Lime Reactions By Curing At Elevated Temperature And By Addition Of Phosphogypsum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Pozzolanic reactions play a key role in improving the compressive strengths of compacted fly ash-lime specimens. Based on studies performed with cement amended fly ash… (more)

Asha, K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Testing the ecological stability of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: effects of heat, ash and mycorrhizal colonization on Pinus muricata seedling performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal pan and heating it in a soil drying oven. During thesoil heating and ash addition, using a drying oven and ash

Peay, Kabir G.; Bruns, Thomas D.; Garbelotto, Matteo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ashe County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

264

Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash Using Acid Sintering-Leaching ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash Using Acid ... Coal fly- ash from coal-fired power plants is rich in Al2O3 content with potential use as a ...

265

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions and increased the international consensus to improve volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low volcanic ash ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

266

Continuous air Agglomeration Method for high Carbon fly ash Beneficiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carbon-free mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ash reduction system using electrically heated particulate matter filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for reducing ash comprises a temperature estimator module that estimates a temperature of an electrically heated particulate matter (PM) filter. A temperature and position estimator module estimates a position and temperature of an oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter. An ash reduction control module adjusts at least one of exhaust flow, fuel and oxygen levels in the electrically heated PM filter to adjust a position of the oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter based on the oxidation wave temperature and position.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; He, Yongsheng [Sterling Heights, MI

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahon L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Monongahela, PA); Finseth, Dennis H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Cobalt-related impurity centers in diamond: electronic properties and hyperfine parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cobalt-related impurity centers in diamond have been studied using first principles calculations. We computed the symmetry, formation and transition energies, and hyperfine parameters of cobalt impurities in isolated configurations and in complexes involving vacancies and nitrogen atoms. We found that the Co impurity in a divacant site is energetically favorable and segregates nitrogen atoms in its neighborhood. Our results were discussed in the context of the recently observed Co-related electrically active centers in synthetic diamond.

Larico, R; Machado, W V M; Justo, J F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

FLY ASH GENERATION AND UTILIZATION -AN OVERVIEW* Tarun R. Naik, Ph.D., P.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a sodium-based sorbent such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

271

Using Zeolites Synthesized from Fly Ash to Reduce Ammonia Loss to the Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes studies using zeolites synthesized from fly ash to reduce ammonia loss to the environment.

2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

272

Mercury Leachability From Concretes That Contain Fly Ashes and Activated Carbon Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents new laboratory data on the leaching of mercury from concrete that contains fly ash and powdered activated carbon (PAC) sorbents used to capture mercury. The concretes studied during this project were made with fly ashes from lignite and subbituminous coal, including fly ashes containing PAC. Only very low levels of mercuryless than 5 parts per trillionwere leached from the fly ash concretes in both 18-hour and 7-day laboratory leach tests.

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

273

Consistency Test and Constraint of Quintessence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we highlight our recent work in arXiv:0803.4504. In that work, we proposed a new consistency test of quintessence models for dark energy. Our test gave a simple and direct signature if certain category of quintessence models was not consistent with the observational data. For a category that passed the test, we further constrained its characteristic parameter. Specifically, we found that the exponential potential was ruled out at the 95% confidence level and the power-law potential was ruled out at the 68% confidence level based on the current observational data. We also found that the confidence interval of the index of the power-law potential was between -2 and 0 at the 95% confidence level.

Chen, Chien-Wen; Gu, Je-AN; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, Pisin; /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

P-6: Dissolution Behavior of Impurities in Scheelite Mineral in Oxalic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of dissolution of these impurities is important for further ... A New Method for Production of Titanium Dioxide Pigment – Eliminating CO2 Emissions.

275

Detection of surface impurity phases in high T.sub.C superconductors using thermally stimulated luminescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Detection of surface impurity phases in high-temperature superconducting materials. Thermally stimulated luminescence has been found to occur in insulating impurity phases which commonly exist in high-temperature superconducting materials. The present invention is sensitive to impurity phases occurring at a level of less than 1% with a probe depth of about 1 .mu.m which is the region of interest for many superconductivity applications. Spectroscopic and spatial resolution of the emitted light from a sample permits identification and location of the impurity species. Absence of luminescence, and thus of insulating phases, can be correlated with low values of rf surface resistance.

Cooke, D. Wayne (Los Alamos, NM); Jahan, Muhammad S. (Bartlett, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Impurities Distribution between SiO Gas and Reactant Materials in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon ... On the Segregation of Impurities in Solar Silicon ... Silicon PV Wafers: Correlation of Mechanical Properties and Crack ...

277

Consistent probabilities in loop quantum cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fundamental issue for any quantum cosmological theory is to specify how probabilities can be assigned to various quantum events or sequences of events such as the occurrence of singularities or bounces. In previous work, we have demonstrated how this issue can be successfully addressed within the consistent histories approach to quantum theory for Wheeler-DeWitt-quantized cosmological models. In this work, we generalize that analysis to the exactly solvable loop quantization of a spatially flat, homogeneous and isotropic cosmology sourced with a massless, minimally coupled scalar field known as sLQC. We provide an explicit, rigorous and complete decoherent histories formulation for this model and compute the probabilities for the occurrence of a quantum bounce vs. a singularity. Using the scalar field as an emergent internal time, we show for generic states that the probability for a singularity to occur in this model is zero, and that of a bounce is unity, complementing earlier studies of the expectation values of the volume and matter density in this theory. We also show from the consistent histories point of view that all states in this model, whether quantum or classical, achieve arbitrarily large volume in the limit of infinite `past' or `future' scalar `time', in the sense that the wave function evaluated at any arbitrary fixed value of the volume vanishes in that limit. Finally, we briefly discuss certain misconceptions concerning the utility of the consistent histories approach in these models.

David A. Craig; Parampreet Singh

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

278

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M. Sulloway

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

279

Cleanup Verification Package for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect

This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 126-F-1, 184-F Powerhouse Ash Pit. This waste site received coal ash from the 100-F Area coal-fired steam plant. Leakage of process effluent from the 116-F-14 , 107-F Retention Basins flowed south into the ash pit, contaminating the northern portion.

S. W. Clark and H. M Sulloway

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

Freidin, C. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fly Ash Construction Manual for Road and Site Applications, Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume construction manual details the use of fly ash in high-volume road construction and site development, covering all project elements from ash procurement to finishing. It addresses the use of fly ash in fills, embankments, backfills, subgrade stabilization, pavement base course, and slurried backfills, as well as its application as a soil amendment.

1988-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

282

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater Reyad; available online 29 October 2003 Abstract A by-product fly ash from oil shale processing was converted shale; Ash; Zeolite; Cadmium and lead removal 1. Introduction Oil shale exists in Jordan with large

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

283

Swirling Melting Characteristics of Fly Ashes from Co-Firing of MSWI in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melting treatment is an efficient for heavy metal stabilization in MSW fly ash. The fly ashes from co-firing of municipal solid waste and coal incinerator were melted in the swirling melting furnace system under various temperatures. The melting characteristics ... Keywords: fly ash, co-firing, melting, melting temperature, heavy metals, fixation rate

Wang Xue-tao; Jiao You-zhou; Xu Bin; Jin Bao-sheng

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Self-degradable Slag/Class F Fly Ash-Blend Cements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Self-degradable slag/Class F fly ash blend pozzolana cements were formulated, assuming that they might serve well as alternative temporary fracture sealers in Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells operating at temperatures of {ge} 200 C. Two candidate formulas were screened based upon material criteria including an initial setting time {ge} 60 min at 85 C, compressive strength {ge} 2000 psi for a 200 C autoclaved specimen, and the extent of self-degradation of cement heated at {ge} 200 C for it was contacted with water. The first screened dry mix formula consisted of 76.5 wt% slag-19.0 wt% Class F fly ash-3.8 wt% sodium silicate as alkali activator, and 0.7 wt% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as the self-degradation promoting additive, and second formula comprised of 57.3 wt% slag, 38.2 wt% Class F fly ash, 3.8 wt% sodium silicate, and 0.7 wt% CMC. After mixing with water and autoclaving it at 200 C, the aluminum-substituted 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal phase was identified as hydrothermal reaction product responsible for the development of a compressive strength of 5983 psi. The 200 C-autoclaved cement made with the latter formula had the combined phases of tobermorite as its major reaction product and amorphous geopolymer as its minor one providing a compressive strength of 5271 psi. Sodium hydroxide derived from the hydrolysis of sodium silicate activator not only initiated the pozzolanic reaction of slag and fly ash, but also played an important role in generating in-situ exothermic heat that significantly contributed to promoting self-degradation of cementitious sealers. The source of this exothermic heat was the interactions between sodium hydroxide, and gaseous CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}COOH by-products generated from thermal decomposition of CMC at {ge} 200 C in an aqueous medium. Thus, the magnitude of this self-degradation depended on the exothermic temperature evolved in the sealer; a higher temperature led to a sever disintegration of sealer. The exothermic temperature was controlled by the extent of thermal decomposition of CMC, demonstrating that CMC decomposed at higher temperature emitted more gaseous reactants. Hence, such large emission enhanced the evolution of in-situ exothermic heat. In contrast, the excessive formation of geopolymer phase due to more incorporation of Class F fly ash into this cementitious system affected its ability to self-degrade, reflecting that there was no self-degradation. The geopolymer was formed by hydrothermal reactions between sodium hydroxide from sodium silicate and mullite in Class F fly ash. Thus, the major reason why geopolymer-based cementitiuos sealers did not degrade after heated sealers came in contact with water was their lack of free sodium hydroxide.

Sugama, T.; Warren, J.; Butcher, T. (BNL); Lance Brothers (Halliburton); Bour, D. (AltaRock Energy, Inc.)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Aluminum - Fly Ash Metal Matrix Composites as Advanced Automobile Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites such as silicon carbide-aluminum, alumina-aluminum, and graphite-aluminum represent a class of emerging materials with significant potential for commercial use in the auto and aerospace industries. In industrial foundry trials, a joint industry and Department of Energy project demonstrated a promising new process for producing a low cost aluminum metal matrix composite containing fly ash particles.

2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

286

Novel Ash Beneficiation Processes for Managing Unburned Carbon and Ammonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes new fly ash beneficiation concepts for managing deleterious effects of unburned carbon and ammonia contamination associated with low nitrogen oxides (low-NOx) combustion systems. The report contains technical data, scientific discussion, and a description of ongoing development and scale-up activities.

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Thermal analysis and characterization of Elephant grass ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... Here, ashes from incineration of elephant grass are characterized and its incorporation into clay to produce ... Moreover, thermal analysis was performed including gas emission ... Differential characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron sandstone deposit.

288

Self-consistent resonance in a plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As an application of the solution of the equations of electromagnetic self-consistency in a plasma, found in a previous paper, the study of controlled thermo-nuclear fusion is undertaken. This study utilizes the resonance which can be developed in the plasma, as indicated by the above solution, and is based to an analysis of the underlying forced oscillation under friction. As a consequence, we find that, in this way, controlled thermonuclear fusion seems now to be feasible in principle. The treatment is rather elementary, and it may serve as a guide for more detailed calculations.

Evangelos Chaliasos

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Spectroscopic research on infrared emittance of coal ash deposits  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits on a pulverized coal combustion boiler of an electric power plant. Normal emittance spectra in the near to medium infrared (2.5-25 {mu}m) region and total normal emittances were measured on four kinds of ground ash deposits. Measurements were conducted in the 570-1460 K temperature range which is common for boiler furnaces, by both heating and cooling the ash samples, with the aim to study the effect of their thermal history. Dependence of emittance on wavelength, temperature and chemical composition was studied, too. Samples were tested for transparency (opacity) to verify the accuracy of results. It was determined that the thicknesses used for the ash powders are opaque for infrared radiation for thicknesses in the order of a millimeter. Tests have shown that spectral emittance increases with an increase of wavelength with a characteristic pattern common for all samples. Spectral normal emittance increases strongly with temperature at shorter wavelengths and remains high and unchanged at longer ones. Emittance spectra are not very sensitive to chemical composition of ashes especially beyond {lambda} {approx} 5 {mu}m. With an increase of temperature, total emittance of the powdered sample decreases to a minimum value around 1200 K. Further temperature rise induces an increase of total emittance due to sintering in the ash. On cooling, the emittance increases monotonically following the hysteresis. Quantitative directions for evaluating thermal radiation characteristics of ash deposits for the merits of the safety design of boiler furnaces were proposed. That comprises correlating the experimentally obtained emittance spectra with curves of simple analytical form, i.e., a continuous function of minimum emittance vs. wavelength. The proposed method can be extended to other specimens from the same furnace and used to determine correlations for thermal calculation of old and design of new furnaces - with similar geometry and combusting similar coal. The method is potentially applicable to completely different boiler furnaces combusting different coal, and the authors recommend running the tests with new deposit samples. The data will then be applicable to the thermal design of a whole new class of furnaces, having similar geometry and combusting similar coal. This is expected to greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of thermal calculation as well as the efficiency of thermal design of steam boilers. (author)

Saljnikov, Aleksandar; Komatina, Mirko; Gojak, Milan [Department of Thermomechanics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS); Vucicevic, Biljana [Laboratory for Thermal Engineering, Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (RS); Goricanec, Darko [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Smetanova 17, Maribor 2000 (Slovenia); Stevanovic, Zoran [Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, Dusina 7, 11120 Belgrade 35 (RS)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Integrated Bayesian Estimation of Zeff in the TEXTOR Tokamak from Bremsstrahlung and CX Impurity Density Measurements  

SciTech Connect

The validation of diagnostic date from a nuclear fusion experiment is an important issue. The concept of an Integrated Data Analysis (IDA) allows the consistent estimation of plasma parameters from heterogeneous data sets. Here, the determination of the ion effective charge (Zeff) is considered. Several diagnostic methods exist for the determination of Zeff, but the results are in general not in agreement. In this work, the problem of Zeff estimation on the TEXTOR tokamak is approached from the perspective of IDA, in the framework of Bayesian probability theory. The ultimate goal is the estimation of a full Zeff profile that is consistent both with measured bremsstrahlung emissivities, as well as individual impurity spectral line intensities obtained from Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS). We present an overview of the various uncertainties that enter the calculation of a Zeff profile from bremsstrahlung date on the one hand, and line intensity data on the other hand. We discuss a simple linear and nonlinear Bayesian model permitting the estimation of a central value for Zeff and the electron density ne on TEXTOR from bremsstrahlung emissivity measurements in the visible, and carbon densities derived from CXRS. Both the central Zeff and ne are sampled using an MCMC algorithm. An outlook is given towards possible model improvements.

Verdoolaege, G.; Oost, G. van [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Hellermann, M. G. von; Jaspers, R. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Ichir, M. M. [Laboratoire des Signaux et Systemes, Unite mixte de recherche 8506 (CNRS-Supelec-UPS), Supelec, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

CHARACTERIZATION OF PD IMPURITIES AND TWIN BOUNDARY DEFECTS IN DETECTOR GRADE CDZNTE CRYSTALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic CdZnTe or ''CZT'' crystals are highly suitable for {gamma}-spectrometers operating at the room temperature. Secondary phases (SP) in CZT are known to inhibit detector performance, particularly when they are present in large numbers or dimensions. These SP may exist as voids or composites of non-cubic phase metallic Te layers with bodies of polycrystalline and amorphous CZT material and voids. Defects associated with crystal twining may also influence detector performance in CZT. Using transmission electron microscopy, we identify two types of defects that are on the nano scale. The first defect consists of 40 nm diameter metallic Pd/Te bodies on the grain boundaries of Te-rich composites. Although the nano-Pd/Te bodies around these composites may be unique to the growth source of this CZT material, noble metal impurities like these may contribute to SP formation in CZT. The second defect type consists of atom-scale grain boundary dislocations. Specifically, these involve inclined ''finite-sized'' planar defects or interfaces between layers of atoms that are associated with twins. Finite-sized twins may be responsible for the subtle but observable striations that can be seen with optical birefringence imaging and synchrotron X-ray topographic imaging.

Duff, M.

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

292

A Limnological Approach to the Management of Fly Ash Disposal Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash disposal ponds are found at half of the U.S. coal burning power plants and receive a mixture of fly ash and water used to sluice the ash from the power plant to the pond. Leaching of metals, notably Cu, As, and Se, from fly ash can be decreased by control of inflow pH, but their release through the discharge to surface waters remains a problem, particularly for Se. Comanagement of low volume wastes of varying chemical composition and volume with fly ash make the management of water quality at the...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

Self Consistent Models of the Solar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origins of the hot solar corona and the supersonically expanding solar wind are still the subject of much debate. This paper summarizes some of the essential ingredients of realistic and self-consistent models of solar wind acceleration. It also outlines the major issues in the recent debate over what physical processes dominate the mass, momentum, and energy balance in the accelerating wind. A key obstacle in the way of producing realistic simulations of the Sun-heliosphere system is the lack of a physically motivated way of specifying the coronal heating rate. Recent models that assume the energy comes from Alfven waves that are partially reflected, and then dissipated by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, have been found to reproduce many of the observed features of the solar wind. This paper discusses results from these models, including detailed comparisons with measured plasma properties as a function of solar wind speed. Some suggestions are also given for future work that could answer the many remain...

Cranmer, Steven R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Physica B 302303 (2001) 7783 Electronic and impurity states in triple quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physica B 302­303 (2001) 77­83 Electronic and impurity states in triple quantum wells M. PachecoaAs­(Ga,Al)As quantum wells in the presence of external electric and magnetic fields is presented. Impurity states distribution of the electronic wave function within the triple-well structure. We show that by changing

Vargas, Patricio

295

Volatile impurities in the ceramic form for the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP)  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal for the impurity tests performed at SRS was to determine the maximum level of volatile impurities that can be accommodated into the ceramic form without significantly affecting product properties. The properties investigated in this study are the apparent porosity and the phase assemblage.

Cozzi, A.D.

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

296

Orbit effects on impurity transport in a rotating tokamak plasma  

SciTech Connect

Particle orbits in a rotating tokamak plasma are calculated from the equation of motion in the frame that rotates with the plasma. It is found that heavy particles in a rotating plasma can drift away from magnetic surfaces significantly faster with a higher bounce frequency, resulting in a diffusion coefficient much larger than that for a stationary plasma. Particle orbits near the surface of a rotating tokamak are also analyzed. Orbit effects indicate that more impurities can penetrate into a plasma rotating with counter-beam injection. Particle simulation is carried out with realistic experimental parameters and the results are in qualitative agreement with some experimental observations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). 19 refs., 15 figs.

Wong, K.L.; Cheng, C.Z.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas fired furnances or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, A.H.

1982-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Evaluation of Concrete Containing Fly Ash With High Carbon Content and/or Small Amounts of Wood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive database of information on the impacts of the use of high carbon coal ashes and concretes with small amounts of wood ash on the performance of concretes. It is expected these data will support easing the restrictions on the use of high carbon ashes and any wood ash products in concrete in the ASTM standards.

1998-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Physical and Chemical Properties of Fly Ash from Coal Gasification and Study on Its Recycling Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aiming at the difficulties in utilization of fly ash from coal gasification, the physical and chemical properties of fly ash were investigated. This research studied recycling utilization on using fly ash as one of cement raw materials for cement clinker. ... Keywords: fly ash, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), recycling utilization

Guohua Qiu; Weiqiang Zeng; Zhenglun Shi; Mengxiang Fang; Zhongyang Luo

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

To be published in Waste Management (2010) Bodnan et al. MINERALOGY AND PORE WATER CHEMISTRY OF A BOILER ASH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF A BOILER ASH FROM A MSW FLUIDIZED-BED INCINERATOR F. Bodénan* , D. Guyonnet, P. Piantone, P. Blanc BRGM presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from to as "boiler ash", is analogous to what Abbas et al. (2003) refer to as "hopper ash" (see Fig. 1 of Abbas et al

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

303

JV Task 6 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP), which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCB performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 1998 to 2007 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. CARRC topical reports were prepared on several completed tasks. Specific CARRC 1998B2007 accomplishments included: (1) Development of several ASTM International Standard Guides for CCB utilization applications. (2) Organization and presentation of training courses for CCB professionals and teachers. (3) Development of online resources including the Coal Ash Resource Center, Ash from Biomass in Coal (ABC) of cocombustion ash characteristics, and the Buyer's Guide to Coal-Ash Containing Products. In addition, development of expanded information on the environmental performance of CCBs in utilization settings included the following: (1) Development of information on physical properties and engineering performance for concrete, soil-ash blends, and other products. (2) Training of students through participation in CARRC research projects. (3) Participation in a variety of local, national, and international technical meetings, symposia, and conferences by presenting and publishing CCB-related papers.

Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Erick Zacher

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Physics and application of impurity plume dispersal as an edge plasma flow diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unique system has been developed for studying impurity transport in the edge plasma of Alcator C-Mod. Impurity gas (which for these experiments is deuterated ethylene, C?D?) is injected locally into the scrape-off layer ...

Gangadhara, Sanjay, 1972-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Geometrically consistent approach to stochastic DBI inflation  

SciTech Connect

Stochastic effects during inflation can be addressed by averaging the quantum inflaton field over Hubble-patch-sized domains. The averaged field then obeys a Langevin-type equation into which short-scale fluctuations enter as a noise term. We solve the Langevin equation for an inflaton field with a Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) kinetic term perturbatively in the noise and use the result to determine the field value's probability density function (PDF). In this calculation, both the shape of the potential and the warp factor are arbitrary functions, and the PDF is obtained with and without volume effects due to the finite size of the averaging domain. DBI kinetic terms typically arise in string-inspired inflationary scenarios in which the scalar field is associated with some distance within the (compact) extra dimensions. The inflaton's accessible range of field values therefore is limited because of the extra dimensions' finite size. We argue that in a consistent stochastic approach the inflaton's PDF must vanish for geometrically forbidden field values. We propose to implement these extra-dimensional spatial restrictions into the PDF by installing absorbing (or reflecting) walls at the respective boundaries in field space. As a toy model, we consider a DBI inflaton between two absorbing walls and use the method of images to determine its most general PDF. The resulting PDF is studied in detail for the example of a quartic warp factor and a chaotic inflaton potential. The presence of the walls is shown to affect the inflaton trajectory for a given set of parameters.

Lorenz, Larissa; Martin, Jerome; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi [Theoretical and Mathematical Physics Group, Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology, Louvain University, 2 Chemin du Cyclotron, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095-CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Research Center for the Early Universe, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8568 (Japan)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with CuO and CuCl2 catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 {micro}g/m3 using a diffusion tube as the source of Hg0(g). All experiments were conducted using 4% O2 in nitrogen mix as a reaction gas, and other reactants (HCl, H2O and SO2, NO2, Br2) were added as required. The fixed bed reactor was operated over a temperature range of 200 to 400 C. In each experiment, the reactor effluent was analyzed using the modified Ontario-Hydro method. After each experiment, fly ash particles were also analyzed for mercury. The results show that the ability of fly ash to adsorb and/or oxidize mercury is primarily dependent on its carbon, iron and calcium content. There can be either one or more than one key component at a particular temperature and flue gas condition. Surface area played a secondary role in effecting the mercury transformations when compared to the concentration of the key component in the fly ash. Amount of carbon and surface area played a key important role in the adsorption of mercury. Increased concentration of gases in the flue gas other than oxygen and nitrogen caused decreased the amount of mercury adsorbed on carbon surface. Mercury adsorption by iron oxide primarily depended on the crystalline structure of iron oxide. {alpha}-Iron oxide had no effect on mercury adsorption or oxidation under most of the flue gas conditions, but ?-iron oxide adsorbed mercury under most of the flue gas conditions. Bromine is a very good oxidizing agent for mercury. But in the presence of calcium oxide containing fly ashes, all the oxidized mercury would be reduced to elemental form. Among the catalysts, it was observed that presence of free lattice chlorine in the catalyst was very important for the oxidation of mercury. But instead of using the catalyst alone, using it along with carbon may better serve the purpose by providing the adsorption surface for mercury and also some extra surface area for the reaction to occur (especially for fly ashes with low surface area).

Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Blue Ash, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Ash, Ohio: Energy Resources Blue Ash, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.2320029°, -84.3782734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2320029,"lon":-84.3782734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

308

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration Y. Roh (rohy@ornl.gov; 865-576-9931) T. J. Phelps (phelpstj1@ornl.gov; 865-574-7290) Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6036 A. D. McMillan (mcmillanad@ornl.gov; 865-241-4554) R. J. Lauf (laufrj@ornl.gov; 865-574-5176) Metal and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6085 *Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration estimates atmospheric greenhouse gas releases may exceed 8 billion metric tons by the year 2010 heightening its international environmental concern. Carbon dioxide will dominate the

309

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- acre basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project was safely completed at a cost of $8.9 million, $2.9 million under budget. The manmade earthen basin received ash from the former R Area Pow- erhouse operations, which ended in 1964. The first of five reactors con- structed at SRS, the R Reactor produced nuclear materials for national defense. Recovery Act funding allowed SRS to accelerate cleanup of the basin and complete the project five years earlier than the target set in a regu- latory schedule. In late 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control determined the closure met all regulatory requirements after inspection

310

Preventing ash agglomeration during gasification of high-sodium lignite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various additives were evaluated to assess their ability to prevent ash agglomeration during the gasification of high-sodium lignite. Additives that showed promise in simple muffle furnace tests included meta-kaolin, vermiculite, two types of silica fume, and one type of bauxite. Additives that were tested and rejected included dolomite, calcite, sand flour, kaolinite, fine kaolin, and calcined bauxite. Based on the muffle furnace test results, the meta-kaolin was selected for a follow-on demonstration in a pilot-scale coal gasifier. Pilot-scale testing showed that the addition of coarse (minus 14-mesh, 920-{mu}m mean size) meta-kaolin at a feed rate roughly equivalent to the ash content of the lignite (10 wt %) successfully prevented agglomeration and deposition problems during gasification of high-sodium lignite at a maximum operating temperature of 927{sup o}C (1700{sup o}F). 13 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

Robert S. Dahlin; Johnny R. Dorminey; WanWang Peng; Roxann F. Leonard; Pannalal Vimalchand [Southern Research Institute and Southern Company Services, Wilsonville, AL (USA). Power Systems Development Facility

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

Two recent large-scale spills of coal combustion waste have highlighted the old problem of handling the enormous quantity of solid waste produced by coal. Both spills happened at power plants run by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). In December 2008 a holding pond for coal ash collapsed at a power plant in Kingstom, Tenn., releasing coal-ash sludge onto farmland and into rivers: in January 2009 a break in a pipe removing water from a holding pond for gypsum caused a spill at Widows Creek Fossil Plant in Stevenson, Ala. The article discusses the toxic outcome of such disasters on ecosystems, quoting work by Willaim Hopkins at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and recommendations and reports of the US EPA. 2 photos.

Chatterjee, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Microsoft Word - CX-Ashe-CGSFiberInstallation_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2011 5, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Debbie Ruckwardt Electrical Engineer - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Installing fiber optic cables between Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Ashe Substation and Energy Northwest's Columbia Generating Station (CGS). Budget Information: Work Order # 00261540 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1864 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights of way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain...infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: The project takes place between BPA's Ashe Substation and Energy Northwest's

313

Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2250114°, -112.4840675° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2250114,"lon":-112.4840675,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

314

A Laboratory Method for Ash Particle Size Determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing stringent particulate emissions limits are putting more pressure on power producers to improve electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance. In an effort to select the most cost effective upgrade option, many power plant engineers are using ESP computer models to estimate the impact of the available options. These models are sensitive to the fly ash particle size distribution used in the calculations, but the actual distribution is rarely known. Furthermore, measuring this distribution has, in...

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

315

Ash Properties Analysis from Co-Firing Biomass and Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant interest in renewable energy has been increasing, especially in response to legislative requirements to include renewables in the generation mix. One promising renewable strategy is co-firing biomass with coal, in pulverized coal- (PC-) fired units. The objective of this research is to provide quantitative data on full-scale test burn samples to demonstrate changes in ash characteristics and to identify anomalies affecting particulate material (PM) collection efficiency that result from co-fi...

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

316

A new way to stabilize fly ash from municipal incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy metals and toxic chlorinated organics, added to very low grain-size distributions, make fly ashes from municipal incinerators a very hazardous waste. For their disposal, the present general trend is, not only to stabilize chemically the ashes, i.e., to reduce the leachability of the toxic substances, but also to stabilize them mechanically, i.e., to convert them into massive, resistant, and unleachable solids. This paper describes various stabilization methods used on representative European fly ash samples, which led to the development of a new stabilization technique taking place in four stages: elimination of the alkali chlorides by dissolution; addition of a moderate quantity of phosphoric acid; calcination; and solidification with Portland clinker or cement. The principal advantages of the process are as follows: the polychlorodibenzodioxins-polychlorodibenzofurans are destroyed, the reactivity of the heavy metals is reduced drastically, the final solids have satisfactory mechanical properties, and the increase in weight of the waste to be disposed of does not exceed one fourth. Comparative results of TCLP extraction tests are presented.

Derie, R. [Free Univ. of Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Ore Dressing

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Classical confinement and outward convection of impurity ions in the MST RFP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impurity ion dynamics measured with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolution reveal classical ion transport in the reversed-field pinch. The boron, carbon, oxygen, and aluminum impurity ion density profiles are obtained in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] using a fast, active charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy diagnostic. Measurements are made during improved-confinement plasmas obtained using inductive control of tearing instability to mitigate stochastic transport. At the onset of the transition to improved confinement, the impurity ion density profile becomes hollow, with a slow decay in the core region concurrent with an increase in the outer region, implying an outward convection of impurities. Impurity transport from Coulomb collisions in the reversed-field pinch is classical for all collisionality regimes, and analysis shows that the observed hollow profile and outward convection can be explained by the classical temperature screening mechanism. The profile agrees well with classical expectations. Experiments performed with impurity pellet injection provide further evidence for classical impurity ion confinement.

Kumar, S. T. A.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Mirnov, V. V.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Caspary, K. J.; Chapman, B. E.; Parke, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Magee, R. M. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Craig, D. [Physics Department, Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 60187 (United States); Fiksel, G. [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

EFFECT OF IMPURITIES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF A Pd-Ag DIFFUSER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A commercially fabricated diffuser purchased from Johnson-Matthey, Inc. was evaluated for performance characterization testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Different impurities are often present in the feed streams of the process diffusers, but the effect of these impurities on the diffuser performance is currently unknown. Various impurities were introduced into the feed stream of the diffuser at various levels ranging from 0.5% to 10% of the total flow in order to determine the effect that these impurities have on the permeation of hydrogen through the palladium-silver membrane. The introduction of various impurities into the feed stream of the diffuser had a minimal effect on the overall permeation of hydrogen through the Pd-Ag membrane. Of the four impurities introduced into the feed stream, carbon monoxide (CO) was the only impurity that showed any evidence of causing a reduction in the amount of hydrogen permeating through the Pd-Ag membrane. The hydrogen permeation returned to its baseline level after the CO was removed from the feed stream. There were no lasting effects of the CO exposure on the ability of the membrane to effectively separate hydrogen from the non-hydrogen species in the gas stream under the conditions tested.

Morgan, G.

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

319

Method and apparatus for detecting and measuring trace impurities in flowing gases  

SciTech Connect

Trace impurities in flowing gases may be detected and measured by a dynamic atomic molecular emission spectrograph utilizing as its energy source the energy transfer reactions of metastable species, atomic or molecular, with the impurities in the flowing gas. An electronically metastable species which maintains a stable afterglow is formed and mixed with the flowing gas in a region downstream from and separate from the region in which the metastable species is formed. Impurity levels are determined quantitatively by the measurement of line and/or band intensity as a function of concentration employing emission spectroscopic techniques.

Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dowdy, Edward J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Analytic formulae for centrifugal effects on turbulent transport of trace impurities in tokamak plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A local gyrokinetic description of the centrifugal effects on impurity transport in tokamak plasmas is presented, which extends previous models with the inclusion of the gradient of the background toroidal angular velocity in the equilibrium distribution. The equations are implemented in a gyrokinetic code. An analytical model is derived and formulae are proposed which allow the calculation of centrifugal effects on impurity transport in the limit where centrifugal effects are large only for heavy impurities in trace concentration, but are negligible for the bulk plasma. The analytic formulae are shown to be in quantitative agreement with the numerical results and are proposed for complementing present transport models.

Angioni, C.; Casson, F. J.; Veth, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, IPP-EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Peeters, A. G. [Physics Department, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was previously known the liquidus temperature of the molten salt would change as spent fuel is processed through the Mk-IV electrorefiner. However, the extent of the increase in liquidus temperature was not known. This work is first of its kind in determining thermodynamic properties of a molten salt electrolyte containing transuranics, fission products and bond sodium. Experimental data concluded that the melting temperature of the electrolyte will become greater than the operating temperature of the Mk-IV ER during current fuel processing campaigns. Collected data also helps predict when the molten salt electrolyte will no longer be able to support electrorefining operations.

Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Superheater Tube Corrosion in Wood Gasifier Ash Deposits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The upper operating temperature of tubes in heat exchangers/steam generators is strongly influenced by the degradation that can occur because of the reaction of the exchanger/generator tubing with the deposits that accumulate on the surface of the tubes. In fact, severe corrosion has been observed in some biomass fired systems, particularly with elevated potassium and chlorine concentrations in the deposits. Wood gasifiers have recently been and are currently being constructed at several sites in North America. In these systems, the syngas is burned to produce steam and the performance of the heat exchanger tubes under ash deposits is of great concern. As temperatures of the heat exchangers are increased in an effort to increase their operating efficiency, the performance of the tubes is of greater interest. The corrosion behavior of alloy steel tubes as a function of temperature has been investigated by exposing samples of selected alloys to ash collected from the steam generator fired by syngas produced in wood gasifiers. This study compares corrosion rates from laboratory exposures of synthesis gas and ash at 500 C and 600 C. This study investigated the material performance of four ferritic steels and one austenitic steel exposed to conditions expected on the fireside of a wood gasifier. The purpose of this study was to identify an effective method for determining material performance for samples exposed to both the process gas and the fly ash that is typically observed within the steam generator for times up to 1000 hours. Mass changes were measured for all of the samples, but this information can be misleading concerning material performance due to the difficulty in sufficiently cleaning the samples after exposure in the ash. Therefore, small cross sections of the samples were collected and imaged using optical microscopy. Oxide thicknesses were measured along with metal losses. The metal loss information provides a clear indication of material performance. The metal loss rates for the ferritic steels at 500 C were almost half of those observed at 600 C and the rates decreased with increasing exposure time. It was also reported that the metal loss rates generally decrease with increasing chromium concentration.

Bestor, Michael A [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

326

Electrostatic Precipitator Performance Modeling of High Carbon Ash Using EPRI's ESPM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet reduced nitrogen oxide (NOX) emission limits, many power producers installed low-NOX combustion systems that raised the level of carbon in the ash. However, carbon can be difficult to collect in an electrostatic precipitator and, consequently, the particulate emissions from many affected units increased. EPRI initiated this study to better understand carbon capture in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), improve collection of high carbon ashes, and predict the collection of such ashes with its ESP...

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

327

Development of New Industrial Ashalloy Material Using Fly-Ash Cenospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites can provide improved functional properties compared to solid metal castings, while saving production energy and raw material costs in the process. In particular, ash-derived metal matrix composites can provide utilities a high value-added market for their coal fly ash. This report describes research on a promising manufacturing process for one such application -- pressure infiltration techniques to produce lead-ash composites for automotive battery applications.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Mercury Emissions from Curing Concretes that Contain Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents new laboratory data on the release of mercury from concrete containing fly ash and powdered activated carbon sorbents used to capture mercury. The concretes studied in this project were made with fly ashes from lignite and subbituminous coal, including fly ashes containing powdered activated carbon (PAC). Minute quantities of mercury were emitted from five concretes during the standard 28-day curing process and throughout an additional 28 days of curing for two of these concretes. Ge...

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Fly Ash Carbon Burn-Out at TVA's Colbert and Shawnee Stations: Site Specific Application Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash beneficiation using Carbon Burn-Out (CBO) technology offers the opportunity to market fly ash that was previously landfilled. This site application study of beneficiating pulverized coal boiler fly ash at Tennessee Valley Authority's Colbert and Shawnee Stations indicates this process is a cost effective solution for decreasing solid waste disposal, increasing landfill life, improving boiler heat rate, and generating a positive revenue stream.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

330

Assessment of Impacts of NOx Reduction Technologies on Coal Ash Use: Volume 1: North American Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume report provides documentation about physical and chemical effects combustion and post-combustion low-NOx technologies have on coal fly ash. U.S., European, and, to a lesser degree, Japanese experience is discussed. The report assesses the effect of low-NOx technologies on fly ash markets in a general manner. Options for beneficiating fly ash for specific markets also appear.

1997-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Use of High Carbon Fly Ash as a Component of Raw Mix for Cement Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the production of concrete, fly ash often serves as a supplementary cementing material, but some fly ashes may not be suitable for this use due to excess unburned carbon. This report presents the results of a literature investigation, bench-scale laboratory study, and pilot-scale tests of the feasibility of using such high carbon fly ashes in the manufacture of portland cement.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Geochemical Investigation of Pyrite Codisposal with Sluiced Fly Ash and Implications for Selecting Remedial Actions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidation of pyrite results in acid generation as well as the release of sulfate, iron, and other metals to solution. When pyritic coal mill rejects are codisposed with coal ash, pyrite oxidation and the subsequent interaction of oxidation products with the ash primarily control leachate quality. The geochemistry of the pyrite/ash system has implications for management and remediation actions at codisposal facilities. Utilities can use the results of this research to make decisions regarding such facilit...

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings Resistant to Attack by Molten Fly Ash in Integrated Gas Combined Cycle Turbine Engines. Author(s), Andrew D.

334

INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... The Leaching Behavior of Heavy Metals in MSWI Bottom Ash by Carbonation Reaction with Diffeent Water Content by Nam-Il Um, Kwang-Suk ...

336

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

337

Removal of Thiosalts using Biomass Ash from Pulp and Paper Mill ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass ash used in this study is collected from Corner Brook Pulp and Paper Mill, NL and Zellstoff Celgar Mill, BC and is characterized to understand the ...

338

and Se(VI) Ions onto Biomass Ash - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass ash used in this study is collected from Zellstoff Celgar Mill, British Columbia, Canada and is characterized to determine the physico-chemical ...

339

Impurity Profiling to Match a Nerve Agent to Its Precursor Source for Chemical Forensics Applications  

SciTech Connect

Chemical forensics is an emerging field in homeland security that aims to attribute a weaponized toxic chemical or related material to its source. Herein, for the first time, trace impurities originating from a chemical precursor were used to match a synthesized nerve agent to its precursor source. Specifically, multiple batches of sarin and its intermediate were synthesized from two commercial stocks of methylphosphonic dichloride (DC) and were then matched by impurity profiling to their DC stocks from out of five possible stocks. This was possible because each DC stock had a unique impurity profile that, for the tested stocks, persisted through synthesis, decontamination, and sample preparation. This work may form a basis for using impurity profiling to help find and prosecute perpetrators of chemical attacks.

Fraga, Carlos G.; Perez Acosta, Gabriel A.; Crenshaw, Michael D.; Wallace, Krys; Mong, Gary M.; Colburn, Heather A.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Impurity-Point Defect Interaction in Fe-Cr Alloys: Size Effects versus ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Impurity-Point Defect Interaction in Fe-Cr Alloys: Size Effects versus Magnetic Behaviour by D. Nguyen-Manh, M.Y. Lavrentiev and S.L. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

H Diffusion for Impurity and Defect Passivation: A Physical Model for Solar Cell Processing; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We propose a physical model for diffusion of H in Si containing impurities and defects. The diffusion occurs via several parallel mechanisms, involving complex formation (trapping) and dissociation (detrapping) at impurities and defects, hopping in lattice interstitial sites, and charge-state conversion. The role of bulk and process-induced traps is considered to explain observations from plasma, ion implantation, and PECVD-nitridation processes.

Sopori, B. L.; Zhang, Y.; Reedy, R.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Final Report - Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is focused on the experimental determination of the effects of key hydrogen side impurities on the performance of PEM fuel cells. Experimental data has been leveraged to create mathematical models that predict the performance of PEM fuel cells that are exposed to specific impurity streams. These models are validated through laboratory experimentation and utilized to develop novel technologies for mitigating the effects of contamination on fuel cell performance. Results are publicly disseminated through papers, conference presentations, and other means.

Trent Molter

2012-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

The Effect of Impurities on the Processing of Aluminum Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project, the effect of impurities on the processing of aluminum alloys was systematically investigated. The work was carried out as a collaborative effort between the Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Industrial support was provided by ALCOA and ThermoCalc, Inc. The achievements described below were made. A method that combines first-principles calculation and calculation of phase diagrams (CALPHAD) was used to develop the multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na. This method was extensively used in this project for the development of a thermodynamic database. The first-principles approach provided some thermodynamic property data that are not available in the open literature. These calculated results were used in the thermodynamic modeling as experimental data. Some of the thermodynamic property data are difficult, if not impossible, to measure. The method developed and used in this project allows the estimation of these data for thermodynamic database development. The multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na was developed. Elements such as Ca, Li, Na, and K are impurities that strongly affect the formability and corrosion behavior of aluminum alloys. However, these impurity elements are not included in the commercial aluminum alloy database. The process of thermodynamic modeling began from Al-Na, Ca-Li, Li-Na, K-Na, and Li-K sub-binary systems. Then ternary and higher systems were extrapolated because of the lack of experimental information. Databases for five binary alloy systems and two ternary systems were developed. Along with other existing binary and ternary databases, the full database of the multicomponent Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na system was completed in this project. The methodology in integrating with commercial or other aluminum alloy databases can be developed. The mechanism of sodium-induced high-temperature embrittlement (HTE) of Al-Mg is now understood. Using the thermodynamic database developed in this project, thermodynamic simulations were carried out to investigate the effect of sodium on the HTE of Al-Mg alloys. The simulation results indicated that the liquid miscibility gap resulting from the dissolved sodium in the molten material plays an important role in HTE. A liquid phase forms from the solid face-centered cubic (fcc) phase (most likely at grain boundaries) during cooling, resulting in the occurrence of HTE. Comparison of the thermodynamic simulation results with experimental measurements on the high-temperature ductility of an Al-5Mg-Na alloy shows that HTE occurs in the temperature range at which the liquid phase exists. Based on this fundamental understanding of the HTE mechanism during processing of aluminum alloy, an HTE sensitive zone and a hot-rolling safe zone of the Al-Mg-Na alloys are defined as functions of processing temperature and alloy composition. The tendency of HTE was evaluated based on thermodynamic simulations of the fraction of the intergranular sodium-rich liquid phase. Methods of avoiding HTE during rolling/extrusion of Al-Mg-based alloys were suggested. Energy and environmental benefits from the results of this project could occur through a number of avenues: (1) energy benefits accruing from reduced rejection rates of the aluminum sheet and bar, (2) reduced dross formation during the remelting of the aluminum rejects, and (3) reduced CO2 emission related to the energy savings. The sheet and extruded bar quantities produced in the United States during 2000 were 10,822 and 4,546 million pounds, respectively. It is assumed that 50% of the sheet and 10% of the bar will be affected by implementing the results of this project. With the current process, the rejection rate of sheet and bar is estimated at 5%. Assuming that at least half of the 5% rejection of sheet and bar will be eliminated by using the results of this project and that 4% of the aluminum will be lost through dross (Al2O3) during remelting of the rejects, the full-scale industrial implementation of the project results would lead to energy

Zi-Kui Liu; Shengjun Zhang; Qingyou Han; Vinod Sikka

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

344

Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect

To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO{sub 2} assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Murray, B.R.; Nissanka, S.P. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Development of an ash particle deposition model considering build-up and removal mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

Slagging and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in power boilers fired with fossil fuels and fuel mixtures has a significant influence on boiler efficiency and availability. Mathematical modelling has long been considered a suitable method to assist boiler operators to determine optimized operating conditions for an existing furnace. The ultimate goal in ash deposition prediction is hereby the determination of the total amount of material deposited and hence the determination of the total reduction in efficiency. Depending on the fuels fired the total deposited mass is a combination of ash particle deposition and ash particle erosion due to non-sticky particles. The novel ash particle deposition model presented in this work considers deposition of sticky ash particles, cleansing of deposit by non-sticky sand particles and sticking of sand due to contact with sticky ash. The steady-state modelling results for the total amount of ash deposited on the deposition probe of an entrained flow reactor presented in this work agree well with the experimental data. Only at very high fractions of sand added as non-sticky material, a significant influence of the sand on the overall mass deposited was found. Since the model considers sticking of non-sticking sand due to contact with sticky ash, the fraction of sand deposited on the probe was especially studied. Using a correction factor to consider the influence of operating time on the steady-state simulations led to good agreement between simulations and experimental data. 12 refs., 10 figs.

Kjell Strandstroem; Christian Muellera; Mikko Hupa [Abo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Abo (Finland)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Release of Mercury During Curing of Concrete Containing Fly Ash and Mercury Sorbent Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides laboratory data on mercury release during the initial curing stage of concrete made with fly ash or mixtures of fly ash and activated carbon containing mercury. These experiments suggest that mercury is not released from these concretes during initial curing.

2002-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

347

Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Herzegovina; UBAL University of Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina; FAZ University of Zagreb, Croatia; BTUC risks of farmed and barren alkaline coal ash landfills in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Environmental its research on the thermo-electric plant (TEP) and associated coal ash sites at Tuzla, Bosnia

348

Quantifying the availability and the stability of trace cationic elements in fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Products Associated with Coal Mining Interactive Forum: Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL in this paper to deter- mine these parameters for model elements Cu(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) in fly ash 50 mM EDTA extraction. Ã? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Coal fly ash has

Ragsdell, Kenneth M.

349

Use of High-Calcium Fly Ash in Cement-Based Construction Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in blended cements with minimum (less than 10%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly ash; concrete impact assessments. INTRODUCTION #12;3 Coal is the most widely used source of energy for power production, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which 100 million tons

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

350

Use of Ash from the Incineration of Urban Garbage into Clayey ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The waste is a type of fly-ash resulting from the incineration of a selected part of urban ... Analysis of Carbon Fiber Recovered from Optimized Processes of ... Clayey Ceramic Incorporated with Powder from the Sintering Plant of a ... Influence of Fly Ash and Fluorgypsum on Hydration Heat and Mortar Strength of Cement.

351

Resuspension of Relic Volcanic Ash and Dust from Katmai: Still an Aviation Hazard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northwest winds were strong enough to continuously resuspend relic volcanic ash from the Katmai volcano cluster and the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes on 20–21 September 2003. The ash cloud reached over 1600 m and extended over 230 km into the ...

David Hadley; Gary L. Hufford; James J. Simpson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Rapid response to the Chaiten eruption, Chile, May 2008: ash fallout and impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid response to the Chaiten eruption, Chile, May 2008: ash fallout and impact David Pyle AGU, 90 (24), 205-7, 16 June 2009. #12;Satellite imagery records widespread ash fallout across central eruption of rhyolite since Katmai (1912). #12;Thick fallout deposits near Chaiten volcano (January 2009

353

Fly Ash Design Manual for Road and Site Applications: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume design manual describes the use of fly ash as a construction material in high-volume applications like structural fills, highway embankments, grouting, roller-compacted concrete, and land reclamation. The engineering data and construction procedures presented should help coal ash managers and power plant managers incorporate such applications in by-product management plans.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Fly Ash Design Manual for Road and Site Applications: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume design manual describes the use of fly ash as a construction material in high-volume applications like structural fills, highway embankments, grouting, roller-compacted concrete, and land reclamation. The engineering data and construction procedures presented should help coal ash managers and power plant managers incorporate such applications in by-product management plans.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Separation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil shale ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordanian oil shale ash was used as an adsorbent for the removal of copper and zinc from aqueous solution.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Oil shale; Ash; Adsorption; Copper and zinc removal 1. IntroductionSeparation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251­257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

356

Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particles. In addition, the composites filled with 20% fly ash became softer. These samples showed lower, composites, tensile properties 1. INTRODUCTION Fly ash, a waste by-product generated abundantly in electric processibility of the filled materials5 . Furthermore, as a waste by-product, its usage decreases the overall

Nemat-Nasser, Sia

357

High-Volume Fly Ash Utilization Projects in the United States and Canada: Second Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash--an increasing disposal problem for utilities operating coal-fired power plants--has considerable unrealized potential as a construction material. In a wide-ranging survey, this study documented more than 250 U.S. and Canadian construction projects employing fly ash in high volume for backfill, landfill, hydraulic fill, embankments, pavement base courses, soil amendment, subgrade stabilization, and grout.

1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

358

Characterization of Slag, Fly Ash and Portland Cement for Saltstone  

SciTech Connect

Batch-to-batch variability in the chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, slag and portland cement (binders) will be an ongoing concern over the many years that salt waste from Tank 50 will be processed into grout at the Saltstone Processing Facility. This batch-to-batch variability in the properties of the binder materials translates to variability in the fresh and cured properties of Saltstone. Therefore, it is important to quantify the batch-to-batch variability of the binder materials and the resultant variation in grout properties. This report is the starting point for that process by providing the baseline (reference point) binder properties to which future batches of binder materials can be compared. For this characterization effort, properties of fly ash, slag and portland cement were obtained and documented in this report. These properties included particle size distribution by laser light scattering and dry sieving, particle size and morphology by scanning electron microscopy, true, aerated and tapped densities, chemical composition, rheological properties of the water based slurries made from individual binder material, and volatility through thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The properties presented in this report also provide a baseline data set to assist in problem solving efforts when or if unanticipated and/or unwanted processing events occur at the Saltstone Processing Facility.

Harbour, J

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Use of ash from municipal solid waste combustion. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the results of efforts to integrate municipal solid waste combustion ash into a high strength portland cement concrete matrix comprised of multiple waste materials. The material developed by this research was to be used to construct a large underground storage vault to house the Friendly Mobile Barrier, a safety barrier system for use at highway crossings for the high speed rail system. The subcontractor, Environmental Solutions, Inc., of Richmond, Virginia, worked with researchers at Pennsylvania State University and the State University of New York--Stony Brook to develop and test the material. The result of this work is a portland cement concrete matrix which utilizes 80.01% recycled materials, and a field-applicable method for incorporating MSW ash as a component at volumes up to 9.78%. Twenty-eight day strengths of over 4000 psi were achieved, with 315 day strengths of 6500 psi. All structural, chemical and environmental testing showed the material to be competitive with conventional concrete.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

In situ analysis of ash deposits from black liquor combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerosols formed during combustion of black liquor cause a significant fire-side fouling problem in pulp mill recovery boilers. The ash deposits reduce heat transfer effectiveness, plug gas passages, and contribute to corrosion. Both vapors and condensation aerosols lead to the formation of such deposits. The high ash content of the fuel and the low dew point of the condensate salts lead to a high aerosol and vapor concentration in most boilers. In situ measurements of the chemical composition of these deposits is an important step in gaining a fundamental understanding of the deposition process. Infrared emission spectroscopy is used to characterize the composition of thin film deposits resulting from the combustion of black liquor and the deposition of submicron aerosols and vapors. New reference spectra of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pure component films were recorded and compared with the spectra of the black liquor deposit. All of the black liquor emission bands were identified using a combination of literature data and ab initio calculations. Ab initio calculations also predict the locations and intensities of bands for the alkali vapors of interest. 39 refs., 9 figs.

Bernath, P. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sinquefield, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Oregon State Univ., Eugene, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L.; Sclippa, G.; Rohlfing, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Barfield, M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effect of cerium and impurities on fatigue and fracture properties of 8090 alloy sheets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the present study is to examine the effect of a rare earth addition, Ce, and some impurities, Fe, Si, Na and K, on the fatigue and fracture properties of 8090 Al-Li alloy sheet by means of the determinations for the fatigue life (N{sub f}) under a constant stress amplitude, fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates and plane stress fracture toughness. Impurity Fe and Si in 8090 alloy sheets increase the fatigue crack propagation rates and impair the fracture properties although they could not bring about significant effect on the fatigue life under the test conditions maximum cyclic stress of 280 MPa, load ratio of 0.1 and Fe + Si content of 0.24%. Impurity Na and K in 8090 alloy sheets reduce the fracture properties and fatigue life. When the level stress intensity factor is higher, or {Delta} K>10{sup 1.1} Mpam{sup 1/2} in the test, Na and K markedly increase the fatigue crack propagation rates. Ce addition in 8090 alloy sheets containing a certain amount of Fe and Si impurities could suppress the effects of Na and K impurities on the fracture behavior. Adding about 0.28% Ce in 8090 alloy containing trace Fe and Si impurities improves the crack propagation resistance and plane stress fracture toughness. However, adding Ce from 0.10% to 0.29% is unprofitable to the fatigue life of 8090 alloy containing more impurities. There are more and coarser Ce-containing compound particles in the alloy sheets with high Ce content. These particles could produce a detrimental effect on the fatigue properties.

Meng Liang; Zheng Xiulin [Northwestern Polytechnical Univ., Xi`an (China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Carburization of austenitic alloys by gaseous impurities in helium  

SciTech Connect

The carburization behavior of Alloy 800H, Inconel Alloy 617 and Hastelloy Alloy X in helium containing various amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/ was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted in a temperature range from 649 to 1000/sup 0/C (1200 to 1832/sup 0/F) for exposure time up to 10,000 h. Four different helium environments, identified as A, B, C, and D, were investigated. Concentrations of gaseous impurities were 1500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 450 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and 50 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment A; 200 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 100 ..mu..atm CO, 20 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/, 50 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O and 5 ..mu..atm CO/sub 2/ for Environment B; 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and < 0.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment C; and 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and 1.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment D. Environments A and B were characteristic of high-oxygen potential, while C and D were characteristic of low-oxygen potential. The results showed that the carburization kinetics in low-oxygen potential environments (C and D) were significantly higher, approximately an order of magnitude higher at high temperatures, than those in high-oxygen potential environments (A and B) for all three alloys. Thermodynamic analyses indicated no significant differences in the thermodynamic carburization potential between low- and high-oxygen potential environments. It is thus believed that the enhanced carburization kinetics observed in the low-oxygen potential environments were related to kinetic effects. A qualitatively mechanistic model was proposed to explain the enhanced kinetics. The present results further suggest that controlling the oxygen potential of the service environment can be an effective means of reducing carburization of alloys.

Lai, G.Y.; Johnson, W.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Argonne CNM HighlightL Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Calcium Map Calcium map of an activated fly ash geopolymer displays regions of high calcium concentration (circled). Their distribution suggests localization as a discrete calcium-rich phase within the lower-calcium aluminosilicate geopolymer gel. Use of the Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) has provided the first access to the nature of heterogeneity in real fly ash-derived geopolymers at the nanoscale. Direct evidence of the formation of discrete high-calcium nanometer-sized particles within a hydroxide-activated geopolymer synthesized from a low-calcium fly ash has been obtained using HXN fluorescence characterization. Additionally, the team of CNM users from the University of Melbourne, the Universidad del Valle of Colombia, and the

364

pH-dependent leaching of dump coal ash - retrospective environmental analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trace and major elements in coal ash particles from dump of 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant in Obrenovac near Belgrade (Serbia) can cause pollution, due to leaching by atmospheric and surface waters. In order to assess this leaching potential, dump ash samples were subjected to extraction with solutions of decreasing pH values (8.50, 7.00, 5.50, and 4.00), imitating the reactions of the alkaline ash particles with the possible alkaline, neutral, and acidic (e.g., acid rain) waters. The most recently deposited ash represents the greatest environmental threat, while 'aged' ash, because of permanent leaching on the dump, was shown to have already lost this pollution potential. On the basis of the determined leachability, it was possible to perform an estimation of the acidity of the regional rainfalls in the last decades.

Popovic, A.; Djordjevic, D. [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Mercury retention by fly ashes from coal combustion: Influence of the unburned carbon content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of unburned carbon particles present in fly ashes produced by coal combustion on mercury retention. To achieve this objective, the work was divided into two parts. The aim of the first part of the study was to estimate the amount of mercury captured by the fly ashes during combustion in power stations and the relationship of this retention to the unburned carbon content. The second part was a laboratory-scale study aimed at evaluating the retention of mercury concentrations greater than those produced in power stations by fly ashes of different characteristics and by unburned carbon particles. From the results obtained it can be inferred that the unburned carbon content is not the only variable that controls mercury capture in fly ashes. The textural characteristics of these unburned particles and of other components of fly ashes also influence retention.

Lopez-Anton, M.A.; Diaz-Somoano, M.; Martinez-Tarazona, M.R. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications EIS-0220: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0220: Final Environmental Impact Statement

367

Gypsum treated fly ash as a liner for waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash has potential application in the construction of base liners for waste containment facilities. While most of the fly ashes improve in the strength with curing, the ranges of permeabilities they attain may often not meet the basic requirement of a liner material. An attempt has been made in the present context to reduce the hydraulic conductivity by adding lime content up to 10% to two selected samples of class F fly ashes. The use of gypsum, which is known to accelerate the unconfined compressive strength by increasing the lime reactivity, has been investigated in further improving the hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic conductivities of the compacted specimens have been determined in the laboratory using the falling head method. It has been observed that the addition of gypsum reduces the hydraulic conductivity of the lime treated fly ashes. The reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the samples containing gypsum is significantly more for samples with high amounts of lime contents (as high as 1000 times) than those fly ashes with lower amounts of lime. However there is a relatively more increase in the strengths of the samples with the inclusion of gypsum to the fly ashes at lower lime contents. This is due to the fact that excess lime added to fly ash is not effectively converted into pozzolanic compounds. Even the presence of gypsum is observed not to activate these reactions with excess lime. On the other hand the higher amount of lime in the presence of sulphate is observed to produce more cementitious compounds which block the pores in the fly ash. The consequent reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of fly ash would be beneficial in reducing the leachability of trace elements present in the fly ash when used as a base liner.

Sivapullaiah, Puvvadi V., E-mail: siva@civil.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Baig, M. Arif Ali, E-mail: reach2arif@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

18 2010 Proceedings Symposium on Ash in North America GTR-NRS-P-72 GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF FRAXINUS SPP. FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

handles, and for fiber in the manufacture of fine papers. White ash is the primary commercial hardwood protocol for green ash. We are also investigating an adventitious shoot regeneration system using leaf18 2010 Proceedings Symposium on Ash in North America GTR-NRS-P-72 GENETIC TRANSFORMATION

370

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of fly ash as amendment to compost is presented. Plant growth/yields of corn collard greens, mustard greens, and sorgum is described. The treatment parameters such as fly ash to compost ratio, fly ash-amended compost to soil ratio, type of compost used for treatment etc. are discussed. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs. (CBS)

Menon, M.P.

1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Measurement and prediction of the resistivity of ash/sorbent mixtures produced by sulfur oxide control processes. Final report, Sep 86-Jun 88  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report describes the development of (1) a modified procedure for obtaining consistent and reproducible laboratory resistivity values for mixtures of coal fly ash and partially spent sorbent, and (2) an approach for predicting resistivity based on the chemical composition of the sample and the resistivities of the key compounds in the sample that are derived from the sorbent. Furnace and cold-side sorbent injection technologies for reducing the emission of sulfur oxides from electric generating plants firing medium- to high-sulfur coal are under development for retrofit applications. The particulate resulting from injecting this sorbent will be a mixture of coal fly ash and partially spent sorbent. The presence of this sorbent causes the resistivity of the mixture to be significantly higher than that of the fly ash alone. Since higher resistivity dusts are more difficult to collect in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), accurate knowledge of the resistivity of the mixture is needed to determine if the ESP will operate within an acceptable efficiency range.

Young, R.P.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Apparatus and method for direct measurement of coal ash sintering and fusion properties at elevated temperatures and pressures  

SciTech Connect

A high-pressure microdilatometer is provided for measuring the sintering and fusion properties of various coal ashes under the influence of elevated pressures and temperatures in various atmospheres. Electrical resistivity measurements across a sample of coal ash provide a measurement of the onset of the sintering and fusion of the ash particulates while the contraction of the sample during sintering is measured with a linear variable displacement transducer for detecting the initiation of sintering. These measurements of sintering in coal ash at different pressures provide a mechanism by which deleterious problems due to the sintering and fusion of ash in various combustion systems can be minimized or obviated.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Apparatus and method for direct measurement of coal ash sintering and fusion properties at elevated temperatures and pressures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-pressure microdilatometer is provided for measuring the sintering and fusion properties of various coal ashes under the influence of elevated pressures and temperatures in various atmospheres. Electrical resistivity measurements across a sample of coal ash provide a measurement of the onset of the sintering and fusion of the ash particulates while the contraction of the sample during sintering is measured with a linear variable displacement transducer for detecting the initiation of sintering. These measurements of sintering in coal ash at different pressures provide a mechanism by which deleterious problems due to the sintering and fusion of ash in various combustion systems can be minimized or obviated. 7 figs.

Khan, M.R.

1989-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

375

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas for further combustion in modified oil or gas fired furnaces or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion volume within the inner shell and a plenum between them through which combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, Albert H. (Huntington, NY)

1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

376

Reduction of carbon content in waste-tire combustion ashes by bio-thermal treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of bio-catalyst (NOE-7F) in thermal treatment can adequately dispose dark-black fly ashes from co-combustion of both waste tires and coal. After thermal treatment of fly ashes by adding 10% NOE-7F, the carbon contents reduced by 37.6% and the weight losses increased by 405%, compared with the fly ashes without mixing with NOE-7F. The combustion behaviors of wasted tires combustion fly ashes with NOE-7F were also investigated by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results verify that NOE-7F has positive effects on the combustion of residual carbon and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the energy release and reduce the toxicity during the process of thermal treatment. Furthermore, using NOE-7F to dispose high-carbon content fly ashes did improve the compressive strength of fly ashes and concrete mixtures. Therefore, NOE-7F is a promising additive which could decrease treatment cost of high-carbon content fly ashes and reduce the amount of survival toxic PAHs.

Chen, C.C.; Lee, W.J.; Shih, S.I.; Mou, J.L. [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (Taiwan). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Conductance of a helical edge liquid coupled to a magnetic impurity.  

SciTech Connect

Transport in an ideal two-dimensional quantum spin Hall device is dominated by the counterpropagating edge states of electrons with opposite spins, giving the universal value of the conductance, 2e{sup 2}/h. We study the effect on the conductance of a magnetic impurity, which can backscatter an electron from one edge state to the other. In the case of isotropic Kondo exchange we find that the correction to the electrical conductance caused by such an impurity vanishes in the dc limit, while the thermal conductance does acquire a finite correction due to the spin-flip backscattering.

Tanaka, Y.; Furusaki, A.; Matveev, K. A. (Materials Science Division); (RIKEN)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Development of New Industrial Ashalloy Material Using Fly Ash Cenospheres "Lead-Lite" Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One potential high-value utilization method for power plant fly ash is to mix it with an alloy to make a metal matrix composite. In the case of this project, the fly ash is mixed with lead to make a composite with low density and improved hardness. This new material can be used in the auto industry to make lighter battery components. This report describes the results of corrosion tests of several lead samples and lead-fly ash composite samples at room temperature for more than 1500 days. This long-term d...

1999-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

379

Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3 to a temperature in the range 700.degree.-900.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acid-soluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

McDowell, William J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seeley, Forest G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Devolatilization and ash comminution of two different sewage sludges under fluidized bed combustion conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different wet sewage sludges have been characterized under fluidized bed combustion conditions with reference to their devolatilization behavior and ash comminution with the aid of different and complementary experimental protocols. Analysis of the devolatilization process allowed to determine the size of fuel particle able to achieve effective lateral spreading of the volatile matter across the cross-section of medium-scale combustors. Primary fragmentation and primary ash particle characterization pointed out the formation of a significant amount of relatively large fragments. The mechanical properties of these fragments have been characterized by means of elutriation/abrasion tests using both quartz and sludge ash beds. (author)

Solimene, R.; Urciuolo, M.; Cammarota, A.; Chirone, R. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione (IRC) - CNR, Napoli (Italy); Salatino, P. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione (IRC) - CNR, Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Damonte, G.; Donati, C.; Puglisi, G. [ECODECO Gruppo A2A, Giussago (PV) (Italy)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Methods for recovering a polar solvent from a fluid stream contaminated with at least one polar impurity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing a polar solvent from a fluid volume contaminated with at least one polar impurity, such as a free fatty acid, is provided. The method comprises providing a fluid volume that includes at least one polar impurity dissolved in at least one solvent. The fluid volume is contacted with an expanding gas to remove the at least one solvent. The expanding gas may be dissolved into the at least one solvent in the fluid volume to form a gas-expanded solvent. The immiscibility of the polar impurities in the gas-expanded solvent enables separation of the polar impurities from the gas-expanded solvent. After separation of the polar impurities, at least one of the temperature and pressure may be reduced to separate the solvent from the expanding gas such that the clean solvent may be reused.

Ginosar, Daniel M.; Wendt, Daniel S.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

382

Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Revealing the Degree of Magnetic Frustration by Non-Magnetic Impurities  

SciTech Connect

Imaging the magnetic fields around a non-magnetic impurity can provide a clear benchmark for quantifying the degree of magnetic frustration. Focusing on the strongly frustrated J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} model and the spatially anisotropic J{sub 1a}-J{sub 1b}-J{sub 2} model, very distinct low energy behaviors reflect different levels of magnetic frustration. In the J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} model, bound magnons appear trapped near the impurity in the ground state and strongly reduce the ordered moments for sites proximal to the impurity. In contrast, local moments in the J{sub 1a}-J{sub 1b}-J{sub 2} model are enhanced on the impurity neighboring sites. These theoretical predictions can be probed by experiments such as nuclear magnetic resonance and scanning tunneling microscopy, and the results can elucidate the role of frustration in antiferromagnets and help narrow the possible models to understand magnetism in the iron pnictdies.

Not Available

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

EFFECT OF FUEL IMPURITY ON STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY OF Ni-YSZ ANODE OF SOFCs  

SciTech Connect

Electricity production through the integration of coal gasification with solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) may potentially be an efficient technique for clean energy generation. However, multiple minor and trace components are naturally present in coals. These impurities in coal gas not only degrade the electrochemical performance of Ni-YSZ anode used in SOFCs, but also severely endanger the structural integrity of the Ni-YSZ anode. In this paper, effect of the trace impurity of the coal syngases on the mechanical degradation of Ni-YSZ anode was studied by using an integrated experimental/modeling approach. Phosphorus is taken as an example of impurity. Anode-support button cell was used to experimentally explore the migration of phosphorous impurity in the Ni-YSZ anode of SOFCs. X-ray mapping was used to show elemental distributions and new phase formation. The subsequent finite element stress analyses were conducted using the actual microstructure of the anode to illustrate the degradation mechanism. It was found that volume expansion induced by the Ni phase change produces high stress level such that local failure of the Ni-YSZ anode is possible under the operating conditions

Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Impurity-defect interaction in polycrystalline silicon for photovoltaic applications. The role of hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the cell ? ii) Will the defects of the polycrystalline material hinder the photovoltaic properties..., leading also to a degradation of the efficiency of the photovoltaic cells ? iii) What would655 Impurity-defect interaction in polycrystalline silicon for photovoltaic applications. The role

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

386

IDENTIFYING IMPURITIES IN SURPLUS NON PIT PLUTONIUM FEEDS FOR MOX OR ALTERNATIVE DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a technical basis for estimating the level of corrosion products in materials stored in DOE-STD-3013 containers based on extrapolating available chemical sample results. The primary focus is to estimate the levels of nickel, iron, and chromium impurities in plutonium-bearing materials identified for disposition in the United States Mixed Oxide fuel process.

Allender, J; Moore, E

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

387

Experimental and gyrokinetic studies of impurity transport in the core of Alcator C-Mod Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a unique set of diagnostics and modeling tools, a comprehensive study of impurity transport was performed on Alcator C-Mod L-mode discharges. A new, multi-pulse laser blow-off system was designed and constructed to ...

Howard, Nathaniel Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Long-time impurity confinement as a precursor to disruptions in ohmically heated tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

It has been observed in several tokamaks that the confinement of test impurities increases dramatically when operating near density limits. The characteristics of the working gas transport coefficients also change character under these conditions. These changes appear to be caused by a suppression of the anomalous transport mechanisms. This series of vugraphs investigates the role of these changes in initiating disruptions.

Isler, R.C.; Rowan, W.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Apparatus having inductively coupled coaxial coils for measuring buildup of slay or ash in a furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The buildup of slag or ash on the interior surface of a furnace wall is monitored by disposing two coils to form a transformer which is secured adjacent to the inside surface of the furnace wall. The inductive coupling between the two coils of the transformer is affected by the presence of oxides of iron in the slag or ash which is adjacent to the transformer, and the application of a voltage to one winding produces a voltage at the other winding that is related to the thickness of the slag or ash buildup on the inside surface of the furnace wall. The output of the other winding is an electrical signal which can be used to control an alarm or the like or provide an indication of the thickness of the slag or ash buildup at a remote location.

Mathur, Mahendra P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ekmann, James M. (Bethel Park, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Diverse latest Pliocene volcanic and plutonic rocks in the north-central Caucasus Mountains of southern Russia are newly interpreted as components of a large caldera system that erupted a compositionally zoned rhyolite-dacite ash-flow sheet at 2.83 ± 0.02 Ma (sanidine and biotite 40Ar/39Ar). Despite its location within a cratonic collision zone, the Chegem system is structurally and petrologically similar to typical

391

Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hunt's Ash Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hunt's Ash Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Hiko, Nevada Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

392

Treated bottom ash medium and method of arsenic removal from drinking water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, October 1996--December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called {open_quotes}Loss On Ignition{close_quotes} (LOI). The concrete producer`s day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Diaz, A. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

STATE-OF-THE-ART: FLY ASH, SILICA FUME AND SLAG UTILIZATION IN USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Backfill. 1.0 Introduction At the present time, coal fired electric power plants in the USA produce, ease of handling, and moisture insensitivity, etc. [2,11]. 2.1.2 Backfills Fly ash is used

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

395

Smyrna's Ashes: Humanitarianism, Genocide, and the Birth of the Middle East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

burning of the city of Izmir, Smyrna’s Ashes is an importantof Smyrna came a new city, Izmir, and a new Turkish nation.Gardens (Kensington), 165 Izmir, 1 Index / 249 Jerusalem, 67

Tusan, Michelle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

M-2: Extracting Alumina from Coal Fly Ash with Ammonium Sulfate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The whole process of extracting alumina from coal fly ash ... Decrease of Heat Consumption at Nepheline Processing to Alumina and By- Products ... Flash -and CFB Calciners, History and Difficulties of Development of Two ...

397

Recovery of Metal Oxides From Fly Ash, Volumes 1-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By processing fly ash to obtain metal oxides and other commercial products, utilities can realize both sales revenues and reduced disposal costs. A commercial-scale processing plant could be ready for demonstration by 1992.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Application of advanced technologies to ash-related problems in boilers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prediction of ash behavior in boilers has, for many years, been based on relatively simple relationships involving the composition of inorganic material in fuels. In recent years, advanced analyses for both fuels and deposits have seen increasing use in the solid fuel combustion community. The combination of the standard and advanced analyses, together with a knowledge of boiler design and operating conditions, allow better interpretation of ash behavior in boilers than has previously been possible. This paper discusses several case histories where advanced technologies have been applied to interpret ash behavior in boilers where standard techniques were insufficient. Included in the discussion are: (1) the behavior of blends of fuels; (2) explanations for markedly different behavior between fuels with similar ASTM characteristics; and (3) effects of boiler operating conditions on ash deposit formation.

Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility); Richards, G.; Harb, J. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

Scheitlin, Frank M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The use of oil shale ash in the production of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale ash obtained from combustion of local oil shale deposits was used in this study as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from waste vegetable oil (WVO). Two alcohols with high and low boiling points

A. Al-Otoom; M. Allawzi; A. Ajlouni; F. Abu-Alrub; M. Kandah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Utilizing fly ash particles to produce low-cost metal matrix composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are a blend of fine ceramic particles mixed with metals such as aluminium or magnesium. Fly ash is considerably cheaper than ceramics; aluminium-fly ash composites cost less than 60% of conventional aluminium-SiC composites making them attractive to automakers striving for lower weight and cheaper materials for brake rotors or brake drums. Ultalite.com has consulted with US researchers to to find the optimum requirements of the fly ash needed to make MMCs. Particle size 20-40 microns, low calcium oxide content and spherical particles were identified. The desired particles once extracted are stirred into molten aluminum and the resulting composite is into ingots for shipment to a casting facility. Dynamometer testing has shown that aluminium-fly ash composite brake drums have better performance and wear than cast iron drums. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Withers, G. [Ultalite.com, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Lubricant-derived ash : in-engine sources and opportunities for reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are an effective means for meeting increasingly stringent emissions regulations that limit particulate matter. Over time, ash primarily derived from metallic additives in the engine oil ...

Watson, Simon A. G. (Simon Andrew Glean)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions about and increased the international consensus toward improving volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The use of sulfer modified bottom ash (SMBA) as an aggregate in asphaltic mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of the 20 million tons of bottom ash and boiler slag generated annually in the United States less than 40 percent is used. The eastern half of Texas is served by 18 coal burning electric power generating plants which produce approximately 3.8 million tons of bottom ash each year. This is also the section of the state in which the sources of quality aggregates are either few. dwindling or nonexistent. While a small fraction of the bottom ash is utilized, the rest is delegated to landfills or on-site disposal areas. Increasing attention is being given to development of new, high-volume uses for this safe and readily available by-product. One such use is as an aggregate in road construction. The use of bottom ash as an aggregate for both roadway surfaces and base courses has been limited due to its absorbency and friability. The former tends to increase asphalt binder demand while the latter adversely affects its ability to withstand the crushing effects of traffic loads. On the other hand, bottom ash is lighter in weight and generally much cheaper than conventional quality aggregates such as limestone, sand and gavel. This research was designed to up-firade the load-bearing characteristics of bottom ash and maximize its use 'in asphaltic concrete roadway mixtures through the use of sulfur. The process essentially coats the ash with liquid sulfur which upon cooling fills the voids on the surface of the particles while increasing their crush resistance. The results of this investigation indicate that asphaltic concrete mix designs in which bottom ash represents from 5 0 to I 00 percent of the aggregate fraction can be achieved.

Chimakurthy, Harshavardhan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Mitigation of SCR-Ammonia Related Aqueous Effects in a Fly Ash Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated fly ash resulting from secondary injection of ammonia to mitigate SO3 produced by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system altered the water quality of a fly ash pond at a coal-fired power generation station. This project attempted to improve water quality by encouraging the growth of algae in the pond to remove ammonia, while keeping other important parameters (pH, total suspended solids, Biological Oxygen Demand, and metals) within allowable limits.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Field Test of a Semi-Continuous Fly Ash Unburned Carbon Monitor: Cyclone Boiler Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unburned carbon (UBC) is the measure of the carbon level in the fly ash of a coal-fired boiler—with increased carbon indicating less-complete and less-efficient combustion. Boiler design is one important factor that affects UBC levels. Cyclone boilers burn coal at high combustion temperatures (ca. 1650°C) and exhibit relatively high, but quite variable, fly ash UBC levels. Recently, because of competitive fuel pricing and reduced SO2 and NOX emissions, cyclone boilers ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

407

Program on Technology Innovation: Formation of Large Particle Ash in Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to obtain a better understanding of the process that underlies the formation of large particle ash (LPA) in coal-fired boilers. As an approach, sample sets of coal, fireside ash deposits, and LPA were collected from selected boilers identified by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray microanalysis techniques. The coals were characterized to determine the abundance, size, and composition of t...

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Laconia, New Hampshire bottom ash paving project: Volume 3, Physical Performance Testing Report  

SciTech Connect

Bottom ash is the principal waste stream from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system, and grate sifting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (@) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Time consistency and risk averse dynamic decision models ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

asset and liability management, scheduling and energy planning. Indeed, ..... the recursive time consistent alternative developed for a CVaR-based portfo-.

411

AMORPHOUS THIN FILMS CONSISTING OF TERNARY MgZnCa ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 20, 2012 ... AMORPHOUS THIN FILMS CONSISTING OF TERNARY MgZnCa-ALLOYS by K. Schlüter, C. Zamponi, U. Schürmann, N. Hort, L. Kienle, K.U. ...

412

UK Energy Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists of five spreadsheets: "overall data tables" plus energy consumption data for each of the following...

413

Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills  

SciTech Connect

Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (<70%). High airflow rate was required to achieve >50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Evaluation of potential risks from ash disposal site leachate  

SciTech Connect

A risk-based approach is used to evaluate potential human health risks associated with a discharge from an ash disposal site into a small stream. The RIVRISK model was used to estimate downstream concentrations and corresponding risks. The modeling and risk analyses focus on boron, the constituent of greatest potential concern to public health at the site investigated, in Riddle Run, Pennsylvania. Prior to performing the risk assessment, the model is validated by comparing observed and predicted results. The comparison is good and an uncertainty analysis is provided to explain the comparison. The hazard quotient (HQ) for boron is predicted to be greater than 1 at presently regulated compliance points over a range of flow rates. The reference dose (RfD) currently recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) was used for the analyses. However, the toxicity of boron as expressed by the RfD is now under review by both the U.S. EPA and the World Health Organization. Alternative reference doses being examined would produce predicted boron hazard quotients of less than 1 at nearly all flow conditions.

Mills, W.B.; Loh, J.Y.; Bate, M.C.; Johnson, K.M. [Tetra Tech, Lafayette, CA (United States)] [Tetra Tech, Lafayette, CA (United States)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fibrous Fillers to Manufacture Ultra High Ash/Performance Paper  

SciTech Connect

The paper industry is one of the largest users of energy and emitters of CO2 in the US manufacturing industry. In addition to that, it is facing tremendous financial pressure due to lower cost imports. The fine paper industry has shrunk from 15 million tons per year production to 10 million tons per year in the last 5 years. This has resulted in mill closures and job loses. The AF&PA and the DOE formed a program called Agenda 2020 to help in funding to develop breakthrough technologies to provide help in meeting these challenges. The objectives of this project were to optimize and scale-up Fibrous Fillers technology, ready for commercial deployment and to develop ultra high ash/high performance paper using Fibrous Fillers. The goal was to reduce energy consumption, carbon footprint, and cost of manufacturing paper and related industries. GRI International (GRI) has been able to demonstrate the techno - economic feasibility and economic advantages of using its various products in both handsheets as well as in commercial paper mills. GRI has also been able to develop sophisticated models that demonstrate the effect of combinations of GRI's fillers at multiple filler levels. GRI has also been able to develop, optimize, and successfully scale-up new products for use in commercial paper mills.

Dr. VIjay K. Mathur

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

ON CONSISTENT FUSION OF MULTIMODAL BIOMETRICS Dept. of Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON CONSISTENT FUSION OF MULTIMODAL BIOMETRICS S. Y. Kung Dept. of Electrical Engineering Princeton feasible. Therefore, multi-modality adaptive fusion, combining audio and visual information, offers architecture. In addition, a consistent fusion strategy is in- troduced as a baseline fusion scheme, which

Mak, Man-Wai

418

An optimal coarse-grained arc consistency algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of constraint propagation is the main feature of any constraint solver. It is thus of prime importance to manage the propagation in an efficient and effective fashion. There are two classes of propagation algorithms for general constraints: fine-grained ... Keywords: Arc consistency, Constraint networks, Constraint programming systems, Non-binary constraints, Path consistency

Christian Bessière; Jean-Charles Régin; Roland H. C. Yap; Yuanlin Zhang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Answer sets for consistent query answering in inconsistent databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relational database is inconsistent if it does not satisfy a given set of integrity constraints. Nevertheless, it is likely that most of the data in it is consistent with the constraints. In this paper we apply logic programming based on answer ... Keywords: answer set programming, consistency, databases, integrity constraints

Marcelo Arenas; Leopoldo Bertossi; Jan Chomicki

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Consistency in multi-viewpoint design of enterprise information systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different stakeholders in the design of an enterprise information system have their own view on that design. To help produce a coherent design this paper presents a framework that aids in specifying relations and consistency rules between such views. ... Keywords: Conceptual modelling, Enterprise information systems, Multi-viewpoint design, View integration, Viewpoint consistency

Remco M. Dijkman; Dick A. C. Quartel; Marten J. van Sinderen

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Performance evaluation of corner detectors using consistency and accuracy measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the performance of several popular corner detectors using two newly defined criteria. The majority of authors of published corner detectors have not used theoretical criteria to measure the consistency and accuracy of their algorithms. ... Keywords: Accuracy, CSS, Consistency, Corner detection, Performance evaluation

Farzin Mokhtarian; Farahnaz Mohanna

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Programmer-centric conditions for itanium memory consistency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We formulate a programmer-centric description of the memory consistency model provided by the Itanium architecture. This allows reasoning about programs at a non-operational level in the natural way, not obscured by the implementation details of the ... Keywords: itanium multi-processor, programmer-centric memory consistency

Lisa Higham; LillAnne Jackson; Jalal Kawash

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fifth workshop on the role of impurities and defects in silicon device processing: Summary of panel discussions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Like previous workshops, the 5th Workshop was organized around a specific theme - Defect Engineering in Silicon Solar Cell Manufacture and Thin-Film Solar Cell Development that matched the current industry concerns. The workshop was very successful in achieving its objectives: (1) to provide a forum for discussing manufacturing and research issues that can help the silicon photovoltaic (PV) industry meet DOE cost objectives, and (2) to identify how laboratory results of using defect/impurity engineering to make high-efficiency cells on low-cost substrates can be implemented into manufacturing processes. The workshop consisted of five sessions: (1) material issues, (2) thin-film silicon solar cells, (3) gettering and passivation, (4) new processes, and (5) wrap-up discussion. The latest research and development (R&D) results were presented in two poster sessions involving 24 poster presentations. The workshop was attended by 78 participants representing the silicon PV industry, academia, and R&D facilities from the United States, Germany, Spain, Australia, and Italy.

Tan, T.; Sopori, B.; Estreicher, S.; Jastrzebski, L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Trophic structure and metal bioaccumulation differences in multiple fish species exposed to coal ash-associated metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008 a dike containing coal fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant near Kingston Tennessee USA failed and resulted in the largest coal ash spill in U.S. history. Coal ash, the by-product of coal combustion, is known to contain multiple contaminants of concern, including arsenic and selenium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioaccumulation of arsenic and selenium and to identify possible differences in trophic dynamics in feral fish at various sites in the vicinity of the Kingston coal ash spill. Elevated levels of arsenic and selenium were observed in various tissues of largemouth bass, white crappie, bluegill and redear sunfish from sites associated with the Kingston coal ash spill. Highest concentrations of selenium were found in redear sunfish with liver concentrations as high as 24.83 mg/kg dry weight and ovary concentrations up to 10.40 mg/kg dry weight at coal ash-associated sites. To help explain the elevated selenium levels observed in redear sunfish, investigations into the gut pH and trophic dynamics of redear sunfish and bluegill were conducted which demonstrated a large difference in the gut physiology between these two species. Redear sunfish stomach and intestinal pH was found to be 1.1 and 0.16 pH units higher than in bluegill, respectively. In addition, fish from coal ash-associated sites showed enrichment of 15N & 13C compared to no ash sites, indicating differences in food web dynamics between sites. These results imply the incorporation of coal ash-associated compounds into local food webs and/or a shift in diet at ash sites compared to the no ash reference sites. Based on these results, further investigation into a broader food web at ash-associated sites is warranted.

Otter, Ryan [Middle Tennessee State University; Bailey, Frank [Middle Tennessee State University; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Consistent Thermodynamics for Quasiparticle Boson System with Zero Chemical Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermodynamic consistency of quasiparticle boson system with effective mass $m^*$ and zero chemical potential is studied. We take the quasiparticle gluon plasma model as a toy model. The failure of previous treatments based on traditional partial derivative is addressed. We show that a consistent thermodynamic treatment can be applied to such boson system provided that a new degree of freedom $m^*$ is introduced in the partial derivative calculation. A pressure modification term different from the vacuum contribution is derived based on the new independent variable $m^*$. A complete and self-consistent thermodynamic treatment for quasiparticle system, which can be widely applied to effective mass models, has been constructed.

Shaoyu Yin; Ru-Keng Su

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

426

Remedial Investigation Report on Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 2 (Filled Coal Ash Pond/Upper McCoy Branch) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1. Main Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a report on the remedial investigation (RI) of Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 consists of Upper McCoy Branch (UMB), the Filled Coal Ash Pond (FCAP), and the area surrounding the Sluice Channel formerly associated with coal ash disposal in the FCAP. Chestnut Ridge OU 2 is located within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation in Anderson County, Tennessee, approximately 24 miles west of Knoxville. The pond is an 8.5-acre area on the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge, 0.5 mile south of the main Y-12 Plant and geographically separated from the Y-12 Plant by Chestnut Ridge. The elevation of the FCAP is {approximately} 950 ft above mean sea level (msl), and it is relatively flat and largely vegetated. Two small ponds are usually present at the northeast and northwest comers of the FCAP. The Sluice Channel Area extends {approximately}1000 ft from the northern margin of the FCAP to the crest of Chestnut Ridge, which has an elevation of {approximately}1100 ft above msl. The Sluice Channel Area is largely vegetated also. McCoy Branch runs from the top of Chestnut Ridge across the FCAP into Rogers Quarry and out of the quarry where it runs a short distance into Milton Hill Lake at McCoy Embayment, termed UMB. The portion south of Rogers Quarry, within Chestnut Ridge OU 4, is termed Lower McCoy Branch. The DOE Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant disposed of coal ash from its steam plant operations as a slurry that was discharged into an ash retention impoundment; this impoundment is the FCAP. The FCAP was built in 1955 to serve as a settling basin after coal ash slurried over Chestnut Ridge from the Y-12 Plant. The FCAP was constructed by building an earthen dam across the northern tributary of McCoy Branch. The dam was designed to hold 20 years of Y-12 steam plant ash. By July 1967, ash had filled up the impoundment storage behind the dam to within 4 ft of the top.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Risk ranking of bioaccessible metals from fly ash dissolved in simulated lung and gut fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant fly ash from two fuels, coal and a mixture of coal and shredded tires were evaluated for trace metal solubility in simulated human lung and gut fluids (SLF and SGF, respectively) to estimate bioaccessibility. The proportion of bioaccessible to total metal ranged from zero (V) to 80% (Zn) for coal-derived ash in SLF and from 2 (Th) to 100% (Cu) for tire-derived fly ash in SGF. The tire-derived ash contained much more Zn. However, Zn ranked only 5th of the various toxic metals in SGF compared with international regulations for ingestion. On the basis of total concentrations, the metals closest to exceeding limits based on international regulations for inhalation were Cr, Pb, and Al. On dissolution in SLF, the most limiting metals were Pb, Cu, and Zn. For metals exposed to SGF there was no relative change in the top metal, Al, before and after dissolution but the second-ranked metal shifted from Pb to Ni. In most cases only a proportion of the total metal concentrations in either fly ash was soluble, and hence bioaccessible, in either biofluid. When considering the regulatory limits for inhalation of particulates, none of the metal concentrations measured were as hazardous as the fly ash particulates themselves. However, on the basis of the international ingestion regulations for Al, the maximum mass of fly ash that could be ingested is only 1 mg per day (10 mg based on bioaccessibility). It is possible that such a small mass could be consumed by exposed individuals or groups. 39 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

John Twining; Peter McGlinn; Elaine Loi; Kath Smith; Reto Giere [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW (Australia)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - Contracting companies supporting EM's cleanup program at the Idaho site volunteered to be among the first to use a new DOE training reciprocity program designed to bring more consistency to health and safety training across the complex, reduce redundancy and realize savings and other efficiencies. The DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) program is meant to eliminate the need for Department employees and contractors to take redundant training when they move among multiple sites in the complex.

429

BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" A finite set of results reported in consistent units * To track progress of individual projects on a consistent basis * To enable comparing projects in a transparent manner Potential BILIWG Figures of Merit Key BILI Distributed Reforming Targets * Cost ($/kg of H2): H2A analysis - Distributed reforming station,1000 kg/day ave./daily dispensed, 5000/6250 psi (and 10,000/12,000 psi) dispensing, 500 units/yr. * nth unit vs. 500 units/yr ? * production unit only (with 300 psi outlet pressure) ? * Production unit efficiency: LHV H2 out/(LHV of feedstocks and all other energy in) GTG - WTG efficiency? - Feedstock conversion energy efficiency? * Production unit capital cost: Distributed reforming station,1000 kg/day ave./daily dispensed, 300 psi outlet pressure

430

The Pilgrim: A New Consistency Protocol for Distributed Shared Memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new consistency protocol for distributed shared memory (DSM) where different shared objects are replicated at each site. This protocol was developed for the cooperative platform called CAliF: Cooperative Application Framework. This system uses the DSM to allow programmers to share objects or variables without having to manage the exchange. We present an algorithm which uses the token technique. The token is data structure which contains the updates of shared data. These data are carried through the ring on the token, named Pilgrim. Pilgrim protocol provides both reliable consistency and guaranteed performance according to the type of application described. The protocol is discussed and proved, and we demonstrate its qualities. Key words: consistency protocol, cooperative work, distributed shared memory, virtual ring. 1 Introduction In this paper, we propose a new consistency protocol for distributed shared memory (DSM) where different shared objects are replicated at eac...

H. Guyennet; J-c. Lapayre; M. Tréhel

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

NPP Boreal Forest: Consistent Worldwide Site Estimates, 1977...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consistent Worldwide Site Estimates, 1977-1994 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Gower, S. T., O. Krankina, R. J. Olson, M. Apps, S. Linder, and C. Wang. 2001. NPP...

432

NPP Tropical Forest: Consistent Worldwide Site Estimates, 1967...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consistent Worldwide Site Estimates, 1967-1999 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Clark, D. A., S. Brown, D. W. Kicklighter, J. Q. Chambers, J. R. Thomlinson, J. Ni, and...

433

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - Contracting companies supporting EM's cleanup program at the Idaho site volunteered to be among the first to use a new DOE training reciprocity program designed to bring more consistency to health and safety training across the complex, reduce redundancy and realize savings and other efficiencies. The DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) program is meant to eliminate the need for Department employees and contractors to take redundant training when they move among multiple sites in the complex.

434

Thermodynamic consistency of liquid-gas lattice Boltzmann simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lattice Boltzmann simulations have been very successful in simulating liquid-gas and other multi-phase fluid systems. However, the underlying second order analysis of the equation of motion has long been known to be insufficient to consistently derive the fourth order terms that are necessary to represent an extended interface. These same terms are also responsible for thermodynamic consistency, i.e. to obtain a true equilibrium solution with both a constant chemical potential and a constant pressure. In this article we present an equilibrium analysis of non-ideal lattice Boltzmann methods of sufficient order to identify those higher order terms that lead to a lack of thermodynamic consistency. We then introduce a thermodynamically consistent forcing method.

A. J. Wagner

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

435

Poor man's social network: consistently trade freshness for scalability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typical social networking functionalities such as feed following are known to be hard to scale. Different from the popular approach that sacrifices consistency for scalability, in this paper we describe, implement, and evaluate a method that can simultaneously ...

Zhiwu Xie; Jinyang Liu; Herbert Van De Sompel; Johann Van Reenen; Ramiro Jordan

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Consistent and efficient reconstruction of latent tree models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of learning a latent tree graphical model where samples are available only from a subset of variables. We propose two consistent and computationally efficient algorithms for learning minimal latent ...

Choi, Myung Jin

437

A SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF IMPURITY BEHAVIOR IN NEUTRAL-BEAM AND OHMICALLY HEATED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF IMPURITY BEHAVIOR SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF IMPURITY BEHAVIOR IN NEUTRAL-BEAM AND OHMICALLY HEATED TFTR DISCHARGES PPPL--2410 DE87 008073 B.C. Stratton, A.T. Ramsey, F.P. Boody, C.E. Busht, R.J. Fonck, R.J. Groebner", R.A. Hulse, R.K. Richardst, and J. Schivell Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton, New Jersey 08544 t permanent address: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN * permanent address: GA Technologies Inc., San Diego, CA c DISCLAIMER B This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or

438

Effects of trap anisotropy on impurity scattering regime in a Fermi gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the low-lying oscillation modes and the ballistic expansion properties of a harmonically trapped gas of fermionic K40 atoms containing thermal Rb87 impurities as functions of the anisotropy of the trap. Numerical results are obtained by solving the Vlasov-Landau equations for the one-body phase-space distribution functions and are used to test simple scaling Ansatzes. Starting from the gas in a weak impurity-scattering regime inside a spherical trap, the time scales associated to motions in the axial and azimuthal directions enter into competition as the trap is deformed to an elongated cigar-like shape. This competition gives rise to coexistence of collisionless and hydrodynamic behaviors in the low-lying surface modes of the gas as well as to a dependence of the aspect ratio of the expanding cloud on the collision time.

P. Capuzzi; P. Vignolo; M. P. Tosi

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

439

Effect of operating parameters and anode gas impurities upon polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PEM fuel cells are actively under development for transportation and other applications. Integration of a PEM fuel cell stack with a methanol reformer requires an understanding of single cell performance under a range of operating conditions using anode gas contaminated with impurities. The effect of temperature, pressure, and anode gas impurities on single cell PEM performance was investigated with platinum black electrodes. Single cell performance remained unchanged as temperature was varied between 80 and 100 at 3 atm pressure. High water partial pressures at 120C produced a mass transfer limiting current. While operation at 120C did not reverse CO{sub 2} poisoning, anode air addition proved effective. Air injection also decreased CO poisoning at injected concentrations up to 200 ppm CO. Higher single cell tolerance was observed for CH{sub 3}OH than CO. Up to 1 mole % CH{sub 3}OH in the gas phase reduced the current density by less than 10%.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Initial measurement of impurity production and hydrogen energy distribution from neutral beam injectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Impurity production and hydrogen energy distributions for neutral beam injectors (NBI) developed by the plasma Technology Section of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Fusion Energy Division have been measured by exposing silicon samples to beam pulses and analyzing them by nuclear microanalysis and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) techniques. The NBI's have been developed for use on the princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX). Extraction voltages O up to 50 kV are used, and maximum power injected for a 0.5-s pulse is approx. 1.2 MW with a design goal of 1.5 MW. The Medium Energy Test Facility (MRTF) was used for exposure of the single-crystal (100) silicon samples.

Langley, R.A.; Magee, C.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ash impurities consisting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Measurement of beam energy spectrum and impurity content in high-power neutral beam injectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy spectrum and impurity content of a high-power neutral beam are measured by implanting the beam into high-purity silicon crystals. The depth distribution of the beam particles is then measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS); the penetration depth is a function of the incident particle energy. This is one of the few measurement techniques that can determine neutral beam energy components directly. From the results, percentages of atomic and molecular ions in the source plasma can be inferred. Use of deuterium as the source gas provides insight into the role of residual hydrogen in the ion source and accelerating grids and in the SIMS analysis. The principal impurities are carbon and oxygen. Preliminary data indicate that carbon can originate from both methane and carbon monoxide, while oxygen can come from molecular oxygen, carbon monoxide, and water. Results are given and future plans are discussed.

Langley, R.A.; Ryan, P.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Menon, M.M.; Botnick, E.M.; Magee, C.W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Interaction of impurity ions with a weakly non-Maxwellian simple hydrogenic plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The average acceleration of an ensemble of ''test particles'' in a plasma is called the ''dynamical friction''; the average rate at which their velocity vectors spread out in velocity space is expressed in a velocity-space diffusion-rate tensor. These quantities are derived for impurity ions interacting with a weakly non-Maxwellian simple hydrogenic plasma. The distribution functions for the plasma ions and electrons are written explicitly. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Terry, W.K.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides  

SciTech Connect

Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides. AmF.sub.4 is not further oxidized to AmF.sub.6 by the application of O.sub.2 F at room temperature, while plutonium compounds present in the americium sample are fluorinated to volatile PuF.sub.6, which can readily be separated therefrom, leaving the purified americium oxides and/or fluorides as the solid tetrafluoride.

FitzPatrick, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Dunn, Jerry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Improved Cobalt Removal: Field Testing Phase: Effects of Normally Encountered Plant Impurities on Removal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the effects of plant impurities on cobalt removal from liquid radioactive waste. Improved process knowledge is critical to utilities that are continually working to increase the performance of their low-level waste (LLW) treatment systems. This report provides predictive chemistry information for improved cobalt removal obtained from test work at Catawba Nuclear Station. It also provides test methodologies for performing similar evaluations at other member plants.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

445

Fly ash properties and mercury sorbent affect mercury release from curing concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of mercury from concrete containing fly ashes from various generator boilers and powdered activated carbon sorbent used to capture mercury was measured in laboratory experiments. Release of gaseous mercury from these concretes was less than 0.31% of the total quantity of mercury present. The observed gaseous emissions of mercury during the curing process demonstrated a dependency on the organic carbon content of the fly ash, with mercury release decreasing with increasing carbon content. Further, lower gaseous emissions of mercury were observed for concretes incorporating ash containing activated carbon sorbent than would be expected based on the observed association with organic carbon, suggesting that the powdered activated carbon more tightly binds the mercury as compared to unburned carbon in the ash. Following the initial 28-day curing interval, mercury release diminished with time. In separate leaching experiments, average mercury concentrations leached from fly ash concretes were less than 4.1 ng/L after 18 h and 7 days, demonstrating that less than 0.02% of the mercury was released during leaching. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; William E. Wolfe [State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash, a relatively abundant and inexpensive material, is currently being investigated as an adsorbent for the removal of various organic pollutants from wastewater. The wastewater contains various types of phenolic compounds, such as chloro, nitro, amino, and other substituted compounds. Various types of pesticides, such as lindane, malathion, carbofuran, etc., and dyes, such as, methylene blue, crystal violet, malachite green, etc., are also present in the wastewater. These contaminants pollute the water stream. These organic pollutants, such as phenolic compounds, pesticides, and dyes, etc., can be removed very effectively using fly ash as adsorbent. This article presents a detailed review on the role of fly ash in the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater. Adsorption of various pollutants using fly ash has been reviewed. The adsorption mechanism and other influencing factors, favorable conditions, and competitive ions, etc., on the adsorption process have also been discussed in this paper. It is evident from the review that fly ash has demonstrated good removal capabilities for various organic compounds. 171 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

M. Ahmaruzzaman [National Institute of Technology, Silchar (India). Department of Chemistry

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Tensile strength of ash cake beds at high-temperature conditions  

SciTech Connect

The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is working with Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and a consortium of companies in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform the research necessary to determine the factors that cause hot-gas cleanup filters to be blinded by ash or to develop deposits that can bridge the filters and cause them to fail. The primary deliverable will be a graphics-driven computer model that can be used as an engineering tool to help predict ash-related hot-gas filter problems based on analyses of coal and sorbent, as well as system operating parameters. This paper presents preliminary testing data on determining the tensile strengths of coal ash particles at elevated temperatures and simulated combustor gas conditions. The range in temperatures for tensile testing is ambient to 900 C. The simulated gas atmosphere includes carbon dioxide, water vapor, oxygen, sulfur dioxide, sodium chloride, hydrochloric acid, and nitrogen. At present, all testing has been performed using ash from the Westinghouse advanced particle filter (APF) at the American Electric Power Service Corporation (AEP) Tidd pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) demonstration plant in Ohio. Other sources of filter ashes, including several from non-American PFBC systems, will also be evaluated.

Dockter, B.A.; Hurley, J.P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Use of Brazilian sugarcane bagasse ash in concrete as sand replacement  

SciTech Connect

Sugarcane today plays a major role in the worldwide economy, and Brazil is the leading producer of sugar and alcohol, which are important international commodities. The production process generates bagasse as a waste, which is used as fuel to stoke boilers that produce steam for electricity cogeneration. The final product of this burning is residual sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA), which is normally used as fertilizer in sugarcane plantations. Ash stands out among agroindustrial wastes because it results from energy generating processes. Many types of ash do not have hydraulic or pozzolanic reactivity, but can be used in civil construction as inert materials. The present study used ash collected from four sugar mills in the region of Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil, which is one of the world's largest producers of sugarcane. The ash samples were subjected to chemical characterization, sieve analysis, determination of specific gravity, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and solubilization and leaching tests. Mortars and concretes with SBA as sand replacement were produced and tests were carried out: compressive strength, tensile strength and elastic modulus. The results indicated that the SBA samples presented physical properties similar to those of natural sand. Several heavy metals were found in the SBA samples, indicating the need to restrict its use as a fertilizer. The mortars produced with SBA in place of sand showed better mechanical results than the reference samples. SBA can be used as a partial substitute of sand in concretes made with cement slag-modified Portland cement.

Sales, Almir, E-mail: almir@ufscar.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Lima, Sofia Araujo, E-mail: sofiaalima@yahoo.com.b [Department of Civil Engineering, UFSCar, Via Washington Luis, km 235, Monjolinho, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Secondary ions mass spectroscopy measurements of dopant impurities in highly stressed InGaN laser diodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed a systematic secondary ions mass spectroscopy (SIMS) study of dopant impurities in life-time stressed InGaN laser devices in order to investigate the main degradation mechanism that is observed in nitride laser diodes. A continuous wave (cw) current density of 3 kA/cm{sup 2} was applied to InGaN laser diodes over an extended period of time and we observed the characteristic square root degradation of optical power. We compared the SIMS profiles of Mg, H, and Si impurities in the aged devices and observe that the impurities are remarkably stable over 10 000 h of cw operation. Nor is there any SIMS evidence of p-contact metals penetrating into the semiconductor material. Thus our SIMS results are contrary to what one would expect for impurity diffusion causing the observed square root degradation characteristic.

Marona, L.; Suski, T. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Perlin, P.; Czernecki, R.; Leszczynski, M.; Bockowski, M. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); TopGaN Ltd., Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Jakiela, R. [Institute of Physics, al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Najda, S. P. [TopGaN Ltd., Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland)

2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

450

Parallel transport studies of high-Z impurities in the core of Alcator C-Mod plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of poloidal variation, [˜ over n][subscript z]/?n[subscript z]? , in high-Z impurity density have been made using photodiode arrays sensitive to vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray emission in Alcator C-Mod ...

Reinke, Matthew Logan

451

The role of oxygen-related defects and hydrogen impurities in HfO2 and ZrO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the properties of oxygen-related defects and hydrogen impurities in monoclinic HfO"2 and ZrO"2 using first-principles calculations based on a hybrid functional. We examine how the formation energy of these defects depend on the Fermi level ... Keywords: Defects in semiconductors, First-principles calculations, HfO2, High-k dielectrics, Hydrogen impurities, Oxygen interstitial, Oxygen vacancy, Sources of fixed charge, ZrO2

J. L. Lyons; A. Janotti; C. G. Van de Walle

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set Final Report NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005 May 3, 2001 Richard J. Olson and Jonathan M. O. Scurlock Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6407 This project, "Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set", is a coordinated, international effort to compile global estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) for parameterization, calibration, and validation of NPP models. The project (NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005) was funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Office of Earth Science, Terrestrial Ecology Program under Interagency Agreement number 2013-M164-A1, under

453

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Self-consistent quasiparticle model for quark-gluon plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we present a self-consistent quasi-particle model for quark-gluon plasma and apply it to explain the non-ideal behaviour seen in lattice simulations. The basic idea, borrowed from electrodynamic plasma, is that the gluons acquire mass as it propagates through plasma due to collective effects and is approximately equal to the plasma frequency. The statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of such a system is studied by treating it as an ideal gas of massive gluons. Since mass or plasma frequency depends on density, which itself is a thermodynamic quantity, the whole problem need to be solved self-consistently.

Vishnu M. Bannur

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Leaching and toxicity behavior of coal-biomass waste cocombustion ashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land disposal of ash residues, obtained from the cocombustion of Greek lignite with biomass wastes, is known to create problems due to the harmful constituents present. In this regard, the leachability of trace elements from lignite, biomass, and blends cocombustion ashes was investigated by using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). In this work, the toxicity of the aqueous leachates and the concentrations of the metals obtained from the leaching procedure were measured using the Microtox test (Vibrio fischen) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), respectively. The toxic effects of most leachates on Vibrio fischeri were found to be significantly low in both 45% and 82% screening test protocols. However, the liquid sample originating from olive kernels fly ash (FA4) caused the highest toxic effect in both protocols, which can be attributed to its relatively high concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn.

Skodras, G.; Prokopidou, M.; Sakellaropoulos, G.P. [Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Consistency of functional learning methods based on derivatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In some real world applications, such as spectrometry, functional models achieve better predictive performances if they work on the derivatives of order m of their inputs rather than on the original functions. As a consequence, the use of derivatives ... Keywords: Consistency, Derivatives, Functional Data Analysis, RKHS, SVM, Smoothing splines, Statistical learning

Fabrice Rossi; Nathalie Villa-Vialaneix

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Consistency among speech parameter vectors: Application to predicting speech intelligibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous researchers interested in physical assessment of speech intelligibility have largely based their predictions on preservation of spectral shape. A new approach is presented in which intelligibility is predicted to be preserved only if a transformation modifies relevant speech parameters in a consistent manner. In particular

Matthew H. Power; Louis D. Braida

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Final Report Fermionic Symmetries and Self consistent Shell Model  

SciTech Connect

In this final report in the field of theoretical nuclear physics we note important accomplishments.We were confronted with "anomoulous" magnetic moments by the experimetalists and were able to expain them. We found unexpected partial dynamical symmetries--completely unknown before, and were able to a large extent to expain them.The importance of a self consistent shell model was emphasized.

Larry Zamick

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

Molecular nanoplasmonics: self-consistent electrodynamics in current carrying junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a biased molecular junction subjected to external time-dependent electromagnetic field. We discuss local field formation due to both surface plasmon-polariton excitations in the contacts and the molecular response. Employing realistic parameters we demonstrate that such self-consistent treatment is crucial for proper description of the junction transport characteristics.

White, Alexander J; Galperin, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A nuclear Frechet space consisting of C -functions and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A nuclear Fr´echet space consisting of C -functions and failing the bounded approximation property Dietmar Vogt Abstract An easy and transparent example is given of a nuclear Fre´echet space failing of Grothendieck whether every nuclear Fr´echet space has the bounded approximation property was open for quite

Vogt, Dietmar