National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for artificial graphite suitable

  1. Efficient graphite ring heater suitable for diamond-anvil cells to 1300 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du Zhixue; Amulele, George; Lee, Kanani K. M.; Miyagi, Lowell

    2013-02-15

    In order to generate homogeneous high temperatures at high pressures, a ring-shaped graphite heater has been developed to resistively heat diamond-anvil cell (DAC) samples up to 1300 K. By putting the heater in direct contact with the diamond anvils, this graphite heater design features the following advantages: (1) efficient heating: sample can be heated to 1300 K while the DAC body temperature remains less than 800 K, eliminating the requirement of a special alloy for the DAC; (2) compact design: the sample can be analyzed with in situ measurements, e.g., x-ray, optical, and electrical probes are possible. In particular, the side access of the heater allows for radial x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in addition to traditional axial XRD.

  2. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhmurikov, Evgenij

    2015-01-01

    This review is devoted to the application of the graphite and graphite composites in the science and technology. The structure and an electrical properties, the technological aspects of producing the high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry, so author concentrates on the actual problems of the application and testing of the graphite materials in the modern science and technology. Translated from chapters 1 of the the monograph (by Zhmurikov E.I., Bubnenkov I.A., Pokrovsky A.S. et al. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique// eprint arXiv:1307.1869, 07/2013 (BC 2013arXiv1307.1869Z).

  3. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgenij Zhmurikov

    2015-08-12

    This review is devoted to the application of the graphite and graphite composites in the science and technology. The structure and an electrical properties, the technological aspects of producing the high-strength artificial graphite and dynamics of its destruction are considered. These type of graphite are traditionally used in the nuclear industry, so author concentrates on the actual problems of the application and testing of the graphite materials in the modern science and technology. Translated from chapters 1 of the the monograph (by Zhmurikov E.I., Bubnenkov I.A., Pokrovsky A.S. et al. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique// eprint arXiv:1307.1869, 07/2013 (BC 2013arXiv1307.1869Z).

  4. Preparation of graphitic articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan; Nemer, Martin; Weigle, John C.

    2010-05-11

    Graphitic structures have been prepared by exposing templates (metal, metal-coated ceramic, graphite, for example) to a gaseous mixture that includes hydrocarbons and oxygen. When the template is metal, subsequent acid treatment removes the metal to yield monoliths, hollow graphitic structures, and other products. The shapes of the coated and hollow graphitic structures mimic the shapes of the templates.

  5. Chapter 20: Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

  6. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept.

  7. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical ďnuclearĒ grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  8. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740įC at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  9. Graphite Gamma Scan Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark W. Drigert

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the measurement and data analysis of the radio isotopic content for a series of graphite specimens irradiated in the first Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment, AGC-1. This is the first of a series of six capsules planned as part of the AGC experiment to fully characterize the neutron irradiation effects and radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphites. The AGC-1 capsule was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL at approximately 700 degrees C and to a peak dose of 7 dpa (displacements per atom). Details of the irradiation conditions and other characterization measurements performed on specimens in the AGC-1 capsule can be found in ďAGC-1 Specimen Post Irradiation Data ReportĒ ORNL/TM 2013/242. Two specimens from six different graphite types are analyzed here. Each specimen is 12.7 mm in diameter by 25.4 mm long. The isotope with the highest activity was 60Co. Graphite type NBG-18 had the highest content of 60Co with an activity of 142.89 ĶCi at a measurement distance of 47 cm.

  10. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  11. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  12. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  13. Diamond-graphite field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

  14. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagally, Max (Madison, WI); Liu, Feng (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  15. Characterisation of graphite using boron as a marker element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamble, Granthali S.; Pandey, Shailaja; Thakur, Neha; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Venkatesh, K.; Kumar, Sangita D.; Kameswaran, R.; Reddy, A. V. R.

    2013-06-12

    Graphite has many industrial applications. Two of the most important applications are as electrodes in industries and as moderator in nuclear industry. Determination of the Boron Equivalent of the impurity elements in graphite is the most important parameter for certifying the grade of graphite electrode [1]. The use of a suitable method with low limits of determination of boron is therefore necessary. A method has been standardised in Analytical Chemistry Division, BARC for determining trace amounts of boron in graphite electrodes. It involves controlled dissolution of graphite sample powder and measurement of boron by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) using matrix matched standards. The method detection limit is 1 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The method Relative Standard Deviation was 5%. The method was verified by spike recovery experiments. Recoveries were found to be within 100{+-}2% in the concentration range of 1 to 100 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The developed method has been adopted for the compositional characterization of several graphite electrode samples.

  16. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  17. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyers, Kurt Edward (Avella, PA); Kolsun, George J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  18. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1997-11-11

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece are disclosed. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal. 5 figs.

  19. Baseline Graphite Characterization: First Billet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark C. Carroll; Joe Lords; David Rohrbaugh

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Graphite Research and Development program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a very high temperature reactor design. To meet this goal, the program is generating the extensive amount of quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the available nuclear graphite grades. In order determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for the latest proposed designs, two main programs are underway. The first, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) program, is a set of experiments that are designed to evaluate the irradiated properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences, and compressive loads. Despite the aggressive experimental matrix that comprises the set of AGC test runs, a limited amount of data can be generated based upon the availability of space within the Advanced Test Reactor and the geometric constraints placed on the AGC specimens that will be inserted. In order to supplement the AGC data set, the Baseline Graphite Characterization program will endeavor to provide supplemental data that will characterize the inherent property variability in nuclear-grade graphite without the testing constraints of the AGC program. This variability in properties is a natural artifact of graphite due to the geologic raw materials that are utilized in its production. This variability will be quantified not only within a single billet of as-produced graphite, but also from billets within a single lot, billets from different lots of the same grade, and across different billets of the numerous grades of nuclear graphite that are presently available. The thorough understanding of this variability will provide added detail to the irradiated property data, and provide a more thorough understanding of the behavior of graphite that will be used in reactor design and licensing. This report covers the development of the Baseline Graphite Characterization program from a testing and data collection standpoint through the completion of characterization on the first billet of nuclear-grade graphite. This data set is the starting point for all future evaluations and comparisons of material properties.

  20. Artificial Intelligence†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appleton, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is a general overview of the field of artificial Intelligence and of some of the application issues within that field. Its first objective is to try and establish a viable definition for what artificial intelligence is, and to make a...

  1. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

  2. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoenig, Clarence L. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2200.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  3. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1994-08-09

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2,200 C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made. 1 fig.

  4. Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II.† Construction began in 1947 and the reactor started...

  5. Graphite Reactor | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphite Reactor 'In the early, desperate days of World War II, the United States launched the top-secret, top-priority Manhattan Project...' In the early, desperate days of U.S....

  6. GRAFEC: A New Spanish Program to Investigate Waste Management Options for Radioactive Graphite - 12399

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marquez, Eva; Pina, Gabriel; Rodriguez, Marina; Fachinger, Johannes; Grosse, Karl-Heinz; Leganes Nieto, Jose Luis; Quiros Gracian, Maria

    2012-07-01

    Spain has to manage about 3700 tons of irradiated graphite from the reactor Vandellos I as radioactive waste. 2700 tons are the stack of the reactor and are still in the reactor core waiting for retrieval. The rest of the quantities, 1000 tons, are the graphite sleeves which have been already retrieved from the reactor. During operation the graphite sleeves were stored in a silo and during the dismantling stage a retrieval process was carried out separating the wires from the graphite, which were crushed and introduced into 220 cubic containers of 6 m{sup 3} each and placed in interim storage. The graphite is an intermediate level radioactive waste but it contains long lived radionuclides like {sup 14}C which disqualifies disposal at the low level waste repository of El Cabril. Therefore, a new project has been started in order to investigate two new options for the management of this waste type. The first one is based on a selective decontamination of {sup 14}C by thermal methods. This method is based on results obtained at the Research Centre Juelich (FZJ) in the Frame of the EC programs 'Raphael' and 'Carbowaste'. The process developed at FZJ is based on a preferential oxidation of {sup 14}C in comparison to the bulk {sup 12}C. Explanations for this effect are the inhomogeneous distribution and a weaker bounding of {sup 14}C which is not incorporated in the graphite lattice. However these investigations have only been performed with graphite from the high temperature reactor Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor Juelich AVR which has been operated in a non-oxidising condition or research reactor graphite operated at room temperature. The reactor Vandellos I has been operated with CO{sub 2} as coolant and significant amounts of graphite have been already oxidised. The aim of the project is to validate whether a {sup 14}C decontamination can also been achieved with graphite from Vandellos I. A second possibility under investigation is the encapsulation of the graphite in a long term stable glass matrix. The principal applicability has been already proved by FNAG. Crushed graphite mixed with a suitable glass powder has been pressed at elevated temperature under vacuum. The vacuum is required to avoid gas enclosures in the obtained product. The obtained products, named IGM for 'Impermeable Graphite Matrix', have densities above 99% of theoretical density. The amount of glass has been chosen with respect to the pore volume of the former graphite parts. The method allows the production of encapsulated graphite without increasing the disposal volume. This paper will give a short overview of characterisation results of different irradiated graphite materials obtained at CIEMAT and in the Carbowaste project as well as the proposed methods and the actual status of the program including first results about leaching of non-radioactive IGM samples and hopefully first tendencies concerning the C-14 separation from graphite of Vandellos I by thermal treatment. Both processes, the thermal treatment as well as the IGM, have the potential to solve problems related to the management of irradiated graphite in Spain. However the methods have only been tested with different types of i-graphite and virgin graphite, respectively. Only investigations with real i-graphite from Spain will reveal whether the described methods are applicable to graphite from Vandellos I. However all partners are convinced that one of these new methods or a combination of them will lead to a feasible option to manage i-graphite in Spain on an industrial scale. (authors)

  7. Micro Joining of Aluminum Graphite Composites†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velamati, Manasa

    2012-07-16

    Advanced aluminum graphite composites have unique thermal properties due to opposing coefficients of thermal expansion of aluminum and graphite. The thermal and mechanical properties of such composites are anisotropic due ...

  8. Systems and methods for forming defects on graphitic materials and curing radiation-damaged graphitic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Sunmin; Brus, Louis E.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Liu, Haitao

    2012-09-25

    Systems and methods are disclosed herein for forming defects on graphitic materials. The methods for forming defects include applying a radiation reactive material on a graphitic material, irradiating the applied radiation reactive material to produce a reactive species, and permitting the reactive species to react with the graphitic material to form defects. Additionally, disclosed are methods for removing defects on graphitic materials.

  9. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Albert J. (Ten Mile, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a brazing material for joining graphite structures that can be used at temperatures up to about 2800.degree. C. The brazing material formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600.degree. C. with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800.degree. C. so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. This brazing temperature for hafnium carbide is considerably less than the eutectic temperature of hafnium carbide of about 3150.degree. C. The brazing composition also incorporates the thermosetting resin so that during the brazing operation the graphite structures may be temporarily bonded together by thermosetting the resin so that machining of the structures to final dimensions may be completed prior to the completion of the brazing operation. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures joined thereby and also provides a joint of sufficient integrity so as to at least correspond with the strength and other properties of the graphite.

  10. Light Emission from Graphite Surfaces during Beam Bombardment, Observation and Consequences for use of Graphite in Divertors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Light Emission from Graphite Surfaces during Beam Bombardment, Observation and Consequences for use of Graphite in Divertors

  11. Slurry Molding Technologies for Novel Carbon and Graphite Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, T.D.

    2004-06-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a slurry molding technology for the manufacture of porous, high surface area, carbon fiber composites molecular sieves, and carbon-carbon composite preforms. Potentially, this technology could be applied to the manufacture of a host of novel carbon materials including porous adsorbent carbons, low-pressure drop adsorbent carbon composites, ultra-fine-grained graphite, and carbon fiber reinforced graphite. New opportunities for high surface carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) materials are now emerging. Many of these opportunities are driven by increasingly harsh environmental pressures. Traditional granular activated carbon (GAC) is not suitable for many of these applications because of the difficulties encountered with attrition and in forming ''structures'' which have the necessary mechanical and physical properties. In addition, the electrical desorption of adsorbed species is not possible with GAC due to its low bulk electrical conductivity. Activated carbon fibers have been found to be useful in some applications. Work by ORNL has shown, for example, that CFCMS materials are capable of adsorbing various gases and desorbing them under electrical stimulation. For some applications these fibers have to be formed into a structure that can offer the desired mechanical integrity and pressure drop characteristics. To date, the work by ORNL has focused on the use of a single manufacturer's isotropic pitch fibers which, when activated, may be cost prohibitive for many applications. Fine-grained graphite is attractive for many applications including the chemical processing industry where their unique combination of properties--including high strength and chemical inertness, are particularly attractive. However, a lack of toughness can limit their utility in certain applications. The use of ultra-fine powders in conjunction with slurry molding and hot pressing offers the possibility of higher strength graphite. Moreover, the inclusion of carbon fibers may provide a toughening mechanism, resulting in tougher, stronger graphite at an attractive cost. The objective of this work was to further develop the ORNL slurry molding technology and apply it to the following tasks: (1) the development of low cost, high surface area CFCMS materials and structures; (2) the development of ultra-fine-grained graphite; and (3) to identify suitable applications for the materials developed in (1) and (2). The work was conducted jointly by SGL and ORNL.

  12. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Zhmurikov; I. A. Bubnenkov; V. V. Dremov; S. I. Samarin; A. S. Pokrovsky; D. V. Harkov

    2015-08-14

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original results, and concentrated on the actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear physics, in scientific and technical applications. For scientists and engineers specializing in nuclear physics and engineering, physics of nuclear reactors, condensed matter, for undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate students of universities physical specialties.

  13. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, A.J.; Dykes, N.L.

    1982-08-10

    A brazing material is described for joining graphite structures that can be used up to 2800/sup 0/C. The brazing material is formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600/sup 0/C with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800/sup 0/C so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures.

  14. Artificial photosynthesis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagneticInexpensive 2- toArthur J.Artificial

  15. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Loyalka, Sudarshan; Ghosh, Tushar; Viswanath, Dabir; Walton, Kyle; Haffner, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few ?m in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 įC. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one graduate student meant that data acquisition with the packed bed systems ended up competing for the graduate studentís available time with the electrodynamic balance redesign and assembly portions of the project. This competition for available time was eventually mitigated to some extent by the later recruitment of an undergraduate student to help with data collection using the packed bed system. It was only the recruitment of the second student that allowed the single particle balance design and construction efforts to proceed as far as they did during the project period. It should be added that some significant time was also spent by the graduate student cataloging previous work involving graphite. This eventually resulted in a review paper being submitted and accepted (ďAdsorption of Iodine on Graphite in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Systems: A Review,Ē Kyle L. Walton, Tushar K. Ghosh, Dabir S. Viswanath, Sudarshan K. Loyalka, Robert V. Tompson). Our specific revised objectives in this project were as follows: Experimentally obtain isotherms of Iodine for reactor grade IG-110 samples of graphite particles over a range of temperatures and pressures using an EDB and a temperature controlled EDB; Experimentally obtain isotherms of Iodine for reactor grade IG-110 samples of graphite particles over a range of temperatures and pressures using a packed column bed apparatus; Explore the effect that charge has on the adsorption isotherms of iodine by varying the charges on and the voltages used to suspend the microscopic particles in the EDB; and To interpret these results in terms of the existing models (Langmuir, BET, Freundlich, and others) which we will modify as necessary to include charge related effects.

  16. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersenís 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  17. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactorís lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  18. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

  19. Decision Matrix Screening Tool to Identify the Best Artificial Lift Method for Liquid-loaded Gas Wells†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soponsakulkaew, Nitsupon

    2010-10-12

    Liquid loading is a serious problem in gas wells. Many proven artificial lift methods have been used to alleviate this problem. However, a complete workflow to determine the most suitable artificial lift method for given well conditions does...

  20. Artificial Intelligence Daniel Polani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polani, Daniel

    Artificial Intelligence Daniel Polani Artificial Intelligence ≠ p.1/26 Is it AI? 1. text editor 2 12. Turing test contenders Artificial Intellige The Turing Test: is partner human or not? See: e.g. [Saygin et al., 2000] Artificial Intelligence ≠ p.3/26 The Turing Test II

  1. PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th...

  2. PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th...

  3. PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; GRAPHITE; CREEP; PHYSICAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    creep of graphite) Kennedy, C.R. 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; GRAPHITE; CREEP; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; JAPAN; MEETINGS; TRAVEL; ASIA; CARBON;...

  4. Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite IG...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite...

  5. Inhibition of Oxidation in Nuclear Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phil Winston; James W. Sterbentz; William E. Windes

    2013-10-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off normal design basis event where an oxidizing atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postualed air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B4C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900įC. The proposed addition of B4C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimize B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed.

  6. for ISMIS91 The Roles of Artificial Intelligence in Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiederhold, Gio

    1 for ISMIS≠91 The Roles of Artificial Intelligence in Information Systems Gio Wiederhold Stanford are suitable for artificial intelligence approaches we outline an architectural structure for large systems. In that structure processing modules become specialized. We argue that artificial intelligence programs should

  7. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products on each type of graphite site. The model will include multiple simultaneous adsorbing species, which will allow for competitive adsorption effects between different fission product species and O and OH (for modeling accident conditions).

  8. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires ďmatched pairĒ creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce ďmatched pairsĒ of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  9. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Weller, Thomas E. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Howard, Christopher A. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC? and YbC? in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  10. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC? and YbC? in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore†Ľand phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.ę†less

  11. Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix D Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum #12;COPYRIGHT DECEMBER Series 2 and Pond Series 3 Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Prepared for Bureau of Reclamation HILL, INC. III Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses

  12. Method for molding threads in graphite panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Short, W.W.; Spencer, C.

    1994-11-29

    A graphite panel with a hole having a damaged thread is repaired by drilling the hole to remove all of the thread and making a new hole of larger diameter. A bolt with a lubricated thread is placed in the new hole and the hole is packed with graphite cement to fill the hole and the thread on the bolt. The graphite cement is cured, and the bolt is unscrewed therefrom to leave a thread in the cement which is at least as strong as that of the original thread. 8 figures.

  13. Method for molding threads in graphite panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Short, William W. (Livermore, CA); Spencer, Cecil (Silverton, OR)

    1994-01-01

    A graphite panel (10) with a hole (11) having a damaged thread (12) is repaired by drilling the hole (11) to remove all of the thread and make a new hole (13) of larger diameter. A bolt (14) with a lubricated thread (17) is placed in the new hole (13) and the hole (13) is packed with graphite cement (16) to fill the hole and the thread on the bolt. The graphite cement (16) is cured, and the bolt is unscrewed therefrom to leave a thread (20) in the cement (16) which is at least as strong as that of the original thread (12).

  14. Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids by electrochemical exfoliation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yueh-Feng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China); Chen, Shih-Ming; Lai, Wei-Hao [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China)] [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-14

    Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids are obtained by electrochemical exfoliation with hydrophobic graphite electrodes. Such counterintuitive characteristics are caused by partial oxidation and investigated by examining both graphite electrodes and exfoliated particles after electrolysis. The extent of surface oxidation can be explored through contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope, electrical sheet resistance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta-potential analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-visible, and Raman spectroscopy. The degree of wettability of the graphite anode can be altered by the electrolytic current and time. The water contact angle declines generally with increasing the electrolytic current or time. After a sufficient time, the graphite anode becomes superhydrophilic and its hydrophobicity can be recovered by peeling with adhesive tape. This consequence reveals that the anodic graphite is oxidized by oxygen bubbles but the oxidation just occurs at the outer layers of the graphite sheet. Moreover, the characteristics of oxidation revealed by UV peak shift, peak ratio between D and G bands, and negative zeta-potential indicate the presence of graphite oxide on the outer shell of the exfoliated colloids. However, thermogravimetric analysis for the extent of decomposition of oxygen functional groups verifies that the amount of oxygen groups is significantly less than that of graphite oxide prepared via Hummer method. The structure of this partially oxidized graphite may consist of a graphite core covered with an oxidized shell. The properties of the exfoliated colloids are also influenced by pH of the electrolytic solution. As pH is increased, the extent of oxidation descends and the thickness of oxidized shell decreases. Those results reveal that the degree of oxidation of exfoliated nanoparticles can be manipulated simply by controlling pH.

  15. Artificial Intelligence and Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brady, Michael

    1984-02-01

    Since Robotics is the field concerned with the connection of perception to action, Artificial Intelligence must have a central role in Robotics if the connection is to be intelligent. Artificial Intelligence addresses ...

  16. The Evolutionary Emergence Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    The Evolutionary Emergence route to Artificial Intelligence Alastair Channon Degree: MSc with a brief discussion. Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, Emergence, Genetic Algorithms, Artificial Life: Inman Harvey Submitted: 2 September 1996 (Minor revisions October 1996) Abstract The artificial

  17. Pyrolytic graphite production : automation of material placement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olle, Chase R

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the process and challenges associated with the addition of an autonomous transfer robot to a manufacturing line for AvCarb Material Solutions for use in production of pyrolytic graphite. Development ...

  18. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-04-06

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

  19. Encyclopedia of Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Faming

    Encyclopedia of Artificial Intelligence Juan Ram√≥n Rabu√Īal Dopico University of A Coru√Īa, Spain of artificial intelligence / Juan Ramon Rabunal Dopico, Julian Dorado de la Calle, and Alejandro Pazos Sierra) -- ISBN 978-1-59904-850-5 (ebook) 1. Artificial intelligence--Encyclopedias. I. Rabunal, Juan Ramon, 1973

  20. An Investigation of the Effect of Graphite Degradation on the Irreversible Capacity in Lithium-ion Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Hardwick, Laurence J.; Marcinek, Marek; Beer, Leanne; Kerr, John B.; Kostecki, Robert

    2008-03-03

    The effect of surface structural damage on graphitic anodes, commonly observed in tested Li-ion cells, was investigated. Similar surface structural disorder was artificially induced in Mag-10 synthetic graphite anodes using argon-ion sputtering. Raman microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) measurements confirmed that Ar-ion sputtered Mag-10 electrodes display similar degree of surface degradation as the anodes from tested Li-ion cells. Artificially modified Mag-10 anodes showed double the irreversible charge capacity during the first formation cycle, compared to fresh un-altered anodes. Impedance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy on surface modified graphite anodes indicated the formation of a thicker and slightly more resistive SEI layer. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis of solvent extracts from the electrodes detected the presence of new compounds with M{sub w} on the order of 1600 g mol{sup -1} for the surface modified electrode with no evidence of elevated M{sub w} species for the unmodified electrode. The structural disorder induced in the graphite during long-term cycling maybe responsible for the slow and continuous SEI layer reformation, and consequently, the loss of reversible capacity due to the shift of lithium inventory in cycled Li-ion cells.

  1. Identification of process suitable diluent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean R. Peterman

    2014-01-01

    The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation (STMAS) was formed within the USDOE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program in order to develop more efficient methods for the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MA) from used nuclear fuel. The development of processes for MA separations is driven by the potential benefits; reduced long-term radiotoxicty of waste placed in a geologic repository, reduced timeframe of waste storage, reduced repository heat load, the possibility of increased repository capacity, and increased utilization of energy potential of used nuclear fuel. The research conducted within the STMAS framework is focused upon the realization of significant simplifications to aqueous recycle processes proposed for MA separations. This report describes the research efforts focused upon the identification of a process suitable diluent for a flowsheet concept for the separation of MA which is based upon the dithiophosphinic acid (DPAH) extractants previously developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  2. Direct printing and reduction of graphite oxide for flexible supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hanyung; Ve Cheah, Chang; Jeong, Namjo; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-08-04

    We report direct printing and photo-thermal reduction of graphite oxide (GO) to obtain a highly porous pattern of interdigitated electrodes, leading to a supercapacitor on a flexible substrate. Key parameters optimized include the amount of GO delivered, the suitable photo-thermal energy level for effective flash reduction, and the substrate properties for appropriate adhesion after reduction. Tests with supercapacitors based on the printed-reduced GO showed performance comparable with commercial supercapacitors: the energy densities were 1.06 and 0.87 mWh/cm{sup 3} in ionic and organic electrolytes, respectively. The versatility in the architecture and choice of substrate makes this material promising for smart power applications.

  3. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna (Centerville, OH); Shi, Jinjun (Columbus, OH); Guo, Jiusheng (Centerville, OH); Jang, Bor Z. (Centerville, OH)

    2010-11-02

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  4. Biocrude suitability for petroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmalzer, D.K.; Gaines, L.L.; Herzenberg, C.L.; Snider, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    Technologies are now being developed that could produce crude oil from biomass, making available an alternative fuel source as petroleum supplies dwindle and prices rise. If the existing infrastructure for transporting and refining petroleum could be used for biocrude, the transition from petroleum would be smoother and less costly. This report examines the suitability of the existing systems for transporting biocrude and processing it into gasoline. Available biomass production areas were identified and potential production was estimated. Production areas with the potential to supply conversion plants were then matched with transportation paths and refinery locations to minimize transportation costs. Technical requirements for treating biocrude were examined, based on its expected chemical composition and physical properties, and compared to existing refinery equipment and capacity. Environmental constraints were taken into account at each step. Although biomass-derived oils could be transported to refineries the existing refinery equipment is not optimal for upgrading these oils to a gasoline-grade product. Furthermore, existing hydrogen production capacity is grossly inadequate for upgrading substantial volumes of biocrude. Partial or total upgrading at conversion facilities or regional upgrading facilities is discussed briefly, but in-depth evaluation of such options is beyond the scope of this study. 82 refs., 26 figs., 35 tabs.

  5. Method for producing thin graphite flakes with large aspect ratios

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunnell, L. Roy (Kennewick, WA)

    1993-01-01

    A method for making graphite flakes of high aspect ratio by the steps of providing a strong concentrated acid and heating the graphite in the presence of the acid for a time and at a temperature effective to intercalate the acid in the graphite; heating the intercalated graphite at a rate and to a temperature effective to exfoliate the graphite in discrete layers; subjecting the graphite layers to ultrasonic energy, mechanical shear forces, or freezing in an amount effective to separate the layes into discrete flakes.

  6. Nondestructive evaluation of nuclear-grade graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 2209, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2209 (United States)

    2012-05-17

    The material of choice for the core of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program is graphite. Graphite is a composite material whose properties are highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. In addition to the material variations intrinsic to the manufacturing process, graphite will also undergo changes in material properties resulting from radiation damage and possible oxidation within the reactor. Idaho National Laboratory is presently evaluating the viability of conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques to characterize the material variations inherent to manufacturing and in-service degradation. Approaches of interest include x-ray radiography, eddy currents, and ultrasonics.

  7. Immobilization of Rocky Flats graphite fines residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T.S.; Marra, J.C.; Peeler, D.K.

    1999-07-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt% graphite, 15 wt% calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and 12 wt% plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Approximately 950 kg of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO{sub 2} concentration in the residue averages 12 wt%, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF{sub 2} dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF{sub 2} and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.

  8. Piezoreslstive graphite/polyimide thin films for micromachining applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piezoreslstive graphite/polyimide thin films for micromachining applications A. Bruno Frazier) In this work, graphite/polyimide composite thin films are introduced and characterized for micromachining tetracarboxylic dianhydride+xydianiline/metaphenylene diamine polyimide matrix. The resultant material represents

  9. NOVEL SALTS OF GRAPHITE AND A BORON NITRIDE SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartlett, Neil

    2011-01-01

    ~ i\\f'{y AND DOCUMENTS SECTION NOVEL SALTS OF GRAPHITE ANDA BORON NITRIDE SALT Neil Bartlett, R. N. Biagioni, B. W.privately owned rights. Novel Salts of Graphite and a Boron

  10. Imparting Electrical Conductivity into Asphalt Composites Using Graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baranikumar, Aishwarya

    2013-07-09

    publications showed the potential of graphite in mitigating the sudden transition. The study presented herein investigates possibility of precisely controlling the electrical conductivity of asphalt concrete only by adding filler size graphite powder. Nine...

  11. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Graphite Print The recent surge of interest in the electronic properties of graphene-that is, isolated layers of graphite just one atomic layer thick-has largely been...

  12. Effect of Vinylene Carbonate on Graphite Anode Cycling Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ridgway, Paul

    2010-01-01

    graphite formulations in particular, are the current standard for battery anodes in electric vehicle lithium-ion batteries (

  13. Carbon 41 (2003) 11751180 Thermomechanical behavior of a graphite foam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    2003-01-01

    vehicle radiators, satellite panels, heat exchangers for the low density of 0.5 g/cm , the specific), 0.15 for flexible graphite and 0.22 for PTFE. The loss tangent of the graphite foam decreased strain in the graphite foam upon heating and subsequent cooling, such that the thermal expansion

  14. Nuclear Graphite -Fission Reactor Brief Outline of Experience and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Nuclear Graphite - Fission Reactor Brief Outline of Experience and Understanding Professor Barry J Marsden and Dr. Graham N Hall Nuclear Graphite Research Group The University of Manchester 20 March 201313 9PL Tel: +44 (0) 161 275 4399, barry.marsden@manchester.ac.uk #12;Overview · Nuclear Graphite

  15. Method of making segmented pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKernan, M.A.; Alford, C.S.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Chen, C.W.

    1994-02-08

    Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite wafers are oriented and bonded together such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are maximized along the back surface of the segmented pyrolytic graphite target to allow for optimum heat conduction away from the sputter target's sputtering surface and to allow for maximum energy transmission from the target's sputtering surface. 2 figures.

  16. Phasefield Modeling of Graphite Single Particles And Porous Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Abstract Graphite is the most commonly used anode material in lithiumion batteries because of excellent Phasefield Modeling of Graphite Single Particles And Porous Electrodes Singlelayer regular of the layered graphite material. We use the same model to fit both singleparticle experimental data

  17. Method of making segmented pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Chen, Chih-Wen (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite wafers are oriented and bonded together such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are maximized along the back surface of the segmented pyrolytic graphite target to allow for optimum heat conduction away from the sputter target's sputtering surface and to allow for maximum energy transmission from the target's sputtering surface.

  18. Industrial Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mark S.

    Industrial Applications of Artificial Intelligence 301 Mark S. Fox Intelligent Systems Laboratory and future applicationsof Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Knowledge-Based systems to manufactur- ing is taking a systemic view of manufacturing. Keywords: Artificial Intelligence and Manufacturing, Knowl- edge

  19. Constructive Artificial Intelligence Information Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polani, Daniel

    Constructive Artificial Intelligence Information Theory Daniel Polani School of Computer Science referenced. Constructive Artificial Intelligence #12;Coin Weighing Problem (after Denker 2004) Problem Given (minimax principle) Constructive Artificial Intelligence #12;Considerations Note in a measurement, left

  20. US graphite reactor D&D experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE).

  1. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air ?helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900įC or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  2. Artificial Insemination in Swine†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterle, Jodi

    1999-09-03

    Artificial insemination in swine works only if used and managed properly. This publication discusses the swine estrous cycle and how to detect estrus. It also provides step-by-step instructions for inseminating the female....

  3. Exercise in artificial gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmonds, Jessica Leigh

    2005-01-01

    Artificial gravity provided by short radius centrifugation is considered a promising countermeasure to the deleterious physiological effects of microgravity during long-duration space flight. We investigated the feasibility ...

  4. Artificial Intelligence Decision and Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polani, Daniel

    Artificial Intelligence Decision and Information Daniel Polani Artificial Intelligence ≠ p.1/26 Decisions: The Fundamental Task Motivation: everything in Artificial Intelligence is basical about taking Intellige Decision: What Door to Open? Artificial Intelligence ≠ p.3/26 Bottom Line Clear: decision about

  5. Differentiating the role of lithium and oxygen in retaining deuterium on lithiated graphite plasma-facing components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.N. Taylor; J. P. Allain; P. S. Krstic; J. Dadras; C. H. Skinner; K. E. Luitjohan

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fundamental interactions responsible for deuterium retention in lithiated graphite. Oxygen was found to be present and play a key role in experiments that simulated NSTX lithium conditioning, where the atomic surface concentration can increase to >40% when deuterium retention chemistry is observed. Quantum-classical molecular dynamic simulations elucidated this oxygen-deuterium effect and showed that oxygen retains significantly more deuterium than lithium in a simulated matrix with 20% lithium, 20% oxygen, and 60% carbon. Simulations further show that deuterium retention is even higher when lithium is removed from the matrix. Experiments artificially increased the oxygen content in graphite to approximately 16% and then bombarded with deuterium. XPS showed depletion of the oxygen and no enhanced deuterium retention, thus demonstrating that lithium is essential in retaining the oxygen that thereby retains deuterium.

  6. Differentiating the role of lithium and oxygen in retaining deuterium on lithiated graphite plasma-facing components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, C. N. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625-7113, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States) [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625-7113, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Allain, J. P. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States); Luitjohan, K. E. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Krstic, P. S. [Institute for Advanced Computational Science, Stony Brook University, New York 11794 (United States) [Institute for Advanced Computational Science, Stony Brook University, New York 11794 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); TheoretiK, Knoxville, Tennessee 379XX (United States); Dadras, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fundamental interactions responsible for deuterium retention in lithiated graphite. Oxygen was found to be present and play a key role in experiments that simulated NSTX lithium conditioning, where the atomic surface concentration can increase to >40% when deuterium retention chemistry is observed. Quantum-classical molecular dynamic simulations elucidated this oxygen-deuterium effect and showed that oxygen retains significantly more deuterium than lithium in a simulated matrix with 20% lithium, 20% oxygen, and 60% carbon. Simulations further show that deuterium retention is even higher when lithium is removed from the matrix. Experiments artificially increased the oxygen content in graphite to ?16% and then bombarded with deuterium. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed depletion of the oxygen and no enhanced deuterium retention, thus demonstrating that lithium is essential in retaining the oxygen that thereby retains deuterium.

  7. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  8. Electron oxidation of graphite by fluorospecies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, G.L.

    1984-09-01

    The fluoride-ion affinity (A/sub F/sup -//) of phosphorus pentafluoride was determined to be 100 kcal/mole from the heats of reaction of the Lewis bases SF/sub 4/ and ClO/sub 2/F with PF/sub 5/ near room temperature. The fluoride-ion affinity of boron trifluoride was determined to be 92 kcal/mole from the heat of reaction of ClO/sub 2/F with BF/sub 3/. The crystal structure of ClO/sub 2/BF/sub 4/ was determined and a precise lattice energy was calculated from this structure and used to determined A/sub F/sup -//. Both PF/sub 5/ and BF/sub 3/ were found to react with graphite in the presence of fluorine gas to yield a variety of non-stoichiometric compounds. The fluoride-ion affinity of silicon tetrafluoride is not known, but it does not react with graphite and F/sub 2/ except at high pressures. These and previous results suggested a threshold in oxidizing power of intercalating species below which the oxidative intercalation reaction would not occur. The reduction of C/sub x/PF/sub 6/ by PF/sub 3/ proved that the reaction is thermodynamically controlled to some extent. The displacement of PF/sub 5/ in C/sub x/PF/sub 6/ by BF/sub 3/ (with a smaller A/sub F/sup -//) suggested that two BF/sub 3/ molecules may have a larger fluoride-ion affinity than one PF/sub 5/ and that B/sub 2/F/sub 7//sup -/ may be a stable anion in graphite. Conductivity studies of PF/sub x/ and BF/sub y/ salts showed that a large drop in conductivity when the reaction reaches first stage is due in the most part to direct fluorination of carbon in graphite.

  9. Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear-Grade Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis C. Kunerth; Timothy R. McJunkin

    2011-07-01

    Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear Grade Graphite Dennis C. Kunerth and Timothy R. McJunkin Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, ID, 83415 This paper discusses the nondestructive evaluation of nuclear grade graphite performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Graphite is a composite material highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. As a result, material variations are expected within individual billets as well billet to billet and lot to lot. Several methods of evaluating the material have been explored. Particular technologies each provide a subset of information about the material. This paper focuses on techniques that are applicable to in-service inspection of nuclear energy plant components. Eddy current examination of the available surfaces provides information on potential near surface structural defects and although limited, ultrasonics can be utilized in conventional volumetric inspection. Material condition (e.g. micro-cracking and porosity induced by radiation and stress) can be derived from backscatter or acousto-ultrasound (AU) methods. Novel approaches utilizing phased array ultrasonics have been attempted to expand the abilities of AU techniques. By combining variable placement of apertures, angle and depth of focus, the techniques provide the potential to obtain parameters at various depths in the material. Initial results of the study and possible procedures for application of the techniques are discussed.

  10. Irradiation Induced Dimensional Changes in Bulk Graphite; The theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Panyukov; A. V. Subbotin; M. V. Arjakov

    2012-10-14

    Basing on experimental data on irradiation-induced deformation of graphite we introduced a concept of diffuse domain structure developed in reactor graphite produced by extrusion. Such domains are considered as random continuous deviations of local graphite texture from the global one. We elucidate the origin of domain structure and estimate the size and the degree of orientational ordering of its domains. Using this concept we explain the well known radiation-induced size effect observed in reactor graphite. We also propose a method for converting the experimental data on shape-change of finite-size samples to bulk graphite. This method gives a more accurate evaluation of corresponding data used in estimations of reactor graphite components lifetime under irradiation.

  11. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T. S.

    1998-11-06

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

  12. Forming gas treatment of lithium ion battery anode graphite powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Contescu, Cristian Ion; Gallego, Nidia C; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer, III, Harry M; Payzant, Edward Andrew; Wood, III, David L; Yoon, Sang Young

    2014-09-16

    The invention provides a method of making a battery anode in which a quantity of graphite powder is provided. The temperature of the graphite powder is raised from a starting temperature to a first temperature between 1000 and 2000.degree. C. during a first heating period. The graphite powder is then cooled to a final temperature during a cool down period. The graphite powder is contacted with a forming gas during at least one of the first heating period and the cool down period. The forming gas includes H.sub.2 and an inert gas.

  13. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    physics, including the novel quantum Hall effect in graphene, the magnetic-field-driven metal-insulator-like transition in graphite, superfluidity in 3He, and the exotic...

  14. Experimental thermal conductivity and contact conductance of graphite composites†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Marian Christine

    1998-01-01

    Graphite fiber organic matrix composites were reviewed ics. for potential heat sink applications in the electronics packaging determined the effective transverse and longitudinal thermal industry. This experimental ...

  15. Role of Nuclear Grade Graphite in Oxidation in Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willaim Windes; G. Strydom; J. Kane; R. Smith

    2014-11-01

    The passively safe High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design is one of the primary concepts considered for Generation IV and Small Modular Reactor (SMR) programs. The helium cooled, nuclear grade graphite moderated core achieves extremely high operating temperatures allowing either industrial process heat or electricity generation at high efficiencies. In addition to their neutron moderating properties, nuclear grade graphite core components provide excellent high temperature stability, thermal conductivity, and chemical compatibility with the high temperature nuclear fuel form. Graphite has been continuously used in nuclear reactors since the 1940ís and has performed remarkably well over a wide range of core environments and operating conditions. Graphite moderated, gas-cooled reactor designs have been safely used for research and power production purposes in multiple countries since the inception of nuclear energy development. However, graphite is a carbonaceous material, and this has generated a persistent concern that the graphite components could actually burn during either normal or accident conditions [ , ]. The common assumption is that graphite, since it is ostensibly similar to charcoal and coal, will burn in a similar manner. While charcoal and coal may have the appearance of graphite, the internal microstructure and impurities within these carbonaceous materials are very different. Volatile species and trapped moisture provide a source of oxygen within coal and charcoal allowing them to burn. The fabrication process used to produce nuclear grade graphite eliminates these oxidation enhancing impurities, creating a dense, highly ordered form of carbon possessing high thermal diffusivity and strongly (covalently) bonded atoms.

  16. Establish and Expand Commercial Production of Graphite Anode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expand Commercial Production of Graphite Anode Materials for High Performance Lithium-ion Batteries 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  17. Regulatory Dynamics of Natural and Artificial Photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaks, Julia

    2012-01-01

    of Natural and Artificial Photosynthesis by Julia Zaks Aof Natural and Artificial Photosynthesis Copyright 2012 byof Natural and Artificial Photosynthesis by Julia Zaks

  18. Suitability of Varicose Veins for Endovenous Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goode, S. D.; Kuhan, G.; Altaf, N.; Simpson, R.; Beech, A.; Richards, T.; MacSweeney, S. T.; Braithwaite, B. D.

    2009-09-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the suitability of radiofrequency ablation (RFA), endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), and foam sclerotherapy (FS) for patients with symptomatic varicose veins (VVs). The study comprised 403 consecutive patients with symptomatic VVs. Data on 577 legs from 403 consecutive patients with symptomatic VVs were collected for the year 2006. Median patient age was 55 years (interquartile range 45-66), and 62% patients were women. A set of criteria based on duplex ultrasonography was used to select patients for each procedure. Great saphenous vein (GSV) reflux was present in 77% (446 of 577) of legs. Overall, 328 (73%) of the legs were suitable for at least one of the endovenous options. Of the 114 legs with recurrent GSV reflux disease, 83 (73%) were suitable to receive endovenous therapy. Patients with increasing age were less likely to be suitable for endovenous therapy (P = 0.03). Seventy-three percent of patients with VVs caused by GSV incompetence are suitable for endovenous therapy.

  19. ENTRY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE [ENTRY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE] Authors: Oliver Knill: March 2000 Literature: Peter Norvig,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knill, Oliver

    ENTRY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE [ENTRY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE] Authors: Oliver Knill: March 2000 Literature: Peter Norvig, Paradigns of Artificial Intelligence Programming Daniel Juravsky and James Martin interface to a neural net simulator. artificial intelligence [artificial intelligence] (AI) is a field

  20. Introduction to Artificial Intelligence Discuss what is meant by Artificial Intelligence (AI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Rong

    Introduction to Artificial Intelligence Objectives ∑ Discuss what is meant by Artificial important AI tests and terms #12;Introduction to Artificial Intelligence Sections ∑ What is Artificial to Artificial Intelligence Question 1 Can a Machine Ever Be Intelligent ? (survey) #12;Introduction

  1. Semantic Web 30Artificial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Harmelen, Frank

    312007.11 "" Semantic Web 30Artificial IntelligenceKnowledge Representation Inductive Web datasets ---- Tim Berners-Lee Tim Berners-Lee " "" " Web 2.0---- Web Web 2.0 Frank van Harmelen W3C OWL Web Sesame RDF Aduna 100 Hirsch 35 5 15 ECAI2002 3 ISWC

  2. Artificial Intelligence Intelligent Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voris, Jonathan

    CS W4701 Artificial Intelligence Fall 2013 Chapter 2: Intelligent Agents Jonathan Voris (based, Environment, Actuators, Sensors) ∑ Environment types ∑ Agent types #12;Agents ∑ An agent is anything that can be viewed as perceiving its environment through sensors and acting upon that environment through actuators

  3. Artificial Heart Valve Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Artificial Heart Valve Design Your Chance to be a Biomedical Engineer #12;Circulatory System Video #12;What is a Heart Valve? ∑ Heart Valve Video #12;#12;What Does a Heart Valve Do? ∑ Maintain the one direction flow of blood through the heart ∑ Heart valves allow blood to flow through in a forward direction

  4. Universal Artificial Intelligence Marcus Hutter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutter, Marcus

    Universal Artificial Intelligence Marcus Hutter Canberra, ACT, 0200, Australia http://www.hutter1.net/ #12;Marcus Hutter - 2 - Universal Artificial Intelligence Abstract The dream of creating artificial devices that reach or outperform human intelligence is many centuries old. In this talk I present

  5. Foundations of Artificial Intelligence Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Rong

    Foundations of Artificial Intelligence Introduction to the Course Module G64FAI #12;General in Artificial Intelligence (AI) ∑ Provide an understanding of the theory of a range of those techniques ∑ Introduce the students to a number of Artificial Intelligence applications ∑ Show how these systems can

  6. Carbon 40 (2002) 22852289 Flexible graphite as a heating element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    2002-01-01

    of aircraft [20,21] and the the plane of the sheet [5,6]. Due to the graphite layers heating of floors, pipes, is corrosion-resistant, does not need to be encased flexible graphite is electrically and thermally conductive

  7. Graphite Sublimation Tests for the Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    cooled graphite target was proposed for a 1.5 MW neutrino production research facility because of its simplicity and favorable performance as a target material for neutrino production (Ref. 1). The conceptual handling performance of radiatively cooled graphite targets, a helium cover gas at nominally one atmosphere

  8. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Readiness to Receive Irradiated Graphite Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen A. Moore

    2011-05-01

    The Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research conducted in this laboratory will support the Advanced Graphite Creep experimentsóa major series of material irradiation experiments within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, silicon-carbide composite, and ceramic materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials. Major infrastructural modifications were undertaken to support this new radiological facility at Idaho National Laboratory. Facility modifications are complete, equipment has been installed, radiological controls and operating procedures have been established and work management documents have been created to place the CCL in readiness to receive irradiated graphite samples.

  9. O2 Reduction on Graphite and Nitrogen-Doped Graphite: Experiment and Theory Reyimjan A. Sidik and Alfred B. Anderson*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    toward NOx reduction.7,8 Others are oxidation catalysts.9 In the case of NOx oxidation and O2 reductionO2 Reduction on Graphite and Nitrogen-Doped Graphite: Experiment and Theory Reyimjan A. Sidik for reduction of approximately 0.5 V (SHE) compared to the onset potential of 0.2 V observed for untreated

  10. Removal of 14C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

    2014-06-10

    The aim of the research presented here was to identify the chemical form of 14C in irradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approximately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 14C, with a half-life of 5730 years.

  11. Pulsed Repetition Rate Nanosecond Laser Heating and Ablation of the Tokamak Graphite Tile Deposited Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulsed Repetition Rate Nanosecond Laser Heating and Ablation of the Tokamak Graphite Tile Deposited Layers

  12. Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Schnitzler

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests requires high performance propulsion systems to support missions beyond low Earth orbit. A robust space exploration program will include robotic outer planet and crewed missions to a variety of destinations including the moon, near Earth objects, and eventually Mars. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. In NASA's recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option for the human exploration of Mars because of its high thrust and high specific impulse ({approx}900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. The recently announced national space policy2 supports the development and use of space nuclear power systems where such systems safely enable or significantly enhance space exploration or operational capabilities. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted under the Rover/NERVA, GE-710 and ANL nuclear rocket programs (1955-1973). Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. The primary and significantly larger Rover/NERVA program focused on graphite type fuels. Research, development, and testing of high temperature graphite fuels was conducted. Reactors and engines employing these fuels were designed, built, and ground tested. The GE-710 and ANL programs focused on an alternative ceramic-metallic 'cermet' fuel type consisting of UO2 (or UN) fuel embedded in a refractory metal matrix such as tungsten. The General Electric program examined closed loop concepts for space or terrestrial applications as well as open loop systems for direct nuclear thermal propulsion. Although a number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion were proposed and designed, none were built. This report summarizes status results of evaluations of small nuclear reactor designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion.

  13. Artificial General Intelligence and the Future of the Human Race

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlacka, Bryon

    2012-01-01

    Institute for Artificial Intelligence [SIAI], 2001, para.robot architecture. Artificial general intelligence, 2008:machines. Artificial general intelligence, 2008: Proceedings

  14. Mechanics of fatigue damage in titanium-graphite hybrid laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burianek, Dennis Arthur

    2001-01-01

    Titanium-graphite hybrid laminates are being developed for high-temperature aerospace applications. Experimental observations have indicated that cracks in the titanium facesheets initiate at free edges as well as in areas ...

  15. Understanding Interfaces in Metal-Graphitic Hybrid NanostructuresĒ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Mengning; Tang, Yifan; Star, Alexander

    2013-01-03

    MetalĖgraphitic interfaces formed between metal nanoparticles (MNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or graphene play an important role in the properties of such hybrid nanostructures. This Perspective summarizes different types of interfaces that exist within the metalĖcarbon nanoassemblies and discusses current efforts on understanding and modeling the interfacial conditions and interactions. Characterization of the metalĖgraphitic interfaces is described here, including microscopy, spectroscopy, electrochemical techniques, and electrical measurements. Recent studies on these nanohybrids have shown that the metalĖgraphitic interfaces play critical roles in both controlled assembly of nanoparticles and practical applications of nanohybrids in chemical sensors and fuel cells. Better understanding, design, and manipulation of metalĖgraphitic interfaces could therefore become the new frontier in the research of MNP/CNT or MNP/graphene hybrid systems.

  16. Dry synthesis of lithium intercalated graphite powders and carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L [ORNL; Adamczyk, Leslie A [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Herein we describe the direct synthesis of lithium intercalated graphite by heating under vacuum or ball milling under pressurized Ar(g). Both methods allow for stoichometric control of Li-C ratio in batter-grade graphites and carbon fibers prior formation of a solid electrolyte interphase. The products' surface chemistries, as probed by XPS, suggest that LiC6 are extremely reactive with trace amounts of moisture or oxygen. The open circuit potential and SEM data show that the reactivity of the lithiated battery-grade graphite and the carbon fiber can be related to the density of edge/defect sites on the surfaces. Preliminary results of spontaneous SEI formation on Li-graphite in electrolyte are also given.

  17. Artificial Intelligence in BiomedicalArtificial Intelligence in Biomedical InformaticsInformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Nancy E.

    ICS 313 1 Artificial Intelligence in BiomedicalArtificial Intelligence in Biomedical Informatics Systems Outline and Objectives Describe basic concepts in artificial intelligence Understand is Artificial Intelligence (AI)? Goals of AI systems fall into four categories: Thinking humanly Thinking

  18. Compression induced delamination in a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earley, John W.

    1981-01-01

    December 1981 Major Subject: Civil Engineering COMPRESSION INDUCED DELAMINATION IN A UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE A Thesis by JOHN W. EARLEY Approved as to style and content by: (K. L. Jerina, Chairman) (R, A. Schape y', MemP ) W. L.... Bradley, Me er Il. 8 0 1d, O. pa t~tH d December 1981 ABSTRACT Compression Induced Delamination in a Unidirectional Graphite/Epoxy Composite (December 1981) John William Earley, B. S. Aeronautical Engineering California Polytechnic State University...

  19. Slow, stable delamination in graphite/epoxy composites†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razi, Hamid

    1982-01-01

    SLOB, STABLE DELAFIINATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by HAMID RA2I Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the reouirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major... Subject: Mechanical Engineering SLOW, STABLE DELAMINATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by HAMID RAZI Approved as to style and content by: (R. A. Schapery, hair (J. R. Wa ton, Member) (W. L. Bradley, Membe . R. Hopkins, ead of Department...

  20. An investigation of damage accumulation in graphite/epoxy laminates†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norvell, Robert Gerald

    1985-01-01

    AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1985 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Approved as to style and content by: David H. Allen (Co-Chair of C mmitt. ) Richard A. Schap...

  1. Electrical and thermal properties of graphite/polyaniline composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourdo, Shawn E., E-mail: sxbourdo@ualr.edu [Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Warford, Brock A.; Viswanathan, Tito [Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    A composite of a carbon allotrope (graphite) and an inherently conducting polymer, polyaniline (PANI), has been prepared that exhibits an electrical conductivity greater than either of the two components. An almost 2-fold increase in the bulk conductivity occurs when only a small mass fraction of polyaniline exists in the composite (91% graphite/ 9% polyaniline, by mass). This increase in dc electrical conductivity is curious since in most cases a composite material will exhibit a conductivity somewhere between the two individual components, unless a modification to the electronic nature of the material occurs. In order to elucidate the fundamental electrical properties of the composite we have performed variable temperature conductivity measurements to better understand the nature of conduction in these materials. The results from these studies suggest a change in the mechanism of conduction as the amount of polyaniline is increased in the composite. Along with superior electrical properties, the composites exhibit an increase in thermal stability as compared to the graphite. - Graphical abstract: (Left) Room temperature electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at different mass ratios. (Right) Electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at temperatures from 5 K to 300 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composites of graphite and polyaniline have been synthesized with unique electrical and thermal properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Certain G-PANI composites are more conductive and more thermally stable than graphite alone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-PANI composites exhibit a larger conductivity ratio with respect to temperature than graphite alone.

  2. Discoveryourself.Startwiththeworld. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jesse

    1 Discoveryourself.Startwiththeworld. New option B ig D ata A nalytics #12;32 ARTIFICIAL, through natural language as well as through vision, sensors and movement. A robot that can represent its that we tend to consider typical of intelligent living beings. WHY STUDY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

  3. The effects of a steam-electric generating plant on suitability of adjacent estuarine waters for growth of phytoplankton†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelsey, John Allen

    1974-01-01

    by fluoromet- rically measuring the growth of Skeletonema costatum and naturally occurring mixed phytoplankton populations in an artificial seawater medium (NH-15), filter sterilized sample water and a 1:1 mixture of the NH-15 and sterile sample medium... AND METHODS 14 Hydrological Method . Sampling and Sample Treatment Glassware Preparation Method Standing Crop Measurement Method Primary Production Rate Measurement Method Medium Suitability Assay Method 14 14 15 16 17 19 RESULTS. 24 Hydrological...

  4. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL and Applications Gideon P. Stein Amnon Shashua Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Institute of Computer Science MIT of Technology, 1995 This report describes research done at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

  5. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL Sciences Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 y Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Institute of Technology, 1995. This report describes research done partly at the Artificial Intelligence

  6. The 2008 Artificial Intelligence Competition Valliappa Lakshmanan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakshmanan, Valliappa

    The 2008 Artificial Intelligence Competition Valliappa Lakshmanan National Severe Storms Laboratory Pennsylvania State University Abstract The Artificial Intelligence Committee of the AMS conducted. The ranking was carried out using the True Skill Statistic. Introduction The Artificial Intelligence Comittee

  7. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL and Computa≠ tional Learning, and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute for the laboratory's artificial intelligence research is provided in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency

  8. Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Doug

    ., & Verfaillie, K. (2009). Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes. Journal of Vision, 9Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes Laboratory of Experimental on postsaccadic perception do indeed occur. We presented subjects with highly similar artificial shapes, preceded

  9. Ecological Consequences of Artificial Night Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piselli, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    of Artificial Night Lighting Catherine Rich and Travisof artificial night lighting. This book provides editedage of modern urban lighting was ushered in. Coincidentally,

  10. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL and Cognitive Sciences and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  11. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL research done at the Center for Biological & Computational Learning and the Artificial Intelligence

  12. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This research was sponsored

  13. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL and Computational Learning in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and at the Artificial Intelligence

  14. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL for Biological and Computational Learning and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts

  15. Treatment of Irradiated Graphite from French Bugey Reactor - 13424

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Thomas [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive NE, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive NE, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA (United States); Poncet, Bernard [electricite de France, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, 69458 Lyon Cedex 06 (France)] [electricite de France, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, 69458 Lyon Cedex 06 (France)

    2013-07-01

    Beginning in 2009, in order to determine an alternative to direct disposal for decommissioned irradiated graphite from EDF's Bugey NPP, Studsvik and EDF began a test program to determine if graphite decontamination and destruction were practicable using Studsvik's thermal organic reduction (THOR) technology. The testing program focused primarily on the release of C-14, H-3, and Cl-36 and also monitored graphite mass loss. For said testing, a bench-scale steam reformer (BSSR) was constructed with the capability of flowing various compositions of gases at temperatures up to 1300 deg. C over uniformly sized particles of graphite for fixed amounts of time. The BSSR was followed by a condenser, thermal oxidizer, and NaOH bubbler system designed to capture H-3 and C-14. Also, in a separate series of testing, high concentration acid and peroxide solutions were used to soak the graphite and leach out and measure Cl-36. A series of gasification tests were performed to scope gas compositions and temperatures for graphite gasification using steam and oxygen. Results suggested higher temperature steam (1100 deg. C vs. 900 deg. C) yielded a practicable gasification rate but that lower temperature (900 deg. C) gasification was also a practicable treatment alternative if oxygen is fed into the process. A series of decontamination tests were performed to determine the release behavior of and extent to which C-14 and H-3 were released from graphite in a high temperature (900-1300 deg. C), low flow roasting gas environment. In general, testing determined that higher temperatures and longer roasting times were efficacious for releasing H-3 completely and the majority (80%) of C-14. Manipulating oxidizing and reducing gas environments was also found to limit graphite mass loss. A series of soaking tests was performed to measure the amount of Cl-36 in the samples of graphite before and after roasting in the BSSR. Similar to C-14 release, these soaking tests revealed that 70-80% Cl-36 is released during roasting tests. (authors)

  16. Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Storms, E.K.

    1987-08-21

    A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

  17. New Progress in Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winston, Patrick H.

    1974-09-01

    This report concentrates on progress during the last two years at the M.I.T. Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Topics covered include the representation of knowledge, understanding English, learning and debugging, ...

  18. Effect of Vinylene Carbonate on Graphite Anode Cycling Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgway, Paul; Zheng, Honghe; Liu, Gao; Song, Xiangun; Ross, Philip; Battaglia, Vincent

    2009-05-05

    Vinylene Carbonate (VC) was added to the electrolyte in graphite-lithium half-cells. We report its effect on the coulombic efficiency (as capacity shift) of graphite electrodes under various formation cycling conditions. Cyclic voltammetry on glassy carbon showed that VC passivates the electrode against electrolyte reduction. The dQ/dV plots of the first lithiation of the graphite suggest that VC alters the SEI layer, and that by varying the cell formation rate, the initial ratio of ethylene carbonate to VC in the SEI layer can be controlled. VC was found to decrease first cycle efficiency and reversible capacity (in ongoing cycling) when used to excess. However, experiments with VC additive used with various formation rates did not show any decrease in capacity shift.

  19. Graphite Foams for Lithium-Ion Battery Current Collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Tiegs, Terry N [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Jang, Young-Il [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Graphite open-cell foams, with their very high electronic and thermal conductivities, may serve as high surface area and corrosion resistant current collectors for lithium-ion batteries. As a proof of principle, cathodes were prepared by sintering carbon-coated LiFePO4 particles into the porous graphite foams. Cycling these cathodes in a liquid electrolyte cell showed promising performance even for materials and coatings that have not been optimized. The specific capacity is not limited by the foam structure, but by the cycling performance of the coated LiFePO4 particles. Upon extended cycling for more than 100 deep cycles, no loss of capacity is observed for rates of C/2 or less. The uncoated graphite foams will slowly intercalate lithium reversibly at potentials less than 0.2 volts versus lithium.

  20. Graphitization of polymer surfaces by scanning ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koval, Yuri [Department of Physics, Universitšt Erlangen-NŁrnberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-10-20

    Graphitization of polymer surfaces was performed by low-energy Ar{sup +} and He{sup +} ion irradiation. A method of scanning irradiation was implemented. It was found that by scanning ion irradiation, a significantly higher electrical conductivity in the graphitized layers can be achieved in comparison with a conventional broad-beam irradiation. The enhancement of the conductance becomes more pronounced for narrower and better collimated ion beams. In order to analyze these results in more detail, the temperature dependence of conductance of the irradiated samples was investigated. The results of measurements are discussed in terms of weak localization corrections to conductance in disordered metals. The observed effects can be explained by enlargement of graphitic patches, which was achieved with the scanning ion irradiation method.

  1. Private development of artificial reefs†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Arthur Allen

    1978-01-01

    PRIVATE DEVFLOPMENT OF ARTIFICIAL REEFS A Thesis ARTHUR ALLEN BURNS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Management PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT OF ARTIFICIAL REEFS A Thesis by ARTHUR ALLEN BURNS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: irman o t e Committee { ead o the Depa tment ~Member Memb e- December 1978 12409Ei'7 ABSTRACT Private Development...

  2. Training artificial neural networks using APPM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Sugata

    - timization algorithm that simulate the plant growing process. It designs two artificial photosynthesis

  3. SOLAR ENERGY FOR ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS Solar Suitability Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    SOLAR ENERGY FOR ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS Solar Suitability Assessment of Dalhousie University.................................................................................................. 2 2.2 Solar Radiation Data for Calculating Solar Energy Resource .................... 3 3 Campus.1 Evaluation of Suitability for Solar Energy Generation................................ 12 4.2 Solar

  4. Chemical and Physical Modification of Graphitic Materials by Oxidative Processes and Solvent Intercalation†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werke, Carrie Beth

    2014-08-27

    is by chemical functionalization, such as oxidation. This work looks at two different oxidation techniques for graphite; UV/O3 exposure and biased AFM lithography for broad and local oxidation, respectively. For the supported graphitic samples including graphene...

  5. Graphit-ceramic RF Faraday-thermal shield and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hwang, David L. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Hosea, Joel C. (Princeton, NJ)

    1989-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process of brazing a ceramic mater to graphite. In particular, the brazing procedure is directed to the production of a novel brazed ceramic graphite product useful as a Faraday shield.

  6. Low-Cost Graphite and Olivine-Based Materials for Li-Ion Batteries...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Graphite and Olivine-Based Materials for Li-Ion Batteries Low-Cost Graphite and Olivine-Based Materials for Li-Ion Batteries Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

  7. Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat storage system for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat storage system for supercritical CO2 power cycles for concentrated solar power Title Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat...

  8. Gelcasting polymeric precursors for producing net-shaped graphites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W.; Janney, Mark A.

    2005-02-15

    The present invention discloses a method for molding complex and intricately shaped high density monolithic carbon, carbon-carbon, graphite, and thermoplastic composites using gelcasting technology. The method comprising a polymeric carbon precursor, a solvent, a dispersant, an anti-foaming agent, a monomer system, and an initiator system. The components are combined to form a suspension which is poured into a mold and heat-treated to form a thermoplastic part. The thermoplastic part can then be further densified and heat-treated to produce a high density carbon or graphite composite. The present invention also discloses the products derived from this method.

  9. Microfabrication of freestanding metal structures released from graphite substrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarova, O. V.; Tang, C.-M.; Mancini, D. C.; Moldovan, N.; Divan, R.; Ryding, D. G.; Lee, R. H.

    2002-02-22

    A sacrificial layer is usually used to release electroformed microstructures. Because of the chemistry applied to the sacrificial layer, only a limited number of metals can be used for electroforming. A novel method to fabricate freestanding electroformed copper structures is presented. A graphite substrate allows the release of the metal part, by abrasive removal of the graphite after electroforming. Results on fabrication of high-aspect-ratio freestanding copper grids are presented; these can be used as x-ray collimator in medical imaging to reduce scattered radiation. This process has potential application to the fabrication of injection molds and microparts on pick-and-place carriers for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  10. Delamination fracture toughness of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulsey, Roy Charles

    1980-01-01

    DELAMINATION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF A UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOS ITE A Thesis by ROY CHARLES HULSEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DELAMINA. ION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF A UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE A Thesis by ROY CHARLES HULSEY Approved as to sty1e and content by: +alter L. Brad1ey, C airman TR. A. S p...

  11. Early Damage Mechanisms in Nuclear Grade Graphite under Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eapen, Dr. Jacob [North Carolina State University] [North Carolina State University; Krishna, Dr Ram [North Carolina State University] [North Carolina State University; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL] [ORNL; Murty, Prof K.L. [North Carolina State University] [North Carolina State University

    2014-01-01

    Using Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,we delineate the bond and defect structures in nuclear block graphite (NBG-18) under neutron and ion irradiation. The strengthening of the defect (D) peak in the Raman spectra under irradiation is attributed to an increase in the topological, sp2-hybridized defects. Using transmission electron microscopy, we provide evidence for prismatic dislocations as well as a number of basal dislocations dissociating into Shockley partials. The non-vanishing D peak in the Raman spectra, together with a generous number of dislocations, even at low irradiation doses, indicates a dislocation-mediated amorphization process in graphite.

  12. Gelcasting polymeric precursors for producing net-shaped graphites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention discloses a method for molding complex and intricately shaped high density monolithic carbon, carbon-carbon, graphite, and thermoplastic composites using gelcasting technology. The method comprising a polymeric carbon precursor, a solvent, a dispersant, an anti-foaming agent, a monomer system, and an initiator system. The components are combined to form a suspension which is poured into a mold and heat-treated to form a thermoplastic part. The thermoplastic part can then be further densified and heat-treated to produce a high density carbon or graphite composite. The present invention also discloses the products derived from this method.

  13. Artificial Intelligence 47 (1991) 31-56 31 Logic and artificial intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    1991-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence 47 (1991) 31-56 31 Elsevier Logic and artificial intelligence Nils J Abstract Nilsson, N.J., Logic and artificial intelligence, Artificial Intelligence 47 (1990) 31-56. The theoretical foundations of the logical approach to artificial intelligence are presented. Logical languages

  14. Performance of Lithium Ion Cell Anode Graphites Under Various Cycling Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ridgway, Paul

    2010-01-01

    graphite formulations in particular, are the current standard for lithium-ion anodes for electric vehicle batteries(

  15. Status of ASME Section III Task Group on Graphite Support Core Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert L. Bratton; Tim D. Burchell

    2005-08-01

    This report outlines the roadmap that the ASME Project Team on Graphite Core Supports is pursuing to establish design codes for unirradiated and irradiated graphite core components during its first year of operation. It discusses the deficiencies in the proposed Section III, Division 2, Subsection CE graphite design code and the different approaches the Project Team has taken to address those deficiencies.

  16. Self-Assembly and Mass Transport in Membranes for Artificial Photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modestino, Miguel Antonio

    2013-01-01

    for artificial photosynthesis systems ..6Artificial Photosynthesis up process of artificial photosynthesis membranes and open

  17. Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemus, Rocky; Baldwin, Brian; Lang, David

    2011-10-01

    In Mississippi, some questions need to be answered about bioenergy crops: how much suitable land is available? How much material can that land produce? Which production systems work best in which scenarios? What levels of inputs will be required for productivity and longterm sustainability? How will the crops reach the market? What kinds of infrastructure will be necessary to make that happen? This publication helps answer these questions: √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę Which areas in the state are best for bioenergy crop production? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How much could these areas produce sustainably? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How can bioenergy crops impact carbon sequestration and carbon credits? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę How will these crops affect fertilizer use and water quality? √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬

  18. Artificial Solid Electrolyte Interphase to Address the Electrochemical Degradation of Silicon Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudney, Nancy J; Nanda, Jagjit; Liang, Chengdu; Li, Juchuan

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical degradation on Si anodes prevents them from being successfully used in lithium-ion full cells. Unlike the case of graphite anodes, natural solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) films generated from carbonate electrolyte do not self-passivate on Si and causes continuous electrolyte decomposition. In this work we aim at solving the issue of electrochemical degradation by fabricating artificial SEI films using a solid electrolyte material, lithium phosphor oxynitride (Lipon), that conducts Li ions and blocks electrons. For Si anodes coated with Lipon of 50 nm or thicker, significant effect is observed in suppressing the electrolyte decomposition, while Lipon of thinner than 40 nm has little effect. Ionic and electronic conductivity measurement reveals that the artificial SEI is effective when it is a pure ionic conductor, and the electrolyte decomposition is not suppressed when the artificial SEI is a mixed electronic-ionic conductor. The critical thickness for this transition in conducting behavior is found to be 40~50 nm. This work provides guidance for designing artificial SEI for high capacity lithium-ion battery electrodes using solid electrolyte materials.

  19. Stability analysis of graphite crystal lattice with moment interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivtsov, Anton M.

    of graphite lattice is considered. The model is based on usage of moment interactions. Carbon atom transversal stiffness to provide the stability of the hexagonal lattice. Proc. of XXXIV Summer School between atoms is r0. The angles between bonds and are shown on Fig.1. Let us present internal energy

  20. High Capacity Graphite Anodes for Li-Ion battery applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    High Capacity Graphite Anodes for Li-Ion battery applications using Tin microencapsulation Basker range 1.6V to 0.01V at 0.05 mV/s Physical characterization SEM, EDAX and XRD #12;SEM images of Bare

  1. Progress in Developing Finite Element Models Replicating Flexural Graphite Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Bratton

    2010-06-01

    This report documents the status of flexural strength evaluations from current ASTM procedures and of developing finite element models predicting the probability of failure. This work is covered under QLD REC-00030. Flexural testing procedures of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) assume a linear elastic material that has the same moduli for tension and compression. Contrary to this assumption, graphite is known to have different moduli for tension and compression. A finite element model was developed and demonstrated that accounts for the difference in moduli tension and compression. Brittle materials such as graphite exhibit significant scatter in tensile strength, so probabilistic design approaches must be used when designing components fabricated from brittle materials. ASTM procedures predicting probability of failure in ceramics were compared to methods from the current version of the ASME graphite core components rules predicting probability of failure. Using the ASTM procedures yields failure curves at lower applied forces than the ASME rules. A journal paper was published in the Journal of Nuclear Engineering and Design exploring the statistical models of fracture in graphite.

  2. Graphite Fiber Brush Anodes for Increased Power Production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graphite Fiber Brush Anodes for Increased Power Production in Air-Cathode Microbial Fuel Cells B R a conductive, but noncorrosive metal core, were examined for power production in cube (C-MFC) and bottle (B-MFC) air-cathode MFCs. Power production in C-MFCs containing brush electrodes at 9600 m2/m3 reactor volume

  3. Oxygen adsorption on graphite and nanotubes P. Giannozzi,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannozzi, Paolo

    Oxygen adsorption on graphite and nanotubes P. Giannozzi,a) R. Car, and G. Scoles Chemistry Department and Princeton Materials Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 Received 29 in molecular form,6 with an estimated binding energy E 0.19 eV. This would be consistent with the well

  4. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA); Juntz, Robert S. (Hayward, CA)

    1995-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding.

  5. ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF A GRAPHITE BASED COMPOSITE AS AFFECTED BY THE DEGREE OF MIXEDNESS OF GRAPHITE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    filled polymers and the mechanisms involved in the formation of conductive composites of polymerELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF A GRAPHITE BASED COMPOSITE AS AFFECTED BY THE DEGREE OF MIXEDNESS of the volume conductivity of the composite. Background Electrically conductive nonmetallic materials are used

  6. Artificial Neural Network for Optimized Power System Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OLeary, Daniel Albert

    2015-01-01

    vii Abstract Artificial Neural Network for Optimized PowerAn Artificial Neural Network (ANN). Data is input to theSANTA CRUZ ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK FOR OPTIMIZED POWER

  7. Artificial Life in Quantum Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Alvarez-Rodriguez; M. Sanz; L. Lamata; E. Solano

    2015-05-14

    We develop a quantum information protocol that models the biological behaviors of individuals living in a natural selection scenario. The artificially engineered evolution of the quantum living units shows the fundamental features of life in a common environment, such as self-replication, mutation, interaction of individuals, and death. We propose how to mimic these bio-inspired features in a quantum-mechanical formalism, which allows for an experimental implementation achievable with current quantum platforms. This result paves the way for the realization of artificial life and embodied evolution with quantum technologies.

  8. Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Koval, Carl; Lee, Kenny; Houle, Frances; Lewis, Nate

    2013-12-19

    The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs. JCAP brings together more than 140 top scientists and researchers from the California Institute of Technology and its lead partner, Berkeley Lab, along with collaborators from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of California campuses at Irvine and San Diego.

  9. An Investigation of the Effect of Graphite Degradation on the Irreversible Capacity in Lithium-ion Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardwick, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    graphite anodes suffer severe surface structural damage upon prolonged cycling in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

  10. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing thermal runaway in lithium batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High elastic modulus polymer...

  11. Artificial Intelligence 119 (2000) 295299 Book Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WŁrtz, Rolf P.

    2000-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence 119 (2000) 295≠299 Book Review Gossiping Nets 6 Rolf P. WŁrtz 1 Ruhr;296 R.P. WŁrtz / Artificial Intelligence 119 (2000) 295≠299 Anderson and Rosenfeld present a book

  12. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL parameters could possibly have application to other problems in vision. We investigate one such application and Cognitive Sciences and at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute

  13. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL vision tasks, including the computation of image correspondence, object verification, image synthesis at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and within the Center for Biological and Computational Learning

  14. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL parameters could possibly have application to other problems in vision. We investigate one such application of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts

  15. Artificial Intelligence: CS background D. Keil 7/11 David Keil, CSCI 400 Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, David M.

    Artificial Intelligence: CS background D. Keil 7/11 David Keil, CSCI 400 Artificial Intelligence Arrangements of data 1D. Keil Special Topics: Artificial Intelligence 1/12 2. Arrangements Topics: Artificial Intelligence 1/12 ( g ) y p * the set of all strings over L * a language (set

  16. 4. Uncertainty D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 1/12 CSCI 400 Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, David M.

    4. Uncertainty D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 1/12 CSCI 400 Artificial Intelligence David Keil in partially observable and non- deterministic environments? D. Keil Special Topics: Artificial Intelligence 1/12 2 #12;4. Uncertainty D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 1/12 Objectives 4a. Describe ways to operate

  17. Publications of the Finnish Artificial Intelligence Society -23 New Developments in Artificial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HyvŲnen, Eero

    Publications of the Finnish Artificial Intelligence Society - 23 New Developments in Artificial Intelligence and the Semantic Web Proceedings of the 12th Finnish Artificial Intelligence Conference STeP 2006 Kauppinen, Jukka Kortela, Mikko Laukkanen, Tapani Raiko, and Kim Viljanen Finnish Artificial Intelligence

  18. An Investigation of Artificial Neural Network Architectures in Artificial Life Implementations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GŁngŲr, Tunga

    . They use vision, smell and sound as input to their artificial neural network brains, which utilize HebbianAn Investigation of Artificial Neural Network Architectures in Artificial Life Implementations®C2D!EF4¶GH§G¶H¶I!46PRQSUTVXW Abstract. In this paper, an artificially created world is defined

  19. Artificial Intelligence through the eyes of Organised Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    Artificial Intelligence through the eyes of Organised Sound Eduardo Miranda Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, symbolic and artificial life approaches, algorithmic composition Abstract Artificial intelligence is a rich and still-developing field with many musical applications

  20. Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks Kenton Kirkpatrick Jim May Jr. John Networks 2 Artificial Neural Networks ANNSID Conclusions and Open Challenges #12;Motivation 3 #12;Motivating Questions Is it possible to use artificial neural networks to determine a linear model

  1. Introduction to Artificial Intelligence Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Rong

    Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (G51IAI) Dr Rong Qu Neural Networks #12;G51IAI ≠ Introduction to AI Neural Networks Chapter 20 ≠ Artificial Intelligence : A Modern Approach (AIMA) Russell ≠ Introduction to AI Neural Networks More precisely: Artificial Neural Networks Simulating, on a computer, what

  2. Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzopoulos, Demetri

    Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos-based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes that can swim hydrodynamically of artificial fishes in their virtual habitat are not entirely predictable because they are not scripted. 1

  3. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE PLANNING PROBLEMS PETRI NET FRAMEWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE PLANNING PROBLEMS IN A PETRI NET FRAMEWORK K.M Passino and PJ. Antsaluis defined and then used to model a class of Artificial Intelligence planning problems. A planning stegy. As an iJlustration of the results three Artificial Intelligence planning problems are modelled and soved

  4. History and Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    G52HPA: History and Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence Lecture 1: Module Overview Tony Pridmore syllabus © Brian Logan 2008 G52HPA Lecture 1: Module Overview 2 What is Artificial Intelligence? © Brian Logan 2008 G52HPA Lecture 1: Module Overview 3 What is Artificial Intelligence? ∑ "The study of how

  5. Unifying Artificial Intelligence Robotics: An Undergraduate Textbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crabbe, Frederick

    Unifying Artificial Intelligence Robotics: An Undergraduate Textbook Introduction to AI Robotics the artificial intelligence (AI) perspective. Robin Murphy's Introduction to AI Robotics (IAIR) is a new and artificial, intelligence perspective. Such a text would need to take into account that few undergraduates can

  6. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE Learning to see and act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meeden, Lisa A.

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE Learning to see and act An artificial-intelligence system uses machine to process large amounts of data have led to progress in many areas of science, not least artificial intelligence (AI). With advances in machine learning has come the development of machines that can learn

  7. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1537 of Technology, 1995 This report describes research done at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and within Science Foundation under contract ASC≠9217041. Support for the A.I. Laboratory's artificial intelligence

  8. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1536 Institute of Technology, 1995 This report describes research done at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory the National Science Foundation under contract ASC≠9217041. Support for the A.I. Laboratory's artificial

  9. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL by a grant from the NSF (ASC--9217041). Support for the laboratory's artificial intelligence research. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, the Center for Biological and Computational Learning, and the Artificial

  10. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1611 June and Cognitive Sciences, the Center for Biological and Computational Learning and the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Support for the artificial intelligence research

  11. Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos the approach, we develop a physics≠based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes. As in nature, the detailed motions of artificial fishes in their vir≠ tual habitat are not entirely predictable

  12. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scassellati, Brian

    February, 1999 A Binocular, Foveated Active Vision System Brian Scassellati MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab project at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. The ac- tive vision system features a 3 degreeMASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1628

  13. Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared for the U.S. Department agency thereof. #12;Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared by Mele University of Hawaii at Manoa August 2011 #12;i Executive Summary Algae are considered to be a viable crop

  14. Suitability, Position Sensitivity Designations, and Related Personnel Matters

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1989-12-19

    The order identifies the interrelationships among suitability, security and access authorizations; to establish guidance and policy regarding position sensitivity designations, certain background investigations, and suitability determinations; and to establish the policies and procedures regarding waivers of pre-employment investigations. Chg 1, dated 7-8-92 supersedes DOE 3731.1.

  15. Testing of Small Graphite Samples for Nuclear Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Chapman

    2010-11-01

    Accurately determining the mechanical properties of small irradiated samples is crucial to predicting the behavior of the overal irradiated graphite components within a Very High Temperature Reactor. The sample size allowed in a material test reactor, however, is limited, and this poses some difficulties with respect to mechanical testing. In the case of graphite with a larger grain size, a small sample may exhibit characteristics not representative of the bulk material, leading to inaccuracies in the data. A study to determine a potential size effect on the tensile strength was pursued under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. It focuses first on optimizing the tensile testing procedure identified in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard C 781-08. Once the testing procedure was verified, a size effect was assessed by gradually reducing the diameter of the specimens. By monitoring the material response, a size effect was successfully identified.

  16. Catalytic graphitization of carbon aerogels by transition metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado-Hodar, F.J.; Moreno-Castilla, C.; Rivera-Utrilla, J.; Hanzawa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2000-05-02

    Carbon aerogels and Cr-, Fe-, Co-, and Ni-containing carbon aerogels were obtained by pyrolysis, at temperatures between 500 and 1,800 C, of the corresponding aerogels prepared by the sol-gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde. All samples were characterized by mercury porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Results obtained show that carbon aerogels are, essentially, macroporous materials that maintain large pore volumes even after pyrolysis at 1,800 C. For pyrolysis at temperatures higher than 1,000 C, the presence of the transition metals produced graphitized areas with three-dimensional stacking order, as shown by HRTEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. HRTEM also showed that the metal-carbon containing aerogels were formed by polyhedral structures. Cr and Fe seem to be the best catalysts for graphitization of carbon aerogels.

  17. Carbon K-Edge XANES Spectromicroscopy of Natural Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes,J.; Cody, G.; Rumble, D.; Haberstroh, P.; Wirick, S.; Gelinas, Y.; Morais-Cabral, J.

    2008-01-01

    The black carbon continuum is composed of a series of carbon-rich components derived from combustion or metamorphism and characterized by contrasting environmental behavior and susceptibility to oxidation. In this work, we present a micro-scale density fractionation method that allows isolating the small quantities of soot-like and graphitic material usually found in natural samples. Organic carbon and {delta}{sup 13}C mass balance calculations were used to quantify the relative contributions of the two fractions to thermally-stable organic matter from a series of aquatic sediments. Varying proportions of soot-like and graphitic material were found in these samples, with large variations in {delta}{sup 13}C signatures suggesting important differences in their origin and/or dynamics in the environment.

  18. Polymer graphite composite anodes for Li-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Polymer graphite composite anodes for Li-ion batteries Basker Veeraraghavan, Bala Haran, Ralph analysis #12;TGA analysis of polymer composite SFG10 samples -0.0 150.0 300.0 450.0 600.0 750.0 900-discharge curves of polymer composite SFG10 samples 0 200 400 600 800 Specific Capacity (mAh/g) 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4

  19. Cryogenic Thermal Expansion of Y-12 Graphite Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eash, D. T.

    2013-07-08

    Thermal expansion measurements betwccn 20įK and 300įK were made on segments of three uranium-loaded Y-12 uncoated graphite fuel elements. The thermal expansion of these fuel elements over this temperature range is represented by the equation: {Delta}L/L = -39.42 x 10{sup -5} + 1.10 x 10{sup -7} T + 6.47 x 10{sup -9} T{sup 2} - 8.30 x 10{sup -12} T{sup 3}.

  20. Graphite having improved thermal stress resistance and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Charles R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating a graphite article comprises the steps of impregnating a coke article by first heating the coke article in contact with a thermoplastic pitch at a temperature within the range of 250.degree.-300.degree. C. at a pressure within the range of 200-2000 psig for at least 4-10 hours and then heating said article at a temperature within the range of 450.degree.-485.degree. C. at a pressure of 200-2000 psig for about 16-24 hours to provide an impregnated article; heating the impregnated article for sufficient time to carbonize the impregnant to provide a second coke article, and graphitizing the second coke article. A graphite having improved thermal stress resistance results when the coke to be impregnated contains 1-3 wt.% sulfur and no added puffing inhibitors. An additional improvement in thermal stress resistance is achieved when the second coke article is heated above about 1400.degree. C. at a rate of at least 10.degree. C./minute to a temperature above the puffing temperature.

  1. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Ramsey, P.B.; Juntz, R.S.

    1995-07-04

    An improved method is disclosed for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite`s high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding. 11 figs.

  2. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcwilliams, A. J.

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  3. Understanding Creep Mechanisms in Graphite with Experiments, Multiscale Simulations, and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eapen, Jacob; Murty, Korukonda; Burchell, Timothy

    2014-06-02

    Disordering mechanisms in graphite have a long history with conflicting viewpoints. Using Raman and x-ray photon spectroscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction experiments and atomistic modeling and simulations, the current project has developed a fundamental understanding of early-to-late state radiation damage mechanisms in nuclear reactor grade graphite (NBG-18 and PCEA). We show that the topological defects in graphite play an important role under neutron and ion irradiation.

  4. Environmental and health effects review for obscurant graphite flakes. Final report, 1991 July--1993 May

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, C.J.; Ligotke, M.W.; Landis, W.G.; Downs, J.L.; Tiller, B.L.; Moore, E.B. Jr.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    The health and environmental effects of obscurant graphite flakes were reviewed and compared to predicted levels of graphite flake material in the field during typical testing and training scenarios. Graphite flake dispersion and deposition for simulated mechanical and pyrotechnic releases were determined using a modified Gaussian atmospheric plume-dispersion model. The potential for wind resuspension of graphite flakes is controlled by weathering processes and incorporation rates in soil. Chemically, graphite flakes pose little risk to aquatic or terrestrial systems. Mechanical damage to plants and invertebrate and vertebrate organisms from the flakes is also minimal. In humans, the pathological and physiological response to inhaled graphite flake is similar to that induced by nuisance dusts and cause only transient pulmonary changes. Repeated exposure to very high concentrations (such as those near the source generator) may overwhelm the clearance mechanisms of the lung and result in pulmonary damage from the retained particles in unprotected individuals. However, these lesions either resolve with time or are of limited severity. Health effects of mixed aerosols of mixed aerosols of graphite and fog oil are similar to those produced by graphite flakes alone. Environmental impacts of fog oil-coated graphite flakes are not well known.

  5. Surface treated natural graphite as anode material for high-power Li-ion battery applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.; Vissers, D. R.; Amine, K.; Barsukov, I. V.; Henry, F.; Doniger, J.; Chemical Engineering; Superior Graphite Co.

    2006-01-01

    High power application of Li-ion battery in hybrid electrical vehicles requires low cost and safe cell materials. Among the various carbon anode materials used in lithium ion batteries, natural graphite shows the most promise with advantages in performance and cost. However, natural graphite is not compatible with propylene carbonate (PC)-based electrolytes, which have a lower melting point and improved safety characteristics. The problem with it is that the molecules of propylene carbonate intercalate with Li+ into graphite, and that frequently leads to the exfoliation of the graphite matrix.

  6. Raman spectroscopy of graphite in high magnetic fields: Electron-phonon coupling and magnetophonon resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Younghee; Smirnov, Dmitry; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C.

    2013-12-04

    The magneto-Raman measurements of graphite were performed in a back-scattering Faraday geometry at temperature 10 K in magnetic fields up to 45 T. The experimental data reveal the rich structure of Raman-active excitations dominated by K-point massive electrons. At high magnetic fields the graphite E{sub 2g} Raman line shows complex multi- component behavior interpreted as magnetophonon resonance coupled electron-phonon modes at graphiteís K-point. Also we found the clear signature of the fundamental, strongly dumped, n=0 magnetophonon resonance associated with H point massless holes.

  7. Optimization and global minimization methods suitable for neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Optimization and global minimization methods suitable for neural networks Wlodzislaw Duch and Jerzy Louis Pasteur, Blvd. Sebastien Brant, 67400 Illkirch, France Abstract Neural networks are usually and statistical methods in many applications. For neural networks with predetermined structure, for example

  8. Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Fei; Xu, Wu; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Wei; Li, Xiaolin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chen, Xilin; Yang, Zhenguo; Zhang, Jiguang

    2012-04-27

    In order to form the stable surface film and to further enhance the long-term cycling stability of the graphite anodes of lithium-ion batteries, the surface of graphite powders has been modified by AlF3 coating through chemical precipitation method. The AlF3-coated graphite shows no evident changes in the bulk structure and a thin AlF3-coating layer of about 2 nm thick is found to uniformly cover the graphite particles with 2 wt% AlF3 content. However, it delivers a higher initial discharge capacity and largely improved rate performances compared to the pristine graphite. Remarkably, AlF3 coated graphite demonstrated a much better cycle life. After 300 cycles, AlF3 coated graphite and uncoated graphite show capacity retention of 92% and 81%, respectively. XPS measurement shows that a more conductive solid electrode interface (SEI) layer was formed on AlF3 coated graphite as compared to uncoated graphite. SEM monograph also reveals that the AlF3-coated graphite particles have a much more stable surface morphology after long-term cycling. Therefore, the improved electrochemical performance of AlF3 coated graphite can be attributed to a more stable and conductive SEI formed on coated graphite anode during cycling process.

  9. Status of Initial Assessment of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Graphite Grades for NGNP Appkications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strizak, Joe P [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2011-12-01

    Current candidate graphite grades for the core structures of NGNP include grades NBG-17, NBG-18, PCEA and IG-430. Both NBG-17 and NBG-18 are manufactured using pitch coke, and are vibrationally molded. These medium grain products are produced by SGL Carbon SAS (France). Tayo Tanso (Japan) produces IG-430 which is a petroleum coke, isostatically molded, nuclear grade graphite. And PCEA is a medium grain, extruded graphite produced by UCAR Carbon Co. (USA) from petroleum coke. An experimental program has been initiated to develop physical and mechanical properties data for these current candidate graphites. The results will be judged against the requirements for nuclear grade graphites set forth in ASTM standard D 7219-05 "Standard Specification for Isotropic and Near-isotropic Nuclear Graphites". Physical properties data including thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion, and mechanical properties data including tensile, compressive and flexural strengths will be obtained using the established test methods covered in D-7219 and ASTM C 781-02 "Standard Practice for Testing Graphite and Boronated Graphite Components for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactors". Various factors known to effect the properties of graphites will be investigated. These include specimen size, spatial location within a graphite billet, specimen orientation (ag and wg) within a billet, and billet-to-billet variations. The current status of the materials characterization program is reported herein. To date billets of the four graphite grades have been procured, and detailed cut up plans for obtaining the various specimens have been prepared. Particular attention has been given to the traceability of each specimen to its spatial location and orientation within a billet.

  10. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  11. Stacking fault induced tunnel barrier in platelet graphite nanofiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Yann-Wen, E-mail: chiidong@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: ywlan@phys.sinica.edu.tw; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chang, Chia-Seng; Chen, Chii-Dong, E-mail: chiidong@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: ywlan@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-Hao [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Opto-Mechatronics, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi 62102, Taiwan (China); Li, Yuan-Yao [Graduate Institute of Opto-Mechatronics, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi 62102, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-08

    A correlation study using image inspection and electrical characterization of platelet graphite nanofiber devices is conducted. Close transmission electron microscopy and diffraction pattern inspection reveal layers with inflection angles appearing in otherwise perfectly stacked graphene platelets, separating nanofibers into two domains. Electrical measurement gives a stability diagram consisting of alternating small-large Coulomb blockade diamonds, suggesting that there are two charging islands coupled together through a tunnel junction. Based on these two findings, we propose that a stacking fault can behave as a tunnel barrier for conducting electrons and is responsible for the observed double-island single electron transistor characteristics.

  12. Fabrication of microfluidic devices for artificial respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hyesung, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    We are developing elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices incorporated with photoactive thin films to create an implantable artificial respiration platform. Whereas state-of-the-art respiration support ...

  13. "Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science discoveries unveiled "Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling: Los Alamos science discoveries unveiled September 15 The event is an opportunity for...

  14. Monash researchers led by Dr. Dan Li have developed a novel method for converting natural graphite into highly porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, David

    natural graphite into highly porous graphene film for advanced applications. Figure 1: illustrates the conversion of inexpensive & abundant graphite into highly porous, mechanically robust conductive films (eg capacitors, batteries and fuel cells) n LCD displays and photovoltaic devices n Composites

  15. Graphite fountain: Modeling of growth on transition metals under a thermal Jongpil Ye and Rodney S. Ruoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4812730] I. INTRODUCTION Graphite has long been in high demand in the steel, automotive storage devices.1,2 Commercial graphite is generally synthesized by mixing and thermally annealing

  16. Study of polypyrrole graphite composite as anode material for secondary lithium-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Study of polypyrrole graphite composite as anode material for secondary lithium-ion batteries; Irreversible capacity; Anode material; Lithium-ion batteries 1. Introduction To ensure long cycle life for the Li-ion battery. Of various carbon materials that have been tried, graphite is favored because it (i

  17. Synthesis of graphene-based nanosheets via chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the preparation of graphene sheets from graphite. After numerous failed attempts to create graphene-based sheetsSynthesis of graphene-based nanosheets via chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide Sasha of a colloidal suspension of exfoliated graphene oxide sheets in water with hydrazine hydrate results

  18. Measurements of chemical erosion of ATJ graphite by low energy D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract We report on initial results of chemical sputtering of ATJ graphite by impact of DĢ 2Measurements of chemical erosion of ATJ graphite by low energy DĢ 2 impact F.W. Meyer *, H. PACS: 34.50.Dy; 52.20.Hv; 52.40.Hf; 79.20.ņm; 79.20.Rf Keywords: Carbon-based materials; Chemical

  19. Laser vaporization clusters from metal loaded graphite used for SWNT generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Laser vaporization clusters from metal loaded graphite used for SWNT generation Toshikazu Mukaea, The Univ. of Tokyo In order to study the generation mechanism of SWNTs, we have studied metal-carbon binary clusters generated by the laser vaporization of Ni/Co and Ni/Y doped graphite materials used

  20. Emission characteristics and dynamics of C2 from laser produced graphite plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Emission characteristics and dynamics of C2 from laser produced graphite plasma S. S. Harilal, Riju 1996; accepted for publication 20 December 1996 The emission features of laser ablated graphite plume diagnostic technique. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy is employed to reveal the velocity

  1. Diffusion within a Layered, Graphite-Like, Spherical Electrode Theoretical Aspects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Philip L.

    Diffusion within a Layered, Graphite-Like, Spherical Electrode Theoretical Aspects Paul B. Antohi. Within this model, which mimics a layered, graphite-like spherical electrode, species can enter or leave further performance optimization of Li+ batteries have generated renewed interest into experimental

  2. Calendar aging of a Graphite/LiFePO4 cell M. Kassem,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Calendar aging of a Graphite/LiFePO4 cell M. Kassem,a J. Bernard,b R. Revel,b S. Pťlissier,c F Rochelle, France Abstract Graphite/LFP commercial cells are stored under 3 different conditions increase is 70% or less. 1. Introduction Lithium-ion batteries are now the dominant rechargeable systems

  3. Coulomb Oscillations and Hall Effect in Quasi-2D Graphite Quantum Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEuen, Paul L.

    Coulomb Oscillations and Hall Effect in Quasi-2D Graphite Quantum Dots J. Scott Bunch, Yuval Yaish-temperature electrical transport measurements on gated, quasi-2D graphite quantum dots. In devices with low contact of graphene, a zero band gap semiconductor with two linearly dispersing bands that touch at the corners

  4. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Jun (Columbia, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  5. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 064302 (2012) Polarons in highly doped atomically thin graphitic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hague, Jim

    2012-01-01

    can be mechanically exfoliated, including SnS2, CdI2, and MoS2, but these have the chalcogenidePHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 064302 (2012) Polarons in highly doped atomically thin graphitic materials J are computed for highly doped graphene-on-substrate and other atomically thin graphitic systems using

  6. Chemical sputtering of ATJ graphite induced by low-energy D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the surface temperature and the hydrogen impact energy. Previ- ous hydrogen impact results obtained using pure sputtering processes that occur when hydrogen interacts with the low-density ATJ form of graphite ($1.7 gChemical sputtering of ATJ graphite induced by low-energy DĢ 2 bombardment L.I. Vergara *, F

  7. INITIAL COMPARISON OF BASELINE PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FOR THE VHTR CANDIDATE GRAPHITE GRADES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Mark C

    2014-09-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design, a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled configuration that is capable of producing thermal energy for power generation as well as process heat for industrial applications that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is endeavoring to minimize the conservative estimates of as-manufactured mechanical and physical properties in nuclear-grade graphites by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a thorough comparison between these values in different graphite grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons both in specific properties and in the associated variability between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between each of the grades of graphite that are considered ďcandidateĒ grades from four major international graphite producers. These particular grades (NBG-18, NBG-17, PCEA, IG-110, and 2114) are the major focus of the evaluations presently underway on irradiated graphite properties through the series of Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiments. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL from which billets are formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration. NBG-17 graphite from SGL is essentially NBG-18 with the grain size reduced by a factor of two. PCEA, petroleum coke graphite from GrafTech with a similar grain size to NBG-17, is formed via an extrusion process and was initially considered the favored grade for the prismatic layout. IG-110 and 2114, from Toyo Tanso and Mersen (formerly Carbone Lorraine), respectively, are fine-grain grades produced via an isomolding process. An analysis of the comparison between each of these grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for the prediction of in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear-grade graphites will continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

  8. Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re; Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie

    2014-05-05

    Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

  9. Suitability for 3D Printed Parts for Laboratory Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwicker, Andrew P.; Bloom, Josh; Albertson, Robert; Gershman, Sophia

    2014-08-01

    3D printing has become popular for a variety of users, from industrial to the home hobbyist, to scientists and engineers interested in producing their own laboratory equipment. In order to determine the suitability of 3D printed parts for our plasma physics laboratory, we measured the accuracy, strength, vacuum compatibility, and electrical properties of pieces printed in plastic. The flexibility of rapidly creating custom parts has led to the 3D printer becoming an invaluable resource in our laboratory and is equally suitable for producing equipment for advanced undergraduate laboratories.

  10. Creating Artificial Radiation Belts in the Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Creating Artificial Radiation Belts in the Lab or "Some Observations of Hot Plasma Trapped Jeff #12;Outline ∑ The Earth's radiation belts and ring current ∑ Fast-electron interchange instability) fusion. #12;#12;"Artificial Radiation Belts" Van Allen kissing Explorer 4 "good bye" before it's launch

  11. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts, which is likely to play a significant role in eventually making intelligent machines. Not surprisingly

  12. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1570 August fl Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1996 This report describes research done at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Support for this research was provided

  13. Research Article Artificial Intelligence in Video Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    Research Article Artificial Intelligence in Video Games: Towards a Unified Framework Firas Safadi artificial intelligence (AI) is a broad notion in video games, it is important to start by defining the scope human intelligence. On the other hand, AI is usually independently designed for each game. This makes

  14. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Christof

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL of Technology within the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and the Center for Biological Information Processing is the sluggish time course of the electrical signals in the very early stages of vision compared with our quick

  15. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY and CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts of antique cars. Computer vision is well on its way to solve restricted versions of the problem of object

  16. ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION OF LAKES AND PONDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION OF LAKES AND PONDS A Review of the Literature SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT., John L. Farley, Director ARTIFICIAL FERTILIZATION OF LAKES AND PONDS A Review of the Literature By John Interpretation of results .................. l5 Fertilization and pond culture .................. l6 The pond

  17. Near & Far Sides of Artificial Sky†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    This paper is a general overview of the field of artificial Intelligence and of some of the application issues within that field. Its first objective is to try and establish a viable definition for what artificial intelligence is, and to make a...

  18. Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared by Mele Chillingworth Scott of Hawaii at Manoa August 2011 #12;i Executive Summary Algae are considered to be a viable crop for biofuel for biofuels has increased interest in growing algae in Hawaii for biofuels. An analysis of algae production

  19. Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE-FC26-06NT42847 Hawai`i on Bioenergy Analyses By the Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

  20. Broadband municipal optical networks in Greece: A suitable business model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broadband municipal optical networks in Greece: A suitable business model Christos Bouras a, Greece b Research Academic Computer Technology Institute, N. Kazanzaki, University of Patras Campus, GR-26500 Rio, Greece c Department of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, PO Box 114, GR

  1. Characterization of Shape Memory Alloys Using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    1 Characterization of Shape Memory Alloys Using Artificial Neural Networks Jim Henrickson, Kenton ≠ Generate Training Data ≠ Train Artificial Neural Network Results Conclusion Characterization of Shape Characterization of Shape Memory Alloys Using Artificial Neural Networks Jim Henrickson, Kenton Kirkpatrick, Dr

  2. Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzopoulos, Demetri

    1 Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning in a Simulated inhabited by realistic artificial fishes. Our algorithms emulate not only the appearance, movement model each animal holistically. An artificial fish is an autonomous agent situated in a simulated

  3. Ben Goertzel, Pascal Hitzler, Marcus Hutter (Editors) Artificial General Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutter, Marcus

    #12;Ben Goertzel, Pascal Hitzler, Marcus Hutter (Editors) Artificial General Intelligence Proceedings of the Second Conference on Artificial General Intelligence, AGI 2009, Arlington, Virginia, USA ________________________________________________________________________ #12;Artificial General Intelligence Volume Editors Ben Goertzel Novamente & Biomind LLC 1405 Bernerd

  4. Artificial general intelligence: an organism and level based position

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Leslie S.

    Artificial general intelligence: an organism and level based position statement Leslie S. SMITH 1. Keywords. artificial general intelligence, brain model, paramecium, level interaction Introduction There are many views of what should be described as artificial general intelligence. Gen- eral intelligence

  5. Eric Baum, Marcus Hutter, Emanuel Kitzelmann (Editors) Artificial General Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutter, Marcus

    #12; Eric Baum, Marcus Hutter, Emanuel Kitzelmann (Editors) Artificial General Intelligence Proceedings of the Third Conference on Artificial General Intelligence, AGI 2010, Lugano, Switzerland, March 5 of the first mathematical theory of Optimal Universal Artificial Intelligence. Ray intended to deliver

  6. Teaching Artificial Intelligence in Introductory Cognitive Science Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, FabiŠn E.

    Teaching Artificial Intelligence in Introductory Cognitive Science Courses Sara Owsley Sood Pomona of Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science is the question "What is intelligence?" The answer of topics and resources intended for use in teaching artificial intelligence in the confines

  7. Artificial Production Review Report and Recommendations of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Artificial Production Review Report and Recommendations of the Northwest Power Planning Council.................................................................................................................................. 1 A. Artificial Production Programs in the Columbia River Basin................................................. 1 B. The Council's Artificial Production Review

  8. Artificial General Intelligence and the Future of the Human Race

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlacka, Bryon

    2012-01-01

    Institute for Artificial Intelligence [SIAI], 2001, para.Institute for Artificial Intelligence [SIAI], 2001, para.I ssue 2 ē 1 B S J Artificial Intelligence is all around us.

  9. Transit Lightcurve Signatures of Artificial Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Arnold

    2005-03-27

    The forthcoming space missions, able to detect Earth-like planets by the transit method, will a fortiori also be able to detect the transit of artificial planet-size objects. Multiple artificial objects would produce lightcurves easily distinguishable from natural transits. If only one artificial object transits, detecting its artificial nature becomes more difficult. We discuss the case of three different objects (triangle, 2-screen, louver-like 6-screen) and show that they have a transit lightcurve distinguishable from the transit of natural planets, either spherical or oblate, although an ambiguity with the transit of a ringed planet exists in some cases. We show that transits, especially in the case of multiple artificial objects, could be used for the emission of attention-getting signals, with a sky coverage comparable to the laser pulse method. The large number of expected planets (several hundreds) to be discovered by the transit method by next space missions will allow to test these ideas.

  10. Quality Control by Artificial Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Edmond Y. [University of Hong Kong, The; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Niel, Kurt S. [Upper Austria University of Applied Science, Engineering and Environmental Studies

    2010-01-01

    Computational technology has fundamentally changed many aspects of our lives. One clear evidence is the development of artificial-vision systems, which have effectively automated many manual tasks ranging from quality inspection to quantitative assessment. In many cases, these machine-vision systems are even preferred over manual ones due to their repeatability and high precision. Such advantages come from significant research efforts in advancing sensor technology, illumination, computational hardware, and image-processing algorithms. Similar to the Special Section on Quality Control by Artificial Vision published two years ago in Volume 17, Issue 3 of the Journal of Electronic Imaging, the present one invited papers relevant to fundamental technology improvements to foster quality control by artificial vision, and fine-tuned the technology for specific applications. We aim to balance both theoretical and applied work pertinent to this special section theme. Consequently, we have seven high-quality papers resulting from the stringent peer-reviewing process in place at the Journal of Electronic Imaging. Some of the papers contain extended treatment of the authors work presented at the SPIE Image Processing: Machine Vision Applications conference and the International Conference on Quality Control by Artificial Vision. On the broad application side, Liu et al. propose an unsupervised texture image segmentation scheme. Using a multilayer data condensation spectral clustering algorithm together with wavelet transform, they demonstrate the effectiveness of their approach on both texture and synthetic aperture radar images. A problem related to image segmentation is image extraction. For this, O'Leary et al. investigate the theory of polynomial moments and show how these moments can be compared to classical filters. They also show how to use the discrete polynomial-basis functions for the extraction of 3-D embossed digits, demonstrating superiority over Fourier-basis functions for this task. Image registration is another important task for machine vision. Bingham and Arrowood investigate the implementation and results in applying Fourier phase matching for projection registration, with a particular focus on nondestructive testing using computed tomography. Readers interested in enriching their arsenal of image-processing algorithms for machine-vision tasks should find these papers enriching. Meanwhile, we have four papers dealing with more specific machine-vision tasks. The first one, Yahiaoui et al., is quantitative in nature, using machine vision for real-time passenger counting. Occulsion is a common problem in counting objects and people, and they circumvent this issue with a dense stereovision system, achieving 97 to 99% accuracy in their tests. On the other hand, the second paper by Oswald-Tranta et al. focuses on thermographic crack detection. An infrared camera is used to detect inhomogeneities, which may indicate surface cracks. They describe the various steps in developing fully automated testing equipment aimed at a high throughput. Another paper describing an inspection system is Molleda et al., which handles flatness inspection of rolled products. They employ optical-laser triangulation and 3-D surface reconstruction for this task, showing how these can be achieved in real time. Last but not least, Presles et al. propose a way to monitor the particle-size distribution of batch crystallization processes. This is achieved through a new in situ imaging probe and image-analysis methods. While it is unlikely any reader may be working on these four specific problems at the same time, we are confident that readers will find these papers inspiring and potentially helpful to their own machine-vision system developments.

  11. Artificial neural networks in models of specialization, guild evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getz, Wayne M.

    Artificial neural networks in models of specialization, guild evolution and sympatric speciation on host choice, employing artificial neural networks as models for the host recognition system

  12. Designing a TAC thermometer from a VHTR graphite structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, James A. Kotter, Dale; Garrett, Steven L.; Ali, Randall A.

    2015-03-31

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. Very High Temperature Reactors are pushing the in core temperatures even higher. A unique sensing approach will be discussed to address the necessary high temperature measurements. Thermoacoustic thermometry exploits high temperatures and uses materials that are immune to the effects of ionizing radiation to create a temperature sensor that is self-powered and wireless. In addition, the form-factor for the Thermoacoustic Thermometer (TACT) can be designed to be integrated within common in-pile structures. There are no physical moving parts required for TACT and the sensor is self-powered, as it uses the nuclear fuel for its heat source. TACT data will be presented from a laboratory prototype mimicking the design necessary for a VHTR graphite structure.

  13. A graphite-prism definition for Avogadro's "integer"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Fraundorf; Melanie Lipp

    2015-08-05

    The new International System of Units may let us select an integer value for Avogadro's number. Some might prefer an integer that's divisible by 12, so that an integer number of $^{12}C$ atoms may be associated (to first order) with a gram's mass. For educational and practical reasons it may also help to choose a {\\em physically-meaningful} definition within measurement error of the current numeric value. Cubes of diamond face-centered-cubic Si and (much rarer) face-centered-cubic C have been proposed, but these structures do not have naturally-occurring facets (or numbers of atoms generally divisible by 12). We show here that graphite prisms formed by stacking $m$ hexagonal graphene sheets, with $m \\equiv 51,150,060$ carbon-12 atoms on each side, are a natural solution that may facilitate generation of precise molar standards as well.

  14. Method of producing exfoliated graphite composite compositions for fuel cell flow field plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-04-08

    A method of producing an electrically conductive composite composition, which is particularly useful for fuel cell bipolar plate applications. The method comprises: (a) providing a supply of expandable graphite powder; (b) providing a supply of a non-expandable powder component comprising a binder or matrix material; (c) blending the expandable graphite with the non-expandable powder component to form a powder mixture wherein the non-expandable powder component is in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the powder mixture; (d) exposing the powder mixture to a temperature sufficient for exfoliating the expandable graphite to obtain a compressible mixture comprising expanded graphite worms and the non-expandable component; (e) compressing the compressible mixture at a pressure within the range of from about 5 psi to about 50,000 psi in predetermined directions into predetermined forms of cohered graphite composite compact; and (f) treating the so-formed cohered graphite composite to activate the binder or matrix material thereby promoting adhesion within the compact to produce the desired composite composition. Preferably, the non-expandable powder component further comprises an isotropy-promoting agent such as non-expandable graphite particles. Further preferably, step (e) comprises compressing the mixture in at least two directions. The method leads to composite plates with exceptionally high thickness-direction electrical conductivity.

  15. Oxidation of PCEA nuclear graphite by low water concentrations in helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I; Mee, Robert; Wang, Peng; Romanova, Anna V; Burchell, Timothy D

    2014-10-01

    Accelerated oxidation tests were performed to determine kinetic parameters of the chronic oxidation reaction of PCEA graphite in contact with helium coolant containing low moisture concentrations in high temperature gas-cooled reactors. To the authors best knowledge such a study has not been done since the detailed analysis of reaction of H-451 graphite with steam [Velasquez, Hightower, Burnette, 1978]. Since that H-451 graphite is now unavailable, it is urgently needed to characterize chronic oxidation behavior of new graphite grades under qualification for gas-cooled reactors. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism of carbon oxidation by water results in a non-linear reaction rate expression, with at least six different parameters. They were determined in accelerated oxidation experiments that covered a large range of temperatures (800 to 1100 oC), and partial pressures of water (15 to 850 Pa) and hydrogen (30 to 150 Pa) and used graphite specimens thin enough (4 mm) in order to avoid diffusion effects. Data analysis employed a statistical method based on multiple likelihood estimation of parameters and simultaneous fitting of non-linear equations. The results show significant material-specific differences between graphite grades PCEA and H-451 which were attributed to microstructural dissimilarity of the two materials. It is concluded that kinetic data cannot be transferred from one graphite grade to another.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of graphite-metal fluoride intercalation compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McQuillan, B.W.

    1981-04-01

    The compound C/sub x/AsF/sub 5/ was prepared and characterized by x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption, which show the presence of As(III) and As(V), and the As-F bond distances are consistent with AsF/sub 3/ and AsF/sup -//sub 6/, C/sup +//sub 8/AsF/sup -//sub 6/ and C/sup +//sub 8/OsF/sup -//sub 6/ were synthesized. The C/sub x/AsF/sub 6/ and numerous standard arsenic-flourine compounds were studied by x-ray absorption. Magnetic susceptibility of C/sup +//sub 8/OsF/sup -//sub 6/ confirms the high degree of oxidation in this compound. X-ray absorption studies were begun to determine the species present within the graphite when BrF/sub 3/ or GeF/sub 4/ + F/sub 2/ are added. In the BrF/sub 3/ case, Br/sub 2/ is evolved and only Br(III) is present in the graphite. The binary phase diagram XeF/sub 2/:Xe/sup +//sub 5/AsF/sup -//sub 6/ was investigated by melting point determination and Raman spectroscopy. This mixture near 1.3:1 forms a kinetically stable glass at room temperature and is molten at 50/sup 0/C. Several new species or phases are observed in the Raman spectra. These species have been assigned tentative structures.

  17. Graphite fuels combustion off-gas treatment options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, R.J.; Lords, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    Scenarios for burning bulk graphite and for burning crushed fuel particles from graphite spent nuclear fuels have been considered. Particulates can be removed with sintered metal filters. Subsequent cooling would then condense semi-volatile fission products into or onto a particulate. These particulates would be trapped by a second sintered metal filter or downstream packed bed. A packed bed scrub column can be used to eliminate most of the iodine-129 and tritium. A molecular sieve bed is proposed to collect the residual {sup 129}I and other tramp radionuclides downstream (Ruthenium, etc.). Krypton-85 can be recovered, if need be, either by cryogenics or by the KALC process (Krypton Adsorption in Liquid Carbon dioxide). Likewise carbon-14 in the form of carbon dioxide could be collected with a caustic or lime scrub solution and incorporated into a grout. Sulfur dioxide present will be well below regulatory concern level of 4.0 tons per year and most of it would be removed by the scrubber. Carbon monoxide emissions will depend on the choice of burner and start-up conditions. Should the system exceed the regulatory concern level, a catalytic converter in the final packed bed will be provided. Radon and its daughters have sufficiently short half-lives (less than two minutes). If necessary, an additional holdup bed can be added before the final HEPA filters or additional volume can be added to the molecular sieve bed to limit radon emissions. The calculated total effective dose equivalent at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory boundary from a single release of all the {sup 3}, {sup 14}C, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I in the total fuel mass if 0.43 mrem/year.

  18. Suitability versus fidelity for rating single-photon guns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George M. Hockney; Pieter Kok; Jonathan P. Dowling

    2003-04-01

    The creation of specified quantum states is important for most, if not all, applications in quantum computation and communication. The quality of the state preparation is therefore an essential ingredient in any assessment of a quantum-state gun. We show that the fidelity, under the standard definitions is not sufficient to assess quantum sources, and we propose a new measure of suitability that necessarily depends on the application for the source. We consider the performance of single-photon guns in the context of quantum key distribution (QKD) and linear optical quantum computation. Single-photon sources for QKD need radically different properties than sources for quantum computing. Furthermore, the suitability for single-photon guns is discussed explicitly in terms of experimentally accessible criteria.

  19. Graphite-ceramic rf Faraday-thermal shield and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hwang, D.L.Q.; Hosea, J.C.

    1983-05-05

    The present invention is directed to a brazing procedure for joining a ceramic or glass material (e.g., Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or Macor) to graphite. In particular, the present invention is directed to a novel brazing procedure for the production of a brazed ceramic graphite product useful as a Faraday shield. The brazed ceramic graphite Faraday shield of the present invention may be used in Magnetic Fusion Devices (e.g., Princeton Large Torus Tokamak) or other high temperature resistant apparatus.

  20. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chan, Kwai S. (San Antonio, TX); Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry (San Antonio, TX); Liang, Wuwei (Austin, TX)

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  1. Suitable thin shell structural configurations for earth sheltered housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behr, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    An earth sheltered house is one whose building envelope is substantially in contact with soil, without necessarily being totally underground. Hence, it can provide the commonly sought attributes of a residence, including natural light, exterior views, and curb appeal. It also exhibits strong energy performance, lower maintenance, and good storm protection. Despite the longer-term life cycle cost advantages of earth sheltered buildings, a current hindrance to the mass market acceptance of earth sheltered housing is higher initial cost which is caused, in part, by the inability of conventional rectilinear structural systems to support economically the massive soil loads imposed on earth covered buildings. In deference to the premise that technical suitability is no guarantee of innovation acceptance in the housing industry, a survey of the nontechnical impediments to housing innovation was first undertaken. These impediment areas include: market inhibition; builder trepidations; industry constraints; and financing problems. As a result of an architectural design program written under contract for the Department of Energy, it was possible to include a rather extensive (but necessarily subjective) evaluation of the architectural potential for earth sheltered shell structures. Engineering suitability dimensions included structural effectiveness, constructability, and economy of construction for single- and double-curvature thin shell structures. Overall engineering suitability and architectural potential are deemed to be adequate, although non-engineering impediments to housing innovation appear to raise significant questions regarding the potential for mass market implementation of thin shell stuctures in earth sheltered housing.

  2. Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid NICTA is developing technology to automate costs. The Future ∑ Cover more of Smart Grid control (diagnosis, reconfiguration, protection, voltage) products for the Smart Grid. Contact Details: Technical Jussi Rintanen Canberra Research Laboratory Tel

  3. Quantization of Games: Towards Quantum Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katarzyna Miakisz; Edward W. Piotrowski; Jan Sladkowski

    2004-12-30

    On grounds of the discussed material, we reason about possible future development of quantum game theory and its impact on information processing and the emerging information society. The idea of quantum artificial intelligence is explained.

  4. Achieving Artificial Intelligence through Building Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Rodney A.

    1986-05-01

    We argue that generally accepted methodologies of Artificial Intelligence research are limited in the proportion of human level intelligence they can be expected to emulate. We argue that the currently accepted ...

  5. Artificial Immune System based urban traffic control†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negi, Pallav

    2007-09-17

    Borrowing ideas from natural immunity, Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) offer a novel approach to solving many diagnosis, optimization and control problems. In the course of this research this paradigm was applied to the problem of optimizing urban...

  6. Building Grounded Abstractions for Artificial Intelligence Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hearn, Robert A.

    2004-06-16

    Most Artificial Intelligence (AI) work can be characterized as either ``high-level'' (e.g., logical, symbolic) or ``low-level'' (e.g., connectionist networks, behavior-based robotics). Each approach suffers from particular ...

  7. Loop formation in graphitic nanoribbon edges using furnace heating or Joule heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Xiaoting

    Here the authors report the use of either furnace heating or Joule heating to pacify the exposed graphene edges by loop formation in a novel graphitic nanoribbonmaterial, grown by chemical vapor deposition. The edge energy ...

  8. Graphitization of small diamond cluster --Molecular dynamics simulation A. Brdka a,, T.W. Zerda b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powles, Rebecca

    Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Nanodiamond; Graphitization; Molecular dynamics simulation 1 of nanodiamond clus- ters (nD-c) [2] is the method that can provide carbon onions with uniform size in a large

  9. Electrochromic polyaniline/graphite oxide nanocomposites with endured electrochemical energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    films for electrochromic displays and electrochemical energy storage devices applications were. Introduction The development of sustainable and renewable energy storage resources with both high power densityElectrochromic polyaniline/graphite oxide nanocomposites with endured electrochemical energy

  10. The effects of marine microorganisms on the mechanical properties of graphite/epoxy composites†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puh, John Shui-Ming

    1997-01-01

    with two different lay-ups were conditioned in natural seawater and then tensile tested while simultaneously monitored for acoustic emission activity. Graphite/epoxy composite specimens were fabricated from prepreg tape and then conditioned for 4 and I I...

  11. Direct Observation of Optically Induced Transient Structures in Graphite Using Ultrafast Electron Crystallography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    initio density functional calculations, we trace the governing mechanism back to electronic structure changes in the electronic properties, direct de- termination of lattice structural dynamics from opticalDirect Observation of Optically Induced Transient Structures in Graphite Using Ultrafast Electron

  12. Claisen Rearrangement of Graphite Oxide: A Route to Covalently Functionalized Graphenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, William R.

    On the GO: The basal plane allylic alcohol functionality of graphite oxide (GO) can be converted into N,N-dimethylamide groups through an EschenmoserĖClaisen sigmatropic rearrangement by using N,N-dimethylacetamide dimethyl ...

  13. Near E{sub F} Electronic Structure of Graphite from Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekhar, B. R.; Kundu, R.; Mishra, P. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Maniraj, M.; Barman, S. R. [Surface Physics Laboratory, UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore 452001, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2011-10-20

    A comparative study of the electronic band structure of single crystal and highly oriented pyrolitic graphite is presented. We have used angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and angle resolved inverse photoelectron spectroscopy to map the occupied and unoccupied electronic states respectively.

  14. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the Li-graphite system from first-principles calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    We present an ab initio study of the thermodynamics and kinetics of Li [subscript x]C[subscript 6], relevant for anode Li intercalation in rechargeable Li batteries. In graphite, the interlayer interactions are dominated ...

  15. Enhancing thermal conductivity of fluids with graphite nanoparticles and carbon nanotube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhiqiang (Lexington, KY); Lockwood, Frances E. (Georgetown, KY)

    2008-03-25

    A fluid media such as oil or water, and a selected effective amount of carbon nanomaterials necessary to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fluid. One of the preferred carbon nanomaterials is a high thermal conductivity graphite, exceeding that of the neat fluid to be dispersed therein in thermal conductivity, and ground, milled, or naturally prepared with mean particle size less than 500 nm, and preferably less than 200 nm, and most preferably less than 100 nm. The graphite is dispersed in the fluid by one or more of various methods, including ultrasonication, milling, and chemical dispersion. Carbon nanotubes with graphitic structure is another preferred source of carbon nanomaterial, although other carbon nanomaterials are acceptable. To confer long term stability, the use of one or more chemical dispersants is preferred. The thermal conductivity enhancement, compared to the fluid without carbon nanomaterial, is proportional to the amount of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes and/or graphite) added.

  16. Oxidation of hydrocarbons over ordered arrays of heteropolyacids and polyoxoanions on graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaikh, S.N.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-08-02

    Alkanes are catalytically oxidized using heteropolyacids or polyoxoanions deposited on a graphite surface. The heteropolyacids and polyoxoanions are framework-substituted with a different metal in place of a metal-oxygen unit.

  17. Oxidation of hydrocarbons over ordered arrays of heteropolyacids and polyoxoanions on graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaikh, Shahid N. (Media, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1994-01-01

    Alkanes are catalytically oxidized using heteropolyacids (HPAs) or polyoxoanions (POAs) deposited on a graphite surface. The HPAs and POAs are framework-substituted with a different metal in place of a metal-oxygen unit.

  18. Modelling artificial pheromone strategies for SPB control†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isakson, Kyle George

    1981-01-01

    MODELLING ARTIFICIAL PHEROMONE STRATEGIES FOR SPB CONTROL A Thesis Kyle George Isakson Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19gl... of Department) -August 1981 ABSTRACT Modelling Artificial Pheromone Strategies for SPB Control. (August 1981) Kyle George Isakson, B. S. , Texas A&M University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. Hain-1 Wu Dr. Youhanna Fares The development...

  19. Applying Artificial Intelligence to Virtual Reality: Intelligent Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luck, Michael

    Applying Artificial Intelligence to Virtual Reality: Intelligent Virtual Environments Ruth Aylett intelligence and artificial life on the other has largely been carried out by two different groups of people combining artificial intelligence and artificial life techniques with those of virtual environments

  20. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-09-24

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications.

  1. Effect of graphite properties in thermal analysis of CHTR: A parametric study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaushik, Ankur; Basak, Abhishek; Dulera, I. V.; Vijayan, P. K.

    2013-06-12

    Compact High Temperature Reactor (CHTR) is a {sup 233}U-Thorium fuelled, lead-bismuth cooled reactor. The CHTR core mainly consists of graphite and beryllium oxide (BeO). The CHTR core consists of nineteen prismatic beryllium oxide (BeO) moderator blocks. These 19 blocks contain centrally located graphite fuel tubes. The BeO moderator blocks are surrounded by reflector blocks (partially graphite and partially BeO). The nuclear heat from the core is removed passively by natural circulation of the coolant between top and bottom plenums, upward through the fuel tubes and returning through the downcomer tubes at the periphery. The temperature gradient in fuel tubes, downcomer tubes and BeO is very high and therefore, to take care of the differential thermal expansion, gaps are provided in the core between the tubes and other core components. These gaps affect the heat transfer through the core in radial direction. In addition, there is a large variation in thermal properties of graphite which in turn affects the thermal behaviour of the core in various operating conditions. The fuel of CHTR is TRISO coated particle fuel. These particles are packed in with graphite powder as matrix and made into cylindrical compacts these compacts are packed in the bores of fuel tube. In this study, the effect of the thermal conductivity variation of the graphite on the temperature distribution of the core and density variation of the matrix graphite material in fuel compact on the maximum fuel kernel temperature is studied along with the overall role of graphite properties variation in heat transfer.

  2. Statistical Comparison of the Baseline Mechanical Properties of NBG-18 and PCEA Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark C. Carroll; David T. Rohrbaugh

    2013-08-01

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled design that is capable of producing process heat for power generation and for industrial process that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is endeavoring to minimize the conservative estimates of as-manufactured mechanical and physical properties by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a comprehensive comparison between these values in different nuclear grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons and variations between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between the two grades of graphite that were initially favored in the two main VHTR designs. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration, while PCEA, a smaller grain, petroleum coke, extruded graphite from GrafTech was favored for the prismatic configuration. An analysis of the comparison between these two grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for the prediction of in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear grade graphites will continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

  3. Mode II delamination fracture toughness of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corleto Mena, Carlos Roberto

    1986-01-01

    MODE II DELAMINATION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by CARLOS ROBERTO CORLETO MENA Submitted to the Graduate College of TEXAS ASM UNIVERSITY in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MODE II DELAMINATION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by CARLOS ROBERTO CORLETO MENA Approved as to style and content by: Walter L. Bra...

  4. Residual thermal stresses in an unsymmetrical cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminate†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Brian Douglas

    1980-01-01

    RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in parrial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Approved as to style and content by: r. Y. N itsman (Chair of Committee) Dr...

  5. Nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of AS-3502 graphite/epoxy composite material†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerstetter, Michael Scott

    1980-01-01

    NONLINEAR VISCOELASTIC CHARACTERIZATION OF AS-3502 GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE MATERIAL A Thesis MICHAEL SCOTT KERSTETTER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering NONLINEAR VISCOELASTIC CHARACTERIZATION OF AS-3502 GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE MATERIAL A Thesis by MICHAEL SCOTT KERSTETTER Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Kenneth L...

  6. Modified SIMD architecture suitable for single-chip implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junichiro Makino

    2005-09-11

    We describe a modified SIMD architecture suitable for single-chip integration of a large number of processing elements, such as 1,000 or more. Important differences from traditional SIMD designs are: a) The size of the memory per processing elements is kept small. b) The processors are organized into groups, each with a small buffer memory. Reduction operation over the groups is done in hardware. The first change allows us to integrate a very large number of processing elements into a single chip. The second change allows us to achieve a close-to-peak performance for many scientific applications like particle-based simulations and dense-matrix operations.

  7. Three-dimensional EBSD characterization of thermo-mechanical fatigue crack morphology in compacted graphite iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirgazi, Hadi, E-mail: Hadi.pirgazi@ugent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Gent (Belgium); Ghodrat, Sepideh, E-mail: s.ghodrat@tudelft.nl [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands); Kestens, Leo A.I., E-mail: leo.kestens@ugent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Gent (Belgium); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-04-01

    In cylinder heads made of compacted graphitic iron (CGI), heating and cooling cycles can lead to localized cracking due to thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF). To meticulously characterize the complex crack path morphology of CGI under TMF condition, in relation to microstructural features and to find out how and by which mechanisms the cracks predominantly develop, three-dimensional electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) was employed. Based on the precise quantitative microstructural analysis, it is found that graphite particles not only play a crucial role in the crack initiation, but also are of primary significance for crack propagation, i.e. crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles. Furthermore, the density of graphite particles on the fracture plane is more than double as high as in any other arbitrary plane of the structure. The obtained results did not indicate a particular crystallographic preference of fracture plane, i.e. the crystal plane parallel to the fracture plane was nearly of random orientation. - Highlights: ē Crystallographic features of a thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) crack were studied. ē Wide-field 3D EBSD is used to characterize the TMF crack morphology. ē Data processing was applied on a large length scale of the order of millimeters. ē Graphite density in the fracture plane is much higher than any other random plane. ē It is revealed that crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles.

  8. Simon Holland 1 Artificial Intelligence in music education: a critical review Artificial Intelligence in music education: a critical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Simon

    © Simon Holland 1 Artificial Intelligence in music education: a critical review Artificial Intelligence in Music Education: a critical review. In Miranda, E. (ed.) Readings in Music and Artificial This paper reviews the principal approaches to using Artificial Intelligence in Music Education. Music

  9. Burning and graphitization of optically levitated nanodiamonds in vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, A T M A; Kim, M S; Bose, S; Morley, G W; Barker, P F

    2015-01-01

    A nitrogen-vacancy (NV$^-$) center in a nanodiamond, levitated in high vacuum, has recently been proposed as a probe for demonstrating mesoscopic center-of-mass superpositions \\cite{Scala2013, Zhang2013} and for testing quantum gravity \\cite{Albrecht2014}. Here, we study the behavior of optically levitated nanodiamonds containing NV$^-$ centers at sub-atmospheric pressures and show that while they burn in air, this can be prevented by replacing the air with nitrogen. However, in nitrogen the nanodiamonds graphitize below $\\approx 10$ mB. Exploiting the Brownian motion of a levitated nanodiamond, we extract its internal temperature ($T_i$) and find that it would be detrimental to the NV$^-$ center's spin coherence time \\cite{Toyli2012}. These values of $T_i$ make it clear that the diamond is not melting, contradicting a recent suggestion \\cite{Neukirch2015}. Additionally, using the measured damping rate of a levitated nanoparticle at a given pressure, we propose a new way of determining its size.

  10. Internal degrees of freedom and transport of benzene on graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astrid S. de Wijn

    2011-07-13

    In this paper, the chaotic internal degrees of freedom of a benzene molecule adsorbed on a graphite substrate, their interplay with thermal noise, and their effects on the diffusion and drift are investigated analytically by making use of the presence of two different time scales as well as by molecular-dynamics simulations. The effects of thermal noise are investigated, and it is found that noise does not significantly alter the dynamics of the internal degrees of freedom, yet affects the friction and diffusion of the center of mass. Qualitative and quantitative theoretical predictions for the friction and diffusion of the molecule on the substrate are made and are compared to molecular-dynamics simulations. Contributions to the friction and diffusion from the finite heat bath as well as the slow dynamics of the center of mass are formally identified. It is shown that the torsion in benzene, which dominates the nonlinear coupling, significantly affects the friction of the molecule on the surface. The results compare favorably with recent results from He/neutron spin echo experiments on this system. Based on the analytical and numerical results, some suggestions are made for experimental conditions under which the effects of internal degrees of freedom might be observable.

  11. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

    1996-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

  12. Bismuth Nanoparticle Decorating Graphite Felt as a High-Performance Electrode for an All-Vanadium Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bin; Gu, Meng; Nie, Zimin; Shao, Yuyan; Luo, Qingtao; Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Xiaolin; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong M.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2013-02-04

    The selection of electrode materials plays a great role in improving performances of all vanadium redox flow batteries (VRBs). Low-cost graphite felt (GF) as traditional electrode material has to be modified to address its issue of low electrocatalytic activity. In our paper, low-cost and highly conductive bismuth nanoparticles, as a powerful alternative electrocatalyst to noble metal, are proposed and synchronously electro-deposited onto the surface of GF while running flow cells employing the electrolytes containing suitable Bi3+. Although bismuth is proved to only take effect on the redox reaction of V(II)/V(III) and present at negative half-cell side, the whole cell electrochemical performances are significantly improved. In particular, the energy efficiency is increased by 11% owing to faster charge transfer as compared with one without Bi at high charge/discharge rate of 150 mA/cm2, which is prone to reduce stack size, thus dramatically reducing the cost. The excellent results show great promise of Bi nano-catalysts in the commercialization of VRBs in terms of product cost as well as electrochemical properties.

  13. Effect of electrode density on cycle performance and irreversible capacity loss for natural graphite anode in lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Joongpyo; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2002-12-02

    The effect of electrode thickness and density for unpressed and pressed natural graphite electrodes were studied using electrochemical characterization. Pressing the graphite electrode decreases the reversible capacity and the irreversible capacity loss during formation. As electrode density increased, the capacity retention at high rate increased until 0.9g/cm{sup 3}, and then decreased. The cycle performances of the pressed graphite electrodes were more stable than the unpressed one. Pressing graphite electrode affected on its electrochemical characterization such as irreversible capacity loss, high rate cycling and cycle performance.

  14. Laminated exfoliated graphite composite-metal compositions for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-05-20

    An electrically conductive laminate composition for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications. The laminate composition comprises at least a thin metal sheet having two opposed exterior surfaces and a first exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the first of the two exterior surfaces of the metal sheet wherein the exfoliated graphite composite sheet comprises: (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite and (b) a binder or matrix material to bond the expanded graphite for forming a cohered sheet, wherein the binder or matrix material is between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet. Preferably, the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet further comprises particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the non-expandable particles and the expanded graphite. Further preferably, the laminate comprises a second exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the second surface of the metal sheet to form a three-layer laminate. Surface flow channels and other desired geometric features can be built onto the exterior surfaces of the laminate to form a flow field plate or bipolar plate. The resulting laminate has an exceptionally high thickness-direction conductivity and excellent resistance to gas permeation.

  15. Experimental Realization of Quantum Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li Zhaokai; Liu Xiaomei; Xu Nanyang; Du jiangfeng

    2014-10-04

    Machines are possible to have some artificial intelligence like human beings owing to particular algorithms or software. Such machines could learn knowledge from what people taught them and do works according to the knowledge. In practical learning cases, the data is often extremely complicated and large, thus classical learning machines often need huge computational resources. Quantum machine learning algorithm, on the other hand, could be exponentially faster than classical machines using quantum parallelism. Here, we demonstrate a quantum machine learning algorithm on a four-qubit NMR test bench to solve an optical character recognition problem, also known as the handwriting recognition. The quantum machine learns standard character fonts and then recognize handwritten characters from a set with two candidates. To our best knowledge, this is the first artificial intelligence realized on a quantum processor. Due to the widespreading importance of artificial intelligence and its tremendous consuming of computational resources, quantum speedup would be extremely attractive against the challenges from the Big Data.

  16. On artificial transits feasibility and SETI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Arnold

    2005-09-15

    It is known that the shape of a planet (oblateness, rings, etc.) slightly modifies the shape of the transit light curve. The forthcoming space missions (Corot, Kepler), able to detect the transit of Earth-like planets, could a fortiori also detect the transit of artificial planet-size objects if their shape is significantly different from a natural (planetary) object. Multiple artificial objects would also produce transit light curves easily recognizable from natural transits. Artificial transits, especially of multiple objects, could be used for the transmission of clear attention-getting signals, with a sky coverage (efficiency) comparable to that of the laser pulse method. Although out of reach of current human technologies, the building of an Earth-size 1-micron thick mask would require energy and bulk material amounts already managed on Earth today. The migration of the mask toward an inner orbit and its protection against asteroids or meteoroids are also briefly discussed.

  17. Building the Second Mind: 1956 and the Origins of Artificial Intelligence Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinner, Rebecca Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Expert Systems and Artificial Intelligence: Applications andExpert Systems and Artificial Intelligence: Applications andThe Man-Machine and Artificial IntelligenceĒ, in Franchi and

  18. Building the Second Mind: 1956 and the Origins of Artificial Intelligence Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinner, Rebecca Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    with robotics and artificial vision. Allen Newell andoriginal research in artificial vision, pattern recognition,and in vision. Marvin Minsky arrives at MIT Artificial

  19. Building the Second Mind: 1956 and the Origins of Artificial Intelligence Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinner, Rebecca Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The Handbook of Artificial Intelligence. Volumes 1-3. LosThe Handbook of Artificial Intelligence. Volume IV. MenloIntroduction to Artificial Intelligence. Reading, MA:

  20. NanoSIMS, TEM, and XANES studies of a unique presolar supernova graphite grain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groopman, Evan; Bernatowicz, Thomas; Zinner, Ernst; Nittler, Larry R.

    2014-07-20

    We report on isotopic and microstructural investigations of a unique presolar supernova (SN) graphite grain, referred to as G6, isolated from the Orgueil CI chondrite. G6 contains complex heterogeneities in its isotopic composition and in its microstructure. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometer isotope images of ultramicrotome sections reveal heterogeneities in its C, N, and O isotopic compositions, including anomalous shell-like structures. Transmission electron microscope studies reveal a nanocrystalline core surrounded by a turbostratic graphite mantle, the first reported nanocrystalline core from a low-density SN graphite grain. Electron diffraction analysis shows that the nanocrystalline core consists of randomly oriented 2-4 nm graphene particles, similar to those in cores of high-density (HD) presolar graphite grains from asymptotic giant branch stars. G6's core also exhibits evidence for planar stacking of these graphene nano-sheets with a domain size up to 4.5 nm, which was unobserved in the nanocrystalline cores of HD graphite grains. We also report on X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements of G6. The complex isotopic- and micro-structure of G6 provides evidence for mixing and/or granular transport in SN ejecta.

  1. Smart Pneumatic Artificial Muscle Actuator with Embedded Microfluidic Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Yong-Lae

    Smart Pneumatic Artificial Muscle Actuator with Embedded Microfluidic Sensing Yong-Lae Park1 materials cannot be employed for large strains. In this paper, we propose a smart artificial pneumatic

  2. Artificial Intelligence Design for Real-time Strategy Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    Artificial Intelligence Design for Real-time Strategy Games Firas Safadi University of Li been challenging intelligence, human and artificial (AI) alike, as one of the top genre in terms

  3. A facile approach to prepare graphene via solvothermal reduction of graphite oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Bihe [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Suzhou Key Laboratory of Urban Public Safety, Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, University of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou 215123 (China); Bao, Chenlu [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Qian, Xiaodong; Wen, Panyue [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Suzhou Key Laboratory of Urban Public Safety, Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, University of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xing, Weiyi; Song, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Hu, Yuan, E-mail: yuanhu@ustc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Suzhou Key Laboratory of Urban Public Safety, Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, University of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: ē Graphene was prepared via a novel and facile solvothermal reduction method for graphite oxide. ē Most of the oxygen functional groups of graphite oxide were removed. ē The reduced graphene oxide obtained was featured with bilayer nanosheets. - Abstract: In this work, a facile reduction strategy is reported for the fabrication of graphene. Graphite oxide (GO) is reduced via a novel solvothermal reaction in a mixed solution of acetone and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO). The structure, surface chemistry, morphology and thermal stability of the as-prepared reduced graphene oxide (RGO) are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that most of the oxygenated groups in GO are effectively removed in this solvothermal reaction. The novel reduction method provides a simple, cost-effective and efficient strategy for the fabrication of graphene.

  4. Phase transformations of nano-sized cubic boron nitride to white graphene and white graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Xue, Wenhua; Anderson, Ryan S.; Sewell, Cody R. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Xue, Sha; Crunkleton, Daniel W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Shen, Yaogen [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang, Sanwu, E-mail: sanwu-wang@utulsa.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States)

    2014-03-03

    We report quantum-mechanical investigations that predict the formation of white graphene and nano-sized white graphite from the first-order phase transformations of nano-sized boron nitride thin-films. The phase transformations from the nano-sized diamond-like structure, when the thickness d?>?1.4?nm, to the energetically more stable nano-sized white graphite involve low activation energies of less than 1.0?eV. On the other hand, the diamond-like structure transforms spontaneously to white graphite when d???1.4?nm. In particular, the two-dimensional structure with single-layer boron nitride, the so-called white graphene, could be formed as a result of such transformation.

  5. The semi-empirical tight-binding model for carbon allotropes ďbetween diamond and graphiteĒ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lytovchenko, V.; Kurchak, A.; Strikha, M.

    2014-06-28

    The new carbon allotropes ďbetween diamond and graphiteĒ have come under intensive examination during the last decade due to their numerous technical applications. The modification of energy gap in thin films of these allotropes was studied experimentally using optical methods. The proposed simple model of carbon clusters with variable lengths of chemical bonds allows us to imitate the transfer from diamond and diamond-like to graphite-like structures, as well as the corresponding modification of hybridization sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} for diamond-like and sp{sub z} for graphite-like phases. This enables us to estimate various allotropes parameters, like the gap E{sub g}, energies of valence E{sub v}, and conduction E{sub c} band edges, and the value of electronic affinity, i.e., optical work function X, which are all of practical importance. The obtained estimations correspond to the experimental data.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline graphite from coconut shell with heating process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachid, Frischa M., E-mail: frischamw@yahoo.com, E-mail: adhiyudhaperkasa@yahoo.com, E-mail: afandisar@yahoo.com, E-mail: nurulrosyidah92@gmail.com, E-mail: darminto@physics.its.ac.id; Perkasa, Adhi Y., E-mail: frischamw@yahoo.com, E-mail: adhiyudhaperkasa@yahoo.com, E-mail: afandisar@yahoo.com, E-mail: nurulrosyidah92@gmail.com, E-mail: darminto@physics.its.ac.id; Prasetya, Fandi A., E-mail: frischamw@yahoo.com, E-mail: adhiyudhaperkasa@yahoo.com, E-mail: afandisar@yahoo.com, E-mail: nurulrosyidah92@gmail.com, E-mail: darminto@physics.its.ac.id; Rosyidah, Nurul, E-mail: frischamw@yahoo.com, E-mail: adhiyudhaperkasa@yahoo.com, E-mail: afandisar@yahoo.com, E-mail: nurulrosyidah92@gmail.com, E-mail: darminto@physics.its.ac.id; Darminto, E-mail: frischamw@yahoo.com, E-mail: adhiyudhaperkasa@yahoo.com, E-mail: afandisar@yahoo.com, E-mail: nurulrosyidah92@gmail.com, E-mail: darminto@physics.its.ac.id [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Campus ITS Sukolilo, Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia)

    2014-02-24

    Graphite were synthesized and characterized by heating process of coconut shell with varying temperature (400, 800 and 1000įC) and holding time (3 and 5 hours). After heating process, the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and analyzed by X'pert HighScore Plus Software, Scanning Electron Microcope-Energy Dispersive X-Ray (SEM-EDX) and Transmission Electron Microscope-Energy Dispersive X-Ray (TEM-EDX). Graphite and londsdaelite phase were analyzed by XRD. According to EDX analysis, the sample was heated in 1000įC got the highest content of carbon. The amorphous carbon and nanocrystalline graphite were observed by SEM-EDX and TEM-EDX.

  7. Phonon mean free path of graphite along the c-axis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Zhiyong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Weiyu; Bi, Kedong; Chen, Yunfei, E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Design and Manufacture of Micro/Nano Biomedical Instruments and School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Li, Deyu, E-mail: deyu.li@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235-1592 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    Phonon transport in the c-axis direction of graphite thin films has been studied using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The simulation results show that the c-axis thermal conductivities for films of thickness ranging from 20 to 500 atomic layers are significantly lower than the bulk value. Based on the MD data, a method is developed to construct the c-axis thermal conductivity as an accumulation function of phonon mean free path (MFP), from which we show that phonons with MFPs from 2 to 2000?nm contribute ?80% of the graphite c-axis thermal conductivity at room temperature, and phonons with MFPs larger than 100?nm contribute over 40% to the c-axis thermal conductivity. These findings indicate that the commonly believed value of just a few nanometers from the simple kinetic theory drastically underestimates the c-axis phonon MFP of graphite.

  8. Coated graphite articles useful in metallurgical processes and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Bird, Eugene L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    Graphite articles including crucibles and molds used in metallurgical processes involving the melting and the handling of molten metals and alloys that are reactive with carbon when in a molten state and at process temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are provided with a multiple-layer coating for inhibiting carbon diffusion from the graphite into the molten metal or alloys. The coating is provided by a first coating increment of a carbide-forming metal on selected surfaces of the graphite, a second coating increment of a carbide forming metal and a refractory metal oxide, and a third coating increment of a refractory metal oxide. The second coating increment provides thermal shock absorbing characteristics to prevent delamination of the coating during temperature cycling. A wash coat of unstabilized zirconia or titanium nitride can be applied onto the third coating increment to facilitate release of melts from the coating.

  9. Colloidal graphite/graphene nanostructures using collagen showing enhanced thermal conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Soumya; Das, Sarit K; Ganguly, Ranjan; Webster, Thomas; Nayar, Suprabha

    2015-01-01

    Time kinetics of interaction of natural graphite (GR) to colloidal graphene (G) collagen (C) nanocomposites was studied at ambient conditions, and observed that just one day at ambient conditions is enough to form colloidal graphene directly from graphite using the protein collagen. Neither controlled temperature and pressure ambiance nor sonication was needed for the same; thereby rendering the process biomimetic. Detailed spectroscopy, X ray diffraction, electron microscopy as well as fluorescence and luminescence assisted characterization of the colloidal dispersions on day one and day seven reveals graphene and collagen interaction and subsequent rearrangement to form an open structure. Detailed confocal microscopy, in the liquid state, reveals the initial attack at the zigzag edges of GR, the enhancement of auto fluorescence and finally the opening up of graphitic stacks of GR to form near transparent G. Atomic Force Microscopy studies prove the existence of both collagen and graphene and the disruption ...

  10. Evaluation of graphite/steam interactions for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolik, G.R.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.; Holland, D.F.

    1990-09-01

    In this report we present the results of an experimental/analytical study designed to determine the quantity of hydrogen generated during a coolant inleakage accident in ITER. This hydrogen could represent a potential explosive hazard, provided the proper conditions exist, causing machine damage and release of radioactive material. We have measured graphite/steam reaction rates for several graphites and carbon-based composites at temperatures between 1000 C and 1700 C. The effects of steam flow rate, and partial pressure were also examined. The measured reaction rates correlated well with two Arrhenius type relationships. We have used the relationships for GraphNOL N3M in a thermal model to determine that for ITER the quantity of hydrogen produced would range between 5 and 35 kg, depending upon how the graphite tiles are attached to the first wall. While 5 kg is not a significant concern, 35 kg presents an explosive hazard. 20 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Risk Estimation; Background Radiation (Natural and Artificial )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    . ∑ This is necessary to obtain reasonable statistics on these rare events of radiation effects at low dose is based artificial and natural ∑ response to low-level radiation. ∑ personal background radiation level. #12;An Organism's Response to Radiation ∑ The dose response can be linear or nonlinear and threshold or non

  12. Applied Intelligence The International Journal of Artificial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potter, Don

    including pro- tecting crops from damage, avoiding heat stress on animals and humans, and in planning related to energy management. Current web-based artificial neural network (ANN) mod- els on the Automated, will cause the wa- ter vapor to condense into liquid water. The dew point is the saturation temperature

  13. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland State University

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1293 April, 1991 Intelligence Without Reason Rodney A. BrooksPrepared for Computers and Thought, IJCAI-91 Abstract Computers and Thought are the two categories that together de ne Arti cial Intelligence as a discipline

  14. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland State University

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY A.I. Memo No. 1439 August to fundamentally change the way arti cial intelligence, cognitive science, linguistics, and philosophy think about the organization of intelligence. We expect to be able to better reconcile the theories that will be developed

  15. Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-01

    The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of feed composition variations on process operating conditions and slag product performance; and collecting mass balance and operating data to support equipment and instrument design.

  16. Artificial Neural Network for Optimized Power System Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OLeary, Daniel Albert

    2015-01-01

    solarĖwindĖhydrogen) model based in artificial intelligence for a remote-housing application in mexico.

  17. On the Suitability of MPI as a PGAS Runtime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily, Jeffrey A.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Palmer, Bruce J.; van Dam, Hubertus JJ; Kerbyson, Darren J.

    2014-12-18

    Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) models are emerging as a popular alternative to MPI models for designing scalable applications. At the same time, MPI remains a ubiquitous communication subsystem due to its standardization, high performance, and availability on leading platforms. In this paper, we explore the suitability of using MPI as a scalable PGAS communication subsystem. We focus on the Remote Memory Access (RMA) communication in PGAS models which typically includes {\\em get, put,} and {\\em atomic memory operations}. We perform an in-depth exploration of design alternatives based on MPI. These alternatives include using a semantically-matching interface such as MPI-RMA, as well as not-so-intuitive interfaces such as MPI two-sided with a combination of multi-threading and dynamic process management. With an in-depth exploration of these alternatives and their shortcomings, we propose a novel design which is facilitated by the data-centric view in PGAS models. This design leverages a combination of highly tuned MPI two-sided semantics and an automatic, user-transparent split of MPI communicators to provide asynchronous progress. We implement the asynchronous progress ranks approach and other approaches within the Communication Runtime for Exascale which is a communication subsystem for Global Arrays. Our performance evaluation spans pure communication benchmarks, graph community detection and sparse matrix-vector multiplication kernels, and a computational chemistry application. The utility of our proposed PR-based approach is demonstrated by a 2.17x speed-up on 1008 processors over the other MPI-based designs.

  18. Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raade, Justin; Roark, Thomas; Vaughn, John; Bradshaw, Robert

    2013-07-22

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are comprised of many miles of fluid-filled pipes arranged in large grids with reflective mirrors used to capture radiation from the sun. Solar radiation heats the fluid which is used to produce steam necessary to power large electricity generation turbines. Currently, organic, oil-based fluid in the pipes has a maximum temperature threshold of 400 įC, allowing for the production of electricity at approximately 15 cents per kilowatt hour. The DOE hopes to foster the development of an advanced heat transfer fluid that can operate within higher temperature ranges. The new heat transfer fluid, when used with other advanced technologies, could significantly decrease solar electricity cost. Lower costs would make solar thermal electricity competitive with gas and coal and would offer a clean, renewable source of energy. Molten salts exhibit many desirable heat transfer qualities within the range of the project objectives. Halotechnics developed advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for application in solar thermal power generation. This project focused on complex mixtures of inorganic salts that exhibited a high thermal stability, a low melting point, and other favorable characteristics. A high-throughput combinatorial research and development program was conducted in order to achieve the project objective. Over 19,000 candidate formulations were screened. The workflow developed to screen various chemical systems to discover salt formulations led to mixtures suitable for use as HTFs in both parabolic trough and heliostat CSP plants. Furthermore, salt mixtures which will not interfere with fertilizer based nitrates were discovered. In addition for use in CSP, the discovered salt mixtures can be applied to electricity storage, heat treatment of alloys and other industrial processes.

  19. Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-Ion Batteries for Fast Charge Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Model of LiFePO4- Graphite Li-Ion Batteries for Fast Charge, a simplified electrochemical and thermal model of LiFePO4-graphite based Li-ion batteries is developed for battery management system (BMS) applications and comprehensive aging investigations. Based on a modified

  20. A Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Aging Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 A Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Aging Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-ion Batteries: Power of a commercial LiFePO4-graphite Li-ion battery. Compared to the isothermal reference, the mechanism of porosity;2 Due to their high power and energy densities, Li-ion technologies are the leading battery systems

  1. Improved Lithium Ion Behavior Properties of TiO2@Graphitic-like Carbon Core@Shell Nanostructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Improved Lithium Ion Behavior Properties of TiO2@Graphitic-like Carbon Core@Shell Nanostructure Min Intercalation Electrochemistry Capacitance Lithium Ion batteries A B S T R A C T We demonstrate TiO2@graphitic on the electrode surface and enhanced lithium ion intercalation, leading to lower charge transfer resistance

  2. A New Method for Quantitative Marking of Deposited Lithium via Chemical Treatment on Graphite Anodes in Lithium-Ion Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Volker

    A New Method for Quantitative Marking of Deposited Lithium via Chemical Treatment on Graphite Anodes in Lithium-Ion Cells Yvonne Kršmer*[a] , Claudia Birkenmaier[b] , Julian Feinauer[a,c] , Andreas*[e] and Thomas Schleid[f] Abstract: A novel approach for the marking of deposited lithium on graphite anodes from

  3. Title: Affective Artificial Intelligence for loving robots By Professor Hooman Samani, NTPU, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chaur-Chin

    Title: Affective Artificial Intelligence for loving robots By Professor Hooman Samani, NTPU, Taiwan advanced artificial intelligence system of Lovotics includes an Artificial Endocrine System (based (based on emotions) modules. Psychological unit of the Lovotics artificial intelligence calculates

  4. Comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite crucibles for boron doped silicon epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    This article reports on the comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite as crucible liners in a high-temperature effusion cell used for boron doping in silicon grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis indicates decomposition of the beryllium oxide liner, leading to significant incorporation of beryllium and oxygen in the grown films. The resulting films are of poor crystal quality with rough surfaces and broad x-ray diffraction peaks. Alternatively, the use of pyrolytic graphite crucible liners results in higher quality films.

  5. Analysis of the effect of matrix degradation on fatigue behavior of a graphite/epoxy laminate†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenburg, Robert Thomas

    1982-01-01

    ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRADATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ANALYSiS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRAOATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  6. Hygrothermal effects in an anti-symmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy material†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Steven Paul

    1984-01-01

    HYGROTHERMAL EFFECTS IN AN ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY MATERIAL A Thesis STEVEN PAUL JACKSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SC...'IENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering HYGROTHERMAL ~S IN AN ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis STEVE? PAUL JACKSON Approved as to style and content by: (Y. eitsman, Charrman) (W. L. Bradley, M (W. E. Haisler...

  7. The Danger Theory and Its Application to Artificial Immune Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somayaji, Anil

    The Danger Theory and Its Application to Artificial Immune Systems Uwe Aickelin1 , Steve Cayzer.aickelin@bradford.ac.uk, Steve_Cayzer@hp.com artificial immune systems, danger theory Over the last decade, a new idea the Danger Theory. In this conceptual paper, we look at this theory from the perspective of Artificial Immune

  8. AI 1 Introductory Notes. Page 1 Artificial Intelligence I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huntbach, Matthew

    AI 1 Introductory Notes. Page 1 Artificial Intelligence I Matthew Huntbach, Dept of Computer.J.M.Bench-Capon Knowledge Representation: An Approach to Artificial Intelligence Academic Press (1990). A little simplistic, but short and not over-technical. Covers roughly the same material as will be in the Artificial Intelligence

  9. MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory The Choices We Make

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, Frťdo

    MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory The Choices We Make Frťdo Durand MIT CSAIL #12;MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Introduction ∑ My background ≠ Math Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Introduction ∑ I don't build tools, I am an academic

  10. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 223 A Geometric Approach to Error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 223 A Geometric Approach to Error Detection and Recovery for Robot Motion, and uncertainty in the geometric * This report describes research done at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the Massach- usetts Institute of Technology. Support for the Laboratory's Artificial Intelligence research

  11. Artificial Intelligence 120 (2000) 2942 Optimal auctions revisited 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monderer, Dov

    2000-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence 120 (2000) 29­42 Optimal auctions revisited 6 Dov Monderer , Moshe. Tennenholtz / Artificial Intelligence 120 (2000) 29­42 game theory [5]. In particular, the design of protocols aspects of multi-agent activity in Artificial Intelligence has grown rapidly in the recent years. Work

  12. Artificial Intelligence and Intrusion Detection: Current and Future Jeremy Frank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Artificial Intelligence and Intrusion Detection: Current and Future Directions Jeremy Frank frank. Artificial Intelligence techniques can reduce the human effort required to build these systems and can data. We survey uses of artificial intelligence methods in ID, and present an example using feature

  13. Readings for Artificial Intelligence CS63 Fall 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meeden, Lisa A.

    Readings for Artificial Intelligence CS63 Fall 2007 1. A proposal for the Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence, John McCarthy, Marvin Minsky, Nathaniel Rochester, and Claude Shannon Norvig (2003). Chapter 3 from Artificial Intelligence: A modern approach, Second edition, Prentice Hall

  14. Emotional Computation in Artificial Intelligence Education Sara Owsley Sood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, FabiŠn E.

    Emotional Computation in Artificial Intelligence Education Sara Owsley Sood Department of Computer of work towards creating artificial intelligence, some researchers are now attempting to create machines that are emotionally intelligent. The standard definition of artificial intelligence is the ability for a machine

  15. Test and Evaluation Challenges of Embodied Artificial Intelligence and Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Bruce

    Test and Evaluation Challenges of Embodied Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Technical Report UT science, artificial intelligence (AI), and robotics promise a new generation of intelligent agents is an unedited draft of "Challenges of Embodied Artificial Intelligence and Robotics," an article invited

  16. One Decade of Universal Artificial Intelligence Marcus Hutter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutter, Marcus

    One Decade of Universal Artificial Intelligence Marcus Hutter RSCS @ ANU and SML @ NICTA Canberra artificial intelligence. This theory of Universal Artifi- cial Intelligence (UAI) has made significant that the grand goal of Artificial General Intelligence is not elusive. This article provides an informal overview

  17. Intelligent Interfaces Artificial Intelligence Meets Human Computer Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meliou, Alexandra

    Intelligent Us er Interfaces Artificial Intelligence Meets Human Computer Interaction r r f ala ris of Intelligent User Interface design is often loosely described as the intersection of the fields of Artificial is that they elude to specific artificial intelligence techniques and as Waern writes ``What, exactly, counts

  18. Artificial Intelligence in the Factory of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mark S.

    Artificial Intelligence in the Factory of the Future Ma rk S. Fox Intelligent Systems Laboratory goal to explore the application of artificial intelligence to mansgerial and professional problems,tk:s Institute of Carnegie-Mellon University. IMS is a long term project concerned with applying artificial

  19. Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Maria

    Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing http://journals.cambridge.org/AIE Additional services for Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing: EmailNo√ęl Demaret, Maria C. Yang and Pierre Leclercq Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis

  20. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE Irish Al research pushes onto international stage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Simon

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE Irish Al research pushes onto international stage Since 2001, when 4C into the international league in terms of artificial intelligence and constraints programming. The 4C centre (Cork this quarter. Four papers were accepted by the American Association for Artificial Intelligence Conference

  1. Lung, Artificial: Basic Principles and Current Applications William J. Federspiel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    Lung, Artificial: Basic Principles and Current Applications William J. Federspiel Kristie A. Henchir University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. INTRODUCTION Artificial lungs currently of the lung, which is to oxygenate the blood and remove carbon dioxide. Current artificial lungs are also

  2. Evaluation of Plasma Resistant Hollow Fiber Membranes For Artificial Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    Evaluation of Plasma Resistant Hollow Fiber Membranes For Artificial Lungs HEIDE J. EASH,* HEATHER in artificial lungs (ox- ygenators) undergo plasma leakage (or wetting) in which blood plasma slowly fills2 gas permeance of a plasma resistant fiber imposes the greatest constraint upon artificial lung

  3. Chaotic time series prediction using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, E.B.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the use of artificial neural networks to model the complex oscillations defined by a chaotic Verhuist animal population dynamic. A predictive artificial neural network model is developed and tested, and results of computer simulations are given. These results show that the artificial neural network model predicts the chaotic time series with various initial conditions, growth parameters, or noise.

  4. Chaotic time series prediction using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the use of artificial neural networks to model the complex oscillations defined by a chaotic Verhuist animal population dynamic. A predictive artificial neural network model is developed and tested, and results of computer simulations are given. These results show that the artificial neural network model predicts the chaotic time series with various initial conditions, growth parameters, or noise.

  5. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  6. Graphite based Schottky diodes formed on Si, GaAs, and 4H-SiC S. Tongay, T. Schumann, and A. F. Hebarda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebard, Arthur F.

    of the graphite electrode is a single graphene sheet, we expect that graphene/semiconductor barriers will manifest at the semiconductor sur- face for two reasons: the graphene sheets of the graphite are robustly impervious the formation of semimetal graphite/semiconductor Schottky barriers where the semiconductor is either silicon Si

  7. Determination of cadmium, chromium, nickel, and lead in urine using Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.G.; Farrar, R.B.

    1980-12-01

    Procedures using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of cadmium, chromium, nickel, and lead are described in this report. The lowest concentrations reported using the procedure are 5 ..mu..g/l for cadmium, chromium, and nickel and 10 ..mu..g/l for lead.

  8. Study of Sn-Coated Graphite as Anode Material for Secondary Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Study of Sn-Coated Graphite as Anode Material for Secondary Lithium-Ion Batteries Basker as an alternate anode material for Li-ion batteries using an autocatalytic deposition technique. The specific have been studied as anodes for the Li-ion battery. Carbon based anodes have many desirable properties

  9. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a graphite furnace with an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Robert G.

    Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a graphite furnace with an optical parametric oscillator laser for sequential multi-element determination of cadmium, cobalt, lead, manganese and thallium, for the ģ rst time, that solid-state lasers required for analysis (ml or mg) and the technique has direct based

  10. Resonating Valence Bonds and Mean-Field d-Wave Superconductivity in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black-Schaffer, Annica M.

    2010-04-27

    We investigate the possibility of inducing superconductivity in a graphite layer by electronic correlation effects. We use a phenomenological microscopic Hamiltonian which includes nearest neighbor hopping and an interaction term which explicitly favors nearest neighbor spin-singlets through the well-known resonance valence bond (RVB) character of planar organic molecules. Treating this Hamiltonian in mean-field theory, allowing for bond-dependent variation of the RVB order parameter, we show that both s- and d-wave superconducting states are possible. The d-wave solution belongs to a two-dimensional representation and breaks time reversal symmetry. At zero doping there exists a quantum critical point at the dimensionless coupling J/t = 1.91 and the s- and d-wave solutions are degenerate for low temperatures. At finite doping the d-wave solution has a significantly higher T{sub c} than the s-wave solution. By using density functional theory we show that the doping induced from sulfur absorption on a graphite layer is enough to cause an electronically driven d-wave superconductivity at graphite-sulfur interfaces. We also discuss applying our results to the case of the intercalated graphites as well as the validity of a mean-field approach.

  11. Molecular dynamics evidences of the full graphitization of a nanodiamond annealed at 1500 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powles, Rebecca

    Molecular dynamics evidences of the full graphitization of a nanodiamond annealed at 1500 K J The annealing of a small nanodiamond cluster at 1500 K is studied by molecular dynamics. The transformation nanodiamond clusters (NDC) [7] is probably the most pop- ular, as it allows the production of onions

  12. Graphite Waste Tank Cleanup and Decontamination under the Marcoule UP1 D and D Program - 13166

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomasset, Philippe [AREVA D and D BU, Marcoule (France)] [AREVA D and D BU, Marcoule (France); Chabeuf, Jean-Michel [AREVA D and D BU, La Hague (France)] [AREVA D and D BU, La Hague (France); Thiebaut, Valerie [CEA/DEN/DAPD/CPUP, Marcoule (France)] [CEA/DEN/DAPD/CPUP, Marcoule (France); Chambon, Frederic [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)] [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The UP1 plant in Marcoule reprocessed nearly 20,000 tons of used natural uranium gas cooled reactor fuel coming from the first generation of civil nuclear reactors in France. During more than 40 years, the decladding operations produced thousands of tons of processed waste, mainly magnesium and graphite fragments. In the absence of a French repository for the graphite waste, the graphite sludge content of the storage pits had to be retrieved and transferred into a newer and safer pit. After an extensive R and D program, the equipment and process necessary for retrieval operations were designed, built and tested. The innovative process is mainly based on the use of two pumps (one to capture and the other one to transfer the sludge) working one after the other and a robotic arm mounted on a telescopic mast. A dedicated process was also set up for the removal of the biggest fragments. The retrieval of the most irradiating fragments was a challenge. Today, the first pit is totally empty and its stainless steel walls have been decontaminated using gels. In the second pit, the sludge retrieval and transfer operations have been almost completed. Most of the non-pumpable graphite fragments has been removed and transferred to a new storage pit. After more than 6 years of operations in sludge retrieval, a lot of experience was acquired from which important 'lessons learned' could be shared. (authors)

  13. Irradiation-Induced Magnetism in Graphite: A Density Functional Study P. O. Lehtinen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    Irradiation-Induced Magnetism in Graphite: A Density Functional Study P. O. Lehtinen,1 A. S. Foster October 2004) Recent experiments indicate that proton irradiation triggers ferromagnetism in originally the origin of irradiation-induced magnetism, we have performed spin-polarized density functional theory

  14. Advanced Surface and Microstructural Characterization of Natural Graphite Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL] [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL] [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL] [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL] [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL] [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL] [ORNL; Yoon, Steve [A123 Systems, Inc.] [A123 Systems, Inc.; Denlinger, Matthew [A123 Systems, Inc.] [A123 Systems, Inc.; Wood III, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Natural graphite powders were subjected to a series of thermal treatments in order to improve the anode irreversible capacity loss (ICL) and capacity retention during long-term cycling of lithium ion batteries. A baseline thermal treatment in inert Ar or N2 atmosphere was compared to cases with a proprietary additive to the furnace gas environment. This additive substantially altered the surface chemistry of the natural graphite powders and resulted in significantly improved long-term cycling performance of the lithium ion batteries over the commercial natural graphite baseline. Different heat-treatment temperatures were investigated ranging from 950-2900 C with the intent of achieving the desired long-term cycling performance with as low of a maximum temperature and thermal budget as possible. A detailed summary of the characterization data is also presented, which includes X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and temperature-programed desorption mass spectroscopy (TPD-MS). This characterization data was correlated to the observed capacity fade improvements over the course of long-term cycling at high charge-discharge rates in full lithium-ion coin cells. It is believed that the long-term performance improvements are a result of forming a more stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the anode graphite surfaces, which is directly related to the surface chemistry modifications imparted by the proprietary gas environment during thermal treatment.

  15. A Monte Carlo simulation study on the wetting behavior of water on graphite surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiongce Zhao

    2012-09-20

    This paper is an expanded edition of the rapid communication published several years ago by the author (Phys. Rev. B, v76, 041402(R), 2007) on the simulation of wetting transition of water on graphite, aiming to provide more details on the methodology, parameters, and results of the study which might be of interest to certain readers. We calculate adsorption isotherms of water on graphite using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations combined with multiple histogram reweighting, based on the empirical potentials of SPC/E for water, the 10-4-3 van der Waals model, and a recently developed induction and multipolar potential for water and graphite. Our results show that wetting transition of water on graphite occurs at 475-480 K, and the prewetting critical temperature lies in the range of 505-510 K. The calculated wetting transition temperature agrees quantitatively with a previously predicted value using a simple model. The observation of the coexistence of stable and metastable states at temperatures between the wetting transition temperature and prewetting critical temperature indicates that the transition is first order.

  16. Late-time particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma S. S. Harilal,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Late-time particle emission from laser-produced graphite plasma S. S. Harilal,a) A. Hassanein online 6 September 2011) We report a late-time "fireworks-like" particle emission from laser was investigated using fast gated imaging and visible emission spectroscopy. The emission dynamics of plasma

  17. Influence of the solvent on the stability of bis(terpyridine) structures1 on graphite2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universitšt

    . Although electronic structure calculations based on48 density functional theory can reproduce Influence of the solvent on the stability of bis(terpyridine) structures1 on graphite2 Daniela molecular dynamics simulations. As a model system, the sol-9 vation of a bis(terpyridine) (BTP) isomer

  18. Layering and orientational ordering of propane on graphite: An experimental and simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borguet, Eric

    Layering and orientational ordering of propane on graphite: An experimental and simulation study 2002; accepted 30 July 2002 We report the results of an experimental and theoretical study of propane and experiments show that propane adsorbs in a layer-by-layer fashion and exhibits continuous growth beyond

  19. Edge-Enriched Graphitic Anodes by KOH Activation for Higher Rate Capability Lithium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lithium Ion Batteries D. Zakhidov,1,2 R. Sugamata,3 T. Yasue,3 T. Hayashi,3 Y. A. Kim,3 and M. Endo4 1 successful anode for lithium ion batteries due to its low cost, safety, and ease of fabrication, but higher are expected to surpass conventional graphite anodes due to larger number of edges for lithium ion

  20. THE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAPHITE-METAL FLUORIDE INTERCALATION COMPOUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuillan, Barry William

    2014-01-01

    inside graphite, except for UF6 which has ~s.1 A. The -6H 0that the lattice energy U(NO+UF6(c)) =- 152 kcal mole- 1 ē Asince PtF6 is smaller than UF6, the electron affinity of PtF

  1. Ultrathin Graphite Foam: A Three-Dimensional Conductive Network for Battery Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    graphite foam (UGF), loaded with lithium iron phosphate (LFP), as a cathode in a lithium ion battery in lithium ion batteries. Moreover, preparation of the UGF electrode was facile, cost-dimensional electrode, conductive network, lithium ion battery Advanced battery technologies are known to suffer from

  2. Electron Energy Loss Spectra of Graphite, Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes: Plasmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Electron Energy Loss Spectra of Graphite, Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes: Plasmon Dispersion in Carbon Systems #12;Outlook dimensionality 1. induced Hartree potentials in low dimensional systems: independent particles energy loss in graphene (in-plane, q = 0.41 įA-1 ) 0 2 4 6 8 10 energy loss (eV) -Im -1

  3. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kangas, Lars J. (Richland, WA); Keller, Paul E. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis.

  4. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. 12 figs.

  5. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiment Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energyís Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energyís lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the worldís premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will have differing compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of the experiment. The first experiment was inserted in the ATR in August 2009 and started its irradiation in September 2009. It is anticipated to complete its irradiation in early calendar 2011. This paper will discuss the design of the experiment including the test train and the temperature and compressive load monitoring, control, and the irradiation experience to date.

  6. Enhancement of oxidation resistance of graphite foams by polymer derived-silicon carbide coating for concentrated solar power applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, T.; Singh, D.; Singh, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphite foam with extremely high thermal conductivity has been investigated to enhance heat transfer of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems. However, the use of graphite foam for elevated temperature applications (>600 įC) is limited due to poor oxidation resistance of graphite. In the present study, oxidation resistance of graphite foam coated with silicon carbide (SiC) was investigated. A pre-ceramic polymer derived coating (PDC) method was used to form a SiC coating on the graphite foams. Post coating deposition, the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The oxidation resistance of PDC-SiC coating was quantifiedmore†Ľby measuring the weight of the samples at several measuring points. The experiments were conducted under static argon atmosphere in a furnace. After the experiments, oxidation rates (%/hour) were calculated to predict the lifetime of the graphite foams. The experimental results showed that the PDC-SiC coating could prevent the oxidation of graphite foam under static argon atmosphere up to 900 įC.ę†less

  7. Enhancement of oxidation resistance of graphite foams by polymer derived-silicon carbide coating for concentrated solar power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T.; Singh, D.; Singh, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphite foam with extremely high thermal conductivity has been investigated to enhance heat transfer of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems. However, the use of graphite foam for elevated temperature applications (>600 įC) is limited due to poor oxidation resistance of graphite. In the present study, oxidation resistance of graphite foam coated with silicon carbide (SiC) was investigated. A pre-ceramic polymer derived coating (PDC) method was used to form a SiC coating on the graphite foams. Post coating deposition, the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The oxidation resistance of PDC-SiC coating was quantified by measuring the weight of the samples at several measuring points. The experiments were conducted under static argon atmosphere in a furnace. After the experiments, oxidation rates (%/hour) were calculated to predict the lifetime of the graphite foams. The experimental results showed that the PDC-SiC coating could prevent the oxidation of graphite foam under static argon atmosphere up to 900 įC.

  8. Influence of Fe-doped Graphite Electrode Characteristics on Ar-H2 Carbon Arc Plasma and SWCNT Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huczko, A.; Lange, H.; Bystrzejewski, M.; Ando, Y.; Zhao, X.; Inoue, S.

    2005-09-27

    Two Fe-doped (ca. 1 at.%) homogeneous graphite electrodes (different graphite microcrystals, degree of graphitization and, thereby, electrical conductivities) electrodes were used in the process of production of single-walled carbon nanotubes in Ar-H2 arc plasma under pressure 26 kPa. The C2 content (namely carbon vapor pressure) and temperature distributions in the arc plasma were determined using optical emission spectroscopy. The mechanism of CNT formation based on carbon dimers as the building blocks seems to be at least questionable.

  9. Applications of artificial intelligence to engineering problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adey, R.A.; Sriram, D.

    1987-01-01

    The conference covered general sessions on AI techniques suitable for engineering applications, e.g. knowledge representation, natural language, probability, design methodologies and constraints. This was followed by sessions covering application in mechanical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, and general engineering. Further sessions covered robotics and tools and techniques for building knowledge based systems.

  10. Artificial Retina Project: Electromagnetic and Thermal Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-08-29

    This award supported the investigation on electromagnetic and thermal effects associated with the artificial retina, designed in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, and private companies. Our work over the two years of support under this award has focused mainly on 1) Design of new telemetry coils for optimal power and data transfer between the implant and the external device while achieving a significant size reduction with respect to currently used coils; 2) feasibility study of the virtual electrode configuration 3) study the effect of pulse shape and duration on the stimulation efficacy.

  11. On the Disposition of Graphite Containing TRISO Particles and the Aqueous Transport of Radionuclides via Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Akker, Bret Patrick

    2012-01-01

    element) 0.225 (compact only) 5.144 Graphite CSNF 21-PWR12-PWR 44-BWR 24-BWR UO2 21 PWR fuel assemblies 12 PWR fuel assemblies, 44

  12. IEEE SYMPOSIUM ON ARTIFICIAL LIFE 1 Using Artificial Organisms To Study The Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liew, Chun Wai

    in Fish C.W. Liew Dept of Computer Science Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 liew methodology for studying how some features evolved in swimming fish. Experiments with the artificial organisms allow us to evaluate the hypothesis that backbones evolved in fish in part because they result in higher

  13. Exercise protocols during short-radius centrifugation for artificial gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmonds, Jessica Leigh

    2008-01-01

    Long-duration spaceflight results in severe physiological deconditioning, threatening the success of interplanetary travel. Exercise combined with artificial gravity provided by centrifugation may be the comprehensive ...

  14. Can Small Go Big? Microfluidics Aid Quest for Artificial Photosynthesi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can Small Go Big? Microfluidics Aid Quest for Artificial Photosynthesis Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding...

  15. Lecturer: Amir Globerson Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, MIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barash, Danny

    Lecturer: Amir Globerson Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, MIT Title: Making in fields such as machine vision, natural language processing and computational biology. With the growing

  16. Synthetic nanotubes lay foundation for new technology: Artificial...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthetic nanotubes lay foundation for new technology: Artificial pores mimic key features of natural pores By Tona Kunz * July 17, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Scientists have overcome...

  17. Abundances of presolar graphite and SiC from supernovae and AGB stars in the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst [McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and the Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Gallino, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitŗ di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2014-05-02

    Pesolar graphite grains exhibit a range of densities (1.65 Ė 2.20 g/cm{sup 3}). We investigated abundances of presolar graphite grains formed in supernovae and in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the four density fractions KE3, KFA1, KFB1 and KFC1 extracted from the Murchison meteorite to probe dust productions in these stellar sources. Seventy-six and 50% of the grains in the low-density fractions KE3 and KFA1, respectively, are supernova grains, while only 7.2% and 0.9% of the grains in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1 have a supernova origin. Grains of AGB star origin are concentrated in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1. From the C isotopic distributions of these fractions and the presence of s-process Kr with {sup 86}Kr/{sup 82}Kr?=?4.43Ī0.46 in KFC1, we estimate that 76% and 80% of the grains in KFB1 and KFC1, respectively, formed in AGB stars. From the abundance of graphite grains in the Murchison meteorite, 0.88 ppm, the abundances of graphite from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.24 ppm and 0.44 ppm, respectively: the abundances of graphite in supernovae and AGB stars are comparable. In contrast, it has been known that 1% of SiC grains formed in supernovae and 95% formed in AGB stars in meteorites. Since the abundance of SiC grains is 5.85 ppm in the Murchison meteorite, the abundances of SiC from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.063 ppm and 5.6 ppm, respectively: the dominant source of SiC grains is AGB stars. Since SiC grains are harder and likely to survive better in space than graphite grains, the abundance of supernova graphite grains, which is higher than that of supernova SiC grains, indicates that supernovae proficiently produce graphite grains. Graphite grains from AGB stars are, in contrast, less abundant that SiC grains from AGB stars (0.44 ppm vs. 5.6 ppm). It is difficult to derive firm conclusions for graphite and SiC formation in AGB stars due to the difference in susceptibility to grain destruction. Metallicity of the parent AGB stars of graphite grains is much lower than that of SiC grains and the difference in metallicity might also have affected to the difference in the abundances in the Murchison meteorite.

  18. The influence of constituent properties on the compression behavior of graphite fiber reinforced composites containing geometric discontinuities†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crane, David Lee

    1990-01-01

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE DECEMBER 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE INFLUENCE OF CONSTITUENT PROPERTIES ON THE COMPRESSION BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES CONTAINING... Committee: Walter L. Bradley This study addresses the compressive behavior of graphite fiber reinforced composites containing toughened matrices. The effect of thermoplastic and rubber particulate toughening mechanisms is evaluated utilizing four...

  19. Experimental investigation of moisture and temperature conditioning of C600/5208 graphite/epoxy composite material†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grieger, Kenneth Allen

    1979-01-01

    I XPERIMENTAI INVESTIGATION OF MOI TURE AND TE11PERATURF CONDITIONING OF CGOO/5208 GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE MATL'RIAL KENNETH AILEN GRIFGFR Su5&ritted to the Graduate College of Texa. s AQh University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE December 1979 Majo, Subject: Ae&ospace Engineering EXPERINENTAL INVESTIGATION OF MOISTURE AND TENPERATURE CONDITIONING OF C600/5208 GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE HATERIAL A Thesis by -KENNETH ALLEN GRIEGER Approved...

  20. Moisture and temperature effects on curvature of anti-symmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Randall Stephen

    1980-01-01

    MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Approved as to style and content...

  1. Research into Oil-based Colloidal-Graphite Lubricants for Forging of Al-based Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrov, A.; Petrov, P.; Petrov, M.

    2011-05-04

    The presented paper describes the topical problem in metal forging production. It deals with the choice of an optimal lubricant for forging of Al-based alloys. Within the scope of the paper, the properties of several oil-based colloidal-graphite lubricants were investigated. The physicochemical and technological properties of these lubricants are presented. It was found that physicochemical properties of lubricant compositions have an influence on friction coefficient value and quality of forgings.The ring compression method was used to estimate the friction coefficient value. Hydraulic press was used for the test. The comparative analysis of the investigated lubricants was carried out. The forging quality was estimated on the basis of production test. The practical recommendations were given to choose an optimal oil-based colloidal-graphite lubricant for isothermal forging of Al-based alloy.

  2. Thin Flexible Lithium Ion Battery Featuring Graphite Paper Based Current Collectors with Enhanced Conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Hang; Tang, Yufeng; Semenikihin, Oleg; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2015-01-01

    A flexible, light weight and high conductivity current collector is the key element that enables fabrication of high performance flexible lithium ion battery. Here we report a thin, light weight and flexible lithium ion battery that uses graphite paper enhanced with a nano-sized metallic layers as the current collector, LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 as the cathode and anode materials, and PE membrane soaked in LiPF6 as a separator. Using thin and flexible graphite paper as a substrate for the current collector instead of a rigid and heavy metal foil enables us to demonstrate a very thin Lithium-Ion Battery into ultra-thin (total thickness including encapsulation layers of less than 250 {\\mu}m) that is also light weight and highly flexible.

  3. Continious production of exfoliated graphite composite compositions and flow field plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shi, Jinjun (Columbus, OH); Zhamu, Aruna (Centerville, OH); Jang, Bor Z. (Centerville, OH)

    2010-07-20

    A process of continuously producing a more isotropic, electrically conductive composite composition is provided. The process comprises: (a) continuously supplying a compressible mixture comprising exfoliated graphite worms and a binder or matrix material, wherein the binder or matrix material is in an amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the mixture; (b) continuously compressing the compressible mixture at a pressure within the range of from about 5 psi or 0.035 MPa to about 50,000 psi or 350 MPa in at least a first direction into a cohered graphite composite compact; and (c) continuously compressing the composite compact in a second direction, different from the first direction, to form the composite composition in a sheet or plate form. The process leads to composite plates with exceptionally high thickness-direction electrical conductivity.

  4. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) plutonium recycle test reactor graphite cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, T.

    1997-09-29

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) provides the evaluation necessary to demonstrate that the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) Graphite Cask meets the requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for transfer of Type B, fissile, non-highway route controlled quantities of radioactive material within the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The scope of this SEP includes risk, shieldling, criticality, and.tiedown analyses to demonstrate that onsite transportation safety requirements are satisfied. This SEP also establishes operational and maintenance guidelines to ensure that transport of the PRTR Graphite Cask is performed safely in accordance with WHC-CM-2-14. This SEP is valid until October 1, 1999. After this date, an update or upgrade to this document is required.

  5. Hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon with graphitized frameworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, Yingying; Fang, Yin; Qian, Xufang; Tu, Bo [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Zhangxiong [Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Asiri, Abdullah M. [Chemistry Department and The Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Zhao, Dongyuan, E-mail: dyzhao@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2014-11-01

    A hierarchical meso-/micro-porous graphitized carbon with uniform mesopores and ordered micropores, graphitized frameworks, and extra-high surface area of ?2200 m{sup 2}/g, was successfully synthesized through a simple one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The commercial mesoporous zeolite Y was utilized as a meso-/ micro-porous template, and the small-molecule methane was employed as a carbon precursor. The as-prepared hierarchical meso-/micro-porous carbons have homogeneously distributed mesopores as a host for electrolyte, which facilitate Li{sup +} ions transport to the large-area micropores, resulting a high reversible lithium ion storage of 1000 mA h/g and a high columbic efficiency of 65% at the first cycle.

  6. Lithium difluoro(oxalato)borate as additive to Improve the thermal stability of llithiated graphite.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Z.; Qin, Y.; Liu, J.; Amine, K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-01-21

    The reaction of lithiated graphite with a nonaqueous electrolyte of 1.2 M LiPF{sub 6} in ethylene carbonate/ethyl methyl carbonate (3:7 by weight) was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. The decomposition of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) took place at about 100 C and was followed by a continuous formation/decomposition of the SEI up to 250 C. Another two peaks were observed at temperatures above 250 C. These peaks were attributed to the major reaction of lithiated graphite with the nonaqueous electrolyte. With the addition of lithium difluoro(oxalato)borate as an electrolyte additive, the onset temperatures of the three peaks were pushed higher, as confirmed by the activation energies obtained.

  7. Direct exfoliation of natural graphite into micrometer size few layers graphene sheets using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Fulvio, P. F.; Baker, G. A.; Veith, G. M.; Unocic, R. R.; Mahurin, S., M.; Chi, M.; Dai, S.

    2010-01-01

    Stable high-concentration suspensions (up to 0.95 mg mL{sup ?1}) of non-oxidized few layer graphene (FLG), five or less sheets, with micrometre-long edges were obtained via direct exfoliation of natural graphite flakes in ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoro-methane-sulfonyl)imide ([Bmim]-[Tf{sub 2}N]), by tip ultrasonication.

  8. Chemical Distribution and Bonding of Lithium in Intercalated Graphite: Identification with Optimized Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Feng; Graetz, Jason; Moreno, M. Sergio; Ma, Chao; Wu, Lijun; Volkov, Vyacheslav; Zhu, Yimei

    2011-01-01

    Direct mapping of the lithium spatial distribution and the chemical state provides critical information on structure-correlated lithium transport in electrode materials for lithium batteries. Nevertheless, probing lithium, the lightest solid element in the periodic table, poses an extreme challenge with traditional X-ray or electron scattering techniques due to its weak scattering power and vulnerability to radiation damage. Here, we report nanoscale maps of the lithium spatial distribution in electrochemically lithiated graphite using electron energy loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope under optimized experimental conditions. The electronic structure of the discharged graphite was obtained from the near-edge fine structure of the Li and C K-edges and ab initio calculations. A 2.7 eV chemical shift of the Li K-edge, along with changes in the density of states, reveals the ionic nature of the intercalated lithium with significant charge transfer to the graphene sheets. Direct mapping of lithium in graphite revealed nanoscale inhomogeneities (nonstoichiometric regions), which are correlated with local phase separation and structural disorder (i.e., lattice distortion and dislocations) as observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The surface solid?electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer was also imaged and determined to have a thickness of 10?50 nm, covering both edge and basal planes with LiF as its primary inorganic component. The Li K-edge spectroscopy and mapping, combined with electron microscopy-based structural analysis provide a comprehensive view of the structure-correlated lithium intercalation in graphite and of the formation of the SEI layer.

  9. Chemical Distribution and Bonding of Lithium in Intercalated Graphite: Identification with Optimized Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Y.; Wang, F.; Graetz, J.; Moreno, M.S.; Ma, C.; Wu, L.; Volkov, V.

    2011-02-01

    Direct mapping of the lithium spatial distribution and the chemical state provides critical information on structure-correlated lithium transport in electrode materials for lithium batteries. Nevertheless, probing lithium, the lightest solid element in the periodic table, poses an extreme challenge with traditional X-ray or electron scattering techniques due to its weak scattering power and vulnerability to radiation damage. Here, we report nanoscale maps of the lithium spatial distribution in electrochemically lithiated graphite using electron energy loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope under optimized experimental conditions. The electronic structure of the discharged graphite was obtained from the near-edge fine structure of the Li and C K-edges and ab initio calculations. A 2.7 eV chemical shift of the Li K-edge, along with changes in the density of states, reveals the ionic nature of the intercalated lithium with significant charge transfer to the graphene sheets. Direct mapping of lithium in graphite revealed nanoscale inhomogeneities (nonstoichiometric regions), which are correlated with local phase separation and structural disorder (i.e., lattice distortion and dislocations) as observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The surface solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer was also imaged and determined to have a thickness of 10-50 nm, covering both edge and basal planes with LiF as its primary inorganic component. The Li K-edge spectroscopy and mapping, combined with electron microscopy-based structural analysis provide a comprehensive view of the structure-correlated lithium intercalation in graphite and of the formation of the SEI layer.

  10. Recapturing Graphite-Based Fuel Element Technology for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trammell, Michael P [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    ORNL is currently recapturing graphite based fuel forms for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). This effort involves research and development on materials selection, extrusion, and coating processes to produce fuel elements representative of historical ROVER and NERVA fuel. Initially, lab scale specimens were fabricated using surrogate oxides to develop processing parameters that could be applied to full length NTP fuel elements. Progress toward understanding the effect of these processing parameters on surrogate fuel microstructure is presented.

  11. The effect of graphite nodules on fracture behavior of ductile iron†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, Glenn Mark

    1986-01-01

    ~/~/ ~ /' " Robert C. Burghard (Member) Leonar Roy Cornwell (Member) N. D. Turner, ing Head Department of Mechanical Engineering May I9B6 ABSTRACT The Effect of Graphite Nodules on F'racture Behavior of Ductile Iron. (Nay 1986) Glenn Nark Tanner, B. S..., and strain-rate on the transition temperature and upper shelf ductile fracture energy. It was determined that the transition temperature of ductile iron could be accurately determined using fatigue precracked Charpy specimens and the upper shelf toughness...

  12. Effect of resin toughness on fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy composites†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald Nelson

    1982-01-01

    . Schaper , Mob (Y. Weitsman, Member) ( L . S . F, etcher, Head of Department. ) ABSTRACT Effect of Resin Toughness on Fracture Behavio~ of Graphite/Epoxy Composites (Becember 1982) Ronald Nelson Cohen, B. S. , Purdue University Chairman of Advisory... with subsequent frac- tography on fractured surfaces. The critical energy release rate for delamination fracture and transverse fracture is less than the critical energy release rate for the neat material for a tough resin system. For a brittle resin system...

  13. SWEPP PAN assay system uncertainty analysis: Passive mode measurements of graphite waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Meachum, T.R.; Yoon, Woo Y.

    1997-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is being used as a temporary storage facility for transuranic waste generated by the U.S. Nuclear Weapons program at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Golden, Colorado. Currently, there is a large effort in progress to prepare to ship this waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. In order to meet the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan nondestructive assay compliance requirements and quality assurance objectives, it is necessary to determine the total uncertainty of the radioassay results produced by the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) Passive Active Neutron (PAN) radioassay system. To this end a modified statistical sampling and verification approach has been developed to determine the total uncertainty of a PAN measurement. In this approach the total performance of the PAN nondestructive assay system is simulated using computer models of the assay system and the resultant output is compared with the known input to assess the total uncertainty. This paper is one of a series of reports quantifying the results of the uncertainty analysis of the PAN system measurements for specific waste types and measurement modes. In particular this report covers passive mode measurements of weapons grade plutonium-contaminated graphite molds contained in 208 liter drums (waste code 300). The validity of the simulation approach is verified by comparing simulated output against results from measurements using known plutonium sources and a surrogate graphite waste form drum. For actual graphite waste form conditions, a set of 50 cases covering a statistical sampling of the conditions exhibited in graphite wastes was compiled using a Latin hypercube statistical sampling approach.

  14. Status of the NGNP graphite creep experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) very high temperature gas reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have three different compressive loads applied to the top half of three diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment.

  15. Report on Thermal Neutron Diffusion Length Measurement in Reactor Grade Graphite Using MCNP and COMSOL Multiphysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Mirfayzi

    2013-01-08

    Neutron diffusion length in reactor grade graphite is measured both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental work includes Monte Carlo (MC) coding using 'MCNP' and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) coding suing 'COMSOL Multiphysics' and Matlab. The MCNP code is adopted to simulate the thermal neutron diffusion length in a reactor moderator of 2m x 2m with slightly enriched uranium ($^{235}U$), accompanied with a model designed for thermal hydraulic analysis using point kinetic equations, based on partial and ordinary differential equation. The theoretical work includes numerical approximation methods including transcendental technique to illustrate the iteration process with the FEA method. Finally collision density of thermal neutron in graphite is measured, also specific heat relation dependability of collision density is also calculated theoretically, the thermal neutron diffusion length in graphite is evaluated at $50.85 \\pm 0.3cm$ using COMSOL Multiphysics and $50.95 \\pm 0.5cm$ using MCNP. Finally the total neutron cross-section is derived using FEA in an inverse iteration form.

  16. Optimized Operating Range for Large-Format LiFePO4/Graphite Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Jiuchun; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Zuo, Pengjian; Xiao, Jie; Chen, Xilin; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-06-01

    e investigated the long-term cycling performance of large format 20Ah LiFePO4/graphite batteries when they are cycled in various state-of-charge (SOC) ranges. It is found that batteries cycled in the medium SOC range (ca. 20~80% SOC) exhibit superior cycling stability than batteries cycled at both ends (0-20% or 80-100%) of the SOC even though the capcity utilized in the medium SOC range is three times as large as those cycled at both ends of the SOC. Several non-destructive techniques, including a voltage interruption approach, model-based parameter identification, electrode impedance spectra analysis, ?Q/?V analysis, and entropy change test, were used to investigate the performance of LiFePO4/graphite batteries within different SOC ranges. The results reveal that batteries at the ends of SOC exhibit much higher polarization impedance than those at the medium SOC range. These results can be attributed to the significant structural change of cathode and anode materials as revealed by the large entropy change within these ranges. The direct correlation between the polarization impedance and the cycle life of the batteries provides an effective methodology for battery management systems to control and prolong the cycle life of LiFePO4/graphite and other batteries.

  17. Polymer surfaces graphitization by low-energy He{sup +} ions irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geworski, A.; Lazareva, I.; Gieb, K.; Koval, Y.; MŁller, P. [Department of Physics, Universitšt Erlangen-NŁrnberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-08-14

    The electrical and optical properties of surfaces of polyimide and AZ5214e graphitized by low-energy (1?keV) He{sup +} irradiation at different polymer temperatures were investigated. The conductivity of the graphitized layers can be controlled with the irradiation temperature within a broad range and can reach values up to ?1000?S/cm. We show that the electrical transport in low-conducting samples is governed by thermally activated hopping, while the samples with a high conductivity show a typical semimetallic behavior. The transition from thermally activated to semimetallic conductance governed by the irradiation temperature could also be observed in optical measurements. The semimetallic samples show an unusually high for graphitic materials carrier concentration, which results in a high extinction coefficient in the visible light range. By analyzing the temperature dependence of the conductance of the semimetallic samples, we conclude that the scattering of charge carriers is dominated by Coulomb interactions and can be described by a weak localization model. The transition from a three to two dimensional transport mechanism at low temperatures consistently explains the change in the temperature dependence of the conductance by cooling, observed in experiments.

  18. Modeling Stress Strain Relationships and Predicting Failure Probabilities For Graphite Core Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, Stephen

    2013-09-09

    This project will implement inelastic constitutive models that will yield the requisite stress-strain information necessary for graphite component design. Accurate knowledge of stress states (both elastic and inelastic) is required to assess how close a nuclear core component is to failure. Strain states are needed to assess deformations in order to ascertain serviceability issues relating to failure, e.g., whether too much shrinkage has taken place for the core to function properly. Failure probabilities, as opposed to safety factors, are required in order to capture the bariability in failure strength in tensile regimes. The current stress state is used to predict the probability of failure. Stochastic failure models will be developed that can accommodate possible material anisotropy. This work will also model material damage (i.e., degradation of mechanical properties) due to radiation exposure. The team will design tools for components fabricated from nuclear graphite. These tools must readily interact with finite element software--in particular, COMSOL, the software algorithm currently being utilized by the Idaho National Laboratory. For the eleastic response of graphite, the team will adopt anisotropic stress-strain relationships available in COMSO. Data from the literature will be utilized to characterize the appropriate elastic material constants.

  19. Colloidal graphite/graphene nanostructures using collagen showing enhanced thermal conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soumya Bhattacharya; Purbarun Dhar; Sarit K Das; Ranjan Ganguly; Thomas Webster; Suprabha Nayar

    2015-11-27

    Time kinetics of interaction of natural graphite (GR) to colloidal graphene (G) collagen (C) nanocomposites was studied at ambient conditions, and observed that just one day at ambient conditions is enough to form colloidal graphene directly from graphite using the protein collagen. Neither controlled temperature and pressure ambiance nor sonication was needed for the same; thereby rendering the process biomimetic. Detailed spectroscopy, X ray diffraction, electron microscopy as well as fluorescence and luminescence assisted characterization of the colloidal dispersions on day one and day seven reveals graphene and collagen interaction and subsequent rearrangement to form an open structure. Detailed confocal microscopy, in the liquid state, reveals the initial attack at the zigzag edges of GR, the enhancement of auto fluorescence and finally the opening up of graphitic stacks of GR to form near transparent G. Atomic Force Microscopy studies prove the existence of both collagen and graphene and the disruption of periodicity at the atomic level. Thermal conductivity of the colloid shows a 17% enhancement for a volume fraction of less than 0.00005 of G. Time variant increase in thermal conductivity provides qualitative evidence for the transient exfoliation of GR to G. The composite reveals interesting properties that could propel it as a future material for advanced bio applications including therapeutics.

  20. Towards an artificial formate dehydrogenase : : mechanistic studies of formate oxidation and CO? reduction by metal P?N? complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seu, Candace Sachi Wai Mei

    Kubiak, C.P. "Artificial photosynthesis of CO: Kinetic andfor use in the ďartificial photosynthesisĒ of solar fuels,biology-inspired ďartificial photosynthesisĒ, it is worth

  1. SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH;SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH POPULATIONS of the elements of study included monitoring the effects of pulp mill effluent on resident fish populations

  2. 7. Distributed AI D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 10/13 1D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 7. Distributed AI 10/13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, David M.

    7. Distributed AI D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 10/13 1D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 7. Distributed AI 10/13 David M. Keil, Framingham State University CSCI 400 Artificial Intelligence 7 might (a) NAO or (b) Siri operate as a member of a team or network? D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 7

  3. Artificial Intelligence: Math and CS background D. Keil 7/13 1D. Keil CSCI 300 Artificial Intelligence 7/13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, David M.

    Artificial Intelligence: Math and CS background D. Keil 7/13 1D. Keil CSCI 300 Artificial Intelligence 7/13 David Keil, Framingham State University CSCI 300 Artificial Intelligence Mathematical is a function? Examples? ∑ What is inference? #12;Artificial Intelligence: Math and CS background D. Keil 7/13 D

  4. New Frontiers For An Artificial Immune System Julie Greensmith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    New Frontiers For An Artificial Immune System Julie Greensmith Digital Media Systems Laboratory HP Laboratories Bristol HPL-2003-204 October 7th , 2003* artificial immune system, document classification on various classification tasks, including data clustering. This thesis proposes the use of this system

  5. Artificial Neural Nets and Cylinder Pressures in Diesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkey, Amanda

    Artificial Neural Nets and Cylinder Pressures in Diesel Engine Fault Diagnosis * Gopi O diagnosis system for a diesel engine, which uses artificial neural nets to identify faults on the basis cylinder Ruston AP 230, medium speed Diesel engine was simulated. When tested on new data previously unseen

  6. Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muggleton, Stephen H.

    1 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Stephen Muggleton , During the centennial year of his birth Alan Turing (1912-1954) has been widely celebrated as having laid the paper. Keywords: Alan Turing, Artificial Intelligence, Ma- chine Intelligence 1. Introduction

  7. Extracting Provably Correct Rules from Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clausen, Michael

    Extracting Provably Correct Rules from Artificial Neural Networks Sebastian B. Thrun University procedures have been applied successfully to a variety of real≠world scenarios, artificial neural networks that automatically compile neural networks into symbolic rules offer a promising perspective to overcome

  8. Safety Lifecycle for Developing Safety Critical Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    Safety Lifecycle for Developing Safety Critical Artificial Neural Networks Zeshan Kurd, Tim Kelly.kelly}@cs.york.ac.uk Abstract. Artificial neural networks are employed in many areas of industry such as medicine and defence. There are many techniques that aim to improve the performance of neural networks for safety-critical systems

  9. Developmental Plasticity in Cartesian Genetic Programming Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Developmental Plasticity in Cartesian Genetic Programming Artificial Neural Networks Maryam Mahsal developmental plasticity in Artificial Neural Networks using Carte- sian Genetic Programming. This is inspired by developmental plasticity that exists in the biological brain allowing it to adapt to a changing environment

  10. SPE-169507-MS Artificial Intelligence (AI) Assisted History Matching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE-169507-MS Artificial Intelligence (AI) Assisted History Matching Alireza Shahkarami, Shahab D a successful history matching project. The pattern recognition capabilities of Artificial Intelligence and Data the history matching process. SRM is an intelligent prototype of the full-field reservoir simulation model

  11. The Role of Artificial Intelligence in Software Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Mark

    The Role of Artificial Intelligence in Software Engineering Mark Harman CREST Centre, University in the application of Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques to Software Engineering (SE) problems. The work is typified by recent advances in Search Based Software Engineering, but also by long established work

  12. Access via Science Online Site Pass ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckett, Tom

    Access via Science Online Site Pass ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: Autonomous Mental Development of an adult brain, such as vision, speech, and language. Nevertheless, these traditional approaches have." A Definition What is autonomous mental development? With time, a brainlike natural or an artificial embodied

  13. Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Technical Report massachusetts institute is a penultimate draft. The final version was published as a chapter in Machine Learning for Computer Vision (2012. Abstract In recent years, scientific and technological advances have produced artificial systems that have

  14. Learning to discriminate complex movements: Biological versus artificial trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kourtzi, Zoe

    Learning to discriminate complex movements: Biological versus artificial trajectories Laboratory consistent with human movements. A second class of stimuli was based on artificial skeleton models that were on learning has been demonstrated for a broad range of visual tasks ranging from lower level vision tasks like

  15. Human Artificial versus Natural Conceptualization of Spacetime Units Bernd Binder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binder, Bernd

    to a system of units. Additionally, the definition and measurement of the Newton constant does not involveHuman Artificial versus Natural Conceptualization of Spacetime Units Bernd Binder binder@quanics.com (Dated: 30.12.2003, www.quanics.com) The human international system of units (SI) is an artificial

  16. Human Artificial versus Natural Conceptualization of Spacetime Units Bernd Binder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binder, Bernd

    of units. Additionally, the definition and measurement of the Newton constant does not involve the lightHuman Artificial versus Natural Conceptualization of Spacetime Units Bernd Binder binder@quanics.com (Dated: 30.12.2003, www.quanics.com) The human international system of units (SI) is an artificial

  17. Biomaterials 28 (2007) 31313139 Towards improved artificial lungs through biocatalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Biomaterials 28 (2007) 3131≠3139 Towards improved artificial lungs through biocatalysis Joel L in the development of artificial lungs and respiratory assist devices, which use hollow fiber membranes (HFMs intervention involves the use of mechan- ical ventilators to provide breathing support while the lungs recover

  18. Lung, Artificial: Current Research and Future Directions William J. Federspiel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    Lung, Artificial: Current Research and Future Directions William J. Federspiel Robert G. Svitek University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. INTRODUCTION Artificial lungs are medical devices designed to take over or supplement the respiratory function of the lung: oxygenating the blood

  19. RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 8 Artificial Production304304

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETURN TO THE RIVER - 2000 Chapter 8 Artificial Production304304 Return to Table of Contents Go to Next Chapter CHAPTER 8. ARTIFICIAL PRODUCTION AND THE EFFECTS OF FISH CULTURE ON NATIVE SALMONIDS largely on hatchery production, with no overt and large scale ecosystem-level recovery program is doomed

  20. LUABAB: Leeds University Angry Birds Artificial Brain Brandon Bennett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Brandon

    LUABAB: Leeds University Angry Birds Artificial Brain Brandon Bennett University of Leeds United Kingdom B.Bennett@leeds.ac.uk Abstract This document gives an overview of the develop- ment and design principles behind LUABAB, the Leeds University Angry Birds Artificial Brain. 1 Background There is a long

  1. General Shape Grammar Interpreter for Intelligent Designs Generations Artificial Intelligence Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Inmaculada

    General Shape Grammar Interpreter for Intelligent Designs Generations T. Trescak Artificial@maia.ub.es M. Esteva Artificial Intelligence Research Institute Spanish Council for Scientific Research visualization and artificial intelligent technologies have motivated the evolution of traditional computer aided

  2. Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence 16 (2003) 237250 Hierarchical decision making for proactive quality control: system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yinlun

    2003-01-01

    Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence 16 (2003) 237≠250 Hierarchical decision making by resorting to artificial intelligence and engineering fundamentals. The approach is developed for solving control; Intelligent decision support; Artificial intelligence; Fuzzy logic; Automotive coating 1

  3. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markovich, Dmitry; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here a new approach for increasing magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer nanoantenna. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of magnetic polarizability, tailoring the later in the dynamical range of 100 % and enhancement up to 36 % relative to performances of standalone spherical particles....

  4. Synthesis of SiO{sub 2}/?-SiC/graphite hybrid composite by low temperature hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhikun; Bi, Kaifeng; Liu, Yanhong; Qin, Fuwen; Liu, Hongzhu; Bian, Jiming; Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 ; Zhang, Dong; Miao, Lihua; Department of Computer and Mathematical Basic Teaching, Shenyang Medical College, Shenyan 110034

    2013-11-18

    ?-SiC thin films were synthesized directly on graphite by hot filament chemical vapor deposition at low temperature. SiH{sub 4} diluted in hydrogen was employed as the silicon source, while graphite was functioned as both substrate and carbon source for the as-grown ?-SiC films. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis indicate that SiO{sub 2}/?-SiC/graphite hybrid composite was formed after post annealing treatment, and its crystalline quality can be remarkably improved under optimized annealing conditions. The possible growth mechanism was proposed based on in situ etching of graphite by reactive hydrogen radicals at the atomic level.

  5. Artificial Intelligence, Story Generation and Literary Creativity: the State of the Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bringsjord, Selmer

    Artificial Intelligence, Story Generation and Literary Creativity: the State of the Art Selmer, doing it. The result of our engineering is BRUTUS, an artificial storyteller who certainly appears

  6. Historical overview on Vacuum suitable Welding and fatigue resistance in Research Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    New inventions change the approach of vacuum suitable welding for research purpose. With orbital welding, laser welding and robot welding the possibilities increase to fabricate larger vessels more accurately. Despite this development there is still no perfect understanding on how to avoid virtual leaks and how to make such joints suitable for dynamic stress. By recalling its historical development, it is apparent how welding mistakes began occurring systematically and how to avoid them. With ASDEX-Upgrade as an example, it is shown how the attempt to conduct vacuum suitable welding has decreased the fatigue strength. ITER could repeat the mistakes of ASDEX-Upgrade even for unwanted welding (accidental fusing of joints).

  7. Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene Generation Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gartley, Michael G.

    Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene models and hardware based infrared scene projectors commonly utilize analytical forms of polarized bi, polarimetric imaging sensors and payloads can benefit greatly from polarization capable synthetic image

  8. Rare-earth tantalates and niobates suitable for use as nanophosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S& gt

    2013-11-19

    A family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  9. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von L. Richards

    2012-09-19

    The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: √?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. √?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. √?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. √?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  10. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2009-01-06

    The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

  11. Measurements of the diffusion coefficient of silver 110-m in a nuclear grade graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Thad Calhoun

    1980-01-01

    of pores. In HTGRs these pores are filled with heliufa gas. Since at the high tem- peratures of HTGRs there is a good chance that some of the metallic fission products will be in vapor form, a theory to describe gas diffusion through pores is needed... of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ron R. Hart 110 m The diffusion of the fission product, Ag, through nuclear grade H-451 graphite was studied. In particular the diffusion co- 110 m efficient of Ag through H-451 was measured in the temperature 0 0 range of 489 C...

  12. Electroanalytical applications of screen-printable surfactant-induced sol-gel graphite composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guadalupe, Ana R. (San Juan, PR); Guo, Yizhu (San Juan, PR)

    2001-05-15

    A process for preparing sol-gel graphite composite electrodes is presented. This process preferably uses the surfactant bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) and eliminates the need for a cosolvent, an acidic catalyst, a cellulose binder and a thermal curing step from prior art processes. Fabrication of screen-printed electrodes by this process provides a simple approach for electroanalytical applications in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents. Examples of applications for such composite electrodes produced from this process include biochemical sensors such as disposable, single-use glucose sensors and ligand modified composite sensors for metal ion sensitive sensors.

  13. Catalytic gasification of graphite or carbon. Quarterly report, January 1, 1986-March 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinemann, H.

    1986-03-01

    Steam gasification of five chars has been carried out in the presence of a mixture of potassium and nickel oxides as catalyst. The steady state rate of hydrogen production after 60 minutes at 620/sup 0/C is highest for a N. Dakota Husky lignite and is twice as high as the next char, Western Kentucky. The order is N. Dakota > W. Kentucky > Illinois number 6, low temp. > number 6, high temp. > Montana. All chars gasified at a rate at least one order of magnitude greater than graphite.

  14. Transition metals on the (0001) surface of graphite: Fundamental aspects of adsorption, diffusion, and morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appy, David [Ames Laboratory; Lei, Huaping [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Tringides, Michael C [Ames Laboratory; Liu, Da-Jiang [Ames Laboratory; Evans, James W [Ames Laboratory; Thiel, Patricia A [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-01

    In this article, we review basic information about the interaction of transition metal atoms with the (0 0 0 1) surface of graphite, especially fundamental phenomena related to growth. Those phenomena involve adatom-surface bonding, diffusion, morphology of metal clusters, interactions with steps and sputter-induced defects, condensation, and desorption. General traits emerge which have not been summarized previously. Some of these features are rather surprising when compared with metal-on-metal adsorption and growth. Opportunities for future work are pointed out.

  15. Experimental Observations and Numerical Prediction of Induction Heating in a Graphite Test Article

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowski, Todd A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Debra P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jurney, James D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freer, Jerry E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dougherty, Lisa M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stout, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The induction heating coils used in the plutonium casting furnaces at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are studied here. A cylindrical graphite test article has been built, instrumented with thermocouples, and heated in the induction coil that is normally used to preheat the molds during casting operations. Preliminary results of experiments aimed at understanding the induction heating process in the mold portion of the furnaces are reported. The experiments have been modeled in COMSOL Multiphysics and the numerical and experimental results are compared to one another. These comparisons provide insight into the heating process and provide a benchmark for COMSOL calculations of induction heating in the mold portion of the plutonium casting furnaces.

  16. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Shao, Dahai; Kwolek, Emma J.; Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.

    2014-11-05

    In this study, we observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  17. Characterization of Shape Memory Alloys Using Artificial Neural Networks†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrickson, James V

    2014-04-28

    shape memory alloy material parameters with satisfactory accuracy. Comparison of the implemented training data generation methods indicates that the Taguchi-based approach yields an artificial neural network that outperforms that of the factorial...

  18. Hunting a robot controlled by an artificial brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Arnoud

    In this demonstration an Raspberry Pi robot, controlled by an artificial brain which simulates the 302 neurons on the GoPiGo robot board1 . The demonstration is based on the later robot, which consists of a Raspberry Pi

  19. Artificial Intelligence, Language and the Study of Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Ira

    1975-07-01

    This paper studies the relationship of Artificial Intelligence to the study of language and the representation of the underlying knowledge which supports the comprehension process. It develops the view that intelligence ...

  20. Artificial Intelligence and The Many Faces of Reason†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    2003-01-01

    I shall focus this discussion on one small thread in the increasingly complex weave of Artificial Intelligence and Philosophy of Mind: the attempt to explain how rational thought is mechanically possible. This is, historically, the crucial place...

  1. Flexible Electronics Could Find Applications As Sensors, Artificial Muscles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Flexible Electronics Could Find Applications As Sensors, Artificial Muscles Science Daily -- Flexible electronic structures with the potential to bend, expand and manipulate electronic devices. In addition to a biomedical impact, flexible electronics are important for energy technology as flexible

  2. Maintaining artificial recharge ponds under uncertainty: a probabilistic approach for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PolitŤcnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Maintaining artificial recharge ponds under uncertainty: a probabilistic approach for engineering surface ponds (SP) Clogging What is clogging? Mathematical models for clogging Risk formulation Carlo analysis Conclusions #12;Surface ponds (SP) collect selected external water (e.g. regenerated

  3. Artificial Neural Network Circuit for Spectral Pattern Recognition†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasheed, Farah

    2013-09-04

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are a massively parallel network of a large number of interconnected neurons similar to the structure of biological neurons in the human brain. ANNs find applications in a large number of fields, from pattern...

  4. Injection Molding at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binnard, Michael

    1995-02-23

    This paper describes the injection molding equipment at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab and how to use it. Topic covered include mold design, insert molding, safety, and material properties.

  5. Evolution of Memory in Reactive Artificial Neural Networks†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Ji Ryang

    2012-07-16

    In the neuronal circuits of natural and artificial agents, memory is usually implemented with recurrent connections, since recurrence allows past agent state to affect the present, on-going behavior. Here, an interesting ...

  6. Artificial teeth : dental biofilm analysis on a chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Raymond Hiu-wai

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, an "artificial teeth" microfluidic device is developed that provides unprecedented control over the conditions required to simulate the growth of complex dental biofilm. Dental plaque formation is not only ...

  7. Collective artificial intelligence : simulated role-playing from crowdsourced data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orkin, Jeffrey David

    2013-01-01

    Collective Artificial Intelligence (CAl) simulates human intelligence from data contributed by many humans, mined for inter-related patterns. This thesis applies CAI to social role-playing, introducing an end-to-end process ...

  8. Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energyís Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

  9. Functionalized Single Graphene Sheets Derived from Splitting Graphite Oxide Hannes C. Schniepp, Je-Luen Li, Michael J. McAllister, Hiroaki Sai,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    ).10 The fundamental prerequisites that enable our preparation of large volumes of dry single grapheneFunctionalized Single Graphene Sheets Derived from Splitting Graphite Oxide Hannes C. Schniepp, Je is described to produce single sheets of functionalized graphene through thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide

  10. Crystalline Graphite from an Organometallic Solution-Phase Reaction Erich C. Walter, Tobias Beetz, Matthew Y. Sfeir, Louis E. Brus, and Michael L. Steigerwald*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    previously reported18 low-tempera- ture preparation of nanocrystals of TiO2, we have discovered to the remarkable science of single-walled carbon nanotubes, SWCNTs.2 In general, the production of graphitic carbon-prepared sample was dominated by areas of crystalline graphite and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs

  11. Encapsulating the meta-level knowledge in distributed artificial intelligence†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underbrink, Alvin Joseph

    1988-01-01

    ENCAPSULATING THE META-LEVEL KNOWLEDGE IN DISTRIBUTED ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE A Thesis by ALVIN JOSEPH UNDERBRINK, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AgcM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Computer Science EN CAP SULATING THE META-LEVEL KNOWLED GE IN DISTRIBUTED ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE A Thesis by ALVIN JOSEPH UNDERBRINK, JR. Approved as to style and content by: &K &, ~ eni'- Donald...

  12. Use of artificial intelligence for process modeling and control†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Yong

    1991-01-01

    USE OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR PROCESS MODELING AND CONTROL A Thesis by YONG YOU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Stuclies of Texas A&M University in partial fulffllment of the requirement for the degree of IvIASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering USE OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR PROCESS MODELING AND CONTROL A Thesis by YONG YOU Approved as to style and content by: Michael Nikolaou (Chair of Committee) Ralph E. White (Member) Alexande...

  13. Summary D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 7/13 David M. Keil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, David M.

    Summary D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 7/13 David M. Keil Framingham State University CSCI 300 Artificial Intelligence 1Special Topics: Artificial Intelligence 9. Summary 7/13D. Keil Summary Multi as part of a team 0f. Present results in the classroom 2Special Topics: Artificial Intelligence 9. Summary

  14. Artificial Intelligence and Literary Creativity Inside the Mind of Brutus, a Storytelling Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bringsjord, Selmer

    Artificial Intelligence and Literary Creativity Inside the Mind of Brutus, a Storytelling Machine Artificial Intelligence for permission to use, in Chapter ??, parts of the paper "The Case Against AI From . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi How Do You Build an Artificial Author? . . . . . . . . . . . xxi Why Build an Artificial Author

  15. Artificial Intelligence 170 (2006) 12511253 www.elsevier.com/locate/artint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spector, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence 170 (2006) 1251≠1253 www.elsevier.com/locate/artint Evolution of artificial the nominal 1956 establishment of the field of artificial intelligence by centuries or, under some definitions of creating artificial intelligence would have to be something like the process of creating a waterwheel

  16. Graphite and Beryllium Reflector Critical Assemblies of UO2 (Benchmark Experiments 2 and 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2012-11-01

    INTRODUCTION A series of experiments was carried out in 1962-65 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2 wt% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 252 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27-cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 252 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506-cm triangular-pitch array [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular-pitch configuration and in a 7-tube-cluster configuration [3]. Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. All three experiments in the series have been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5]. The evaluation of the first experiment in the series was discussed at the 2011 ANS Winter meeting [6]. The evaluations of the second and third experiments are discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems [7].

  17. Preparations and characterizations of novel graphite-like materials and some high oxidation state fluorine chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Ciping

    1992-11-01

    Novel graphite-like materials, BC{sub x} (6>x{ge}3), have been prepared using BCl{sub 3} and C{sub 6}H{sub 6} at 800--1000C, and C{sub x}N (14>x{ge}5) have been synthesized using C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N and Cl{sub 2} at 680C--986C. Bulk and thin film characterization were used to study the structure and bonding in these solids. C{sub 8}K(NH{sub 3}){sub 1.1} was prepared by reacting C{sub 8}K with gaseous NH{sub 3}. The carbon sub-lattice is hexagonal: a = 2.47 {Angstrom}, c = 6.47 {Angstrom}. The smaller a parameter and lower conductivity are attributed to smaller electron transfer from K to the conduction band solvation of K by NH{sub 3}. A simplified liquid phase method for synthesizing Li-graphite intercalation compounds has been developed; synthesis of a lamellar mixed conductor, C{sub x}{sup +}Li{sub 2}N{sup {minus}}, has been attempted. Stability and conductivity of (BN){sub 3}SO{sub 3}F have been studied; it was shown to be metallic with a specific conductivity of 1.5 S{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}1}. Its low conductivity is attributed to the low mobility of holes in BN sheets.

  18. Selection of a suitable reactor type for water desalination and power generation in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, F.M.

    1988-03-01

    Selection of a reactor type suitable for water desalination and power generation is a complex process that involves the evaluation of many criteria and requires the professional judgment of many experts in different fields. A reactor type that is suitable for one country might not be suitable for another. This is especially true in the case of Saudi Arabia because of its strategic location, the nature of its land and people, and its moderate technological situation. A detailed study using a computer code based on Saaty's mathematical pairwise comparison technique and developed in a previous study was carried out to find the most suitable reactor for water desalination and power generation in Saudi Arabia from among five potential types: boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors, CANDU heavy water reactors (HWRs), steam-generating heavy water reactors (SGHWRs), and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. It was concluded that the CANDU HWR is the most suitable type for this purpose followed first by the BWR, then the SGHWR.

  19. Sept.. 1060 HYDROGENS O R P T I O N O X GRAPHITEAT E L E V A T E D TEMPERATURES 1093 HYDROGEN SORPTIOK ON GRAPHITE AT ELEVATED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sept.. 1060 HYDROGENS O R P T I O N O X GRAPHITEAT E L E V A T E D TEMPERATURES 1093 HYDROGEN SORPTIOK ON GRAPHITE AT ELEVATED BYJ. P. REDMONDAND 1'. L. W..ZLHER,JR. Lkpaitmcnt of Fuel Technology does n>toccur. Introduction drtificial graphite of use in graphite-moderated nuclear reactors

  20. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the Li-graphite system from first-principles calculations Kristin Persson,1 Yoyo Hinuma,2 Ying Shirley Meng,2 Anton Van der Ven,3 and Gerbrand Ceder4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    interca- lation in rechargeable Li batteries. In graphite, the interlayer interactions are dominated in rechargeable Li batteries.1 Also, graphitic environments are present, to some extent, in almost all carbonThermodynamic and kinetic properties of the Li-graphite system from first-principles calculations

  1. Inteligencia Artificial, Revista Iberoamericana de Inteligencia Artificial. Vol 11, No. 36 (2007), pp. 9-17. ISSN: 1137-3601. AEPIA (http://www.aepia.org/revista).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pineda, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Inteligencia Artificial, Revista Iberoamericana de Inteligencia Artificial. Vol 11, No. 36 (2007), pp. 9-17. ISSN: 1137-3601. © AEPIA (http://www.aepia.org/revista). ARTÕCULO The obligations

  2. New gas mixtures suitable for rare event detection using a Micromegas-TPC detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Ounalli; J-L. Vuilleumier; D. Schenker; J-M. Vuilleumier

    2008-12-29

    The aim of the presented work was to develop further techniques based on a Micromegas-TPC, in order to reach a high gas gain with good energy resolution, and to search for gas mixtures suitable for rare event detection. This paper focuses on xenon, which is convenient for the search of neutrinoless double beta decay in 136 Xe. Conversely, a small admixture of xenon to CF 4 can reduce attachment in the latter. This gas mixture would be suitable for dark matter searches and the study of solar and reactor neutrinos. Various configurations of the Micromegas plane were investigated and are described.

  3. or the artificial intelligence community, 2006 is a special year, for it was fifty years ago when, at Dartmouth College, the term "artificial intelligence" was first intro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    F or the artificial intelligence community, 2006 is a special year, for it was fifty years ago when, at Dartmouth College, the term "artificial intelligence" was first intro- duced as a topic for a summer on Artificial Intelligence, cele- brates the fifty years of growth and diversity of our field. It also includes

  4. Published in Artificial Life V: Proc. Fifth Inter. Conf. on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems, Nara, Japan, May, 1996. Perception and Learning in Artificial Animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    equip our artificial animals with directable, virtual eyes capable of foveal vision. This aspect of ourPublished in Artificial Life V: Proc. Fifth Inter. Conf. on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems, Nara, Japan, May, 1996. Perception and Learning in Artificial Animals Demetri Terzopoulos, Tamer

  5. Published in Artificial Life V: Proc. Fifth Inter. Conf. on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems, Nara, Japan, May, 1996. Perception and Learning in Artificial Animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzopoulos, Demetri

    is carried out using computer vision algo- rithms. We equip our artificial animals withdirectable, virtualPublished in Artificial Life V: Proc. Fifth Inter. Conf. on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems, Nara, Japan, May, 1996. Perception and Learning in Artificial Animals Demetri Terzopoulos, Tamer

  6. Formation of Stable Phosphorus-Carbon Bond for Enhanced Performance in Black Phosphorus Nanoparticle-Graphite Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    batteries are critical power sources for mobile applications such as portable electronics, electric vehicles Nanoparticle-Graphite Composite Battery Anodes Jie Sun,,# Guangyuan Zheng, Hyun-Wook Lee, Nian Liu,ß Haotian States # State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology

  7. Temperature programed desorption of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} from pure and graphite-covered Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermang, B.; Juel, M.; Raaen, S.

    2007-11-15

    Ethylene adsorption on Pt(111) at 95 K was studied by temperature programed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ethylene desorbs reversibly at 112 K and irreversibly at 255 and 280 K. It is generally accepted that annealing of ethylene adsorbed on Pt(111) to 300 K results in a dehydrogenation to ethylidyne through an ethylidene intermediate. This was observed by a hydrogen desorption peak at 300 K. Also, hydrogenation of the adsorbed ethylene was observed by a small ethane desorption peak at 300 K. Upon heating to 700 K, the ethylidyne species will further dehydrogenate to carbidic carbon species with hydrogen desorption peaks at 460 and 640 K. If the carbidic species is heated to higher temperatures (up to 1000 K), it will further dehydrogenate and form graphitic islands which will accumulate by Ostwald ripening in larger islands at the step edges of the surface. After annealing the sample to 1000 K, a statistically distributed 8x8 superstructure of these graphite islands is achieved, as interpreted from A pattern in the LEED data. The TPD results indicate that ethylene adsorption on Pt(111) results in the formation of graphitic islands upon heating to 1000 K, contrary to previous conjectures of formation of a full graphite monolayer.

  8. Graphitic carbon nitride materials: variation of structure and morphology and their use as metal-free catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    properties of carbon nitrides, they show unexpected catalytic activity for a variety of reactions, such as for the activation of benzene, trimerization reactions, and also the activation of carbon dioxide. Model calculationsGraphitic carbon nitride materials: variation of structure and morphology and their use as metal

  9. doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(03)00463-0 Structural, chemical, and isotopic microanalytical investigations of graphite from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floss, Christine

    ≠2400 ppm) of internal titanium carbides (TiCs), with a single graphite in some cases containing hundreds of TiCs. Isotopic compositions of individual TiCs by nanoscale resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) confirmed their presolar origin. In addition to TiCs, composite TiC/Fe grains (TiCs

  10. Surface Self-Diffusion and Mean Displacement of Hydrogen on Graphite and a PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Surface Self-Diffusion and Mean Displacement of Hydrogen on Graphite and a PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst molecules and a carbon material commonly used in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), called XC coefficient at each temperature. At 350 K, a typical fuel cell temperature, the temperature function

  11. Modeling lithium diffusion in nickel composite graphite Venkat R. Subramanian, Ping Yu, Branko N. Popov, Ralph E. White*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Modeling lithium diffusion in nickel composite graphite Venkat R. Subramanian, Ping Yu, Branko N. Exchange current and diffusion coefģcient for the lithium-diffusion are predicted. # 2001 Elsevier Science computers, and camcorders. The distinguished feature of lithium-ion batteries is the use of intercalation

  12. Near-critical phase explosion promoting breakdown plasma ignition during laser ablation of graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Seleznev, L. V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15

    Removal rate, air shock, and ablative recoil pressure parameters were measured as a function of laser intensity I{sub peak} during nanosecond laser ablation of graphite. Surface vaporization of molten graphite at low intensities I{sub peak}<0.15 GW/cm{sup 2} was observed to transform into its near-critical phase explosion (intense homogeneous boiling) at the threshold intensity I{sub PE}approx =0.15 GW/cm{sup 2} in the form of a drastic, correlated rise of removal rate, air shock, and ablative recoil pressure magnitudes. Just above this threshold (I{sub peak}>=0.25 GW/cm{sup 2}), the explosive mass removal ended up with saturation of the removal rate, much slower increase of the air and recoil pressure magnitudes, and appearance of a visible surface plasma spark. In this regime, the measured far-field air shock pressure amplitude exhibits a sublinear dependence on laser intensity (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 4/9}), while the source plasma shock pressure demonstrates a sublinear trend (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 3/4}), both indicating the subcritical character of the plasma. Against expectations, in this regime the plasma recoil pressure increases versus I{sub peak} superlinearly (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 1.1}), rather than sublinearly (propor toI{sub peak}{sup 3/4}), with the mentioned difference related to the intensity-dependent initial spatial plasma dimensions within the laser waist on the graphite surface and to the plasma formation time during the heating laser pulse (overall, the pressure source effect). The strict coincidence of the phase explosion, providing high (kbar) hydrodynamic pressures of ablation products, and the ignition of ablative laser plasma in the carbon plume may indicate the ablative pressure-dependent character of the underlying optical breakdown at the high plume pressures, initiating the plasma formation. The experimental data evidence that the spatiotemporal extension of the plasma in the laser plume and ambient air during the heating laser pulse is supported by fast lateral electron and radiative heat conduction (laser-supported combustion wave regime), rather than by propagation of a strong shock wave (laser-supported detonation wave regime).

  13. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine operations and the engine and stage design were constrained to fit within the payload volume of the then planned space shuttle. The SNRE core design utilized hexagonal fuel elements and hexagonal structural support elements. The total number of elements can be varied to achieve engine designs of higher or lower thrust levels. Some variation in the ratio of fuel elements to structural elements is also possible. Options for SNRE-based engine designs in the 25,000-lbf thrust range were described in a recent (2010) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. The reported designs met or exceeded the performance characteristics baselined in the DRA 5.0 Study. Lower thrust SNRE-based designs were also described in a recent (2011) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. Recent activities have included parallel evaluation and design efforts on fast spectrum engines employing refractory metal alloy fuels. These efforts include evaluation of both heritage designs from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and General Electric Company GE-710 Programs as well as more recent designs. Results are presented for a number of not-yet optimized fast spectrum engine options.

  14. Fiber-optic communication links suitable for on-board use in modern aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    connections can be a problem for aircraft that operate in coastal environments, as such corrosion can leadFiber-optic communication links suitable for on-board use in modern aircraft Hung Nguyena , Duc emphasis on air transportation communication systems in on-board aircraft. The conventional solutions

  15. Oil and Gas CDT Are non-marine organic-rich shales suitable exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Are non-marine organic-rich shales suitable exploration targets? The University will receive 20 weeks residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks in Year 1 and also experienced oil and gas industry professionals. The supervisors at Oxford and Exeter have

  16. Assessing the suitability of GIS as an aid for Location Scouting in Low-Budget Filmmaking†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Callum

    2010-11-24

    The purpose of this analysis was to assess the suitability of GIS as an aid for location scouting in low-budget filmmaking, with Edinburgh serving as the target area. The main aspect of the project was to create a web based map service to act as a...

  17. Criteria for Suitable Spawning Habitat for the Robust Redhorse Moxostoma robustum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    populations persist in rivers with flows influenced by hydropower dams. The robust redhorse is uncommon. Potential loss of suitable habitat as a result of hydrologic alteration, especially for life history stages considered having the narrowest habitat requirements, is a primary management concern. Evaluating potential

  18. Habitat suitability modeling for the eastern hog-nosed snake, Heterodon platirhinos, in Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Habitat suitability modeling for the eastern hog-nosed snake, Heterodon platirhinos, in Ontario, the eastern hog- nosed snake, Heterodon platirhinos, is found in a limited portion of southern Ontario Ontario, it is crucial to document what limits the snake's habitat to direct conservation efforts better

  19. Mapping Suitability Areas for Concentrated Solar Power Plants Using Remote Sensing Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Singh, Nagendra; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2015-01-01

    The political push to increase power generation from renewable sources such as solar energy requires knowing the best places to site new solar power plants with respect to the applicable regulatory, operational, engineering, environmental, and socioeconomic criteria. Therefore, in this paper, we present applications of remote sensing data for mapping suitability areas for concentrated solar power plants. Our approach uses digital elevation model derived from NASA s Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) at a resolution of 3 arc second (approx. 90m resolution) for estimating global solar radiation for the study area. Then, we develop a computational model built on a Geographic Information System (GIS) platform that divides the study area into a grid of cells and estimates site suitability value for each cell by computing a list of metrics based on applicable siting requirements using GIS data. The computed metrics include population density, solar energy potential, federal lands, and hazardous facilities. Overall, some 30 GIS data are used to compute eight metrics. The site suitability value for each cell is computed as an algebraic sum of all metrics for the cell with the assumption that all metrics have equal weight. Finally, we color each cell according to its suitability value. We present results for concentrated solar power that drives a stream turbine and parabolic mirror connected to a Stirling Engine.

  20. Toward Improved Identifiability of Soil Hydraulic Parameters: On the Selection of a Suitable Parametric Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrugt, Jasper A.

    hydraulic properties (Hopmans et al., 1992; van Dam useful description of parameter uncertainty and itsToward Improved Identifiability of Soil Hydraulic Parameters: On the Selection of a Suitable identifiability analysis of the soil hydraulic During the last two decades, a great deal of researchparameters

  1. The effect of 150?m expandable graphite on char expansion of intumescent fire retardant coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullah, Sami, E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com; Shariff, A. M., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my; Bustam, M. A., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my [Research Center for Carbon Dioxide Capture, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia); Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmadster@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Intumescent is defined as the swelling of certain substances to insulate the underlying substrate when they are heated. In this research work the effect of 150?m expandable graphite (EG) was studied on char expansion, char morphology and char composition of intumescent coating formulations (ICFs). To study the expansion and thermal properties of the coating, nine different formulations were prepared. The coatings were tested at 500 įC for one hour and physically were found very stable and well bound with the steel substrate. The morphology was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The char composition was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. EG above than 10.8wt% expands the char abruptly with uniform network structure and affect the outer surface of the char.

  2. Predicting the Voltage Dependence of Interfacial Electrochemical Processes at Lithium-Intercalated Graphite Edge Planes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The applied potential governs lithium-intercalation and electrode passivation reactions in lithium ion batteries, but are challenging to calibrate in condensed phase DFT calculations. In this work, the "anode potential" of charge-neutral lithium-intercalated graphite (LiC(6)) with oxidized edge planes is computed as a function of Li-content n(Li)) at edge planes, using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), a previously introduced Li+ transfer free energy method, and the experimental Li+/Li(s) value as reference. The voltage assignments are corroborated using explicit electron transfer from fluoroethylene carbonate radical anion markers. PF6- is shown to decompose electrochemically (i.e., not just thermally) at low potentials imposed by our voltage calibration technique. We demonstrate that excess electrons reside in localized states-in-the-gap in the organic carbonate liquid region, which is not semiconductor-like (band-state-like) as widely assumed in the literature.

  3. Corrosion of graphite/aluminum metal-matrix composites. Technical report, 1 Mar-31 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonanno, M.A.; Latanision, R.M.; Hihara, L.H.; Chiang, J.F.

    1991-02-01

    Several commercial G/Al MMCs have been studied by potentiodynamic polarization in deaerated 0.5 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The results have been compared with those which were predicted by the mixed electrode theory. The results indicate that processing conditions, especially the cooling rate, had a strong influence on the corrosion behavior of the G/Al MMCs. Large scale G/Al model MMCs were fabricated at MIT in order to study the corrosion behavior of G/Al galvanic couples with the scanning potential microprobe (SPM). Preliminary results indicate that coating graphite with discontinuous alumina did not reduce the corrosion rate of the G/Al galvanic couple. Ion implanting the surface of G/Al model MMCs with zinc, a cathodic inhibitor, did reduce the corrosion G/Al galvanic couple; however, the protection was incomplete.

  4. Synthesis of few layer graphene by direct exfoliation of graphite and a Raman spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gayathri, S.; Jayabal, P.; Ramakrishnan, V., E-mail: vr.optics1@gmail.com [Department of Laser Studies, School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai-625021, India. (India); Kottaisamy, M. [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai-625015, India. (India)] [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai-625015, India. (India)

    2014-02-15

    The exfoliation of graphene from pristine graphite in a liquid phase was achieved successfully via sonication followed by centrifugation method. UltravioletĖvisible (UVĖvis) spectra of the obtained graphene dispersions at different exfoliation time indicated that the concentration of graphene dispersion increased markedly with increasing exfoliation time. The sheet-like morphology of the exfoliated graphene was revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image. Further, the morphological change in different exfoliation time was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A complete structural and defect characterization was probed using micro-Raman spectroscopic technique. The shape and position of the 2D band of Raman spectra revealed the formation of bilayer to few layer graphene. Also, Raman mapping confirmed the presence of uniformly distributed bilayer graphene sheets on the substrate.

  5. Development of a thin wall graphite/polyimide composite pressure vessel with a large aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Trinh, K.V.; Bartel, J.J.; Spingarn, J.R.

    1988-10-01

    A graphite/polyimide composite pressure vessel has been developed to contain corrosive gas mixtures up to 400 psig and 300/degree/F. The goal of this research project was to develop a lightweight, thin-walled, composite pressure vessel with an l/d aspect ratio of 42 capable of containing hydrogen fluoride (HF) and chlorine trifluoride (ClF/sub 3/). The vessel was to have a crown radius approaching infinity, a desired knuckle radius approaching zero, and a desired wall thickness of 0.023 in. In this paper the problems encountered and the iterative solutions in addition to the design, analysis, and fabrication of the vessel are presented. 3 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Coating formulation and method for refinishing the surface of surface-damaged graphite articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ardary, Z.L.; Benton, S.T.

    1987-07-08

    The described development is directed to a coating formulation for filling surface irregularities in graphite articles such as molds, crucibles, and matched die sets used in high-temperature metallurgical operations. The coating formulation of the present invention is formed of carbon black flour, thermosetting resin and a solvent for the resin. In affixing the coating to the article, the solvent is evaporated, the resin cured to bond the coating to the surface of the article and then pyrolyzed to convert the resin to carbon. Upon completion of the pyrolysis step, the coating is shaped and polished to provide the article with a surface restoration that is essentially similar to the original or desired surface finish without the irregularity.

  7. Bias-dependent molecular-level structure of electrical double layer in ionic liquid on graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Jennifer M; Walters, Deron; Labuda, Aleksander; Feng, Guang; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Proksch, Roger; Balke, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Bias-dependent structure of electrochemical double layers at liquid-solid interfaces underpin a multitude of phenomena in virtually all areas of scientific enquiry ranging from energy storage and conversion systems, biology, to geophysics and geochemistry. Here we report the bias-evolution of the electric double layer structure of an ionic liquid on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite as a model system for carbon-based electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors measured by atomic force microscopy. Matching the observed structures to molecular dynamics simulations allows us to resolve steric effects due to cation and anion layers. We observe reconfiguration under applied bias and the orientational transitions in the Stern layer. The synergy between molecular dynamics simulation and experiment provides a comprehensive picture of structural phenomena and long- and short range interactions. This insight will improve understanding of the mechanism of charge storage in electrochemical capacitors on a molecular level which can be used to enhance their electrochemical performance.

  8. Coating formulation and method for refinishing the surface of surface-damaged graphite articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ardary, Z.L.; Benton, S.T.

    1988-11-22

    The described development is directed to a coating formulation for filling surface irregularities in graphite articles such as molds, crucibles, and matched die sets used in high-temperature metallurgical operations. The coating formulation of the present invention is formed of carbon black flour, thermosetting resin and a solvent for the resin. In affixing the coating to the article, the solvent is evaporated, the resin cured to bond the coating to the surface of the article and then pyrolyzed to convert the resin to carbon. Upon completion of the pyrolysis step, the coating is shaped and polished to provide the article with a surface restoration that is essentially similar to the original or desired surface finish without the irregularity.

  9. Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

    2008-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

  10. Disposal options for burner ash from spent graphite fuel. Final study report November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto, A.P.

    1994-08-01

    Three major disposal alternatives are being considered for Fort St. Vrain Reactor (FSVR) and Peach Bottom Reactor (PBR) spent fuels: direct disposal of packaged, intact spent fuel elements; (2) removal of compacts to separate fuel into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW); and (3) physical/chemical processing to reduce waste volumes and produce stable waste forms. For the third alternative, combustion of fuel matrix graphite and fuel particle carbon coatings is a preferred technique for head-end processing as well as for volume reduction and chemical pretreatment prior to final fixation, packaging, and disposal of radioactive residuals (fissile and fertile materials together with fission and activation products) in a final repository. This report presents the results of a scoping study of alternate means for processing and/or disposal of fissile-bearing particles and ash remaining after combustion of FSVR and PBR spent graphite fuels. Candidate spent fuel ash (SFA) waste forms in decreasing order of estimated technical feasibility include glass-ceramics (GCs), polycrystalline ceramic assemblages (PCAs), and homogeneous amorphous glass. Candidate SFA waste form production processes in increasing order of estimated effort and cost for implementation are: low-density GCs via fuel grinding and simultaneous combustion and waste form production in a slagging cyclone combustor (SCC); glass or low-density GCs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by conventional melting of SFA and frit; PCAs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) of SFA/frit mixtures; and high-density GCs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by HIPing of Calcine/Frit/SFA mixtures.

  11. Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bornstein, Jonathan G. (Miami, FL); Friedman, Peter S. (Toledo, OH)

    1985-01-01

    A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

  12. Artificial ciliary bundles with nano fiber tip links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensory ciliary bundles in fishes are the inspiration for carefully engineered artificial flow sensors. We report the development of a new class of ultrasensitive MEMS flow sensors that mimic the intricate morphology of the ciliary bundles, including the stereocilia, tip links, and the cupula, and thereby achieve threshold detection limits that match the biological example. An artificial ciliary bundle is achieved by fabricating closely-spaced arrays of polymer micro-pillars with gradiating heights. Tip links that form the fundamental sensing elements are realized through electrospinning aligned PVDF piezoelectric nano-fibers that link the distal tips of the polymer cilia. An optimized synthesis of hyaluronic acid-methacrylic anhydride hydrogel that results in properties close to the biological cupula, together with drop-casting method are used to form the artificial cupula that encapsulates the ciliary bundle. In testing, fluid drag force causes the ciliary bundle to slide, stretching the flexible nan...

  13. Computers for artificial intelligence a technology assessment and forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    This study reviews the development and current state-of-the-art in computers for artificial intelligence, including LISP machines, AI workstations, professional and engineering workstations, minicomputers, mainframes, and supercomputers. Major computer systems for AI applications are reviewed. The use of personal computers for expert system development is discussed, and AI software for the IBM PC, Texas Instrument Professional Computer, and Apple MacIntosh is presented. Current research aimed at developing a new computer for artificial intelligence is described, and future technological developments are discussed.

  14. Real Time Selective Harmonic Minimization for Multilevel Inverters Connected to Solar Panels Using Artificial Neural Network Angle Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolbert, Leon M; Ozpineci, Burak; Filho, Faete; Cao, Yue

    2011-01-01

    This work approximates the selective harmonic elimination problem using artificial neural networks (ANNs) to generate the switching angles in an 11-level full-bridge cascade inverter powered by five varying dc input sources. Each of the five full bridges of the cascade inverter was connected to a separate 195-W solar panel. The angles were chosen such that the fundamental was kept constant and the low-order harmonics were minimized or eliminated. A nondeterministic method is used to solve the system for the angles and to obtain the data set for the ANN training. The method also provides a set of acceptable solutions in the space where solutions do not exist by analytical methods. The trained ANN is a suitable tool that brings a small generalization effect on the angles' precision and is able to perform in real time (50-/60-Hz time window).

  15. Estimating Rooftop Suitability for PV: A Review of Methods, Patents, and Validation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melius, J.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

    2013-12-01

    A number of methods have been developed using remote sensing data to estimate rooftop area suitable for the installation of photovoltaics (PV) at various geospatial resolutions. This report reviews the literature and patents on methods for estimating rooftop-area appropriate for PV, including constant-value methods, manual selection methods, and GIS-based methods. This report also presents NREL's proposed method for estimating suitable rooftop area for PV using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in conjunction with a GIS model to predict areas with appropriate slope, orientation, and sunlight. NREL's method is validated against solar installation data from New Jersey, Colorado, and California to compare modeled results to actual on-the-ground measurements.

  16. Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziari, Fred

    2002-12-19

    This report discusses the findings of the Echo Meadows Project (BPA Project 2001-015-00). The main purpose of this project is to artificially recharge an alluvial aquifer, WITH water from Umatilla River during the winter high flow period. In turn, this recharged aquifer will discharge an increased flow of cool groundwater back to the river, thereby improving Umatilla River water quality and temperature. A considerable side benefit is that the Umatilla River should improve as a habitat for migration, spanning, and rearing of anadromous and resident fish. The scope of this project is to provide critical baseline information about the Echo Meadows and the associated reach of the Umatilla River. Key elements of information that has been gathered include: (1) Annual and seasonal groundwater levels in the aquifer with an emphasis on the irrigation season, (2) Groundwater hydraulic properties, particularly hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, and (3) Groundwater and Umatilla River water quality including temperature, nutrients and other indicator parameters. One of the major purposes of this data gathering was to develop input to a groundwater model of the area. The purpose of the model is to estimate our ability to recharge this aquifer using water that is only available outside of the irrigation season (December through the end of February) and to estimate the timing of groundwater return flow back to the river. We have found through the data collection and modeling efforts that this reach of the river had historically returned as much as 45 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water to the Umatilla River during the summer and early fall. However, this return flow was reduced to as low as 10 cfs primarily due to reduced quantities of irrigation application, gain in irrigation efficiencies and increased groundwater pumping. Our modeling indicated that it is possible to restore these critical return flows using applied water outside of the irrigation season. We further found that this water can be timed to return to the river during the desired time of the year (summer to early fall). This is because the river stage, which remains relatively high until this time, drops during the irrigation season-thereby releasing the stored groundwater and increasing river flows. A significant side benefit is that these enhanced groundwater return flows will be clean and cold, particularly as compared to the Umatilla River. We also believe that this same type of application of water could be done and the resulting stream flows could be realized in other watersheds throughout the Pacific Northwest. This means that it is critical to compare the results from this baseline report to the full implementation of the project in the next phase. As previously stated, this report only discusses the results of data gathered during the baseline phase of this project. We have attempted to make the data that has been gathered accessible with the enclosed databases and spreadsheets. We provide computer links in this report to the databases so that interested parties can fully evaluate the data that has been gathered. However, we cannot emphasize too strongly that the real value of this project is to implement the phases to come, compare the results of these future phases to this baseline and develop the science and strategies to successfully implement this concept to other rivers in the Pacific Northwest. The results from our verified and calibrated groundwater model matches the observed groundwater data and trends collected during the baseline phase. The modeling results indicate that the return flows may increase to their historic values with the addition of 1 acre-ft/acre of recharge water to the groundwater system (about 9,600 acre-feet total). What this means is that through continued recharge project, you can double to quadruple the annual baseflow of the Umatilla River during the low summer and fall flow periods as compared to the present base-flow. The cool and high quality recharge water is a significant beneficial impact to the river system.

  17. Interplay of oxygen-evolution kinetics and photovoltaic power curves on the construction of artificial leaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surendranath, Yogesh

    An artificial leaf can perform direct solar-to-fuels conversion. The construction of an efficient artificial leaf or other photovoltaic (PV)-photoelectrochemical device requires that the power curve of the PV material and ...

  18. Proposal to ARPA for Research on Artificial Intelligence at M.I.T., 1971-1972

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsky, Marvin

    1971-10-01

    The activities of the Artificial Intelligence laboratory can be viewed under three main aspects; (1) Artificial Intelligence- understanding the principles of making intelligent machines along the lines discusses in ...

  19. Experimental and artificial neural network modeling study on soot formation in premixed hydrocarbon flamesq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senkan, Selim M.

    Experimental and artificial neural network modeling study on soot formation in premixed hydrocarbon classical light scattering measurement techniques. The experimental data revealed that the soot properties rights reserved. Keywords: Soot; Hydrocarbon flames; Artificial neural networks 1. Introduction

  20. Artificial Intelligence, Story Generation and Literary Creativity: the State of the Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bringsjord, Selmer

    Artificial Intelligence, Story Generation and Literary Creativity: the State of the Art this engineering would be like, by, in part, doing it. The result of our engineering is BRUTUS, an artificial