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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

artificially mediated games: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

electron mediators in the cathode chamber while using plain graphite 148 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

2

NGNP Graphite Selection and Acquisition Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear graphite (H-451) previously used in the United States for High-Temperature Reactors (HTRs) is no longer available. New graphites have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A complete properties database for these new, available, candidate grades of graphite must be developed to support the design and licensing of NGNP core components. Data are required for the physical, mechanical (including radiation-induced creep), and oxidation properties of graphites. Moreover, the data must be statistically sound and take account of in-billet, between billets, and lot-to-lot variations of properties. These data are needed to support the ongoing development1 of the risk-derived American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) graphite design code (a consensus code being prepared under the jurisdiction of the ASME by gas-cooled reactor and NGNP stakeholders including the vendors). The earlier Fort St. Vrain design of High-Temperature Reactor (HTRs) used deterministic performance models for H-451, while the NGNP will use new graphite grades and risk-derived (probabilistic) performance models and design codes, such as that being developed by the ASME. A radiation effects database must be developed for the currently available graphite materials, and this requires a substantial graphite irradiation program. The graphite Technology Development Plan (TDP)2 describes the data needed and the experiments planned to acquire these data in a timely fashion to support NGNP design, construction, and licensing. The strategy for the selection of appropriate grades of graphite for the NGNP is discussed here. The final selection of graphite grades depends upon the chosen reactor type and vendor because the reactor type (pebble bed or prismatic block) has a major influence on the graphite chosen by the designer. However, the time required to obtain the needed irradiation data for the selected NGNP graphite is sufficiently long that a preliminary selection was necessary in 2005. A further downselect was made in 2006, reducing the number of candidate graphites to two, with two reserve grades. Since then additional information has been obtained from potential NGNP vendors and graphite manufacturers. Therefore, the NGNP graphite selection strategy has been reassessed. New recommendations, and the rationale for these recommendations, are reported and discussed here.

Burchell, T.; Bratton, R.; Windes, W.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

W. Windes; R. Smith

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Graphite Technology Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

Graphite Gamma Scan Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the measurement and data analysis of the radio isotopic content for a series of graphite specimens irradiated in the first Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment, AGC-1. This is the first of a series of six capsules planned as part of the AGC experiment to fully characterize the neutron irradiation effects and radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphites. The AGC-1 capsule was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL at approximately 700 degrees C and to a peak dose of 7 dpa (displacements per atom). Details of the irradiation conditions and other characterization measurements performed on specimens in the AGC-1 capsule can be found in “AGC-1 Specimen Post Irradiation Data Report” ORNL/TM 2013/242. Two specimens from six different graphite types are analyzed here. Each specimen is 12.7 mm in diameter by 25.4 mm long. The isotope with the highest activity was 60Co. Graphite type NBG-18 had the highest content of 60Co with an activity of 142.89 µCi at a measurement distance of 47 cm.

Mark W. Drigert

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Irradiation Creep in Graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

8

Improved graphite furnace atomizer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

Siemer, D.D.

1983-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

9

Diamond-graphite field emitters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Graphite-based photovoltaic cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

Lagally, Max (Madison, WI); Liu, Feng (Salt Lake City, UT)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

Artificial Photosynthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I Artificial Photosynthesis I - Design Principles for Light Harvesting FlemingSmall.png Key Challenges: Researchers measure a two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform electronic...

12

Heat exchanger using graphite foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

Noncovalently functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a stable support of Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction. Noncovalently functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a stable...

14

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II.  Construction began in 1947 and the reactor started...

15

NGNP Graphite Testing and Qualification Specimen Selection Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The available grades of graphite for the NGNP are reviewed. A selection matrix is presented outlining the available grades for the NGNP graphite irradiation program based upon input from potential NGNP vendors, graphite manufactures, and graphite experts.

Robert Bratton

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Micro Joining of Aluminum Graphite Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced aluminum graphite composites have unique thermal properties due to opposing coefficients of thermal expansion of aluminum and graphite. The thermal and mechanical properties of such composites are anisotropic due to directional properties...

Velamati, Manasa

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

17

Systems and methods for forming defects on graphitic materials and curing radiation-damaged graphitic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods are disclosed herein for forming defects on graphitic materials. The methods for forming defects include applying a radiation reactive material on a graphitic material, irradiating the applied radiation reactive material to produce a reactive species, and permitting the reactive species to react with the graphitic material to form defects. Additionally, disclosed are methods for removing defects on graphitic materials.

Ryu, Sunmin; Brus, Louis E.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Liu, Haitao

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

18

Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a brazing material for joining graphite structures that can be used at temperatures up to about 2800.degree. C. The brazing material formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600.degree. C. with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800.degree. C. so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. This brazing temperature for hafnium carbide is considerably less than the eutectic temperature of hafnium carbide of about 3150.degree. C. The brazing composition also incorporates the thermosetting resin so that during the brazing operation the graphite structures may be temporarily bonded together by thermosetting the resin so that machining of the structures to final dimensions may be completed prior to the completion of the brazing operation. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures joined thereby and also provides a joint of sufficient integrity so as to at least correspond with the strength and other properties of the graphite.

Taylor, Albert J. (Ten Mile, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original results, and concentrated on the actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear physics, in scientific and technical applications. For scientists and engineers specializing in nuclear physics and engineering, physics of nuclear reactors, condensed matter, for undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate students of universities physical specialties.

Zhmurikov, E I; Pokrovsky, A S; Harkov, D V; Dremov, V V; Samarin, S I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original results, and concentrated on the actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear physics, in scientific and technical applications. For scientists and engineers specializing in nuclear physics and engineering, physics of nuclear reactors, condensed matter, for undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate students of universities physical specialties.

E. I. Zhmurikov; I. A. Bubnenkov; A. S. Pokrovsky; D. V. Harkov; V. V. Dremov; S. I. Samarin

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Artificial Photosynthesis II -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

22

AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

25

Stable aqueous dispersions of graphitic nanoplatelets via the reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide in the presence of poly(sodium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stable aqueous dispersions of graphitic nanoplatelets via the reduction of exfoliated graphite be prepared via an exfoliation/in-situ reduction of graphite oxide in the presence of poly(sodium 4 prepare graphite nanoplatelets via the chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide nanoplatelets

26

Graphitized-carbon fiber/carbon char fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for recovery of intact graphitic fibers from fiber/polymer composites is described. The method comprises first pyrolyzing the graphite fiber/polymer composite mixture and then separating the graphite fibers by molten salt electrochemical oxidation.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

Graphite Reactor | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshortGeothermalGo BackGrantsGraphics ServicesGraphite

28

Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix D Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum #12;COPYRIGHT DECEMBER Series 2 and Pond Series 3 Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Prepared for Bureau of Reclamation HILL, INC. III Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses

29

Establish and Expand Commercial Production of Graphite Anode...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Expand Commercial Production of Graphite Anode Materials for High Performance Lithium-ion Batteries Establish and Expand Commercial Production of Graphite Anode Materials...

30

PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th...

31

Polyelectrolyte-Induced Reduction of Exfoliated Graphite Oxide...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reduction of Exfoliated Graphite Oxide: A Facile Route to Synthesis of Soluble Graphene Nanosheets. Polyelectrolyte-Induced Reduction of Exfoliated Graphite Oxide: A Facile...

32

Microsoft Word - tev-235 Technical Evaluation of Graphite Acquisition...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

graphite manufacturing companies have an approved NQA-1-based quality assurance (QA) program. Two graphite vendors supplying three of the major grades being tested in the...

33

Inhibition of Oxidation in Nuclear Graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphite is a fundamental material of high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off normal design basis event where an oxidizing atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postualed air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B4C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900°C. The proposed addition of B4C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimize B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed.

Phil Winston; James W. Sterbentz; William E. Windes

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Artificial Intelligence and Robotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since Robotics is the field concerned with the connection of perception to action, Artificial Intelligence must have a central role in Robotics if the connection is to be intelligent. Artificial Intelligence addresses ...

Brady, Michael

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Impact of high energy ball milling on the nanostructure of magnetite–graphite and magnetite–graphite–molybdenum disulphide blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different, partly complementary and partly redundant characterization methods were applied to study the transition of magnetite, graphite and MoS{sub 2} powders to mechanically alloyed nanostructures. The applied methods were: Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), Raman spectroscopy (RS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The main objective was to prepare a model material providing the essential features of a typical tribofilm forming during automotive braking, and to assess the impact of different constituents on sliding behaviour and friction level. Irrespective of the initial grain size, the raw materials were transferred to a nanocrystalline structure and mixed on a nanoscopic scale during high energy ball milling. Whereas magnetite remained almost unchanged, graphite and molybdenum disulphide were transformed to a nanocrystalline and highly disordered structure. The observed increase of the coefficient of friction was attributed to a loss of lubricity of the latter ingredient due to this transformation and subsequent oxidation. - Highlights: • Characterization of microstructural changes induced by high energy ball milling • Assessment of the potential of different characterization methods • Impact of mechanical alloying on tribological performance revealed by tests • Preparation of an artificial third body resembling the one formed during braking.

Österle, W., E-mail: Werner.oesterle@bam.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Orts-Gil, G.; Gross, T.; Deutsch, C. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Hinrichs, R. [Instituto de Geociências, UFRGS, P.O. Box 15001, 91501-970 Porto Alegre (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.A.Z. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, P.O. Box 15051, 91501-970 Porto Alegre (Brazil); Zoz, H.; Yigit, D.; Sun, X. [Zoz Group, 57482 Wenden (Germany)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Thermal and electrical conduction in the compaction direction of exfoliated graphite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal and electrical conduction in the compaction direction of exfoliated graphite in the compaction direction of graphite-flake-based exfoliated graphite have been decoupled. The compact Exfoliated graphite is elongated graphite particles obtained by the exfoliation (typically involving rapid

Chung, Deborah D.L.

37

AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products on each type of graphite site. The model will include multiple simultaneous adsorbing species, which will allow for competitive adsorption effects between different fission product species and O and OH (for modeling accident conditions).

Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

39

Identification of process suitable diluent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation (STMAS) was formed within the USDOE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program in order to develop more efficient methods for the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MA) from used nuclear fuel. The development of processes for MA separations is driven by the potential benefits; reduced long-term radiotoxicty of waste placed in a geologic repository, reduced timeframe of waste storage, reduced repository heat load, the possibility of increased repository capacity, and increased utilization of energy potential of used nuclear fuel. The research conducted within the STMAS framework is focused upon the realization of significant simplifications to aqueous recycle processes proposed for MA separations. This report describes the research efforts focused upon the identification of a process suitable diluent for a flowsheet concept for the separation of MA which is based upon the dithiophosphinic acid (DPAH) extractants previously developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

Dean R. Peterman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Method for molding threads in graphite panels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A graphite panel (10) with a hole (11) having a damaged thread (12) is repaired by drilling the hole (11) to remove all of the thread and make a new hole (13) of larger diameter. A bolt (14) with a lubricated thread (17) is placed in the new hole (13) and the hole (13) is packed with graphite cement (16) to fill the hole and the thread on the bolt. The graphite cement (16) is cured, and the bolt is unscrewed therefrom to leave a thread (20) in the cement (16) which is at least as strong as that of the original thread (12).

Short, William W. (Livermore, CA); Spencer, Cecil (Silverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Method for molding threads in graphite panels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A graphite panel with a hole having a damaged thread is repaired by drilling the hole to remove all of the thread and making a new hole of larger diameter. A bolt with a lubricated thread is placed in the new hole and the hole is packed with graphite cement to fill the hole and the thread on the bolt. The graphite cement is cured, and the bolt is unscrewed therefrom to leave a thread in the cement which is at least as strong as that of the original thread. 8 figures.

Short, W.W.; Spencer, C.

1994-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

Development of a graphite probe calorimeter for absolute clinical dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to present the numerical design optimization, construction, and experimental proof of concept of a graphite probe calorimeter (GPC) conceived for dose measurement in the clinical environment (U.S. provisional patent 61/652,540). A finite element method (FEM) based numerical heat transfer study was conducted using a commercial software package to explore the feasibility of the GPC and to optimize the shape, dimensions, and materials used in its design. A functioning prototype was constructed inhouse and used to perform dose to water measurements under a 6 MV photon beam at 400 and 1000 MU/min, in a thermally insulated water phantom. Heat loss correction factors were determined using FEM analysis while the radiation field perturbation and the graphite to water absorbed dose conversion factors were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. The difference in the average measured dose to water for the 400 and 1000 MU/min runs using the TG-51 protocol and the GPC was 0.2% and 1.2%, respectively. Heat loss correction factors ranged from 1.001 to 1.002, while the product of the perturbation and dose conversion factors was calculated to be 1.130. The combined relative uncertainty was estimated to be 1.4%, with the largest contributors being the specific heat capacity of the graphite (type B, 0.8%) and the reproducibility, defined as the standard deviation of the mean measured dose (type A, 0.6%). By establishing the feasibility of using the GPC as a practical clinical absolute photon dosimeter, this work lays the foundation for further device enhancements, including the development of an isothermal mode of operation and an overall miniaturization, making it potentially suitable for use in small and composite radiation fields. It is anticipated that, through the incorporation of isothermal stabilization provided by temperature controllers, a subpercent overall uncertainty will be achieved.

Renaud, James; Seuntjens, Jan; Sarfehnia, Arman [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Marchington, David [Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids by electrochemical exfoliation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids are obtained by electrochemical exfoliation with hydrophobic graphite electrodes. Such counterintuitive characteristics are caused by partial oxidation and investigated by examining both graphite electrodes and exfoliated particles after electrolysis. The extent of surface oxidation can be explored through contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope, electrical sheet resistance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta-potential analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-visible, and Raman spectroscopy. The degree of wettability of the graphite anode can be altered by the electrolytic current and time. The water contact angle declines generally with increasing the electrolytic current or time. After a sufficient time, the graphite anode becomes superhydrophilic and its hydrophobicity can be recovered by peeling with adhesive tape. This consequence reveals that the anodic graphite is oxidized by oxygen bubbles but the oxidation just occurs at the outer layers of the graphite sheet. Moreover, the characteristics of oxidation revealed by UV peak shift, peak ratio between D and G bands, and negative zeta-potential indicate the presence of graphite oxide on the outer shell of the exfoliated colloids. However, thermogravimetric analysis for the extent of decomposition of oxygen functional groups verifies that the amount of oxygen groups is significantly less than that of graphite oxide prepared via Hummer method. The structure of this partially oxidized graphite may consist of a graphite core covered with an oxidized shell. The properties of the exfoliated colloids are also influenced by pH of the electrolytic solution. As pH is increased, the extent of oxidation descends and the thickness of oxidized shell decreases. Those results reveal that the degree of oxidation of exfoliated nanoparticles can be manipulated simply by controlling pH.

Li, Yueh-Feng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China); Chen, Shih-Ming; Lai, Wei-Hao [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China)] [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

An Investigation of the Effect of Graphite Degradation on the Irreversible Capacity in Lithium-ion Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of surface structural damage on graphitic anodes, commonly observed in tested Li-ion cells, was investigated. Similar surface structural disorder was artificially induced in Mag-10 synthetic graphite anodes using argon-ion sputtering. Raman microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) measurements confirmed that Ar-ion sputtered Mag-10 electrodes display similar degree of surface degradation as the anodes from tested Li-ion cells. Artificially modified Mag-10 anodes showed double the irreversible charge capacity during the first formation cycle, compared to fresh un-altered anodes. Impedance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy on surface modified graphite anodes indicated the formation of a thicker and slightly more resistive SEI layer. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis of solvent extracts from the electrodes detected the presence of new compounds with M{sub w} on the order of 1600 g mol{sup -1} for the surface modified electrode with no evidence of elevated M{sub w} species for the unmodified electrode. The structural disorder induced in the graphite during long-term cycling maybe responsible for the slow and continuous SEI layer reformation, and consequently, the loss of reversible capacity due to the shift of lithium inventory in cycled Li-ion cells.

Stevenson, Cynthia; Hardwick, Laurence J.; Marcinek, Marek; Beer, Leanne; Kerr, John B.; Kostecki, Robert

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

45

Laboratory for Characterization of Irradiated Graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center (IRC). The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research is in support of the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment — a major material irradiation experiment within the NGNP Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials.

Karen A. Moore

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Pyrolytic graphite production : automation of material placement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research examines the process and challenges associated with the addition of an autonomous transfer robot to a manufacturing line for AvCarb Material Solutions for use in production of pyrolytic graphite. Development ...

Olle, Chase R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

Rudisill, T.S.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Direct printing and reduction of graphite oxide for flexible supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report direct printing and photo-thermal reduction of graphite oxide (GO) to obtain a highly porous pattern of interdigitated electrodes, leading to a supercapacitor on a flexible substrate. Key parameters optimized include the amount of GO delivered, the suitable photo-thermal energy level for effective flash reduction, and the substrate properties for appropriate adhesion after reduction. Tests with supercapacitors based on the printed-reduced GO showed performance comparable with commercial supercapacitors: the energy densities were 1.06 and 0.87 mWh/cm{sup 3} in ionic and organic electrolytes, respectively. The versatility in the architecture and choice of substrate makes this material promising for smart power applications.

Jung, Hanyung [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ve Cheah, Chang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Namjo [Energy Materials and Convergence Research Department, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Junghoon, E-mail: jleenano@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Division of WCU Multiscale Mechanical Design, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

Removal of {sup 14}C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the research presented here was to identify the checmical from of {sup 14}C inirradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approimately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 ({sup 14}C), with a half-life of 5730 years.

Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

Zhamu, Aruna (Centerville, OH); Shi, Jinjun (Columbus, OH); Guo, Jiusheng (Centerville, OH); Jang, Bor Z. (Centerville, OH)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Method for producing thin graphite flakes with large aspect ratios  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making graphite flakes of high aspect ratio by the steps of providing a strong concentrated acid and heating the graphite in the presence of the acid for a time and at a temperature effective to intercalate the acid in the graphite; heating the intercalated graphite at a rate and to a temperature effective to exfoliate the graphite in discrete layers; subjecting the graphite layers to ultrasonic energy, mechanical shear forces, or freezing in an amount effective to separate the layes into discrete flakes.

Bunnell, L. Roy (Kennewick, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology....

53

Nuclear Graphite -Fission Reactor Brief Outline of Experience and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cooled ­ Chicago Pile, GLEEP, BEPO, Windscale Piles, G1-France · Light Water-cooled Graphite Moderated ­ Hanford

McDonald, Kirk

54

COMBUSTIBILITY OF HIGH-PURITY, NUCLEAR-GRADE GRAPHITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graphite-moderated nuclear reactors, primarily bex~use of the accidents at Windscale in 1957 [1] and

M. B. Richards

55

Characteristics of Graphitic Films for Carbon Based Magnetism and Electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the nineteenth century to exfoliate graphene, is now used tolayers of graphite to exfoliate the graphene sheets. This

Hong, Jeongmin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Electrochemical and Solid-State Lithiation of Graphitic C3N4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

: Lithiated graphitic carbon n.itride {C3N4 ) was fabricated by electrochemical and solid-state reactions. The addition of Li to C3N4 results in a reaction between the Li and the graphite-like C3N species in C3N4. This irreversible reaction leads to the formation of Li-CH=NR and Li-N=CR2 species, which are detrimental to anode properties. Suitable nitrogen-doped carbon structures for anode applications are predicted to need high concentrations of pyridinic C-N-C terminal bonds and low concentrations of w quaternary C3N species to boost electronic conductivity and reversibly cycle Li ions. 3.5r-- - - -------, Li 25 + 1 5 0.5 KEYWORDS: mrbo11 uilride, lit!Jiatiou, auode, battery Copaoty tmAIVol

Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Adamczyk, Leslie A [ORNL; Guo, Bingkun [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Albert, Austin A [ORNL; Humble, James R [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Barnes, Craig E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bojdys, Michael J [University of Liverpool; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Preparation and evaluation of coal extracts as precursors for carbon and graphite products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coal extraction process coupled with coal hydrotreatment has been shown capable of producing suitable precursors for a variety of commercially important carbon and graphite products. The N-methylpyrolidone (NMP) extracts of hydrotreated coals have been analytically and chemically characterized and shown to have properties acceptable for use as binder and impregnation pitch. Mesophase formation studies have demonstrated their capability for producing both needle and anode grade coke as well as precursors for mesophase pitch fibers. A graphite artifact has been produced using a coal extract as a binder and coke derived from the extract as a filler. Further evaluation of the extract materials is being carried out by industrial members of the Carbon Products Consortium.

Zondlo, J.W.; Stiller, A.W.; Stansberry, P.G. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Engineering of Ferrite-Graphite Composite Media for Microwave Shields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering of Ferrite-Graphite Composite Media for Microwave Shields Marina Koledintseva, PoornaAA@mpei.ru Abstract-- An electromagnetic shielding of objects using ferrite-graphite composites is considered- shielding; dielectric base material; ferrite- graphite composite, Maxwell Garnett formulation I

Koledintseva, Marina Y.

59

CHARACTERIZATION, TREATMENT AND CONDITIONING OF RADIOACTIVE GRAPHITE FROM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphite has been used as a moderator and reflector of neutrons in more than 100 nuclear power plants and in many research and plutonium-production reactors. It is used primarily as a neutron reflector or neutron moderator, although graphite is also used for other features of reactor cores, such as fuel sleeves. Many of the graphite-moderated reactors are now quite old, with some already shutdown. Therefore radioactive graphite dismantling and the management of radioactive graphite waste are becoming an increasingly important issue for a number of IAEA Member States. Worldwide, there are more than 230 000 tonnes of radioactive graphite which will eventually need to be managed as radioactive waste. Proper management of radioactive graphite waste requires complex planning and the implementation of several interrelated operations. There are two basic options for graphite waste management: (1) packaging of non-conditioned graphite waste with subsequent direct disposal of the waste packages, and (2) conditioning of graphite waste (principally either by incineration or calcination) with separate disposal of any waste products produced, such as incinerator ash. In both cases, the specific properties of graphite — such as Wigner energy, graphite dust explosibility, and

Graphite From Decommissioning; Graphite From Decommissioning

60

Method of making segmented pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite wafers are oriented and bonded together such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are maximized along the back surface of the segmented pyrolytic graphite target to allow for optimum heat conduction away from the sputter target's sputtering surface and to allow for maximum energy transmission from the target's sputtering surface. 2 figures.

McKernan, M.A.; Alford, C.S.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Chen, C.W.

1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nanometal-Decorated Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelet Based Glucose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanometal-Decorated Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelet Based Glucose Biosensors with High Sensitivity demonstrated for the first time that exfoli- ated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnPs), which are 1 10 nm, and affordable amperometric glucose biosensor using exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnPs) decorated with Pt

Lee, Ilsoon

62

US graphite reactor D&D experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE).

Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Environmental Management Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-out report · Transition to long-term surveillance and maintenance · Office of Environmental ManagementEnvironmental Management Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Project Completion John Sattler Federal Project Director Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy BNL

Homes, Christopher C.

64

Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air ?helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

Mohamed El-Genk

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

65

Generation of genuine $?$-type four-particle entangled state of superconducting artificial atoms with broken symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a scheme for generating a genuine $\\chi$-type four-particle entangled state of superconducting artificial atoms with broken symmetry by using one-dimensional transmission line resonator as a data bus. The $\\Delta$-type three-level artificial atom we use in the scheme is different from natural atom and has cyclic transitions. After suitable interaction time and simple operations, the desired entangled state can be obtained. Since artificial atomic excited states and photonic states are adiabatically eliminated, our scheme is robust against the spontaneous emissions of artificial atoms and the decays of transmission line resonator.

Chun-Ling Leng; Qi Guo; Xin Ji; Shou Zhang

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

Differentiating the role of lithium and oxygen in retaining deuterium on lithiated graphite plasma-facing components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fundamental interactions responsible for deuterium retention in lithiated graphite. Oxygen was found to be present and play a key role in experiments that simulated NSTX lithium conditioning, where the atomic surface concentration can increase to >40% when deuterium retention chemistry is observed. Quantum-classical molecular dynamic simulations elucidated this oxygen-deuterium effect and showed that oxygen retains significantly more deuterium than lithium in a simulated matrix with 20% lithium, 20% oxygen, and 60% carbon. Simulations further show that deuterium retention is even higher when lithium is removed from the matrix. Experiments artificially increased the oxygen content in graphite to ?16% and then bombarded with deuterium. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed depletion of the oxygen and no enhanced deuterium retention, thus demonstrating that lithium is essential in retaining the oxygen that thereby retains deuterium.

Taylor, C. N. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625-7113, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States) [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625-7113, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Allain, J. P. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois 61801 (United States); Luitjohan, K. E. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Krstic, P. S. [Institute for Advanced Computational Science, Stony Brook University, New York 11794 (United States) [Institute for Advanced Computational Science, Stony Brook University, New York 11794 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); TheoretiK, Knoxville, Tennessee 379XX (United States); Dadras, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Differentiating the role of lithium and oxygen in retaining deuterium on lithiated graphite plasma-facing components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fundamental interactions responsible for deuterium retention in lithiated graphite. Oxygen was found to be present and play a key role in experiments that simulated NSTX lithium conditioning, where the atomic surface concentration can increase to >40% when deuterium retention chemistry is observed. Quantum-classical molecular dynamic simulations elucidated this oxygen-deuterium effect and showed that oxygen retains significantly more deuterium than lithium in a simulated matrix with 20% lithium, 20% oxygen, and 60% carbon. Simulations further show that deuterium retention is even higher when lithium is removed from the matrix. Experiments artificially increased the oxygen content in graphite to approximately 16% and then bombarded with deuterium. XPS showed depletion of the oxygen and no enhanced deuterium retention, thus demonstrating that lithium is essential in retaining the oxygen that thereby retains deuterium.

C.N. Taylor; J. P. Allain; P. S. Krstic; J. Dadras; C. H. Skinner; K. E. Luitjohan

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Atomic resolution images of graphite in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear-Grade Graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear Grade Graphite Dennis C. Kunerth and Timothy R. McJunkin Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, ID, 83415 This paper discusses the nondestructive evaluation of nuclear grade graphite performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Graphite is a composite material highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. As a result, material variations are expected within individual billets as well billet to billet and lot to lot. Several methods of evaluating the material have been explored. Particular technologies each provide a subset of information about the material. This paper focuses on techniques that are applicable to in-service inspection of nuclear energy plant components. Eddy current examination of the available surfaces provides information on potential near surface structural defects and although limited, ultrasonics can be utilized in conventional volumetric inspection. Material condition (e.g. micro-cracking and porosity induced by radiation and stress) can be derived from backscatter or acousto-ultrasound (AU) methods. Novel approaches utilizing phased array ultrasonics have been attempted to expand the abilities of AU techniques. By combining variable placement of apertures, angle and depth of focus, the techniques provide the potential to obtain parameters at various depths in the material. Initial results of the study and possible procedures for application of the techniques are discussed.

Dennis C. Kunerth; Timothy R. McJunkin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Coal precursors for production of carbon and graphite products. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of this program was to demonstrate the utility of coal extracts from the West Virginia University (WVU) extraction process as suitable base raw materials for the carbon products encompassed by the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) team. These include binder and impregnation pitches, Coke for graphite electrodes, Cokes for anodes and specialty graphite, matrices for C/C composites and raw material for mesophase pitch fibers. Previous work in this program has shown that the WVU coal extraction process coupled with hydrotreatment, does have the potential for achieving this objective. The current effort involved screening and evaluation of extracts produced by the WVU Group and recommending appropriate materials for scaleup for subsequent evaluation by Consortium Team members. The program involved an initial characterization of small-scale extracts using standard analytical methods and mesophase formation studies. This was followed by feedback to the WVU Group and to the CPC partners with recommendation of material for scaleup. Similar analytical and mesophase studies on some of the scaled-up extracts was performed. The activation of the coal extraction residues for the purpose of producing a useful active carbon was investigated. A further task was to fabricate a small graphite artifact using Coke derived from coal extract as the filler and the coal extract itself as a binder. The results of the studies are summarized in this report.

Lewis, I.C.; Lewis, R.T.; Mayer, H.K. [Ucar Carbon Co., Inc., Parma, OH (United States)

1996-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

71

Semantic Web 30Artificial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

312007.11 "" Semantic Web 30Artificial IntelligenceKnowledge Representation Inductive Web datasets ---- Tim Berners-Lee Tim Berners-Lee " "" " Web 2.0---- Web Web 2.0 Frank van Harmelen W3C OWL Web Sesame RDF Aduna 100 Hirsch 35 5 15 ECAI2002 3 ISWC

van Harmelen, Frank

72

Artificial Heart Valve Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial Heart Valve Design Your Chance to be a Biomedical Engineer #12;Circulatory System Video #12;What is a Heart Valve? · Heart Valve Video #12;#12;What Does a Heart Valve Do? · Maintain the one direction flow of blood through the heart · Heart valves allow blood to flow through in a forward direction

Provancher, William

73

Flexible graphite modified by carbon black paste for use as a thermal interface material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graphite is a material that is made by the com- pression of exfoliated graphite, which is in turn made by the exfoliation of intercalated graphite flake [3]. Due to the accordion-like microstructure of exfoliated graphite, mechan- ical interlocking between pieces of exfoliated graphite (each piece obtained from a flake

Chung, Deborah D.L.

74

4, 11371165, 2007 Suitability QCL for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 4, 1137­1165, 2007 Suitability QCL for eddy covariance P. S. Kroon et al. Title Page Abstract Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Department of Air Quality and Climate Change, Netherlands 2 TU Delft, Department of Multi-Scale Physics, Research group Clouds, Climate and Air Quality, Netherlands 3 Aerodyne

Boyer, Edmond

75

Putting the Spin on Graphite: Observing the Spins of Impurity...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Spins of Impurity Atoms Align Friday, February 28, 2014 The existence of magnetism in graphite is a very intriguing subject. The possibility to exploit the magnetic...

76

Forming gas treatment of lithium ion battery anode graphite powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a method of making a battery anode in which a quantity of graphite powder is provided. The temperature of the graphite powder is raised from a starting temperature to a first temperature between 1000 and 2000.degree. C. during a first heating period. The graphite powder is then cooled to a final temperature during a cool down period. The graphite powder is contacted with a forming gas during at least one of the first heating period and the cool down period. The forming gas includes H.sub.2 and an inert gas.

Contescu, Cristian Ion; Gallego, Nidia C; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer, III, Harry M; Payzant, Edward Andrew; Wood, III, David L; Yoon, Sang Young

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

77

Role of Nuclear Grade Graphite in Oxidation in Modular HTGRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The passively safe High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design is one of the primary concepts considered for Generation IV and Small Modular Reactor (SMR) programs. The helium cooled, nuclear grade graphite moderated core achieves extremely high operating temperatures allowing either industrial process heat or electricity generation at high efficiencies. In addition to their neutron moderating properties, nuclear grade graphite core components provide excellent high temperature stability, thermal conductivity, and chemical compatibility with the high temperature nuclear fuel form. Graphite has been continuously used in nuclear reactors since the 1940’s and has performed remarkably well over a wide range of core environments and operating conditions. Graphite moderated, gas-cooled reactor designs have been safely used for research and power production purposes in multiple countries since the inception of nuclear energy development. However, graphite is a carbonaceous material, and this has generated a persistent concern that the graphite components could actually burn during either normal or accident conditions [ , ]. The common assumption is that graphite, since it is ostensibly similar to charcoal and coal, will burn in a similar manner. While charcoal and coal may have the appearance of graphite, the internal microstructure and impurities within these carbonaceous materials are very different. Volatile species and trapped moisture provide a source of oxygen within coal and charcoal allowing them to burn. The fabrication process used to produce nuclear grade graphite eliminates these oxidation enhancing impurities, creating a dense, highly ordered form of carbon possessing high thermal diffusivity and strongly (covalently) bonded atoms.

Willaim Windes; G. Strydom; J. Kane; R. Smith

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Macroscopic Properties of Restacked, Redox-Liquid Exfoliated Graphite and Graphite Mimics Produced in Bulk Quantities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The excellent properties exhibited by monolayer graphene have spurred the development of exfoliation techniques using bulk graphite to produce large quantities of pristine monolayer sheets. Development of simple chemistry to exfoliate and intercalate graphite and graphite mimics in large quantities is required for numerous applications. To determine the macroscopic behavior of restacked, exfoliated bulk materials, a systematic approach is presented using a simple, redox-liquid sonication process along to obtain large quantities of 2D and 3D hexagonally layered graphite, molybdenum disulfi de, and boron nitride, which are subsequently characterized to observe chemical and structural changes. For MoS 2 sonicated with the antioxidant sodium bisulfi te, results from Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy indicate the presence of distorted phases from different polymorphs, and apparent nanotube structures in the bulk, restacked powder. Furthermore, using thermograviemtric analysis, the antioxidant enhances the resistance to oxidative degradation of MoS 2 , upon thermal treatment up to 900 C. The addition of the ionic antioxidant decreased dispersion stability in non-polar solvent, suggesting decreased compatibility with non-polar systems. Using simple chemical methods, the ability to generate tailored multidimensional layered materials with unique macroscopic properties is critical for numerous applications, including electrical devices, reinforced polymer composites, lithium ion capacitors, and chemical sensing.

Srivastava, Vikram K [ORNL; Quinlan, Ronald [ORNL; Agapov, Alexander L [ORNL; Dunlap, John R [ORNL; Nelson, Kimberly M [ORNL; Duranty, Edward R [ORNL; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL; Bhat, Gajanan [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Letter to the Editor Microwave assisted exfoliation and reduction of graphite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Letter to the Editor Microwave assisted exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide yet versatile method to simultaneously achieve the exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide of crumpled, few-layer thick and electronically conductive graphitic sheets. Using the microwave exfoliated

80

Using Graphite to view network data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlongUpdates byUser Guide PrintUsers'DominionGraphite to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Abstract: Low-cost...

82

Exfoliation of Graphite Oxide in Propylene Carbonate and Thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exfoliation of Graphite Oxide in Propylene Carbonate and Thermal Reduction of the Resulting,2 The exfoliation of graphite oxide (GO) followed by reduction has provided an affordable route to the large scale (by the exfoliation of GO) has been demon- strated by the fabrication of paperlike films,3 transparent

83

Multiscale modeling of polyisoprene on graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The local dynamics and the conformational properties of polyisoprene next to a smooth graphite surface constructed by graphene layers are studied by a multiscale methodology. First, fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of oligomers next to the surface are performed. Subsequently, Monte Carlo simulations of a systematically derived coarse-grained model generate numerous uncorrelated structures for polymer systems. A new reverse backmapping strategy is presented that reintroduces atomistic detail. Finally, multiple extensive fully atomistic simulations with large systems of long macromolecules are employed to examine local dynamics in proximity to graphite. Polyisoprene repeat units arrange close to a parallel configuration with chains exhibiting a distribution of contact lengths. Efficient Monte Carlo algorithms with the coarse-grain model are capable of sampling these distributions for any molecular weight in quantitative agreement with predictions from atomistic models. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations with well-equilibrated systems at all length-scales support an increased dynamic heterogeneity that is emerging from both intermolecular interactions with the flat surface and intramolecular cooperativity. This study provides a detailed comprehensive picture of polyisoprene on a flat surface and consists of an effort to characterize such systems in atomistic detail.

Pandey, Yogendra Narayan; Brayton, Alexander; Doxastakis, Manolis, E-mail: edoxastakis@uh.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)] [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Burkhart, Craig; Papakonstantopoulos, George J. [Global Materials Science Division, The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio 44305 (United States)] [Global Materials Science Division, The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio 44305 (United States)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Electroless plating of graphite with copper and nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning in the European Union of gas-cooled nuclear reactors using graphite as the moderator will generate a large amount of irradiated graphite as waste. Graphite is a radioactive waste of relatively low activity and consequently the options considered for the management of the waste may include: (i) incineration, (ii) ocean bed disposal, (iii) deep geological disposal, and (iv) shallow land burial. In case the last is the selected mode, an appropriate conditioning procedure is necessary before final disposal, by covering the graphite with a material avoiding or reducing the emission of radionuclides to its surrounding. This work analyses the possibility of conditioning graphite pieces (with a large proportion of pores of different sizes up to 100 {micro}m) with a metal coating of copper or nickel produced by electroless plating, with the aim of completely isolating the graphite from its surrounding. Electroless plating with copper results in a very large proportion of pores filled or covered, but a fraction of the pores remain in the graphite, which decreases with increasing thickness of metal deposit. Furthermore, the copper plating is permeable to liquids and consequently the graphite does not become completely isolated from the surrounding. The percentage of porosity filled or covered by nickel deposits is similar to copper, but they are not permeable to liquids, at least when the thickness is relatively high, and consequently the access of the liquids to the graphite is rather limited. However, when electroless plating with copper is followed by nickel deposition the graphite becomes isolated from the exterior.

Caturla, F.; Molina, F.; Molina-Sabio, M.; Rodriguez-Reinoso, F. [Univ. de Alicante (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica; Esteban, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

EPAC02_graphite.doc STUDY OF GRAPHITE TARGETS INTERACTING WITH THE 24 GeV PROTON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials selected for the experiment are ATJ graphite and the anisotropic carbon-carbon composite. Each, in the first phase of the E951 experiment, graphite and carbon-carbon composite targets were exposed to the AGS to evaluate candidate target materials for the future muon collider/neutrino factory carbon-based solid

McDonald, Kirk

86

Project Profile: Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids Project Profile: Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids Halotechnics...

87

Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the Union address, January 26, 2011 Overview The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an...

88

Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JCAP North JCAP Headquarters Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis California Institute of Technology Jorgensen Laboratory, Mail Code 132-80 1200 East California Boulevard...

89

Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests requires high performance propulsion systems to support missions beyond low Earth orbit. A robust space exploration program will include robotic outer planet and crewed missions to a variety of destinations including the moon, near Earth objects, and eventually Mars. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. In NASA's recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option for the human exploration of Mars because of its high thrust and high specific impulse ({approx}900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. The recently announced national space policy2 supports the development and use of space nuclear power systems where such systems safely enable or significantly enhance space exploration or operational capabilities. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted under the Rover/NERVA, GE-710 and ANL nuclear rocket programs (1955-1973). Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. The primary and significantly larger Rover/NERVA program focused on graphite type fuels. Research, development, and testing of high temperature graphite fuels was conducted. Reactors and engines employing these fuels were designed, built, and ground tested. The GE-710 and ANL programs focused on an alternative ceramic-metallic 'cermet' fuel type consisting of UO2 (or UN) fuel embedded in a refractory metal matrix such as tungsten. The General Electric program examined closed loop concepts for space or terrestrial applications as well as open loop systems for direct nuclear thermal propulsion. Although a number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion were proposed and designed, none were built. This report summarizes status results of evaluations of small nuclear reactor designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion.

Bruce G. Schnitzler

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702672 Intact Pattern Transfer of Conductive Exfoliated Graphite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702672 Intact Pattern Transfer of Conductive Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelet as biosensors[8,9] or in drug deliv- ery.[10,11] Exfoliated graphite has been incorporated into PEM and other incorporated into PEM.[15­18] Oxidized graphite is created by the acid treatment of graphite, which exfoliates

Lee, Ilsoon

91

Elastomeric behavior of exfoliated graphite, as shown by instrumented indentation testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elastomeric behavior of exfoliated graphite, as shown by instrumented indentation testing Po for the first time the elastomeric behavior of a non-polymeric material, as observed in exfoliated graphite sliding of the graphite layers within the cell wall of exfoliated graphite. The reversibility is probably

Chung, Deborah D.L.

92

Ecological Consequences of Artificial Night Lighting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Artificial Night Lighting Catherine Rich and Travisof artificial night lighting. This book provides editedage of modern urban lighting was ushered in. Coincidentally,

Piselli, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

ams graphite target: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF THE BNL, in the first phase of the E951 experiment, graphite and carbon-carbon composite targets were exposed to the AGS materials selected for the experiment are ATJ...

94

arak iran graphite: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF THE BNL, in the first phase of the E951 experiment, graphite and carbon-carbon composite targets were exposed to the AGS materials selected for the experiment are ATJ...

95

astm graphite oxidation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OF THE BNL, in the first phase of the E951 experiment, graphite and carbon-carbon composite targets were exposed to the AGS materials selected for the experiment are ATJ...

96

BGRR-039, Rev. 0 Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................................ 17 4.0 Waste Management 17 5.0 Lessons Learned 18 6.0 REFERENCES 19 Appendix A Action MemorandumBGRR-039, Rev. 0 Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project FINAL COMPLETION

97

Direct exfoliation of natural graphite into micrometer size few...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Direct exfoliation of natural graphite into micrometer size few layers graphene sheets using ionic liquids Re-direct Destination: Stable high-concentration suspensions (up to 0.95...

98

Experimental thermal conductivity and contact conductance of graphite composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 2. 1 One-Dimensional Heat Transfer by Conduction Across a Plane Wall Figure 2. 2 Fundamental Element for Electrically Based Thermal Model. . . 14 Figure 2. 3 Rectangular Unit Cell Orientation . 14 Figure 2. 4 Model of Parabolic Distribution... a low transverse thermal conductivity, they show better thermal performance than MMC's for some weight-critical applications (Ibrahim, 1992). Graphite/organic compound composites also will be reviewed. Using a high conductivity graphite fiber...

Jackson, Marian Christine

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Electrical and thermal properties of graphite/polyaniline composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite of a carbon allotrope (graphite) and an inherently conducting polymer, polyaniline (PANI), has been prepared that exhibits an electrical conductivity greater than either of the two components. An almost 2-fold increase in the bulk conductivity occurs when only a small mass fraction of polyaniline exists in the composite (91% graphite/ 9% polyaniline, by mass). This increase in dc electrical conductivity is curious since in most cases a composite material will exhibit a conductivity somewhere between the two individual components, unless a modification to the electronic nature of the material occurs. In order to elucidate the fundamental electrical properties of the composite we have performed variable temperature conductivity measurements to better understand the nature of conduction in these materials. The results from these studies suggest a change in the mechanism of conduction as the amount of polyaniline is increased in the composite. Along with superior electrical properties, the composites exhibit an increase in thermal stability as compared to the graphite. - Graphical abstract: (Left) Room temperature electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at different mass ratios. (Right) Electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at temperatures from 5 K to 300 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composites of graphite and polyaniline have been synthesized with unique electrical and thermal properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Certain G-PANI composites are more conductive and more thermally stable than graphite alone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-PANI composites exhibit a larger conductivity ratio with respect to temperature than graphite alone.

Bourdo, Shawn E., E-mail: sxbourdo@ualr.edu [Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Warford, Brock A.; Viswanathan, Tito [Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

SOLAR ENERGY FOR ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS Solar Suitability Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR ENERGY FOR ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS Solar Suitability Assessment of Dalhousie University.................................................................................................. 2 2.2 Solar Radiation Data for Calculating Solar Energy Resource .................... 3 3 Campus.1 Evaluation of Suitability for Solar Energy Generation................................ 12 4.2 Solar

Brownstone, Rob

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Artificial Intelligence Decision and Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Sk+3000,000) EU(decline bet) = U(S k+1000,000) not that different Bottom Line: the utility U of money Intellige Decision: What Door to Open? Artificial Intelligence ­ p.3/26 Bottom Line Clear: decision about preference by a numerical utility function U. For outcomes A, B U(A) > U(B) A B U(A) = U(B) A B Artificial

Polani, Daniel

102

Treatment of Irradiated Graphite from French Bugey Reactor - 13424  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in 2009, in order to determine an alternative to direct disposal for decommissioned irradiated graphite from EDF's Bugey NPP, Studsvik and EDF began a test program to determine if graphite decontamination and destruction were practicable using Studsvik's thermal organic reduction (THOR) technology. The testing program focused primarily on the release of C-14, H-3, and Cl-36 and also monitored graphite mass loss. For said testing, a bench-scale steam reformer (BSSR) was constructed with the capability of flowing various compositions of gases at temperatures up to 1300 deg. C over uniformly sized particles of graphite for fixed amounts of time. The BSSR was followed by a condenser, thermal oxidizer, and NaOH bubbler system designed to capture H-3 and C-14. Also, in a separate series of testing, high concentration acid and peroxide solutions were used to soak the graphite and leach out and measure Cl-36. A series of gasification tests were performed to scope gas compositions and temperatures for graphite gasification using steam and oxygen. Results suggested higher temperature steam (1100 deg. C vs. 900 deg. C) yielded a practicable gasification rate but that lower temperature (900 deg. C) gasification was also a practicable treatment alternative if oxygen is fed into the process. A series of decontamination tests were performed to determine the release behavior of and extent to which C-14 and H-3 were released from graphite in a high temperature (900-1300 deg. C), low flow roasting gas environment. In general, testing determined that higher temperatures and longer roasting times were efficacious for releasing H-3 completely and the majority (80%) of C-14. Manipulating oxidizing and reducing gas environments was also found to limit graphite mass loss. A series of soaking tests was performed to measure the amount of Cl-36 in the samples of graphite before and after roasting in the BSSR. Similar to C-14 release, these soaking tests revealed that 70-80% Cl-36 is released during roasting tests. (authors)

Brown, Thomas [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive NE, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive NE, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA (United States); Poncet, Bernard [electricite de France, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, 69458 Lyon Cedex 06 (France)] [electricite de France, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, 69458 Lyon Cedex 06 (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Artificial Solid Electrolyte Interphase to Address the Electrochemical Degradation of Silicon Electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrochemical degradation on Si anodes prevents them from being successfully used in lithium-ion full cells. Unlike the case of graphite anodes, natural solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) films generated from carbonate electrolyte do not self-passivate on Si and causes continuous electrolyte decomposition. In this work we aim at solving the issue of electrochemical degradation by fabricating artificial SEI films using a solid electrolyte material, lithium phosphor oxynitride (Lipon), that conducts Li ions and blocks electrons. For Si anodes coated with Lipon of 50 nm or thicker, significant effect is observed in suppressing the electrolyte decomposition, while Lipon of thinner than 40 nm has little effect. Ionic and electronic conductivity measurement reveals that the artificial SEI is effective when it is a pure ionic conductor, and the electrolyte decomposition is not suppressed when the artificial SEI is a mixed electronic-ionic conductor. The critical thickness for this transition in conducting behavior is found to be 40~50 nm. This work provides guidance for designing artificial SEI for high capacity lithium-ion battery electrodes using solid electrolyte materials.

Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL] [ORNL; Nanda, Jagjit [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Juchuan [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Graphite Foams for Lithium-Ion Battery Current Collectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphite open-cell foams, with their very high electronic and thermal conductivities, may serve as high surface area and corrosion resistant current collectors for lithium-ion batteries. As a proof of principle, cathodes were prepared by sintering carbon-coated LiFePO4 particles into the porous graphite foams. Cycling these cathodes in a liquid electrolyte cell showed promising performance even for materials and coatings that have not been optimized. The specific capacity is not limited by the foam structure, but by the cycling performance of the coated LiFePO4 particles. Upon extended cycling for more than 100 deep cycles, no loss of capacity is observed for rates of C/2 or less. The uncoated graphite foams will slowly intercalate lithium reversibly at potentials less than 0.2 volts versus lithium.

Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Tiegs, Terry N [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Jang, Young-Il [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries. Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries....

106

Partially graphitic, high-surface-area mesoporous carbons from polyacrylonitrile templated by ordered and disordered  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of mesoporosity. The high-temperature treatment led to a marked enhancement of graphitic ordering, which, and manufacturing of electrochemical dou- ble-layer capacitors and Li-ion batteries. Graphitic carbons exhibit

107

Graphit-ceramic RF Faraday-thermal shield and plasma limiter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a process of brazing a ceramic mater to graphite. In particular, the brazing procedure is directed to the production of a novel brazed ceramic graphite product useful as a Faraday shield.

Hwang, David L. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Hosea, Joel C. (Princeton, NJ)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Low-Cost Graphite and Olivine-Based Materials for Li-Ion Batteries...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low-Cost Graphite and Olivine-Based Materials for Li-Ion Batteries Low-Cost Graphite and Olivine-Based Materials for Li-Ion Batteries Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of...

109

Gelcasting polymeric precursors for producing net-shaped graphites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention discloses a method for molding complex and intricately shaped high density monolithic carbon, carbon-carbon, graphite, and thermoplastic composites using gelcasting technology. The method comprising a polymeric carbon precursor, a solvent, a dispersant, an anti-foaming agent, a monomer system, and an initiator system. The components are combined to form a suspension which is poured into a mold and heat-treated to form a thermoplastic part. The thermoplastic part can then be further densified and heat-treated to produce a high density carbon or graphite composite. The present invention also discloses the products derived from this method.

Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Equation of State of Graphite-like BC,  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compressibility of turbostratic boron-substituted graphite (t-BC) was measured up to 12 GPa at room temperature using energy-dispersive X-ray powder diffraction with synchrotron radiation. A fit to the experimental p-V data using Birch-Murnaghan equation of state gives values of the t-BC bulk modulus 23(2) GPa and its pressure derivative 8.0(6). These values point to a higher compressibility of t-BC as compared to turbostratic graphite.

Solozhenko,V.; Kurakevych, O.; Solozhenko, E.; Chen, J.; Parise, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Electronic properties of graphite in tilted magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The minimal nearest-neighbor tight-binding model with the Peierls substitution is employed to describe the electronic structure of Bernal-stacked graphite subject to tilted magnetic fields. We show that while the presence of the in-plane component of the magnetic field has a negligible effect on the Landau level structure at the K point of the graphite Brillouin zone, at the H point it leads to the experimentally observable splitting of Landau levels which grows approximately linearly with the in-plane field intensity.

Goncharuk, Nataliya A.; Smr?ka, Ludvík [Institute of Physics, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v. v. i., Cukrovarnická 10, 162 53 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Microfabrication of freestanding metal structures released from graphite substrates.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sacrificial layer is usually used to release electroformed microstructures. Because of the chemistry applied to the sacrificial layer, only a limited number of metals can be used for electroforming. A novel method to fabricate freestanding electroformed copper structures is presented. A graphite substrate allows the release of the metal part, by abrasive removal of the graphite after electroforming. Results on fabrication of high-aspect-ratio freestanding copper grids are presented; these can be used as x-ray collimator in medical imaging to reduce scattered radiation. This process has potential application to the fabrication of injection molds and microparts on pick-and-place carriers for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

Makarova, O. V.; Tang, C.-M.; Mancini, D. C.; Moldovan, N.; Divan, R.; Ryding, D. G.; Lee, R. H.

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

113

Revisiting the domain model for lithium intercalated graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter, we study the stability of the domain model for lithium intercalated graphite in stages III and II by means of Density Functional Theory and Kinetic Lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the domain model is either thermodynamically or kinetically stable when compared to the standard model in stages III and II. The existence of domains in the intercalation sequence is well supported by recent high resolution transmission electron microscope observations in lithiated graphite. Moreover, we predict that such domain staging sequences leads to a wide range of diffusivity as reported in experiments.

Krishnan, Sridevi; Brenet, Gilles; Caliste, Damien; Genovese, Luigi; Deutsch, Thierry; Pochet, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.pochet@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Simulation Atomistique (L-Sim), SP2M, UMR-E CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, Grenoble F-38054 (France)] [Laboratoire de Simulation Atomistique (L-Sim), SP2M, UMR-E CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, Grenoble F-38054 (France); Machado-Charry, Eduardo [Laboratoire de Simulation Atomistique (L-Sim), SP2M, UMR-E CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, Grenoble F-38054 (France) [Laboratoire de Simulation Atomistique (L-Sim), SP2M, UMR-E CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, Grenoble F-38054 (France); Nanosciences Fondation, 23 rue des martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

114

Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs. JCAP brings together more than 140 top scientists and researchers from the California Institute of Technology and its lead partner, Berkeley Lab, along with collaborators from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and the University of California campuses at Irvine and San Diego.

Koval, Carl; Lee, Kenny; Houle, Frances; Lewis, Nate

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

115

Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Regarding the Suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site for a Repository Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 Recommendation by the...

116

The dependence on excitation energy of the D-mode in graphite and carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dependence on excitation energy of the D-mode in graphite and carbon nanotubes C. Thomsen, S of carbon nanotubes as well. The corresponding calculated D-mode shift is shown explicitely in the nanotube is seven times narrower than in graphite as agrees with experiment. Graphite was first

Nabben, Reinhard

117

Non-oxidative intercalation and exfoliation of graphite by Brnsted acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-oxidative intercalation and exfoliation of graphite by Brønsted acids Nina I. Kovtyukhova1 and the polarizable graphene sheets. The intercalated graphites readily exfoliate in dimethylformamide to give, with loss of conductivity9,10. These highly oxidized graphite compounds can be exfoliated to form

118

Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial neural networks o Require minimal user input o Easily implemented o Robust to noise o Fast #12 interactions between neurons that pass electrochemical signals between each other Artificial neural networks

Valasek, John

119

Artificial Intelligence Problem Solving and Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Artificial Intelligence ­ p.1/89 #12;Example: Romania Problem: On holiday in Romania; currently in Arad, Fagaras, Bucharest Artificial Intelligence ­ p.2/89 #12;Example: Romania Giurgiu Urziceni Hirsova Eforie

Srinivasan, Padmini

120

Artificial Intelligence Problem Solving and Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Artificial Intelligence ­ p.1/89 Example: Romania Problem: On holiday in Romania; currently in Arad. Flight, Bucharest Artificial Intelligence ­ p.2/89 Example: Romania Giurgiu Urziceni Hirsova Eforie Neamt Oradea

Srinivasan, Padmini

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Corrosion quantification test for flanges with graphite-based gaskets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The substitution of asbestos with nonasbestos fiber-reinforced materials in some industrial plants has caused corrosion problems in flanges and valves. A novel corrosion apparatus, the Corrosion Qualification Test, quantified corrosion and gives preliminary results of tests on flexible graphite-based gasket products.

Mameri, N.; Piron, D.L.; Bouzid, A.; Derenne, M.; Marchand, L.; Birembaut, Y.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Author's personal copy Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the surface [18]. Hence the effect of lithium on plasma­wall interactions is expected to dependAuthor's personal copy Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface S.S. Harilal a, *, J in fusion devices [1­5]. For example, wall conditioning with thin lithium layers gives rise to low hydrogen

Harilal, S. S.

123

THORIUM FUEL CYCLES: A GRAPHITE-MODERATED MOLTEN SALT REACTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THORIUM FUEL CYCLES: A GRAPHITE-MODERATED MOLTEN SALT REACTOR VERSUS A FAST SPECTRUM SOLID FUEL is to compare two main options dedicated to long-term energy production with Thorium: solid fuel with fast its be- haviour until it reaches the 232Th/233U equilibrium from two di erent starting fuels: 232Th

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

124

TITLE SOIL SUITABILITY EVALUATION FOR TOBACCO BASED ON GREY CLUSTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TITLE SOIL SUITABILITY EVALUATION FOR TOBACCO BASED ON GREY CLUSTER ANALYSIS GAO Rui QIAO Hong Abstract: Suitability evaluation of soil for tobacco is the base of spatial analysis and optimization disposition. It provides scientific basis for reasonable development of soil for tobacco. Taking soil in San

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

125

Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared for the U.S. Department agency thereof. #12;Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared by Mele University of Hawaii at Manoa August 2011 #12;i Executive Summary Algae are considered to be a viable crop

126

Suitability, Position Sensitivity Designations, and Related Personnel Matters  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order identifies the interrelationships among suitability, security and access authorizations; to establish guidance and policy regarding position sensitivity designations, certain background investigations, and suitability determinations; and to establish the policies and procedures regarding waivers of pre-employment investigations. Chg 1, dated 7-8-92.

1989-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

127

Foundations of Artificial Intelligence Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foundations of Artificial Intelligence Neural Networks Building Artificial Brains #12;Background of observed examples (training data). #12;Neural Networks Objectives Show how the human brain works Introduction The Human Brain (How a neuron works) Building Artificial Neurons Network Architecture and Learning

Qu, Rong

128

Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos the approach, we develop a physics­based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes. As in nature, the detailed motions of artificial fishes in their vir­ tual habitat are not entirely predictable

Toronto, University of

129

Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos-based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes that can swim hydrodynamically of artificial fishes in their virtual habitat are not entirely predictable because they are not scripted. 1

Terzopoulos, Demetri

130

Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA); Juntz, Robert S. (Hayward, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

assessing donor suitability: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 SOLAR ENERGY FOR ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS Solar Suitability Assessment Biology and Medicine Websites...

132

Local diamagnetic susceptibility of quasi-two-dimensional graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sample of quasi-two-dimensional graphite (QTDG) whose magnetic properties are described within the Dirac fermion model is investigated by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques. The broad spectrum of the sample points to a large dispersion of crystallite sizes in this system, which is also confirmed by STM data. It is established that the local diamagnetic susceptibility may substantially exceed the average value over the sample and reaches an abnormally high value of -1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} emu/g at T = 4.2 K, which is greater than the corresponding value of highly oriented graphite by a factor of four.

Nikolaev, E. G., E-mail: nikolaev@kapitza.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems (Russian Federation); Kotosonov, A. S. [OAO NIIgrafit (Russian Federation)] [OAO NIIgrafit (Russian Federation); Shalashugina, E. A.; Troyanovskii, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems (Russian Federation); Tsebro, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Catalytic graphitization of carbon aerogels by transition metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels and Cr-, Fe-, Co-, and Ni-containing carbon aerogels were obtained by pyrolysis, at temperatures between 500 and 1,800 C, of the corresponding aerogels prepared by the sol-gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde. All samples were characterized by mercury porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Results obtained show that carbon aerogels are, essentially, macroporous materials that maintain large pore volumes even after pyrolysis at 1,800 C. For pyrolysis at temperatures higher than 1,000 C, the presence of the transition metals produced graphitized areas with three-dimensional stacking order, as shown by HRTEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. HRTEM also showed that the metal-carbon containing aerogels were formed by polyhedral structures. Cr and Fe seem to be the best catalysts for graphitization of carbon aerogels.

Maldonado-Hodar, F.J.; Moreno-Castilla, C.; Rivera-Utrilla, J.; Hanzawa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

134

Quantum modelling of hydrogen chemisorption on graphene and graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemisorption of hydrogen on graphene or graphite is studied within a quantum formalism involving a subsystem coupled to a phonon bath. The subsystem includes the hydrogen atom approaching the surface perpendicularly right on top of a carbon atom which puckers out of the surface. The bath includes the acoustic and optical phonon modes vibrating perpendicularly to the surface. Couplings between subsystem and bath are obtained with a periodic density functional theory calculation. Trapping probabilities are obtained as a function of the hydrogen atom kinetic energy. These results are discussed in the light of the experimental hydrogenation studies performed on graphite by Zecho et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 8486 (2002)] and on graphene by Haberer et al. [Adv. Mater. 23, 4497 (2011)].

Karlický, František, E-mail: frantisek.karlicky@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, T?. 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic)] [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, T?. 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Lepetit, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.lepetit@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Lemoine, Didier, E-mail: didier.lemoine@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC and UMR5589 du CNRS, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse cedex (France)] [Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC and UMR5589 du CNRS, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse cedex (France)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

Cryogenic Thermal Expansion of Y-12 Graphite Fuel Elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal expansion measurements betwccn 20°K and 300°K were made on segments of three uranium-loaded Y-12 uncoated graphite fuel elements. The thermal expansion of these fuel elements over this temperature range is represented by the equation: {Delta}L/L = -39.42 x 10{sup -5} + 1.10 x 10{sup -7} T + 6.47 x 10{sup -9} T{sup 2} - 8.30 x 10{sup -12} T{sup 3}.

Eash, D. T.

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

Graphite having improved thermal stress resistance and method of preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method for fabricating a graphite article comprises the steps of impregnating a coke article by first heating the coke article in contact with a thermoplastic pitch at a temperature within the range of 250.degree.-300.degree. C. at a pressure within the range of 200-2000 psig for at least 4-10 hours and then heating said article at a temperature within the range of 450.degree.-485.degree. C. at a pressure of 200-2000 psig for about 16-24 hours to provide an impregnated article; heating the impregnated article for sufficient time to carbonize the impregnant to provide a second coke article, and graphitizing the second coke article. A graphite having improved thermal stress resistance results when the coke to be impregnated contains 1-3 wt.% sulfur and no added puffing inhibitors. An additional improvement in thermal stress resistance is achieved when the second coke article is heated above about 1400.degree. C. at a rate of at least 10.degree. C./minute to a temperature above the puffing temperature.

Kennedy, Charles R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method is disclosed for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite`s high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding. 11 figs.

Makowiecki, D.M.; Ramsey, P.B.; Juntz, R.S.

1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

"Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling:...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science discoveries unveiled "Artificial" brains, electrical grids, and disease modeling: Los Alamos science discoveries unveiled September 15 The event is an opportunity for...

139

Fabrication of microfluidic devices for artificial respiration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are developing elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices incorporated with photoactive thin films to create an implantable artificial respiration platform. Whereas state-of-the-art respiration support ...

Park, Hyesung, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Laser-induced dehydration of graphite oxide coatings on polymer substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanosized graphite has been oxidized by the Hummers method to give high quality graphite oxide. This reaction is characterized by a very fast kinetic behavior and a high yield. The produced graphite oxide has been conveniently used to pattern graphene by using a standard photolithographic method, and the resulting systems have been characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Visible-Near Infrared spectroscopy (Vis-NIR)

Longo, Angela, E-mail: angela.longo@cnr.it; Palomba, Mariano; Carotenuto, Gianfranco; Nicolais, Luigi [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Viale Kennedy, 54, Mostra d'Oltremare Padiglione 20, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Orabona, Emanuele; Maddalena, Pasqualino [Department of Physics, University of Naples, Federico II, via cintia, 80126, Naples, Italy and SPIN Institute, National Research Council, UOS Naples, via cintia, 80126, Naples (Italy); Ambrosio, Antonio [SPIN Institute, National Research Council, UOS Naples, via cintia, 80126, Naples (Italy)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Understanding Creep Mechanisms in Graphite with Experiments, Multiscale Simulations, and Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disordering mechanisms in graphite have a long history with conflicting viewpoints. Using Raman and x-ray photon spectroscoy, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction experiments and atomistic modeling and simulations, the current project has developed a fundamental understanding of early-to-late state radiation damage mechanisms in nuclear reactor grade graphite (NBG-18 and PCEA). We show that the topological defects in graphite play an important role under neutron and ion irradiation.

Eapen, Jacob; Murty, Korukonda; Burchell, Timothy

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

142

From Artificial Atoms to Nanocrystal Molecules: Preparation and Properties of More Complex Nanostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from “artificial atoms” to “artificial molecules”. Angew.quantum dot as an artificial atom. (a) Density of states inFrom Artificial Atoms to Nanocrystal Molecules: Preparation

Choi, Charina L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Microsoft Word - 911136_0 SSC-4b Reactor Graphite Test Plan_rel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 Revision 0 Engineering Services for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) with Hydrogen Production Test Plan for Reactor Graphite Elements Prepared by General Atomics for the...

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-cooled graphite reactors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

kernesikkerhedsforskning Norrnar kjarnryggisrannsknir Summary: the Nordic region. Windscale2 Two air-cooled graphite moderated metal U reactors operated at Windscale from......

145

Thermal Characterization of Graphitic Carbon Foams for Use in Thermal Storage Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Highly conductive graphitic foams are currently being studied for use as thermal conductivity enhancers (TCEs) in thermal energy storage (TES) systems. TES systems store… (more)

Drummond, Kevin P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Graphitic Electrical Contacts to Metallic Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Pt Electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NANO LETTERS Graphitic Electrical Contacts to Metallicof the interfacial electrical resistance between nano- tubesprovide excellent electrical contacts to many types of

Collins, Philip G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced gas cooled graphite moderated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at Chicago's Stagg Field and the X-IO graphite reactor at Oak Ridge). The Los Alamos Water Boiler... for neutron multiplication experiments at moderate power. They also...

148

Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared by Mele Chillingworth Scott of Hawaii at Manoa August 2011 #12;i Executive Summary Algae are considered to be a viable crop for biofuel for biofuels has increased interest in growing algae in Hawaii for biofuels. An analysis of algae production

149

A Sensorless Direct Torque Control Scheme Suitable for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Sensorless Direct Torque Control Scheme Suitable for Electric Vehicles Farid Khoucha, Khoudir an Electric Vehicle (EV). The proposed scheme uses an adaptive flux and speed observer that is based on a full is a good candidate for EVs propulsion. Index Terms--Electric vehicle, Induction motor, sensorless drive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

150

Assessment of the suitability of zircons for thermoluminescence dating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of the suitability of zircons for thermoluminescence dating H.J. van Esa, *, H.W. den for experiments by thermoluminescence (TL) and by Laser Ablation ICP-MS to study the role of rare earth elements can- didate for detrital sediment dating by thermolumines- cence (TL). Other important advantages

Donoghue, Joseph

151

Web Page Classification on Child Suitability Carsten Eickhoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Web Page Classification on Child Suitability Carsten Eickhoff Delft University of Technology Delft, Netherlands c.eickhoff@tudelft.nl Pavel Serdyukov Delft University of Technology Delft, Netherlands p.serdyukov@tudelft.nl Arjen P. de Vries Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica Amsterdam, Netherlands arjen@acm.org ABSTRACT Children

152

An Artificial Animated Boxer Alexander Kolliopoulos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that need to be addressed for this project: animation and control. It is difficult to model good human of artificial life is to model independently acting human characters that appear to behave realistically to a viewer. By modeling artificial human characters engaged in one activity, such as boxing, we may gain

Toronto, University of

153

Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning in a Simulated inhabited by realistic artificial fishes. Our algorithms emulate not only the appearance, movement model each animal holistically. An artificial fish is an autonomous agent situated in a simulated

Toronto, University of

154

Optical and electronic properties of two dimensional graphitic silicon carbide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical and electronic properties of two dimensional few layers graphitic silicon carbide (GSiC), in particular monolayer and bilayer, are investigated by density functional theory and found different from that of graphene and silicene. Monolayer GSiC has direct bandgap while few layers exhibit indirect bandgap. The bandgap of monolayer GSiC can be tuned by an in-plane strain. Properties of bilayer GSiC are extremely sensitive to the interlayer distance. These predictions promise that monolayer GSiC could be a remarkable candidate for novel type of light-emitting diodes utilizing its unique optical properties distinct from graphene, silicene and few layers GSiC.

Lin, Xiao; Lin, Shisheng; Hakro, Ayaz Ali; Cao, Te; Chen, Hongsheng; Zhang, Baile

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herman, Herbert (Port Jefferson, NY); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

157

Compression induced delamination in a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

110 Vl Table LIST OF TABLES Page 1 Compression Delamination Test Results P = 19. 79 N (4, 45 lb) E* = 136. 55 GPa (19. 8E6 Psi) s 2 Compression Delamination Test Results P = 24. OZ N (5. 4 lb) E = 136. 55 GPa (19. 8E6 Psi) s 3 Compression... Involving Different Crack Surface Displacements 3 fl . P /P 4 f2 vs. Pa/Pc 5 f3 vs. Pa/Pc 6 f4 vs. Pa/Pc 7 Test Specimen 8 Specimen Geometry 9 Cure Cycle for ASl/3502 Graphite/Epoxy Panels 10 Split Laminate in the Form of a Double-Cantilever Beam...

Earley, John W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Collisions between Hydrogen and Graphite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen adsorption by graphite is examined by classical molecular dynamics simulation using a modified Brenner REBO potential. Such interactions are typical in chemical sputtering experiments, and knowledge of the fundamental behavior of hydrogen and graphene in collisional conditions is essential for modeling the sputtering mechanism. The hydrogen adsorption rate is found to be dependent on the incident hydrogen energy and not on graphene temperature. Rather than destroying the graphene, hydrogen incidence at energies of less than 100 eV can be classified into three regimes of adsorption, reflection and penetration through one or more graphene layers. Incidence at the lowest energies is shown to distort the graphene structure.

A. Ito; H. Nakamura

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

159

Status of Initial Assessment of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Graphite Grades for NGNP Appkications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current candidate graphite grades for the core structures of NGNP include grades NBG-17, NBG-18, PCEA and IG-430. Both NBG-17 and NBG-18 are manufactured using pitch coke, and are vibrationally molded. These medium grain products are produced by SGL Carbon SAS (France). Tayo Tanso (Japan) produces IG-430 which is a petroleum coke, isostatically molded, nuclear grade graphite. And PCEA is a medium grain, extruded graphite produced by UCAR Carbon Co. (USA) from petroleum coke. An experimental program has been initiated to develop physical and mechanical properties data for these current candidate graphites. The results will be judged against the requirements for nuclear grade graphites set forth in ASTM standard D 7219-05 "Standard Specification for Isotropic and Near-isotropic Nuclear Graphites". Physical properties data including thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion, and mechanical properties data including tensile, compressive and flexural strengths will be obtained using the established test methods covered in D-7219 and ASTM C 781-02 "Standard Practice for Testing Graphite and Boronated Graphite Components for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactors". Various factors known to effect the properties of graphites will be investigated. These include specimen size, spatial location within a graphite billet, specimen orientation (ag and wg) within a billet, and billet-to-billet variations. The current status of the materials characterization program is reported herein. To date billets of the four graphite grades have been procured, and detailed cut up plans for obtaining the various specimens have been prepared. Particular attention has been given to the traceability of each specimen to its spatial location and orientation within a billet.

Strizak, Joe P [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

artificial intelligence consortium: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle, artificial intelligence. 1 INTRODUCTION Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 142 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

artificial intelligence technical: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle, artificial intelligence. 1 INTRODUCTION Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 155 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

162

artificial intelligence expert: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle, artificial intelligence. 1 INTRODUCTION Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 155 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

163

artificial intelligence workflow: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle, artificial intelligence. 1 INTRODUCTION Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 143 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

164

artificial intelligence methods: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle, artificial intelligence. 1 INTRODUCTION Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 149 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

165

artificial intelligence method: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle, artificial intelligence. 1 INTRODUCTION Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 149 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

166

applied artificial intelligence: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle, artificial intelligence. 1 INTRODUCTION Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 155 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

167

artificial intelligence tools: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle, artificial intelligence. 1 INTRODUCTION Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 163 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

168

artificial intelligence search: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cycle, artificial intelligence. 1 INTRODUCTION Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 164 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

169

artificial immune pattern: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the field of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. By developing abstractDynamic Pattern Recognition in Sport by Means of Artificial Neural Networks Jrgen Perl, Peter...

170

artificial life lessons: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12;Marcus Hutter - 2 - Universal Artificial Intelligence Abstract The dream of creating artificial devices that reach or outperform human intelligence is many centuries old. In...

171

artificial processivity clamp: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

172

artificial vision technique: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

173

artificial satellites: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been carried out by two different groups of people combining artificial intelligence and artificial life techniques with those of virtual environments Luck, Michael 239 Satellite...

174

artificial intelligence ai: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1628 February, 1999 A Binocular, Foveated Active Vision System Brian Scassellati MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab project at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. The ac- tive...

175

artificial intelligence based: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Introduction Qu, Rong 14 An artificial intelligence approach to model-based gas lift troubleshooting Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: AN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE...

176

Evaluation of co-cokes from bituminous coal with vacuum resid or decant oil, and evaluation of anthracites, as precursors to graphite.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Graphite is utilized as a neutron moderator and structural component in some nuclear reactor designs. During the reactor operaction the structure of graphite is damaged… (more)

Nyathi, Mhlwazi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Emission characteristics and dynamics of C2 from laser produced graphite plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emission characteristics and dynamics of C2 from laser produced graphite plasma S. S. Harilal, Riju 1996; accepted for publication 20 December 1996 The emission features of laser ablated graphite plume diagnostic technique. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy is employed to reveal the velocity

Harilal, S. S.

178

Adsorption of the first layer of argon on graphite (*) Laboratoire des Composs non St0153chiomtriques,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. The cooling bath is solid nitrogen obtained by pumping. The adsorption cell, enclosed in an aluminium blockL-9 Adsorption of the first layer of argon on graphite (*) F. Millot Laboratoire des Composés non déterminé des isothermes d'adsorption d'argon sur le graphite entre 55 et 62 K. Nous proposons une

Boyer, Edmond

179

Study of polypyrrole graphite composite as anode material for secondary lithium-ion batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of polypyrrole graphite composite as anode material for secondary lithium-ion batteries of the composite. The composite material has been studied for specific discharge capacity, coulombic efficiency for the Li-ion battery. Of various carbon materials that have been tried, graphite is favored because it (i

Popov, Branko N.

180

Effect of the graphite electrode material on the characteristics of molten salt electrolytically produced carbon nanomaterials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical erosion of a graphite cathode during the electrolysis of molten lithium chloride salt may be used for the preparation of nano-structured carbon materials. It has been found that the structures and morphologies of these carbon nanomaterials are dependent on those of the graphite cathodes employed. A combination of tubular and spherical carbon nanostructures has been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of predominantly planar micro-sized grains and a minor fraction of more irregular nano-sized grains, whilst only spherical carbon nanostructures have been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of primarily nano-sized grains. Based on the experimental results, a best-fit regression equation is proposed that relates the crystalline domain size of the graphite reactants and the carbon products. The carbon nanomaterials prepared possess a fairly uniform mesoporosity with a sharp peak in pore size distribution at around 4 nm. The results are of crucial importance to the production of carbon nanomaterials by way of the molten salt electrolytic method. - Highlights: {yields} Carbon nanomaterials are synthesised by LiCl electrolysis with graphite electrodes. {yields} The degree of crystallinity of graphite reactant and carbon product are related. {yields} A graphite reactant is identified that enables the preparation of carbon nanotubes. {yields} The carbon products possess uniform mesoporosity with narrow pore size distribution.

Kamali, Ali Reza, E-mail: ark42@cam.ac.uk; Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Synthesis of graphene-based nanosheets via chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis of graphene-based nanosheets via chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide Sasha of a colloidal suspension of exfoliated graphene oxide sheets in water with hydrazine hydrate results at the nanoscale if graphite can be exfoliated into thin nanoplatelets, and even down to the single graphene sheet

182

Direct Physical Exfoliation of Few-Layer Graphene from Graphite Grown on a Nickel Foil Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Physical Exfoliation of Few-Layer Graphene from Graphite Grown on a Nickel Foil Using Physical graphene exfoliation from graphite using optimized PDMS PACS codes: 68.65.Pq, 81.05.ue, 81.05.uf for the site-specific direct physical exfoliation of few-layer graphene sheets from cheap and easily

Maruyama, Shigeo

183

Simple Fabrication of a Highly Sensitive Glucose Biosensor Using Enzymes Immobilized in Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelets Nafion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simple Fabrication of a Highly Sensitive Glucose Biosensor Using Enzymes Immobilized in Exfoliated for the development of a glucose biosensor. Exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) were tested to enhance to 100s of dollars per gram) often makes them cost-prohibitive for some applications. Exfoliated graphite

Lee, Ilsoon

184

Adsorption of supramolecular building blocks on graphite: A force field and density functional theory study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that both adsorption energies as well as adsorption geometries of or- ganic molecules on graphite determined studies in which the adsorption energies of supramolecular building blocks are measured.12 This hampersAdsorption of supramolecular building blocks on graphite: A force field and density functional

Pfeifer, Holger

185

Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Jun (Columbia, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Graphite-to-diamond transformation induced by ultrasound cavitation A.Kh. Khachatryan a,c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphite-to-diamond transformation induced by ultrasound cavitation A.Kh. Khachatryan a,c , S microcrystals have been synthesized using ultrasonic cavitation of a suspension of hexagonal graphite in various. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Ultrasound cavitation; Microcrystalline diamond 1

Bristol, University of

187

Generation of graphitic soot by an urban fire storm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have obtained samples of aerosols deposited during the Hiroshima fire storm that was initiated by the atomic bomb detonated on August 6, 1945. These particles, which we extracted from streaks of black rain found on a plaster wall, are being studied. Initial studies show that the artifact appears to contain aerosol particles that may be representative of the aerosols that may lead to a nuclear winter. Aerosol generation in urban fire storms have been considered by studying these particles. The presence of graphite as a component of these particles is suggested by electron photomicrographs and has been confirmed using Raman spectroscopy, surface ionization mass spectroscopy, and electron scattering for chemical analysis. Several hypotheses are being considered to explain the presence of this form of carbon. Among these are generation in sooty clouds, in raindrops, in the interior of the first storm, and on the wall surface itself. The distribution of particle sizes suggests that the residence time of particles in the atmosphere would be long if they were not removed by rainout. An experimental and theoretical examination of the conditions necessary to produce graphitic soot is in progress.

Fields, D.E.; Cole, L.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Benchmarking of Graphite Reflected Critical Assemblies of UO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments were carried out in 1963 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 253 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27 cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 253 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506 cm triangular pitch [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods with a 1.506 cm triangular pitch. [3] Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. The first part of this experimental series has been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5] and is discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems. [6

Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Suitability versus fidelity for rating single-photon guns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The creation of specified quantum states is important for most, if not all, applications in quantum computation and communication. The quality of the state preparation is therefore an essential ingredient in any assessment of a quantum-state gun. We show that the fidelity, under the standard definitions is not sufficient to assess quantum sources, and we propose a new measure of suitability that necessarily depends on the application for the source. We consider the performance of single-photon guns in the context of quantum key distribution (QKD) and linear optical quantum computation. Single-photon sources for QKD need radically different properties than sources for quantum computing. Furthermore, the suitability for single-photon guns is discussed explicitly in terms of experimentally accessible criteria.

George M. Hockney; Pieter Kok; Jonathan P. Dowling

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

Chan, Kwai S. (San Antonio, TX); Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry (San Antonio, TX); Liang, Wuwei (Austin, TX)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

Sun, Xiao-Yu [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re [Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie, E-mail: yj-xu@whu.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

192

The role of oxygen in the uptake of deuterium in lithiated graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the mechanism of deuterium retention by lithiated graphite and its relationship to the oxygen concentration through surface sensitive experiments and atomistic simulations. Deposition of lithium on graphite yielded 5%–8% oxygen surface concentration and when subsequently irradiated with D ions at energies between 500 and 1000?eV/amu and fluences over 1016?cm-2 the oxygen concentration rose to between 25% and 40%. These enhanced oxygen levels were reached in a few seconds compared to about 300?h when the lithiated graphite was allowed to adsorb oxygen from the ambient environment under equilibrium conditions. Irradiating graphite without lithium deposition, however, resulted in complete removal of oxygen to levels below the detection limit of XPS (e.g., <1%). These findings confirm the predictions of atomistic simulations, which had concluded that oxygen was the primary component for the enhanced hydrogen retention chemistry on the lithiated graphite surface.

C.N. Taylor; J. Dadras; K.E. Luitjohan; J.P. Allain; P.S. Krstic; C.H. Skinner

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Project of Rotating Carbon High-Power Neutron Target. Research of Graphite Properties for Production of High Intensity Neutron Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project of Rotating Carbon High-Power Neutron Target. Research of Graphite Properties for Production of High Intensity Neutron Source

Gubin, K V; Bak, P A; Kot, N K; Logatchev, P V

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Self-Assembly and Mass Transport in Membranes for Artificial Photosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for artificial photosynthesis systems ..6Photosynthesis 7up process of artificial photosynthesis membranes and open

Modestino, Miguel Antonio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid NICTA is developing technology to automate costs. The Future · Cover more of Smart Grid control (diagnosis, reconfiguration, protection, voltage) products for the Smart Grid. Contact Details: Technical Jussi Rintanen Canberra Research Laboratory Tel

196

6.034 Artificial Intelligence, Fall 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6.034 is the header course for the department's "Artificial Intelligence and Applications" concentration. This course introduces students to the basic knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning methods of ...

Winston, Patrick Henry

197

Capacitance of edge plane of pyrolytic graphite in acetonitrile solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capacitance of the edge plane of pyrolytic graphite electrodes, in acetonitrile solutions, is measured by recording the current response to an applied triangular voltage sweep; TVS, and then fitting the current response with an appropriate function, (via a set of adjustable parameters). The pretreatment of the electrodes, the supporting electrolyte concentration used, and the frequency of the input TVS, were all found to affect the measured capacitance. In these experiments, a background current was also seen and the shape of the current output for the TVS; the charging/discharging curve, is shown to correlate with the magnitude of this background current. In addition, the size of the background current was found to have some dependence on the type of electrode pretreatment procedure used. 60 refs., 49 figs., 3 tabs.

Minick, S.K.; Ishida, Takanobu

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Method of producing exfoliated graphite composite compositions for fuel cell flow field plates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing an electrically conductive composite composition, which is particularly useful for fuel cell bipolar plate applications. The method comprises: (a) providing a supply of expandable graphite powder; (b) providing a supply of a non-expandable powder component comprising a binder or matrix material; (c) blending the expandable graphite with the non-expandable powder component to form a powder mixture wherein the non-expandable powder component is in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the powder mixture; (d) exposing the powder mixture to a temperature sufficient for exfoliating the expandable graphite to obtain a compressible mixture comprising expanded graphite worms and the non-expandable component; (e) compressing the compressible mixture at a pressure within the range of from about 5 psi to about 50,000 psi in predetermined directions into predetermined forms of cohered graphite composite compact; and (f) treating the so-formed cohered graphite composite to activate the binder or matrix material thereby promoting adhesion within the compact to produce the desired composite composition. Preferably, the non-expandable powder component further comprises an isotropy-promoting agent such as non-expandable graphite particles. Further preferably, step (e) comprises compressing the mixture in at least two directions. The method leads to composite plates with exceptionally high thickness-direction electrical conductivity.

Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

199

Oxidation of PCEA nuclear graphite by low water concentrations in helium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accelerated oxidation tests were performed to determine kinetic parameters of the chronic oxidation reaction of PCEA graphite in contact with helium coolant containing low moisture concentrations in high temperature gas-cooled reactors. To the authors best knowledge such a study has not been done since the detailed analysis of reaction of H-451 graphite with steam [Velasquez, Hightower, Burnette, 1978]. Since that H-451 graphite is now unavailable, it is urgently needed to characterize chronic oxidation behavior of new graphite grades under qualification for gas-cooled reactors. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism of carbon oxidation by water results in a non-linear reaction rate expression, with at least six different parameters. They were determined in accelerated oxidation experiments that covered a large range of temperatures (800 to 1100 oC), and partial pressures of water (15 to 850 Pa) and hydrogen (30 to 150 Pa) and used graphite specimens thin enough (4 mm) in order to avoid diffusion effects. Data analysis employed a statistical method based on multiple likelihood estimation of parameters and simultaneous fitting of non-linear equations. The results show significant material-specific differences between graphite grades PCEA and H-451 which were attributed to microstructural dissimilarity of the two materials. It is concluded that kinetic data cannot be transferred from one graphite grade to another.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Mee, Robert [University of Tennessee (UT); Wang, Peng [ORNL; Romanova, Anna V [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Graphite-ceramic rf Faraday-thermal shield and plasma limiter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a brazing procedure for joining a ceramic or glass material (e.g., Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or Macor) to graphite. In particular, the present invention is directed to a novel brazing procedure for the production of a brazed ceramic graphite product useful as a Faraday shield. The brazed ceramic graphite Faraday shield of the present invention may be used in Magnetic Fusion Devices (e.g., Princeton Large Torus Tokamak) or other high temperature resistant apparatus.

Hwang, D.L.Q.; Hosea, J.C.

1983-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effect of oxidizing environment on the strength and oxidation kinetics of HTGR graphites. Part I. Reactivity and strength loss of H451, PGX and IG-11 graphites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of oxidizing atmosphere and temperature on the reactivities and strengths of PGX, H451, and IG-11 were examined. Preliminary measurements of the oxidation kinetics of these graphites in H/sub 2/O-, CO/sub 2/- and O/sub 2/-containing atmospheres indicated that the reactivities of H451 graphite toward O/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O are quite similar to those of IG-11 graphite. The apparent activation energy for oxidation of these in O/sub 2/ were estimated to be approx. 175 kJ/mol while that in H/sub 2/O is probably approx. 200 kJ/mol. The apparent activation energy of IG-11 graphite oxidized in CO/sub 2/ is 255 +- 18 kJ/mol. PGX graphite was found to be quite variable in its reactivity toward H/sub 2/O. A linear dependence with (Fe) was determined, but other intrinsic properties were found to affect its absolute reactivity by as much as a factor of X50.

Eto, M.; Growcock, F.B.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Geophysical remote sensing of water reservoirs suitable for desalinization.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many parts of the United States, as well as other regions of the world, competing demands for fresh water or water suitable for desalination are outstripping sustainable supplies. In these areas, new water supplies are necessary to sustain economic development and agricultural uses, as well as support expanding populations, particularly in the Southwestern United States. Increasing the supply of water will more than likely come through desalinization of water reservoirs that are not suitable for present use. Surface-deployed seismic and electromagnetic (EM) methods have the potential for addressing these critical issues within large volumes of an aquifer at a lower cost than drilling and sampling. However, for detailed analysis of the water quality, some sampling utilizing boreholes would be required with geophysical methods being employed to extrapolate these sampled results to non-sampled regions of the aquifer. The research in this report addresses using seismic and EM methods in two complimentary ways to aid in the identification of water reservoirs that are suitable for desalinization. The first method uses the seismic data to constrain the earth structure so that detailed EM modeling can estimate the pore water conductivity, and hence the salinity. The second method utilizes the coupling of seismic and EM waves through the seismo-electric (conversion of seismic energy to electrical energy) and the electro-seismic (conversion of electrical energy to seismic energy) to estimate the salinity of the target aquifer. Analytic 1D solutions to coupled pressure and electric wave propagation demonstrate the types of waves one expects when using a seismic or electric source. A 2D seismo-electric/electro-seismic is developed to demonstrate the coupled seismic and EM system. For finite-difference modeling, the seismic and EM wave propagation algorithms are on different spatial and temporal scales. We present a method to solve multiple, finite-difference physics problems that has application beyond the present use. A limited field experiment was conducted to assess the seismo-electric effect. Due to a variety of problems, the observation of the electric field due to a seismic source is not definitive.

Aldridge, David Franklin; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Bonal, Nedra; Engler, Bruce Phillip

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Identification of structural defects in graphitic materials by gas-phase anisotropic etching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of structural defects in graphitic materials by gas-phase anisotropic etching Shuang interest but also industrial importance, as the existence of surface and bulk defects inevitably influences

Zhang, Guangyu

204

Electrochromic polyaniline/graphite oxide nanocomposites with endured electrochemical energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochromic polyaniline/graphite oxide nanocomposites with endured electrochemical energy February 2013 Keywords: Polyaniline nanocomposite film Electropolymerization Electrochromism a b s t r a c films for electrochromic displays and electrochemical energy storage devices applications were

Guo, John Zhanhu

205

The addition of a calender machine to a pyrolytic graphite sheet production plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis documents the process and challenges of adding a new calender machine to AvCarb Material Solutions' pyrolytic graphite production plant. Before the machine could be used for mass production, several experiments ...

Svenson, Ernest Knute

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Enhancing thermal conductivity of fluids with graphite nanoparticles and carbon nanotube  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluid media such as oil or water, and a selected effective amount of carbon nanomaterials necessary to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fluid. One of the preferred carbon nanomaterials is a high thermal conductivity graphite, exceeding that of the neat fluid to be dispersed therein in thermal conductivity, and ground, milled, or naturally prepared with mean particle size less than 500 nm, and preferably less than 200 nm, and most preferably less than 100 nm. The graphite is dispersed in the fluid by one or more of various methods, including ultrasonication, milling, and chemical dispersion. Carbon nanotubes with graphitic structure is another preferred source of carbon nanomaterial, although other carbon nanomaterials are acceptable. To confer long term stability, the use of one or more chemical dispersants is preferred. The thermal conductivity enhancement, compared to the fluid without carbon nanomaterial, is proportional to the amount of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes and/or graphite) added.

Zhang, Zhiqiang (Lexington, KY); Lockwood, Frances E. (Georgetown, KY)

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

207

Claisen Rearrangement of Graphite Oxide: A Route to Covalently Functionalized Graphenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the GO: The basal plane allylic alcohol functionality of graphite oxide (GO) can be converted into N,N-dimethylamide groups through an Eschenmoser–Claisen sigmatropic rearrangement by using N,N-dimethylacetamide dimethyl ...

Collins, William R.

208

Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-cost graphite submicronparticles (GSP) are employed as a possible catalyst support for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Platinum nanoparticles are deposited on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black (XC-72), carbon nanotubes (CNT), and GSP via ethylene glycol (EG) reduction method. The morphologies and the crystallinity of Pt/XC-72, Pt/CNT, and Pt/GSP are characterized with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, which shows that Pt nanoparticles (~ 3.5 nm) are uniformly dispersed on GSP support. Pt/GSP exhibits the highest activity towards oxygen reduction reactions. The durability study indicates that Pt/GSP is 2 ~ 3 times durable than Pt/CNT and Pt/XC-72. The enhanced durability of Pt/GSP catalyst is attributed to the higher corrosion resistance of graphite submicronparticles, which results from higher graphitization degree of GSP support. Considering its low production cost, graphite submicronparticles are promising electrocatalyst support for fuel cells.

Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Xiaohong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1, * Milton W. Cole,2 surface, covered by a monolayer of Cs. With data obtained from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations

Curtarolo, Stefano

210

THE USE OF THE ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF GRAPHITE AS A RADIATION...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

THE USE OF THE ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF GRAPHITE AS A RADIATION DAMAGE AND FLUX MONITOR. IMPLICATIONS OF THE RESULTS TO THE GENERAL THEORY OF RADIATION DAMAGE Re-direct...

211

Oxidation of hydrocarbons over ordered arrays of heteropolyacids and polyoxoanions on graphite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alkanes are catalytically oxidized using heteropolyacids (HPAs) or polyoxoanions (POAs) deposited on a graphite surface. The HPAs and POAs are framework-substituted with a different metal in place of a metal-oxygen unit.

Shaikh, Shahid N. (Media, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Statistical Comparison of the Baseline Mechanical Properties of NBG-18 and PCEA Graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled design that is capable of producing process heat for power generation and for industrial process that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is endeavoring to minimize the conservative estimates of as-manufactured mechanical and physical properties by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a comprehensive comparison between these values in different nuclear grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons and variations between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between the two grades of graphite that were initially favored in the two main VHTR designs. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration, while PCEA, a smaller grain, petroleum coke, extruded graphite from GrafTech was favored for the prismatic configuration. An analysis of the comparison between these two grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for the prediction of in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear grade graphites will continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

Mark C. Carroll; David T. Rohrbaugh

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Effect of graphite properties in thermal analysis of CHTR: A parametric study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compact High Temperature Reactor (CHTR) is a {sup 233}U-Thorium fuelled, lead-bismuth cooled reactor. The CHTR core mainly consists of graphite and beryllium oxide (BeO). The CHTR core consists of nineteen prismatic beryllium oxide (BeO) moderator blocks. These 19 blocks contain centrally located graphite fuel tubes. The BeO moderator blocks are surrounded by reflector blocks (partially graphite and partially BeO). The nuclear heat from the core is removed passively by natural circulation of the coolant between top and bottom plenums, upward through the fuel tubes and returning through the downcomer tubes at the periphery. The temperature gradient in fuel tubes, downcomer tubes and BeO is very high and therefore, to take care of the differential thermal expansion, gaps are provided in the core between the tubes and other core components. These gaps affect the heat transfer through the core in radial direction. In addition, there is a large variation in thermal properties of graphite which in turn affects the thermal behaviour of the core in various operating conditions. The fuel of CHTR is TRISO coated particle fuel. These particles are packed in with graphite powder as matrix and made into cylindrical compacts these compacts are packed in the bores of fuel tube. In this study, the effect of the thermal conductivity variation of the graphite on the temperature distribution of the core and density variation of the matrix graphite material in fuel compact on the maximum fuel kernel temperature is studied along with the overall role of graphite properties variation in heat transfer.

Kaushik, Ankur; Basak, Abhishek; Dulera, I. V.; Vijayan, P. K. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400 085 (India)

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

215

Graphite Furnance Atomic Absorption as a detector for High Performance Liquid Chromatography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION AS A DETECTOR FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHy A Thesis by HUSTON EDWARD HOWELL, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College oi' Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Chemistry GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION AS A DETECTOR FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY A Thesis by HUSTON EDWARD HOWELL, JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Howell, Huston Edward

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Effect of resin toughness on fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF RESIN TOUGHNESS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis Dy RONALD NELSON COHEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1982 Mlajor Subject: Interdisciplinary Enqi neeri ng EFFECT OF RESIN TOUGHNESS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by RONALD NELSON COHEN Approved as to style and content by: (N. L. Bradley, Cha man) (R. A...

Cohen, Ronald Nelson

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Residual thermal stresses in an unsymmetrical cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in parrial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Approved as to style and content by: r. Y. N itsman (Chair of Committee) Dr...

Harper, Brian Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

Artificial Intelligence Techniques for Steam Generator Modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates the use of different Artificial Intelligence methods to predict the values of several continuous variables from a Steam Generator. The objective was to determine how the different artificial intelligence methods performed in making predictions on the given dataset. The artificial intelligence methods evaluated were Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems. The types of neural networks investigated were Multi-Layer Perceptions, and Radial Basis Function. Bayesian and committee techniques were applied to these neural networks. Each of the AI methods considered was simulated in Matlab. The results of the simulations showed that all the AI methods were capable of predicting the Steam Generator data reasonably accurately. However, the Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference system out performed the other methods in terms of accuracy and ease of implementation, while still achieving a fast execution time as well as a reasonable training time.

Wright, Sarah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Motion detector suitable for detecting earthquakes and the like  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A motion detector device is described suitable for detecting vibrational tremors such as earthquakes comprising: an inertial mass, spring means comprising a spring barb oriented principally for motion along a horizontal axis and a coil spring oriented principally for motion along a vertical axis, means for resiliently supporting the inertial mass on the spring means for resilient motion along both the horizontal and vertical axes comprising means for anchoring the spring barb at one end thereof and means for connecting the coil spring between the other end of the spring barb and the inertial mass, the mass and spring means forming a resonant mechanical vibration circuit at a predetermined vibrational frequency corresponding to that of the vibrational tremor to be detected, spaced apart oppositely positioned electrical switching contact means connected to the spring means and the inertial mass respectively, the contact means being brought into switching contact with each other when the vibrational circuit is excited at the predetermined vibrational frequency, and alarm means connected to the switching means for providing an alarm signal when the contact means are brought into switching contact.

Windisch, D.E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Suitable Geological Formations for Spent Fuel Disposal in Romania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the experience in the field of advanced countries and formerly Romanian program data, ANDRAD, the agency responsible for the disposal of radioactive wastes, started the program for spent fuel disposal in deep geological formations with a documentary analysis at the national scale. The potential geological formations properly characterized elsewhere in the world: salt, clay, volcanic tuff, granite and crystalline rocks,. are all present in Romania. Using general or specific selection criteria, we presently consider the following two areas for candidate geological formations: 1. Clay formations in two areas in the western part of Romania: (1) The Pannonian basin Socodor - Zarand, where the clay formation is 3000 m thick, with many bentonitic strata and undisturbed structure, and (2) The Eocene Red Clay on the Somes River, extending 1200 m below the surface. They both need a large investigation program in order to establish and select the required homogeneous, dry and undisturbed zones at a suitable depth. 2. Old platform green schist formations, low metamorphosed, quartz and feldspar rich rocks, in the Central Dobrogea structural unit, not far from Cernavoda NPP (30 km average distance), 3000 m thick and including many homogeneous, fine granular, undisturbed, up to 300 m thick layers. (authors)

Marunteanu, C. [Bucharest Univ. (Romania); Ionita, G. [ANDRAD, Bucharest (Romania); Durdun, I. [S.C. GEOTEC S.A., Bucharest (Romania)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

artificial intelligence approach: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... Brady, Michael 1984-02-01 16 An artificial intelligence approach to model-based gas lift troubleshooting Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: AN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE...

223

artificial intelligence approaches: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... Brady, Michael 1984-02-01 16 An artificial intelligence approach to model-based gas lift troubleshooting Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: AN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE...

224

Unifying Artificial Intelligence Robotics: An Undergraduate Textbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unifying Artificial Intelligence Robotics: An Undergraduate Textbook Introduction to AI Robotics United States Naval Academy Robotics as a discipline has been active for more than 40 years in robotics, history has checked the development of texts appropriate for an undergraduate course from

Crabbe, Frederick

225

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ] Learning One Subprocedure per Lesson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ] Learning One Subprocedure per Lesson Kurt VanLehn Department be called learning from lesson s'equence.~, because the extra information given to the learner is embedded section ,of this article, a variant of learning from lesson sequcnccs will bc discusscd whercm lessons arc

VanLehn, Kurt

226

Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are comprised of many miles of fluid-filled pipes arranged in large grids with reflective mirrors used to capture radiation from the sun. Solar radiation heats the fluid which is used to produce steam necessary to power large electricity generation turbines. Currently, organic, oil-based fluid in the pipes has a maximum temperature threshold of 400 °C, allowing for the production of electricity at approximately 15 cents per kilowatt hour. The DOE hopes to foster the development of an advanced heat transfer fluid that can operate within higher temperature ranges. The new heat transfer fluid, when used with other advanced technologies, could significantly decrease solar electricity cost. Lower costs would make solar thermal electricity competitive with gas and coal and would offer a clean, renewable source of energy. Molten salts exhibit many desirable heat transfer qualities within the range of the project objectives. Halotechnics developed advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for application in solar thermal power generation. This project focused on complex mixtures of inorganic salts that exhibited a high thermal stability, a low melting point, and other favorable characteristics. A high-throughput combinatorial research and development program was conducted in order to achieve the project objective. Over 19,000 candidate formulations were screened. The workflow developed to screen various chemical systems to discover salt formulations led to mixtures suitable for use as HTFs in both parabolic trough and heliostat CSP plants. Furthermore, salt mixtures which will not interfere with fertilizer based nitrates were discovered. In addition for use in CSP, the discovered salt mixtures can be applied to electricity storage, heat treatment of alloys and other industrial processes.

Raade, Justin; Roark, Thomas; Vaughn, John; Bradshaw, Robert

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

Identifying suitable "piercement" salt domes for nuclear waste storage sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Piercement salt domes of the northern interior salt basins of the Gulf of Mexico are being considered as permanent storage sites for both nuclear and chemically toxic wastes. The suitable domes are stable and inactive, having reached their final evolutionary configuration at least 30 million years ago. They are buried to depths far below the level to which erosion will penetrate during the prescribed storage period and are not subject to possible future reactivation. The salt cores of these domes are themselves impermeable, permitting neither the entry nor exit of ground water or other unwanted materials. In part, a stable dome may be recognized by its present geometric configuration, but conclusive proof depends on establishing its evolutionary state. The evolutionary state of a dome is obtained by reconstructing the growth history of the dome as revealed by the configuration of sedimentary strata in a large area (commonly 3,000 square miles or more) surrounding the dome. A high quality, multifold CDP reflection seismic profile across a candidate dome will provide much of the necessary information when integrated with available subsurface control. Additional seismic profiles may be required to confirm an apparent configuration of the surrounding strata and an interpreted evolutionary history. High frequency seismic data collected in the near vicinity of a dome are also needed as a supplement to the CDP data to permit accurate depiction of the configuration of shallow strata. Such data must be tied to shallow drill hole control to confirm the geologic age at which dome growth ceased. If it is determined that a dome reached a terminal configuration many millions of years ago, such a dome is incapable of reactivation and thus constitutes a stable storage site for nuclear wastes.

Kehle, R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

artificial intelligence techniques: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vs. "Conventional Control" Intelligent Control: Basic Techniques 164 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

229

Characterization of Porosity Development in Oxidized Graphite using Automated Image Analysis Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on initial activities at ORNL aimed at quantitative characterization of porosity development in oxidized graphite specimens using automated image analysis (AIA) techniques. A series of cylindrical shape specimens were machined from nuclear-grade graphite (type PCEA, from GrafTech International). The specimens were oxidized in air to various levels of weight loss (between 5 and 20 %) and at three oxidation temperatures (between 600 and 750 oC). The procedure used for specimen preparation and oxidation was based on ASTM D-7542-09. Oxidized specimens were sectioned, resin-mounted and polished for optical microscopy examination. Mosaic pictures of rectangular stripes (25 mm x 0.4 mm) along a diameter of sectioned specimens were recorded. A commercial software (ImagePro) was evaluated for automated analysis of images. Because oxidized zones in graphite are less reflective in visible light than the pristine, unoxidized material, the microstructural changes induced by oxidation can easily be identified and analyzed. Oxidation at low temperatures contributes to development of numerous fine pores (< 100 m2) distributed more or less uniformly over a certain depth (5-6 mm) from the surface of graphite specimens, while causing no apparent external damage to the specimens. In contrast, oxidation at high temperatures causes dimensional changes and substantial surface damage within a narrow band (< 1 mm) near the exposed graphite surface, but leaves the interior of specimens with little or no changes in the pore structure. Based on these results it appears that weakening and degradation of mechanical properties of graphite materials produced by uniform oxidation at low temperatures is related to the massive development of fine pores in the oxidized zone. It was demonstrated that optical microscopy enhanced by AIA techniques allows accurate determination of oxidant penetration depth and of distribution of porosity in oxidized graphite materials.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Precambrian coal or anthraxolite: A source for graphite in high-grade schists and gneisses-a reply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argues that without considering data for igneous carbon (carbonatites) or for ultrahigh metamorphic calcareous gneisses such as are found in the Grenville province of North America, the conclusion that the source of carbon for vein graphite is magmatic or carbonate carbon is not justified. Points out that marbles and calc-silicate gneisses occur with the graphite-bearing granulite facies rocks in Sri Lanka. Calcite may also be seen in the veins with the graphite. Concludes that whether the graphite in epigenetic veins in high grade schists and gneisses has variable carbon isotope ratios depends on whether it was derived from organic material in carbonate or noncarbonate metasediments.

Mancuso, J.J.; Seavoy, R.E.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Laminated exfoliated graphite composite-metal compositions for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive laminate composition for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications. The laminate composition comprises at least a thin metal sheet having two opposed exterior surfaces and a first exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the first of the two exterior surfaces of the metal sheet wherein the exfoliated graphite composite sheet comprises: (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite and (b) a binder or matrix material to bond the expanded graphite for forming a cohered sheet, wherein the binder or matrix material is between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet. Preferably, the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet further comprises particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the non-expandable particles and the expanded graphite. Further preferably, the laminate comprises a second exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the second surface of the metal sheet to form a three-layer laminate. Surface flow channels and other desired geometric features can be built onto the exterior surfaces of the laminate to form a flow field plate or bipolar plate. The resulting laminate has an exceptionally high thickness-direction conductivity and excellent resistance to gas permeation.

Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Low-temperature, site selective graphitization of SiC via ion implantation and pulsed laser annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique is presented to selectively graphitize regions of SiC by ion implantation and pulsed laser annealing (PLA). Nanoscale features are patterned over large areas by multi-ion beam lithography and subsequently converted to few-layer graphene via PLA in air. Graphitization occurs only where ions have been implanted and without elevating the temperature of the surrounding substrate. Samples were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, ion scattering/channeling, SEM, and AFM, from which the degree of graphitization was determined to vary with implantation species, damage and dose, laser fluence, and pulsing. Contrasting growth regimes and graphitization mechanisms during PLA are discussed.

Lemaitre, Maxime G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (United States); Tongay, Sefaattin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (United States); Wang, Xiaotie [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (United States); Venkatachalam, Dinesh K.; Elliman, Robert G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Fridmann, Joel [Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (United States); Raith USA, Incorporated, Ronkonkoma, New York 11779 (United States); Gila, Brent P.; Appleton, Bill R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (United States); Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (United States); Hebard, Arthur F. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (United States); Ren, Fan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601 (United States)

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

234

Improving interface through surface modification by plasma polymerization, in carbon/graphite fiber reinforced polymeric composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon/graphite fiber surfaces were modified by plasma polymerization. An inductively coupled electrodeless glow-discharge system was utilized to treat the surfaces with acrylonitrile or styrene at the established operating conditions. Critical surface erosion for wetting measured by the sessile drop method, of plasma treated pyrolytic graphite blocks, used as a model surface for carbon/graphite fibers, were lower than of untreated block. Contact angles on plasma polymers deposited on different substrates had similar values. Contact angle, measured by Wilhelmy balance method of water, on untreated Fortafil 3 carbon/graphite fiber was 55.1/sup 0/, whereas the commercially treated one was 43.7/sup 0/. Plasma treatments reduced the contact angle to 44.3/sup 0/ in An and 47.3/sup 0/ in styrene monomer cases. Thicknesses of plasma polymers deposited under the established optimum conditions, measured by ellipsometer, were 840 A for PPAN and 2192 A for PPST after one hour treatment. In conclusion, plasma treatments of carbon/graphite fibers are an effective alternative to existing methods for improving interfacial shear strengths and maintaining or improving the tensile strengths of the fibers.

Dagli, N.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Construction of suitable weak solutions for the 3D incompressible NSEs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Construction of suitable weak solutions for the 3D incompressible NSEs Jean-Luc Guermond Department-Luc Guermond Construction of suitable weak solutions for the 3D NSEs #12;Outline 1 BASIC FACTS ABOUT THE 3D NSE Jean-Luc Guermond Construction of suitable weak solutions for the 3D NSEs #12;Outline 1 BASIC FACTS

Guermond, Jean-Luc

236

Construction of suitable weak solutions for the 3D incompressible NSEs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Construction of suitable weak solutions for the 3D incompressible NSEs Jean-Luc Guermond Department Univ. October 24, 2008 Jean-Luc Guermond Construction of suitable weak solutions for the 3D NSEs #12;Outline 1 BASIC FACTS ABOUT THE 3D NSE Jean-Luc Guermond Construction of suitable weak solutions for the 3

Guermond, Jean-Luc

237

The Dept. of Energy Artificial Retina project  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

LLNL has assisted in the development of the first long-term retinal prosthesis - called an artificial retina - that can function for years inside the harsh biological environment of the eye. This work has been done in collaboration with four national laboratories (Argonne, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge and Sandia), four universities (the California Institute of Technology, the Doheny Eye Institute at USC, North Carolina State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz), an industrial partner (Second Sight® Medical Products Inc. of Sylmar, Calif.) and the U.S. Department of Energy. With this device, application-specific integrated circuits transform digital images from a camera into electric signals in the eye that the brain uses to create a visual image. In clinical trials, patients with vision loss were able to successfully identify objects, increase mobility and detect movement using the artificial retina.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Carbon nanomaterial produced by microwave exfoliation of graphite oxide: new insights.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present detailed characterization of graphene-like material obtained through microwave stimulated exfoliation of graphite oxide (GO). Properties of this material were studied by multiple techniques including, among others, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, mass-spectroscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and broadband dielectric spectroscopy. Specific surface area and volume of microwave exfoliated graphite oxide reached 600 m2 g1 and 6 cm3 g1, respectively. It is shown that during such an explosive reduction process the sample emits CO2, CO and H2O and, in some cases, SO2 gases. The resulting reduced material exhibits IR spectra similar to that of graphite and a dc-conductivity of 0.12 S cm1.

Shulga, Y.M. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia] [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia; Baskakov, S.A. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia] [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia; Knerelman, E.I. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia] [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia; Davidova, G.I. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia] [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia; Badamshina, E.R. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia] [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia; Shulga, N. Yu. [National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Moscow, Russia] [National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Moscow, Russia; Skryleva, E.A. [National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Moscow, Russia] [National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Moscow, Russia; Agapov, Alexander L [ORNL] [ORNL; Voylov, Dmitry N [ORNL] [ORNL; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL] [ORNL; Martynenko, V.M. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia] [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Ac. Sci, Chernogolovka, Russia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Development of a plasma coating system for induction melting zirconium in a graphite crucible  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plasma coating system has been developed for induction melting zirconium at 1900 C using a graphite crucible. This laminated coating system consists of plasma spraying the following materials onto the graphite: (1) molybdenum or tungsten, (2) a 50% blend by weight of the metal powder and calcia-stabilized zirconium oxide, and (3) calcia-stabilized zirconia followed by painting a final coating of nonstabilized zirconia on top of the plasma-sprayed coating system. Zirconium was melted in argon using both laminating systems without any degradation of the graphite crucible and with only a minimal amount of carbon absorption. This novel approach that is being proposed as an alternative method of melting zirconium alloys offers substantial cost savings over the standard practice of electric arc melting using a consumable electrode.

Bird, E.L.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

1993-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

240

Phase transformations of nano-sized cubic boron nitride to white graphene and white graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report quantum-mechanical investigations that predict the formation of white graphene and nano-sized white graphite from the first-order phase transformations of nano-sized boron nitride thin-films. The phase transformations from the nano-sized diamond-like structure, when the thickness d?>?1.4?nm, to the energetically more stable nano-sized white graphite involve low activation energies of less than 1.0?eV. On the other hand, the diamond-like structure transforms spontaneously to white graphite when d???1.4?nm. In particular, the two-dimensional structure with single-layer boron nitride, the so-called white graphene, could be formed as a result of such transformation.

Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Xue, Wenhua; Anderson, Ryan S.; Sewell, Cody R. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Xue, Sha; Crunkleton, Daniel W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Shen, Yaogen [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang, Sanwu, E-mail: sanwu-wang@utulsa.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Coated graphite articles useful in metallurgical processes and method for making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Graphite articles including crucibles and molds used in metallurgical processes involving the melting and the handling of molten metals and alloys that are reactive with carbon when in a molten state and at process temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are provided with a multiple-layer coating for inhibiting carbon diffusion from the graphite into the molten metal or alloys. The coating is provided by a first coating increment of a carbide-forming metal on selected surfaces of the graphite, a second coating increment of a carbide forming metal and a refractory metal oxide, and a third coating increment of a refractory metal oxide. The second coating increment provides thermal shock absorbing characteristics to prevent delamination of the coating during temperature cycling. A wash coat of unstabilized zirconia or titanium nitride can be applied onto the third coating increment to facilitate release of melts from the coating.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Bird, Eugene L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of feed composition variations on process operating conditions and slag product performance; and collecting mass balance and operating data to support equipment and instrument design.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Electrochemical and structural characterization of ordered graphite electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was utilized to examine the structure/reactivity relationships for carbon electrodes in a well-defined matter. The basal plane of HOPG is ideal for this type of study due to its well-ordered surface structure. The electrochemical reactivity of basal plane HOPG was determined in terms of adsorption of anthraquinone 2,6-desulfonate ([Gamma][sub 2,6-AQDS]), the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of the ferro/ferricyanide redox couple (k[degrees] for Fe(CN)[sup [minus]3/[minus]4][sub 6]) and electrode capacitance (C[degrees]). [Gamma][sub 2,6-AQDS] tracks defects at basal plane HOPG electrodes indicating that the adsorption of 2,6-AQDS is a good marker for defects on the surface of basal plane HOPG. When measured on the same basal plane surface, k[degrees] for Fe(CN)[sup [minus]3/[minus]4][sub 6] and C[degrees] correlate with [Gamma][sub 2,6-AQDS] indicating that all three electrochemical observables are controlled by the same surface variables. This illustrates the importance of surface defects on electrochemical activity at basal plane HOPG electrodes. The correlation between k[degrees] for Fe(CN)[sup [minus]3/[minus]4][sub 6], C[degrees] and [Gamma][sub 2,6-AQDS] enabled the evaluation of these parameters at near-perfect basal plane. The data indicate that basal plane HOPG exhibits anomalously low electrochemical reactivity. An investigation of basal plane HOPG electrodes with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) revealed that defects, in the form of cleavage steps, cover 1% of the surface for the HOPG sample studied. Atomic scale STM images of step edges revealed that structural defects induce an electronic perturbation of the surface which occupies a significant area near the defect. [Gamma][sub 2,6-AQDS], k[degrees] for Fe(CN)[sup [minus]3/[minus]4][sub 6] and C[degrees] are influenced not only by the structural defect but also by the defect induced electronic perturbation.

McDermott, M.T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. 12 figs.

Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis.

Kangas, Lars J. (Richland, WA); Keller, Paul E. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Artificial intelligence and intelligent tutoring systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a species we have evolved by increasing our mental and physical powers through the deliberate development and use of instruments that amplify our inherent capabilities. Whereas hereditarily given instincts predetermine the actions of lower animal forms, human existence begins with freedom. As humans we can choose what actions we will perform. We have invented a technology called education to prepare ourselves for life. At present, our educational structures and procedures are failing to prepare us efficiently for the demands of modern life. One of the most important new technologies, in relation to human development, is the digital computer. This dissertation proposes that artificial intelligence maintain a highly critical technological awareness. Artificial intelligence, because of its origin as a politically sponsored field of investigation, must strive for constant awareness of its place within the larger political-economic world and its possible misuse by factions intent on manipulation and control. Computerized models of the human mind could be used in developing progressively more sophisticated brainwashing systems. Intelligent tutoring systems comprise an important new technology within the field of artificial intelligence. This dissertation explores specification and design procedures, functions and issues in developing intelligent tutoring systems.

Livergood, N.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Scattering of 64 eV to 3 keV Neutrons from Polyethylene and Graphite and the Coherence Length Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scattering of 64 eV to 3 keV Neutrons from Polyethylene and Graphite and the Coherence Length intensity ratios from polyethylene (CH2) relative to graphite (C) at several discrete final energies

Danon, Yaron

248

STUDY OF GRAPHITE TARGETS INTERACTING WITH THE 24 GeV PROTON BEAM OF THE BNL MUON TARGET EXPERIMENT*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiment, graphite and carbon-carbon composite targets were exposed to the AGS beam and their response materials for the future muon collider/neutrino factory carbon-based solid targets have been considered for the experiment are ATJ graphite and the anisotropic carbon-carbon composite. Each target consists of a pair of 16

McDonald, Kirk

249

Improved Lithium Ion Behavior Properties of TiO2@Graphitic-like Carbon Core@Shell Nanostructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved Lithium Ion Behavior Properties of TiO2@Graphitic-like Carbon Core@Shell Nanostructure Min Intercalation Electrochemistry Capacitance Lithium Ion batteries A B S T R A C T We demonstrate TiO2@graphitic on the electrode surface and enhanced lithium ion intercalation, leading to lower charge transfer resistance

Cao, Guozhong

250

A New Method for Quantitative Marking of Deposited Lithium via Chemical Treatment on Graphite Anodes in Lithium-Ion Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A New Method for Quantitative Marking of Deposited Lithium via Chemical Treatment on Graphite*[e] and Thomas Schleid[f] Abstract: A novel approach for the marking of deposited lithium on graphite anodes from of the electrochemical stability window of the electrolyte components.[3] Therefore, changes on the electrode

Schmidt, Volker

251

Latex and two-roll mill processing of thermally-exfoliated graphite oxide/natural rubber nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Latex and two-roll mill processing of thermally-exfoliated graphite oxide/natural rubber t Thermally-exfoliated graphite oxide (TEGO) is a graphene-based material that has been previously shown to graphene-based materials [4]. GO can be exfoliated in water into single-layer graphene oxide platelets

252

A Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Aging Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-ion Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Aging Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-ion Batteries: Power of a commercial LiFePO4-graphite Li-ion battery. Compared to the isothermal reference, the mechanism of porosity;2 Due to their high power and energy densities, Li-ion technologies are the leading battery systems

253

Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-Ion Batteries for Fast Charge Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Model of LiFePO4- Graphite Li-Ion Batteries for Fast Charge, a simplified electrochemical and thermal model of LiFePO4-graphite based Li-ion batteries is developed : 10.1149/2.064209jes #12;Over the past 15 years, Li-ion batteries have received much attention

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

254

Molecular models for the intercalation of hydrogen molecules into modified graphites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbonized aerogels have been proposed as a medium for the storage of H{sub 2} gas. Quantum chemical calculations were performed on a series of substituted polyaromatic ring compounds. Parallel ``sandwiches`` of these compounds were used as a model of graphite. Hydrogen was introduced between the compounds as a model of H{sub 2} intercalated into graphite. It was found that it required work to insert the H{sub 2} into most of the compounds, except when the presence of the hydrogen allowed the compound to find a new configuration with a lower energy.

Calef, D.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Analysis of the effect of matrix degradation on fatigue behavior of a graphite/epoxy laminate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRADATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ANALYSiS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRAOATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Arenburg, Robert Thomas

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Near-field thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials: Graphite and carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The near-field radiative heat transfer for two hyperbolic metamaterials, namely, graphite and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), is investigated. Graphite is a naturally existing uniaxial medium, while CNT arrays can be modeled as an effective anisotropic medium. Different hyperbolic modes can be separately supported by these materials in certain infrared regions, resulting in a strong enhancement in near-field heat transfer. It is predicted that the heat flux between two CNT arrays can exceed that between SiC plates at any vacuum gap distance and is about 10 times higher with a 10?nm gap.

Liu, X. L.; Zhang, R. Z.; Zhang, Z. M., E-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu [G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

257

Laser-processed three dimensional graphitic electrodes for diamond radiation detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used an original approach for diamond detectors where three dimensional buried graphitic electrodes are processed in the bulk of a diamond substrate via laser-induced graphitization. Prototype made of polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond was fabricated using a nanosecond UV laser. Its charge collection efficiency was evaluated using ?-particles emitted by a 241-Americium source. An improved charge collection efficiency was measured proving that laser micro-machining of diamond is a valid option for the future fabrication of three dimensional diamond detectors.

Caylar, Beno?-carett; Pomorski, Michal; Bergonzo, Philippe [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)] [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

258

Measurements of the diffusion coefficient of silver 110-m in a nuclear grade graphite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of graphite was found to obey classical Fickian diffusion for short diffusion times. The citations on the following pages follow the style of the Journal Nuclear Technolo I. B The Heed for this Research I. B. l Fission Product Control An important aspect... 1. At temperatures above 800 C, Ag rapidly diffuses in, around, and out the sample. In gas form it moves to the cool ends of the quartz tube and plates out. 110 m 2. It is difficult to diffuse Ag into a graphite sample, particularly if it has...

McMillan, Thad Calhoun

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

Application of a Barrier Filter at a High Purity Synthetic Graphite Plant, CRADA 99-F035, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superior Graphite Company and the US Department of Energy have entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to study the application of ceramic barrier filters at its Hopkinsville, Kentucky graphite plant. Superior Graphite Company is a worldwide leader in the application of advanced thermal processing technology to produce high purity graphite and carbons. The objective of the CRADA is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of incorporating the use of high-temperature filters to improve the performance of the offgas treatment system. A conceptual design was developed incorporating the ceramic filters into the offgas treatment system to be used for the development of a capital cost estimate and economic feasibility assessment of this technology for improving particulate removal. This CRADA is a joint effort of Superior Graphite Company, Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Adsorption and catalyzed reactions of CO and CO/sub 2/ on graphite surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is a study of catalytic reactions of graphite with CO and CO/sub 2/. The experimental probes that are brought to bear on this problem are Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for elemental analysis of the surface, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) to examine thermal decomposition of adsorbate species and, finally, x-ray photoelectron specroscopy (XPS) in order to identify surface entities.

Tysoe, W.T.; Carrazza, J.; Somorjai, G.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Relative and kinetic properties of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide on a graphite surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) results after chemisorption of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) on polycrystalline graphite are presented. CO adsorbs onto graphite with a very low sticking coefficient. After CO chemisorption CO (mass 28 amu) desorbs in two temperature regions, between 400 and 700 K and between 1000 and 1300 K, and CO/sub 2/ (mass 44 amu) desorbs below 950 K. The intensity of the CO/sub 2/ signal is less than 1 order of magnitude lower than the CO intensity. After CO/sub 2/ adsorption the major desorption product is CO at high temperatures (1000 < T (K) < 1300), whereas a small amount of CO/sub 2/ desorbs around 450 K. The adsorption of C/sup 16/O/sub 2/ and C/sup 18/O/sub 2/ mixture leads to a nearly total oxygen scrambling of the CO/sub 2/ desorbed. A mechanism for CO and CO/sub 2/ interconversion on the graphite surface is presented in terms of surface oxide species, mainly lactones and semiquinones, and their relative stability. Assignments of the TPD features are proposed accordingly. Reaction studies on the CO/sub 2/ gasification of clean graphite and the CO disproportionation (Boudouard reaction) have been performed. A good agreement is found between the activation energies obtained and the desorption energies calculated from the analysis of the TPD results.

Marchon, B.; Tysoe, W.T.; Carrazza, J.; Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.

1988-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

262

Electropolymerization kinetics of pyrrole in aqueous solution on graphite felt electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electropolymerization kinetics of pyrrole in aqueous solution on graphite felt electrodes I. depends on the synthesis conditions, such as the nature of the solvent, the electro- synthesis method®c properties, the synthesis conditions play a vital role in the performance of the material. In this work, we

Otero, Toribio Fernández

263

Polymer-Graphite Nanocomposites: Effective Dispersion and Major Property Enhancement via  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/kinetic limitations associated with con- ventional processes. With SSSP, a modified twin-screw extruder applies shear-44 provide details on the SSSP process and equipment; parameters (screw design, barrel size, feed rate, etc with similar filler content was fabricated via single-screw melt extrusion (Randcastle RCP-0625). Graphite

264

Graphite Waste Tank Cleanup and Decontamination under the Marcoule UP1 D and D Program - 13166  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UP1 plant in Marcoule reprocessed nearly 20,000 tons of used natural uranium gas cooled reactor fuel coming from the first generation of civil nuclear reactors in France. During more than 40 years, the decladding operations produced thousands of tons of processed waste, mainly magnesium and graphite fragments. In the absence of a French repository for the graphite waste, the graphite sludge content of the storage pits had to be retrieved and transferred into a newer and safer pit. After an extensive R and D program, the equipment and process necessary for retrieval operations were designed, built and tested. The innovative process is mainly based on the use of two pumps (one to capture and the other one to transfer the sludge) working one after the other and a robotic arm mounted on a telescopic mast. A dedicated process was also set up for the removal of the biggest fragments. The retrieval of the most irradiating fragments was a challenge. Today, the first pit is totally empty and its stainless steel walls have been decontaminated using gels. In the second pit, the sludge retrieval and transfer operations have been almost completed. Most of the non-pumpable graphite fragments has been removed and transferred to a new storage pit. After more than 6 years of operations in sludge retrieval, a lot of experience was acquired from which important 'lessons learned' could be shared. (authors)

Thomasset, Philippe [AREVA D and D BU, Marcoule (France)] [AREVA D and D BU, Marcoule (France); Chabeuf, Jean-Michel [AREVA D and D BU, La Hague (France)] [AREVA D and D BU, La Hague (France); Thiebaut, Valerie [CEA/DEN/DAPD/CPUP, Marcoule (France)] [CEA/DEN/DAPD/CPUP, Marcoule (France); Chambon, Frederic [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)] [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

THE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAPHITE-METAL FLUORIDE INTERCALATION COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inside graphite, except for UF6 which has ~s.1 A. The -6H 0that the lattice energy U(NO+UF6(c)) =- 152 kcal mole- 1 • Asince PtF6 is smaller than UF6, the electron affinity of PtF

McQuillan, Barry William

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Advanced Surface and Microstructural Characterization of Natural Graphite Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural graphite powders were subjected to a series of thermal treatments in order to improve the anode irreversible capacity loss (ICL) and capacity retention during long-term cycling of lithium ion batteries. A baseline thermal treatment in inert Ar or N2 atmosphere was compared to cases with a proprietary additive to the furnace gas environment. This additive substantially altered the surface chemistry of the natural graphite powders and resulted in significantly improved long-term cycling performance of the lithium ion batteries over the commercial natural graphite baseline. Different heat-treatment temperatures were investigated ranging from 950-2900 C with the intent of achieving the desired long-term cycling performance with as low of a maximum temperature and thermal budget as possible. A detailed summary of the characterization data is also presented, which includes X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and temperature-programed desorption mass spectroscopy (TPD-MS). This characterization data was correlated to the observed capacity fade improvements over the course of long-term cycling at high charge-discharge rates in full lithium-ion coin cells. It is believed that the long-term performance improvements are a result of forming a more stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the anode graphite surfaces, which is directly related to the surface chemistry modifications imparted by the proprietary gas environment during thermal treatment.

Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL] [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL] [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL] [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL] [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL] [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL] [ORNL; Yoon, Steve [A123 Systems, Inc.] [A123 Systems, Inc.; Denlinger, Matthew [A123 Systems, Inc.] [A123 Systems, Inc.; Wood III, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Photoexfoliation of Graphene from Graphite: An Ab Initio Study Yoshiyuki Miyamoto,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exfoliation process follows exposure to femtosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 800 nm and the full and intensity speed up the exfoliation and cause transient contraction in subsurface layers. Photoexfoliation] or chemical [3­7] exfoliation of graphite, or may form by annealing SiC single crystals [8], or by chemical

268

Edge-Enriched Graphitic Anodes by KOH Activation for Higher Rate Capability Lithium Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithium Ion Batteries D. Zakhidov,1,2 R. Sugamata,3 T. Yasue,3 T. Hayashi,3 Y. A. Kim,3 and M. Endo4 1 successful anode for lithium ion batteries due to its low cost, safety, and ease of fabrication, but higher are expected to surpass conventional graphite anodes due to larger number of edges for lithium ion

269

Nucleation and growth in electrodeposition of thin copper films on pyrolytic graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrodeposition of Cu on graphite electrodes was studied, with emphasis on nucleation. Various ex-situ and in-situ methods were investigated for determining the number density of nuclei. Two direct methods were studied (scanning electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy); indirect determinations included Raman spectroscopy and analysis of potentiostatic current transients. Though some of the techniques correctly predicted the nucleation densities under special conditions, SEM was the most reliable tool. The large scatter in the data necessitated steps to minimize this effect. To electrodeposit Cu on graphite, a nucleation overpotential of 250 mV was measured with cyclic voltammetry; such a large overpotential does not occur on a Pt or on a Cu-covered graphite electrode. The deposition potential is the dominant parameter governing nucleation density. There is a sharp increase in the nucleation density with applied potential. Cu can be deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite only between the nucleation overpotential and the hydrogen evolution potential. To increase the Cu nucleation density, while avoiding excessive H evolution, a double pulse potential technique was used; nucleation densities on the order of 10{sup 10} nuclei/cm{sup 2} were achieved. The use of inhibitors (PVA, benzotriazole) was also investigated. Deposition on conducting polymer electrodes was also studied; initial results with polyaniline show promise. 57 figs, 6 tabs, refs. (DLC)

Kinaci, F.S.; Muller, R.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Development of a Safeguards Approach for a Small Graphite Moderated Reactor and Associated Fuel Cycle Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small graphite-moderated and gas-cooled reactors have been around since the beginning of the atomic age. Though their existence in the past has been associated with nuclear weapons programs, they are capable of being used in civilian power programs...

Rauch, Eric B.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Jaszczak et al. 1 MICRO-AND NANO-SCALE GRAPHITE CONES AND TUBES FROM HACKMAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of micro- and nano-scale RGS. The largest of the RGS are hollow scrolls, with the c-axis predominantly at the micro- and nano-scales. The nano-scale cones tend not to be hollow and may have a cone-helix structureJaszczak et al. 1 MICRO- AND NANO-SCALE GRAPHITE CONES AND TUBES FROM HACKMAN VALLEY, KOLA

Jaszczak, John A.

272

An electrochemically reduced graphite-cobalt compound : synthesis and magnetic study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

direct intercalation of transition metals into graphite. One of the reasons could be the very high to metal- carbides formation than G.I.C.'s. Only indirect pre- paration methods have been described by many authors mostly consisting on a chemical [2-7] or electrochemical [8-10] reduction of the transition metal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

273

Excimer laser reduction and patterning of graphite oxide Denis A. Sokolov a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 901 Atlantic Drive NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0400, USA b Georgia Institute graphene include exfoliation of graphite [1], epitaxial growth on silicon carbide via silicon sublimation author: Fax: +1 404 3856057. E-mail address: Thomas.Orlando@chemistry.gatech.edu (T.M. Orlando). C A R B

Geohegan, David B.

274

Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a graphite furnace with an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a graphite furnace with an optical parametric oscillator laser for sequential multi-element determination of cadmium, cobalt, lead, manganese and thallium, for the ® rst time, that solid-state lasers required for analysis (ml or mg) and the technique has direct based

Michel, Robert G.

275

Self-assembly of long chain alkanes and their derivatives on graphite Teng Yang,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA Received 5 November 2007; accepted 16 January the energetic origin of the domain formation observed in the STM images. Our results for the hierarchy­8 Although many patterns have been reported even for alkane films on graphite, the energetic grounds

276

Dynamic Monte-Carlo modeling of hydrogen isotope reactivediffusive transport in porous graphite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by voids which are typically a fraction of a microm- eter. The granules consist of graphitic micro-crystal- lites of size 10­100 nm separated by micro-voids which are typically 1 nm (Fig. 1) [1­4]. These sub chemical reactions to form hydrocarbons or recombine to form hydro- gen molecules which can then diffuse

Nordlund, Kai

277

Layering and orientational ordering of propane on graphite: An experimental and simulation study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Layering and orientational ordering of propane on graphite: An experimental and simulation study 2002; accepted 30 July 2002 We report the results of an experimental and theoretical study of propane and experiments show that propane adsorbs in a layer-by-layer fashion and exhibits continuous growth beyond

Borguet, Eric

278

Artificial Retina Project: Electromagnetic and Thermal Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This award supported the investigation on electromagnetic and thermal effects associated with the artificial retina, designed in collaboration with national laboratories, universities, and private companies. Our work over the two years of support under this award has focused mainly on 1) Design of new telemetry coils for optimal power and data transfer between the implant and the external device while achieving a significant size reduction with respect to currently used coils; 2) feasibility study of the virtual electrode configuration 3) study the effect of pulse shape and duration on the stimulation efficacy.

Lazzi, Gianluca

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

279

Artificial Muscle Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo Feng Bio Energy CoClimateArtificial Muscle Inc Jump to:

280

artificial intelligence technologies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

significant foresight. We argue that there is much that can be inferred Su, Sara 169 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

artificial intelligence technology: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

significant foresight. We argue that there is much that can be inferred Su, Sara 169 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

282

artificial intelligence application: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Schuster, New York, 1986. 9 Allen Newell and Herbert A. Simon Ricci, Francesco 171 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

283

artificial intelligence applications: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Schuster, New York, 1986. 9 Allen Newell and Herbert A. Simon Ricci, Francesco 171 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

284

artificial intelligence environment: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

requires creative imagination and marks real advance in science. Marcus Hutter 154 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

285

artificial neural analysis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Databases and Resources Websites Summary: Applications of Artificial Neural Networks and Fuzzy Models in High Throughput Screening to the existing HTS method, via Quantitative...

286

artificial neural network: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

neural networks, for phosphene localisation are used Rattray, Magnus 63 Dynamic Pattern Recognition in Sport by Means of Artificial Neural Networks Computer Technologies...

287

artificial neural networks: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

neural networks, for phosphene localisation are used Rattray, Magnus 63 Dynamic Pattern Recognition in Sport by Means of Artificial Neural Networks Computer Technologies...

288

artificial sensory organ: Topics by E-print Network  

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of Artificial Visual Sensorimotor Structures Engineering Websites Summary: in supporting perception by orienting and relocating the visual sensory organs. Motor and sensory...

289

artificial lighting good: Topics by E-print Network  

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24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Adaptive predictive lighting controllers for daylight artificial light integrated schemes. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

290

Synthetic nanotubes lay foundation for new technology: Artificial...  

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Synthetic nanotubes lay foundation for new technology: Artificial pores mimic key features of natural pores By Tona Kunz * July 17, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Scientists have overcome...

291

artificial saliva solution: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 463 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

292

artificial life body: Topics by E-print Network  

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press) in Jessica Riskin (ed.) The Sistine Gap: Essays on the History and Philosophy of Artificial Life. Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

293

Artificial Spin Ice - A New Playground to Better Understand Magnetism...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Artificial Spin Ice - A New Playground to Better Understand Magnetism Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding...

294

artificially elevated intraocular: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 477 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

295

artificial neutral network: Topics by E-print Network  

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it was proposed that the theory of neutral mutations Fernandez, Thomas 48 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

296

artificial intrauterina em: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 396 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

297

artificial teeth opposed: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 475 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

298

artificial ascites induce: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 425 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

299

artificial acelerado sobre: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 397 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

300

artificial utilizado para: Topics by E-print Network  

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Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 419 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

artificial nobel gas: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 482 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

302

artificial internal organ: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1996-01-01 231 Magnetic anisotropy of elongated thin ferromagnetic nano-islands for artificial spin ice arrays Physics Websites Summary: Magnetic anisotropy of elongated thin...

303

artificial immune networks: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

if the learning resides purely in the weights of fixed Fernandez, Thomas 115 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

304

artificial caries lesion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 474 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

305

artificial corneas prepared: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 460 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

306

artificial pancreas system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

206 Effective Temperature in an Interacting Vertex System: Theory and Experiment on Artificial Spin Ice Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

307

artificial urinary sphincter: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 436 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

308

artificial tactile feedback: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 429 Vectorial Feedback with Carry Registers CERN...

309

artificial microbialite model: Topics by E-print Network  

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viscosity model is employed with an otherwise higher Peraire, Jaime 196 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

310

artificial immune system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

391 Effective Temperature in an Interacting Vertex System: Theory and Experiment on Artificial Spin Ice Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

311

artificially inoculated cereal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 489 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

312

artificial nucleation sites: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Inman Harvey Submitted: 2 September 1996 (Minor revisions October 1996) Abstract The artificial Fernandez, Thomas 83 Controlling ice nucleation through surface hydrophilicity...

313

artificial auxiliar caa: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 406 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

314

artificial insemination: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 427 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

315

artificial life models: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

life in all environ- ments and ecological niches Carrapio, Francisco 378 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

316

artificial por irradiacao: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 398 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

317

artificial dermis integra: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 402 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

318

artificial sweetener sucralose: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 412 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

319

artificial gastric juice: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 468 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

320

artificial sweetener sc45647: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 411 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

artificial endolymph injection: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 484 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

322

artificial diet irradiacao: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 475 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

323

artificially inoculated efeitos: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 455 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

324

artificial neuron networks: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

machine-learning algorithm, inspired by the immune Kent, University of 68 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

325

artificial organs: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 454 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

326

artificial intelligence research: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

represent our observations such as "one's blood type is AB Sato, Taisuke 118 Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research 33 (2008) 3377 Submitted 0907; published 0908 ICE: An...

327

artificial ground freezing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Moorman, Brian 6 Ground state lost but degeneracy found: the effective thermodynamics of artificial spin ice Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: We analyze the rotational...

328

artificial small shallow: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(1990 PAGE 3 12;2011 Prof. Micheloni Christian Universit Degli Studi di Udine Artificial Vision State 48 Preliminary Assessment SHALLOW LAND DISPOSAL AREA, PARKS...

329

artificial neuronal networks: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

machine-learning algorithm, inspired by the immune Kent, University of 68 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

330

artificial immune systems: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

391 Effective Temperature in an Interacting Vertex System: Theory and Experiment on Artificial Spin Ice Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

331

artificial polyclonal globulin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Optimization (Stochastic Approaches ). Carlos Fernandes 2005-03-02 418 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

332

artificial vein system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

203 Effective Temperature in an Interacting Vertex System: Theory and Experiment on Artificial Spin Ice Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

333

artificial hip joint: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment Project Title: Artificial bone for prosthetic hip joints Computer Technologies and...

334

artificial heart valve: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sigfridsson; S. Franzn; A. F. Bolger; T. Ebbers 30 A Hybrid Artificial Intelligence System for Assistance in Remote Monitoring of Heart Computer Technologies and Information...

335

artificial heart valves: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sigfridsson; S. Franzn; A. F. Bolger; T. Ebbers 30 A Hybrid Artificial Intelligence System for Assistance in Remote Monitoring of Heart Computer Technologies and Information...

336

artificial learning approaches: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Adults University of Kansas - KU ScholarWorks Summary: in the artificial language system. These findings provide initial evidence suggesting that executive function processes...

337

artificial compressibility method: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solutions of the Incompressible Navier Stokes system on exterior domains via the artificial compressibility method Mathematical Physics (arXiv) Summary: In this paper we study...

338

artificial metalloenzymes based: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from bacteria Jacob, Eshel Ben 6 An Interactive Electronic Art System Based on Artificial Ecosystemics Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: An...

339

artificial intelligence conference: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence, 2005 Aggregation Pheromone System and Its Cycle model Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

340

applications artificial intelligence: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

16 (2003) 237250 Hierarchical decision making for proactive quality control: system Materials Science Websites Summary: by resorting to artificial intelligence and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

artificial intelligence systems: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

particular Casillas Barranquero, Jorge 7 Intelligent Agents for an Artificial Market System Nikos Karacapilidis Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

342

Optimization Online - Varying the Population Size of Artificial ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 2, 2005 ... Varying the Population Size of Artificial Foraging Swarms on Time Varying ... Abstract: Swarm Intelligence (SI) is the property of a system ...

Carlos Fernandes

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

343

artificial extracellular matrix: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demetri 346 Algorithms and Hardware for Implementing Artificial Neural Networks Nathan Hower Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Algorithms and...

344

Exercise protocols during short-radius centrifugation for artificial gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-duration spaceflight results in severe physiological deconditioning, threatening the success of interplanetary travel. Exercise combined with artificial gravity provided by centrifugation may be the comprehensive ...

Edmonds, Jessica Leigh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

IEEE SYMPOSIUM ON ARTIFICIAL LIFE 1 Using Artificial Organisms To Study The Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Fish C.W. Liew Dept of Computer Science Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 liew methodology for studying how some features evolved in swimming fish. Experiments with the artificial organisms allow us to evaluate the hypothesis that backbones evolved in fish in part because they result in higher

Liew, Chun Wai

346

Impact of graphite gasket/duplex stainless steel couples on crevice chemistry and likelihood of crevice attack in seawater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrochemical polarization measurements have been made on a graphite laminate gasket and a super-duplex stainless steel (DSS) in deaerated IM NaCl solution over a range of pH. The open circuit potential of the graphite is significantly more noble than that of the duplex stainless steel and the kinetics of the hydrogen ion reduction are greater at potentials more positive than about 0.0 V SCE. The data were used as input to a model of crevice chemistry and predictions made for potentials up to +0.4 V SCE. For crevices of parallel plates of DSS-DSS and DSS-Plastic, the usual acidic conditions were predicted but for a DSS-Graphite combination the pH was predicted to be alkaline. The latter is a consequence of the enhanced kinetics for cathodic reduction of hydrogen ions and water on the graphite which, when contained within the crevice, act to elevate the pH. The predictions suggest that coupling to graphite, contained within the crevice, may act to prevent crevice corrosion initiation in contrast to the usual perception of behavior when coupling to more noble materials. In practice, there have been significant crevice corrosion failures of a super-duplex stainless steel associated with graphite gaskets. However, in all cases, the failures were in chlorinated systems for which the corrosion potentials are particularly high and beyond the range for which a benefit from graphite could be anticipated.

Turnbull, A. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom). Centre for Materials Measurement and Technology

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Science 100 Suitability Assessment 2012/13. Page 1 of 2 Science 100  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science 100 Suitability Assessment 2012/13. Page 1 of 2 Science 100 Suitability Assessment This is a brief self-questionnaire to help you decide if Science 100 is the right choice for you. There are no right or wrong answers, only honest ones. Science 100 may or may not be for you. Now is the time to find

Machel, Hans

348

High Frequency Characteristicsof NanocompositeThin Film "Supercapacitors" and their Suitability For EmbeddedDecoupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Frequency Characteristicsof NanocompositeThin Film "Supercapacitors" and their Suitability, the capacitance density would be much lower. Newer capacitor concepts such as supercapacitors can overcome and the suitability of the thin film supercapacitors for high-frequency decoupling applications will be discussed. 1

Swaminathan, Madhavan

349

Striped Bass Habitat Selection Rules in Reservoirs without Suitable Summer Habitat Offer Insight into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.--The traditional view of habitat requirements for inland striped bass Morone saxatilis suggests that these fish 2 mg/L. Once hypoxia forced striped bass into warmer water, the fish concentrated at the top to provide suitable habitat for adult fish. In severe cases, suitable habitat for adult striped bass may

350

Artificial Neural Nets and Cylinder Pressures in Diesel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial Neural Nets and Cylinder Pressures in Diesel Engine Fault Diagnosis * Gopi O diagnosis system for a diesel engine, which uses artificial neural nets to identify faults on the basis­temporal representation of cylinder pressures. Draw cards and power cards are regularly assessed for the condition

Sharkey, Amanda

351

Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Stephen Muggleton , During the centennial year of his birth Alan Turing (1912-1954) has been widely celebrated as having laid the paper. Keywords: Alan Turing, Artificial Intelligence, Ma- chine Intelligence 1. Introduction

Muggleton, Stephen H.

352

Acta Physicae Superficierum Vol VII 2004 EXPLORING ARTIFICIAL MAGNETISM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acta Physicae Superficierum · Vol VII · 2004 EXPLORING ARTIFICIAL MAGNETISM FROM THIN FILMS of artificially structured, new magnetic materials play a fundamental role in modern science and technology. From thin films to patterned magnetic nano-structures, these magnetic materials and systems can be utilized

Rau, Carl

353

Simulations of Embodied Evolving Semiosis: Emergent Semantics in Artificial Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulations of Embodied Evolving Semiosis: Emergent Semantics in Artificial Environments LUIS-238. Abstract. As we enter this amazing new world of artificial and virtual systems and environments in the context of human communities, we are interested in the development of systems and environments which have

Rocha, Luis

354

Artificial intelligence based on Darwin's idea By Mark Baard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial intelligence based on Darwin's idea By Mark Baard January 31, 2011 PROTOTYPES, his robots' artificial brains evolved not in isolation, but in conjunction with their changing bodies yielding. The result is a grip that is firm enough to lift a fragile object, but which requires none

Bongard, Josh

355

Developmental Plasticity in Cartesian Genetic Programming Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developmental Plasticity in Cartesian Genetic Programming Artificial Neural Networks Maryam Mahsal developmental plasticity in Artificial Neural Networks using Carte- sian Genetic Programming. This is inspired by developmental plasticity that exists in the biological brain allowing it to adapt to a changing environment

Fernandez, Thomas

356

Artificial Life: The Utrecht Machine W. Garrett Mitchener  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial Life: The Utrecht Machine W. Garrett Mitchener College of Charleston October 10, 2013 W. Garrett Mitchener (C of C) Utrecht Machine October 10, 2013 1 / 17 #12;Introduction Artificial life is hard W. Garrett Mitchener (C of C) Utrecht Machine October 10, 2013 2 / 17 #12;Introduction Let's start

Mitchener, W. Garrett

357

Apple Defect Segmentation by Artificial Neural Networks Devrim Unay a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apple Defect Segmentation by Artificial Neural Networks Devrim Unay a Bernard Gosselin a a TCTS Lab-colored apple fruits performed by several artificial neural networks. Pixel-wise classification approach apple defects. 1 Introduction Quality of apple fruits depends on size, color, shape and presence

Dupont, Stéphane

358

artificial intelligence system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

artificial intelligence system First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Artificial Intelligence...

359

AI and Cinema -Does artificial insanity rule? Robert B. Fisher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AI and Cinema - Does artificial insanity rule? Robert B. Fisher Division of Informatics University the early days of cinema (1907). These movies are interesting, because they help shape the mainstream public's view of artificial intelligence and robotics. The experienced science fiction reader and AI

Fisher, Bob

360

Full waveform inversion of a 3-D source inside an artificial rock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a 3-D Source Inside an Artificial Rock Albert C. To andof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate inof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate is

To, A C; Glaser, Steven D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Use of coal tar pitch and petroleum bitumen in the production of thermally expanded graphite (Short Communication)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The applicability of coal tar pitch and petroleum bitumen to the production of thermally expanded graphite was studied. The dependence of the coefficient of thermal expansion and the specific surface area on the amount of added substances was examined.

T.P. Miloshenko; O.Yu. Fetisova; M.L. Shchipko; B.N. Kuznetsov [Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russia). Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Abundances of presolar graphite and SiC from supernovae and AGB stars in the Murchison meteorite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pesolar graphite grains exhibit a range of densities (1.65 – 2.20 g/cm{sup 3}). We investigated abundances of presolar graphite grains formed in supernovae and in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the four density fractions KE3, KFA1, KFB1 and KFC1 extracted from the Murchison meteorite to probe dust productions in these stellar sources. Seventy-six and 50% of the grains in the low-density fractions KE3 and KFA1, respectively, are supernova grains, while only 7.2% and 0.9% of the grains in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1 have a supernova origin. Grains of AGB star origin are concentrated in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1. From the C isotopic distributions of these fractions and the presence of s-process Kr with {sup 86}Kr/{sup 82}Kr?=?4.43±0.46 in KFC1, we estimate that 76% and 80% of the grains in KFB1 and KFC1, respectively, formed in AGB stars. From the abundance of graphite grains in the Murchison meteorite, 0.88 ppm, the abundances of graphite from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.24 ppm and 0.44 ppm, respectively: the abundances of graphite in supernovae and AGB stars are comparable. In contrast, it has been known that 1% of SiC grains formed in supernovae and 95% formed in AGB stars in meteorites. Since the abundance of SiC grains is 5.85 ppm in the Murchison meteorite, the abundances of SiC from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.063 ppm and 5.6 ppm, respectively: the dominant source of SiC grains is AGB stars. Since SiC grains are harder and likely to survive better in space than graphite grains, the abundance of supernova graphite grains, which is higher than that of supernova SiC grains, indicates that supernovae proficiently produce graphite grains. Graphite grains from AGB stars are, in contrast, less abundant that SiC grains from AGB stars (0.44 ppm vs. 5.6 ppm). It is difficult to derive firm conclusions for graphite and SiC formation in AGB stars due to the difference in susceptibility to grain destruction. Metallicity of the parent AGB stars of graphite grains is much lower than that of SiC grains and the difference in metallicity might also have affected to the difference in the abundances in the Murchison meteorite.

Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst [McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and the Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Gallino, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

363

The determination of some anions using ion chromatography and ion chromatography-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DETERMINATION OF SOME ANIONS USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY AND ION CHROMATOGRAPHY-GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY A Thesis by DANIEL C. J. HILLMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981 Major Subject: Chemistry THE DETERMINATION OF SOME ANIONS USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY AND ION CHROMATOGRAPHY-GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY A Thesis by DANIEL C. J. HILLMAN...

Hillman, Daniel C

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon with graphitized frameworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hierarchical meso-/micro-porous graphitized carbon with uniform mesopores and ordered micropores, graphitized frameworks, and extra-high surface area of ?2200 m{sup 2}/g, was successfully synthesized through a simple one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The commercial mesoporous zeolite Y was utilized as a meso-/ micro-porous template, and the small-molecule methane was employed as a carbon precursor. The as-prepared hierarchical meso-/micro-porous carbons have homogeneously distributed mesopores as a host for electrolyte, which facilitate Li{sup +} ions transport to the large-area micropores, resulting a high reversible lithium ion storage of 1000 mA h/g and a high columbic efficiency of 65% at the first cycle.

Lv, Yingying; Fang, Yin; Qian, Xufang; Tu, Bo [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Zhangxiong [Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Asiri, Abdullah M. [Chemistry Department and The Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Zhao, Dongyuan, E-mail: dyzhao@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Examination of the solidification macrostructure of spheroidal and flake graphite cast irons using DAAS and ESBD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation focuses on the study of the solidification macrostructure of sand cast flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons. The macrostructure is revealed by using a special technique developed earlier by the authors, called Direct Austempering After Solidification. The observations make use of conventional metallography and Electron Back Scattering Diffraction. The latter technique allows a more detailed observation of the morphology of the austenite grains and the microstructure of the matrix. The results of Electron Back Scattering Diffraction validate the observations made using the macrographic technique. It is verified that the solidification of both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons is dominated by the growth of large austenite dendrites that form a grain pattern similar to that usually found in most metallic alloys.

Rivera, G. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Calvillo, P.R. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Ghent University (Belgium); Boeri, R. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: boeri@fi.mdp.edu.ar; Houbaert, Y. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Ghent University (Belgium); Sikora, J. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: jsikora@fi.mdp.edu.ar

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Continious production of exfoliated graphite composite compositions and flow field plates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of continuously producing a more isotropic, electrically conductive composite composition is provided. The process comprises: (a) continuously supplying a compressible mixture comprising exfoliated graphite worms and a binder or matrix material, wherein the binder or matrix material is in an amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the mixture; (b) continuously compressing the compressible mixture at a pressure within the range of from about 5 psi or 0.035 MPa to about 50,000 psi or 350 MPa in at least a first direction into a cohered graphite composite compact; and (c) continuously compressing the composite compact in a second direction, different from the first direction, to form the composite composition in a sheet or plate form. The process leads to composite plates with exceptionally high thickness-direction electrical conductivity.

Shi, Jinjun (Columbus, OH); Zhamu, Aruna (Centerville, OH); Jang, Bor Z. (Centerville, OH)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) plutonium recycle test reactor graphite cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) provides the evaluation necessary to demonstrate that the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) Graphite Cask meets the requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for transfer of Type B, fissile, non-highway route controlled quantities of radioactive material within the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The scope of this SEP includes risk, shieldling, criticality, and.tiedown analyses to demonstrate that onsite transportation safety requirements are satisfied. This SEP also establishes operational and maintenance guidelines to ensure that transport of the PRTR Graphite Cask is performed safely in accordance with WHC-CM-2-14. This SEP is valid until October 1, 1999. After this date, an update or upgrade to this document is required.

Romano, T.

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial reefs project Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On a small-scale, artificial reefs, which include structures such as breakwaters and offshore... , to design and construct a matrix of artificial reefs large enough ... Source:...

369

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial gravity countermeasure Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: artificial gravity countermeasure Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Modeling the benefits of an artificial...

370

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial intelligence canberra Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

intelligence canberra Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid Summary: Artificial Intelligence for the Smart Grid NICTA is developing...

371

Historical overview on Vacuum suitable Welding and fatigue resistance in Research Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New inventions change the approach of vacuum suitable welding for research purpose. With orbital welding, laser welding and robot welding the possibilities increase to fabricate larger vessels more accurately. Despite this development there is still no perfect understanding on how to avoid virtual leaks and how to make such joints suitable for dynamic stress. By recalling its historical development, it is apparent how welding mistakes began occurring systematically and how to avoid them. With ASDEX-Upgrade as an example, it is shown how the attempt to conduct vacuum suitable welding has decreased the fatigue strength. ITER could repeat the mistakes of ASDEX-Upgrade even for unwanted welding (accidental fusing of joints).

Wolf, Martin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Mode II delamination fracture toughness of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(August 1986) Carlos Roberto Corleto Nena, B. S. , Nechanical Engineering Texas AaN University Chairmam of Advisory Committee: Dr. Walter L. Bradley The mode II delamination fracture toughness of a ductile and a brittle unidirectional graphite... applications is their inherently poor damage tolerance for delamination. The resistance of composites to delamination can be well characterized by the delamination fracture toughness, measured as energy dissipated per unit area of crack growth. Where...

Corleto Mena, Carlos Roberto

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Water-cooled pyrolytic graphite targets at LAMPF: design and operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design considerations and actual operating experience are reported for water-cooled pyrolytic graphite targets at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Emphasis is placed on the use of finite element computer calculations to determine target temperatures and stresses, which can then be evaluated to judge the usefulness of a particular design. Consideration is also given to the swelling of the target following irradiation, and to the measures taken to prolong target lifetime.

Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A solution to level 3 dismantling of gas-cooled reactors: Graphite incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach developed to solve the specific decommissioning problems of the G2 and G3 gas cooled reactors at Marcoule and the strategy applied with emphasis in incinerating the graphite core components, using a fluidized-bed incinerator developed jointly between the CEA and FRAMATOME. The incineration option was selected over subsurface storage for technical and economic reasons. Studies have shown that gaseous incineration releases are environmentally acceptable.

Dubourg, M. [FRAMATOME, Paris-La Defense (France)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Mode I transverse cracking in an epoxy and a graphite fiber reinforced epoxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tension specimens tested under intermittent fixed grip conditions. The graphite/epoxy composite manifests a significant increase in fracture toughness with crack length as the crack length to specimen width ratio I'a/w) exceeds 0. 5. This increase... in toughness is correlated with an increase in fiber break- age and pullout and permanent matrix deformation. Results obtained in this study are compared with results from studies of delamination fracture toughness of the same composite material to show...

Williams, David Robert

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Method to Assess the Radionuclide Inventory of Irradiated Graphite from Gas-Cooled Reactors - 13072  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 17,000 t of irradiated graphite waste will be produced from the decommissioning of the six French gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Determining the radionuclide (RN) content of this waste is of relevant importance for safety reasons and in order to determine the best way to manage them. For many reasons the impurity content that gave rise to the RNs in irradiated graphite by neutron activation during operation is not always well known and sometimes actually unknown. So, assessing the RN content by the use of traditional calculation activation, starting from assumed impurity content, leads to a false assessment. Moreover, radiochemical measurements exhibit very wide discrepancies especially on RN corresponding to precursor at the trace level such as natural chlorine corresponding to chlorine 36. This wide discrepancy is unavoidable and is due to very simple reasons. The level of impurity is very low because the uranium fuel used at that very moment was not enriched, so it was a necessity to have very pure nuclear grade graphite and the very low size of radiochemical sample is a simple technical constraint because device size used to get mineralization product for measurement purpose is limited. The assessment of a radionuclide inventory only based on few number of radiochemical measurements lead in most cases, to a gross over or under-estimation that is detrimental for graphite waste management. A method using an identification calculation-measurement process is proposed in order to assess a radiological inventory for disposal sizing purpose as precise as possible while guaranteeing its upper character. This method present a closer approach to the reality of the main phenomenon at the origin of RNs in a reactor, while also incorporating the secondary effects that can alter this result such as RN (or its precursor) release during reactor operation. (authors)

Poncet, Bernard [EDF-CIDEN, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, F-69458 LYON cedex 06 (France)] [EDF-CIDEN, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, F-69458 LYON cedex 06 (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Status of the NGNP graphite creep experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) very high temperature gas reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have three different compressive loads applied to the top half of three diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment.

S. Blaine Grover

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Modeling Stress Strain Relationships and Predicting Failure Probabilities For Graphite Core Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will implement inelastic constitutive models that will yield the requisite stress-strain information necessary for graphite component design. Accurate knowledge of stress states (both elastic and inelastic) is required to assess how close a nuclear core component is to failure. Strain states are needed to assess deformations in order to ascertain serviceability issues relating to failure, e.g., whether too much shrinkage has taken place for the core to function properly. Failure probabilities, as opposed to safety factors, are required in order to capture the bariability in failure strength in tensile regimes. The current stress state is used to predict the probability of failure. Stochastic failure models will be developed that can accommodate possible material anisotropy. This work will also model material damage (i.e., degradation of mechanical properties) due to radiation exposure. The team will design tools for components fabricated from nuclear graphite. These tools must readily interact with finite element software--in particular, COMSOL, the software algorithm currently being utilized by the Idaho National Laboratory. For the eleastic response of graphite, the team will adopt anisotropic stress-strain relationships available in COMSO. Data from the literature will be utilized to characterize the appropriate elastic material constants.

Duffy, Stephen

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

379

Optimized Operating Range for Large-Format LiFePO4/Graphite Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

e investigated the long-term cycling performance of large format 20Ah LiFePO4/graphite batteries when they are cycled in various state-of-charge (SOC) ranges. It is found that batteries cycled in the medium SOC range (ca. 20~80% SOC) exhibit superior cycling stability than batteries cycled at both ends (0-20% or 80-100%) of the SOC even though the capcity utilized in the medium SOC range is three times as large as those cycled at both ends of the SOC. Several non-destructive techniques, including a voltage interruption approach, model-based parameter identification, electrode impedance spectra analysis, ?Q/?V analysis, and entropy change test, were used to investigate the performance of LiFePO4/graphite batteries within different SOC ranges. The results reveal that batteries at the ends of SOC exhibit much higher polarization impedance than those at the medium SOC range. These results can be attributed to the significant structural change of cathode and anode materials as revealed by the large entropy change within these ranges. The direct correlation between the polarization impedance and the cycle life of the batteries provides an effective methodology for battery management systems to control and prolong the cycle life of LiFePO4/graphite and other batteries.

Jiang, Jiuchun; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Zuo, Pengjian; Xiao, Jie; Chen, Xilin; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Production yields of noble-gas isotopes from ISOLDE UC$_{x}$/graphite targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yields of He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe isotopic chains were measured from UC$_{x}$/graphite and ThC$_{x}$/graphite targets at the PSB-ISOLDE facility at CERN using isobaric selectivity achieved by the combination of a plasma-discharge ion source with a water-cooled transfer line. %The measured half-lives allowed %to calculate the decay losses of neutron-rich isotopes in the %target and ion-source system, and thus to obtain information on the in-target %productions from the measured yields. The delay times measured for a UC$_x$/graphite target allow for an extrapolation to the expected yields of very neutron-rich noble gas isotopes, in particular for the ``NuPECC reference elements'' Ar and Kr, at the next-generation radioactive ion-beam facility EURISOL. \\end{abstract} \\begin{keyword} % keywords here, in the form: keyword \\sep keyword radioactive ion beams \\sep release \\sep ion yields \\sep ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) \\sep uranium and thorium carbide targets. % PACS codes here, in the form: \\PACS code \\sep code...

Bergmann, U C; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Diget, C A; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Gausemel, H; Georg, U; Giles, T; Hagebø, E; Jeppesen, H B; Jonsson, O C; Köster, U; Lettry, Jacques; Nilsson, T; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Riisager, K; Weissman, L; Äystö, J

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Rare-earth tantalates and niobates suitable for use as nanophosphors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S& gt

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

Mapping red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) habitat suitability using GIS and remote sensing techniques   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The British red squirrel population has dramatically declined in the last years. The survival of the species in the UK may depend on the careful selection and management of suitable habitats. A deep understanding of its habitat requirements...

de Lamo, Xavier

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Solar Energy to Drive Absorption Cooling Systems Suitable for Small Building Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results and an overview of the performance of low capacity single stage and half-effect absorption cooling systems, suitable for residential and small building applications. The primary heat source is solar energy supplied from flat plate collectors...

Gomri, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Suitability of Shape Memory Alloys for vibration isolation with application to launch vehicle payloads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work details an investigation into the suitability of Shape Memory Alloys for the task of vibration isolation based on the similarities between the Shape Memory Alloy pseudoelastic behavior and the softening response of isolators whose response...

Mayes, John Jeramy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Making Solar Fuels by Artificial Photosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order for solar energy to serve as a primary energy source, it must be paired with energy storage on a massive scale. At this scale, solar fuels and energy storage in chemical bonds is the only practical approach. Solar fuels are produced in massive amounts by photosynthesis with the reduction of CO{sub 2} by water to give carbohydrates but efficiencies are low. In photosystem II (PSII), the oxygen-producing site for photosynthesis, light absorption and sensitization trigger a cascade of coupled electron-proton transfer events with time scales ranging from picoseconds to microseconds. Oxidative equivalents are built up at the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) for water oxidation by the Kok cycle. A systematic approach to artificial photo-synthesis is available based on a “modular approach” in which the separate functions of a final device are studied separately, maximized for rates and stability, and used as modules in constructing integrated devices based on molecular assemblies, nanoscale arrays, self-assembled monolayers, etc. Considerable simplification is available by adopting a “dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell” (DSPEC) approach inspired by dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Water oxidation catalysis is a key feature, and significant progress has been made in developing a single-site solution and surface catalysts based on polypyridyl complexes of Ru. In this series, ligand variations can be used to tune redox potentials and reactivity over a wide range. Water oxidation electrocatalysis has been extended to chromophore-catalyst assemblies for both water oxidation and DSPEC applications.

Song, Wenjing; Chen, Zuofeng; Brennaman, Kyle M; Concepcion, Javier J; Patrocinio, Antonio O T; Murakami Iha, Neyde Y; Meyer, Thomas J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Impact of graphite gasket/duplex stainless steel couples on crevice chemistry and the likelihood of crevice attack in seawater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crevice corrosion in seawater usually is assumed to be induced by attainment of a critical solution chemistry. Electrochemical polarization measurements were made on a graphite laminate gasket and a super-duplex stainless steel (DSS) in deaerated 1M sodium chloride (NaCl) solution over a range of pH. The open-circuit potential of the graphite was significantly more noble than that of the DSS, and the kinetics of the hydrogen ion reduction were greater at potentials more positive than {approximately} 0.0 V{sub SCE}. Data were used as input to a model of crevice chemistry, and predictions were made for potentials up to 0.4 V{sub SCE}. For crevices of parallel plates of DSS-DSS and DSS-plastic, the usual acidic conditions were predicted. However, for a DSS-graphite combination, there was no significant decrease in pH. The latter was a consequence of the enhanced kinetics for cathodic reduction of hydrogen ions and water on the graphite which, when confined within the crevice, opposed the fall in pH associated with the metal-ion hydrolysis process. The predictions suggested that coupling to graphite, contained within the crevice, may act to prevent crevice corrosion initiation in contrast to the usual perception of behavior when coupling to more noble materials. In practice, there have been significant crevice corrosion failures of DSS associated with graphite gaskets. However, in all cases, the failures were in chlorinated systems for which corrosion potentials are particularly high and beyond the range for which a benefit from graphite could be anticipated.

Turnbull, A. [National Physical Lab., Middlesex (United Kingdom). Centre for Materials Measurement and Technology

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

artificial intelligence: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 141 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

388

artificial intelligence melbourne: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 141 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

389

artificial intelligence algorithm: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

London, WC1H 0AP, U.K. E-mail: A.Blandford@ucl.ac Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 162 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

390

artificial intelligence mrida: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 141 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

391

artificial intelligence techinques: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 141 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

392

artificial intelligence adelaide: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 141 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

393

artificial intelligence europe: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 141 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

394

artificial intelligence planning: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 161 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

395

artificial intelligence epia: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 141 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

396

artificial intelligence sistema: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 141 Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Computer Technologies and...

397

Artificial teeth : dental biofilm analysis on a chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, an "artificial teeth" microfluidic device is developed that provides unprecedented control over the conditions required to simulate the growth of complex dental biofilm. Dental plaque formation is not only ...

Lam, Raymond Hiu-wai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Artificial Production and Harvest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on "Harvest Hatcheries" to emphasize greater concern about stray rates and take of weak stocks. And NOAA along of artificial production to supplement depressed natural stocks, reintroduce extirpated stocks, and provide

399

Stochastic artificial retinas: algorithm, optoelectronic circuits, and implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stochastic artificial retinas: algorithm, optoelectronic circuits, and implementation Philippe tasks in the presence of discontinuities, dedicated optoelectronic hardware to implement thermal motion by photodetection of speckles, and hybrid architectures that combine optoelectronic, asynchronous

Boyer, Edmond

400

CNCR Talk on AI and Philosophy ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND PHILOSOPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CNCR Talk on AI and Philosophy ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND PHILOSOPHY How AI (including robotics) relates to philosophy and in some ways Improves on Philosophy Aaron Sloman http are also relevant) Also relevant · The Computer Revolution in Philosophy (1978) http

Sloman, Aaron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

arima models artificial: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

this prediction. Peter A. Dinda; David R. O& apos; Hallaron 1998-01-01 210 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

402

artificial matter exchange: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

changes in the real exchange rate. Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas 1999-01-01 9 Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research 33 (2008) 3377 Submitted 0907; published 0908 ICE: An...

403

Artificial Intelligence and The Many Faces of Reason   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I shall focus this discussion on one small thread in the increasingly complex weave of Artificial Intelligence and Philosophy of Mind: the attempt to explain how rational thought is mechanically possible. This is, historically, ...

Clark, Andy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

artificial ant colonies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Applying Ant Colony Optimization Methods in an Artificial Chemistry Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

405

artificial ant colony: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Applying Ant Colony Optimization Methods in an Artificial Chemistry Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

406

The New Frontier of Human-Level Artificial Intelligence Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the field of human-level intelligence, researchers are combining a variety of approaches toward the goals of human-like breadth, flexibility, and resilience for artificial intelligence systems. Each of the four ...

Winston, Patrick Henry

407

artificial limbs: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brain Control for Artificial Limbs - Businessweek Related How About Them Gams: 3D Printing Custom Legs When Jan Scheuermann grasped a chocolate bar and raised it to her mouth...

408

artificial neural computation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A RECONFIGURABLE COMPUTING ARCHITECTURE FOR IMPLEMENTING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS ON FPGA Engineering Websites Summary: A...

409

Synthesis of SiO{sub 2}/?-SiC/graphite hybrid composite by low temperature hot filament chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

?-SiC thin films were synthesized directly on graphite by hot filament chemical vapor deposition at low temperature. SiH{sub 4} diluted in hydrogen was employed as the silicon source, while graphite was functioned as both substrate and carbon source for the as-grown ?-SiC films. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis indicate that SiO{sub 2}/?-SiC/graphite hybrid composite was formed after post annealing treatment, and its crystalline quality can be remarkably improved under optimized annealing conditions. The possible growth mechanism was proposed based on in situ etching of graphite by reactive hydrogen radicals at the atomic level.

Zhang, Zhikun; Bi, Kaifeng; Liu, Yanhong; Qin, Fuwen; Liu, Hongzhu [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bian, Jiming, E-mail: jmbian@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Dong [New Energy Source Research Center of Shenyang Institute of Engineering, Shengyang 110136 (China)] [New Energy Source Research Center of Shenyang Institute of Engineering, Shengyang 110136 (China); Miao, Lihua [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Department of Computer and Mathematical Basic Teaching, Shenyang Medical College, Shenyan 110034 (China)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

410

Thermal benefits of artificial shelters in snakes: A radiotelemetric study of two sympatric colubrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

successfully for conservation (Webb and Shine, 2000; Arida and Bull, 2008; Grillet et al., 2010). Artificial

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

411

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial chromosome library Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

library Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: artificial chromosome library...

412

Artificial photosynthesis- solar fuels: current status and future prospects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review considers the case for using artificial photosynthesis to make solar fuels. The conceptual framework on which this idea is based is described. Photosynthesis is broken down into four partial reactions. Each one is described and progress in mimicking each of these is discussed. Finally, the current major barriers to achieving working systems based on artificial photosynthesis capable of making solar fuels are highlighted

Cogdell, Richard J; Brotosudarmo, Tatas H.P.; Gardiner, Alastair T; Sanchez, Pedro M; Cronin, Leroy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Implications of Graphite Radiation Damage on the Neutronic, Operational, and Safety Aspects of Very High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In both the prismatic and pebble bed designs of Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR), the graphite moderator is expected to reach exposure levels of 1021 to 1022 n/cm2 over the lifetime of the reactor. This exposure results in damage to the graphite structure. In this work, molecular dynamic and ab initio molecular static calculations will be used to: 1) simulate radiation damage in graphite under various irradiation and temperature conditions, 2) generate the thermal neutron scattering cross sections for damaged graphite, and 3) examine the resulting microstructure to identify damage formations that may produce the high-temperature Wigner effect. The impact of damage on the neutronic, operational and safety behavior of the reactor will be assessed using reactor physics calculations. In addition, tests will be performed on irradiated graphite samples to search for the high-temperature Wigner effect, and phonon density of states measurements will be conducted to quantify the effect on thermal neutron scattering cross sections using these samples.

Hawari, Ayman I

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

Treatment of Irradiated Graphite to meet Acceptance Criteria for Waste Disposal: A New IAEA Collaborative Research Program - 12443  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

World-wide, more than 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite have arisen through commercial nuclear-power operations and from military production reactors. Whilst most nations responsible for the generation of this material have in mind repository disposal alongside other radwaste, the lack of progress in this regard has led in some cases to difficulties where, for example, the site of an existing graphite-moderated reactor is required for re-utilisation. In any case, graphite as a radwaste stream has unique chemical and physical properties which may lend itself to more radical and innovative treatment and disposal options, including the recovery of useful isotopes and also recycling within the nuclear industry. Such aspects are important in making the case for future graphite-moderated reactor options (for example, High-Temperature Reactors planned for simultaneous power production and high-grade heat sources for such applications as hydrogen production for road fuel). A number of initiatives have taken place since the mid 1990s aimed at exploring such alternative strategies and, more recently, improving technology offers new options at all stages of the dismantling and disposal process. A new IAEA Collaborative Research Program aims to build upon the work already done and the knowledge achieved, in order to identify the risks and uncertainties associated with alternative options for graphite disposal, along with cost comparisons, thus enabling individual Member States to have the best-available information at their disposal to configure their own programs. (authors)

Wickham, A.J. [Nuclear Technology Consultancy, PO Box 50, Builth Wells, Powys LD2 3XA (United Kingdom); Drace, Z. [Waste Technology Section, Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, PO Box 100, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: ���¢�������¢ Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. ���¢�������¢ Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. ���¢�������¢ Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. ���¢�������¢ Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

Von L. Richards

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

416

New gas mixtures suitable for rare event detection using a Micromegas-TPC detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of the presented work was to develop further techniques based on a Micromegas-TPC, in order to reach a high gas gain with good energy resolution, and to search for gas mixtures suitable for rare event detection. This paper focuses on xenon, which is convenient for the search of neutrinoless double beta decay in 136 Xe. Conversely, a small admixture of xenon to CF 4 can reduce attachment in the latter. This gas mixture would be suitable for dark matter searches and the study of solar and reactor neutrinos. Various configurations of the Micromegas plane were investigated and are described.

L. Ounalli; J-L. Vuilleumier; D. Schenker; J-M. Vuilleumier

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

Comparison of the electrochemical properties of several commercial graphites with a templated disordered carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A templated carbon was prepared by the pyrolysis of pyrene impregnated into pillared clay (PILC). The electrochemical performance of this was evaluated with the goal of using this material as an anode in Li-ion cells. The reversible capacity was measured as a function of C rate and the cycling characteristics were determined for various intercalation protocols. The performance of this material was compared to that of several commercial graphites tested under the same conditions. The PILC carbon shows great promise as a Li-ion anode if the fade and first-cycle losses can be controlled.

Guidotti, R. A.; Reinhardt, F. W.; Sandi, G.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

418

Comparison of the electrochemical properties of several commercial graphites with a templated disordered carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A templated carbon was prepared by the pyrolysis of pyrene impregnated into pillared clay (PILC). The electrochemical performance of this was evaluated with the goal of using this material as an anode in Li-ion cells. The reversible capacity was measured as a function of C rate and the cycling characteristics were determined for various intercalation protocols. The performance of this material was compared to that of several commercial graphites tested under the same conditions. The PILC carbon shows great promise as a Li-ion anode if the fade and first-cycle losses can be controlled.

GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; SANDI,GISELLE

2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

419

Synthesis of graphene nanoribbons from amyloid templates by gallium vapor-assisted solid-phase graphitization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single- and double-layer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with widths of around 10?nm were synthesized directly onto an insulating substrate by solid-phase graphitization using a gallium vapor catalyst and carbon templates made of amyloid fibrils. Subsequent investigation revealed that the crystallinity, conductivity, and carrier mobility were all improved by increasing the temperature of synthesis. The carrier mobility of the GNR synthesized at 1050?°C was 0.83 cm{sup 2}/V?s, which is lower than that of mechanically exfoliated graphene. This is considered to be most likely due to electron scattering by the defects and edges of the GNRs.

Murakami, Katsuhisa, E-mail: k.murakami@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Dong, Tianchen; Kajiwara, Yuya; Takahashi, Teppei; Fujita, Jun-ichi [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Hiyama, Takaki; Takai, Eisuke; Ohashi, Gai; Shiraki, Kentaro [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Electroanalytical applications of screen-printable surfactant-induced sol-gel graphite composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparing sol-gel graphite composite electrodes is presented. This process preferably uses the surfactant bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) and eliminates the need for a cosolvent, an acidic catalyst, a cellulose binder and a thermal curing step from prior art processes. Fabrication of screen-printed electrodes by this process provides a simple approach for electroanalytical applications in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents. Examples of applications for such composite electrodes produced from this process include biochemical sensors such as disposable, single-use glucose sensors and ligand modified composite sensors for metal ion sensitive sensors.

Guadalupe, Ana R. (San Juan, PR); Guo, Yizhu (San Juan, PR)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Spatio-temporal mapping of ablated species in ultrafast laser-produced graphite plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied the spatial and temporal distributions of ionic, neutral, and molecular species generated by femtosecond laser produced plasma under varying ambient nitrogen gas pressures. Plasmas were generated by irradiating planar graphite targets using 40 fs pulses of 800 nm radiation from a Ti:Sapphire laser. The results show that in the presence of an ambient gas, the molecular species spatial extension and lifetime are directly correlated to the evolution of excited ions. The present studies also provide valuable insights into the evolution history of various species and their excitation during ultrafast laser ablation.

Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

422

Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

Appy, David [Ames Laboratory; Lei, Huaping [Ames Laboratory; Han, Yong [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Tringides, Michael C [Ames Laboratory; Shao, Dahai [Ames Laboratory; Kwolek, Emma J [Iowa State University; Evans, J W [Ames Laboratory; Thiel, P A [Ames Laboratory

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Exploration of coal-based pitch precursors for ultra-high thermal conductivity graphite fibers. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Goal was to explore the utility of coal-based pitch precursors for use in ultra high thermal conductivity carbon (graphite) fibers. From graphite electrode experience, it was established that coal-based pitches tend to form more highly crystalline graphite at lower temperatures. Since the funding was limited to year 1 effort of the 3 year program, the goal was only partially achieved. The coal-base pitches can form large domain mesophase in spite of high N and O contents. The mesophase reactivity test performed on one of the variants of coal-based pitch (DO84) showed that it was not a good candidate for carbon fiber processing. Optimization of WVU`s isotropic pitch process is required to tailor the pitch for carbon fiber processing. The hetero atoms in the coal pitch need to be reduced to improve mesophase formation.

Deshpande, G.V. [Amoco Performance Products, Inc., Alpharetta, GA (United States)

1996-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

424

Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

Blaine Grover

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

OVERSAMPLING COMPLEX-MODULATED DIGITAL FILTER BANK PAIRS SUITABLE FOR EXTENSIVE SUBBAND-SIGNAL AMPLIFICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subband-signals by a synthe- sis filter bank (SFB). Due to low battery energy available in hear- ing aidsOVERSAMPLING COMPLEX-MODULATED DIGITAL FILTER BANK PAIRS SUITABLE FOR EXTENSIVE SUBBAND@nt.rub.de, web: www.dsv.rub.de ABSTRACT Oversampling, complex-modulated digital subband coder filter banks

Göckler, Heinz G.

426

GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-245 Land Suitability for Establishing Rainwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

harvesting systems (RHS), which describe all methods to concentrate, store and collect rainwater runoff (DeGENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-245 304 Land Suitability for Establishing Rainwater Harvesting Rainwater harvesting systems (RHSs) can be used to improve the efficiency of helicopter fire- fighting

Standiford, Richard B.

427

The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the Indiana Bat of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries Introduction · Biofuel: ­ National Security ­ Stimulate Local Economies Negative Impacts of Biofuel Production ­ Decreased Site Productivity/Decreased Soil Conservation

Gray, Matthew

428

Real-Time Wind Turbine Emulator Suitable for Power Quality and Dynamic Control Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Real-Time Wind Turbine Emulator Suitable for Power Quality and Dynamic Control Studies Dale S. L. Dolan, Student Member, IEEE, P. W. Lehn, Member IEEE Abstract-- Wind turbines are increasingly becoming-time Wind Turbine Emulator, which emulates the dynamic torque produced by an actual turbine has been

Lehn, Peter W.

429

New creative teams in priorities of scientific research is searching for suitable candidates for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New creative teams in priorities of scientific research The VSB is searching for suitable systems in energetics (5 postdoc positions; contact: A basic description of each specific project module i preparation of new joint research projects New creative teams in priorities of scientific research

Savicky, Petr

430

Investigation of the suitability of silicate bonding for facet termination in active  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of the suitability of silicate bonding for facet termination in active fiber devices Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623, USA supriyo@stanford.edu Abstract: We demonstrate that silicate / OPTICS EXPRESS 13003 #12;11. K. Mackenzie, I. Brown, P. Ranchod, and R. Meinhold, "Silicate bonding

Byer, Robert L.

431

Antipatharian Diversity and Habitat Suitability Mapping in the Mesophotic Zone of the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Habitat suitability models for the distribution of black coral species at selected banks in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico were generated. Presence-only models made using the MaxEnt modeling program were compared to presence-absence models made using...

Nuttall, Marissa F

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

432

Assessment of Managed Aquifer Recharge Site Suitability Using a GIS and Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a regional groundwater model to assess the hydrologic impact of potential MAR placement and operating planning, including evaluation of options for enhancing groundwater resources. Introduction ManagedAssessment of Managed Aquifer Recharge Site Suitability Using a GIS and Modeling by Tess A. Russo1

Fisher, Andrew

433

Oil and Gas CDT Are non-marine organic-rich shales suitable exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Are non-marine organic-rich shales suitable exploration targets? The University Hesselbo, University of Exeter http://emps.exeter.ac.uk/csm/staff/sph216 Key Words Shales, depositional environments, diagenesis, sedimentology, geochemistry Overview Shales are of increasing interest not only

Henderson, Gideon

434

Carotenoid Photoprotection in Artificial Photosynthetic Antennas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of phthalocyanine?carotenoid dyads in which a phenylamino group links a phthalocyanine to carotenoids having 8?11 backbone double bonds were examined by visible and near-infrared femtosecond pump?probe spectroscopy combined with global fitting analysis. The series of molecules has permitted investigation of the role of carotenoids in the quenching of excited states of cyclic tetrapyrroles. The transient behavior varied dramatically with the length of the carotenoid and the solvent environment. Clear spectroscopic signatures of radical species revealed photoinduced electron transfer as the main quenching mechanism for all dyads dissolved in a polar solvent (THF), and the quenching rate was almost independent of carotenoid length. However, in a nonpolar solvent (toluene), quenching rates displayed a strong dependence on the conjugation length of the carotenoid and the mechanism did not include charge separation. The lack of any rise time components of a carotenoid S{sub 1} signature in all experiments in toluene suggests that an excitonic coupling between the carotenoid S{sub 1} state and phthalocyanine Q state, rather than a conventional energy transfer process, is the major mechanism of quenching. A pronounced inhomogeneity of the system was observed and attributed to the presence of a phenyl-amino linker between phthalocyanine and carotenoids. On the basis of accumulated work on various caroteno?phthalocyanine dyads and triads, we have now identified three mechanisms of tetrapyrrole singlet excited state quenching by carotenoids in artificial systems: (i) Car?Pc electron transfer and recombination; (ii){sup 1}Pc to Car S{sub 1} energy transfer and fast internal conversion to the Car ground state; (iii) excitonic coupling between {sup 1}Pc and Car S{sub 1} and ensuing internal conversion to the ground state of the carotenoid. The dominant mechanism depends upon the exact molecular architecture and solvent environment. These synthetic systems are providing a deeper understanding of structural and environmental effects on the interactions between carotenoids and tetrapyrroles and thereby better defining their role in controlling natural photosynthetic systems.

Kloz, Miroslav; Pillai, Smitha; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Graphene oxide sheets, the chemical exfoliation product of graphite powders and precursor for the bulk production of graphene based materials, are found to be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Graphene oxide sheets, the chemical exfoliation product of graphite powders and precursor), is the product of chemical oxidation and exfoliation of graphite powders that was first synthesized over a cen atomic layer of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms (Fig. 1a). In 2004, it was isolated by mechanical exfoliation

Huang, Jiaxing

436

Coordinated TEM and NanoSIMS of Presolar Graphites T.K. Croat, F.J. Stadermann, and T.J. Bernatowicz*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, MO 63130 Presolar graphites are especially interesting in that they encapsulate many internal grains kamacite grains which was then encapsulated within a graphite with the isotopic signatures of a supernova, this condensation sequence implies an iron abundance that is considerably above the solar ratios in the gas from

437

Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of the experiment. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in September 2008, and the fabrication and assembly of the experiment test train as well as installation and testing of the control and support systems that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation are being completed in early calendar 2009. The first experiment is scheduled to be ready for insertion in the ATR by April 30, 2009. This paper will discuss the design of the experiment including the test train and the temperature and compressive load monitoring, control, and data collection systems.

S. Blaine Grover

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Porous electrodes and prototypes of secondary cells based on a novel electrochemical system graphite-HBF{sub 4}-anthraquinone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porous electrodes and experimental prototypes of rechargeable batteries based on a novel electrochemical system graphite-HBF{sub 4} + tetrafluoroborate additives-anthraquinone are developed. Intercalation of anions in the graphite electrode is studied in detail and the intercalation potential is determined (E{sub i} {approximately} 1.55 V vs. Ag-AgCl). Side reactions proceeding concurrently with primary current-generating processes at the electrodes are described. Feasibility of hermetically sealing a battery based on the new system due to anthrahydroquinone`s ability to reduce oxygen that evolves during charging is demonstrated.

Barsukov, V.Z. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Kiev (Ukraine); Barsukov, I.V.; Motronyuk, T.I. [Kiev Polytechnical Institute (Ukraine); Beck, F. [Univ. of Duisburg (Germany)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Standard Test Methods for Properties of Continuous Filament Carbon and Graphite Fiber Tows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover the preparation and tensile testing of resin-impregnated and consolidated test specimens made from continuous filament carbon and graphite yarns, rovings, and tows to determine their tensile properties. 1.2 These test methods also cover the determination of the density and mass per unit length of the yarn, roving, or tow to provide supplementary data for tensile property calculation. 1.3 These test methods include a procedure for sizing removal to provide the preferred desized fiber samples for density measurement. This procedure may also be used to determine the weight percent sizing. 1.4 These test methods include a procedure for determining the weight percent moisture adsorption of carbon or graphite fiber. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of t...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Calculated criticality for sup 235 U/graphite systems using the VIM Monte Carlo code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations for highly enriched uranium and graphite systems gained renewed interest recently for the new production modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). Experiments to validate the physics calculations for these systems are being prepared for the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) reactor at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL-West) and in the Compact Nuclear Power Source facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The continuous-energy Monte Carlo code VIM, or equivalently the MCNP code, can utilize fully detailed models of the MHTGR and serve as benchmarks for the approximate multigroup methods necessary in full reactor calculations. Validation of these codes and their associated nuclear data did not exist for highly enriched {sup 235}U/graphite systems. Experimental data, used in development of more approximate methods, dates back to the 1960s. The authors have selected two independent sets of experiments for calculation with the VIM code. The carbon-to-uranium (C/U) ratios encompass the range of 2,000, representative of the new production MHTGR, to the ratio of 10,000 in the fuel of TREAT. Calculations used the ENDF/B-V data.

Collins, P.J.; Grasseschi, G.L.; Olsen, D.N. (Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls (United States)); Finck, P.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Preparations and characterizations of novel graphite-like materials and some high oxidation state fluorine chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Novel graphite-like materials, BC{sub x} (6>x{ge}3), have been prepared using BCl{sub 3} and C{sub 6}H{sub 6} at 800--1000C, and C{sub x}N (14>x{ge}5) have been synthesized using C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N and Cl{sub 2} at 680C--986C. Bulk and thin film characterization were used to study the structure and bonding in these solids. C{sub 8}K(NH{sub 3}){sub 1.1} was prepared by reacting C{sub 8}K with gaseous NH{sub 3}. The carbon sub-lattice is hexagonal: a = 2.47 {Angstrom}, c = 6.47 {Angstrom}. The smaller a parameter and lower conductivity are attributed to smaller electron transfer from K to the conduction band solvation of K by NH{sub 3}. A simplified liquid phase method for synthesizing Li-graphite intercalation compounds has been developed; synthesis of a lamellar mixed conductor, C{sub x}{sup +}Li{sub 2}N{sup {minus}}, has been attempted. Stability and conductivity of (BN){sub 3}SO{sub 3}F have been studied; it was shown to be metallic with a specific conductivity of 1.5 S{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}1}. Its low conductivity is attributed to the low mobility of holes in BN sheets.

Shen, Ciping

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Graphite and Beryllium Reflector Critical Assemblies of UO2 (Benchmark Experiments 2 and 3)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION A series of experiments was carried out in 1962-65 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2 wt% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 252 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27-cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 252 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506-cm triangular-pitch array [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular-pitch configuration and in a 7-tube-cluster configuration [3]. Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. All three experiments in the series have been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5]. The evaluation of the first experiment in the series was discussed at the 2011 ANS Winter meeting [6]. The evaluations of the second and third experiments are discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems [7].

Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

Bornstein, Jonathan G. (Miami, FL); Friedman, Peter S. (Toledo, OH)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Myoelectric Control of Artificial Limb Inspired by Quantum Information Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precise and elegant coordination of a prosthesis across many degrees of freedom represents a significant challenge to efficient rehabilitation of people with limb deficiency. Processing the electrical neural signals, collected from the surface of the remnant muscles of the stump, is a common way to initiate and control the different movements available to the artificial limb. Based on the assumption that there are distinguishable and repeatable signal patterns among different types of muscular activation, the problem of the prosthesis control reduces to one of pattern recognition. Widely accepted classical methods for pattern recognition, however, cannot provide simultaneous and proportional control of the artificial limb. Here we show that, in principle, quantum information processing of the neural signals allows us to overcome the above-mentioned difficulties suggesting a very simple scheme for myoelectric control of artificial limb with advanced functionalities.

Michael Siomau; Ning Jiang

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

445

Chemical sputtering of ATJ graphite induced by low-energy D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydro- gen atoms or ions is essential to assess the suitability of these materials for use in large preparation and thermal heat treatment (hysteresis effects) [1]; results may be affected as well by micro

446

Laboratory rearing of the cottonwood twig borer on artificial diets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY REARING OF THE COTTONWOOD TWIG BORER ON ARTIFICIAL DIETS A Thesis VICTOR CARL MASTRO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1973 Ma)or Sub)ect: Entomology LABORATORY REARING OF THE COTTONWOOD TWIG BORER ON ARTIFICIAL DIETS A Thesis by VICTOR CARL MASTRO Approved as to style and conte by (Cha rman of Committee) Head De artment) (He er) ( mber) mber) August 1973...

Mastro, Victory Carl

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Estimating Rooftop Suitability for PV: A Review of Methods, Patents, and Validation Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of methods have been developed using remote sensing data to estimate rooftop area suitable for the installation of photovoltaics (PV) at various geospatial resolutions. This report reviews the literature and patents on methods for estimating rooftop-area appropriate for PV, including constant-value methods, manual selection methods, and GIS-based methods. This report also presents NREL's proposed method for estimating suitable rooftop area for PV using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in conjunction with a GIS model to predict areas with appropriate slope, orientation, and sunlight. NREL's method is validated against solar installation data from New Jersey, Colorado, and California to compare modeled results to actual on-the-ground measurements.

Melius, J.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Identifying beef muscles and processing treatments suitable for use in fajita application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFYING BEEF MUSCLES AND PROCESSING TREATMENTS SUITABLE FOR USE IN FAJITA APPLICATION A Thesis by DIANA LORENA HUERTA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... Thesis by DIANA LORENA HUERTA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Jeffrey W...

Huerta Sanchez, Diana Lorena

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

449

Carbyne contamination in carbon-coated TEM microgrids made from vacuum-resistive heating deposition from a graphite rod  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbyne contamination was found to exist on the as-prepared carbon-coated transmission electron microscope (TEM) microgrids made by the method of vacuum-resistive heating deposition from a graphite rod. It is a source to bring mistaken and confusing information to the samples being studied by TEM.

Li Hanying; Sun Jingzhi; Wang Youwen; Chen Hongzheng; Cao Jian; Wang Mang

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Viscoelastic behavior of the cell wall of exfoliated graphite Po-Hsiu Chen, D.D.L. Chung *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the civil infrastructure, railroad, aircraft, satellites, automobiles, wind turbines, skis, washing machines * Composite Materials Research Laboratory, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY;graphite [12,13] and of continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites contain

Chung, Deborah D.L.

451

Chemical composition of the graphitic black carbon fraction in riverine and marine sediments at sub-micron scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a closed loop in the carbon cycle Chemical composition of the graphitic black carbon fraction in riverine and marine sediments at sub-micron scales using carbon X-ray spectromicroscopy Paul R. Haberstroh a,*, Jay A. Brandes b , Yves Ge´linas c

Long, Bernard

452

doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(03)00463-0 Structural, chemical, and isotopic microanalytical investigations of graphite from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

km/s (i.e., a few percent of the SN mass outflow speed). Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDXS electron microscopy (TEM) of ultramicrotome slices of these SN graphites revealed a high abundance (25 spectrometry (NanoSIMS) confirmed their presolar origin. In addition to TiCs, composite TiC/Fe grains (Ti

453

Growth of SiC thin films on graphite for oxidation-protective coating J.-H. Boo,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, it is necessary to improve its resistance to oxidation. SiC is used as a semiconductor material for high of the SiC layers compared to those grown by thermal MOCVD. The mechanical and oxidation-resistant-2101 00 18204-1 I. INTRODUCTION Graphite, with its advantages of high thermal conductiv- ity, low-thermal

Boo, Jin-Hyo

454

Surface Self-Diffusion and Mean Displacement of Hydrogen on Graphite and a PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst Support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Self-Diffusion and Mean Displacement of Hydrogen on Graphite and a PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst molecules and a carbon material commonly used in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), called XC coefficient at each temperature. At 350 K, a typical fuel cell temperature, the temperature function

Kjelstrup, Signe

455

Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the findings of the Echo Meadows Project (BPA Project 2001-015-00). The main purpose of this project is to artificially recharge an alluvial aquifer, WITH water from Umatilla River during the winter high flow period. In turn, this recharged aquifer will discharge an increased flow of cool groundwater back to the river, thereby improving Umatilla River water quality and temperature. A considerable side benefit is that the Umatilla River should improve as a habitat for migration, spanning, and rearing of anadromous and resident fish. The scope of this project is to provide critical baseline information about the Echo Meadows and the associated reach of the Umatilla River. Key elements of information that has been gathered include: (1) Annual and seasonal groundwater levels in the aquifer with an emphasis on the irrigation season, (2) Groundwater hydraulic properties, particularly hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, and (3) Groundwater and Umatilla River water quality including temperature, nutrients and other indicator parameters. One of the major purposes of this data gathering was to develop input to a groundwater model of the area. The purpose of the model is to estimate our ability to recharge this aquifer using water that is only available outside of the irrigation season (December through the end of February) and to estimate the timing of groundwater return flow back to the river. We have found through the data collection and modeling efforts that this reach of the river had historically returned as much as 45 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water to the Umatilla River during the summer and early fall. However, this return flow was reduced to as low as 10 cfs primarily due to reduced quantities of irrigation application, gain in irrigation efficiencies and increased groundwater pumping. Our modeling indicated that it is possible to restore these critical return flows using applied water outside of the irrigation season. We further found that this water can be timed to return to the river during the desired time of the year (summer to early fall). This is because the river stage, which remains relatively high until this time, drops during the irrigation season-thereby releasing the stored groundwater and increasing river flows. A significant side benefit is that these enhanced groundwater return flows will be clean and cold, particularly as compared to the Umatilla River. We also believe that this same type of application of water could be done and the resulting stream flows could be realized in other watersheds throughout the Pacific Northwest. This means that it is critical to compare the results from this baseline report to the full implementation of the project in the next phase. As previously stated, this report only discusses the results of data gathered during the baseline phase of this project. We have attempted to make the data that has been gathered accessible with the enclosed databases and spreadsheets. We provide computer links in this report to the databases so that interested parties can fully evaluate the data that has been gathered. However, we cannot emphasize too strongly that the real value of this project is to implement the phases to come, compare the results of these future phases to this baseline and develop the science and strategies to successfully implement this concept to other rivers in the Pacific Northwest. The results from our verified and calibrated groundwater model matches the observed groundwater data and trends collected during the baseline phase. The modeling results indicate that the return flows may increase to their historic values with the addition of 1 acre-ft/acre of recharge water to the groundwater system (about 9,600 acre-feet total). What this means is that through continued recharge project, you can double to quadruple the annual baseflow of the Umatilla River during the low summer and fall flow periods as compared to the present base-flow. The cool and high quality recharge water is a significant beneficial impact to the river system.

Ziari, Fred

2002-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

456

Interplay of oxygen-evolution kinetics and photovoltaic power curves on the construction of artificial leaves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An artificial leaf can perform direct solar-to-fuels conversion. The construction of an efficient artificial leaf or other photovoltaic (PV)-photoelectrochemical device requires that the power curve of the PV material and ...

Surendranath, Yogesh

457

First Year Sedimentological Characteristics and Morphological Evolution of an Artificial Berm at Fort Myers Beach, Florida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First Year Sedimentological Characteristics and Morphological Evolution of an Artificial Berm Methods and Data Analysis 29 Results and Discussion 34 Sedimentological Characteristics of the Artificial Project Area 45 Control Area Northwest of Berm 47 Discussion of Sedimentological Characteristics 49

US Army Corps of Engineers

458

Artificial Intelligence 170 (2006) 835871 www.elsevier.com/locate/artint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial Intelligence 170 (2006) 835­871 www.elsevier.com/locate/artint On the computational / Artificial Intelligence 170 (2006) 835­871 desires to achieve one of a set of goals, and every coalition has

Woolridge, Mike

459

Predicting the Voltage Dependence of Interfacial Electrochemical Processes at Lithium-Intercalated Graphite Edge Planes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The applied potential governs lithium-intercalation and electrode passivation reactions in lithium ion batteries, but are challenging to calibrate in condensed phase DFT calculations. In this work, the "anode potential" of charge-neutral lithium-intercalated graphite (LiC(6)) with oxidized edge planes is computed as a function of Li-content n(Li)) at edge planes, using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), a previously introduced Li+ transfer free energy method, and the experimental Li+/Li(s) value as reference. The voltage assignments are corroborated using explicit electron transfer from fluoroethylene carbonate radical anion markers. PF6- is shown to decompose electrochemically (i.e., not just thermally) at low potentials imposed by our voltage calibration technique. We demonstrate that excess electrons reside in localized states-in-the-gap in the organic carbonate liquid region, which is not semiconductor-like (band-state-like) as widely assumed in the literature.

Leung, Kevin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Bias-dependent molecular-level structure of electrical double layer in ionic liquid on graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bias-dependent structure of electrochemical double layers at liquid-solid interfaces underpin a multitude of phenomena in virtually all areas of scientific enquiry ranging from energy storage and conversion systems, biology, to geophysics and geochemistry. Here we report the bias-evolution of the electric double layer structure of an ionic liquid on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite as a model system for carbon-based electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors measured by atomic force microscopy. Matching the observed structures to molecular dynamics simulations allows us to resolve steric effects due to cation and anion layers. We observe reconfiguration under applied bias and the orientational transitions in the Stern layer. The synergy between molecular dynamics simulation and experiment provides a comprehensive picture of structural phenomena and long- and short range interactions. This insight will improve understanding of the mechanism of charge storage in electrochemical capacitors on a molecular level which can be used to enhance their electrochemical performance.

Black, Jennifer M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walters, Deron [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA] [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; Labuda, Aleksander [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA] [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; Feng, Guang [ORNL] [ORNL; Hillesheim, Patrick C [ORNL] [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Cummings, Peter T [ORNL] [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL] [ORNL; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA] [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; Balke, Nina [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Proceedings of the conference on electrochemistry of carbon allotropes: Graphite, fullerenes and diamond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference provided an opportunity for electrochemists, physicists, materials scientists and engineers to meet and exchange information on different carbon allotropes. The presentations and discussion among the participants provided a forum to develop recommendations on research and development which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes. The following topics which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes were addressed: Graphitized and disordered carbons, as Li-ion intercalation anodes for high-energy-density, high-power-density Li-based secondary batteries; Carbons as substrate materials for catalysis and electrocatalysis; Boron-doped diamond film electrodes; and Electrochemical characterization and electrosynthesis of fullerenes and fullerene-type materials. Abstracts of the presentations are presented.

Kinoshita, K. [ed.] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Scherson, D. [ed.] [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Development of mixed-waste analysis capability for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer (GFAAS) are typically configured with ventilation to capture potentially toxic and corrosive gases emitted from the vaporization of sample aliquots. When radioactive elements are present, additional concerns (such as meeting safety guidelines and ALARA principles) must be addressed. This report describes a modification to a GFAAS that provides additional containment of vaporized sample aliquots. The modification was found to increase containment by a factor of 80, given expected operating conditions. The use of the modification allows more mixed-waste samples to be analyzed, permits higher levels of radioactive samples to be analyzed, or exposes the analyst to less airborne radioactivity. The containment apparatus was attached to a Perkin-Elmer Zeeman 5000 spectrophotometer for analysis of mixed-waste samples; however, it could also be used on other systems and in other applications where greater containment of vaporized material is desired.

Bass, D.A.; TenKate, L.B.; Wroblewski, A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Evaluation of replacement thread lubricants for red lead and graphite in mineral oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eight commercially available thread lubricants were evaluated to determine the best replacement for Red Lead and Graphite in Mineral Oil (RLGMO). The evaluation included coefficient of friction testing, high temperature anti-seizing testing, room temperature anti-galling testing, chemical analysis for detrimental impurities, corrosion testing, off-gas testing, and a review of health and environmental factors. The coefficient of friction testing covered a wide variety of factors including stud, nut, and washer materials, sizes, manufacturing methods, surface coatings, surface finishes, applied loads, run-in cycles, and relubrication. Only one lubricant, Dow Corning Molykote P37, met all the criteria established for a replacement lubricant. It has a coefficient of friction range similar to RLGMO. Therefore, it can be substituted directly for RLGMO without changing the currently specified fastener torque values for the sizes, materials and conditions evaluated. Other lubricants did not perform as well as Molykote P37 in one or more test or evaluation categories.

Jungling, T.L.; Rauth, D.R.; Goldberg, D.

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

Synthesis of few layer graphene by direct exfoliation of graphite and a Raman spectroscopic study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The exfoliation of graphene from pristine graphite in a liquid phase was achieved successfully via sonication followed by centrifugation method. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectra of the obtained graphene dispersions at different exfoliation time indicated that the concentration of graphene dispersion increased markedly with increasing exfoliation time. The sheet-like morphology of the exfoliated graphene was revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image. Further, the morphological change in different exfoliation time was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A complete structural and defect characterization was probed using micro-Raman spectroscopic technique. The shape and position of the 2D band of Raman spectra revealed the formation of bilayer to few layer graphene. Also, Raman mapping confirmed the presence of uniformly distributed bilayer graphene sheets on the substrate.

Gayathri, S.; Jayabal, P.; Ramakrishnan, V., E-mail: vr.optics1@gmail.com [Department of Laser Studies, School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai-625021, India. (India); Kottaisamy, M. [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai-625015, India. (India)] [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai-625015, India. (India)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alan Turing and the development of Artificial Intelligence Stephen Muggleton Department of the early work of Alan Turing which pre-dated his paper in Mind [42]. 1.1 Early work of Computing, Imperial College London December 19, 2012 Abstract During the centennial year of his birth Alan

Muggleton, Stephen H.

466

artificial neural net: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

neural net First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 On Combining Artificial Neural Nets CiteSeer...

467

Safety Criteria and Safety Lifecycle for Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Criteria and Safety Lifecycle for Artificial Neural Networks Zeshan Kurd, Tim Kelly and Jim performance based techniques that aim to improve the safety of neural networks for safety critical applications. However, many of these techniques provide inadequate forms of safety arguments required

Kelly, Tim

468

Safety Lifecycle for Developing Safety Critical Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Lifecycle for Developing Safety Critical Artificial Neural Networks Zeshan Kurd, Tim Kelly. There are many techniques that aim to improve the performance of neural networks for safety-critical systems. Consequently, their role in safety-critical applications, if any, is typically restricted to advisory systems

Kelly, Tim

469

artificially structured materials: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

artificially structured materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Vector Symbolic...

470

artificial implantation materials: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

artificial implantation materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 "In Vivo" Pose...

471

artificial organ materials: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

artificial organ materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Deformable Organisms: An...

472

artificial restriction dna: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0.5 ul 10X buffer 4 ul dH2O mix well add 1 ul to digest and mix well; place digest on wet ice until 31 Artificial Forms CiteSeer Summary: Using results from the simulation of...

473

artificial martian regolith: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

artificial martian regolith First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Water in the Martian...

474

Self-assembling DNA templates for programmed artificial biomineralization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-assembling DNA templates for programmed artificial biomineralization Enrique C. Samano created via engineered DNA self-assembly represent an important new class of soft matter. These assemblies nanostructures Our current ability to create complex DNA nanostructures via designed self- assembly owes much

Finkelstein, Gleb

475

Visually-Guided Robot Navigation: From Artificial To Natural Landmarks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visually-Guided Robot Navigation: From Artificial To Natural Landmarks Enric Celaya, Jose-Luis Albarral, Pablo Jim´enez, and Carme Torras Institut de Rob`otica i Inform`atica Industrial (CSIC seems to be the fast detection of reliable visual references in the image stream as the robot moves

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

476

NEST Scientific Report 2007-2009 Graphene and artificial graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEST Scientific Report 2007-2009 Graphene 43 Graphene and artificial graphene T his area-layer graphene behave like massless fermions. Graphene is a first remarkable and clean example of the impact of a potential with honeycomb structure on the electronic states and dynamics. In graphene the crystalline

Abbondandolo, Alberto

477

THE EFFECT OF ARTIFICIALLY REDUCING THE SIZE OF INDUCTORS IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

damped using a capacitance modi¯ed shunt circuit. Keywords: Dampers, Passive Compensation, Vibration of the piezoelectric transducer, creates a damped electrical resonance, equivalent to that of a tuned vibrationalTHE EFFECT OF ARTIFICIALLY REDUCING THE SIZE OF INDUCTORS IN PIEZOELECTRIC SHUNT DAMPING CIRCUITS 1

Fleming, Andrew J.

478

To appear, Artificial Intelligence, 1995 Abduction as Belief Revision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To appear, Artificial Intelligence, 1995 Abduction as Belief Revision Craig Boutilier and Ver, V6T 1Z4 email: cebly@cs.ubc.ca, becher@cs.ubc.ca Abstract We propose a model of abduction based the generality of our approach, we reconstruct two of the key paradigms for model-based diagnosis, abductive

Boutilier, Craig

479

Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Using artificial neural networks to predict the quality and performance of oilfield cements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inherent batch to batch variability, ageing and contamination are major factors contributing to variability in oilfield cement slurry performance. Of particular concern are problems encountered when a slurry is formulated with one cement sample and used with a batch having different properties. Such variability imposes a heavy burden on performance testing and is often a major factor in operational failure. We describe methods which allow the identification, characterization and prediction of the variability of oilfield cements. Our approach involves predicting cement compositions, particle size distributions and thickening time curves from the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrum of neat cement powders. Predictions make use of artificial neural networks. Slurry formulation thickening times can be predicted with uncertainties of less than {+-}10%. Composition and particle size distributions can be predicted with uncertainties a little greater than measurement error but general trends and differences between cements can be determined reliably. Our research shows that many key cement properties are captured within the Fourier transform infrared spectra of cement powders and can be predicted from these spectra using suitable neural network techniques. Several case studies are given to emphasize the use of these techniques which provide the basis for a valuable quality control tool now finding commercial use in the oilfield.

Coveney, P.V.; Hughes, T.L. [Schlumberger Cambridge Research Ltd., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Fletcher, P. [Schlumberger Dowell, Skene, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "artificial graphite suitable" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Peroxidase activity of perennial ryegrass and tall fescue seedlings artificially infected with endophytes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with endophytes Walid Naffaaa Catherine Ravelb Nicole Boyer' Jean-Jacques Guillaumina a Unité de pathologie. The peroxidase activity of tall fescue cv. Clarine artificially infected with Neotyphodium coenophialum or with e-endophytes ryegrass cv. Vigor artificially infected with different e-endophytes. In contrast, artificial infection

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

482

2006 Nature Publishing Group Artificial `spin ice' in a geometrically frustrated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2006 Nature Publishing Group Artificial `spin ice' in a geometrically frustrated lattice positions in frozen water3­6 . Here we report an artificial geometrically frus- trated magnet based is strikingly similar to the low-temperature state of spin ice. These results demonstrate that artificial

Chandra, Premi

483

in: Third German Workshop on Artificial Life C. Wilke and S. Altmeyer and T. Martinetz, Editors,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in: Third German Workshop on Artificial Life C. Wilke and S. Altmeyer and T. Martinetz, Editors, pp chemistry provides an abstract model for a complex chemical system which consists of a potentially infinite is an artificial system, which is similar to a chemical system. Bagley and Farmer write in [1]: An artificial

Dittrich, Peter

484

Testing of Safety-Critical Software Embedded in an Artificial Heart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing of Safety-Critical Software Embedded in an Artificial Heart Sungdeok Cha1 , Sehun Jeong1 frequently to control medical devices such as artificial heart or robotic surgery system. While much (KAOC). It is a state-of-the-art artificial heart which completed animal testing phase. We per- formed

485

Artificial Intelligence 58 (1992) 3-20 3 The logic of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial Intelligence 58 (1992) 3-20 3 Elsevier ARTINT 948 The logic of satisfaction constraint, Canada V6T 1W5 Abstract Mackworth, A.K., The logic of constraint satisfaction, Artificial Intelligence 58 Artificial Intelligence and related areas. The finite CSP (FCSP) framework is presented here as a restricted

Mackworth, Alan K.

486

Development of a Habitat Suitability Index Model for the Sage Sparrow on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mitigation threshold guidelines for the Hanford Site are based on habitat requirements of the sage sparrow (Amphispiza belli) and only apply to areas with a mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) overstory and a native understory. The sage sparrow habitat requirements are based on literature values and are not specific to the Hanford Site. To refine these guidelines for the Site, a multi-year study was undertaken to quantify habitat characteristics of sage sparrow territories. These characteristics were then used to develop a habitat suitability index (HSI) model which can be used to estimate the habitat value of specific locations on the Site.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Simmons, Mary Ann; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Becker, James M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Evaluation of Suitability of Selected Set of Coal Plant Sites for Repowering with Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the approach that ORNL developed for screening a sample set of small coal stations for possible repowering with SMRs; the methodology employed, including spatial modeling; and initial results for these sample plants. The objective in conducting this type of siting evaluation is to demonstrate the capability to characterize specific sample coal plant sites to identify any particular issues associated with repowering existing coal stations with SMRs using OR-SAGE; it is not intended to be a definitive assessment per se as to the absolute suitability of any particular site.

Belles, Randy [ORNL; Copinger, Donald A [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

An electrochemical method suitable for preparing nine metal-nitride powders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an electrochemical method that is suitable for the preparation of metal-nitride ceramic materials that is both simple and general. We begin with a single-compartment electrochemical cell containing suitable metal (M) anodes and cathodes (M=Al, Mo, Nb, Ni, Ti, V, W, Zn, or Zr) and a NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X (X=Br or Cl) electrolyte solution. Application of a sufficiently high voltage results in oxidation and dissolution of M to M{sup n+} at the anode and reduction of NH{sub 3} to NH{sub 2}- at the cathode. When M=Al, this results in formation of an insoluble inorganic polymer, which can subsequently be calcined above 600{degrees}C to yield phase-pure AlN. For some of the other metals, a simple ammoniated metal ion is formed at the anode, but calcination of this material also leads to the corresponding metal nitride. The phases and morphologies of the powders depends strongly on the calcining conditions. The important point is that this method is general for the preparation of metal-nitride powders even though the pathway that leads to the powders is metal-dependent. This talk will focus primarily on the preparation of AlN, which is an important packaging material for the electronics industry, and NbN, which is a superconductor (T{sub c}{approximately}17 K) with important technological applications.

Wade, T.; Crooks, R.M. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

489

An artificial neural network controller for intelligent transportation systems applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control (AICC) has been designed using a feedforward artificial neural network, as an example for utilizing artificial neural networks for nonlinear control problems arising in intelligent transportation systems applications. The AICC is based on a simple nonlinear model of the vehicle dynamics. A Neural Network Controller (NNC) code developed at Argonne National Laboratory to control discrete dynamical systems was used for this purpose. In order to test the NNC, an AICC-simulator containing graphical displays was developed for a system of two vehicles driving in a single lane. Two simulation cases are shown, one involving a lead vehicle with constant velocity and the other a lead vehicle with varying acceleration. More realistic vehicle dynamic models will be considered in future work.

Vitela, J.E.; Hanebutte, U.R.; Reifman, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Analysis Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Measurement of the Young's modulus and internal friction of single crystal and polycrystalline copper, and copper-graphite composites as a function of temperature and orientation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEASUREMENT OF THE YOUNG'S MODULUS AND INTERNAL FRICTION OF SINGLE CRYSTAL AND POLYCRYSTALLINE COPPER, AND COPPER- GRAPHITE COMPOSITES AS A FUNCTION OF TEMPERATURE AND ORIENTATION A Thesis by S teven Norman Wicks trom Submitted... AND POLYCRYSTALLINE COPPER, AND COPPER- GRAPHITE COMPOSITES AS A FUNCTION OF TEMPERATURE AND ORIENTATION A Thesis by Steven Norman Wickstrom Approved as to style and content by: A(J ~a Alan Wolfenden (Chairman of Committee) Don E. Bray (Member) Donald G...

Wickstrom, Steven Norman

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Encapsulating the meta-level knowledge in distributed artificial intelligence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solving process and resiliency and decentralized control to the distributed system as a whole. This capability extends distributed artificial intelligence techniques to a much broader range of application domains. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS As everyone who has... and methodologies are evolving that reduce the time and efFort in the development of production quality expert systems. Methods of knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, inferencing, learn- ing, and a host of other non-traditional means of' computation...

Underbrink, Alvin Joseph

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Intentionality, Artificial Intelligence and the Causal Powers of the Brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intentionality, Artificial Intelligence and the Causal Powers of the Brain Jeffrey M. Whitmer Northern Illinois University It seems to be a common belief that in the future, if not in the present, digital computers are going to be capable... of cognitive states, experiences, and con­ sciousness equal in every respect to that which exists in human beings. 1 Not everyone, however, is so optimistic. One such skeptic is John Searle and his "Minds, Brains, and Programs" 2 represents a direct con...

Whitmer, Jeffrey M.

493

Chaos and Nonlinear Dynamics in a Quantum Artificial Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chaos and nonlinear economic dynamics are addressed for a quantum coupled map lattice model of an artificial economy, with quantized supply and demand equilibrium conditions. The measure theoretic properties and the patterns that emerge in both the economic business volume dynamics' diagrams as well as in the quantum mean field averages are addressed and conclusions are drawn in regards to the application of quantum chaos theory to address signatures of chaotic dynamics in relevant discrete economic state variables.

Carlos Pedro Gonçalves

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

494

EFFECTS OF GRAPHITE SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON BYPASS FLOW COMPUTATIONS FOR AN HTGR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) occurs between graphite blocks as they sit side by side in the core. Bypass flow is not intentionally designed to occur in the reactor, but is present because of tolerances in manufacture, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. It is desired to increase the knowledge of the effects of such flow, which has been estimated to be as much as 20% of the total helium coolant flow. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations can provide estimates of the scale and impacts of bypass flow. Previous CFD calculations have examined the effects of bypass gap width, level and distribution of heat generation and effects of shrinkage. The present contribution examines the effects of graphite surface roughness on the bypass flow for different relative roughness factors on three gap widths. Such calculations should be validated using specific bypass flow measurements. While such experiments are currently underway for the specific reference prismatic HTGR design for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) program of the U. S. Dept. of Energy, the data are not yet available. To enhance confidence in the present calculations, wall shear stress and heat transfer results for several turbulence models and their associated wall treatments are first compared for flow in a single tube that is representative of a coolant channel in the prismatic HTGR core. The results are compared to published correlations for wall shear stress and Nusselt number in turbulent pipe flow. Turbulence models that perform well are then used to make bypass flow calculations in a symmetric onetwelfth sector of a prismatic block that includes bypass flow. The comparison of shear stress and Nusselt number results with published correlations constitutes a partial validation of the CFD model. Calculations are also compared to ones made previously using a different CFD code. Results indicate that increasing surface roughness increases the maximum fuel and helium temperatures as do increases in gap width. However, maximum coolant temperature variation due to increased gap width is not changed by surface roughness.

Rich Johnson; Yu-Hsin Tung; Hiroyuki Sato

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Functionalization/passivation of porous graphitic carbon with di-tert-amylperoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porous graphitic carbon (PGC) particles were functionalized/passivated in situ in packed beds at elevated temperature with neat di-tert-amylperoxide (DTAP) in a column oven. The performance of these particles for high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was assayed before and after this chemistry with the following analytes: benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, n-propyl benzene, n-butyl benzene, p-xylene, phenol, 4-methylphenol, phenetole, 3,5-xylenol, and anisole. After the first functionalization/passivation, the retention factors, k, of these compounds decreased by about 5% and the number of theoretical plates (N) increased by ca. 15%. These values of k then remained roughly constant after a second functionalization/ passivation but a further increase in N was noticed. In addition, after each of the reactions, the peak asymmetries decreased by ca. 15%, for a total of ca. 30%. The columns were then subjected twice to methanol at 100 C for 5 h at 1 mL/min. After these stability tests, the values of k remained roughly constant, the number of plates increased, which is favorable, and the asymmetries rose and then declined, where they remained below the initial values for the unfunctionalized columns. Functionalized and unfunctionalized particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and BET measurements, which showed no difference between the functionalized and unfunctionalized materials, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), where ToF-SIMS suggested some chemical differences between the functionalized and unfunctionalized materials. In particular ToF-SIMS suggested that the expected five-carbon fragments from DTAP exist at higher concentrations on DTAP-functionalized PGC. First principle calculations on model graphitic surfaces suggest that the first addition of a DTAP radical to the surface proceeds in an approximately isothermal or slightly favorable fashion, but that subsequent DTAP additions are then increasingly thermodynamically favorable. Thus, this analysis suggests that the direct functionalization/passivation of PGC with DTAP is plausible. Chemometric analyses of the chromatographic and ToF-SIMS data are also presented.

Jensen, David S.; Gupta, Vipul; Olsen, Rebecca E.; Miller, Alex T.; Davis, Robert C.; Ess, Daniel; Zhu, Zihua; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Linford, Matthew R.

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

496

Final Report: Use of Graphite Foam as a Thermal Performance Enhancement of Heavy Hybrid Propulsion Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's graphite foam has the potential to be used as a heat exchanger for the Army's Future Combat System Manned Ground Vehicle and thus has the potential to improve its thermal performance. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program FLOW3D was used to develop a new CFD model for the graphite foam to be used in the development of a proper heat exchanger. The program was calibrated by first measuring the properties of the solid foams and determining the parameters to be used in the CFD model. Then the model was used to predict within 5% error the performance of finned foam heat sinks. In addition, the f factors and j factors commonly used to predict pressure drop and heat transfer were calculated for both the solid and finned structures. There was some evidence that corrugating the foams would yield higher j/f ratios than state of the art heat exchangers, confirming previously measured data. Because the results show that the CFD model was validated, it is recommended that the funding for Phases 2 through 5 be approved for the design of both the finned heat exchanger using tubes and round fin structures and the solid foam design using corrugated foams. It was found that the new CFD model using FLOW3D can predict both solid foam heat transfer and finned foam heat transfer with the validated model parameters. In addition, it was found that the finned foam structures exhibited j/f ratios that indicate that significant heat transfer is occurring within the fin structures due to aerodynamically induced flow, which is not present in solid aluminum fin structures. It is possible that the foam surfaces can act as turbulators that increase heat transfer without affecting pressure drop, like the vortex generators seen in state of the art heat exchangers. These numbers indicate that the foam can be engineered into an excellent heat exchanger. It was also found that corrugating the solid foams would increase the j/f ratio dramatically, allowing the solid foams to compete directly with standard heat exchangers. Although corrugated L1 foam samples have not been produced (attempts are under way), it is possible that their j/f ratio can be even higher than those of the finned structures.

Klett, James William [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Phonon lifetime in SiSn and its suitability for hot-carrier solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a phononic and electronic study of SiSn in the zinc-blende phase. A detailed description of the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon decay in a three-phonon process is presented together with the corresponding lifetime. The necessity to go beyond the zone center phonon approximation in this case is highlighted as it reveals a steep dependence of the lifetime on the initial phonon wavenumber, which differs from usual semiconductors. The electronic band structure is calculated within the GW formalism and shows a small direct band gap. It is shown that the LO-phonon resulting from electron cooling has a lifetime four to eight orders of magnitude above all the known value in semiconductors for this process. We finally show the suitability of SiSn for hot-carrier solar cells, as it is endowed with ultra-slow cooling of hot carriers.

Levard, Hugo; Laribi, Sana; Guillemoles, Jean-François [Institute for Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), UMR 7174, EDF R and D/CNRS/Chimie ParisTech, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France)

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

498

B{sub 4}C-SiC reaction-sintered coatings on graphite plasma facing components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron carbide plus silicon carbide (B{sub 4}C-SiC) reaction-sintered coatings for use on graphite plasma-facing components were developed. Such coatings are of interest in TEXTOR tokamak limiter-plasma interactions as a means of reducing carbon erosion, of providing a preferred release of boron for oxygen gettering, and of investigating silicon`s effect on radiative edge phenomena. Specimens evaluated had (a) either Ringsdorfwerke EK 98 graphite or Le Carbon Lorraine felt-type AEROLOR A05 CFC substrates; (b) multiphase coatings, comprised of B{sub 4}C, Sic, and graphite; (c) nominal coating compositions of 69 wt.-% B{sub 4}C + 31 wt.-% SiC; and (d) nominal coating thicknesses between 250 and 775 {mu}m. Coated coupons were evaluated by high heat flux experiments in the JUDITH (electron beam) test facility at KFA. Simulated disruptions, with energy densities up to 10 MJm{sup {minus}2}, and normal operation simulations, with power densities up to 12 MWm{sup {minus}2}, were conducted. The coatings remained adherent; at the highest levels tested, minor changes occurred, including localized remelting, modification of the crystallographic phases, occasional microcracking, and erosion.

Valentine, P.G.; Trester, P.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Winter, J. [Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH (Germany)] [and others

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Experimental Study of the Effect of Graphite Dispersion on the Heat Transfer Phenomena in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental activity was performed to observe and study the effects of graphite dispersion and deposition on thermal-hydraulic phenomena in a reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS). The small-scale RCCS experimental facility (16.5 x 16.5 x 30.4 cm) used for this activity represents half of the reactor cavity with an electrically heated vessel. Water flowing through five vertical pipes removes the heat produced in the vessel and releases it into the environment by mixing with cold water in a large tank. The particle image velocimetry technique was used to study the velocity field of the air inside the cavity. A set of 52 thermocouples was installed in the facility to monitor the temperature profiles of the vessel, pipe walls, and air. Ten grams of a fine graphite powder (average particle size 2 m) was injected into the cavity through a spraying nozzle placed at the bottom of the vessel. The temperatures and air velocity field were recorded and compared with the measurements obtained before the graphite dispersion, showing a decrease of the temperature surfaces that was related to an increase in their emissivity. The results contribute to the understanding of RCCS capability in an accident scenario.

Rodolfo Vaghetto; Luigi Capone; Yassin A. Hassan

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

500

Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a final report of the DOE award DE-SC0001132, Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation. This document describes the achievements of the goals, and resulting research made possible by this award.

Saffer, Shelley (Sam) I.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z