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1

Beam cooling: Principles and achievements  

SciTech Connect

After a discussion of Liouville's theorem, and its implications for beam cooling, a brief description is given of each of the various methods of beam cooling: stochastic, electron, radiation, laser, ionization, etc. For each, we present the type of particle for which it is appropriate, its range of applicability, and the currently achieved degree of cooling. For each method we also discuss the present applications and, also, possible future developments and further applications.

Mohl, Dieter; Sessler, Andrew M.

2003-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

SUMMARY OF BEAM COOLING AND INTRABEAM SCATTERING.  

SciTech Connect

For heavy-particle beams in storage rings where there is no significant synchrotron radiation damping, beam cooling is an essential tool in obtaining high phase-space density high brightness beams. Advances in various types of cooling such as electron, stochastic, laser and muon cooling are covered in dedicated Conferences. In this series of Workshops (HB2002-06), discussions are aimed only at a few specific subjects which are crucial for future projects. The discussion topics in our session closely followed those discussed during the HB2004 workshop [1]. Specifically, we concentrated on the topics of electron cooling and intrabeam scattering, motivated by the design of the future high-energy coolers [2,3,4]. These cooling projects at high-energy require accurate numerical modeling and experimental verification. A variety of tasks were put together at HB2004 [1]. In our working group we discussed a progress in addressing these tasks. We had 10 presentations [5]-[14] (with additional presentations in the joint sessions) which followed by dedicated discussions. Our main topics of discussions: intrabeam scattering (IBS), electron cooling, and beam stability are summarized.

FEDOTOV, A.V.; MESHKOV, I.N.; WEI, J.

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight new ideas are being developed under SBIR/STTR grants to cool muon beams for colliders, neutrino factories, and muon experiments. Analytical and simulation studies have confirmed that a six-dimensional (6D) cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas can provide effective beam cooling. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and helical sextupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange and achieve 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m segment. Four such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse physical dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost five orders of magnitude. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, then can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that can be used as MANX, an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

Rolland P. Johnson; Mohammad Alsharo'a; Charles Ankenbrandt; Emanuela Barzi; Kevin Beard; S. Alex Bogacz; Yaroslav Derbenev; Licia Del Frate; Ivan Gonin; Pierrick M. Hanlet; Robert Hartline; Daniel M. Kaplan; Moyses Kuchnir; Alfred Moretti; David Neuffer; Kevin Paul; Milorad Popovic; Thomas J. Roberts; Gennady Romanov; Daniele Turrioni; Victor Yarba; and Katsuya Yonehara

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Integrals for IBS and beam cooling  

SciTech Connect

Simulation of beam cooling usually requires performing certain integral transformations every time step or so, which is a significant burden on the CPU. Examples are the dispersion integrals (Hilbert transforms) in the stochastic cooling, wake fields and IBS integrals. An original method is suggested for fast and sufficiently accurate computation of the integrals. This method is applied for the dispersion integral. Some methodical aspects of the IBS analysis are discussed.

Burov, A.; /Fermilab

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Hydrogen Cryostat for Muon Beam Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project was to develop cryostat designs that could be used for muon beam cooling channels where hydrogen would circulate through refrigerators and the beam-cooling channel to simultaneously refrigerate 1) high-temperature-superconductor (HTS) magnet coils, 2) cold copper RF cavities, and 3) the hydrogen that is heated by the muon beam. In an application where a large amount of hydrogen is naturally present because it is the optimum ionization cooling material, it was reasonable to explore its use with HTS magnets and cold, but not superconducting, RF cavities. In this project we developed computer programs for simulations and analysis and conducted experimental programs to examine the parameters and technological limitations of the materials and designs of Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) components (magnet conductor, RF cavities, absorber windows, heat transport, energy absorber, and refrigerant).The project showed that although a hydrogen cryostat is not the optimum solution for muon ionization cooling channels, the studies of the cooling channel components that define the cryostat requirements led to fundamental advances. In particular, two new lines of promising development were opened up, regarding very high field HTS magnets and the HS concept, that have led to new proposals and funded projects.

Johnson, Rolland P.

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

The state of the art in hadron beam cooling  

SciTech Connect

Cooling of hadron beams (including heavy-ions) is a powerful technique by which accelerator facilities around the world achieve the necessary beam brightness for their physics research. In this paper, we will give an overview of the latest developments in hadron beam cooling, for which high energy electron cooling at Fermilab's Recycler ring and bunched beam stochastic cooling at Brookhaven National Laboratory's RHIC facility represent two recent major accomplishments. Novel ideas in the field will also be introduced.

Prost, L.R.; Derwent, P.; /Fermilab

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design  

SciTech Connect

The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Towards demonstration of electron cooling with bunched electron beam  

SciTech Connect

All electron cooling systems which were in operation so far employed electron beam generated with an electrostatic electron gun in DC operating mode, immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field. At low energies magnetic field is also being used to transport electron beam through the cooling section from the gun to the collector. At higher energies (few MeV), it was shown that one can have simpler electron beam transport without continuous magnetic field. Because of a rather weak magnetic field on the cathode and in the cooling section the latter approach was referred to as 'non-magnetized cooling', since there was no suppression of the transverse angular spread of the electron beam with the magnetic field in the cooling section. Such a cooler successfully operated at FNAL (2005-11) at electron beam energy of 4.3 MeV. Providing cooling at even higher energies would be easier with RF acceleration of electron beam, and thus using bunched electron beam for cooling. Significant efforts were devoted to explore various aspects of such bunched electron beam cooling as part of R and D of high-energy electron cooling for RHIC. However, experimental studies of such cooling are still lacking. Establishing this technique experimentally would be extremely useful for future high-energy applications. Presently there is an ongoing effort to build Proof-of-Principle (PoP) experiment of Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) at RHIC, which promises to be superior to conventional electron cooling for high energies. Since the CEC experiment is based on bunched electron beam and it has sections where electron beam co-propagates with the ion beam at the same velocity, it also provides a unique opportunity to explore experimentally conventional electron cooling but for the first time with a bunched electron beam. As a result, it allows us to explore techniques needed for the high-energy electron cooling such as 'painting' with a short electron beam and control of ion beam distribution under cooling which is essential if cooling is provided in a collider. The software needed for comparison with the experiments is already developed as part of the previous high-energy electron cooling studies for RHIC. Since electron beam will be non-magnetized and there will be no magnetic field in the cooling section it will be also a first demonstration of fully non-magnetized cooling. The purpose of these studies was to explore whether we would be able to observe conventional electron cooling with parameters expected in the CEC PoP experiment. Below we summarize requirements on electron beam and cooling section needed for such demonstration.

Fedotov, A.

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

9

Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are disclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. 6 figs.

Lamartine, B.C.; Stutz, R.A.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Use of an Electron Beam for Stochastic Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave instability of an electron beam can be used for a multiple increase in the collective response for the perturbation caused by a particle of a co-moving ion beam, i.e. for enhancement of friction force in electron cooling method. The low scale (hundreds GHz and higher frequency range) space charge or FEL type instabilities can be produced (depending on conditions) by introducing an alternating magnetic fields along the electron beam path. Beams’ optics and noise conditioning for obtaining a maximal cooling effect and related limitations will be discussed. The method promises to increase by a few orders of magnitude the cooling rate for heavy particle beams with a large emittance for a wide energy range with respect to either electron and conventional stochastic cooling.

Yaroslave Derbenev

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

11

Transverse laser cooling of a thermal atomic beam of dysprosium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermal atomic beam of dysprosium (Dy) atoms is cooled using the $4f^{10}6s^2(J=8) \\to 4f^{10}6s6p (J=9)$ transition at 421 nm. The cooling is done via a standing light wave orthogonal to the atomic beam. Efficient transverse cooling to a temperature of $\\sim$ 22 mK is demonstrated for all stable isotopes of dysprosium. Branching ratios to metastable states are demonstrated to be $cooling is proposed as well as a method for direct identification of possible trap states.

Leefer, N; Gerber-Siff, B; Sharma, Arijit; Torgerson, J R; Budker, D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Influence of electron beam parameters on coherent electron cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coherent electron cooling (CeC) promises to revolutionize the cooling of high energy hadron beams. The intricate dynamics of the CeC depends both on the local density and energy distribution of the beam. The variations of the local density (beam current) are inevitable in any realistic beam. Hence, in this paper we propose a novel method of beam conditioning. The conditioning provides compensation of effect from such variation by a correlated energy modulation. We use our analytical FEL model for an electron bunch with Gaussian line charge density and cosine-type energy variation along bunch. We analyze the phase variation between the electron density modulation at the exit of the FEL-amplifier and the ions inducing it in the modulator as a function of the peak current and the electron beam energy. Based on this analysis, electron bunch parameters for optimal CeC cooling are found numerically.

Wang G.; Hao, Y.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics should allow an order of magnitude smaller final equilibrium transverse beam emittances than conventional ionization cooling alone. In this scheme, a half-integer parametric resonance is induced in a cooling channel causing the beam to be naturally focused with the period of the channel?s free oscillations. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points then cool the beam?s angular divergence through the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. A special continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion was developed for PIC. We present the results of modeling PIC in such a channel using GEANT4/ G4beamline. We discuss the challenge of precise beam aberration control from one absorber to another over a wide angular spread.

V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, B. Erdelyi, J.A. Maloney

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Advances in Beam Cooling for Muon Colliders  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas is the basis for the latest plans for muon colliders. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields, where emittance exchange is achieved by using a continuous homogeneous absorber. Momentum-dependent path length differences in the dense hydrogen energy absorber provide the required correlation between momentum and ionization loss to accomplish longitudinal cooling. Recent studies of an 800 MHz RF cavity pressurized with hydrogen, as would be used in this application, show that the maximum gradient is not limited by a large external magnetic field, unlike vacuum cavities. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, will be employed to further reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that is being developed for an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment. The status of the designs, simulations, and tests of the cooling components for a high luminosity, low emittance muon collider will be reviewed.

R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Parametric-resonance ionization cooling of muon beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics should allow an order of magnitude smaller final equilibrium transverse beam emittances than conventional ionization cooling alone. In this scheme, a half-integer parametric resonance is induced in a cooling channel causing the beam to be naturally focused with the period of the channel's free oscillations. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points then cool the beam's angular divergence through the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. A special continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion was developed for PIC. We present the results of modeling PIC in such a channel using GEANT4/G4beamline. We discuss the challenge of precise beam aberration control from one absorber to another over a wide angular spread.

Morozov, V. S.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Afanasev, A.; Johnson, R. P.; Erdelyi, B.; Maloney, J. A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States) and George Washington University, Washington, D.C. 20052 (United States); Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

MANX, a 6-D Muon Beam Cooling Experiment for RAL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MANX is a six-dimensional muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment based on the concept of a helical cooling channel in which a beam of muons loses energy in a continuous helium or hydrogen absorber while passing through a special superconducting magnet called a helical solenoid. The goals of the experiment include tests of the theory of the helical cooling channel and the helical solenoid implementation of it, verification of the simulation programs, and a demonstration of effective six-dimensional cooling of a muon beam. We report the status of the experiment and in particular, the proposal to have MANX follow MICE at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) as an extension of the MICE experimental program. We describe the economies of such an approach which allow the MICE beam line and much of the MICE apparatus and expertise to be reused.

Yonehara, K.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab; Abrams, R.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Johnson, R.P.; Kahn, S.; /Muons Inc., Batavia; Maloney, J.; /Northern Illinois U.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Optics for Phase Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The realization of a muon collider requires a reduction of the 6D normalized emittance of an initially generated muon beam by a factor of more than 106. Analytical and simulation studies of 6D muon beam ionization cooling in a helical channel filled with pressurized gas or liquid hydrogen absorber indicate that a factor of 106 is possible. Further reduction of the normalized 4D transverse emittance by an additional two orders of magnitude is envisioned using Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC). To realize the phase shrinkage effect in the parametric resonance method, one needs to design a focusing channel free of chromatic and spherical aberrations. We report results of our study of a concept of an aberration-free wiggler transport line with an alternating dispersion function. Resonant beam focusing at thin beryllium wedge absorber plates positioned near zero dispersion points then provides the predicted PIC effect.

R.P. Johnson; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

19

Effects of e-beam parameters on coherent electron cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) requires detailed control of the phase between the hadron an the FEL-amplified wave packet. This phase depends on local electron beam parameters such as the energy spread and the peak current. In this paper, we examine the effects of local density variations on the cooling rates for CeC. Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) [1] is a new concept in intense, high energy hadron beamcooling, in which the Debye screened charge perturbation calculated in [2] is used to seed a high-gain free electron laser (FEL). Using delays to give the perturbing hadron an energy-dependent longitudinal displacement relative to its frequencymodulated charge perturbation, the hadron receives an energy-dependent kick which reduces its energy variation from the design energy. The equations of motion in [1] assume that the electron bunch is the same physical size as the hadron bunch, and has a homogeneous charge density across the entire bunch. In practice, the electron bunches will be much shorter than the hadron bunch, and this local spacial inhomogeneity in the charge distribution will alter the gain length of the FEL, resulting in both a change in the amplification of the initial signal and a phase shift. In this paper we consider these inhomogeneity effects, determining cooling equations for bunched beam CeC consistent with these effects and determining thresholds for the cooling parameters.

Webb, S.D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Wang, G.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

20

Doped H(2)-Filled RF Cavities for Muon Beam Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

RF cavities pressurized with hydrogen gas may provide effective muon beam ionization cooling needed for muon colliders. Recent 805 MHz test cell studies reported below include the first use of SF{sub 6} dopant to reduce the effects of the electrons that will be produced by the ionization cooling process in hydrogen or helium. Measurements of maximum gradient in the Paschen region are compared to a simulation model for a 0.01% SF{sub 6} doping of hydrogen. The observed good agreement of the model with the measurements is a prerequisite to the investigation of other dopants.

Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; /Fermilab; Alsharo'a, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia; Rose, D.V.; /Voss Sci., Albuquerque

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Stochastic cooling of bunched beams from fluctuation and kinetic theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical formalism for stochastic phase-space cooling of bunched beams in storage rings is developed on the dual basis of classical fluctuation theory and kinetic theory of many-body systems in phase-space. The physics is that of a collection of three-dimensional oscillators coupled via retarded nonconservative interactions determined by an electronic feedback loop. At the heart of the formulation is the existence of several disparate time-scales characterizing the cooling process. Both theoretical approaches describe the cooling process in the form of a Fokker-Planck transport equation in phase-space valid up to second order in the strength and first order in the auto-correlation of the cooling signal. With neglect of the collective correlations induced by the feedback loop, identical expressions are obtained in both cases for the coherent damping and Schottky noise diffusion coefficients. These are expressed in terms of Fourier coefficients in a harmonic decomposition in angle of the generalized nonconservative cooling force written in canonical action-angle variables of the particles in six-dimensional phase-space. Comparison of analytic results to a numerical simulation study with 90 pseudo-particles in a model cooling system is presented.

Chattopadhyay, S.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

SIMULATION STUDY OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL LASER COOLING SCHEMES FOR FAST STORED BEAMS  

SciTech Connect

Molecular dynamics (MD) approach is employed to study laser cooling of fast circulating beams in a storage ring. The authors compare several three-dimensional (3D) cooling methods, examining achievable minimum beam temperature. In particular, the stress is put upon the three coupling schemes, i.e. the dispersion-coupling scheme, the coupling-cavity scheme, and the tapered cooling scheme. The authors show that beam temperatures much lower than the currently achievable level could be reached with these schemes.

KIHARA,T.; OKAMOTO,H.; IWASHITA,Y.; OIDE,K.; LAMANNA,G.; WEI,J.

1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

23

Laser-Cooled Lithium Atoms: A New Source for Focused Ion Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser-Cooled Lithium Atoms: A New Source for Focused Ion Beams P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Jabez Mc E N T S Designed and constructed a laser-cooled, magneto-optical trap-based lithium ion source mounted on a commercial focused ion beam system, creating the world's first lithium ion microscope

Magee, Joseph W.

24

Ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromill and articles therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are disclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. 6 figs.

Lamartine, B.C.; Stutz, R.A.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Low-energy ionization cooling of ions for beta beam sources  

SciTech Connect

Rubbia et al.[1] have recently suggested that multiturn passage of a low-energy ion beam (v/c {approx_equal} 0.1) through a low-Z target can be used in the production of ions useable for beta-beam sources and that ionization cooling techniques can increase the circulating beam lifetime and thus enhance that production. Some parameters in their initial discussion are somewhat optimistic, and the conditions for 3-D cooling are not completely developed. In the present paper we reconsider some features of the scenarios and suggest some variations that may be more practical. While 3-D cooling is possible at these energies, mixing of longitudinal motion with both horizontal and vertical motion is necessary to obtain simultaneous cooling in all dimensions; we suggest lattice variations that would be needed. Direct and reverse kinematics are described and explored.

Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cooling and squeezing the fluctuations of a nanomechanical beam by indirect quantum feedback control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study cooling and squeezing the fluctuations of a nanomechanical beam using quantum feedback control. In our model, the nanomechanical beam is coupled to a transmission line resonator via a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The leakage of the electromagnetic field from the transmission line resonator is measured using homodyne detection. This measured signal is then used to design a quantum-feedback-control signal to drive the electromagnetic field in the transmission line resonator. Although the control is imposed on the transmission line resonator, this quantum-feedback-control signal indirectly affects the thermal motion of the nanomechanical beam via the inductive beam-resonator coupling, making it possible to cool and squeeze the fluctuations of the beam, allowing it to approach the standard quantum limit.

Jing Zhang; Yu-xi Liu; Franco Nori

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pseudo isothermal ice crystallization kinetics in the gas diffusion Pseudo isothermal ice crystallization kinetics in the gas diffusion layer of a fuel cell from differential scanning calorimetry journal International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer volume year month pages abstract p Non isothermal ice crystallization kinetics in the fibrous gas diffusion layer GDL of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is investigated using differential scanning calorimetry DSC Non isothermal ice crystallization rates and ice crystallization temperatures are obtained from heat flow measurements in a water saturated commercial GDL at cooling rates of and K min Our previously developed isothermal ice crystallization rate expression is extended to non isothermal crystallization to predict ice crystallization kinetics in a GDL at various cooling

28

Six-dimensional muon beam cooling in a continuous, homogeneous, gaseous hydrogen absorber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fast reduction of the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams is required for muon colliders and is also of great importance for neutrino factories based on accelerated muon beams. Ionization cooling, where all momentum components are degraded by an energy absorbing material and only the longitudinal momentum is restored by RF cavities, provides a means to quickly reduce transverse beam sizes. However, the beam momentum spread cannot be reduced by this method unless the longitudinal emittance can be transformed or exchanged into the transverse emittance. The best emittance exchange plans up to now have been accomplished by using magnets to disperse the beam along the face of a wedge-shaped absorber such that higher momentum particles pass through thicker parts of the absorber and thus suffer larger ionization energy loss. In the scheme advocated in this paper, it is noted that one can generate a magnetic channel filled with absorber where higher momentum corresponds to a longer path length and therefore larger ionization energy loss. Thus a homogeneous absorber, without any special edge shaping, can provide the desired emittance exchange. An attractive example of a cooling channel based on this principle involves the use of RF cavities filled with a continuous gaseous hydrogen absorber in a magnetic channel composed of a solenoidal field with superimposed helical transverse dipole, quadrupole, and octupole fields. The theory of this helical channel is described to support the analytical prediction of a million-fold reduction in phase space volume in a channel 150 m long.

Yaroslav Derbenev; Rolland P. Johnson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase change related degradation of catalyst layers in proton Phase change related degradation of catalyst layers in proton exchange membrane fuel cells journal Electrochimica Acta volume year month pages abstract p Understanding and optimizing water and thermal management in the catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells is crucial for performance and durability improvements This is especially the case at low temperatures where liquid water and even ice may exist In this article the durability of a traditional Pt C dispersed and a nanostructure thin film NSTF membrane electrode assembly MEA are examined under wet dry and freeze thaw cycles using both in situ and ex situ experiments Multiple isothermal cold starts result in a performance degradation for the dispersed MEA while no such a degradation is found

30

Thermal fatigue due to beam interruptions in a Lead-Bismuth cooled ATW blanket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal fatigue consequences of frequent accelerator beam interruptions are quantified for both sodium and lead-bismuth cooled blankets in current designs for accelerator transmutation of waste devices. Temperature response was calculated using the SASSYS-1 systems analysis code for an immediate drop in beam current from full power to zero. Coolant temperatures from SASSYS-1 were fed into a multi-node structure temperature calculation to obtain thermal strains for various structural components. Fatigue curves from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code were used to determine the number of cycles that these components could endure, based on these thermal strains. Beam interruption frequency data from a current accelerator were used to estimate design lifetimes for components. Mitigation options for reducing thermal fatigue are discussed.

Dunn, F.

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

AN IONIZATION COOLING CHANNEL FOR MUON BEAMS BASED ON ALTERNATING SOLENOIDS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The muon collider requires intense, cooled muon bunches to reach the required luminosity. Due to the limited life-time of the muon, the cooling process must take place very rapidly. Ionization cooling seems to be our only option, given the large emittances of the muon beam from pion decay. However, this ionization cooling method has been found quite difficult to implement in practice. We describe a scheme based on the use of liquid hydrogen absorbers followed by r.f. cavities (''pillbox'' or ''open iris'' type), embedded in a transport lattice based on high field solenoids. These solenoidal fields are reversed periodically in order to suppress the growth of the canonical angular momentum. This channel has been simulated in detail with independent codes, featuring conventional tracking in e.m. fields and detailed simulation of multiple scattering and straggling in the absorbers and windows. These calculations show that the 15 Tesla lattice cools in 6-D phase space by a factor {approx} 2 over a distance of 20 m.

GALLARDO,J.C.; FERNOW,R.C.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; LEBRUN,P.; MORETTI,A.; TOLLESTRUP,A.T.; KAPLAN,D.M.; FUKUI,Y.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

32

Simulations of a Gas-Filled Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A helical cooling channel (HCC) has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. The HCC is composed of a series of RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas that acts as the energy absorber for ionization cooling and suppresses RF breakdown in the cavities. Magnetic solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole coils outside of the RF cavities provide the focusing and dispersion needed for the emittance exchange for the beam as it follows a helical equilibrium orbit down the HCC. In the work presented here, two Monte Carlo programs have been developed to simulate a HCC to compare with the analytic predictions and to begin the process of optimizing practical designs that could be built in the near future. We discuss the programs, the comparisons with the analytical theory, and the prospects for a HCC design with the capability to reduce the six-dimensional phase space emittance of a muon beam by a factor of over five orders of magnitude in a linear channel less than 100 meters long.

K. Yonehara; D.M. Kaplan; K. Beard; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev; R.P. Johnson; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

33

Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling and Prospects for Muon Colliders  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A six-dimensional(6D)cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas* is used to achieve the small transverse emittances demanded by a high-luminosity muon collider. This helical cooling channel**(HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange. Simulations verify the analytic predictions and have shown a 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m HCC segment. Using three such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost six orders of magnitude. After this, two new post-cooling ideas can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to one or two mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. In this report we discuss the status of and the plans for the HCC simulation and engineering efforts. We also describe the new post-cooling ideas and comment on the prospects for a Higgs factory or energy frontier muon collider using existing laboratory infrastructure.

R.P. Johnson; M. Alsharo'a; P.M. Hanlet; R. E. Hartline; M. Kuchnir; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts; C.M. Ankenbrandt; E. Barzi; L. DelFrate; I.G. Gonin; A. Moretti; D.V. Neuffer; M. Popovic; G. Romanov; D. Turrioni; V. Yarba; K. Beard; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev; D.M. Kaplan; K. Yonehara

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

34

Stochastic Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

Blaskiewicz, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Studies of a Gas-filled Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A helical cooling channel (HCC) can quickly reduce the six dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. The HCC is composed of solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields to provide the focusing and dispersion needed for emittance exchange as the beam follows an equilibrium helical orbit through a continuous homogeneous absorber. We consider liquid helium and liquid hydrogen absorbers in HCC segments that alternate with RF accelerating sections and we also consider gaseous hydrogen absorber in pressurized RF cavities imbedded in HCC segments. In the case of liquid absorber, the possibility of using superconducting RF in low magnetic field regions between the HCC segments may provide a cost effective solution to the high repetition rate needed for an intense neutrino factory or high average luminosity muon collider. In the gaseous hydrogen absorber case, the pressurized RF cavities can be operated at low temperature to improve their efficiency for higher repetition rates. Numerical simulations are used to optimize and compare the liquid and gaseous HCC techniques.

R.P. Johnson; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts; Y.S. Derbenev; K. Yonehara

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Novel Method for Transport and Cooling of a Muon Beam Based on Magnetic Insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unwanted field emission is a well known problem for high-gradient accelerating structures as it can cause damage and initiate breakdown. Recent experiments indicated that the deleterious effects of field-emission are greatly enhanced in the presence of external magnetic fields. In the context of designing a muon accelerator this imposes numerous constraints since rf cavities need to operate within strong magnetic fields in order to successfully transport the beam. Here, a novel design of a magnetically insulated cavity in which the walls are parallel to the magnetic field lines is presented. We show that with magnetic insulation, damage from field emission can be significantly suppressed. Effects of coil positioning errors on the cavity performance are discussed and the required magnetic field strength to achieve insulation is estimated. We present a conceptual design of a muon collider cooling lattice with magnetic insulated cavities and cross-check its performance to the one with pillbox cavities. Finally an experiment to test magnetic insulation is described.

Stratakis, Diktys; Gallardo, Juan C.; Palmer, Robert B. [Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

Original article: A three-dimensional model for the study of the cooling system of submersible electric pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the cooling system for submersible electric pumps. This study aims to provide some guidelines to improve the existing cooling system of these electric pumps when they work partially or totally not immersed in the service fluid. Note that inefficient ... Keywords: Finite element method, Heat transfer, Numerical approximation

N. Egidi; P. Maponi; L. Misici; S. Rubino

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Design and power management of a solar-powered “Cool Robot” for polar instrument networks: Research Articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cool Robot is a four-wheel-drive, solar-powered, autonomous robot designed to support summertime science campaigns in Antarctica and Greenland over distances exceeding 500 km. This paper provides an overview of key features of the robot, including ...

Laura E. Ray; James H. Lever; Alexander D. Streeter; Alexander D. Price

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Further tests on liquid-nitrogen-cooled, thin silicon-crystal monochcromators using a focused wiggler synchrotron beam  

SciTech Connect

A newly designed, cryogenically cooled, thin Si crystal monochromator was tested at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) beamline BL3. It exhibited less than 1 arcsec of thermal strain up to a maximum incident power of 186 W and average power density of 521 W/mm{sup 2}. Data were collected for the thin (0.7 mm) portion of the crystal and for the thick (>25 mm) part. Rocking curves were measured as a function of incident power. With a low power beam, the Si(333) rocking curve at 30 keV for the thin and thick sections was < 1 arcsec FWHM at room temperature. The rocking curve of the thin section increased to 2.0 arcsec when cooled to 78 K, while the thick part was unaffected by the reduction in temperature. The rocking curve of the thin section broadened to 2.5 arcsec FWHM and that of the thick section broadened to 1.7 arcsec at the highest incident power. The proven range of performance for this monochromator has been extended to the power density, but not the absorbed power, expected for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) undulator A in closed-gap operation (first harmonic at 3.27 keV) at a storage-ring current of 300 mA.

Rogers, C.S.; Mills, D.M.; Fernandez, P.B. [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Further tests on liquid-nitrogen-cooled, thin silicon-crystal monochromators using a focused wiggler synchrotron beam  

SciTech Connect

A newly designed cryogenically cooled, thin Si crystal monochromator was tested at the European Synchrotrons Radiation Facility (ESRF) beamline BL3. It exhibited less than 1 arcsec of thermal strain up to a maximum incident power of 186 W and average power density of 521 W/mm{sup 2}. Data were collected for the thin (0.7 mm) portion of the crystal and for the thick (>25 mm) part. Rocking curves were measured as a function of incident power. With a low power beam, the Si(333) rocking curve at 30 keV for the thin and thick sections was < 1 arcsec FWHM at room temperature. The rocking curve of the thin section increased to 2.0 arcsec when cooled to 78 K, while the thick part was unaffected by the reduction in temperature. The rocking curve of the this section broadened to 2.5 arcsec FWHM and that of the thick section broadened to 1.7 arcsec at the highest incident power. The proven range of performance for this monochromator has been extended to the power density, but not the absorbed power, expected for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) undulator A in closed-gap operation (first harmonic at 3.27 kev) at a storage-ring current of 300 mA.

Rogers, C. S.; Mills, D. M.; Fernandez, P. B.; Knapp, G. S.; Wulff, M.; Hanfland, M.; Freund, A.; Rossat, M.; Holmberg, J.; Yamaoka, H.

2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-06ER86282 Development and Demonstration of 6-Dimensional Muon Beam Cooling  

SciTech Connect

The overarching purpose of this project was to prepare a proposal for an experiment to demonstrate 6-dimensional muon beam cooling. The technical objectives were all steps in preparing the proposal, which was successfully presented to the Fermilab Accelerator Advisory Committee in February 2009. All primary goals of this project have been met.

Muons, Inc.

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen  

SciTech Connect

The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment.

Jana, M. R.; Chung, M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Torun, Y. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Stochastic cooling in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

44

Original article: Lumped-parameter-based thermal analysis of a doubly radial forced-air-cooled direct-driven permanent magnet wind generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lumped-parameter-based thermal analysis of a direct-driven permanent magnet wind generator with double radial forced-air cooling is presented. In the proposed thermal model, the thermal conduction and convection as well as the heating of the cooling ... Keywords: Air cooling, Permanent magnet synchronous generator, Thermal analysis, Thermal resistance networks

Janne Nerg, Vesa Ruuskanen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

THE MECHANICAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A CONVECTIVELY COOLED ION ACCELERATOR FOR CONTINUOUSLY OPERATING NEUTRAL BEAM SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 kV 1. 5 sec Table 1. Grid heat loads as %beam power. Towith a central separation. Grid heat loading is the dominantsystem. To investigate grid heat loads on our grid designs

Paterson, J.A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar) Place Livermore, California Zip 94550 Product CoolEarth is a concentrated PV developer using inflatable concentrators to focus light onto triple-junction cells. References CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar) is a company located in Livermore, California . References ↑ "CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CoolEarth_formerly_Cool_Earth_Solar&oldid=343892" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

47

Multi-Photon Laser Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... used traditional cooling beams at 852 nm in the x-y plane, but replaced the usual two beams along z with lasers at 795 nm. This laser only couples ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

48

Stochastic cooling in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

49

Microwave sintering of multiple articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for producing articles of alumina and of alumina and silicon carbide in which the articles are sintered at high temperatures using microwave radiation. The articles are placed in a sintering container which is placed in a microwave cavity for heating. The rates at which heating and cooling take place is controlled.

Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM); Katz, Joel D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Laser cooling of solids  

SciTech Connect

We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Space Heating and Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Supporting Equipment for Heating and Cooling Systems Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Water Heating Basics Heating and Cooling System Support...

52

SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

FISCHER,W.

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

53

Advance in MEIC cooling studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling of ion beams is essential for achieving a high luminosity for MEIC at Jefferson Lab. In this paper, we present the design concept of the electron cooling system for MEIC. In the design, two facilities are required for supporting a multi-staged cooling scheme; one is a 2 MeV DC cooler in the ion pre-booster; the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) ERL-circulator cooler in the collider ring. The simulation studies of beam dynamics in an ERL-circulator cooler are summarized and followed by a report on technology development for this cooler. We also discuss two proposed experiments for demonstrating high energy cooling with a bunched electron beam and the ERL-circulator cooler.

Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Ya. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Douglas, D. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Kimber, A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, R. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Nissen, E. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Tennant, [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, H. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Article URL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon. Endometrial cancer in Puerto Rico: incidence, mortality and survival (1992-2003)

Ana P Ortiz; Javier Perez; Katherine Svensson; Karen Ortiz; Mariela Torres; José L. Vergara-arroyo; Karen Ortiz; Mariela Torres; Guillermo Tortolero-luna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Article URL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Copyedited and fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon. Retrospective genomic analysis of sorghum adaptation to temperate-zone grain production

Carrie S Thurber; Justin M Ma; Race H Higgins; Patrick J Brown; Carrie S Thurber; Justin M Ma; Race H Higgins; Patrick J Brown

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Feature Article  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Feature Article Feature Article * $ &RPSDULVRQ RI 6HOHFWHG (,$'DWD:LWK2WKHU'DWD 6RXUFHV A Comparison of Selected EIA-782 Data With Other Data Sources by Theresa E. Hallquist Introduction The Petroleum Marketing Division (PMD) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects information re- lating to petroleum market prices and volumes on the EIA-782 survey. One way PMD assesses the quality of these data is to compare the data with other sources. Large, irreconcilable differences among data series could indicate the need for improvement in survey design or implementa- tion, or may be due to conceptual differences. For more de- tailed information on the EIA-782 survey, refer to the notes at the end of this article. PMD compares its EIA-782 series of petroleum market prices and volumes with both internal and external data sources

57

Superconductive articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article of manufacture including a substrate, a patterned interlayer of magnesium oxide, barium-titanium oxide or barium-zirconium oxide, the patterned interlayer material overcoated with a secondary interlayer material of yttria-stabilized zirconia or magnesium-aluminum oxide, upon the surface of the substrate whereby an intermediate article with an exposed surface of both the overcoated patterned interlayer and the substrate is formed, a coating of a buffer layer selected from the group consisting of oxides of Ce, Y, Cm, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Gd, Ho, In, La, Mn, Lu, Nd, Pr, Pu, Sm, Tb, Tl, Tm, Y, and Yb over the entire exposed surface of the intermediate article, and, a ceramic superconductive material layer as an overcoat upon the buffer layer whereby the ceramic superconductive material situated directly above the substrate has a crystal structure substantially different than the ceramic superconductive material situated above the overcoated patterned interlayer.

Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Stochastic cooling in muon colliders  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to {approximately}10{sup 3} for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW.

Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Article URL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon. Relationship between perceived body weight and body mass index based on self- reported height and weight among university students: a cross-sectional study in seven European countries

Rafael T Mikolajczyk; Annette E Maxwell; Walid El Ansari; Christiane Stock; Janina Petkeviciene; Rafael T. Mikolajczyk; Annette E. Maxwell; Walid El Ansari; Christiane Stock; Francisco Guillen-grima

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Article URL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Provisional PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon. A phase II clinical trial to assess the safety of clonidine in acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning

Shaluka F Jayamanna; Raja Hettiarachchi; Chandana Abeysinghe; Harindra Karunatilake; Andrew H. Dawson; Nick A Buckley; Polwattage M. S. Perera; Shaluka F. Jayamanna; Raja Hettiarachchi; Harindra Karunatilake; Andrew H. Dawson; Nick A. Buckley

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Article URL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Copyedited and fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon. Genomic and small RNA sequencing of Miscanthus x giganteus shows the utility of sorghum as a reference genome sequence for Andropogoneae grasses

Kankshita Swaminathan; Magdy Alabady; Kranthi Varala; Isaac Ho; Dan S Rokhsar; Aru K Arumuganathan; Ray Ming; Pamela J Green; Blake C Meyers; Stephen P Moose; Kankshita Swaminathan; Magdy Alabady; Kranthi Varala; Emanuele De Paoli; Isaac Ho; Dan Rokhsar; Aru K Arumuganathan; Ray Ming; Pamela J Green; Blake C Meyers; Stephen P Moose; Matthew E Hudson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Article URL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Provisional PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon. New views on the hypothesis of respiratory cancer risk from soluble nickel exposure; and reconsideration of this risk's historical sources in nickel refineries

James G. Heller; Philip G. Thornhill; Bruce R. Conard; James G. Heller; Philip G. Thornhill; Bruce R. Conard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Article URL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Fully formatted PDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon. Genome-wide interval mapping using SNPs identifies new QTL for growth, body composition and several physiological variables in an F2 intercross between fat and lean chicken lines

Olivier Demeure; Michel J Duclos; Nicola Bacciu; Guillaume Le Mignon; Olivier Filangi; Frédérique Pitel; Anne Boland; Sandrine Lagarrigue; Larry A Cogburn; Jean Simon; Pascale Le Roy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Progress in Absorber R&D for Muon Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stored-muon-beam neutrino factory may require transverse ionization cooling of the muon beam. We describe recent progress in research and development on energy absorbers for muon-beam cooling carried out by a collaboration of university and laboratory groups.

D. M. Kaplan; E. L. Black; M. Boghosian; K. W. Cassel; R. P. Johnson; S. Geer; C. J. Johnstone; M. Popovic; S. Ishimoto; K. Yoshimura; L. Bandura; M. A. Cummings; A. Dyshkant; D. Hedin; D. Kubik; C. Darve; Y. Kuno; D. Errede; M. Haney; S. Majewski; M. Reep; D. Summers

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Stochastic cooling of a high energy collider  

SciTech Connect

Gold beams in RHIC revolve more than a billion times over the course of a data acquisition session or store. During operations with these heavy ions the event rates in the detectors decay as the beams diffuse. A primary cause for this beam diffusion is small angle Coloumb scattering of the particles within the bunches. This intra-beam scattering (IBS) is particularly problematic at high energy because the negative mass effect removes the possibility of even approximate thermal equilibrium. Stochastic cooling can combat IBS. A theory of bunched beam cooling was developed in the early eighties and stochastic cooling systems for the SPS and the Tevatron were explored. Cooling for heavy ions in RHIC was also considered.

Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Lee, R.C.; Mernick, K.

2011-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

66

VORPAL Simulations Relevant to Coherent Electron Cooling  

SciTech Connect

Coherent electron cooling (CEC)* combines the best features of electron cooling and stochastic cooling, via free-electron laser technology**, to offer the possibility of cooling high-energy hadron beams with order-of-magnitude shorter cooling times. Many technical difficulties must be resolved via full-scale 3D simulations, before the CEC concept can be validated experimentally. VORPAL is the ideal code for simulating the â modulatorâ and â kickerâ regions, where the electron and hadron beams will co-propagate as in a conventional electron cooling section. Unlike previous VORPAL simulations*** of electron cooling physics, where dynamical friction on the ions was the key metric, it is the details of the electron density wake driven by each ion in the modulator section that must be understood, followed by strong amplification in the FEL. We present some initial simulation results. In particular, we compare the semi-analytic binary collision model with electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC).

Bell, G.I.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Sobol, A.V.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Derbenev, Yaroslav

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

VORPAL simulations relevant to coherent electron cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coherent electron cooling (CEC) [1] combines the best features of electron cooling and stochastic cooling, via free-electron laser technology [2], to offer the possibility of cooling high-energy hadron beams with order-of-magnitude shorter cooling times. Many technical difficulties must be resolved via full-scale 3D simulations, before the CEC concept can be validated experimentally. VORPAL is the ideal code for simulating the modulator and kicker regions, where the electron and hadron beams will co-propagate as in a conventional electron cooling section. Unlike previous VORPAL simulations [3] of electron cooling physics, where dynamical friction on the ions was the key metric, it is the details of the electron density wake driven by each ion in the modulator section that must be understood, followed by strong amplification in the FEL. We present some initial simulation results.

Bell,G.; Bruhwiler, D.; Sobol, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Litvinenko, V.; Derbenev, Y.

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

Magneto-Optical Cooling of Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an alternative method to laser cooling. Our approach utilizes the extreme brightness of a supersonic atomic beam, and the adiabatic atomic coilgun to slow atoms in the beam or to bring them to rest. We show how internal-state optical pumping and stimulated optical transitions, combined with magnetic forces can be used to cool the translational motion of atoms. This approach does not rely on momentum transfer from photons to atoms, as in laser cooling. We predict that our method can surpass laser cooling in terms of flux of ultra-cold atoms and phase-space density, with lower required laser power and reduced complexity.

Raizen, Mark G; Rochester, Simon; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Cooled railplug  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

Weldon, William F. (Austin, TX)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

FOCUS COOLING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

www.datacenterdynamics.com www.datacenterdynamics.com FOCUS COOLING Issue 28, March/April 2013 LBNL'S NOVEL APPROACH TO COOLING Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and APC by Schneider Electric test a unique double-exchanger cooling system LBNL program manager Henry Coles says can cut energy use by half A s part of a demonstration sponsored by the California Energy Commission in support of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group's data center summit, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with APC by Schneider Electric to demonstrate a novel prototype data center cooling device. The device was installed at an LBNL data center in Berkeley, California. It included two air-to-water heat exchangers. Unlike common single-heat-exchanger configurations, one of these was supplied with

71

Ventilative cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ION BEAM COLLIMATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for defining a beam of high energy particles wherein the means for defining the beam in the horizontal and vertical dimension are separately adjustable and the defining members are internally cooled. In general, the device comprises a mounting block having a central opening through which the beam is projected, means for rotatably supporting two pairs of beam- forming members, passages in each member for the flow of coolant; the beam- forming members being insulated from each other and the block, and each having an end projecting into the opening. The beam-forming members are adjustable and may be cooperatively positioned to define the beam passing between the end of the members. To assist in projecting and defining the beam, the member ends have individual means connected thereto for indicating the amount of charge collected thereon due to beam interception.

Langsdorf, A.S. Jr.

1957-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

73

Cooled railplug  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

Weldon, W.F.

1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

Feasibility of Electron Cooling for Low-Energy RHIC operation April 18, 2008 FEASIBILITY OF ELECTRON COOLING FOR LOW-ENERGY RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for RHIC low-energy cooling. 5.1 DC cooler Electron cooling with electron beam kinetic energies Ek,e=0 for the DC and RF electron beam approach. It suggests that the cost of such a cooler for Low-Energy RHIC;Feasibility of Electron Cooling for Low-Energy RHIC operation April 18, 2008 A.2 Parameters of DC electron

75

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Johnson, R.P.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Derbenev, Y.S.; Morozov, V.S.; /Jefferson Lab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

C. Y. Yoshikawa, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, D.V. Neuffer, K. Yonehara

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

REACTOR COOLING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

Quackenbush, C.F.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

78

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid cooling, dry cooler, cooling tower 1. INTRODUCTIONsolutions for cooling. Substituting cooling towers,hybrid cooling towers, or dry coolers that provide warmer

Coles, Henry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Beam History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Status Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Simulation study of electron response amplification in coherent electron cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC), it is essential to study the amplification of electron response to a single ion in the FEL process, in order to proper align the electron beam and the ion beam in the kicker to maximize the cooling effect. In this paper, we use Genesis to simulate the amplified electron beam response of single ion in FEL amplification process, which acts as Green's function of the FEL amplifier.

Hao Y.; Litvinenko, V.N.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Ionization cooling in the muon collider  

SciTech Connect

The muon beams in a high luminosity muon collider are produced with a very large emittance. The process of ionization cooling offers a method for reducing the 6-dimensional normalized emittance of the beam by a factor of {approx} 10{sup 6}. A simple analytic theory has been developed that demonstrates the dependence of the net cooling on various experimental parameters. The simple theory has been checked and realistic arrangements have been examined using Monte Carlo simulations. Transverse cooling of the initial beam can be achieved using passive Li absorbers in a FOFO lattice. The last factor of 10 in transverse cooling probably requires the use of current-carrying Li lenses. Efficient longitudinal cooling requires the use of wedge shaped absorbers in a dispersive section of the beam line. An example, multi-stage cooling scenario has been developed that meets the requirements of the muon collider. Preliminary designs have been made of solenoids for use in the FOFO lattice and of solenoids and dipoles for use in the emittance exchange sections. Detailed simulation work, farther optimization, and preparations for experimental demonstrations of critical components are currently in progress.

Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Resolved-sideband cooling of a micromechanical oscillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a series of absorption lines, broadened owing to the upper state's decay rate (Fig. 1a). Cooling canARTICLES Resolved-sideband cooling of a micromechanical oscillator A. SCHLIESSER, R. RIVI`ERE, G In atomic laser cooling, preparation of the motional quantum ground state has been achieved using resolved

Loss, Daniel

84

RADIATIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling R&D Contractors'been supported by the Solar Heating and Cooling Research andof Energy. 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling R&D

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Colliding Crystalline Beams  

SciTech Connect

Crystalline Beams* are an ordered state of an ensemble of ions, circulating in a storage ring, with very small velocity fluctuations. They can be obtained from ordinary warm ion beams with the application of powerful cooling techniques (stochastic, electron, laser, ...). Depending on the focussing properties and dimensions of the storage ring, and on the ion beam density, several ground states are possible. All of them can be visualized as a bundle of n{sub s} symmetrically distributed, parallel strings. The longitudinal ion separation {lambda} is the same for all strings. The minimum temperature that can be achieved depends on die background noise of the cooling technique used. It is required for stability that the vibration amplitude of the ions is only a fraction of the separation {lambda}.

Haffmans, A.F.; Maletic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Beam History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and day, then...

87

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aerosols were shown to have little impact on tropospheric cooling through modification of clouds, indicating that surface precipitation is insensitive to aerosols given...

88

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

regulator of global warming. The current uncertainty associated with water vapor absorption in these bands can lead to assumptions about their cooling effect in the upper...

89

Energy Basics: Evaporative Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

absorbent material. Evaporative cooling uses evaporated water to naturally and energy-efficiently cool. How Evaporative Coolers Work There are two types of evaporative...

90

Articles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

163 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly February 2012 Articles Feature articles on energy-related subjects are ...

91

Proceedings: Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems performance strongly affects availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Papers presented at EPRI's 1994 Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions. Specific topics include cooling tower upgrades and retrofits, cooling tower performance, cooling tower fouling, and dry and hybrid cooling systems.

1995-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

92

'Radio Wave Cooling' Offers New Twist on Laser Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'Radio Wave Cooling' Offers New Twist on Laser Cooling. From NIST Tech Beat: September 13, 2007. ...

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

93

Beam line windows at LAMPF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The A-6 main beam-line window at LAMPF separates the vacuum of the main beam line from the isotope production station, proton irradiation ports, and the beam stop, which operate in air. This window must withstand the design beam current of 1 mA at 800 MeV for periods of at least 3000 hours without failure. The window is water cooled and must be strong enough to withstand the 2.1 MPa (300 psig) cooling water pressure, as well as beam-induced thermal stresses. Two designs have been used to meet these goals, a stepped-plate window and a hemispherical window, both made from a precipitation-hardened nickel base alloy, Alloy 718. Calculations of the temperatures and stresses in each of these windows are presented.

Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

OCCUPATIONAL COOLING TOWERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY COOLING TOWERS EMPLOYEE HEALTH B C D F E CHILDREN'S ELEVATORS MEDICAL SCHOOL

Crews, Stephen

95

Hybrid Cooling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water consumption by power plants has become an increasingly contentious siting issue. In nearly all fossil-fired and nuclear plants, water for plant cooling is by far the greatest water requirement. Therefore, the use of water-conserving cooling systems such as dry or hybrid cooling is receiving increasing attention. This technology overview from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provides a brief introduction to hybrid cooling systems. As defined in the report, the term "hybrid cooling" refer...

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

96

Cooling Plant Optimization Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central cooling plants or district cooling systems account for 22 percent of energy costs for cooling commercial buildings. Improving the efficiency of central cooling plants will significantly impact peak demand and energy usage for both building owners and utilities. This guide identifies opportunities for optimizing a central cooling plant and provides a simplified optimization procedure. The guide focuses on plant optimization from the standpoint of minimizing energy costs and maximizing efficiencies...

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

97

Laser production of articles from powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. Preferably the tool path and other parameters of the deposition process are established using computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of a deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which a deposition head which delivers the laser beam and powder to the deposition zone moves along the tool path. 20 figs.

Lewis, G.K.; Milewski, J.O.; Cremers, D.A.; Nemec, R.B.; Barbe, M.R.

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

98

Laser production of articles from powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. Preferably the tool path and other parameters of the deposition process are established using computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of a deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which a deposition head which delivers the laser beam and powder to the deposition zone moves along the tool path.

Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Nemec, Ronald B. (White Rock, NM); Barbe, Michael R. (White Rock, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Experiments on stochastic cooling of 200 MeV protons  

SciTech Connect

Equipment for the stochastic cooling of 200 MeV protons in the Fermilab cooler ring has been installed and operated. Vertical and longitudinal cooling systems were installed by early 1980 and had successfully operated by May 1980. Traveling-wave structures particularly effective for the sub-relativistic beam velocities were used for the pickup and kicker electrodes.

Lambertson, G.R.; Bisognano, J.; Flood, W.; Kim, K.; Leeman, C.; Leskovar, B.; Lo, C.C.; Main, R.; Reimers, R.; Smith, L.; Staples, J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Update: Cooling tower and spray pond technology  

SciTech Connect

The 9th Cooling Tower and Spray Pond Symposium, under the auspices of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, took place at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Belgium, in September 1994. Technical topics discussed included cooling system design, performance, operation, environmental effects, modeling and components. Symposium proceedings will not be published. However, information of primary interest to staffs of power plants in the United States is summarized in this article.

Bartz, J.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2007 [Facility News] 6, 2007 [Facility News] Radiative Heating in Unexplored Bands Campaign Begins Today Bookmark and Share This chart shows the spectral and height dependence of the infrared cooling rates for a mid-latitude summer profile. Note that the majority of the infrared cooling in the middle and upper tropsphere occurs in spectral regions that RHUBC will investigate. This chart shows the spectral and height dependence of the infrared cooling rates for a mid-latitude summer profile. Note that the majority of the infrared cooling in the middle and upper tropsphere occurs in spectral regions that RHUBC will investigate. In conjunction with other scientific activities taking place during International Polar Year 2007-2008, today (February 26) an international research team begins a three-week field campaign in Barrow, Alaska. The

103

OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC.  

SciTech Connect

RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far.

Fischer, W; Brennan, J M; Cameron, P; Connolly, R; Montag, C; Peggs, S; Pilat, F; Ptitsyn, V; Tepikian, S; Trbojevic, D

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

104

Matching equipment size to the cooling load  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a heat extraction rate analysis method, using ASHRAE algorithms that enables HVAC system designers to optimally size cooling equipment. The final stage of the cooling load calculation process determines the heat extraction rate required to achieve design conditions. Put another way, this stage determines the equipment capacity required to match the cooling load profile, and it does so in a manner that predicts the resulting space temperature profile, and it does so in a manner that predicts the resulting space temperature profile. It is a stage in the design process that, in practice, may not be given the attention it deserves.

Bloom, B. (Harvey Toub Engineering, Atlanta, GA (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

DOE Science Showcase - Cool roofs, cool research, at DOE | OSTI...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Accelerator returns cool roof documents from 6 DOE Databases Executive Order on Sustainability Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement One Cool Roof Cool Roofs Lead to Cooler...

106

Coherent electron cooling proof of principle instrumentation design  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Coherent Electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment being designed at RHIC is to demonstrate longitudinal (energy spread) cooling before the expected CD-2 for eRHIC. The scope of the experiment is to longitudinally cool a single bunch of 40 GeV/u gold ions in RHIC. This paper will describe the instrumentation systems proposed to meet the diagnostics challenges. These include measurements of beam intensity, emittance, energy spread, bunch length, position, orbit stability, and transverse and temporal alignment of electron and ion beams.

Gassner D. M.; Litvinenko, V.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T.; Minty, M.; Pinayev, I.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Space Heating and Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A wide variety of technologies are available for heating and cooling homes and other buildings. In addition, many heating and cooling systems have certain supporting equipment in common, such as...

108

Booster gold beam injection efficiency and beam loss  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the BNL requires the AGS to provide gold beam with the intensity of 10{sup 9} ions per bunch. Over the years, the Tandem Van de Graaff has provided steadily increasing intensity of gold ion beams to the AGS Booster. However, the gold ion beam injection efficiency at the Booster has been found to decrease with the rising intensity of injected beams. As the result, for Tandem beams of the highest intensity, the Booster late intensity is lower than with slightly lower intensity Tandem beam. In this article, the authors present two experiments associated with the Booster injection efficiency and beam intensity. One experiment looks at the Booster injection efficiency by adjusting the Tandem beam intensity, and another looks at the beam life time while scraping the beam in the Booster. The studies suggest that the gold beam injection efficiency at the AGS Booster is related to the beam loss in the ring, rather than the intensity of injected beam or circulating beam.

Zhang, S.Y.; Ahrens, L.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Cooling System Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...size Flow restrictions Heat exchanger size and design All of these factors must be considered. Every component in the cooling

110

Cooling load estimation methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

McFarland, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cooling Water System Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower performance. To understand the importance of the optimization techniques, cooling tower theory will be discussed first.

Aegerter, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Natural Cooling Retrofit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Substantial numbers of existing plants and buildings are found to depend solely upon Mechanical Cooling even though Natural Cooling techniques could be employed utilizing ambient air. Most of these facilities were constructed without Natural Cooling capability due to 'first cost' budget constraints when the cost and availability of energy were of little concern.

Fenster, L. C.; Grantier, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cooling Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these...

114

Cooling water distribution system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

SOLERAS solar cooling project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of the increasing demand for cooling in both the United States and Saudi Arabia, solar cooling systems are being considered as serious alternatives to the energy intensive conventional systems, especially when confronted with rising fossil fuel costs. Saudi Arabia and the hot, southern regions of the United States, having abundant sunshine and high cooling demand, are obvious candidates for solar active cooling systems and passive cooling design. Solar active cooling has yet to be shown to be either technologically mature or economically feasible, but efforts have been, and are presently being made within the United States National Solar Cooling Program to develop reliable systems which can compete economically with conventional cooling systems. Currently, the program is funding research and development projects in the areas of absorption, Rankine, dessicant, and advanced technologies. Saudi Arabia has a long and successful tradition of building cooling using passive architectural designs. Combining these past achievements with a program of research and development in both active and passive solar cooling should permit an early economical introduction of entirely solar cooled buildings to Saudi Arabia and the southern United States.

Corcoleotes, G.; Williamson, J.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Microwave sintering of single plate-shaped articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for high temperature sintering of plate-shaped articles of alumina, magnesia, silica, yttria, zirconia, and mixtures thereof using microwave radiation. An article is placed within a sintering structure located within a sintering container which is placed in a microwave cavity for heating. The rates at which heating and cooling take place is controlled.

Katz, Joel D. (Los Alamos, NM); Blake, Rodger D. (Tucson, AZ)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Recent Refereed Journal Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Journal Articles Recent Journal Articles Recent Refereed Journal Articles Print Monday, 16 August 2010 17:38 General Information Refereed journal articles before 2010 will be posted in an archive. Articles may also be searched by beamline, author, journal, or year. View Journal Covers showcasing ALS science. All staff and users are reminded that when submitting any article based on work conducted in whole or in part at the ALS, must include the following acknowledgment statement: The Advanced Light Source is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Report Publications, Awards, Talks here . 2010 Refereed Publications Al-Khatatbeh, Y., Y. Lee, and B. Kiefer, "Phase relations and hardness trends of ZrO2 phases at high pressure ," Phys. Rev. B 81(21), 214102 (2010). 12.2.2

118

ii. articles of incorporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

led in t.” 1'.“ .l'tment of in the '. 84730357. Secretary of the Commonwealth. ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION. OF . ms PIEI'ALHIRGICAL SOCIETY, INC.

119

Method of drying articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: (a) Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and (b) contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores. 3 figs.

Janney, M.A.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

Method of drying articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: a. Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and b. contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores.

Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

TMS News Article  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 23, 2010 ... “Resources for International Travelers” is organized into two sections: Navigating the U.S. Visa and Entry Process: Articles and information of ...

122

TMS News Article  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2009 ... According to a June 24 article in the New York Times, architects helming the Sears Tower renovation estimate that the environmental makeover ...

123

ARM - Events Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and predictability, YOTC is a year of coordinated observing, modelling, and forecasting. Noteworthy progress includes: Science plan published. Journal articles will soon...

124

Efficient cooling: Making it happen  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a series of solutions that can help everyone to some basic questions about air conditioning: what`s the best way to size a residential air conditioner? to what extent do air conditioners tend to be oversized? how can energy research and programs help promote optimal sizing of cooling systems? Topics covered include the following: defining the debate over sizing of air conditioners; methods for sizing; evaluating simple {open_quotes}rules of thumb{close_quotes}; working with HVAC contractors; creating consumer demand for proper sizing. 1 fig. 1 tab.

Sherman, C.; Hildebrandt, E. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Indirect evaporative cooling in retail  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JCPenney Co., Inc., recently opened a 126,000-sq ft, two-level retail store in Albuquerque, NM. The project construction was accomplished using a design-build format. This process allows preliminary construction processes to begin while the design is finalized. Law/Kingdom, Inc. was assigned the architectural and engineering services for this building. During the process of design, the team decided to study the addition of evaporative cooling into the air system. This article reviews system design, selection, and performance using an indirect evaporative system in the HVAC system. It also demonstrates the company`s design approach on the original equipment selection for a typical anchor store.

Bartlett, T.A. [JCPenney Co., Plano, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Radiation shielding issues for MuCool test area at Fermilab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets being developed for cooling intense muon beams. In this study the origin of the outgoing collimated neutron beam is examined. An alternative shielding option for MTA is investigated as well as the hypothetical worst case of experimental setup is considered.

Rakhno, I.; Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

ARM - Journal Articles 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govPublicationsJournal Articles 2013 govPublicationsJournal Articles 2013 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2013 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Kafle Micropulse lidar-derived aerosol optical depth climatology at ARM sites worldwide (Citation) Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres ARM

128

BOOSTER GOLD BEAM INJECTION EFFICIENCY AND BEAM LOSS  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the BNL requires the AGS to provide Gold beam with the intensity of 10{sup 9} ions per bunch. Over the years, the Tandem Van de Graaff has provided steadily increasing intensity of gold ion beams to the AGS Booster. However, the gold beam injection efficiency at the Booster has been found to decrease with the rising intensity of injected beams. As the result, for Tandem beams of the highest intensity, the Booster late intensity is lower than with slightly lower intensity Tandem beam. In this article, the authors present two experiments associated with the Booster injection efficiency and beam intensity. One experiment looks at the Booster injection efficiency by adjusting the Tandem beam intensity, and another looks at the beam life time while scraping the beam in the Booster. The studies suggest that the gold beam injection efficiency at the AGS Booster is related to the beam loss in the ring, rather than the intensity of injected beam or circulating beam. A close look at the effect of the lost gold ion at the Booster injection leads to the prediction that the lost gold ion creates large number of positive ions, and even larger number of electrons. The lost gold beam is also expected to create large numbers of neutral particles. In 1998 heavy ion run, the production of positive ions and electrons due to the lost gold beam has been observed. Also the high vacuum pressure due to the beam loss, presumably because of the neutral particles it created, has been measured. These results will be reported elsewhere.

ZHANG,S.Y.; AHRENS,L.A.

1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Method for fabricating uranium alloy articles without shape memory effects  

SciTech Connect

Uranium-rich niobium and niobium-zirconium alloys possess a characteristic known as shape memory effect wherein shaped articles of these alloys recover their original shape when heated. The present invention circumvents this memory behavior by forming the alloys into the desired configuration at elevated temperatures with "cold" matched dies and maintaining the shaped articles between the dies until the articles cool to ambient temperature.

Banker, John G. (Boulder, CO)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Method for fabricating uranium alloy articles without shape memory effects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uranium-rich niobium and niobium-zirconium alloys possess a characteristic known as shape memory effect wherein shaped articles of these alloys recover their original shape when heated. The present invention circumvents this memory behavior by forming the alloys into the desired configuration at elevated temperatures with cold matched dies and maintaining the shaped articles between the dies until the articles cool to ambient temperature.

Banker, J.G.

1980-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

Gas turbine cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W-Band Cloud Radar Added to ARM Mobile Facility in Africa W-Band Cloud Radar Added to ARM Mobile Facility in Africa Bookmark and Share Most of the WACR is mounted on top of one of the AMF shelters. The WACR computer and chiller (used to keep the WACR cool in temperatures up to 47 degrees C) are located in the shelter below the radar. Most of the WACR is mounted on top of one of the AMF shelters. The WACR computer and chiller (used to keep the WACR cool in temperatures up to 47 degrees C) are located in the shelter below the radar. A W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) recently joined the suite of baseline capabilities offered by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF). The term "W-band" refers to the specific radio frequency range of this radar, which is a 95 gigahertz pulse Doppler zenith pointing radar, providing profiles of cloud

133

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

Conway, Lawrence E. (Robinson Township, Allegheny County, PA); Stewart, William A. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Power electronics cooling apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

Sanger, Philip Albert (Monroeville, PA); Lindberg, Frank A. (Baltimore, MD); Garcen, Walter (Glen Burnie, MD)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy Basics: Absorption Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption...

136

Process Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers have been on the scene for more than 50 years. It is because they have proven to be an economic choice for waste heat dissipation. But it seems, for some reason, that after installation very little attention is paid to the cooling-tower and its effect on plant operating efficiency and production. This paper will describe the value of working with a cooling tower specialist to establish the physical and thermal potential of an existing cooling tower. It also demonstrates that a repair and thermal upgrade project to improve efficiency will have a better than average return on investment.

McCann, C. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Energy Basics: Cooling Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the...

138

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Cool Storage Technology Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a fact that avoiding load growth is cheaper than constructing new power plants. Cool storage technologies offer one method for strategically stemming the impact of future peak demand growth. This guide provides a comprehensive resource for understanding and evaluating cool storage technologies.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cooling Tower Technology Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems cause significant loss of availability and heat rate degradation in both nuclear and fossil-fired power plants. Twenty-one papers presented at a 2003 conference in Charleston, South Carolina discussed industrial experience and provided case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions.

2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

142

Cool Roof Colored Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Roof Colored Materials Cool Roof Colored Materials Speaker(s): Hashem Akbari Date: May 29, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60% can reduce cooling-energy use in buildings in excess of 20%. Cool roofs also result in a lower ambient temperature that further decreases the need for air conditioning and retards smog formation. Reflective roofing products currently available in the market are typically used for low-sloped roofs. For the residential buildings with steep-sloped roofs, non-white (colored) cool roofing products are generally not available and most consumers prefer colors other than white. In this collaborative project LBNL and ORNL are working with the roofing industry to develop and produce reflective, colored roofing products and make yhrm a market reality within three to

143

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Cool Magnetic Molecules Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Wednesday, 25 May 2011 00:00 Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

144

Hydronic Radiant Cooling Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Hydronic Radiant Cooling Systems Cooling nonresidential buildings in the U.S. contributes significantly to electrical power consumption and peak power demand. Part of the electrical energy used to cool buildings is drawn by fans transporting cool air through the ducts. The typical thermal cooling peak load component for California office buildings can be divided as follows: 31% for lighting, 13% for people, 14% for air transport, and 6% for equipment (in the graph below, these account for 62.5% of the electrical peak load, labeled "chiller"). Approximately 37% of the electrical peak power is required for air transport, and the remainder is necessary to operate the compressor. DOE-2 simulations for different California climates using the California

145

Solar Desiccant Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Desiccant Cooling Solar Desiccant Cooling Speaker(s): Paul Bourdoukan Date: December 6, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Ashok Gadgil The development of HVAC systems is a real challenge regarding its environmental impact. An innovative technique operating only by means of water and solar energy, is desiccant cooling. The principle is evaporative cooling with the introduction of a dehumidification unit, the desiccant wheel to control the humidity levels. The regeneration of the desiccant wheel requires a preheated airstream. A solar installation is a very interesting option for providing the preheated airstream. In France, at the University of La Rochelle, and at the National Institute of Solar Energy (INES), the investigation of the solar desiccant cooling technique has been

146

Water cooled steam jet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

Wagner, Jr., Edward P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

148

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hydronic rooftop cooling systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

Bourne, Richard C. (Davis, CA); Lee, Brian Eric (Monterey, CA); Berman, Mark J. (Davis, CA)

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

Home Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Cooling Home Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Learn how to avoid heat buildup and keep your home cool with ventilation. Read more Cooling with a Whole House Fan A whole-house fan, in combination with other cooling systems, can meet all or most of your home cooling needs year round. Read more Although your first thought for cooling may be air conditioning, there are many alternatives that provide cooling with less energy use. You might also consider fans, evaporative coolers, or heat pumps as your primary means of cooling. In addition, a combination of proper insulation, energy-efficient windows and doors, daylighting, shading, and ventilation will usually keep homes cool with a low amount of energy use in all but the hottest climates. Although ventilation is not an effective cooling strategy in hot, humid

152

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 31, 2008 [Facility News] August 31, 2008 [Facility News] Phase 2 of Orbiting Carbon Observatory Field Campaign Begins Bookmark and Share A camera, weather station, and sun tracker with a protective dome are located on the roof of the fully automated FTS mobile laboratory. Inside the shelter, the spectrometer receives the reflected solar beam from the sun tracker, while the main computer system operates all the instruments and acquires the data. A camera, weather station, and sun tracker with a protective dome are located on the roof of the fully automated FTS mobile laboratory. Inside the shelter, the spectrometer receives the reflected solar beam from the sun tracker, while the main computer system operates all the instruments and acquires the data. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory, or OCO, is a National Aeronautics and

153

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Happy New (fiscal) Year! Cloud Droplet Probe Arrives in Time for SPARTICUS Happy New (fiscal) Year! Cloud Droplet Probe Arrives in Time for SPARTICUS Bookmark and Share The new cloud droplet probe, from Droplet Measurement Technologies, has angled tips to deflect particles away from the beam path and minimize the effects of "forward scattering." The new cloud droplet probe, from Droplet Measurement Technologies, has angled tips to deflect particles away from the beam path and minimize the effects of "forward scattering." Kicking off the new fiscal year, on October 1 the ARM Aerial Facility received the first component - a cloud droplet probe (CDP) - of many new aircraft research instruments that will arrive in the coming year through funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Designed to measure the size distribution of cloud particles, the new probe

154

Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

155

ARM - Journal Articles 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2004 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Jakob Use of cloud radar observations for model evaluation: A probabilistic approach (Citation) Journal of Geophysical Research ARM Schultz Snowbands during the cold-air outbreak of 23 January 2003. (Citation) Monthly Weather Review ARM

156

Article Atmospheric Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

© The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp © The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp *Corresponding author (email: luchunsong110@gmail.com) Article Atmospheric Science February 2013 Vol.58 No.4-5: 545  551 doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5556-6 A method for distinguishing and linking turbulent entrainment mixing and collision-coalescence in stratocumulus clouds LU ChunSong 1,2* , LIU YanGang 2 & NIU ShengJie 1 1 Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Physics and Environment of China Meteorological Administration, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973, USA

157

ARM - Journal Articles 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2002 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Smith A Simple Model of Cirrus Horizontal Inhomogeneity and Cloud Fraction (Citation) Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc. ARM Jensen Radiative impacts of anvil outflow during the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment (Citation) J. of Appl. Meteor. ARM

158

ARM - Journal Articles 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2007 Author Article Title Journal Funded By McFarlane Optical properties of shallow tropical cumuli derived from ARM ground-based remote sensing (Citation) Geophysical Research Letters ARM Mattioli Analysis of Radiosonde and ground-based remotely sensed PWV data from the 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment (Citation) Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology ARM

159

ARM - Journal Articles 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2003 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Dong Arctic stratus cloud properties and radiative forcing at the ARM NSA site (Citation) J. Climate ARM Zurovac-Jevtic Development and test of a cirrus parameterization scheme using NCAR CCM3 (Citation) Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences ARM

160

ARM - Journal Articles 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2006 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Kogan Large-eddy simulation of air parcels in stratocumulus clouds: Time scales and spatial variability (Citation) Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences ARM Duchon Broadband albedo observations in the Southern Great Plains (Citation) Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology ARM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ARM - Journal Articles 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 09 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2009 Author Article Title Journal Funded By de Gouw Emission and chemistry of organic carbon in the gas and aerosol phase at a sub-urban site near Mexico City in March 2006 during the MILAGRO study (Citation) Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics ARM

162

ARM - Journal Articles 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2011 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Torn Seasonal and inter-annual variability in δ13C of net ecosystem carbon exchanges from 2002-2009 in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (Citation) Tellus ARM Lin Parameterization of riming intensity and its impact on ice fall speed using ARM data (Citation) Monthly Weather Review ARM

163

A low energy beam transport system for proton beam  

SciTech Connect

A low energy beam transport (LEBT) system has been built for a compact pulsed hadron source (CPHS) at Tsinghua University in China. The LEBT, consisting of two solenoids and three short-drift sections, transports a pulsed proton beam of 60 mA of energy of 50 keV to the entrance of a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). Measurement has shown a normalized RMS beam emittance less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad at the end of the LEBT. Beam simulations were carried out to compare with the measurement and are in good agreement. Based on the successful CPHS LEBT development, a new LEBT for a China ADS projector has been designed. The features of the new design, including a beam chopper and beam simulations of the LEBT are presented and discussed along with CPHS LEBT development in this article.

Yang, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhang, Z. M.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, W. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, Z. W.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

RMOTC - News - Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Articles Articles Artificial Lift Innovations World Oil Magazine, May 2012 Carbon Sequestration Newsletter October 2010, See Page 7, Recent Publications Oil and gas coproduction expands geothermal power possibilities Renewable Energy World, July 9, 2010 A new energy convergence: Wyoming explores renewable energy Clean Energy Pioneers, June 2010 Oil industry waste could be geothermal treasure Land Letter - Natural Resources Weekly Report, May 20, 2010 Testing a multistage fluid treatment World Oil, April 2010 Geothermal Energy Holds Strong Presence at Renewable Energy World Conference Geothermal Energy Weekly, March 5, 2010 (Page 4) Oil Production Waste Stream: A Source of Electrical Power Renewable Energy World, January 2010 Wireline retrievable ESP shuttle could change pump management paradigms

165

Evaporative Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling (Redirected from Hybrid Cooling) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Evaporative Cooling: An evaporative cooler is a device that cools air through the evaporation of water. Evaporative cooling works by employing water's large enthalpy of vaporization. The temperature of dry air can be dropped significantly through the phase transition of liquid water to water vapor (evaporation), which can cool air using much less energy than refrigeration. Evaporative cooling requires a water source, and must continually consume water to operate. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling Tower Diagram of Evaporative Cooling Tower Evaporative cooling technologies take advantage of both air and water to extract heat from a power plant. By utilizing both water and air one can

166

Focus Article Nuclear winter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus Article Nuclear winter Alan Robock Nuclear winter is the term for a theory describing the climatic effects of nuclear war. Smoke from the fires started by nuclear weapons, especially the black, sooty smoke from cities and industrial facilities, would be heated by the Sun, lofted into the upper

Robock, Alan

167

REVIEW ARTICLE Molecular Anions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVIEW ARTICLE Molecular Anions Jack Simons Chemistry Department, Henry Eyring Center ReceiVed: February 28, 2008 The experimental and theoretical study of molecular anions has undergone on the experimental front. Theoretical developments on the electronic structure and molecular dynamics fronts now

Simons, Jack

168

Molecular Cell Short Article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Cell Short Article Nucleosome Organization Affects the Sensitivity of Gene Expression to Promoter Mutations Gil Hornung,1 Moshe Oren,2 and Naama Barkai1,* 1Department of Molecular Genetics 2Department of Molecular Cell Biology Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel *Correspondence: naama

Barkai, Naama

169

Would You Consider Installing a Cool Roof? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Would You Consider Installing a Cool Roof? Would You Consider Installing a Cool Roof? Would You Consider Installing a Cool Roof? August 12, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Erin discussed cool roof technologies and how they can improve the comfort of buildings while reducing energy costs. Would you consider installing a cool roof? Why or why not? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? Would You Consider Installing a Cool Roof? Tips: Energy-Efficient Roofs How Do You Save Water When Caring for Your Lawn?

170

Overview: Home Cooling Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

than earlier models. Dehumidifying heat pipes can help an air conditioner remove humidity and more efficiently cool the air. Radiant Cooling Radiant cooling cools a floor or...

171

ARM - Events Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, 2007 [Events] , 2007 [Events] Climate Scientists Cool Their Heels at Science Team Meeting in Monterey Bookmark and Share Nearly 300 participants from countries as far away as Japan, Australia, and Finland attended the 2007 ARM Science Team Meeting. Nearly 300 participants from countries as far away as Japan, Australia, and Finland attended the 2007 ARM Science Team Meeting. A spring mix of sunny skies and stormy weather provided an appropriate setting for the Seventeenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team Meeting, held March 26 through March 30 in Monterey, California. Held annually since 1990, this meeting brings together ARM scientists, ARM infrastructure staff, and user facility researchers to review program progress and plan future activities.

172

LBNL's Novel Approach to Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

systems department, chilled water, cooling water tower, double exchanger cooling, dual heat exchanger, high tech and industrial systems group, inrow, lawrence berkeley national...

173

Cool Roofs and Heat Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(510) 486-7494 Links Heat Island Group The Cool Colors Project Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and...

174

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

175

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

176

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

177

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

178

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Cool Magnetic Molecules Print Certain materials are known to heat up or cool down when they are exposed to a changing magnetic field. This is known as the magnetocaloric effect. All magnetic materials exhibit this effect, but in most cases, it is too small to be technologically useful. Recently, however, the search for special molecules with a surprisingly large capacity to keep cool has heated up, driven by environmental and cost considerations as well as by recent improvements in our ability to design, assemble, and probe the structure and chemistry of small molecules. An international collaboration of researchers from Spain, Scotland, and the U.S. has utilized ALS Beamline 11.3.1 (small-molecule crystallography) to characterize the design of such "molecular coolers." The work targets the synthesis of molecular cluster compounds containing many unpaired electrons ("nanomagnets") for applications involving enhanced magnetic refrigeration at very low temperatures.

179

Optimization of Cooling Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems.

Matson, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

RADIATIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Passive Cooling Marlo Martin and Paul Berdahl SeptemberNTIS. 3. P. Berdahl and M. Martin, "The Resource for Radia-1978) p. 684. 4. M. Martin and P. Berdahl, "Description of a

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Stimulated radiative laser cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host, into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

Muys, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Sisyphus Cooling of Lithium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser cooling to sub-Doppler temperatures by optical molasses is thought to be inhibited in atoms with unresolved, near-degenerate hyperfine structure in the excited state. We demonstrate that such cooling is possible in one to three dimensions, not only near the standard D2 line for laser cooling, but over a range extending to the D1 line. Via a combination of Sisyphus cooling followed by adiabatic expansion, we reach temperatures as low as 40 \\mu K, which corresponds to atomic velocities a factor of 2.6 above the limit imposed by a single photon recoil. Our method requires modest laser power at a frequency within reach of standard frequency locking methods. It is largely insensitive to laser power, polarization and detuning, magnetic fields, and initial hyperfine populations. Our results suggest that optical molasses should be possible with all alkali species.

Paul Hamilton; Geena Kim; Trinity Joshi; Biswaroop Mukherjee; Daniel Tiarks; Holger Müller

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

183

Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seiber, Larry E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlino, Laura D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

Cooling tower waste reduction  

SciTech Connect

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the two main cooling tower systems (central and northwest) were upgraded during the summer of 1997 to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. In 1996, these two tower systems generated approximately 135,400 lbs (61,400 kg) of hazardous sludge, which is more than 90 percent of the hazardous waste for the site annually. At both, wet decks (cascade reservoirs) were covered to block sunlight. Covering the cascade reservoirs reduced the amount of chemical conditioners (e.g. algaecide and biocide), required and in turn the amount of waste generated was reduced. Additionally, at the northwest cooling tower system, a sand filtration system was installed to allow cyclical filtering and backflushing, and new pumps, piping, and spray nozzles were installed to increase agitation. the appurtenance upgrade increased the efficiency of the cooling towers. The sand filtration system at the northwest cooling tower system enables operators to continuously maintain the cooling tower water quality without taking the towers out of service. Operational costs (including waste handling and disposal) and maintenance activities are compared for the cooling towers before and after upgrades. Additionally, the effectiveness of the sand filter system in conjunction with the wet deck covers (northwest cooling tower system), versus the cascade reservoir covers alone (south cooling tower south) is discussed. the overall expected return on investment is calculated to be in excess of 250 percent. this upgrade has been incorporated into the 1998 DOE complex-wide water conservation project being led by Sandia National Laboratory/Albuquerque.

Coleman, S.J.; Celeste, J.; Chine, R.; Scott, C.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

WATER COOLED RETORT COVER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Article 29 Employee Awards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Article 29 Employee Awards Article 29 Employee Awards The percentage allocation for the bargaining unit performance awards budget will be no less than the amount allocated to any other pool, e.g., the non-unit, managerial pool (not including the SES pool). The Employer will provide NTEU with the element. of the awards equation as soon as it is known. Information will include the total adjusted salary and the percentage of salaries allocated to the awards pool for each first tier. NTEU will be provided additional information and details in a briefing, if requested. The Employer will notify NTEU throughout the year of any changes in budget administration that affect the awards pools immediately upon a decision about the change. If funds are available, performance-based cash awards will be paid to employees no later than 4 months after

187

Beam profile measurement with flying wires at the Fermilab Recycler Ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flying wires were installed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring for transverse beam profile measurement for both proton and antiproton beams. The following note describes the system configuration, calibration and resolution of the flying wire system, interactions between the wires and the beam, as well as analysis of the transverse beam profile in the presence of a stochastic cooling system.

Carcagno, R.; Pishchalnikov, Yu.; Krider, J.; Hu, M.; Lorman, E.; Marchionni, A.; Pordes, S.; Wilson, P.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

Experience to date with operation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors has been quite favorable. Despite problems in completion of construction and startup, three high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) units have operated well. The Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) in the United Kingdom has had an excellent operating history, and initial operation of commercial AGRs shows them to be satisfactory. The latter reactors provide direct experience in scale-up from the Windscale experiment to fullscale commercial units. The Colorado Fort St. Vrain 330-MWe prototype helium-cooled HTGR is now in the approach-to-power phase while the 300-MWe Pebble Bed THTR prototype in the Federal Republic of Germany is scheduled for completion of construction by late 1978. THTR will be the first nuclear power plant which uses a dry cooling tower. Fuel reprocessing and refabrication have been developed in the laboratory and are now entering a pilot-plant scale development. Several commercial HTGR power station orders were placed in the U.S. prior to 1975 with similar plans for stations in the FRG. However, the combined effects of inflation, reduced electric power demand, regulatory uncertainties, and pricing problems led to cancellation of the 12 reactors which were in various stages of planning, design, and licensing.

Schulten, R.; Trauger, D.B.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cooling Towers, The Debottleneckers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power generating plants and petro-chemical works are always expanding. An on-going problem is to identify and de-bottle neck restricting conditions of growth. The cooling tower is a highly visible piece of equipment. Most industrial crossflow units are large structures, Illustration 1. Big budget money and engineering time goes into gleaming stainless steel equipment and exotic process apparatus, the poor cooling tower is the ignored orphan of the system. Knowledgeable Engineers, however, are now looking into the function of the cooling tower, which is to produce colder water- and question the quality of water discharged from that simple appearing box. These cross-flow structures are quite large, ranging up to 60 feet tall with as many as 6 or more cells in a row. With cells up to 42 feet long so immense in aspect, with fans rotating, operators assume, just by appearances, that all is well, and usually pay no attention to the quality of cold water returning from the cooling tower. The boxes look sturdy, but the function of the cooling tower is repeated ignored production of water as cold as possible.

Burger, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter  

SciTech Connect

The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Rapid Beam-switching Allows...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rapid Beam-switching Allows SLAC X-ray Laser to Multitask By Glenn Roberts Jr. August 9, 2013 A high-energy SLAC laser that creates shock waves and superhot plasmas needs to cool...

192

EPIC Muon Cooling Simulations using COSY INFINITY  

SciTech Connect

Next gen­er­a­tion mag­net sys­tems need­ed for cool­ing chan­nels in both neu­tri­no fac­to­ries and muon col­lid­ers will be in­no­va­tive and com­pli­cat­ed. De­sign­ing, sim­u­lat­ing and op­ti­miz­ing these sys­tems is a chal­lenge. Using COSY IN­FIN­I­TY, a dif­fer­en­tial al­ge­bra-based code, to sim­u­late com­pli­cat­ed el­e­ments can allow the com­pu­ta­tion and cor­rec­tion of a va­ri­ety of high­er order ef­fects, such as spher­i­cal and chro­mat­ic aber­ra­tions, that are dif­fi­cult to ad­dress with other sim­u­la­tion tools. As an ex­am­ple, a he­li­cal dipole mag­net has been im­ple­ment­ed and sim­u­lat­ed, and the per­for­mance of an epicyclic para­met­ric ion­iza­tion cool­ing sys­tem for muons is stud­ied and com­pared to sim­u­la­tions made using G4Beam­line, a GEAN­T4 toolk­it.

J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Evaporative Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaporative Cooling: Evaporative Cooling: An evaporative cooler is a device that cools air through the evaporation of water. Evaporative cooling works by employing water's large enthalpy of vaporization. The temperature of dry air can be dropped significantly through the phase transition of liquid water to water vapor (evaporation), which can cool air using much less energy than refrigeration. Evaporative cooling requires a water source, and must continually consume water to operate. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling Tower Diagram of Evaporative Cooling Tower Evaporative cooling technologies take advantage of both air and water to extract heat from a power plant. By utilizing both water and air one can reduce the amount of water required for a power plant as well as reduce the

194

Air Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Air Cooling: Air cooling is commonly defined as rejecting heat from an object by flowing air over the surface of the object, through means of convection. Air cooling requires that the air must be cooler than the object or surface from which it is expected to remove heat. This is due to the second law of thermodynamics, which states that heat will only move spontaneously from a hot reservoir (the heat sink) to a cold reservoir (the air). Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Air Cooling Air Cooling Diagram of Air Cooled Condenser designed by GEA Heat Exchangers Ltd. (http://www.gea-btt.com.cn/opencms/opencms/bttc/en/Products/Air_Cooled_Condenser.html) Air cooling is limited on ambient temperatures and typically require a

195

Water Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling: Cooling: Water cooling is commonly defined as a method of using water as a heat conduction to remove heat from an object, machine, or other substance by passing cold water over or through it. In energy generation, water cooling is typically used to cool steam back into water so it can be used again in the generation process. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Water Cooling Typical water cooled condenser used for condensing steam Water or liquid cooling is the most efficient cooling method and requires the smallest footprint when cold water is readily available. When used in power generation the steam/vapor that exits the turbine is condensed back into water and reused by means of a heat exchanger. Water cooling requires a water resource that is cold enough to bring steam, typically

196

Possible demonstration of ionization cooling using absorbers in a solenoidal field  

SciTech Connect

Ionization cooling may play an important role in reducing the phase space volume of muons for a future muon-muon collider. We describe a possible experiment to demonstrate transverse emittance cooling using a muon beam at the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The experiment uses device dimensions and parameters and beam conditions similar to what is expected in an actual muon-muon collider.

Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

cooling | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cooling cooling Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

198

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

Billig, Paul F. (San Jose, CA); Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA); Fitch, James R. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

200

Logos 2001 APS Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 A quarterly magazine about Argonne research. The Argonne Logos articles in this section focus on APS-related research. Volume 19, no. 2 - Fall 2001 Argonne's SBC provides a close look at life's construction workers Diagram of X-ray crystallography at teh APS Evidence of human construction work is all around us: on the roads we travel, in the buildings we occupy and now even in outer space... But one form of "human construction" quietly does its job without making the daily news or creating the slightest bit of noise or inconvenience, unless its machinery goes highly awry. This is the construction that has gone on inside every human cell - and probably every cell that has ever existed - since life began on Earth 3.5 billion years ago. Right now these cellular construction workers, called

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling (TABS) with a cooling tower providing chilled waterevaporative cooling (cooling tower) for radiant ceiling slabradiant cooling with a cooling tower providing chilled water

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

204

Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

Hultgren, Kent Goran (Winter Park, FL); McLaurin, Leroy Dixon (Winter Springs, FL); Bertsch, Oran Leroy (Titusville, FL); Lowe, Perry Eugene (Oviedo, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Five solar cooling projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The jointly funded $100 million five-year international agreement (SOLERAS) between Saudi Arabia and the United States was undertaken to promote the development of solar energy technologies of interest to both nations. Five engineering field tests of active solar cooling systems funded under the SOLERAS agreement for installation and operation in the U.S. southwest are described.

Davis, R.E.; Williamson, J.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Supplementary material on passive solar heating concepts. A compilation of published articles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A compilation of published articles and reports dealing with passive solar energy concepts for heating and cooling buildings is presented. The following are included: fundamental of passive systems, applications and technical analysis, graphic tools, and information sources. (MHR)

None

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Cooling Towers- Energy Conservation Strategies Understanding Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers are energy conservation devices that Management, more often than not, historically overlooks in the survey of strategies for plant operating efficiencies. The utilization of the colder water off the cooling tower is the money maker!

Smith, M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Designing a 'Near Optimum' Cooling-Water System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling water is expensive to circulate. Reducing its flow - i.e., hiking exchanger outlet temperatures - can cut tower, pump and piping investment as much as one-third and operating cost almost in half. Heat-exchanger-network optimization has been accomplished in large integrated plants, such as petroleum refineries. In many of the chemical process industries, however, a plant contains several individual processes, and network optimization, except on a limited basis, is not feasible. So far, no one has developed similar procedures for designing and optimizing a cooling-water once through-exchanger system. This article attempts to fill the void by presenting a design basis that will produce a 'near optimum' system. A cooling-water system consists of four major components: heat exchangers, cooling towers, circulation piping and pumps. To optimize such a system, one must define the system interactions and apply these relationships to the simultaneous design of the aforementioned equipment. This article develops criteria that for most applications allow one to ignore system interactions, and still design a 'near optimum' system. Cooling-water systems have long been designed by 'rules of thumb' that call for fixing the cool ant temperature-rise across all heat exchangers (usually 20 F) and setting the coolant inlet temperature to the heat exchanger at the site's wet-bulb temperature plus 8 F. These rules produce a workable cooling system; but, by taking the same coolant rise across all exchangers, regardless of the individual process outlet-temperatures, this cannot result in an optimized design. The design method presented in this article replaces the 'rules of thumb' with criteria that are easy to apply and that take into account the effect that the individual exchanger process outlet- temperatures have on cooling-system economics. Economic analyses of actual process have shown that cooling-system investment can be reduced by one third, and cooling-system operating cost by one half, If the proposed design criteria are used instead of the 'rules of thumb.' It has been found that the controlling economic factor for a cooling system is the quantity of water being circulated. Reducing the flow (raising the coolant outlet temperature of heat exchangers) significantly reduces cooling tower, pump and piping investment, and operating cost, and only moderately increases the heat-exchanger investment. The overriding conclusion to be drawn is that cooling water is very expensive, and its conservation can result in significant savings.

Crozier, R. A., Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Radiation shielding calculations for MuCool test area at Fermilab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets being developed for cooling intense muon beams. In this shielding study the results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding calculations performed using the MARS14 code for the MuCool Test Area and including the downstream portion of the target hall and berm around it, access pit, service building, and parking lot are presented and discussed within the context of the proposed MTA experimental configuration.

Igor Rakhno; Carol Johnstone

2004-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

210

Dynamic Model of Facial Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent modifications to windchill forecasting have motivated the development of a rate-of-tissue-cooling model for the purpose of predicting facial cooling times. The model assumes a hollow cylindrical geometry with a fixed internal boundary ...

Peter Tikuisis; Randall J. Osczevski

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

1958-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

212

HEPTAFLUOROPROPANE WITH WATER SPRAY COOLING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEPTAFLUOROPROPANE WITH WATER SPRAY COOLING SYSTEM AS A TOTAL ... and evaluation studies on active and passive fire protection ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Conduction cooled tube supports  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Becht, IV, Charles (Morristown, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

SCINTILLATION DETECTOR COOLING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A well logging apparatus for irradiating earth formations with neutrons and recording the gamma rays emitted therefrom is designed which hss a scintillation decay time of less than 3 x 10/sup -8/ sec and hence may be used with more intense neutron sources. The scintillation crystal is an unactivated NaI crystal maintained at liquid N/sub 2/ temperature. The apparatus with the cooling system is described in detail. (D.L.C.)

George, W.D.; Jones, S.B.; Yule, H.P.

1962-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

215

Cooling your home naturally  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes some alternatives to air conditioning which are common sense suggestions and low-cost retrofit options to cool a house. It first describes how to reflect heat away from roofs, walls, and windows. Blocking heat by using insulation or shading are described. The publication then discusses removing built-up heat, reducing heat-generating sources, and saving energy by selecting energy efficient retrofit appliances. A resource list is provided for further information.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Moving core beam energy absorber and converter  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

217

Proceedings: Cooling Tower Technology Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems performance strongly affect availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Twenty-two papers presented at the 1997 Cooling Tower Technology Conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions.

1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

218

Conduction cooling: multicrate fastbus hardware  

SciTech Connect

Described is a new and novel approach for cooling nuclear instrumentation modules via heat conduction. The simplicity of liquid cooled crates and ease of thermal management with conduction cooled modules are described. While this system was developed primarily for the higher power levels expected with Fastbus electronics, it has many general applications.

Makowiecki, D.; Sims, W.; Larsen, R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art chemistry programs help to ensure the continued operation of open cooling water systems while mitigating corrosion and fouling mechanisms. This document, Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline, prepared by a committee of industry experts, reflects field and laboratory data on corrosion and fouling issues of open cooling systems.BackgroundService Water System Chemical Addition Guideline (Electric Power Research Institute ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

220

Temperature and cooling management in computing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

72 5.1.2 Memory thermal and cooling model . . . . . . . . 75Energy, Thermal and Cooling Management . . . . . . . .Conclusion . . Chapter 4 Thermal and Cooling Management in

Ayoub, Raid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Guide to Minimizing Compress-based Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cooling (direct or indirect), or various liquid cooled solutions. In addition to weather data, the Green Grid organization has developed a free cooling map tool to aid in...

222

Parallel Simulation of Electron Cooling Physics and Beam Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL. CEBAF is the main research accelerator at JLAB. The Nuclear Physics program supports a broad range of activities aimed at research and...

223

Immersion Cooling of Photovoltaic Cells in Highly Concentrated Solar Beams.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Concentrated solar radiation can be utilized to generate electrical power from photovoltaic cells, but concentrated solar radiation increases the photovoltaic cell’s temperature. This increase in… (more)

Darwish, Ahmed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Electronic Materials: Books/Articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FORUMS > ELECTRONIC MATERIALS: BOOKS/ARTICLES, Replies, Views, Originator, Last Post. Search Category: [ advanced search ]. rss feed. Spacer

225

Progress on muon parametric-resonance ionization cooling channel development  

SciTech Connect

Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is intended as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. To implement PIC, a continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel was developed. A 6D cooling with stochastic effects off is demonstrated in a GEANT4/G4beamline model of a system where wedge-shaped Be absorbers are placed at the appropriate dispersion points in the twin-helix channel and are followed by short rf cavities. To proceed to cooling simulations with stochastics on, compensation of the beam aberrations from one absorber to another is required. Initial results on aberration compensation using a set of various-order continuous multipole fields are presented. As another avenue to mitigate the aberration effect, we optimize the cooling channel's period length. We observe a parasitic parametric resonance naturally occurring in the channel's horizontal plane due to the periodic beam energy modulation caused by the absorbers and rf. We discuss options for compensating this resonance and/or properly combining it with the induced half-integer parametric resonance needed for PIC.

V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, B. Erdelyi, J.A. Maloney

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Shielding of a hadron in a finite e-beam  

SciTech Connect

The thorough study of coherent electron cooling, the modern cooling technique capable to deal with accelerators operating in the range of few TeVs, rises many interesting questions. One of them is a shielding dynamics of a hadron in an electron beam. Now this effect is computed analytically in the infinite beam approximation. Many effects are drastically different in finite and infinite plasmas. Here we propose a method to compute the dynamical shielding effect in a finite cylindrical plasma - the realistic model of an electron beam in accelerators.

Elizarov A.; Litvinenko, V.; Wang, G.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

227

Contact-cooled U-monochromators for high heat load x-ray beamlines  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design, expected performance, and preliminary test results of a contact-cooled monochromator for use on high heat load x-ray beamlines. The monochromator has a cross section in the shape of the letter U. This monochromator should be suitable for handing heat fluxes up to 5 W/square millimeter. As such, for the present application, it is compatible with the best internally cooled crystal monochromators. There are three key features in the design of this monochromator. First, it is contact cooled, thereby eliminating fabrication of cooling channels, bonding, and undesirable strains in the monochromator due to coolant-manifold-to-crystal-interface. Second, by illuminating the entire length of the crystal and extracting the central part of the reflected beam, sharp slope changes in the beam profile and thus slope errors are avoided. Last, by appropriate cooling of the crystal, tangential slope error can be substantially reduced.

Khounsary, A.; Yun, W.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Xu, S.; Assoufid, L.; Lee, W.K.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Microwave accelerator E-beam pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for pumping gaseous lasers by means of a microwave accelerator. The microwave accelerator produces a relativistic electron beam which is applied along the longitudinal axis of the laser through an electron beam window. The incident points of the electron beam on the electron beam window are varied by deflection coils to enhance the cooling characteristics of the foil. A thyratron is used to reliably modulate the microwave accelerator to produce electron beam pulses which excite the laser medium to produce laser pulse repetition frequencies not previously obtainable. An aerodynamic window is also disclosed which eliminates foil heating problems, as well as a magnetic bottle for reducing laser cavity length and pressures while maintaining efficient energy deposition.

Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Charge recombination in the muon collider cooling channel  

SciTech Connect

The final stage of the ionization cooling channel for the muon collider must transversely recombine the positively and negatively charged bunches into a single beam before the muons can be accelerated. It is particularly important to minimize any emittance growth in this system since no further cooling takes place before the bunches are collided. We have found that emittance growth could be minimized by using symmetric pairs of bent solenoids and careful matching. We show that a practical design can be found that has transmission {approx}99%, emittance growth less than 0.1%, and minimal dispersion in the recombined bunches.

Fernow, R. C.; Palmer, R. B. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

230

Surface treatment of ceramic articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for producing an article with improved ceramic surface properties including providing an article having a ceramic surface, and placing the article onto a conductive substrate holder in a hermetic enclosure. Thereafter a low pressure ambient is provided in the hermetic enclosure. A plasma including ions of solid materials is produced the ceramic surface of the article being at least partially immersed in a macroparticle free region of the plasma. While the article is immersed in the macroparticle free region, a bias of the substrate holder is biased between a low voltage at which material from the plasma condenses on the surface of the article and a high negative voltage at which ions from the plasma are implanted into the article. 15 figs.

Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

231

Kink instability suppression with stochastic cooling pickup and kicker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kink instability is one of the major beam dynamics issues of the linac-ring based electron ion collider. This head-tail type instability arises from the oscillation of the electron beam inside the opposing ion beam. It must be suppressed to achieve the desired luminosity. There are various ways to suppress the instability, such as tuning the chromaticity in the ion ring or by a dedicated feedback system of the electron beam position at IP, etc. However, each method has its own limitation. In this paper, we will discuss an alternative opportunity of suppressing the kink instability of the proposed eRHIC at BNL using the existing pickup-kicker system of the stochastic cooling system in RHIC.

Hao Y.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Ptitsyn, V.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled, top entry loop nuclear fission reactors. It comprises: a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant; a passive cooling system; and a secondary passive cooling system.

Boardman, C.E.; Hunsbedt, A.; Hui, M.M.

1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

233

Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Cooling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method provide for cooling of a system having an energy source, one or more devices that actively consume energy, and one or more devices that generate heat. The device may include one or more thermoelectric coolers ("TECs") in conductive engagement with at least one of the heat-generating devices, and an energy diverter for diverting at least a portion of the energy from the energy source that is not consumed by the active energy-consuming devices to the TECs.

Mayes, James C. (Sugar Land, TX)

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

235

Superconducting magnet cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

Vander Arend, Peter C. (Center Valley, PA); Fowler, William B. (St. Charles, IL)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

A CONTINUOUS HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP OF THE HOT-DOG-COOKER TYPE  

SciTech Connect

A beam dump with partially rotating water-cooled tube arrays is proposed and studied for the dump of continuous high power density unneutralized ion beams out of the neutral beam injectors. Analyses were made of both steady and transient heat transfer characteristics.

Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Introduction of a Cooling Fan Efficiency Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with four cooling fans of different designs available on thedesign, installation, and use, the performance of cooling fans

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Advanced Cooling Options for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative power plant cooling systems exist that offer significant opportunity for reducing the amount of water used in power plant cooling. These systems include direct dry cooling using air-cooled condensers, indirect dry cooling using air-cooled heat exchangers paired with water-cooled surface condensers, and a variety of hybrid systems incorporating both dry and wet cooling elements. The water savings afforded by the use of these systems, however, comes at a price in the form of more expensive ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Evaporative Roof Cooling - A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the "Energy Crisis" Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retrofit installations show direct energy savings and paybacks from twelve to thirty months. The main operating cost of an Evaporative Roof Cooling System is water. One thousand gallons of water, completely evaporated, will produce over 700 tons of cooling capability. Water usage seldom averages over 100 gallons per 1000 ft^2 of roof area per day or 10 oz. of water per 100 ft^2 every six minutes. Roof Cooling Systems, when planned in new construction, return 1-1/2 times the investment the first year in equipment savings and operating costs. Roof sprays are a low cost cooling solution for warehouses, distribution centers and light manufacturing or assembly areas with light internal loads. See text "Flywheel Cooling."

Abernethy, D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Cooling and Heating Loads | Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling and Heating Loads Cooling and Heating Loads The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on heating and cooling system design loads for the purpose of sizing systems and equipment should be calculated in accordance with generally accepted engineering standards and handbooks such as ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_cooling_and_heating_loads.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Emergency core cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Spray Cooling Enhancement of Air-Cooled Condensers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dry cooling of power plants may be an attractive alternative to wet cooling, particularly where water conservation and environmental protection pose critical siting issues. However, dry cooling technology may be unable to maintain design plant output during the hottest periods of the year, which are often periods of peak system demand. This study—cosponsored by EPRI, the California Energy Commission, and Crockett Cogeneration Co.—evaluated the use of a low-pressure spray enhancement system to...

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

243

Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a passive cooling system. It is for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors having a pool of liquid metal coolant with the heat generating fissionable fuel core substantially immersed in the pool of liquid metal coolant. The passive cooling system including a combination of spaced apart side-by-side partitions in generally concentric arrangement and providing for intermediate fluid circulation and heat transfer therebetween.

Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

244

Don`t overlook natural gas cooling equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If one thought the confusion surrounding chiller specification and operation ended with the availability of CFC-free refrigerant alternatives, think again. Plant engineers involved in the selection and installation of cooling equipment are facing yet another complicated task, this time thanks to deregulation of the electric utility industry. Still in its early stages, deregulation is a process that could take up to a decade. However, deregulation is also bringing about changing pricing structures. Electric power costs may not always be low for everyone. For plants paying $0.02/kwh for electricity, an electric-powered chiller is a must. But those paying $0.35 or $0.40/kwh, even for a few hours, cannot afford NOT to consider something besides an electric-motor-driven chiller. Among the most viable, yet often overlooked, options available is natural gas cooling. Gas cooling equipment gives industrial users the flexibility to choose either gas or electricity to drive their cooling systems. Natural gas cooling is defined here as the use of absorption cooling systems and engine-driven chillers, as alternatives to electric-driven equipment, to deliver chilled water in a conventional manner. Desiccant systems can also be gas fired and are used primarily for providing dry air for process control. Because of their specialized applications, desiccant cooling is not covered in this article.

Katzel, J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with two-phase forced convection Title Improving efficiency of high-concentrator photovoltaics by cooling with two-phase forced convection Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Ho, Tony, Samuel S. Mao, and Ralph Greif Journal International Journal of Energy Research Volume 34 Start Page 1257 Issue 14 Pagination 1257-1271 Date Published 11/2010 Keywords high-concentrator photovoltaic efficiency, two-phase flow cooling applications Abstract The potential of increasing high-concentrator photovoltaic cell efficiency by cooling with two-phase flow is analyzed. The governing energy equations were used to predict cell temperature distributions and cell efficiencies for a photovoltaic cell under 100 suns' concentration. Several design conditions were taken into consideration in the analysis, including cooling channel height, working fluid type (between water and R134a), working fluid inlet temperature, pressure, and mass flow rate. It was observed that the dominant parameter for increasing cell efficiency was the working fluid saturation temperature, which itself is affected by a number of the aforementioned design parameters. The results show R134a at low inlet pressures to be highly effective in this two-phase cooling design.

246

SIMULATING THE COOLING FLOW OF COOL-CORE CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

We carry out high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of a cool core cluster, resolving the flow from Mpc scales down to pc scales. We do not (yet) include any active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating, focusing instead on cooling in order to understand how gas reaches the supermassive black hole at the center of the cluster. We find that, as the gas cools, the cluster develops a very flat temperature profile, undergoing a cooling catastrophe only in the central 10-100 pc of the cluster. Outside of this region, the flow is smooth, with no local cooling instabilities, and naturally produces very little low-temperature gas (below a few keV), in agreement with observations. The gas cooling in the center of the cluster rapidly forms a thin accretion disk. The amount of cold gas produced at the very center grows rapidly until a reasonable estimate of the resulting AGN heating rate (assuming even a moderate accretion efficiency) would overwhelm cooling. We argue that this naturally produces a thermostat which links the cooling of gas out to 100 kpc with the cold gas accretion in the central 100 pc, potentially closing the loop between cooling and heating. Isotropic heat conduction does not affect the result significantly, but we show that including the potential well of the brightest cluster galaxy is necessary to obtain the correct result. Also, we found that the outcome is sensitive to resolution, requiring very high mass resolution to correctly reproduce the small transition radius.

Li Yuan; Bryan, Greg L. [Department of Astronomy, Pupin Physics Laboratories, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Berglund, Robert C. (Saratoga, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

BEAM LINE  

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BEAM LINE BEAM LINE 45 W ILHELM ROENTGEN'S INITIAL DISCOVERY of X-radiation in 1895 led immediately to practical applications in medicine. Over the next few decades X rays proved to be an invaluable tool for the investigation of the micro-world of the atom and the development of the quantum theory of matter. Almost a century later, telescopes designed to detect X-radiation are indispensable for understanding the structure and evolution of the macro-world of stars, galaxies, and the Universe as a whole. The X-Ray Universe by WALLACE H. TUCKER X-ray images of the Universe are strikingly different from the usual visible-light images. 46 SUMMER 1995 did not think: I investigated." Undeterred by NASA's rejection of a proposal to search for cosmic X-radiation, Giacconi persuaded the

250

Technology@TMS: Online Article  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For an article on Java-based Materials Properties software able to calculate thermo-physical and physical properties, TTT/CCT diagrams, stress/strain diagrams, ...

251

Accelerator beam profile analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beam profile analyzer employing sector or quadrant plates each servo controlled to outline the edge of a beam.

Godel, Julius B. (Bayport, NY); Guillaume, Marcel (Grivegnee, BE); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Withnell, Ronald (East Setauket, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Variable area fuel cell cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Article  

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U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Initiative: Update on Validation and Development Phases Traci Rodosta 1 , John Litynski 1 , Sean Plasynski 1 , Lee Spangler 2 , Robert Finley 3 , Edward Steadman 4 , David Ball 5 , Gerald, Hill 6 , Brian McPherson 7 , Elizabeth Burton 8 , Derek Vikara 9 1 National Energy Technology Laboratory, United States Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236, USA. 2 Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA. 3 Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium, Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL 61820, USA.

254

article  

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Performance and cycling of the iron ion hydrogen redox flow cell Performance and cycling of the iron ion hydrogen redox flow cell with various catholyte salts journal Journal of Applied Electrochemistry volume year month pages abstract p A redox flow cell utilizing the Fe2 Fe3 and H H couples is investigated as an energy storage device A conventional polymer electrolyte fuel cell anode and membrane design is employed with a cathode chamber containing a carbon felt flooded with aqueous acidic solution of iron salt The maximum power densities achieved for iron sulfate iron chloride and iron nitrate are and mW cm respectively It is found that the capacity of the iron nitrate solution decreases rapidly during cycling Stable cycling is observed for more than h with iron chloride and iron sulfate solutions Both iron sulfate and iron chloride

255

article  

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Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous Methods for detailed energy data collection of miscellaneous and electronic loads in a commercial office building journal Building and Environment volume year month pages chapter abstract p Miscellaneous and electronic loads MELs consume about of the primary energy used in U S buildings and this share is projected to increase for the foreseeable future Our understanding however of which devices are most responsible for this energy use is still rudimentary due to the difficulty and expense of performing detailed studies on MELs and their energy use In order to better understand the energy use of MELs and the design of MELs field metering studies we conducted a year long study of MELs in an sq ft nbsp m sup sup office building We present insights obtained from this study using wireless plug load

256

article  

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Energy impacts of envelope tightening and mechanical ventilation Energy impacts of envelope tightening and mechanical ventilation for the U S residential sector journal Energy and Buildings volume year month pages abstract p Effective residential envelope air sealing reduces infiltration and associated energy costs for thermal conditioning yet often creates a need for mechanical ventilation to protect indoor air quality This study estimated the potential energy savings of implementing airtightness improvements or absolute standards along with mechanical ventilation throughout the U S housing stock We used a physics based modeling framework to simulate the impact of envelope tightening providing mechanical ventilation as needed There are million homes in the US We calculated the change in energy demand for each home in a nationally representative

257

article  

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Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits journal Building Environment volume year month pages textendash abstract p span style color e2e2e font family textquoteright Arial Unicode MS textquoteright textquoteright Arial Unicode textquoteright Arial textquoteright URW Gothic L textquoteright Helvetica Tahoma sans serif font size px font style normal font variant normal font weight letter spacing normal line height px orphans auto text align justify text indent px text transform none white space normal widows auto word spacing px webkit text size adjust auto webkit text stroke width px background color ffffff display inline important float none Sixteen apartments serving low income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving

258

article  

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International Comparison of Energy Efficiency Criteria and Test International Comparison of Energy Efficiency Criteria and Test Procedures in Standards and Labeling Programs for Computer Monitors and Commercial Gas Stoves year month institution Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory abstract p class BodyText This report presents a technical review and comparative analysis of existing and or proposed international mandatory energy performance standards and voluntary and mandatory energy efficiency labels and test procedures for two products textendash computer monitors and commercial gas stoves textendash being considered for revised and new minimum energy performance standards MEPS in China An overview of the scope of international programs energy efficiency and other energy related requirements description and detailed summary table

259

Articles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 449 Low-Sulfur Diesel: Requirements and Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 1993 Distillate Fuel Oil Outlook for Winter 1993-94 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 1993 Propane Outlook for Winter 1993-1994 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 1993 A Comparison of Selected EIA-782 Data with Other Data Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1993 The Economics of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Review of the 1992-1993 Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Season . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1993 Changes to Form EIA-782C "Monthly Report of Petroleum Products

260

Articles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 449 Low-Sulfur Diesel: Requirements and Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 1993 Distillate Fuel Oil Outlook for Winter 1993-94 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 1993 Propane Outlook for Winter 1993-1994 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 1993 A Comparison of Selected EIA-782 Data with Other Data Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1993 The Economics of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Review of the 1992-1993 Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Season . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1993 Changes to Form EIA-782C "Monthly Report of Petroleum Products

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

article  

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Effect of the shutdown of a large coal fired power plant on ambient mercury species journal Chemosphere volume year month pages abstract p In the spring of a MWe coal fired power...

262

Article  

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Elsevier use only: Received date here; revised date here; accepted date here Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency for the development and...

263

Article  

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Elsevier use only: Received date here; revised date here; accepted date here Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead Federal agency for the development and...

264

ARTICLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Huntington’s disease CAG expansion at the murine Hdh locus is unstable and associated with behavioural abnormalities in mice

Peggy F. Shelbourne; Nigel Killeen; Robert F. Hevner; Heather M. Johnston; Laurence Tecott; Mark Lew; Margaret Ennis; Lucia Ramirez; Zhen Li; Carlo Iannicola; Dan R. Littman; Richard M. Myers

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

article  

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a function of incident solar irradiance and outdoor air temperature illustrating how radiation influences glass temperature and thus effectively lowers the critical switching...

266

article  

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house characteristics Explanatory variables that are correlated with NL includeyear built climate zone floor area house height and whether homes participated in WAPs or if theyare...

267

article  

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p Building energy simulation programs are effective tools for the evaluation of building energy saving and optimization of design The fact that large discrepancies exist in...

268

Articles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . April 1987 Determining Minimum Acceptable Bid Prices for the Test Sale of Strategic Petroleum Reserve Crude Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

269

article  

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Evaluation of China textquoteright s local enforcement of energy efficiency standards and labeling programs for appliances and equipment journal Energy Policy year month abstract...

270

article  

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Assessment of China textquoteright s renewable energy contribution during the th Five Year Plan journal Energy Policy year month abstract p span In recent years China has been...

271

article  

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for employing solid phase supported PF for field measurement of specific ROS in other combustion systems i e biomass burning candles and diesel exhaust and environmental...

272

article  

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of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep Pak XPoSure samplers journal Atmospheric Environment volume...

273

article  

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prospective decomposition analyses are conducted for three different scenarios The scenario analysis indicates that if China wants to realize structural change in the...

274

article  

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and its effect on solar reflectance textendash Part II Development of an accelerated aging method for roofing materials journal Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells volume...

275

article  

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Tracking the Sun VI An Historical Summary of the Installed Price of Photovoltaics in the United States from to year month attachments http eetd lbl gov sites all files lbnl e pdf...

276

article  

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A validation of a ray tracing tool used to generate bi directional A validation of a ray tracing tool used to generate bi directional scattering distribution functions for complex fenestration systems journal Solar Energy volume year month pages abstract p class Body FirstParagraph Fenestration attachments are anticipated to produce significant reductions in building energy use because they can be deployed quickly at low cost nbsp New software tools enable users to assess the building energy impacts of optically complex fenestration systems CFS such as shades Venetian blinds or daylighting systems nbsp However such tools require users to provide bi directional scattering distribution function BSDF data that describe the solar optical performance of the CFS nbsp A free open source Radiance tool em genBSDF em enables users to generate BSDF data for arbitrary CFS nbsp Prior to nbsp genBSDF

277

Direct cooled power electronics substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

Wiles, Randy H. (Powell, TN), Wereszczak, Andrew A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN); Lowe, Kirk T. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published 112011 Conference Location Seattle, WA Call Number LBNL-5128E Abstract Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and...

279

Muon Cooling R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International efforts are under way to design and test a muon ionization cooling channel. The present R&D program is described, and future plans outlined.

Steve Geer

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Laser Cooling of Trapped Ions.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... period, so it can be assumed to give an in- stantaneous impulse to the ... In sympathetic laser cooling, two different ion species are loaded into a trap. ...

2002-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Influence of Cooling on Distortion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 11   Factors that influence the cooling intensity of liquid quenchants...the vapor pressure is, the more difficult the

282

Theory of Semiconductor Laser Cooling .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recently laser cooling of semiconductors has received renewed attention, with the hope that a semiconductor cooler might be able to achieve cryogenic temperatures. In order… (more)

Rupper, Greg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Thermally activated miniaturized cooling system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A comprehensive study of a miniaturized thermally activated cooling system was conducted. This study represents the first work to conceptualize, design, fabricate and successfully test… (more)

Determan, Matthew Delos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Recent progress in tailoring trap-based positron beams  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress is described to implement two approaches to specially tailor trap-based positron beams. Experiments and simulations are presented to understand the limits on the energy spread and pulse duration of positron beams extracted from a Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap after the particles have been buffer-gas cooled (or heated) in the range of temperatures 1000 {>=} T {>=} 300 K. These simulations are also used to predict beam performance for cryogenically cooled positrons. Experiments and simulations are also presented to understand the properties of beams formed when plasmas are tailored in a PM trap in a 5 tesla magnetic field, then non-adiabatically extracted from the field using a specially designed high-permeability grid to create a new class of electrostatically guided beams.

Natisin, M. R.; Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093-0319 (United States)

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

285

GAS COOLED NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-cooled nuclear reactor consisting of a graphite reacting core and reflector structure supported in a containing vessel is described. A gas sealing means is included for sealing between the walls of the graphite structure and containing vessel to prevent the gas coolant by-passing the reacting core. The reacting core is a multi-sided right prismatic structure having a pair of parallel slots around its periphery. The containing vessel is cylindrical and has a rib on its internal surface which supports two continuous ring shaped flexible web members with their radially innermost ends in sealing engagement within the radially outermost portion of the slots. The core structure is supported on ball bearings. This design permits thermal expansion of the core stracture and vessel while maintainirg a peripheral seal between the tvo elements.

Long, E.; Rodwell, W.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

286

Performance prediction of cryogenically cooled silicon crystal monochromator  

SciTech Connect

To predict the performance of the cryogenically cooled silicon crystal, intensive studies have been carried out to sort out the influences of various parameters, such as heat load power and power distribution, cooling coefficient, and beam size. The thermal slope error of the crystal is calculated by finite element modeling. Quadratic law was applied to calculate the rocking-curve width. Heat load tests were also performed with a channel-cut silicon monochromator on beamline ID09 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The silicon crystal is indirectly cooled from the sides by liquid nitrogen. Measured rocking-curve widths are compared with those calculated by finite element modeling. When we include the broadening from the intrinsic rocking-curve width and mounting strain, the calculated rocking-curve width versus heat load is in excellent agreement with experiment.

Zhang Lin; Wulff, Michael; Eybert, Laurent [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Lee, Wah-Keat [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

ARM - Journal Articles 2013 - 2014  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govPublicationsJournal Articles 2013 - 2014 govPublicationsJournal Articles 2013 - 2014 Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Journal Search [ Advanced Search ] Publication Years 2013 149 2012 163 2011 185 2010 197 2009 213 2008 174 2007 150 2006 213 2005 139 2004 141 2003 187 2002 205 2001 207 2000 232 1999 136 1998 172 1997 103 1996 84 1995 124 1994 65 1993 51 1992 47 1991 25 1990 12 1986 1 Journal Articles : 2013 - 2014 Author Article Title Journal Funded By Kafle Micropulse lidar-derived aerosol optical depth climatology at ARM sites worldwide (Citation) Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres ARM

288

Film cooling for a closed loop cooled airfoil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. At least one film cooling hole is defined through a wall of at least one of the cavities for flow communication between an interior of the cavity and an exterior of the vane. The film cooling hole(s) are defined adjacent a potential low LCF life region, so that cooling medium that bleeds out through the film cooling hole(s) reduces a thermal gradient in a vicinity thereof, thereby the increase the LCF life of that region.

Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Nondestructive method and apparatus for imaging grains in curved surfaces of polycrystalline articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nondestructive method, and associated apparatus, are provided for determining the grain flow of the grains in a convex curved, textured polycrystalline surface. The convex, curved surface of a polycrystalline article is aligned in a horizontal x-ray diffractometer and a monochromatic, converging x-ray beam is directed onto the curved surface of the polycrystalline article so that the converging x-ray beam is diffracted by crystallographic planes of the grains in the polycrystalline article. The diffracted x-ray beam is caused to pass through a set of horizontal, parallel slits to limit the height of the beam and thereafter. The linear intensity of the diffracted x-ray is measured, suing a linear position sensitive proportional counter, as a function of position in a direction orthogonal to the counter so as to generate two dimensional data. An image of the grains in the curved surface of the polycrystalline article is provided based on the two-dimensional data.

Carpenter, D.A.

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

290

Nondestructive method and apparatus for imaging grains in curved surfaces of polycrystalline articles  

SciTech Connect

A nondestructive method, and associated apparatus, are provided for determining the grain flow of the grains in a convex curved, textured polycrystalline surface. The convex, curved surface of a polycrystalline article is aligned in a horizontal x-ray diffractometer and a monochromatic, converging x-ray beam is directed onto the curved surface of the polycrystalline article so that the converging x-ray beam is diffracted by crystallographic planes of the grains in the polycrystalline article. The diffracted x-ray beam is caused to pass through a set of horizontal, parallel slits to limit the height of the beam and thereafter. The linear intensity of the diffracted x-ray is measured, using a linear position sensitive proportional counter, as a function of position in a direction orthogonal to the counter so as to generate two dimensional data. An image of the grains in the curved surface of the polycrystalline article is provided based on the two-dimensional data.

Carpenter, Donald A. (Lenior City, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A Possible Hybrid Cooling Channel for a Neutrino Factory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Neutrino Factory requires an intense and well-cooled (in transverse phase space) muon beam. We discuss a hybrid approach for a linear 4D cooling channel consisting of high-pressure gas-filled RF cavities--potentially allowing high gradients without breakdown--and discrete LiH absorbers to provide the necessary energy loss that results in the required muon beam cooling. We report simulations of the channel performance and its comparison with the vacuum case; we also briefly discuss technical and safety issues associated with cavities filled with high-pressure hydrogen gas. Even with additional windows that might be needed for safety reasons, the channel performance is comparable to that of the original, all-vacuum Feasibility Study 2a channel on which our design is based. If tests demonstrate that the gas-filled RF cavities can operate effectively with an intense beam of ionizing particles passing through them, our approach would be an attractive way of avoiding possible breakdown problems with a vacuum RF channel.

Zisman, Michael S; Gallardo, Juan C.

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

292

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

Forsberg, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Polarizing a stored proton beam by spin flip?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss polarizing a proton beam in a storage ring, either by selective removal or by spin flip of the stored ions. Prompted by recent, conflicting calculations, we have carried out a measurement of the spin flip cross section in low-energy electron-proton scattering. The experiment uses the cooling electron beam at COSY as an electron target. The measured cross sections are too small for making spin flip a viable tool in polarizing a stored beam. This invalidates a recent proposal to use co-moving polarized positrons to polarize a stored antiproton beam.

D. Oellers; L. Barion; S. Barsov; U. Bechstedt; P. Benati; S. Bertelli; D. Chiladze; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; J. Dietrich; N. Dolfus; S. Dymov; R. Engels; W. Erven; A. Garishvili; R. Gebel; P. Goslawski; K. Grigoryev; H. Hadamek; A. Kacharava; A. Khoukaz; A. Kulikov; G. Langenberg; A. Lehrach; P. Lenisa; N. Lomidze; B. Lorentz; G. Macharashvili; R. Maier; S. Martin; S. Merzliakov; I. N. Meshkov; H. O. Meyer; M. Mielke; M. Mikirtychiants; S. Mikirtychiants; A. Nass; M. Nekipelov; N. N. Nikolaev; M. Nioradze; G. d'Orsaneo; M. Papenbrock; D. Prasuhn; F. Rathmann; J. Sarkadi; R. Schleichert; A. Smirnov; H. Seyfarth; J. Sowinski; D. Spoelgen; G. Stancari; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; H. J. Stein; H. Stockhorst; H. Straatmann; H. Stroeher; M. Tabidze; G. Tagliente; P. Thoerngren Engblom; S. Trusov; A. Vasilyev; Chr. Weidemann; D. Welsch; P. Wieder; P. Wuestner; P. Zupranski

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

295

ATOMIC BEAM STUDIES IN THE RHIC H-JET POLARIMETER.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of atomic beam production studies are presented. Improved cooling of the atoms before jet formation in the dissociator cold nozzle apparently reduces the atomic beam velocity spread and improves beam focusing conditions. A carefully designed sextupole separating (and focusing) magnet system takes advantage of the high brightness source. As a result a record beam intensity of a 12.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 16} atoms/s was obtained within 10 mm acceptance at the collision point. The results of the polarization dilution factor measurements (by the hydrogen molecules at the collision point) are also presented.

MAKDISI,Y.; ZELENSKI,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KOKHANOVSKI,S.; MAHLER,G.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.; ZUBETS,V.; ET AL.

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Cool Roofs July 26, 2013 - 10:36am Addthis White painted roofs have been popular since ancient times in places like Greece. Similar technology can be easy to adapt to modern homes and other buildings. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/PhotoTalk White painted roofs have been popular since ancient times in places like Greece. Similar technology can be easy to adapt to modern homes and other buildings. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/PhotoTalk If you live in a hot climate, a cool roof can: Save you money on air conditioning Make your home more comfortable in hot weather How does it work? By making your roof more reflective, you reduce heat gain into your home. Check out these resources for more information. A cool roof is one that has been designed to reflect more sunlight and

297

Laser cooling to quantum degeneracy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in a gas of strontium atoms, using laser cooling as the only cooling mechanism. The condensate is formed within a sample that is continuously Doppler cooled to below 1\\muK on a narrow-linewidth transition. The critical phase-space density for BEC is reached in a central region of the sample, in which atoms are rendered transparent for laser cooling photons. The density in this region is enhanced by an additional dipole trap potential. Thermal equilibrium between the gas in this central region and the surrounding laser cooled part of the cloud is established by elastic collisions. Condensates of up to 10^5 atoms can be repeatedly formed on a timescale of 100ms, with prospects for the generation of a continuous atom laser.

Stellmer, Simon; Grimm, Rudolf; Schreck, Florian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Keeping cool in the job  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Describes cooling garments used at nuclear plants to keep workers cooler for longer periods of time, safeguard health, boost efficiency, and elevate morale. Examines 2 cooling concepts tested by EPRI in laboratory and field conditions: using circulating liquids for cooling (represented by 2 commercially available personal cooling systems); and using frozen water for cooling (represented by 2 prototype garments recently developed by EPRI). Explains that pipes and pressure vessels inside nuclear power plants give off significant amounts of waste heat, with temperatures reaching up to 55C (131F)-not very comfortable for maintenance workers who are swathed in radiation protection gear and doing repair work. Finds that the frozen-water concept may considerably extend working time in the power plant. Concludes that the right research can overcome heat, humidity, and close quarters which conspire to make maintenance work in power plants a tough task.

Lihach, N.; O'Brien, J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil  

SciTech Connect

Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC); Osgood, Sarah Jane (East Thetford, VT); Bagepalli, Radhakrishna (Schenectady, NY); Webbon, Waylon Willard (Greenville, SC); Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Research Article Building Thermal, Lighting,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Article Building Thermal, Lighting, and Acoustics Modeling E-mail: yanda@tsinghua.edu.cn A detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: EnergyPlus, DeST...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

European Section Articles of interest.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

European geographical region. European Section Articles of interest. Sections award awards canadian division fats member membership network oils section European Section aocs awards European Section European Section Awards for Young Lipid Scienti

302

Acoustic cooling engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

Hofler, Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM); Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

304

New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

305

ATA diagnostic beam dump conceptual design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic beam dump, able to withstand 72,000 pulses (10 kA, 50 MeV/pulse) per shift was designed and analyzed. The analysis shows that the conceptual beam dump design consisting of 80 vitreous carbon plate-foam elements is able to withstand the thermal and mechanical stresses generated. X-rays produced by bremsstrahlung are absorbed by a three element copper plate-foam x-ray absorber. Cooling between bursts of electron pulses is provided by pressurized helium.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

MANX, A 6-D Muon Cooling Demonstration Experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most ionization cooling schemes now under consideration are based on using many large flasks of liquid hydrogen energy absorber. One important example is the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which has recently been approved to run at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). In the work reported here, a potential muon cooling demonstration experiment based on a continuous liquid energy absorber in a helical cooling channel (HCC) is discussed. The original HCC used a gaseous energy absorber for the engineering advantage of combining the energy absorption and RF energy regeneration in hydrogen-filled RF cavities. In the Muon And Neutrino eXperiment (MANX) that is proposed here, a liquid-filled HCC is used without RF energy regeneration to achieve the largest possible cooling rate in six dimensions. In this case, the magnetic fields of the HCC must diminish as the muons lose momentum as they pass through the liquid energy absorber. The length of the MANX device is determined by the maximum momentum of the muon test beam and the maximum practical field that can be sustained at the magnet coils. We have studied a 3 meter-long HCC example that could be inserted between the MICE spectrometers at RAL.

Roberts,Thomas; Alsharo'a, Mohammad; Hanlet, Pierrick M; Johnson, Rolland P; Kuchnir, Moyses; Paul, Kevin; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Moretti, Alfred; Popovic, Milorad; Yarba, Victor; Kaplan, Daniel; Yonehara, Katsuya

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Predictive pre-cooling control for low lift radiant cooling using building thermal mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low lift cooling systems (LLCS) hold the potential for significant energy savings relative to conventional cooling systems. An LLCS is a cooling system which leverages existing HVAC technologies to provide low energy cooling ...

Gayeski, Nicholas (Nicholas Thomas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Simple beam profile monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

309

Non-intrusive cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A readily replaceable heat exchange cooling jacket for applying fluid to a system conduit pipe. The cooling jacket comprises at least two members, separable into upper and lower portions. A chamber is formed between the conduit pipe and cooling jacket once the members are positioned about the pipe. The upper portion includes a fluid spray means positioned above the pipe and the bottom portion includes a fluid removal means. The heat exchange cooling jacket is adaptable with a drain tank, a heat exchanger, a pump and other standard equipment to provide a system for removing heat from a pipe. A method to remove heat from a pipe, includes the steps of enclosing a portion of the pipe with a jacket to form a chamber between an outside surface of the pipe and the cooling jacket; spraying cooling fluid at low pressure from an upper portion of the cooling jacket, allowing the fluid to flow downwardly by gravity along the surface of the pipe toward a bottom portion of the chamber; and removing the fluid at the bottom portion of the chamber.

Morrison, Edward F. (Burnt Hills, NY); Bergman, John W. (Barrington, NH)

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

310

Solid-State Lighting: Related Articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Articles on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Related Articles on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Related Articles on Delicious Rank Solid-State...

311

CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING and COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l U CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING* M.Wahlig,be capable of operating solar heating and cooling systemsand now transferred to ERDA, on solar heating and cooling of

Dols, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Cooling arrangement for a tapered turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

A cooling arrangement (11) for a highly tapered gas turbine blade (10). The cooling arrangement (11) includes a pair of parallel triple-pass serpentine cooling circuits (80,82) formed in an inner radial portion (50) of the blade, and a respective pair of single radial channel cooling circuits (84,86) formed in an outer radial portion (52) of the blade (10), with each single radial channel receiving the cooling fluid discharged from a respective one of the triple-pass serpentine cooling circuit. The cooling arrangement advantageously provides a higher degree of cooling to the most highly stressed radially inner portion of the blade, while providing a lower degree of cooling to the less highly stressed radially outer portion of the blade. The cooling arrangement can be implemented with known casting techniques, thereby facilitating its use on highly tapered, highly twisted Row 4 industrial gas turbine blades that could not be cooled with prior art cooling arrangements.

Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

313

MUCOOL: Ionization Cooling R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory MUCOOL Muon Ionization Cooling R&D Welcome to the muon ionization cooling experimental R&D page. The MuCool collaboration has been formed to pursue the development of a...

314

Evaluation of the cooling fan efficiency index.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the cooling effect (measured with a thermal manikin)output is the body cooling effect [5]. Thermal manikins withThermal manikins can be used to measure the fan cooling

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Introduction of a Cooling Fan Efficiency Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the cooling effect measured with the thermal manikin andThe mea- sured cooling effect with the thermal manikin isby a thermal manikin to quantify the cooling effects of air

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Economic Evaluation of Alternative Cooling Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water use and conservation at electric power plants are becoming increasingly important siting issues. At most plants, the requirement for condensing exhaust steam from the steam turbine, generically known as power plant cooling, is the major use of water. Alternative cooling systems exist, including once-through cooling, wet-recirculating cooling, dry cooling, and hybrid (or wet/dry cooling), some of which offer significant opportunity for water conservation. These water savings normally, but perhaps no...

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

Relativistic electron beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

1975-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

318

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Cooling Water Intake Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The types of cooling water systems to be evaluated are: Wet Cooling Tower - The condenser is cooled with water recirculated to a mechanical draft cooling tower. Because there...

319

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Generation, Absorption Cooling, Space Cooling,use heat to drive an absorption cooling cycle, and the heatlargest drivers for absorption cooling technology adoption

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

SRF photoinjector for proof-of-principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) based on Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier promises to be a very good way to cool protons and ions at high energies. A proof of principle experiment to demonstrate cooling at 40 GeV/u is under construction at BNL. One of possible sources to provide sufficient quality electron beam for this experiment is a SRF photoinjector. In this paper we discuss design and simulated performance of the photoinjector based on existing 112 MHz SRF gun and newly designed single-cavity SRF linac operating at 704 MHz.

Kayran D.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; et al

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Cool roofs could save money, save planet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool roofs could save money, save planet Title Cool roofs could save money, save planet Publication Type Broadcast Year of Publication 2009 Authors Akbari, Hashem, and Arthur H....

322

Temperature and cooling management in computing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

78 5.2 Combined Energy, Thermal and CoolingOne reason for thermal and energy variations betweenWe propose a combined energy, thermal and cooling management

Ayoub, Raid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Vehicle Cooling Systems - Energy Innovation Portal  

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and ... The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a ...

324

Cooling Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Power Plant Cooling Technologies Cooling Technologies Cooling tower at Steamboat Springs geothermal power plant in Steamboat Springs, NV. Power generation facilities that rely on thermal sources as their energy inputs such as Coal, Natural Gas, Geothermal, Concentrates Solar Power, and Nuclear require cooling technologies to reject the heat that is created. The second law of thermodynamics states: "No process can convert heat absorbed from a reservoir at one temperature directly into work without also rejecting heat to a cooler reservoir. That is, no heat engine is 100% efficient"[1] In the context of power generation from thermal energy, this means that any heat that is created must be rejected. Heat is most commonly rejected in

325

Convective Cooling of Lightning Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report experimental data which trace the time development of electric discharge channels in air and which demonstrate the turbulent cooling of such channels. These data provide qualitative confirmation of the model proposed and used by Hill, ...

J. M. Picone; J. P. Boris; J. R. Greig; M. Raleigh; R. F. Fernsler

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Success Stories: Cool Color Roofs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

instead of absorbing, solar heat. So the question for scientists interested in increasing energy efficiency is, can one make a roof that is both cool and dark? Hashem Akbari, Paul...

327

Energy Savers: Cool Summer Tips  

SciTech Connect

A tri-fold brochure addressing energy-saving tips for homeowners ranging from low- or no-cost suggestions to higher cost suggestions for longer-term savings. Cooling, windows, weatherizing, and landscaping are addressed.

Miller, M.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

328

Cooling Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and...

329

Absorption Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

it is also referred to as gas-fired cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial...

330

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating March 26, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo courtesy of Solar Design Associates, Inc. Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo courtesy of Solar Design Associates, Inc. Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Read Energy Saver's article on solar heating systems to see whether see whether active solar heating is a good option for you. Most people are familiar with solar photovoltaic panels, but far fewer know about using solar as a source of heat in their homes. Active solar heating uses solar energy to heat fluid or air, which then transfers the solar heat

331

NK Muon Beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NK Muon Beam will be a modified version of the existing NT beam line. The decision to employ a modified version of the NT beam line was made based on considerations of cost and availability of the beam line. Preliminary studies considered use of other beam lines, e.g., the NW beam line, and even of moving the bubble chamber with its superconducting coils but were rejected for reasons such as cost, personnel limitations, and potential conflicts with other users.

Koizumi, G.

1988-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

332

How and why side cooling of high-heat-load optics works.  

SciTech Connect

The temperature gradients in a side-cooled mirror would create a thermal bending moment along the mirror length. For a slender side-cooled mirror with longitudinally uniform incident beam, the tangential slope error is primarily due to the bowing deformation caused by this thermal bending moment. The thermal bending moment depends on the temperature distribution, which is a function of the mirror geometry, heat load, and cooling design. Optimal design of a side-cooled mirror can achieve a 'favorable' temperature profile to make the thermal bending moment, with respect to the substrate neutral plane, approach zero, so that the bowing deformation of the mirror is minimized. To understand the deformation of a side-cooled mirror and achieve an optimal design, a theoretical formulation is developed.

Li, Y.; Khounsary, A.; Nair, S.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); IIT

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, in all too many industrial plants, are often the neglected units of the process chain which are hidden bonanzas for energy conservation and dollar savings. By lowering the entire systems temperature by the use of colder water returning from the cooling tower, greater chemical product volume can be condensed and less energy is required to run compressors. This paper will discuss two case histories and the rapid cost-effective savings thereby accruing through retrofit.

Burger, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Quantum limit of photothermal cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of cooling a mechanical oscillator using the photothermal (bolometric) force. Contrary to previous attempts to model this system, we take into account the noise effects due to the granular nature of photon absorption. This allows us to tackle the cooling problem down to the noise dominated regime and to find reasonable estimates for the lowest achievable phonon occupation in the cantilever.

De Liberato, Simone; Nori, Franco

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A computer simulation appraisal of non-residential low energy cooling systems in California  

SciTech Connect

An appraisal of the potential performance of different Low Energy Cooling (LEC) systems in nonresidential buildings in California is being conducted using computer simulation. The paper presents results from the first phase of the study, which addressed the systems that can be modeled, with the DOE-2.1E simulation program. The following LEC technologies were simulated as variants of a conventional variable-air-volume system with vapor compression cooling and mixing ventilation in the occupied spaces: Air-side indirect and indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beams. Displacement ventilation. Results are presented for four populous climates, represented by Oakland, Sacramento, Pasadena and San Diego. The greatest energy savings are obtained from a combination of displacement ventilation and air-side indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beam systems have the lowest peak demand but do not reduce energy consumption significantly because the reduction in fan energy is offse t by a reduction in air-side free cooling. Overall, the results indicate significant opportunities for LEC technologies to reduce energy consumption and demand in nonresidential new construction and retrofit.

Bourassa, Norman; Haves, Philip; Huang, Joe

2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Technique for measuring cooling patterns in ion source grids by infrared scanning  

SciTech Connect

Many plasma sources designed for neutral beam injection heating of plasmas now employ copper beam acceleration grids which are water-cooled by small capillary tubes fed from one or more headers. To prevent thermally-induced warpage of these grids it is essential that one be able to detect inhomogeneities in the cooling. Due to the very strong thermal coupling between adjacent cooling lines and the concomitant rapid equilibration times, it is not practical to make such measurements in a direct manner with a contact thermometer. We have developed a technique whereby we send a burst of hot water through an initially cool grid, followed by a burst of cool water, and record the transient thermal behavior usng an infrared television camera. This technique, which would be useful for any system with cooling paths that are strongly coupled thermally, has been applied to a number of sources built for the PLT and PDX tokamaks, and has proven highly effective in locating cooling deficiencies and blocked capillary tubes.

Grisham, L.R.; Eubank, H.P.; Kugel, H.W.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator and then out to a multiplicity of holes to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe to the suction plenum and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum. 3 figs.

English, W.A.; Young, R.R.

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

338

Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler 18 and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor 24 where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap 50 which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator 26 and then out to a multiplicity of holes 52 to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber 58 to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole 62 also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator 68 from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe 66 to the suction plenum 64 and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum 64.

English, William A. (Murrysville, PA); Young, Robert R. (Murrysville, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Energy Efficient Electronics Cooling Project  

SciTech Connect

Parker Precision Cooling Business Unit was awarded a Department of Energy grant (DE-EE0000412) to support the DOE-ITP goal of reducing industrial energy intensity and GHG emissions. The project proposed by Precision Cooling was to accelerate the development of a cooling technology for high heat generating electronics components. These components are specifically related to power electronics found in power drives focused on the inverter, converter and transformer modules. The proposed cooling system was expected to simultaneously remove heat from all three of the major modules listed above, while remaining dielectric under all operating conditions. Development of the cooling system to meet specific customer's requirements and constraints not only required a robust system design, but also new components to support long system functionality. Components requiring further development and testing during this project included pumps, fluid couplings, cold plates and condensers. All four of these major categories of components are required in every Precision Cooling system. Not only was design a key area of focus, but the process for manufacturing these components had to be determined and proven through the system development.

Steve O'Shaughnessey; Tim Louvar; Mike Trumbower; Jessica Hunnicutt; Neil Myers

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

340

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and remains on the roadmap for the foreseeable future. This is because the heat capacity of liquids is orders of magnitude larger than that of air and once heat has been transferred to a liquid, it can be removed from the datacenter efficiently. The transition from air to liquid cooling is an inflection point providing an opportunity to work collectively to set guidelines for facilitating the energy efficiency of liquid-cooled High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and systems. The vision is to use non-compressor-based cooling, to facilitate heat re-use, and thereby build solutions that are more energy-efficient, less carbon intensive and more cost effective than their air-cooled predecessors. The Energy Efficient HPC Working Group is developing guidelines for warmer liquid-cooling temperatures in order to standardize facility and HPC equipment, and provide more opportunity for reuse of waste heat. This report describes the development of those guidelines.

IBM Corporation; Energy Efficient HPC Working Group; Hewlett Packard Corporation; SGI; Cray Inc.; Intel Corporation; U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center; Coles, Henry; Ellsworth, Michael; Martinez, David J.; Bailey, Anna-Maria; Banisadr, Farhad; Bates, Natalie; Coghlan, Susan; Cowley, David E.; Dube, Nicholas; Fields, Parks; Greenberg, Steve; Iyengar, Madhusudan; Kulesza, Peter R.; Loncaric, Josip; McCann, Tim; Pautsch, Greg; Patterson, Michael K.; Rivera, Richard G.; Rottman, Greg K.; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William; Vinson, Wade; Wescott, Ralph

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air  

SciTech Connect

The importance of controlling humidity in buildings is cause for concern, in part, because of indoor air quality problems associated with excess moisture in air-conditioning systems. But more universally, the need for ventilation air has forced HVAC equipment (originally optimized for high efficiency in removing sensible heat loads) to remove high moisture loads. To assist cooling equipment and meet the challenge of larger ventilation loads, several technologies have succeeded in commercial buildings. Newer technologies such as subcool/reheat and heat pipe reheat show promise. These increase latent capacity of cooling-based systems by reducing their sensible capacity. Also, desiccant wheels have traditionally provided deeper-drying capacity by using thermal energy in place of electrical power to remove the latent load. Regardless of what mix of technologies is best for a particular application, there is a need for a more effective way of thinking about the cooling loads created by ventilation air. It is clear from the literature that all-too-frequently, HVAC systems do not perform well unless the ventilation air loads have been effectively addressed at the original design stage. This article proposes an engineering shorthand, an annual load index for ventilation air. This index will aid in the complex process of improving the ability of HVAC systems to deal efficiently with the amount of fresh air the industry has deemed useful for maintaining comfort in buildings. Examination of typical behavior of weather shows that latent loads usually exceed sensible loads in ventilation air by at least 3:1 and often as much as 8:1. A designer can use the engineering shorthand indexes presented to quickly assess the importance of this fact for a given system design. To size those components after they are selected, the designer can refer to Chapter 24 of the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals, which includes separate values for peak moisture and peak temperature.

Harriman, L.G. III [Mason-Grant, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Plager, D. [Quantitative Decision Support, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Kosar, D. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

BEAM STOP DESIGN METHODOLOGY AND DESCRIPTION OF A NEW SNS BEAM STOP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of accelerator components such as magnets, accelerator cavities and beam instruments tends to be a fairly standardized and collective effort within the particle accelerator community with well established performance, reliability and, in some cases, even budgetary criteria. Beam stop design, by contrast, has been comparatively subjective historically with much more general goals. This lack of rigor has lead to a variety of facility implementations with limited standardization and minimal consensus on approach to development within the particle accelerator community. At the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), for example, there are four high power beam stops in use, three of which have significantly different design solutions. This paper describes the design of a new off-momentum beam stop for the SNS. The technical description of the system will be complemented by a discussion of design methodology. This paper presented an overview of the new SNS HEBT off-momentum beam stop and outlined a methodology for beam stop system design. The new beam stop consists of aluminium and steel blocks cooled by a closed-loop forced-air system and is expected to be commissioned this summer. The design methodology outlined in the paper represents a basic description of the process, data, analyses and critical decisions involved in the development of a beam stop system.

Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Plum, Michael A [ORNL; Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Jacobs, Lorelei L [ORNL; Lu, Wei [ORNL; McTeer, Stephen Mark [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

344

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

345

Definition: Water Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Cooling Water Cooling Water cooling is commonly defined as a method of using water as a heat conduction to remove heat from an object, machine, or other substance by passing cold water over or through it. In energy generation, water cooling is typically used to cool steam back into water so it can be used again in the generation process.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Water cooling is a method of heat removal from components and industrial equipment. As opposed to air cooling, water is used as the heat conductor. Water cooling is commonly used for cooling automobile internal combustion engines and large industrial facilities such as steam electric power plants, hydroelectric generators, petroleum refineries and chemical plants. Other uses include cooling the barrels of machine guns, cooling of

346

Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography  

SciTech Connect

Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

Hampel, U. [Institute of Fluid Dynamics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); AREVA Endowed Chair of Imaging Techniques in Energy and Process Engineering, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Baertling, Y.; Hoppe, D. [Institute of Fluid Dynamics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Kuksanov, N.; Fadeev, S.; Salimov, R. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Science, Lavrentiev av. 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Heat transfer analysis and optimization of two-beam microelectromechanical thermal actuators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article investigates rectangular two-beam microelectromechanical thermal actuators and provides a method for their optimization. The thermal actuators investigated consisted of two asymmetric parallel arms

Ryan Hickey; Marek Kujath; Ted Hubbard

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Oriented spray-assisted cooling tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparatus useful for heat exchange by evaporative cooling when employed in conjunction with a conventional cooling tower. The arrangement includes a header pipe which is used to divert a portion of the water in the cooling tower supply conduit up stream of the cooling tower to a multiplicity of vertical pipes and spray nozzles which are evenly spaced external to the cooling tower so as to produce a uniform spray pattern oriented toward the central axis of the cooling tower and thereby induce an air flow into the cooling tower which is greater than otherwise achieved. By spraying the water to be cooled towards the cooling tower in a region external to the cooling tower in a manner such that the spray falls just short of the cooling tower basin, the spray does not interfere with the operation of the cooling tower, proper, and the-maximum increase in air velocity is achieved just above the cooling tower basin where it is most effective. The sprayed water lands on a concrete or asphalt apron which extends from the header pipe to the cooling tower basin and is gently sloped towards the cooling tower basin such that the sprayed water drains into the basin. By diverting a portion of the water to be cooled to a multiplicity of sprays external to the cooling tower, thermal performance is improved. 4 figs.

Bowman, C.F.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

349

Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Reflective Greenhouses in SE Spain Title Mesoscale Climatic Simulation of Surface Air Temperature Cooling by Highly Reflective Greenhouses in SE Spain Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Campra, Pablo, and Dev Millstein Journal Environmental Science & Technology Volume 47 Issue 21 Pagination 12284 - 12290 Date Published 11/2013 ISSN 0013-936X Keywords buildings, Heat Island Group Abstract A long-term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world, at the Province of Almeria, SE Spain, associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area. The availability of reliable long-term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate. Using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, we have run a sensitivity experiment to simulate the impact of the observed surface albedo change on monthly and annual surface air temperatures. The model output showed a mean annual cooling of 0.25 °C associated with a 0.09 albedo increase, and a reduction of 22.8 W m-2 of net incoming solar radiation at surface. Mean reduction of summer daily maximum temperatures was 0.49 °C, with the largest single-day decrease equal to 1.3 °C. WRF output was evaluated and compared with observations. A mean annual warm bias (MBE) of 0.42 °C was estimated. High correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.9) were found between modeled and observed values. This study has particular interest in the assessment of the potential for urban temperature cooling by cool roofs deployment projects, as well as in the evaluation of mesoscale climatic models performance.

350

Article removal device for glovebox  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article removal device for a glovebox is described comprising a conduit extending through a glovebox wall which may be closed by a plug within the glovebox, and a fire-resistant container closing the outer end of the conduit and housing a removable container for receiving pyrophoric or otherwise hazardous material without disturbing the interior environment of the glovebox or adversely affecting the environment outside of the glovebox. (Official Gazette)

Guyer, R.H.; Leebl, R.G.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Method for making glass-ceramic articles exhibiting high frangibility  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is concerned with glass-ceramic articles having compositions within a very narrowly-delimited area of the MgO-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 -B.sub.2 O.sub.3 -SiO.sub.2 field and having alpha-quartz and sapphirine as the principal crystal phases, resulting from nucleation through a combination of TiO.sub.2 and ZrO.sub.2. Upon contacting such articles with lithium ions at an elevated temperature, said lithium ions will replace magnesium ions on a two Li.sup.+-for-one Mg.sup..sup.+2 basis within the crystal structures, thereby providing a unitary glass-ceramic article having an integral surface layer wherein the principal crystal phase is a lithium-stuffed beta-quartz solid solution. That transformation of crystal phases results in compressive stresses being set up within the surface layer as the articles are cooled. Through the careful control of composition, crystallization treatment, and the parameters of the replacement reaction in the crystal structures, a tremendous degree of stored elastic energy can be developed within the articles such that they will demonstrate frangibility when fractured but will not exhibit undesirable spontaneous breakage and/or spalling.

Beall, George H. (Big Flats, NY); Brydges, III., William T. (Corning, NY); Ference, Joseph (Corning, NY); Kozlowski, Theodore R. (Horseheads, NY)

1976-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

352

Dry Cooling: Perspectives on Future Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total number of dry-cooled power plants in the United States has increased significantly in recent years. This is because nonutility generators are using dry-cooling systems to meet environmental protection and water conservation requirements. A survey shows that utility planners expect that dry cooling could become an important cooling-system option for new utility plants.

1991-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

353

Parametric Study of Turbine Blade Internal Cooling and Film Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines are extensively used in the aviation and power generation industries. They are used as topping cycles in combined cycle power plants, or as stand alone power generation units. Gains in thermodynamic efficiency can be realized by increasing the turbine inlet temperatures. Since modern turbine inlet temperatures exceed the melting point of the constituent superalloys, it is necessary to provide an aggressive cooling system. Relatively cool air, ducted from the compressor of the engine is used to remove heat from the hot turbine blade. This air flows through passages in the hollow blade (internal cooling), and is also ejected onto the surface of the blade to form an insulating film (film cooling). Modern land-based gas turbine engines use high Reynolds number internal flow to cool their internal passages. The first part of this study focuses on experiments pertaining to passages with Reynolds numbers of up to 400,000. Common turbulator designs (45degree parallel sharp-edged and round-edged) ribs are studied. Older correlations are found to require corrections in order to be valid in the high Reynolds number parameter space. The effect of rotation on heat transfer in a typical three-pass serpentine channel is studied using a computational model with near-wall refinement. Results from this computational study indicate that the hub experiences abnormally high heat transfer under rotation. An experimental study is conducted at Buoyancy numbers similar to an actual engine on a wedge shaped model trailing edge, roughened with pin-fins and equipped with slot ejection. Results show an asymmetery between the leading and trailing surfaces due to rotation - a difference which is subdued due to the provision of pin-fins. Film cooling effectiveness is measured by the PSP mass transfer analogy technique in two different configurations: a flat plate and a typical high pressure turbine blade. Parameters studied include a step immediately upstream of a row of holes; the Strouhal number (quantifying rotor-stator interaction) and coolant to mainstream density ratio. Results show a deterioration in film cooling effectiveness with on increasing the Strouhal number. Using a coolant with a higher density results in higher film cooling effectiveness.

Rallabandi, Akhilesh P.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Personal cooling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable lightweight cooling apparatus for cooling a human body is disclosed, having a channeled sheet which absorbs sweat and/or evaporative liquid, a layer of highly conductive fibers adjacent the channeled sheet; and, an air-moving device for moving air through the channeled sheet, wherein the layer of fibers redistributes heat uniformly across the object being cooled, while the air moving within the channeled sheet evaporates sweat and/or other evaporative liquid, absorbs evaporated moisture and the uniformly distributed heat generated by the human body, and discharges them into the environment. Also disclosed is a method for removing heat generated by the human body, comprising the steps of providing a garment to be placed in thermal communication with the body; placing a layer of highly conductive fibers within the garment adjacent the body for uniformly distributing the heat generated by the body; attaching an air-moving device in communication with the garment for forcing air into the garment; removably positioning an exchangeable heat sink in communication with the air-moving device for cooling the air prior to the air entering the garment; and, equipping the garment with a channeled sheet in communication with the air-moving device so that air can be directed into the channeled sheet and adjacent the layer of fibers to expell heat and moisture from the body by the air being directed out of the channeled sheet and into the environment. The cooling system may be configured to operate in both sealed and unsealed garments.

Siman-Tov, Moshe (Knoxville, TN); Crabtree, Jerry Allen (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A Successful Cool Storage Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air conditioning load, which is highly coincident with HL&P's system peak, provided a large market for cool storage technologies. Initial market research made it very clear that a special cool storage rate was required to successfully market the technology. Development of the rate required an integrated, multidepartment effort and extensive use of DSManager, an integrated resource planning model. An experimental version of the rate was initially implemented as part of the initial phase of the cool storage program. A permanent rate, incorporating lessons learned from the experimental rate, was then developed for the long term implementation of the program. The permanent rate went through a lengthy regulatory approval process which included intervention by a local natural gas distribution company. The end result is a very successful cool storage program with 52 projects and 31 megawatts of demand reduction in the first three and one-half years of program implementation.

Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While our engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified for the particular requirements before a cooling tower is purchased. After it is put on the line and the cold water temperature or volume becomes inadequate, they look to solutions other than the obvious. While all cooling towers are purchased to function at 100% of capability in accordance with the required Design Conditions, in actual on stream employment, the level of operation many times is lower, downwards to as much as 50% due to a variety of reasons: (1) The present service needed is now greater than the original requirements which the tower was purchased for; (2) 'Slippage' due to usage and perhaps deficient maintenance has reduced the performance of the tower over years of operation; (3) The installation could have been originally undersized due to the low bidder syndrome; and (4) New plant expansion needs colder temperatures off the tower.

Burger, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Oxygen Absorption in Cooling Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inhomogeneous cooling flow scenario predicts the existence of large quantities of gas in massive elliptical galaxies, groups, and clusters that have cooled and dropped out of the flow. Using spatially resolved, deprojected X-ray spectra from the ROSAT PSPC we have detected strong absorption over energies ~0.4-0.8 keV intrinsic to the central ~1 arcmin of the galaxy, NGC 1399, the group, NGC 5044, and the cluster, A1795. These systems have amongst the largest nearby cooling flows in their respective classes and low Galactic columns. Since no excess absorption is indicated for energies below ~0.4 keV the most reasonable model for the absorber is warm, collisionally ionized gas with T=10^{5-6} K where ionized states of oxygen provide most of the absorption. Attributing the absorption only to ionized gas reconciles the large columns of cold H and He inferred from Einstein and ASCA with the lack of such columns inferred from ROSAT, and also is consistent with the negligible atomic and molecular H inferred from HI, and CO observations of cooling flows. The prediction of warm ionized gas as the product of mass drop-out in these and other cooling flows can be verified by Chandra, XMM, and ASTRO-E.

David A. Buote

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

Bartholomew Heating and Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heating and Cooling Heating and Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Name Bartholomew Heating and Cooling Place Linwood, NJ Website http://bartholomewheatingandco References Bartholomew Heating and Cooling[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Bartholomew Heating and Cooling is a company located in Linwood, NJ. References ↑ "Bartholomew Heating and Cooling" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Bartholomew_Heating_and_Cooling&oldid=381585" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

359

Integrated Modeling of Building Energy Requirements Incorporating Solar Assisted Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat recovery and absorption cooling are selected in allself- generated and absorption cooling displaces a further

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Laser-cooled atoms inside a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the loading of laser-cooled rubidium atoms into a single-mode hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber. Inside the fiber, the atoms are confined by a far-detuned optical trap and probed by a weak resonant beam. We ...

Bajcsy, M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

cooling | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cooling cooling Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more energy from the utility grid than it produces using renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, or geothermal installations (and sometimes these renewable energy resources actually feed energy back to the utility grid).

362

Keeping Cool at Fermilab INSIDE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 28, 1996 June 28, 1996 Number 13 Keeping Cool at Fermilab INSIDE 2 University Close-Up: The University of Minnesota 6 Summer at Fermilab by Eric Berger, Office of Public Affairs As debate heats up among lawmakers on the fate of the nation's helium reserve, Fermilab researchers prepare for a long, cold summer. How cold? Minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit-the temperature of the liquid helium that cools the Tevatron's supercon- ducting magnets. Proposed congressional changes to the 1960 Helium Act, however, could ultimately affect Fermilab's vital cooling operation, which uses 13 million cubic feet of gaseous helium annually. Electric current travels through a supercon- ductor friction-free, like skaters on smooth ice, allowing physicists to run accelerators at higher f energies, while using far less electricity than

363

Quench cooling under reduced gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the quench cooling experiments performed with liquid O2 under different levels of gravity simulated with the magnetic gravity compensation. A copper disk is quenched from 270K to 90K. It is found that the cooling time in microgravity is very long in comparison with any other gravity level. This phenomenon is explained by the isolation effect of the gas surrounding the disk. The liquid subcooling is shown to drastically improuve the heat exchange thus reducing the cooling time (about 20 times). The effect of subcooling on the heat transfer is analyzed at different gravity levels. It is shown that such type of experiments cannot be used for the analysis of the critical heat flux (CHF) of the boiling crisis. The minimum heat flux (MHF) of boiling is analyzed instead.

Chatain, D; Nikolayev, V S; Beysens, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Cooling Tower Inspection with Scuba  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A serious problem of scale and other solid material settling in heat transfer equipment was threatening to shut down our ethylene plant. All evidence pointed to the cooling tower as the source of the contamination. Visual inspection of the cooling tower pump suction basin was accomplished by diving into the basin using SCUBA gear. It was possible to see a build-up of debris on the pump suction basket strainers and on the floor of the sumps. Also, it was discovered that one of the four baskets had been installed incorrectly. Photographs of the basket strainers were taken to aid in describing their exact condition. With the aid of SCUBA it was possible to sufficiently clean the pump sumps so that costly downtime was avoided. Likewise, using this technique, steps were taken to greatly reduce the chance for further contamination of the circulating cooling water system.

Brenner, W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Thermal performance of cooling towers  

SciTech Connect

Wet cooling towers are often used in HVAC applications to reject heat to the atmosphere. Heat rejection is accomplished within the tower by heat and mass transfer between hot water droplets and ambient air. These heat and mass transfer processes and the resulting coefficient of performance are often misunderstood and misinterpreted. To demystify these concepts, the heat and mass transfer exchange at the water droplet level are reviewed. This is followed by an analysis of an idealized spray-type tower to show how cooling tower performance is affected by fill height, water retention time, and air and water mass flow rates. Finally, the so-called coefficient of performance of cooling towers is examined.

Bernier, M.A. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Desiccant Cooling Systems - A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling systems have been investigated extensively during the past decade as alternatives to electrically driven vapor compression systems because regeneration temperatures of the desiccant - about 160°F, can be achieved using natural gas or by solar systems. Comfort is achieved by reducing the moisture content of air by a solid or liquid desiccant and then reducing the temperature in an evaporative cooler (direct or indirect). Another system is one where the dehumidifier removes enough moisture to meet the latent portion of the load while the sensible portion is met by a vapor compression cooling system; desiccant regeneration is achieved by using the heat rejected from the condenser together with other thermal sources. At present, residential desiccant cooling systems are in actual operation but are more costly than vapor compression systems, resulting in relatively long payback periods. Component efficiencies need to be improved, particularly the efficiency of the dehumidifier.

Kettleborough, C. F.; Ullah, M. R.; Waugaman, D. G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-modulated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-dimensional nano-structure arrays by passing a pulsed atomic beam through an intensity-modulated continuous of ``cooling'' along the longitudinal direction. This enables fabrication of vertically heterogeneous nano

Zhu, Xiangdong

368

Diagnostics of the ITER neutral beam test facility  

SciTech Connect

The ITER heating neutral beam (HNB) injector, based on negative ions accelerated at 1 MV, will be tested and optimized in the SPIDER source and MITICA full injector prototypes, using a set of diagnostics not available on the ITER HNB. The RF source, where the H{sup -}/D{sup -} production is enhanced by cesium evaporation, will be monitored with thermocouples, electrostatic probes, optical emission spectroscopy, cavity ring down, and laser absorption spectroscopy. The beam is analyzed by cooling water calorimetry, a short pulse instrumented calorimeter, beam emission spectroscopy, visible tomography, and neutron imaging. Design of the diagnostic systems is presented.

Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Agostini, M.; Brombin, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Gazza, E.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Spolaore, M.; Zaniol, B. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Sonato, P.; De Muri, M. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Padova University (Italy); Croci, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); Gorini, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Lamination cooling system formation method  

SciTech Connect

An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a cooling system. A stack of laminations have apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define straight or angled cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack. Gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

Rippel, Wally E. (Altadena, CA); Kobayashi, Daryl M. (Monrovia, CA)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

370

Cooling assembly for fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling assembly for fuel cells having a simplified construction whereby coolant is efficiently circulated through a conduit arranged in serpentine fashion in a channel within a member of such assembly. The channel is adapted to cradle a flexible, chemically inert, conformable conduit capable of manipulation into a variety of cooling patterns without crimping or otherwise restricting of coolant flow. The conduit, when assembled with the member, conforms into intimate contact with the member for good thermal conductivity. The conduit is non-corrodible and can be constructed as a single, manifold-free, continuous coolant passage means having only one inlet and one outlet.

Kaufman, Arthur (West Orange, NJ); Werth, John (Princeton, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Lamination cooling system formation method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a cooling system. A stack of laminations have apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define straight or angled cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack. Gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

Rippel, Wally E [Altadena, CA; Kobayashi, Daryl M [Monrovia, CA

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

Quantum noise in photothermal cooling  

SciTech Connect

We study the problem of cooling a mechanical oscillator using the photothermal (bolometric) force. Contrary to previous attempts to model this system, we take into account the noise effects due to the granular nature of photon absorption. We achieve this by developing a Langevin formalism for the motion of the cantilever, valid in the bad-cavity limit, which includes both photon absorption shot noise and the noise due to radiation pressure. This allows us to tackle the cooling problem down to the noise-dominated regime and to find reasonable estimates for the lowest achievable phonon occupation in the cantilever.

De Liberato, Simone [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Lambert, Neill [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Guidelines for Selecting Cool Roofs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Guidelines for Selecting Cool Roofs July 2010 V. 1.2 Prepared by the Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program and Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Additional technical support provided by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Federal Energy Management Program. Authors: Bryan Urban and Kurt Roth, Ph.D. ii Table of Contents Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 3 Why Use Cool Roofs .............................................................................................................. 3

374

Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Bishofberger, K.; /UCLA; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

FEL options for power beaming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The demand for the output power of communication satellites has been increasing exponentially. The satellite power is generated from solar panels which collect the sunlight and convert it to electrical power. The power per satellite is limited due to the limit in the practical size of the solar panel. One way to meet the power demand is to employ multiple satellites (up to 10) per the internationally agreed-upon ``slot`` in the geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). However, this approach is very expensive due to the high cost of sending a satellite into a GEO orbit. An alternative approach is power beaming, i.e., to illuminate the solar panels with high power, highly-directed laser beams from earth. The power beaming generates more power per satellite for the same area of the solar panel. The minimum optical beam power, interesting for power beaming application, is P{sub L} = 200kW. The wavelength is chosen to be {lambda} = 0.84 {micro}m, so that it is within one of the transmission windows of the air, and at the same time near the peak of the photo-voltaic conversion efficiency of Si, which is the commonly used material for the solar panels. Free electron lasers (FELs) are well suited for the power beaming application because they can provide high power with coherent wavefront, but without high energy density in media. In this article the authors discuss some principal issues, such as the choice of accelerator and electron gun, the choice of beam parameters, radiation hazards, technological availability, and overall efficiency and reliability of the installation. They also attempt to highlight the compromise between the cost of the primary installation, the operation cost, and the choice of technology, and its maturity. They then present several schemes for the accelerator-FEL systems based on RF accelerators. The initial electron beam accelerator up to the energy of a few MeV is more or less common for all these schemes.

Kim, K.J.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Vinokurov, N.A. [Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A window is disclosed that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 {micro}m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons. 1 fig.

Logan, C.M.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A window that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 .mu.m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons.

Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

ACM Computing Survey, Vol. X, No. X, Article X, Pub. date:. Recent Thermal Management Techniques for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACM Computing Survey, Vol. X, No. X, Article X, Pub. date:. Recent Thermal Management Techniques are higher- capacity alternatives to conventional air cooling techniques. Thermal reliability/security issues, performance and reliability ACM File Format: KONG, J., CHUNG, S. W., AND SKADRON, K., 2010. Recent Thermal

Skadron, Kevin

379

Potential benefits of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving energy, saving money, and reducing emission of greenhouse gases and air pollutants Title Potential benefits of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving energy, saving money, and reducing emission of greenhouse gases and air pollutants Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Levinson, Ronnen M., and Hashem Akbari Journal Energy Efficiency Volume 3 Pagination 53-109 Publisher Springer Netherlands ISSN 1570-646X Keywords cool roof, Heat Island Abstract Cool roofs-roofs that stay cool in the sun by minimizing solar absorption and maximizing thermal emission-lessen the flow of heat from the roof into the building, reducing the need for space cooling energy in conditioned buildings. Cool roofs may also increase the need for heating energy in cold climates. For a commercial building, the decrease in annual cooling load is typically much greater than the increase in annual heating load. This study combines building energy simulations, local energy prices, local electricity emission factors, and local estimates of building density to characterize local, state average, and national average cooling energy savings, heating energy penalties, energy cost savings, and emission reductions per unit conditioned roof area. The annual heating and cooling energy uses of four commercial building prototypes-new office (1980+), old office (pre-1980), new retail (1980+), and old retail (pre-1980)-were simulated in 236 US cities. Substituting a weathered cool white roof (solar reflectance 0.55) for a weathered conventional gray roof (solar reflectance 0.20) yielded annually a cooling energy saving per unit conditioned roof area ranging from 3.30 kWh/m2 in Alaska to 7.69 kWh/m2 in Arizona (5.02 kWh/m2 nationwide); a heating energy penalty ranging from 0.003 therm/m2 in Hawaii to 0.14 therm/m2 in Wyoming (0.065 therm/m2 nationwide); and an energy cost saving ranging from $0.126/m2 in West Virginia to $1.14/m2 in Arizona ($0.356/m2 nationwide). It also offered annually a CO2 reduction ranging from 1.07 kg/m2 in Alaska to 4.97 kg/m2 in Hawaii (3.02 kg/m2 nationwide); an NOx reduction ranging from 1.70 g/m2 in New York to 11.7 g/m2 in Hawaii (4.81 g/m2 nationwide); an SO2 reduction ranging from 1.79 g/m2 in California to 26.1 g/m2 in Alabama (12.4 g/m2 nationwide); and an Hg reduction ranging from 1.08 μg/m2 in Alaska to 105 μg/m2 in Alabama (61.2 μg/m2 nationwide). Retrofitting 80% of the 2.58 billion square meters of commercial building conditioned roof area in the USA would yield an annual cooling energy saving of 10.4 TWh; an annual heating energy penalty of 133 million therms; and an annual energy cost saving of $735 million. It would also offer an annual CO2 reduction of 6.23 Mt, offsetting the annual CO2 emissions of 1.20 million typical cars or 25.4 typical peak power plants; an annual NOx reduction of 9.93 kt, offsetting the annual NOx emissions of 0.57 million cars or 65.7 peak power plants; an annual SO2 reduction of 25.6 kt, offsetting the annual SO2 emissions of 815 peak power plants; and an annual Hg reduction of 126 kg.

380

How Do You Save Energy and Stay Cool While Cooking in the Summer? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Stay Cool While Cooking in the Summer? and Stay Cool While Cooking in the Summer? How Do You Save Energy and Stay Cool While Cooking in the Summer? August 19, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Andrea discussed some ways you can keep cooking during the summer while saving energy and staying cool. How do you save energy and stay cool while cooking in the summer? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles How Do You Save Energy in the Summer? How Do You Save Energy When Entertaining in the Summer? At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the Summer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

How Are You Keeping Your Home Cool This Summer? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Keeping Your Home Cool This Summer? Keeping Your Home Cool This Summer? How Are You Keeping Your Home Cool This Summer? July 21, 2011 - 8:06am Addthis This week, Allison shared her experience of adding insulation to her attic. The result? A better-insulated home with less use of her air conditioning system. It's one of several things she's doing to keep her home cool during the summer (though insulation is effective year round). How are you keeping your home cool this summer? Have you taken any steps to improve the efficiency of your attic? Each week, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles How Do You Shade Your Home in the Summer?

382

How Are You Keeping Your Home Cool This Summer? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Are You Keeping Your Home Cool This Summer? How Are You Keeping Your Home Cool This Summer? How Are You Keeping Your Home Cool This Summer? July 21, 2011 - 8:06am Addthis This week, Allison shared her experience of adding insulation to her attic. The result? A better-insulated home with less use of her air conditioning system. It's one of several things she's doing to keep her home cool during the summer (though insulation is effective year round). How are you keeping your home cool this summer? Have you taken any steps to improve the efficiency of your attic? Each week, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles How Do You Shade Your Home in the Summer?

383

Aspects of Cooling at the TRI$?$P Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tri$\\mu$P facility at KVI is dedicated to provide short lived radioactive isotopes at low kinetic energies to users. It comprised different cooling schemes for a variety of energy ranges, from GeV down to the neV scale. The isotopes are produced using beam of the AGOR cyclotron at KVI. They are separated from the primary beam by a magnetic separator. A crucial part of such a facility is the ability to stop and extract isotopes into a low energy beamline which guides them to the experiment. In particular we are investigating stopping in matter and buffer gases. After the extraction the isotopes can be stored in neutral atoms or ion traps for experiments. Our research includes precision studies of nuclear $\\beta$-decay through $\\beta$-$\

L. Willmann; G. P. Berg; U. Dammalapati; S. De; P. Dendooven; O. Dermois; K. Jungmann; A. Mol; C. J. G. Onderwater; A. Rogachevskiy; M. Sohani; E. Traykov; H. W. Wilschut

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

384

Report Articles | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Articles Report Articles The Y-12 Report communicates the significant accomplishments of and events involving the Y-12 National Security Complex and its people. View report...

385

Global Cool Cities Alliance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Cool Cities Alliance Global Cool Cities Alliance Global Cool Cities Alliance The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the worldwide installation of cool roofs, pavements, and other surfaces. GCCA is dedicated to advancing policies and actions that increase the solar reflectance of our buildings and pavements as a cost-effective way to promote cool buildings, cool cities, and to mitigate the effects of climate change through global cooling. The alliance was launched in June of 2011. Cool reflective surfaces are an important near-term strategy for improving city sustainability by delivering significant benefits such as increased building efficiency and comfort, improved urban health, and heat

386

Heating & Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Cooling Heating & Cooling Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most homes. Learn more about the principles of heating and cooling. Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most homes. Learn more about the principles of heating and cooling. Did you know that heating and cooling accounts for more than half of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most homes? Energy Saver shares tips and advice on ways you can reduce your heating and cooling costs, putting more money in your wallet.

387

Commercial Cool Storage Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This state-of-the-art handbook provides comprehensive guidance for designing ice and chilled-water storage systems for commercial buildings. HVAC engineers can take advantage of attractive rates and incentives offered by utilities to increase the market for cool storage systems.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Solar-powered cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system uses nanostructural materials made of high specific surface area adsorption aerogel as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material. A circulation system circulates refrigerant from the nanostructural material to a cooling unit.

Farmer, Joseph C

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

Beam position monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

390

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 034001 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/6/3/034001) Download details: IP Address: 98.204.49.123 The article was downloaded on 01/07/2011 at 12:38 Please note that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 6 (2011) 034001 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/6/3/034001 Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Dev Millstein and Surabi Menon Lawrence

391

Multi-pass cooling for turbine airfoils  

SciTech Connect

An airfoil for a turbine vane of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil includes an outer wall having pressure and suction sides, and a radially extending cooling cavity located between the pressure and suction sides. A plurality of partitions extend radially through the cooling cavity to define a plurality of interconnected cooling channels located at successive chordal locations through the cooling cavity. The cooling channels define a serpentine flow path extending in the chordal direction. Further, the cooling channels include a plurality of interconnected chambers and the chambers define a serpentine path extending in the radial direction within the serpentine path extending in the chordal direction.

Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

392

Evaporative cooling enhanced cold storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides an evaporatively enhanced cold storage system wherein a warm air stream is cooled and the cooled air stream is thereafter passed into contact with a cold storage unit. Moisture is added to the cooled air stream prior to or during contact of the cooled air stream with the cold storage unit to effect enhanced cooling of the cold storage unit due to evaporation of all or a portion of the added moisture. Preferably at least a portion of the added moisture comprises water condensed during the cooling of the warm air stream. 3 figures.

Carr, P.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

Coleman, John H. (Salem Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Research Article Building Thermal, Lighting,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Article Building Thermal, Lighting, and Acoustics Modeling E-mail: yanda@tsinghua.edu.cn A detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: EnergyPlus, DeST and DOE-2.1E Dandan Zhu 1 , Tianzhen Hong 2 , Da Yan 1 (), Chuang Wang 1 1. Department of Building Science, School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China 2. Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract Building energy simulation is widely used to help design energy efficient building envelopes and HVAC systems, develop and demonstrate compliance of building energy codes, and implement building energy rating programs. However, large discrepancies exist between simulation results

395

Author template for journal articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

28E 28E Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States New Construction Market Alex B. Lekov, Victor H. Franco, Gabrielle Wong-Parodi, James E. McMahon, and Peter Chan Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2009 This manuscript has been authored by an author at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The U.S. Government retains, and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges, that the U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

396

Closed circuit steam cooled turbine shroud and method for steam cooling turbine shroud  

SciTech Connect

A turbine shroud cooling cavity is partitioned to define a plurality of cooling chambers for sequentially receiving cooling steam and impingement cooling of the radially inner wall of the shoud. An impingement baffle is provided in each cooling chamber for receiving the cooling media from a cooling media inlet in the case of the first chamber or from the immediately upstream chamber in the case of the second through fourth chambers and includes a plurality of impingement holes for effecting the impingement cooling of the shroud inner wall.

Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Sexton, Brendan Francis (Simpsonville, SC); Kellock, Iain Robertson (Simpsonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Beam injection into RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Electron beam device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

1975-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cool Roofs: An Introduction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs: An Introduction Cool Roofs: An Introduction Cool Roofs: An Introduction August 9, 2010 - 4:43pm Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Lately, I've been hearing a lot about cool roof technologies, so I welcomed the chance to learn more at a recent seminar. Cool roofs, also referred to as white roofs, have special coatings that reflect sunlight and emit heat more efficiently than traditional roofs, keeping them cooler in the sun. Cool roofing technologies can be implemented quickly and at a relatively low cost, making it the fastest growing sector of the building industry. U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu is among the many cool roof enthusiasts. The Secretary recently announced plans to install cool roofs

400

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs Addthis Description This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment. Duration 2:17 Topic Tax Credits, Rebates, Savings Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Credit Energy Department Video MR. : Maybe you've never given much thought about what color your roof is or what it's made of, but your roof could be costing you more money than you know to cool your home or office building, especially if you live in a warmer climate. Think about it this way: In the summertime, we wear light-colored clothes because they keep us cooler. Lighter clothes reflect rather than absorb the heat of the sun. It's the same with your roof. A cool roof is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Experimental Study of Hybrid Cooled Heat Exchanger.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A test system for a hybrid cooled heat exchanger was designed, and the test facility was constructed based on ASHRAE Standard 41.2-1987. A conventional air-cooled… (more)

Tsao, Han-Chuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cooling water system can be optimized by operating the cooling tower at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces, tube bundles, refrigeration equipment, overhead condensers, and other associates heat rejection equipment.

Matson, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Introduction of a Cooling Fan Efficiency Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

°C °F Cooling Effect (?t eq ) °C °F Fan Power, W (P f ) Cooling-Fan Efficiency (CFE) °C/W °F/Wand B. Jones. 1983. Ceiling fans as extenders of the summer

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Absorption Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Basics Cooling Basics Absorption Cooling Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Absorption coolers use heat rather than electricity as their energy source. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption cooling, it is also referred to as gas-fired cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption coolers are commercially available for large residential homes. How Absorption Cooling Works An absorption cooling cycle relies on three basic principles: When a liquid is heated it boils (vaporizes) and when a gas is cooled it condenses Lowering the pressure above a liquid reduces its boiling point Heat flows from warmer to cooler surfaces.

405

What's so cool about Curiosity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's so cool about Curiosity? What's so cool about Curiosity? Curiosity, the Mars Science Laboratory, is the largest and most complicated device we have ever landed on a planet other than Earth. ï‚· About the size of a small SUV -- ten feet long (not including the arm), nine feet wide and seven feet tall ï‚· 900 kilograms (2,000 pounds) (Spirit and Opportunity, earlier research vehicles sent to Mars were 384 pounds) ï‚· Uses aerobraking, parachute, retro rockets and skycrane concepts to land gently (Spirit and Opportunity used aerobraking, parachutes and airbags that bounced them to the surface) Curiosity carries three instruments from Los Alamos National Laboratory. ï‚· The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator supplies electricity and heat to the rover

406

Transphase cool storage test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial cool storage systems. Transphase, Inc. provided a prototype of a new storage tank design equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system and filled with a eutectic designed to freeze at 41{degree}F. The Transphase cool storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank with relatively constant brine temperatures over most of the charging cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was governed mainly by the brine flow rate and the tank`s remaining charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. This prototype unit experienced several operational problems, not unexpected for the first full-size execution of a new design. Such prototype testing was one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

Stovall, T.K.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Modeling Cathode Cooling Due to Power Interruption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Modeling Cathode Cooling Due to Power Interruption ... Development and Application of SAMI's Low Voltage Energy-Saving Technology.

408

Engineered design of SSC cooling ponds  

SciTech Connect

The cooling requirements of the SSC are significant and adequate cooling water systems to meet these requirements are critical to the project`s successful operation. The use of adequately designed cooling ponds will provide reliable cooling for operation while also meeting environmental goals of the project to maintain streamflow and flood peaks to preconstruction levels as well as other streamflow and water quality requirements of the Texas Water Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Bear, J.B.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Data Center Alternative Cooling Analysis Tool  

amounts of energy. Consistent large loads of energy are required for data center efficiency and reliability. Four different cooling technologies, ...

410

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter: to advance the understanding and applications of cold atomic matter, including ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Previous Up Next Article From References: 0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minh´os, F. (P-EVOR-CIM); Gyulov, T. (BG-RUS-CAM); Santos, A. I. (P-EVOR-CIM) On an elastic beam fully

Minhós, Feliz

412

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cooling Evolution of Hybrid Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cooling of compact isolated objects for different values of the gravitational mass has been simulated for two alternative assumptions. One is that the interior of the star is purely hadronic and second that the star can have a rather large quark core. It has been shown that within a nonlocal chiral quark model the critical density for a phase transition to color superconducting quark matter under neutron star conditions can be low enough for these phases to occur in compact star configurations with masses below 1.3 M_sun. For a realistic choice of parameters the equation of state (EoS) allows for 2SC quark matter with a large quark gap ~ 100 MeV for u and d quarks of two colors that coexists with normal quark matter within a mixed phase in the hybrid star interior. We argue that, if in the hadronic phase the neutron pairing gap in 3P_2 channel is larger than few keV and the phases with unpaired quarks are allowed, the corresponding hybrid stars would cool too fast. Even in the case of the essentially suppressed 3P_2 neutron gap if free quarks occur for M cooling data existing by today. It is suggested to discuss a "2SC+X" phase, as a possibility to have all quarks paired in two-flavor quark matter under neutron star constraints, where the X-gap is of the order of 10 keV - 1 MeV. Density independent gaps do not allow to fit the cooling data. Only the presence of an X-gap that decreases with increase of the density could allow to appropriately fit the data in a similar compact star mass interval to that following from a purely hadronic model.

H. Grigorian

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

414

Gas-cooled nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-cooled nuclear reactor includes a central core located in the lower portion of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Primary coolant gas flows upward through the core and into four overlying heat-exchangers wherein stream is generated. During normal operation, the return flow of coolant is between the core and the vessel sidewall to a pair of motor-driven circulators located at about the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel. The circulators repressurize the gas coolant and return it back to the core through passageways in the underlying core structure. If during emergency conditions the primary circulators are no longer functioning, the decay heat is effectively removed from the core by means of natural convection circulation. The hot gas rising through the core exits the top of the shroud of the heat-exchangers and flows radially outward to the sidewall of the concrete pressure vessel. A metal liner covers the entire inside concrete surfaces of the concrete pressure vessel, and cooling tubes are welded to the exterior or concrete side of the metal liner. The gas coolant is in direct contact with the interior surface of the metal liner and transfers its heat through the metal liner to the liquid coolant flowing through the cooling tubes. The cooler gas is more dense and creates a downward convection flow in the region between the core and the sidewall until it reaches the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel when it flows radially inward and up into the core for another pass. Water is forced to flow through the cooling tubes to absorb heat from the core at a sufficient rate to remove enough of the decay heat created in the core to prevent overheating of the core or the vessel.

Peinado, Charles O. (La Jolla, CA); Koutz, Stanley L. (San Diego, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Heat transfer issues in high-heat-load synchrotron x-ray beams  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a short description of the synchrotron radiation x-ray sources and the associated power loads is given, followed by a brief description of typical synchrotron components and their heat load. It is emphasized that the design goals for most of these components is to limit (a) temperature, (b) stresses, or (c) strains in the system. Each design calls for a different geometry, material selection, and cooling scheme. Cooling schemes that have been utilized so far are primarily single phase and include simple macrochannel cooling, microchannel cooling, contact cooling, pin-post cooling, porous-flow cooling, jet cooling, etc. Water, liquid metals, and various cryogenic coolants have been used. Because the trend in x-ray beam development is towards brighter (i.e., more powerful) beams and assuming that no radical changes in the design of x-ray generating machines occurs in the next few years, it is fair to state that the utilization of various effective cooling schemes and, in particular, two-phase flow (e.g., subcooled boiling) warrants further investigation. This, however, requires a thorough examination of stability and reliability of two-phase flows for high-heat-flux components operating in ultrahigh vacuum with stringent reliability requirements.

Khounsary, A.M.; Mills, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Air and water cooled modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method are disclosed for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air. 9 figs.

Birx, D.L.; Arnold, P.A.; Ball, D.G.; Cook, E.G.

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

417

Air and water cooled modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air.

Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Arnold, Phillip A. (Livermore, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Improvements in solid desiccant cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DINC (Direct-Indirect Evaporative Cooling) cycle was proposed in 1986 by Texas A and M researchers. The idea was to combine the benefits of direct and indirect evaporative cooling with desiccant dehumidifying using a rotating solid silica-gel dehumidifier. Recent parametric studies completed for the Texas Energy Research in Applications Program have developed a computer design for a nominal 3-ton system that would minimize the energy consumption (both thermal and electric) while maintaining a sensible heat ratio of 75% or less. That optimum design for the original 1986 DINC cycle was modified to improve its energy efficiency. The modifications described in this paper were: (1) staging the desiccant regeneration air and (2) recirculation of the primary air to the secondary side of the indirect evaporative cooling. Computer simulations were run to study the effect of the modifications on the performance of the system. American Refrigeration Institute (AIR) standard conditions (Ambient air at 35C, 40% R.H. and Room air at 26.7C, 50% R.H.) were used for all the modifications. Results were also compared to the familiar Pennington (ventilation) cycle. The study indicated that recirculating the indirect evaporative cooler air only degenerated the performance. However, staging a portion of the regeneration air could improve the thermal coefficient of Performance by 25% over the non-staged DINC cycle. Compared to a similar staged-regeneration Pennington cycle it is a 16% improvement in thermal COP and the sensible heat ratio was 70%.

Waugaman, D.; Kini, A.; Kettleborough, C.F. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Cooling system for superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir. 3 figs.

Gamble, B.B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Cooling system for superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system is configured to control the flow of a refrigerant by controlling the rate at which the refrigerant is heated, thereby providing an efficient and reliable approach to cooling a load (e.g., magnets, rotors). The cooling system includes a conduit circuit connected to the load and within which a refrigerant circulates; a heat exchanger, connected within the conduit circuit and disposed remotely from the load; a first and a second reservoir, each connected within the conduit, each holding at least a portion of the refrigerant; a heater configured to independently heat the first and second reservoirs. In a first mode, the heater heats the first reservoir, thereby causing the refrigerant to flow from the first reservoir through the load and heat exchanger, via the conduit circuit and into the second reservoir. In a second mode, the heater heats the second reservoir to cause the refrigerant to flow from the second reservoir through the load and heat exchanger via the conduit circuit and into the first reservoir.

Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed (Framingham, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Proceedings of the Cooling Tower Technology Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of cooling towers and associated systems strongly affects availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Twenty-four papers presented at the 2012 Cooling Tower Technology Conference, held August 8–9, 2012, in Pensacola, Florida, discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions. ...

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

422

Rapid cooling technology could aid surgery patients, heart attack...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cooling technology could aid surgery patients, heart attack victims Diagram shows how ice slurry cools blood INTERNAL COOLING - An ice slurry, delivered through an endotracheal...

423

Model Predictive Control for the Operation of Building Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the chillers and cooling towers, the thermal storage tankthe chillers and cooling towers, the thermal storage tank,of thermal energy storage in building cooling systems.

Ma, Yudong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Thermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COOLING AND DOUBLE WALLBOARD COMPARISON OF THERMAL STORAGEThermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential CoolingThermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling

Feustel, H.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Viability of dynamic cooling control in a data center environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Beitelmal, “Thermal Considerations in Cooling Large Scalesmart cooling, dynamic thermal control, energy optimization,thermal management conditions. EP-04-1163, BASH Keywords: Data center cooling,

Boucher, T.; Auslander, D.; Bash, C.; Federspiel, C.; Patel, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cooling load differences between radiant and air systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effect of thermal mass on cooling loads, and thereforelift radiant cooling using building thermal mass, Departmentlevel thermal modelling are recommended for design cooling

Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THIS DOCUME THERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSi- LBL-25393 THERMAL FOR COOLING w ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSpeak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

On-chip high speed localized cooling using superlattice microrefrigerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for on-chip cooling solution, thermal characterization andActive cooling can provide an effective thermal resistance (cooling of electron gas and by reducing the lattice thermal

Zhang, Y; Christofferson, J; Shakouri, A; Zeng, G H; Bowers, J E; Croke, E T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Thermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the shortcomings of alternative cooling sources, or to avoidthe shortcomings of alternative cooling sources, or to avoidC . Blumstein; "Alternatives to Compressor Cooling in

Feustel, H.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Passive Cooling of a Micromechanical Oscillator with a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Closely related passive cooling has been reported in [9,20 ... Although rather modest cooling is obtained here ... eventually provide ground state cool- ing ...

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

431

BEAM CONTROL PROBE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

Chesterman, A.W.

1959-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cryogenics for the MuCool Test Area (MTA)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MuCool Test Area (MTA) is a complex of buildings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which are dedicated to operate components of a cooling cell to be used for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D. The long-term goal of this facility is to test ionization cooling principles by operating a 25-liter liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) absorber embedded in a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet. The MTA solenoid magnet will be used with RF cavities exposed to a high intensity beam. Cryogens used at the MTA include LHe, LN{sub 2} and LH{sub 2}. The latter dictates stringent system design for hazardous locations. The cryogenic plant is a modified Tevatron refrigerator based on the Claude cycle. The implementation of an in-house refrigerator system and two 300 kilowatt screw compressors is under development. The helium refrigeration capacity is 500 W at 14 K. In addition the MTA solenoid magnet will be batch-filled with LHe every 2 days using the same cryo-plant. This paper reviews cryogenic systems used to support the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D programs and emphasizes the feasibility of handling cryogenic equipment at MTA in a safe manner.

Darve, Christine; Norris, Barry; Pei, Liu-Jin; /Fermilab

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

EUROv Super Beam Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to significantly increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. An essential part of these facilities is an intense proton driver producing a beam power higher than a MW. The protons hit a target able to accept the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to deal with the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from an eventual construction of a high power proton driver. The European FP7 Design Study EUROv, among other neutrino beams, studies this Super Beam possibility. This paper will give the latest developments in this direction.

Dracos, Marcos [IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

434

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have higher cooling capacity because the thermal resistancethe thermal comfort requirement unless the cooling capacitysurface cooling system and TABS systems THERMAL COMFORT

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Western Cooling Efficiency Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Efficiency Center Efficiency Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Cooling Efficiency Center Place Davis, CA Website http://http://wcec.ucdavis.edu References Western Cooling Efficiency Center [1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections Western Cooling Efficiency Center is a research institution located in Davis, CA, at the University of California at Davis (UC Davis). References ↑ "Western Cooling Efficiency Center" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Western_Cooling_Efficiency_Center&oldid=382319" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

436

Alternate Cooling Methods for Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling in industrial facilities has traditionally been performed by mechanical vapor compression units. While it remains the standard, recent concerns with the rising cost of electricity and environmental legislation restricting or outlawing CFC refrigerants has caused many plants to evaluate existing cooling methods. This paper presents case studies on alternate cooling methods used for space conditioning at several different industrial facilities. Methods discussed include direct and indirect evaporative, desiccant, and absorption cooling. Cooling effectiveness, operating cost and investment are also presented. Data for this evaluation was collected from clients served by Georgia Tech's Industrial Energy Extension Service, a state-sponsored energy conservation assistance program.

Brown, M.; Moore, D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Passive containment cooling water distribution device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using a series of radial guide elements and cascading weir boxes to collect and then distribute the cooling water into a series of distribution areas through a plurality of cascading weirs. The cooling water is then uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weir notches in the face plate of the weir box.

Conway, Lawrence E. (Hookstown, PA); Fanto, Susan V. (Plum Borough, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production and cooling energy savings from installation of a production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Title Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Ban-Weiss, George, Craig P. Wray, William W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 56 Pagination 210 - 220 ISSN 0378-7788 Keywords Advanced Technology Demonstration, building design, Building heat transfer, cool roof, energy efficiency, Energy Performance of Buildings, energy savings, Energy Usage, energy use, Heat Island Abstract Reflective roofs can reduce demand for air conditioning and warming of the atmosphere. Roofs can also host photovoltaic (PV) modules that convert sunlight to electricity. In this study we assess the effects of installing a building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roof on an office building in Yuma, AZ. The system consists of thin film PV laminated to a white membrane, which lies above a layer of insulation. The solar absorptance of the roof decreased to 0.38 from 0.75 after installation of the BIPV, lowering summertime daily mean roof upper surface temperatures by about 5 °C. Summertime daily heat influx through the roof deck fell to ±0.1 kWh/m2from 0.3-1.0 kWh/m2. However, summertime daily heat flux from the ventilated attic into the conditioned space was minimally affected by the BIPV, suggesting that the roof was decoupled from the conditioned space. Daily PV energy production was about 25% of building electrical energy use in the summer. For this building the primary benefit of the BIPV appeared to be its capacity to generate electricity and not its ability to reduce heat flows into the building. Building energy simulations were used to estimate the cooling energy savings and heating energy penalties for more typical buildings.

439

Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a top entry loop joined satellite assembly with a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This satellite type reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary cooling system when rendered inoperative.

Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Cupertino, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Status of proof-of-principle experiment for coherent electron cooling  

SciTech Connect

Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron colliders. To verify the concept we conduct proof-of-the-principle experiment at RHIC. In this paper, we describe the current experimental setup to be installed into 2 o'clock RHIC interaction regions. We present current design, status of equipment acquisition and estimates for the expected beam parameters. We use a dogleg to merge the electron and ion beams. The ions 'imprint' their distribution into the electron beam via a space charge density modulation. The modulation is amplified in an FEL comprised of a 7-m long helical wiggler. The ions are co-propagating with electron beam through the FEL. The ion's average velocity is matched to the group velocity of the wave-packet of e-beam density modulation in the FEL. A three-pole wiggler at the exit of the FEL tune the phase of the wave-packet so the ion with the central energy experience the maximum of the e-beam density modulation, where electric field is zero. The time-of-flight dependence on ion's provides for the electrical field caused by the density modulation to reduce energy spread of the ion beam. The used electron beam is bent off the ion path and damped.

Pinayev I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Bengtsson, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Elizarov, A. et al

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Cool Roofs video. The video opens with "Energy 101: Cool Roofs." This is followed by images of residential rooftops. Maybe you've never given much thought about what color your roof is, or what it's made of. But your roof could be costing you more money than you know to cool your home or office building, especially if you live in a warmer climate. The video shows pedestrians walking on a city street. Think about it this way... in the summertime we wear light-colored clothes because they keep us cooler. Lighter colors reflect - rather than absorb - the heat of the sun. The video shows images of a white roof. It's the same with your roof. A cool roof is often light in color and made

442

Why Cool Roofs? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Why Cool Roofs? Why Cool Roofs? Why Cool Roofs? Addthis Description By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills. Speakers Secretary Steven Chu Duration 1:46 Topic Tax Credits, Rebates, Savings Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Fossil Oil Credit Energy Department Video SECRETARY OF ENERGY STEVEN CHU: The reason we wanted the Department of Energy to take the lead in cool roofs is to demonstrate that this really saves money. If you have a roof and it's black, it's absorbing energy from the sun

443

Fans for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fans for Cooling Fans for Cooling Fans for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:46pm Addthis Ceiling fans circulate air in a room to help keep occupants cool. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/jimkruger Ceiling fans circulate air in a room to help keep occupants cool. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/jimkruger What does this mean for me? You may be able to keep your home cool with energy-efficient and well-placed fans. Fans are less expensive to operate than air conditioners. Circulating fans include ceiling fans, table fans, floor fans, and fans mounted to poles or walls. These fans create a wind chill effect that will make you more comfortable in your home, even if it's also cooled by natural ventilation or air conditioning. Ceiling Fans Ceiling fans are considered the most effective of these types of fans,

444

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of Bose condensates, which are destroyed by randomly directed recoil kicks. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of single rubidium atoms stored in an intracavity dipole trap. The cooling mechanism res...

Maunz, P; Schuster, I; Syassen, N; Pinkse, P W H; Rempe, G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

ION-BY-ION COOLING EFFICIENCIES  

SciTech Connect

We present ion-by-ion cooling efficiencies for low-density gas. We use Cloudy (version 10.00) to estimate the cooling efficiencies for each ion of the first 30 elements (H-Zn) individually. We present results for gas temperatures between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 8} K, assuming low densities and optically thin conditions. When nonequilibrium ionization plays a significant role the ionization states deviate from those that obtain in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), and the local cooling efficiency at any given temperature depends on specific nonequilibrium ion fractions. The results presented here allow for an efficient estimate of the total cooling efficiency for any ionic composition. We also list the elemental cooling efficiencies assuming CIE conditions. These can be used to construct CIE cooling efficiencies for non-solar abundance ratios or to estimate the cooling due to elements not included in any nonequilibrium computation. All the computational results are listed in convenient online tables.

Gnat, Orly [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Ferland, Gary J., E-mail: orlyg@tapir.caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Passive cooling program element. [Skytherm system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An outline of the Passive Cooling R and D program element is presented with significant technical achievements obtained during FY 1978. Passive cooling mechanisms are enumerated and a survey of ongoing projects is made in the areas of cooling resource assessment and system development. Results anticipated within the next fiscal year are discussed and the direction of the R and D effort is indicated. Passive cooling system development has centered primarily about the Skytherm system. Two projects are underway to construct such systems in regions having a higher cooling load than the original Skytherm site at Atascadero, California. Component development and commercialization studies are major goals of these two projects and a third project at Atascadero. A two-story passive cooling test module has been built to study radiative, evaporative and convective cooling effects in a structure making use of the thermosiphon principle, but not equipped with a roof pond.

Wahlig, M.; Martin, M.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Method of nitriding refractory metal articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Omatete, Ogbemi O. (Lagos, NG); Young, Albert C. (Flushing, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Method of nitriding refractory metal articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Tiegs, T.N.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Omatete, O.O.; Young, A.C.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Cooling by Heat Conduction Inside Magnetic Flux Loops and the Moderate Cluster Cooling Flow Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I study non-radiative cooling of X-ray emitting gas via heat conduction along magnetic field lines inside magnetic flux loops in cooling flow clusters of galaxies. I find that such heat conduction can reduce the fraction of energy radiated in the X-ray band by a factor of 1.5-2. This non-radiative cooling joins two other proposed non-radiative cooling processes, which can be more efficient. These are mixing of cold and hot gas, and heat conduction initiated by magnetic fields reconnection between hot and cold gas. These processes when incorporated into the moderate cooling flow model lead to a general cooling flow model with the following ingredients. (1) Cooling flow does occur, but with a mass cooling rate about 10 times lower than in old versions of the cooling flow model. Namely, heating occurs such that the effective age of the cooling flow is much below the cluster age, but the heating can't prevent cooling altogether. (2) The cooling flow region is in a non-steady state evolution. (3) Non-radiative cooling of X-ray emitting gas can bring the model to a much better agreement with observations. (4) The general behavior of the cooling flow gas, and in particular the role played by magnetic fields, make the intracluster medium in cooling flow clusters similar in some aspects to the active solar corona.

Noam Soker

2003-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

450

Underground-desiccant cooling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Underground-Desiccant Cooling System relies on the successful coordination of various components. The central feature of the system is a bed of silica gel which will absorb moisture from house air until the gel has become saturated. When this point has been reached, the silica gel must be regenerated by passing hot air through it. For this project, the hot air is produced by air-type solar collectors mounted on the roof and connected with the main air-handling system by means of ducts attached to the outside of the house. As the air is dehumidified its temperature is raised somewhat by the change of state. The dried but somewhat heated air, after leaving the silica gel bed, passes through a rock bin storage area and then past a water coil chiller before being circulated through the house by means of the previously existing ductwork. The cooling medium for both the rock bin and the chiller coil is water which circulates through underground pipes buried beneath the back yard at a depth of about 10 to 12 ft. When the silica gel is being regenerated by the solar collectors, house air bypasses the desiccant bed but still passes through the rock bin and the chiller coil and is cooled continuously. The system is designed for maximum flexibility so that full use can be made of the solar collectors. Ducting is arranged so that the collectors provide heat for the house in the winter and there is also a hot-water capability year-round.

Finney, O.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders.

Qiang, Ji

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

452

Cooling Fusion in a Flash | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Fusion in a Flash American Fusion News Category: U.S. Universities Link: Cooling Fusion in a Flash...

453

Two-Phase Spray Cooling of Hybrid Vehicle Electronics: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spray cooling is a feasible cooling technology for hybrid vehicle electronics; HFE 7100 is a promising coolant.

Mudawar, I.; Bharathan, D.; Kelly, K.; Narumanchi, S.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Beam-Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Gas and Thermal Photon Scattering in the NLC Main Linac as a Source of Beam Halo P. Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0051 12-JAN-2001 Abstract Scattering of primary beam electrons off of residual gas molecules or blackbody radiation photons in the NLC main linac has been identified as a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated in the beam delivery system. We consider the contributions from four scat- tering mechanisms: inelastic thermal-photon scattering, elastic beam-gas (Coulomb) scattering inelastic beam-gas (Bremsstrahlung) scattering, and atomic-electron scattering. In each case we develop the formalism necessary to estimate the backgrounds generated in the main linac, and determine the expected number of off-energy or large-amplitude particles from each process, assuming a main linac injection energy of 8 GeV and extraction energy of 500 GeV. 1 Introduction The

455

Ion Beam Materials Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities » Facilities » Ion Beam Materials Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. April 12, 2012 Ion Beam Danfysik Implanter High Voltage Terminal. Contact Yongqiang Wang (505) 665-1596 Email Devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams. The IBML provides and operates the core facilities, while supporting the design and implementation of specific apparati needed for experiments requested by users of the facility. The result is a facility with

456

Particle beam injection system  

SciTech Connect

This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ); Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Effect of Thermal Load Configurations on Passive Chilled Beam Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents the findings of a study to quantify the effect of heat source configurations on the performance of passive chilled beams. Experiments in a thermally controlled test room were conducted using thermal manikins as heat sources cooled with a 0.6 m by 2.4 m beam. The thermal manikins were arranged in a symmetric and an asymmetric configuration and tested over a range of input power to simulate a low-to-high load heat distribution of an indoor space. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed in Star CCM+ v6.06 and used for further analysis of the flow field and to predict additional spatial arrangements of the beam, interior dimensions, and heat source configurations. The CFD model implemented a calculation for the beam cooling capacity to predict the beam performance based on the room thermal conditions. The experimental data revealed an average reduction of 15% in the passive beam cooling capacity for the asymmetrically configured thermal manikins compared to the symmetric arrangement. The CFD model was validated with the experimental data and predicted the asymmetric heat source beam performance reduction to be 17%. The reduction in performance based on the heat source arrangement was found with analysis of the CFD simulations to be a result of the above-beam air velocity field. The unbalanced thermal manikin configuration generated an unbalanced flow condition at the inlet of the beam that resulted in the room air circumventing the inlet of the passive beam, as compared to the inlet velocity field of the symmetric configuration. Additional configurations were investigated with the CFD model to include the beam position, floor area, ceiling height, and thermal manikin arrangements. The simulation results were analyzed by comparing the efficiency of beam performance using the beam cooling capacity calculation for each scenario. The predictions of additional configurations found that the efficiency increased when the beam was perpendicular to a group of heat sources and the changes in beam performance with heat source configurations was not affected by the interior dimensions of the space. However, the resulting thermal conditions in the occupied zone for the beam positions of highest efficiency may negatively impact the thermal comfort of occupants.

Nelson, Ian 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Ion beam surface treatment: A new technique for thermally modifying surfaces using intense, pulsed ion beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emerging capability to produce high average power (10--300 kW) pulsed ion beams at 0.2{minus}2 MeV energies is enabling us to develop a new, commercial-scale thermal surface treatment technology called Ion Beam Surface Treatment (IBEST). This new technique uses high energy, pulsed ({le}500 ns) ion beams to directly deposit energy in the top 1--20 micrometers of the surface of any material. The depth of treatment is controllable by varying the ion energy and species. Deposition of the energy in a thin surface layer allows melft of the layer with relatively small energies (1--10J/cm2) and allows rapid cooling of the melted layer by thermal conduction into the underlying substrate. Typical cooling rates of this process (109 K/sec) are sufficient to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures (nanocrystalline and metastable phases). Results from initial experiments confirm surface hardening, amorphous layer and nanocrystalline grain size formation, corrosion resistance in stainless steel and aluminum, metal surface polishing, controlled melt of ceramic surfaces, and surface cleaning and oxide layer removal as well as surface ablation and redeposition. These results follow other encouraging results obtained previously in Russia using single pulse ion beam systems. Potential commercialization of this surface treatment capability is made possible by the combination of two new technologies, a new repetitive high energy pulsed power capability (0.2{minus}2MV, 25--50 kA, 60 ns, 120 Hz) developed at SNL, and a new repetitive ion beam system developed at Cornell University.

Stinnett, R.W.; Buchheit, R.G.; Neau, E.L. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Heat pipe turbine vane cooling  

SciTech Connect

The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

Langston, L.; Faghri, A. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Cooling Evolution of Hybrid Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cooling of compact isolated objects for different values of the gravitational mass has been simulated for two alternative assumptions. One is that the interior of the star is purely hadronic and second that the star can have a rather large quark core. It has been shown that within a nonlocal chiral quark model the critical density for a phase transition to color superconducting quark matter under neutron star conditions can be low enough for these phases to occur in compact star configurations with masses below 1.3 M_sun. For a realistic choice of parameters the equation of state (EoS) allows for 2SC quark matter with a large quark gap ~ 100 MeV for u and d quarks of two colors that coexists with normal quark matter within a mixed phase in the hybrid star interior. We argue that, if in the hadronic phase the neutron pairing gap in 3P_2 channel is larger than few keV and the phases with unpaired quarks are allowed, the corresponding hybrid stars would cool too fast. Even in the case of the essentially supp...

Grigorian, H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

DOE Science Showcase - Cool roofs, cool research, at DOE | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cool roofs, cool research, at DOE Cool roofs, cool research, at DOE Science Accelerator returns cool roof documents from 6 DOE Databases Executive Order on Sustainability Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement One Cool Roof Cool Roofs Lead to Cooler Cities Guidelines for Selecting Cool Roofs DOE Cool Roof Calculator Visit the Science Showcase homepage. OSTI Homepage Mobile Gallery Subscribe to RSS OSTI Blog Get Widgets Get Alert Services OSTI Facebook OSTI Twitter OSTI Google+ Bookmark and Share (Link will open in a new window) Go to Videos Loading... Stop news scroll Most Visited Adopt-A-Doc DOE Data Explorer DOE Green Energy DOepatents DOE R&D Accomplishments .EDUconnections Energy Science and Technology Software Center E-print Network National Library of Energy OSTIblog Science.gov Science Accelerator

462

BEAMS Crossword Puzzle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

puzzle with words from the BEAMS Vocabulary List. Download this Activity Lab Pages Puzzle Puzzle Puzzle (cont) Puzzle (cont) Sample AnswersAnswer Key Ansewr Key Ansewr Key...

463

Electron Beam Melting (EBM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) I Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI; ...

464

Electron Beam Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting Program Organizers: Ian Harris, EWI; Ola Harrysson, North Carolina State University; ...

465

Broad beam ion implanter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Mechanically-reattachable liquid-cooled cooling apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus comprising a rack having a row of shelves, each shelf supporting an electronics circuit board, each one of the circuit boards being manually removable from the shelve supporting the one of the circuit boards and having a local heat source thereon. The apparatus also comprises a cooler attached to the rack and being able to circulate a cooling fluid around a channel forming a closed loop. The apparatus further comprises a plurality of heat conduits, each heat conduit being located over a corresponding one of the circuit boards and forming a path to transport heat from the local heat source of the corresponding one of the circuit boards to the cooler. Each heat conduit is configured to be manually detachable from the cooler or the circuit board, without breaking a circulation pathway of the fluid through the cooler.

Arney, Susanne; Cheng, Jen-Hau; Kolodner, Paul R; Kota-Venkata, Krishna-Murty; Scofield, William; Salamon, Todd R; Simon, Maria E

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

467

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [University of Texas Austin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [University of Texas Austin] On: 9? ............................................................................................................................278 C. The Limiting Anthropogenic Energy Input

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

468

Cool Farm Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cool Farm Tool Cool Farm Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Cool Farm Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Unilever Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.unilever.com/aboutus/supplier/sustainablesourcing/tools/?WT.LHNAV= Cost: Free Language: English Cool Farm Tool Screenshot References: Cool Farm Tool [1] Overview "The Cool Farm Tool is a new greenhouse gas calculator for farming. It's easy to use and gives instant results that invite users to try out alternatives and ask 'what if' questions. The tool was commissioned by Unilever from the University of Aberdeen The tool is ideal for farmers, supply chain managers and companies interested in quantifying their

469

Evaporative Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaporative Cooling Basics Evaporative Cooling Basics Evaporative Cooling Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:53pm Addthis Evaporative cooling uses evaporated water to naturally and energy-efficiently cool. An illustration of an evaporative cooler. In this example of an evaporative cooler, a small motor (top) drives a large fan (center) which blows air out the bottom and into your home. The fan sucks air in through the louvers around the box, which are covered with water-saturated absorbent material. How Evaporative Coolers Work There are two types of evaporative coolers: direct and indirect. Direct evaporative coolers, also called swamp coolers, work by cooling outdoor air by passing it over water-saturated pads, causing the water to evaporate into it. The 15°-40°F-cooler air is then directed into the home

470

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cool Roofs_090804  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for: for: Quarterly Facilities and Infrastructure Meeting Presented by: The Office of Engineering and Construction Management Content Excerpted From Presentation of: Bob Schmidt - NNSA Kansas City Plant Cool Roofs - An Overview August 4, 2009 2 *The terms "white roof" and "cool roof" are often mistakenly used interchangeably. A white roof is not necessarily a cool roof and a cool roof is not necessarily white. *"Cool Roofs" come in many style as defined by industry standard and can include: Metal Single ply Modified bitumen Acrylic coated White Roof vs. Cool Roof 3 Solar reflectance alone can significantly influence surface temperature, with the white stripe on the brick wall about 5 to 10° F (3-5° C) cooler than the surrounding, darker

471

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101: Cool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs February 1, 2011 - 10:50am Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Editor's Note: This entry has been cross-posted from DOE's Energy Blog. In this edition of Energy 101 we take a look at one of Secretary Chu's favorite energy efficiency techniques, cool roofs. Traditional dark-colored roofing materials absorb a great deal of sunlight, which in turn transfers heat to a building. Cool roofs use light-colored, highly reflective materials to regulate building temperatures without increasing electricity demand, which can result in energy savings of up to 10 to 15 percent. Cool roofs can also reduce the "heat island" effect in cities and suburbs, a phenomenon that produces higher temperatures in densely populated areas

472

Evaporative Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaporative Cooling Basics Evaporative Cooling Basics Evaporative Cooling Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:53pm Addthis Evaporative cooling uses evaporated water to naturally and energy-efficiently cool. An illustration of an evaporative cooler. In this example of an evaporative cooler, a small motor (top) drives a large fan (center) which blows air out the bottom and into your home. The fan sucks air in through the louvers around the box, which are covered with water-saturated absorbent material. How Evaporative Coolers Work There are two types of evaporative coolers: direct and indirect. Direct evaporative coolers, also called swamp coolers, work by cooling outdoor air by passing it over water-saturated pads, causing the water to evaporate into it. The 15°-40°F-cooler air is then directed into the home

473

Definition: Evaporative Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaporative Cooling An evaporative cooler is a device that cools air through the evaporation of water. Evaporative cooling works by employing water's large enthalpy of vaporization. The temperature of dry air can be dropped significantly through the phase transition of liquid water to water vapor (evaporation), which can cool air using much less energy than refrigeration. Evaporative cooling requires a water source, and must continually consume water to operate.[1] References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evaporative_cooler Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Evaporative_Cooling&oldid=601323" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes

474

Cool Roofs: An Introduction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roofs: An Introduction Roofs: An Introduction Cool Roofs: An Introduction August 9, 2010 - 4:43pm Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Lately, I've been hearing a lot about cool roof technologies, so I welcomed the chance to learn more at a recent seminar. Cool roofs, also referred to as white roofs, have special coatings that reflect sunlight and emit heat more efficiently than traditional roofs, keeping them cooler in the sun. Cool roofing technologies can be implemented quickly and at a relatively low cost, making it the fastest growing sector of the building industry. U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu is among the many cool roof enthusiasts. The Secretary recently announced plans to install cool roofs

475

Abstract Radiative Cooling in Hot Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive radiative cooling of buildings has been an underachieving concept for decades. The few deployments have generally been in dry climates with low solar angles. The greatest need for cooling is in the tropics. The high humidity endemic to many of these regions severely limits the passive cooling available per radiative area. To wrest temperature relief from humid climates, not just nocturnal cooling but solar irradiance, both direct and indirect, must be addressed. This investigation explores the extent to which thermal radiation can be used to cool buildings in the tropics. It concludes that inexpensive materials could be fabricated into roof panels providing passive cooling day and night in tropical locations with an unobstructed view of sky.

Aubrey Jaffer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental verification and model-based evaluation Title Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: experimental verification and model-based evaluation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Salamanca, Francisco, Shaheen R. Tonse, Surabi Menon, Vishal Garg, Krishna P. Singh, Manish Naja, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 4 Abstract We evaluate differences in clear-sky upwelling shortwave radiation reaching the top of the atmosphere in response to increasing the albedo of roof surfaces in an area of India with moderately high aerosol loading. Treated (painted white) and untreated (unpainted) roofs on two buildings in northeast India were analyzed on five cloudless days using radiometric imagery from the IKONOS satellite. Comparison of a radiative transfer model (RRTMG) and radiometric satellite observations shows good agreement (R2 = 0.927). Results show a mean increase of ~50 W m-2 outgoing at the top of the atmosphere for each 0.1 increase of the albedo at the time of the observations and a strong dependence on atmospheric transmissivity.

477

Cooling-tower rebuild, treatment overhaul halt fouling  

SciTech Connect

Partial fixes over a period of time were insufficient to meet cooling requirements at this four-tower powerplant. The eventual remedy involved complete fill replacement and chemistry-program revision. Cooling-tower performance hinges on many factors. Assuming the proper water and air distribution and unhindered operation of spray nozzles, pumps, valves, etc, fill design is the key element. However, a decade of experience at Keystone station (operated by Pennsylvania Electric Co for a consortium of East Coast utilities) showed that more than just changing to a fouling-resistant fill was required to provide and maintain design performance. As described in this article, careful analysis, revision, and continuous monitoring of the chemical water-treatment program were needed as well. At each of Keystone's two units, two natural-draft, hyperbolic towers provide cooling for main-condenser circulating water and service water. The 325-ft-tall towers are counter-current flow, and measure 247 ft across the basin. Film-type fill originally installed in the towers consisted of assemblies of fiber-cement board, 9 ft deep in the center and 7 ft in the peripheral regions. Fiber-cement was also the construction material used in the drift eliminators, and in the piping connected to concrete distribution flumes within the towers.

Gall, G.P.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Simulation of a method for forming a laser-cooled positron plasma A. S. Newbury,* B. M. Jelenkovic,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

axis at the same frequency as the 9 Be ions . Therefore, a centrifugal separation will occur, forcing beams of high brightness for a number of different ex- periments 4,6,18 . A dense gas of positrons-temperature buffer gas of N2 to provide trapping and cooling. By remov- ing the buffer gas, the base pressure

479

Solar cooling R and D overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of the principal solar energy conversion processes for cooling is reviewed; applications ready for demonstrations are identified; and directions for near term R and D efforts needed to bring other potentially successful cooling systems to the point of demonstration are recommended. The principal solar cooling methods are classified as: absorption, heat engine/vapor compression, desiccant, solar assisted heat pump, photovoltaic heat pump, and passive and others.

Auh, P.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "articles beam cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Wet/dry cooling tower and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Cooling of Neutron Stars. Hadronic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the cooling of isolated neutron stars. The main cooling regulators are introduced: EoS, thermal transport, heat capacity, neutrino and photon emissivity, superfluid nucleon gaps. Neutrino emissivity includes main processes. A strong impact of medium effects on the cooling rates is demonstrated. With taking into account of medium effects in reaction rates and in nucleon superfluid gaps modern experimental data can be well explained.

D. Blaschke; H. Grigorian; D. N. Voskresensky

2004-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

483

A Comparative Demonstration of Alternative Milk Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A newly-designed groundwater-ice bank milk cooling system significantly reduces energy use and peak electric demand by about 30% over a conventional direct expansion bulk tank cooling system. This study compared the energy efficiency, electrical demands, and milk quality obtained using the new and conventional systems. Overall, the new system represents a viable, cost-effective alternative for dairy farms that are upgrading or replacing milk cooling equipment.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484