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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Beamline 5.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available

2

Beamline 5.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Beamline 5.0.3 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:36 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available; automated sample mounting system

3

Beamline 5.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available; automated sample mounting system

4

Beamline 8.2.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.5 (v) mrad Measured spot size (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K

5

Beamline 8.3.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3.1 Print 3.1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315r) Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 0.120 (h) x 0.108 (v) mm Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules. Crystallization tray goniometer available with prior arrangement.

6

Beamline 5.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available

7

Beamline 8.2.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.5 (v) mrad Measured spot size (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K

8

Beamline 5.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available; automated sample mounting system

9

Beamline 5.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available; automated sample mounting system

10

Beamline 5.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available; automated sample mounting system

11

Beamline 5.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available

12

Beamline 5.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available

13

Beamline 5.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Beamline 5.0.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:32 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules

14

Beamline 8.2.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.5 (v) mrad Measured spot size (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K

15

Beamline 8.3.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315r) Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 0.120 (h) x 0.108 (v) mm Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules. Crystallization tray goniometer available with prior arrangement.

16

Beamline 5.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available

17

Beamline 8.3.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315r) Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 0.120 (h) x 0.108 (v) mm Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules. Crystallization tray goniometer available with prior arrangement.

18

Beamline 5.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Print 3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available; automated sample mounting system

19

Beamline 8.2.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.5 (v) mrad Measured spot size (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3x3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available Sample environment Ambient or ~100 K

20

Beamline 8.3.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Print 1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315r) Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 0.120 (h) x 0.108 (v) mm Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules. Crystallization tray goniometer available with prior arrangement.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Beamline 5.0.3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Beamline 5.0.3 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:36 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v) mrad (user selectable) Spot size 100 µm Endstations Standard hutch Detectors 3 x 3 CCD array (ADSC Q315R) Sample format Single crystals of biological molecules Sample preparation Support labs available; automated sample mounting system

22

Accordion arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we present accordion arrays, a straight-forward and effective memory compression technique targeting Unicode-based character arrays. In many non-numeric Java programs, character arrays represent a significant fraction (30-40% on average) ... Keywords: Java, array, character, compression, memory management, polymorphism, unicode

Craig Zilles

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Waveguide electrooptic switch arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is presented of electrooptic waveguide switch arrays with strong emphasis on those based on titanium-diffused lithium niobate waveguides. Crosspoint and array design considerations and performance are discussed as are waveguide technology limits. ...

R. C. Alferness

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Automatic array privatization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter discusses techniques for automatic array privatization developed as part of the Polaris project at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Array privatization is one of the most important transformations for effective program parallelization. ...

Peng Tu; David Padua

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

odd shaped array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. odd shaped array. (data structure). Definition: See ragged matrix. Author: PEB. Go to the Dictionary of Algorithms and ...

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

26

Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

27

CG-3 Detector Array  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tanks for the SANS instruments at HFIR. The Bio-SANS detector is on the left. CG-3 Detector Array For more information, contact Instrument Scientist: Volker Urban,...

28

Micromachined electrode array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

29

Carbon Nanotube Arrays: Synthesis of Dense Arrays of Well ...  

Carbon Nanotube Arrays: Synthesis of Dense Arrays of Well-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Completely Filled with Titanium Carbide on Titanium Substrates

30

Flexible retinal electrode array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

Okandan, Murat (Albuquerque, NM); Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

31

Random array grid collimator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

Fenimore, E.E.

1980-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Photovoltaic array performance model.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Definition: DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger Array) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) The Schlumberger array is a type of electrode configuration for a DC...

34

Nanoelectrospray Emitter Arrays Providing Interemitter ...  

Nanoelectrospray Emitter Arrays Providing Interemitter Electric Field Uniformity Ryan T. Kelly, Jason S. Page, Ioan Marginean, Keqi Tang, and Richard ...

35

Striped tape arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A growing number of applications require high capacity, high throughput tertiary storage systems [1] [2]. We are investigating how data striping ideas apply to arrays of magnetic tape drives. Data striping increases throughput and reduces response time for large accesses to a storage system. Striped magnetic tape systems are particularly appealing because many inexpensive magnetic tape drives have low bandwidth; striping may offer dramatic performance improvements for these systems. There are several important issues in designing striped tape systems: the choice of tape drives and robots, whether to stripe within or between robots, and the choice of the best scheme for distributing data on cartridges. One of the most troublesome problems in striped tape arrays is the synchronization of transfers across tape drives. Another issue is how improved devices will affect the desirability of striping in the future. We present the results of simulations comparing the performance of striped tape systems to non-striped systems.

Ann L. Drapeau; Randy H. Katz

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cellular array processing simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cellular array processing simulation (CAPS) system is a high-level image language that runs on a multiprocessor configuration. CAPS is interpretively decoded on a conventional minicomputer with all image operation instructions executed on an array processor. CAPS was designed to be both modular and table driven so that it can be easily maintained and modified. CAPS uses the image convolution operator as one of its primitives and performs this cellular operation by decomposing it into parallel image steps. Among its features is the ability to observe the imagery in real time as a user's algorithm is executed. CAPS also contains a language processor that permits users to develop re-entrant image processing subroutines or algorithms. 4 references.

Lee, H.C.; Preston, E.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Solar array construction  

SciTech Connect

An interconnect tab on each cell of a first set of circular solar cells connects that cell in series with an adjacent cell in the set. This set of cells is arranged in alternate columns and rows of an array and a second set of similar cells is arranged in the remaining alternate columns and rows of the array. Three interconnect tabs on each solar cell of the said second set are employed to connect the cells of the second set to one another, in series and to connect the cells of the second set to those of the first set in parallel. Some tabs (making parallel connections) connect the same surface regions of adjacent cells to one another and others (making series connections) connect a surface region of one cell to the opposite surface region of an adjacent cell; however, the tabs are so positioned that the array may be easily assembled by depositing the cells in a certain sequence and in proper orientation.

Crouthamel, Marvin S. (Pennsauken, NJ); Coyle, Peter J. (Oaklyn, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

Yelton, William G. (Sandia Park, NM); Siegal, Michael P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Light harvesting arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light harvesting array useful for the manufacture of devices such as solar cells comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2, and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Passive microfluidic array card and reader  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

Dugan, Lawrence Christopher (Modesto, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

Church, George M. (Brookline, MA); Mitra, Robi D. (Chestnut Hill, MA)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Diastolic arrays : throughput-driven reconfigurable computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we propose a new reconfigurable computer substrate: diastolic arrays. Diastolic arrays are arrays of processing elements that communicate exclusively through First-In First-Out (FIFO) queues, and provide ...

Cho, Myong Hyon, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Phenotype MicroArray Profiling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MicroArray MicroArray Profiling of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 Barry Bochner & Vanessa Gomez & Michael Ziman & Shihui Yang & Steven D. Brown Received: 22 May 2009 / Accepted: 26 October 2009 # The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract In this study, we developed a Phenotype MicroArray(tm) (PM) protocol to profile cellular phenotypes in Zymomonas mobilis, which included a standard set of nearly 2,000 assays for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur source utilization, nutrient stimulation, pH and osmotic stresses, and chemical sensitivities with 240 inhibitory chemicals. We observed two positive assays for C-source utilization (fructose and glucose) using the PM screen, which uses redox chemistry and cell respiration as a universal reporter to profile growth phenotypes in a high-throughput 96-well plate-based format.

44

Scattering arrays for matrix computations  

SciTech Connect

Several new mesh connected multiprocessor architectures are adapted to execute highly parallel algorithms for matrix algebra and signal processing, such as triangular- and eigen-decomposition, inversion and low-rank updating of general matrices, as well as Toeplitz and Hankel related matrices. These algorithms are based on scattering theory concepts and information preserving transformations hence they exhibit local communication, and simple control and memory management, ideal for VLSI implementation. The architectures are based on two-dimensional scattering arrays that can be folded into linear arrays either through time-sharing or due to simple computation wavefronts, or due to special structures of the matrices involved, such as Toeplitz. 21 references.

Delosme, J.M.; Morf, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Design Considerations for Array CGH to OligonucleotideArrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis has been developed for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms and/or for genome copy number changes. In this process, the intensity of hybridization to oligonucleotides arrays is increased by hybridizing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified representation of reduced genomic complexity. However, hybridization to some oligonucleotides is not sufficiently high to allow precise analysis of that portion of the genome. Methods: In an effort to identify aspects of oligonucleotide hybridization affecting signal intensity, we explored the importance of the PCR product strand to which each oligonucleotide is homologous and the sequence of the array oligonucleotides. We accomplished this by hybridizing multiple PCR-amplified products to oligonucleotide arrays carrying two sense and two antisense 50-mer oligonucleotides for each PCR amplicon. Results: In some cases, hybridization intensity depended more strongly on the PCR amplicon strand (i.e., sense vs. antisense) than on the detection oligonucleotide sequence. In other cases, the oligonucleotide sequence seemed to dominate. Conclusion: Oligonucleotide arrays for analysis of DNA copy number or for single nucleotide polymorphism content should be designed to carry probes to sense and antisense strands of each PCR amplicon to ensure sufficient hybridization and signal intensity.

Baldocchi, R.A.; Glynne, R.J.; Chin, K.; Kowbel, D.; Collins, C.; Mack, D.H.; Gray, J.W.

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

46

Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) took place in spring 2007 and is the third in the series of Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) experiments. The HATS experiments have been instrumental in testing and developing subfilterscale (...

Edward G. Patton; Thomas W. Horst; Peter P. Sullivan; Donald H. Lenschow; Steven P. Oncley; William O. J. Brown; Sean P. Burns; Alex B. Guenther; Andreas Held; Thomas Karl; Shane D. Mayor; Luciana V. Rizzo; Scott M. Spuler; Jielun Sun; Andrew A. Turnipseed; Eugene J. Allwine; Steven L. Edburg; Brian K. Lamb; Roni Avissar; Ronald J. Calhoun; Jan Kleissl; William J. Massman; Kyaw Tha Paw U; Jeffrey C. Weil

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Simulations of astronomical imaging phased arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a theoretical procedure for analyzing astronomical phased arrays with overlapping beams, and apply the procedure to simulate a simple example. We demonstrate the effect of overlapping beams on the number of degrees of freedom of the array, and on the ability of the array to recover a source. We show that the best images are obtained using overlapping beams, contrary to common practise, and show how the dynamic range of a phased array directly affects the image quality.

George Saklatvala; Stafford Withington; Michael P. Hobson

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

Proceedings: EPRI Second Phased Array Inspection Seminar  

SciTech Connect

The Second EPRI Phased Array Inspection Seminar focused on industrial applications of phased array technology that have been achieved to date or are planned for the near future. Presentations were made by developers of inspection techniques, inspection services vendors, and utility personnel who have performed inspections using arrays.

None

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Proceedings: EPRI Second Phased Array Inspection Seminar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Second EPRI Phased Array Inspection Seminar focused on industrial applications of phased array technology that have been achieved to date or are planned for the near future. Presentations were made by developers of inspection techniques, inspection services vendors, and utility personnel who have performed inspections using arrays.

2001-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

51

Means of manufacturing annular arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for manufacturing an annular acoustic transducer array from a plate of transducer material, which enables production of precision aligned arrays at low cost. The circular plate is sawed along at least two lines that are radial to the axis of the plate. At steps along each radial cut, the plate is rotated first in one direction and then in an opposite direction by a predetermined angle such as slightly less than 90/sup 0/. The cuts result in the forming of several largely ring-shaped lands, each largely ring-shaped land being joined to the other rings of different radii by thin portions of the plate, and each ring being cut into segments. The bridges that join different rings hold the transducer together until it can be mounted on a lens.

Day, R.A.

1985-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

Array Based Java Source Code Obfuscation Using Classes with Restructured Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Array restructuring operations obscure arrays. Our work aims on java source code obfuscation containing arrays. Our main proposal is Classes with restructured array members and obscured member methods for setting, getting array elements and to get the length of arrays. The class method definition codes are obscured through index transformation and constant hiding. The instantiated objects of these classes are used for source code writing. A tool named JDATATRANS is developed for generating classes and to the best of our knowledge this is the first tool available for array restructuring, on java source codes.

Sivadasan, Praveen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Automated array assembly. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the ERDA/JPL LSSA program of $0.50/W selling price for array modules in 1986 turns out to have been remarkably appropriate. An extensive and detailed analysis of technologies which could be related to array module manufacturing was completed and a minimum manufacturing cost in a highly automated line of $0.30/W was found assuming the silicon is free. The panels are of a double glass construction and are based on round wafers. Screen printed silver has been used as the metallization with a spray-coated AR layer. The least expensive junction formation technology appears to be ion implantation; however, several other technologies also may be used with very little cost penalty as described. Based on the required investment, a profit of $0.05/W appears reasonable. If silicon wafers are available at a price of $20 to 40/M/sup 2/, a selling price for these array modules of $0.50 to 0.66/W is projected. An analysis of the impact of factory size has been made. For a production level of 500 MW/yr, the price above is derived. For comparison, a factory processing 50 MW/yr using the same technology would sell modules for $0.54/W to $0.70/W. An analysis of the impact of wafer size indicates that with traditional metallization and panel designs there is no advantage in increasing wafer size from 3 in. to 5 in., and, in fact, there is some penalty (10% in $/W) due to increasedmetallization costs and reduced system performance. There is a premium placed on high efficiency due to its impact, not only on array module cost, but on system cost. For the near term goals of this program, wafers cut from single-crystal material seem the most likely sheet configuration.

Williams, B.F.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Status of wake and array loss research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, many projects have evaluated wind turbine wake effects and resultant array losses in both Europe and the United States. This paper examines the status of current knowledge about wake effects and array losses and suggests future research. Single-turbine wake characteristics have been studied extensively and are generally described well by existing theoretical models. Field measurements of wake effects in wind turbine arrays are largely limited to small arrays, with 2 to 4 rows of turbines. Few data have been published on wake effects within large arrays. Measurements of wake deficits downwind of large arrays that deficits are substantially larger and extend farther downwind than expected. Although array design models have been developed, these models have been tested and verified using only limited data from a few rows of wind turbines in complex terrain, whereas some of the largest arrays have more than 40 rows of wind turbines. Planned cooperative efforts with the wind industry will obtain existing data relevant to analyzing energy deficits within large arrays and identifying data sets for potential use in array model verification efforts. Future research being considered include a cooperative research experiment to obtain more definitive data on wake deficits and turbulence within and downwind of large arrays. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Definition: PV array | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PV array PV array Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png PV array An interconnected system of PV modules that function as a single electricity-producing unit. In smaller systems, an array can consist of a single module.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A Photovoltaic system (informally, PV system) is an arrangement of components designed to supply usable electric power for a variety of purposes, using the Sun (or, less commonly, other light sources) as the power source. PV systems may be built in various configurations: Off-grid without battery (Array-direct) Off-grid with battery storage for DC-only appliances Off-grid with battery storage for AC & DC appliances Grid-tie without battery Grid-tie with battery storage A photovoltaic array (also called a solar array) consists of multiple photovoltaic modules, casually

56

Automated array assembly. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three main sections are included which describe a general technology assessment and manufacturing cost analysis; a near-term (1982) factory design; and the results of an experimental production study for the large-scale production of flat-panel silicon solar-cell arrays. The results of an extensive study and detailed analysis of technologies which could be related to array module manufacturing are presented. From this study, several manufacturing sequences emerge as candidates for satisfying the ERDA/JPL cost goal of $0.50/W selling price in 1986. A minimum manufacturing cost was found in a highly automated line of $0.30/W assuming the silicon is free. The panels are of a double-glass construction and are based on round wafers. Screen-printed silver has been used as the metallization with a spray-coated antireflection (AR) layer. The least expensive junction-formation technology appears to be ion implantation;however, several other technologies also may be used with very little cost penalty as described. An interim 1982 factory is described for the large-scale production of silicon solar-cell array modules. The boundary conditions for this design are the use of Czochralski silicon crystals and $25/kg polycrystalline silicon. The objective is a large-scale production facility to meet an intermediate ERDA cost goal of $2.00/W in 1982. A 6-month experimental production study of the elements of low-cost solar-cell manufacturing sequences is described as an outgrowth of the cost and manufacturing studies. This program consisted of three parts: an experimental production line study of the major variables associated with the fabrication of 3-in.-diameter silicon solar cells; a study of thick-film screen-printed silver metallization; and panel design and assembly development. (WHK)

D'Aiello, R.V.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Double interconnection fuel cell array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell array (10) is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells (12) which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes (14) and outer electrodes (18 and 18'), with solid electrolyte (16 and 16') between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections (20 and 20') contacting the inner electrode (14), each cell (12) having only three metallic felt electrical connectors (22) which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other.

Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); Zymboly, Gregory E. (Murrysville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Alignment method for solar collector arrays - Energy ...  

The present invention is directed to an improved method for establishing camera fixture location for aligning mirrors on a solar collector array (SCA) comprising ...

59

Carbon Nanofiber Arrays Introduced as Artificial Local ...  

ORNL 2010-G00642/jcn UT-B IDs PFTT-200100978, PFTT-200201199, PFTT-200401482, PFTT-200401483 Carbon Nanofiber Arrays Introduced as Artificial Local ...

60

Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet overview of the Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array project implemented by the Department of Energy Golden Office and National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Not Available

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Primary Dendrite Array Morphology: Observations from Ground ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Influence of natural convection on primary dendrite array ... Solidification and Microstructure Evaluation of the Ni-Ga and Co-Ni-Ga Alloys.

62

Carbon Nanotube Nano-Electrode Arrays - Available ...  

Computers & Electronics; Publication(s) Nanoelectrode Arrays Based on Low Site Density Aligned Carbon Nanotubes. (pdf) - Tu, Y., Lin, Y., Ren, ...

63

Array Converter | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Converter Converter Jump to: navigation, search Name Array Converter Place Sunnyvale, California Zip 94086 Product US manufacturer of micro-inverters. Coordinates 32.780338°, -96.547405° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.780338,"lon":-96.547405,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

REMARC: Reconfigurable Multimedia Array Coprocessor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a new reconfigurable processor architecture called REMARC (Reconfigurable Multimedia Array Coprocessor). REMARC is a reconfigurable coprocessor that is tightly coupled to a main RISC processor and consists of a global control unit and 64 programmable logic blocks called nano processors. REMARC is designed to accelerate multimedia applications, such as video compression, decompression, and image processing. These applications typically use 8bit or 16-bit data therefore, each nano processor has a 16-bit datapath that is much wider than those of other reconfigurable coprocessors. We have developed a programming environment for REMARC and several realistic application programs, DES encryption, MPEG-2 decoding, and MPEG-2 encoding. REMARC achieves speedups ranging from a factor of 2.3 to 21.2 on these applications. 1 Introduction As the demand for multimedia applications, such as video compression, decompression, and image processing, increasing the performance of thes...

Takashi Miyamori; Kunle Olukotun

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Shared Memory Programming in Metacomputing Environments: The Global Array Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the Global Array shared-memory nonuniform memory-access programming model is explored in a wide-area-network (WAN) distributed supercomputer environment. The Global Array model is extended by introducing a concept of mirrored arrays ... Keywords: Metacomputing, NUMA memory architecture, distributed arrays, global arrays, shared-memory programming

Jarek Nieplocha; Robert Harrison

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

DPAD2A Field Programmable Analog Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DPAD2 is a Field Programmable Analog Array (FPAA) based on CMOS switched capacitor technology. This paper describes the major design decisions that went into creating DPAD2 with respect to the ultimate goal of the work, being a mixed signal field programmable ... Keywords: CMOS, analog field array

Adrian Bratt; Ian Macbeth

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Solar Array Ventures Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Array Ventures Inc Place Austin, Texas Product Texas-based start-up thin film PV panel maker, which plans to develop five production plants over the next five years, with four of those facilities located at a site in New Mexico. References Solar Array Ventures Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solar Array Ventures Inc is a company located in Austin, Texas . References ↑ "Solar Array Ventures Inc" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Solar_Array_Ventures_Inc&oldid=351246" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

68

Imaging the Coso geothermal area crustal structure with an array...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from converted phases stack coherently. Combining data from all arrays we process the data set as an array of mini-arrays and stack the data into CCP bins. Processing the data in...

69

Definition: DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wenner Array) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) The Wenner array is a type of electrode configuration for a DC resistivity survey and...

70

Definition: DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) The Pole-Dipole array is a type of electrode configuration for a DC...

71

Resonator for Coherent Addition of Semiconductor Laser Arrays ...  

Resonator for Coherent Addition of Semiconductor Laser Arrays and Applications for a Solar Pumped Laser Array Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Contact ...

72

Multilayer nanoassembly of Sn-nanopillar arrays sandwiched between...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multilayer nanoassembly of Sn-nanopillar arrays sandwiched between graphene layers for high-capacity lithium storage Title Multilayer nanoassembly of Sn-nanopillar arrays...

73

High power semiconductor laser diode arrays  

SciTech Connect

The cw optical power obtainable from semiconductor laser diodes has been extended to unprecedented levels in recent years through the use of multistripe arrays. By spreading out the optical power with more than 100 stripes, single-facet, cw output in exces of 5 Watts has been demonstrated, and 500 mW cw is now commercially available. Recent improvements to array performance include: arrays up to 1 cm wide that generates quasi-cw (150 usec pulse) output in excesss of 11 Watts, and a novel device structure which produces up to 215 mW cw in a single diffraction limited lobe.

Cross, P.S.

1986-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Electromagnetic formation flight of satellite arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposed methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining ...

Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

He, SC2002 1 MPI and OpenMP Paradigms on Cluster of SMP Architectures: the Vacancy Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition Yun (Helen) He and Chris Ding...

76

Low-cost laser diode array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost. 19 figs.

Freitas, B.L.; Skidmore, J.A.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Low-cost laser diode array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost.

Freitas, Barry L. (Livermore, CA); Skidmore, Jay A. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Sampling Errors in Rawinsonde-Array Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rawinsonde data used for sounding-array budget computations have random errors, both instrumental errors and errors of representativeness (here called sampling errors). The latter are associated with the fact that radiosondes do not measure large-...

Brian E. Mapes; Paul E. Ciesielski; Richard H. Johnson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Randomized post-optimization of covering arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of covering arrays with the fewest rows remains a challenging problem. Most computational and recursive constructions result in extensive repetition of coverage. While some is necessary, some is not. By reducing the repeated coverage, ...

Peyman Nayeri; Charles J. Colbourn; Goran Konjevod

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Regional Wave Field Modeling and Array Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Array with Hs 7.58 m, Tp 2.22 s and DSPR 4. WEC Farm Modeling: WEC Energy Sink Definition WEC Energy Sink Definition * Currently WECs modeled in SWAN as constant...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

Ren, Zhifeng F. (Newton, MA); Tu, Yi (Belmont, MA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesis  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally relates to high density nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesizing nucleic acid sequences on a solid surface. Specifically, the present invention contemplates the use of stabilized nucleic acid primer sequences immobilized on solid surfaces, and circular nucleic acid sequence templates combined with the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification to thereby increase nucleic acid sequence concentrations in a sample or on an array of nucleic acid sequences.

Sabanayagam, Chandran R. (Allston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Needham, MA); Misasi, John (Syracuse, NY); Hatch, Anson (Seattle, WA); Cantor, Charles (Del Mar, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Quasi-random array imaging collimator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes-touching imaging collimator. The quasi-random array imaging collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasing throughput by elimination of a substrate. The present invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

Fenimore, E.E.

1980-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

84

Systolic Arrays for Integer Chinese Remaindering Getin K. Koc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Coeentino, #Fault Tolerance in a Systolic Residue Arithmetic Processor Array," IEEE Trona. on Computers, Vol

California at Davis, University of

85

Active and passive cooling for concentrating photovoltaic arrays  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimization, based on minimum energy cost, of active and passive cooling designs for point-focus Fresnel lens photovoltaic arrays and line-focus, parabolic-trough photovoltaic arrays is discussed, and the two types of cooling are compared. Passive cooling is more cost-effective for Fresnel lens arrays while the reverse is true for parabolic-trough arrays.

Edenburn, M.W.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

HEMI AL FREE WATER ANALYSIS WITH NANOELE TRODE ARRAYS  

hemi al free water analysis with nanoele trode arrays te hnology summary te hnology readiness level:

87

Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40/sup 0/C instead of at about 270/sup 0/C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementary particles or cosmic rays.

Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

1985-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO.sub.2, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO.sub.2, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40.degree. C. instead of at about 270.degree. C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementry particles or cosmic rays.

Tewari, Param H. (Milpitas, CA); Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Silicon ball grid array chip carrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

Palmer, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Gassman, Richard A. (Greensboro, NC); Chu, Dahwey (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Early expansion in exploding multiple wire arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model is developed for the initial stage (blow-off and the onset of pinching) of a multiple exploded wire array. With obvious modifications the model can also be applied to single wires or other self-pinched plasma columns. Each wire in the array is modeled as a plasma cylinder undergoing self-similar radial motion, and the whole array is coupled self-consistently to an external circuit. The plasma expands initially; the onset of self-pinch is shown to be coincident with the plasma conductivity reaching a value large enough for skin effect to occur. The model is run for a variety of system parameters, and the choice of machine and wire parameters to attain particular objectives (e.g., rapid current rise, limited wire expansion, etc.) is discussed.

Bloomberg, H.W.; Lampe, M.; Colombant, D.G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Multisource Self-calibration for Sensor Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibration of a sensor array is more involved if the antennas have direction dependent gains and multiple calibrator sources are simultaneously present. We study this case for a sensor array with arbitrary geometry but identical elements, i.e. elements with the same direction dependent gain pattern. A weighted alternating least squares (WALS) algorithm is derived that iteratively solves for the direction independent complex gains of the array elements, their noise powers and their gains in the direction of the calibrator sources. An extension of the problem is the case where the apparent calibrator source locations are unknown, e.g., due to refractive propagation paths. For this case, the WALS method is supplemented with weighted subspace fitting (WSF) direction finding techniques. Using Monte Carlo simulations we demonstrate that both methods are asymptotically statistically efficient and converge within two iterations even in cases of low SNR.

Wijnholds, Stefan J; 10.1109/TSP.2009.2022894

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Terabyte IDE RAID-5 Disk Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy physics experiments are currently recording large amounts of data and in a few years will be recording prodigious quantities of data. New methods must be developed to handle this data and make analysis at universities possible. We examine some techniques that exploit recent developments in commodity hardware. We report on tests of redundant arrays of integrated drive electronics (IDE) disk drives for use in offline high energy physics data analysis. IDE redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) prices now are less than the cost per terabyte of million-dollar tape robots! The arrays can be scaled to sizes affordable to institutions without robots and used when fast random access at low cost is important.

David A. Sanders et al.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Nitrate Solution Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October and November of 1981 thirteen approach-to-critical experiments were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington, using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas{reg_sign} reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were performed to fill a gap in experimental data regarding criticality limits for storing and handling arrays of Pu solution in reprocessing facilities. Of the thirteen approach-to-critical experiments eleven resulted in extrapolations to critical configurations. Four of the approaches were extrapolated to the critical number of bottles; these were not evaluated further due to the large uncertainty associated with the modeling of a fraction of a bottle. The remaining seven approaches were extrapolated to critical array spacing of 3-4 and 4-4 arrays; these seven critical configurations were evaluation for inclusion as acceptable benchmark experiments in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook. Detailed and simple models of these configurations were created and the associated bias of these simplifications was determined to range from 0.00116 and 0.00162 {+-} 0.00006 ?keff. Monte Carlo analysis of all models was completed using MCNP5 with ENDF/BVII.0 neutron cross section libraries. A thorough uncertainty analysis of all critical, geometric, and material parameters was performed using parameter perturbation methods. It was found that uncertainty in the impurities in the polyethylene bottles, reflector position, bottle outer diameter, and critical array spacing had the largest effect. The total uncertainty ranged from 0.00651 to 0.00920 ?keff. Evaluation methods and results will be presented and discussed in greater detail in the full paper.

M. A. Marshall; J. D. Bess

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Method of fabricating a solar cell array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A first set of pre-tabbed solar cells are assembled in a predetermined array with at least part of each tab facing upward, each tab being fixed to a bonding pad on one cell and abutting a bonding pad on an adjacent cell. The cells are held in place with a first vacuum support. The array is then inverted onto a second vacuum support which holds the tabs firmly against the cell pads they abut. The cells are exposed to radiation to melt and reflow the solder pads for bonding the tab portions not already fixed to bonding pads to these pads.

Lazzery, Angelo G. (Oaklyn, NJ); Crouthamel, Marvin S. (Pennsauken, NJ); Coyle, Peter J. (Oaklyn, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Development of the ORRUBA Silicon Detector Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High quality radioactive beams have recently made possible the measurement of (d,p) reactions on unstable nuclei in inverse kinematics, which can yield information on the development of single-neutron structure away from stability, and are of astrophysical interest due to the proximity to suggested r-process paths. The Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) is a new high solid-angular coverage array, composed of two rings of silicon detectors, optimized for measuring (d,p) reactions. A partial implementation has been used to measure (d,p) reactions on nuclei around the N = 82 shell closure.

Pain, S. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Smith, M. S. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Chae, K. Y.; Jones, K. L.; Kapler, R.; Moazen, B. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Chipps, K. A. [Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80403 (United States); Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; O'Malley, P.; Thomas, J. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Johnson, M. S.; Matei, C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Kozub, R. L. [Department of Physics, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505 (United States)

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

Efficient tiling patterns for reconfigurable gate arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a few potentially efficient tiling patterns for gate-array realizations. We start with a brief recapitulation of tiling patterns, and fundamental limits of placement/routing in a two-dimensional plane. We state the first principles ... Keywords: FPGA, hexagonal, octagonal, tiling

Sumanta Chaudhuri; Sylvain Guilley; Philippe Hoogvorst; Jean-Luc Danger

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Accelerating Haskell array codes with multicore GPUs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current GPUs are massively parallel multicore processors optimised for workloads with a large degree of SIMD parallelism. Good performance requires highly idiomatic programs, whose development is work intensive and requires expert knowledge. To raise ... Keywords: arrays, data parallelism, dynamic compilation, gpgpu, haskell, skeletons

Manuel M.T. Chakravarty; Gabriele Keller; Sean Lee; Trevor L. McDonell; Vinod Grover

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

FAWN: a fast array of wimpy nodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a fast array of wimpy nodes---FAWN---an approach for achieving low-power data-intensive data-center computing. FAWN couples low-power processors to small amounts of local flash storage, balancing computation and I/O capabilities. ...

David G. Andersen; Jason Franklin; Michael Kaminsky; Amar Phanishayee; Lawrence Tan; Vijay Vasudevan

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

ROBOTIC DEVICE FOR CLEANING PHOTOVOLTAIC PANEL ARRAYS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

output from a photovoltaic cell installed at Northeastern University., Boston, MA, USA. The graph shows to human crews and current hardware alternatives. A photovoltaic cell is an electronic device that converts1 ROBOTIC DEVICE FOR CLEANING PHOTOVOLTAIC PANEL ARRAYS MARK ANDERSON, ASHTON GRANDY, JEREMY HASTIE

Mavroidis, Constantinos

100

Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report we demonstrate that consistent highquality quantitative results can be achieved by array CGH after random prime amplification (RPA) and labeling. Further, we show that careful attention to quantitation of the starting DNA from manually microdissected paraffin material is necessary for optimum results

Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Breast; Y Devries; Sarah Nyante; Jim Korkola; Richard Segraves; Kentaro Nakao; Dan Moore; Hanik Bae; Monica Wilhelm; Shelley Hwang; Frederic Waldman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hybrid algorithms for adaptive array systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, mobile communications have caused an explosive growth to the number of wireless users. This growth has triggered an enormous demand not only for capacity but also for better coverage and quality of services with priority on interference ... Keywords: adaptive arrays, beamforming, least mean squares algorithm, mobile communications, sample matrix inversion algorithm, smart antennas

D. Papadimitriou; I. O. Vardiambasis

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Compute Node MD3000 Storage Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compute Node MD3000 Storage Array Dell 2950 Head Node 24-Port Switch Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node 24-Port Switch Dell 2950

Weber, David J.

103

Objective Array Design: Application to the Tropical Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple, versatile, computationally efficient ensemble-based method for objectively designing an observation array is described. The method seeks to compute the observation array that minimizes the analysis error variance, according to Kalman ...

Pavel Sakov; Peter R. Oke

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Laser Array Synchronization - Oak Ridge National Laboratory | ORNL  

Laser Array Synchronization Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

105

Au nanoslit arrays as plasmonic substrates for solar water ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Au nanoslit arrays as plasmonic substrates for solar water splitting with ?-Fe 2 O 3. Bohn, Christopher; Agrawal, Amit; Lee ...

106

Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5{prime}- and/or 3{prime}-overhangs. 16 figs.

Cantor, C.R.; Przetakiewicz, M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, T.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

Proceedings of the Third EPRI Phased Array Ultrasound Seminar  

SciTech Connect

Phased array technology for ultrasonic examination is providing innovative solutions for nuclear in-service examination applications. EPRI has been a prime mover in the development and deployment of phased array ultrasound applications in the domestic nuclear market over the past decade. As part of this strategic effort, EPRI has hosted a series of seminars on phased array technology and its applications.

None

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Przetakiewicz, Marek (Boston, MA); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array, NREL (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array System Specifications System size: 720 kilowatts (kW) DC Characteristics: Single axis tracker photovoltaic, ground mounted Annual output: 1.2 gigawatt hours (GWh) Location: Top of South Table Mountain, Golden, Colorado Start of operation: December 2008 Financial Terms System ownership: SunEdison financed, built, owns, operates and maintains the system Solar Power and Services Agreement (SPSA): SunEdison and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) entered into a 20-year SPSA to provide Solar Energy Services to the Department of Energy (DOE) for use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Cost to DOE/NREL: There are no up-front costs to DOE or NREL * The price per kilowatt hour (kWh) for the power purchased from the

110

Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array, NREL (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array System Specifications System size: 720 kilowatts (kW) DC Characteristics: Single axis tracker photovoltaic, ground mounted Annual output: 1.2 gigawatt hours (GWh) Location: Top of South Table Mountain, Golden, Colorado Start of operation: December 2008 Financial Terms System ownership: SunEdison financed, built, owns, operates and maintains the system Solar Power and Services Agreement (SPSA): SunEdison and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) entered into a 20-year SPSA to provide Solar Energy Services to the Department of Energy (DOE) for use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Cost to DOE/NREL: There are no up-front costs to DOE or NREL * The price per kilowatt hour (kWh) for the power purchased from the

111

Annular array and method of manufacturing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for manufacturing an annular acoustic transducer array from a plate of transducer material, which enables production of precision aligned arrays at low cost. The circular plate is sawed along at least two lines that are radial to the axis of the plate. At steps along each radial cut, the plate is rotated first in one direction and then in an opposite direction by a predetermined angle such as slightly less than 90.degree.. The cuts result in the forming of several largely ring-shaped lands, each largely ring-shaped land being joined to the other rings of different radii by thin portions of the plate, and each ring being cut into segments. The bridges that join different rings, hold the transducer together until it can be mounted on a lens.

Day, Robert A. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Economic analysis of the unified heliostat array  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Unified Heliostat Array (UHA) is comprised of conventional two-axis heliostats mounted on a terraced south-facing wall of a single structure. The arrangement of heliostats on the array is chosen to eliminate or control the degree of inter-heliostat shading and blocking. The UHA was investifated as to cost and optical performance. Two heliostats, the Veda Industrial Heliostat (VIH) and the Repowering Heliostat were investigated in conjunction with the UHA. The UHA was found to be a viable candidate for solar thermal central receiver applications. The UHA-VIH combination was shown to provide very high flux densities and to be suitable for high temperature applications in the 1000/sup 0/K to 2000/sup 0/K range. These temperatures were shown to be achievable even with very small (1 MWt) collector fields.

Not Available

1980-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Bipolar battery with array of sealed cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery as a dipolar battery is disclosed with an array of stacked cells with the anode and cathode electrode materials in each cell sealed in a confining structure and separated from one another except across separator material interposed therebetween. The separator material is contained in a module having separate perforated metallic sheets that sandwich opposite sides of the separator material for the cell and an annular insulating spacer that surrounds the separator material beyond the perforations and is also sandwiched between and sealed to the sheets. The peripheral edges of the sheets project outwardly beyond the spacer, traverse the side edges of the adjacent electrode material to form cup-like electrode holders, and are fused to the adjacent current collector or end face members of the array. Electrolyte is infused into the electrolyte cavity through the perforations of one of the metallic sheets with the perforations also functioning to allow ionic conductance across the separator material between the adjacent electrodes. A gas-tight housing provides an enclosure of the array.

Kaun, T.D.; Smaga, J.A.

1986-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

114

Module/array interface study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel National, Inc. has conducted a study of alternate module, panel, and array designs for use in large scale applications such as central station photovoltaic power plants. The objective of the study is to identify design features that will lead to minimum plant costs. Several aspects of module design are evaluated, including glass superstrate and metal substrate module configurations, the potential for hail damage, light absorption in glass superstrates, the economics of glass selection, and electrical design. Also, three alternate glass superstrate module configurations are evaluated by means of finite element computer analyses. Two panel sizes, 1.2 by 2.4 m (4 by 8 ft) and 2.4 by 4.8 m (8 by 16 ft), are used to support three module sizes, 0.6 by 1.2 m (2 by 4 ft), 1.2 by 1.2 m (4 by 4 ft), and 1.2 by 2.4 m (4 by 8 ft), for design loadings of +- 1.7 kPa (35 psf), +- 2.4 kPa (50 psf), and +- 3.6 kPa (75 psf). Designs and cost estimates are presented for twenty panel types and nine array configurations at each of the three design loadings. Structural cost sensitivities of combined array configurations and panel cases are presented.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Bipolar battery with array of sealed cells  

SciTech Connect

A lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery as a dipolar battery is disclosed with an array of stacked cells with the anode and cathode electrode materials in each cell sealed in a confining structure and separated from one another except across separator material interposed therebetween. The separator material is contained in a module having separate perforated metallic sheets that sandwich opposite sides of the separator material for the cell and an annular insulating spacer that surrounds the separator material beyond the perforations and is also sandwiched between and sealed to the sheets. The peripheral edges of the sheets project outwardly beyond the spacer, traverse the side edges of the adjacent electrode material to form cup-like electrode holders, and are fused to the adjacent current collector or end face members of the array. Electrolyte is infused into the electrolyte cavity through the perforations of one of the metallic sheets with the perforations also functioning to allow ionic conductance across the separator material between the adjacent electrodes. A gas-tight housing provides an enclosure of the array.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Smaga, John A. (Lemont, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The ASTRI Mini-Array Science Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASTRI is a Flagship Project financed by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, and led by INAF, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics. Within this framework, INAF is currently developing an end-to-end prototype of a Small Size Telescope in a dual-mirror configuration (SST-2M) for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), scheduled to start data acquisition in 2014. Although the ASTRI SST-2M prototype is mainly a technological demonstrator, it will perform scientific observations of the Crab Nebula, Mrk 421 and Mrk 501 at E>1 TeV. A remarkable improvement in terms of performance could come from the operation, in 2016, of a SST-2M mini-array, composed of a few SST-2M telescopes to be placed at final CTA Southern Site. The SST mini-array will be able to study in great detail relatively bright sources (a few x 10E-12 erg/cm2/s at 10 TeV) with angular resolution of a few arcmin and energy resolution of about 10-15%. Thanks to the stereo approach, it will be possible to verify the wide field of view (FoV) performance through the detections of very high-energy showers with core located at a distance up to 500 m, to compare the mini-array performance with the Monte Carlo expectations by means of deep observations of selected targets, and to perform the first CTA science at the beginning of the mini-array operations. Prominent sources such as extreme blazars, nearby well-known BL Lac objects and radio-galaxies, galactic pulsar wind nebulae, supernovae remnants, micro-quasars, and the Galactic Center can be observed in a previously unexplored energy range, in order to investigate the electron acceleration and cooling, relativistic and non relativistic shocks, the search for cosmic-ray (CR) Pevatrons, the study of the CR propagation, and the impact of the extragalactic background light on the spectra of the sources.

S. Vercellone; G. Agnetta; L. A. Antonelli; D. Bastieri; G. Bellassai; M. Belluso; C. Bigongiari; S. Billotta; B. Biondo; G. Bonanno; G. Bonnoli; P. Bruno; A. Bulgarelli; R. Canestrari; M. Capalbi; P. Caraveo; A. Carosi; E. Cascone; O. Catalano; M. Cereda; P. Conconi; V. Conforti; G. Cusumano; V. De Caprio; A. De Luca; A. Di Paola; F. Di Pierro; D. Fantinel; M. Fiorini; D. Fugazza; D. Gardiol; M. Ghigo; F. Gianotti; S. Giarrusso; E. Giro; A. Grillo; D. Impiombato; S. Incorvaia; A. La Barbera; N. La Palombara; V. La Parola; G. La Rosa; L. Lessio; G. Leto; S. Lombardi; F. Lucarelli; M. C. Maccarone; G. Malaguti; G. Malaspina; V. Mangano; D. Marano; E. Martinetti; R. Millul; T. Mineo; A. Misto'; C. Morello; G. Morlino; M. R. Panzera; G. Pareschi; G. Rodeghiero; P. Romano; F. Russo; B. Sacco; N. Sartore; J. Schwarz; A. Segreto; G. Sironi; G. Sottile; A. Stamerra; E. Strazzeri; L. Stringhetti; G. Tagliaferri; V. Testa; M. C. Timpanaro; G. Toso; G. Tosti; M. Trifoglio; P. Vallania; V. Zitelli; F. Tavecchio

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

Ivanov, Ilia N; Simpson, John T; Hendricks, Troy R

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

Ivanov, Ilia N. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN); Hendricks, Troy R. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

PV array simulator development and validation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to harvest all available energy from a photovoltaic (PV) array is essential if new system developments are to meet levelized cost of energy targets and achieve grid parity with conventional centralized utility power. Therefore, exercising maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms, dynamic irradiance condition operation and startup and shutdown routines and evaluating inverter performance with various PV module fill-factor characteristics must be performed with a repeatable, reliable PV source. Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with Ametek Programmable Power to develop and demonstrate a multi-port TerraSAS PV array simulator. The simulator will replicate challenging PV module profiles, enabling the evaluation of inverter performance through analyses of the parameters listed above. Energy harvest algorithms have traditionally implemented methods that successfully utilize available energy. However, the quantification of energy capture has always been difficult to conduct, specifically when characterizing the inverter performance under non-reproducible dynamic irradiance conditions. Theoretical models of the MPPT algorithms can simulate capture effectiveness, but full validation requires a DC source with representative field effects. The DC source being developed by Ametek and validated by Sandia is a fully integrated system that can simulate an IV curve from the Solar Advisor Model (SAM) module data base. The PV simulator allows the user to change the fill factor by programming the maximum power point voltage and current parameters and the open circuit voltage and short circuit current. The integrated PV simulator can incorporate captured irradiance and module temperature data files for playback, and scripted profiles can be generated to validate new emerging hardware embedded with existing and evolving MPPT algorithms. Since the simulator has multiple independent outputs, it also has the flexibility to evaluate an inverter with multiple MPPT DC inputs. The flexibility of the PV simulator enables the validation of the inverter's capability to handle vastly different array configurations.

Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Lucca, Roberto (Ametek Programmable Power, San Diego, CA); Deuel, Don (Ametek Programmable Power, San Diego, CA)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

TES imaging array technology for CLOVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOVER is an experiment which aims to detect the signature of gravitational waves from inflation by measuring the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background. CLOVER consists of three telescopes operating at 97, 150, and 220 GHz. The 97-GHz telescope has 160 horns in its focal plane while the 150 and 220-GHz telescopes have 256 horns each. The horns are arranged in a hexagonal array and feed a polarimeter which uses finline-coupled TES bolometers as detectors. To detect the two polarizations the 97-GHz telescope has 320 detectors while the 150 and 220-GHz telescopes have 512 detectors each. To achieve the required NEPs the detectors are cooled to 100 mK for the 97 and 150-GHz polarimeters and 230 mK for the 220-GHz polarimeter. Each detector is fabricated as a single chip to guarantee fully functioning focal planes. The detectors are contained in linear modules made of copper which form split-block waveguides. The detector modules contain 16 or 20 detectors each for compatibility with the hexagonal arrays of horns in the telescopes' focal planes. Each detector module contains a time-division SQUID multiplexer to read out the detectors. Further amplification of the multiplexed signals is provided by SQUID series arrays. The first prototype detectors for CLOVER operate with a bath temperature of 230 mK and are used to validate the detector design as well as the polarimeter technology. We describe the design of the CLOVER detectors, detector blocks, and readout, and give an update on the detector development.

Michael D. Audley; Robert W. Barker; Michael Crane; Roger Dace; Dorota Glowacka; David J. Goldie; Anthony N. Lasenby; Howard M. Stevenson; Vassilka Tsaneva; Stafford Withington; Paul Grimes; Bradley Johnson; Ghassan Yassin; Lucio Piccirillo; Giampaolo Pisano; William D. Duncan; Gene C. Hilton; Kent D. Irwin; Carl D. Reintsema; Mark Halpern

2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Working Group Reports A Short-Wave Radiometer Array Across the Tropical Pacific Ocean as a Component of the TOGA-TAO Buoy Array R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction The purpose of this document is to bring together pertinent information concerning the NOAA TOGA-TAO buoy array so that a decision can be made for the following questions: 1. Are the scientific gains from an array of short-wave radiation sensors in the equatorial Pacific Ocean sufficiently impelling that DOE/ARM should provide financial and material support to NOAA/PMEL to install and operate this array? 2. What scientists and/or scientific studies would directly benefit from such a data set? 3. What should that array look like? That is, what sub-set of buoys should be so implemented given the per-buoy

122

Acoustic Array Development for Wind Turbine Noise Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the design and use of a multi-arm, logarithmic spiral acoustic array by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for measurement and characterization of wind turbine-generated noise. The array was developed in collaboration with a team from the University of Colorado Boulder. This design process is a continuation of the elliptical array design work done by Simley. A description of the array system design process is presented, including array shape design, mechanical design, design of electronics and the data acquisition system, and development of post-processing software. System testing and calibration methods are detailed. Results from the initial data acquisition campaign are offered and discussed. Issues faced during this initial deployment of the array are presented and potential remedies discussed.

Buck, S.; Roadman, J.; Moriarty, P.; Palo, S.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Definition: DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) The Dipole-Dipole array is a type of electrode configuration for a Direct-Current Resistivity Survey and is defined by its electrode array geometry.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://appliedgeophysics.berkeley.edu/dc/EM46.pdf Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:DC_Resistivity_Survey_(Dipole-Dipole_Array)&oldid=596974" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

124

Method and apparatus for laying wire arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Wire arrays (11) having a continuous wire (12) which is formed into a predetermined pattern and adhered to a backing material or substrate (13) are fabricated by applying adhesive material (16a, 16b) along opposite edge portions (17, 18) of the substrate, positioning a row of winding spools (21) along each of the edge portions and repeatedly extending the wire between and around successive spools at the opposite edge portions. The wound wire is then traveled along each spool toward the substrate and into contact with the adhesive. The spools are then removed and a coating of hardenable material (54) is applied to secure the wound wire to the substrate. Tension in the wire is relieved prior to contact of the wire with the adhesive and a small amount of slack is introduced into the wire before the final coating step. Mechanism (32) is provided for lifting the spools away from the substrate without disturbing the wound wire. The method and apparatus enable manufacture of precisely configured wire arrays without complex or costly equipment and do not require structural alterations in the substrate for the purpose of accommodating to fabrication equipment.

Horowitz, Seymour M. (6525 Swainland Dr., Oakland, CA 94611); Nesbitt, Dale D. (1712 Marin Ave., Berkeley, CA 94707)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Halbach array DC motor/generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new configuration of DC motor/generator is based on a Halbach array of permanent magnets. This motor does not use ferrous materials so that the only losses are winding losses and losses due to bearings and windage. An "inside-out" design is used as compared to a conventional motor/generator design. The rotating portion, i.e., the rotor, is on the outside of the machine. The stationary portion, i.e., the stator, is formed by the inside of the machine. The rotor contains an array of permanent magnets that provide a uniform field. The windings of the motor are placed in or on the stator. The stator windings are then "switched" or "commutated" to provide a DC motor/generator much the same as in a conventional DC motor. The commutation can be performed by mechanical means using brushes or by electronic means using switching circuits. The invention is useful in electric vehicles and adjustable speed DC drives.

Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA); Dreifuerst, Gary R. (Livermore, CA); Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Halbach array DC motor/generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new configuration of DC motor/generator is based on a Halbach array of permanent magnets. This motor does not use ferrous materials so that the only losses are winding losses and losses due to bearings and windage. An ``inside-out`` design is used as compared to a conventional motor/generator design. The rotating portion, i.e., the rotor, is on the outside of the machine. The stationary portion, i.e., the stator, is formed by the inside of the machine. The rotor contains an array of permanent magnets that provide a uniform field. The windings of the motor are placed in or on the stator. The stator windings are then ``switched`` or ``commutated`` to provide a DC motor/generator much the same as in a conventional DC motor. The commutation can be performed by mechanical means using brushes or by electronic means using switching circuits. The invention is useful in electric vehicles and adjustable speed DC drives. 17 figs.

Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.; Post, R.F.

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

127

Methods for validating the presence of and characterizing proteins deposited onto an array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining if proteins have been transferred from liquid-phase protein fractions to an array comprising staining the array with a total protein stain and imaging the array, optionally comparing the staining with a standard curve generated by staining known amounts of a known protein on the same or a similar array; a method of characterizing proteins transferred from liquid-phase protein fractions to an array including staining the array with a post-translational modification-specific (PTM-specific) stain and imaging the array and, optionally, after staining the array with a PTM-specific stain and imaging the array, washing the array, re-staining the array with a total protein stain, imaging the array, and comparing the imaging with the PTM-specific stain with the imaging with the total protein stain; stained arrays; and images of stained arrays.

Schabacker, Daniel S. (Naperville, IL)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Cesiated Carbon Nanoflakes Field Emitter Array Infrared Imager  

Cesiated Carbon Nanoflakes Field Emitter Array Infrared Imager ... The field emission current of each cesiated carbon nanoflake structure is modulated by the

129

Resonator for Coherent Addition of Semiconductor Laser Arrays ...  

Each laser in the array outputs only a few watts and could be pumped by solar energy. ... For directed energy laser communication in space and underwater ...

130

Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal...

131

DC Resistivity Survey (Gradient Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Gradient Array) edit Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

132

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Raft River Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1975) Jump...

133

Implementation of a Performance Instrumentation Framework for Global Arrays.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Global Arrays (GA) toolkit implements a shared-memory programming model for distributed memory machines where data locality is managed by the programmer. GA uses an (more)

Kawsar, Golam H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nanopost Arrays Anchor Molecules, Improve Ion Yields for Laser ...  

ORNL 2011-G00228/jcn UT-B ID 200902284 09.2011 Nanopost Arrays Anchor Molecules, Improve Ion Yields for Laser Mass Spectrometry Technology Summary

135

HEMI AL FREE WATER ANALYSIS WITH NANOELE TRODE ARRAYS  

hemi al free water analysis with nanoele trode arrays te hnology summary te hnology readiness level: proof of on ept has een demonstrated.

136

Quantum manipulation and simulation using Josephson junction arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the prospect of using quantum properties of large scale Josephson junction arrays for quantum manipulation and simulation. We study the collective vibrational quantum modes of a Josephson junction array and show that they provide a natural and practical method for realizing a high quality cavity for superconducting qubit based QED. We further demonstrate that by using Josephson junction arrays we can simulate a family of problems concerning spinless electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions. These protocols require no or few controls over the Josephson junction array and are thus relatively easy to realize given currently available technology.

Xingxiang Zhou; Ari Mizel

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Materials Issues in Area-Array Microelectronic Packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Higher power devices require more signal and ground lines and, to limit point .... on BGA interconnects using column grid arrays10 rather than standard balls.

138

Mirror Development for the Cherenkov Telescope Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a planned observatory for very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy. It will consist of several tens of telescopes of different sizes, with a total mirror area of up to 10,000 square meters. Most mirrors of current installations are either polished glass mirrors or diamond-turned aluminium mirrors, both labour intensive technologies. For CTA, several new technologies for a fast and cost-efficient production of light-weight and reliable mirror substrates have been developed and industrial pre-production has started for most of them. In addition, new or improved aluminium-based and dielectric surface coatings have been developed to increase the reflectance over the lifetime of the mirrors compared to those of current Cherenkov telescope instruments.

Frster, A; Baba, H; Bhr, J; Bonardi, A; Bonnoli, G; Brun, P; Canestrari, R; Chadwick, P; Chikawa, M; Carton, P -H; De Souza, V; Dipold, J; Doro, M; Durand, D; Dyrda, M; Giro, E; Glicenstein, J -F; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Hrabovski, M; Jeanney, C; Kagaya, M; Katagiri, H; Lessio, L; MANDAT, D; Mariotti, M; Medina, C; Micha?owski, J; Micolon, P; Nakajima, D; Niemiec, J; Nozato, A; Palatka, M; Pareschi, G; Pech, M; Peyaud, B; Phlhofer, G; Rataj, M; Rodeghiero, G; Rojas, G; Rousselle, J; Sakonaka, R; Schovanek, P; Seweryn, K; Schultz, C; Shu, S; Stinzing, F; Stodulski, M; Teshima, M; Travniczek, P; Van Eldik, C; Vassiliev, V; Wi?niewski, ?; Wrnlein, A; Yoshida, T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Receiver control for the Submillimeter Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient operation of a submillimeter interferometer requires remote (preferably automated) control of mechanically tuned local oscillators, phase-lock loops, mixers, optics, calibration vanes and cryostats. The present control system for these aspects of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) will be described. Distributed processing forms the underlying architecture. In each antenna cabin, a serial network of up to ten independent 80C196 microcontroller boards attaches to the real-time PowerPC computer (running LynxOS). A multi-threaded, gcc-compiled program on the PowerPC accepts top-level requests via remote procedure calls (RPC), subsequently dispatches tuning commands to the relevant microcontrollers, and regularly reports the system status to optical-fiber-based reflective memory for common access by the telescope monitor and error reporting system. All serial communication occurs asynchronously via encoded, variable-length packets. The microcontrollers respond to the requested commands and queries by accessin...

Hunter, T R; Kimberk, R; Leiker, P S; Christensen, R D

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Pin stack array for thermoacoustic energy conversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoacoustic stack for connecting two heat exchangers in a thermoacoustic energy converter provides a convex fluid-solid interface in a plane perpendicular to an axis for acoustic oscillation of fluid between the two heat exchangers. The convex surfaces increase the ratio of the fluid volume in the effective thermoacoustic volume that is displaced from the convex surface to the fluid volume that is adjacent the surface within which viscous energy losses occur. Increasing the volume ratio results in an increase in the ratio of transferred thermal energy to viscous energy losses, with a concomitant increase in operating efficiency of the thermoacoustic converter. The convex surfaces may be easily provided by a pin array having elements arranged parallel to the direction of acoustic oscillations and with effective radial dimensions much smaller than the thicknesses of the viscous energy loss and thermoacoustic energy transfer volumes.

Keolian, Robert M. (Monterey, CA); Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC); Meyer, Gerald J. (Baltimore, MD)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Alignment method for solar collector arrays  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to an improved method for establishing camera fixture location for aligning mirrors on a solar collector array (SCA) comprising multiple mirror modules. The method aligns the mirrors on a module by comparing the location of the receiver image in photographs with the predicted theoretical receiver image location. To accurately align an entire SCA, a common reference is used for all of the individual module images within the SCA. The improved method can use relative pixel location information in digital photographs along with alignment fixture inclinometer data to calculate relative locations of the fixture between modules. The absolute locations are determined by minimizing alignment asymmetry for the SCA. The method inherently aligns all of the mirrors in an SCA to the receiver, even with receiver position and module-to-module alignment errors.

Driver, Jr., Richard B

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sensor array for toxic gas detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting and identifying a hazardous component in air or other gas including an array of small sensors which upon exposure to the gas from a pattern of electrical responses, a source of standard response patterns characteristic of various components, and microprocessor means for comparing the sensor-formed response pattern with one or more standard patterns to thereby identify the component on a display. The number of responses may be increased beyond the number of sensors by changing the operating voltage, temperature or other condition associated with one or more sensors to provide a plurality of responses from each of one or more of the sensors. In one embodiment, the instrument is capable of identifying anyone of over 50-100 hazardous components.

Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL); Penrose, William R. (Naperville, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Parallel numerical algorithms based on tensor notation and Co-Array Fortran syntax  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-Array Fortran represents a correspondence between tensor notation and an extended Fortran array syntax. It uses normal Fortran array indices to point to data in local memory and adds co-array indices to point to data in remote memory. By writing algorithms ... Keywords: Co-Array Fortran, Numerical linear algebra, Tensor algebra

Robert W. Numrich

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Rationale for co-arrays in Fortran 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explains some of the technical decisions made during the incorporation of co-arrays in Fortran 2008. Familiarity with John Reid's summary of co-arrays [R07] is assumed. This document is by no means exhaustive: It is a selection of issues from ...

Aleksandar Donev

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Subband adaptive array for DS-CDMA mobile radio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel scheme of subband adaptive array (SBAA) for direct-sequence code divisionmultiple access (DS-CDMA). The scheme exploits the spreading code and pilot signal as the reference signal to estimate the propagation channel. Moreover, instead ... Keywords: CDMA, RAKE, multipath fading, subband adaptive array

Xuan Nam Tran; Takanori Omata; Tetsuki Taniguchi; Yoshio Karasawa

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Co-arrays in the next Fortran Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WG5 committee, at its meeting in Delft, May 2005, decided to include co-arrays in the next Fortran Standard. A Fortran program containing co-arrays is interpreted as if it were replicated a fixed number of times and all copies were executed asynchronously. ...

John Reid; Robert W. Numrich

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Polymorphic Systems with Arrays, 2-Counter Machines and Multiset Rewriting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polymorphic systems with arrays (PSAs) is a general class of nondeterministic reactive systems. A PSA is polymorphic in the sense that it depends on a signature, which consists of a number of type variables, and a number of symbols whose types can be ... Keywords: array, infinite-state, model checking, parameterised

Ranko Lazi?; Tom Newcomb; Bill Roscoe

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

SciQL: array data processing inside an RDBMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific discoveries increasingly rely on the ability to efficiently grind massive amounts of experimental data using database technologies. To bridge the gap between the needs of the Data-Intensive Research fields and the current DBMS technologies, ... Keywords: array database, array query language, scientific databases, sciql

Ying Zhang; Martin Kersten; Stefan Manegold

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Thermal Sensor Arrays for The Combinatorial Analysis of Thin Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Sensor Arrays for The Combinatorial Analysis of Thin Films A dissertation presented Advisor Author Joost J. Vlassak Patrick J. McCluskey Thermal Sensor Arrays for The Combinatorial Analysis analysis of the thermophysical properties of thin films. The continuous growth of integrated circuits

152

Current isolating epitaxial buffer layers for high voltage photodiode array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of photodiodes in series on a common semi-insulating substrate has a non-conductive buffer layer between the photodiodes and the semi-insulating substrate. The buffer layer reduces current injection leakage between the photodiodes of the array and allows optical energy to be converted to high voltage electrical energy.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Cooper, Gregory A. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ancestor worship in CS1: on the primacy of arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

History has given us the array as the fundamental data structure to present to students within the CS1 curriculum. However, with the recent growth in popularity of object-oriented languages for CS1 (C++, Java, C#), and with that, the acceptance of the ... Keywords: CS1, arrays, curriculum, data structures, object oriented-design, object-oriented programming, objects-first

Phil Ventura; Christopher Egert; Adrienne Decker

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hydraulic Performance of a Multistage Array of Advanced Centrifugal Contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydraulic characteristics of an advanced design centrifugal contactor array have been determined at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). The advanced design utilizes couette mixing (Taylor vortices) in the annulus between the rotating and stationary bowls. Excellent phase separation over a wide range of flow conditions was obtained. Interfaces within an entire eight-stage array were controlled with a single weir air pressure.

Hodges, M.E.

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 18 Photovoltaic Arrays & Modules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 18 Photovoltaic Arrays & Modules Dr. Todd J. Kaiser tjkaiser@ece.montana.edu Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University - Bozeman Photovoltaic Arrays PV PV Open Circuit Current reduced from this block by 25 % Current reduced from this cell by 25 % 3

Kaiser, Todd J.

156

PUMA for homemade arrays Maitreya Dunham September 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the database, select Spotted as array type, Genepix as analysis software, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae from on loader. SFTP them onto the PC. Gridding Open Genepix 5.1 in Analysis Only mode. Emulate scanner 4000B sure pixel size is set to 5 µm. Click the little disk icon on the right and "load array list." Select

Dunham, Maitreya

157

A Mirnov loop array for field-reversed configurations  

SciTech Connect

An array of 64 magnetic pick-up loops has been used for stability studies of large field-reversed configurations in the FRX-C/LSM device. This array proved reliable, could resolve signals of a few Gauss, and allowed the detection of several plasma instabilities. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Tuszewski, M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array November 21, 2011 - 12:16pm Addthis An aerial view of the 32-megawatt photovoltaic array of the Long Island Solar Farm, which will produce enough energy to power up to 4,500 local homes. The central Brookhaven National Laboratory campus is seen at left. An aerial view of the 32-megawatt photovoltaic array of the Long Island Solar Farm, which will produce enough energy to power up to 4,500 local homes. The central Brookhaven National Laboratory campus is seen at left. Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? The 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm Project will produce enough

159

National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array National Lab 'Flips Switch' on East Coast's Largest Solar Array November 21, 2011 - 12:16pm Addthis An aerial view of the 32-megawatt photovoltaic array of the Long Island Solar Farm, which will produce enough energy to power up to 4,500 local homes. The central Brookhaven National Laboratory campus is seen at left. An aerial view of the 32-megawatt photovoltaic array of the Long Island Solar Farm, which will produce enough energy to power up to 4,500 local homes. The central Brookhaven National Laboratory campus is seen at left. Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? The 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm Project will produce enough

160

Residential photovoltaic module and array requirements study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Burt Hill Kosar Rittelmann Associates has conducted a study to identify design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in residential applications. Building codes and referenced standards were reviewed for their applicability to residential photovoltaic array installations. Four installation types were identified - integral (replaces roofing), direct (mounted on top of roofing), stand-off (mounted away from roofing), and rack (for flat or low slope roofs, or ground mounted). Installation costs were developed for these mounting types as a function of panel/module size. cost drivers were identified. Studies were performed to identify optimum module shapes and sizes and operating voltage cost drivers. The general conclusion is that there are no perceived major obstacles to the use of photovoltaic modules in residential arrays. However, there is no applicable building code category for residential photovolttaic modules and arrays and early additional work is needed with standards writing organizations to develop residential module and array requirements.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Optimized low-cost-array field designs for photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As manager of the US Department of Energy Photovoltaic Systems Definition Project, Sandia National Laboratories is engaged in a comprehensive program to define and develop array field subsystems which can achieve the lowest possible lifecycle costs. The major activity of this program is described, namely, the design and development of optimized, modular array fields for photovoltaic (PV) systems. As part of this activity, design criteria and performance requirements for specific array subsystems including support structures, foundations, intermodule connections, field wiring, lightning protection, system grounding, site preparation, and monitoring and control have been defined and evaluated. Similarly, fully integrated flat-panel array field designs, optimized for lowest lifecycle costs, have been developed for system sizes ranging from 20 to 500 kW/sub p/. Key features, subsystem requirements, and projected costs for these array field designs are presented and discussed.

Post, H.N.; Carmichael, D.C.; Castle, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

3D self-supported nanoarchitectured arrays electrodes for lithium-ion batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional self-supported nanoarchitectured arrays electrodes (3DSNAEs) consisting of a direct growth of nanoarchitectured arrays on the conductive current collector, including homogeneous and heterogeneous nanoarchitectured arrays structures, ...

Xin Chen, Ying Du, Nai Qing Zhang, Ke Ning Sun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

SiC APDs and arrays for UV and solar blind detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report advancements in APDs and arrays using 4H SiC. Novel structures, array designs and specialized read out integrated circuits have been developed towards the realization of UV and solar-blind detector arrays exhibiting ...

Shaw, Gary A.

164

Receiver control for the Submillimeter Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient operation of a submillimeter interferometer requires remote (preferably automated) control of mechanically tuned local oscillators, phase-lock loops, mixers, optics, calibration vanes and cryostats. The present control system for these aspects of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) will be described. Distributed processing forms the underlying architecture. In each antenna cabin, a serial network of up to ten independent 80C196 microcontroller boards attaches to the real-time PowerPC computer (running LynxOS). A multi-threaded, gcc-compiled program on the PowerPC accepts top-level requests via remote procedure calls (RPC), subsequently dispatches tuning commands to the relevant microcontrollers, and regularly reports the system status to optical-fiber-based reflective memory for common access by the telescope monitor and error reporting system. All serial communication occurs asynchronously via encoded, variable-length packets. The microcontrollers respond to the requested commands and queries by accessing non-volatile, rewriteable lookup-tables (when appropriate) and executing embedded software that operates additional electronic devices (DACs, ADCs, etc.). Since various receiver hardware components require linear or rotary motion, each microcontroller also implements a position servo via a one-millisecond interrupt service routine which drives a DC-motor/encoder combination that remains standard across each subsystem.

T. R. Hunter; R. W. Wilson; R. Kimberk; P. S. Leiker; R. D. Christensen

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

165

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger Array) Schlumberger Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

166

The effect of sandstorms on PV arrays and components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems deployed in desert areas are exposed to wind-blown particles during most of their lifetimes. Here I describe the characteristics of wind-blown particles and with their effect on exposed surfaces. I provide insights for use in array design to minimize the effects of exposure and keep system costs as low as possible. Finally, I present some data describing the exposure of polymer-encapsulated arrays to both field and laboratory wind-blown sand environments, and I present evidence that an encapsulated or ``soft`` array has a higher abrasion resistance and, therefore, a much higher probability of surviving a severe sand environment.

Thornton, J.P.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

168

DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wenner Array) Wenner Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

169

DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pole-Dipole Array) Pole-Dipole Array) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: DC Resistivity Survey (Pole-Dipole Array) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Profiling Configurations Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png

170

The effect of sandstorms on PV arrays and components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems deployed in desert areas are exposed to wind-blown particles during most of their lifetimes. Here I describe the characteristics of wind-blown particles and with their effect on exposed surfaces. I provide insights for use in array design to minimize the effects of exposure and keep system costs as low as possible. Finally, I present some data describing the exposure of polymer-encapsulated arrays to both field and laboratory wind-blown sand environments, and I present evidence that an encapsulated or soft'' array has a higher abrasion resistance and, therefore, a much higher probability of surviving a severe sand environment.

Thornton, J P

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Reconfigurable long-range phonon dynamics in optomechanical arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate periodic optomechanical arrays as reconfigurable platforms for engineering the coupling between multiple mechanical and electromagnetic modes and for exploring many-body phonon dynamics. Exploiting structural resonances in the coupling between light fields and collective motional modes of the array, we show that tunable effective long-range interactions between mechanical modes can be achieved. This paves the way towards the implementation of controlled phononic walks and heat transfer on densely-connected graphs as well as the coherent transfer of excitations between distant elements of optomechanical arrays.

Andr Xuereb; Claudiu Genes; Guido Pupillo; Mauro Paternostro; Aurlien Dantan

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

Optimum matching of ohmic loads to the photovoltaic array  

SciTech Connect

Optimum matching of loads to the photovoltaic (PV) generator is most desirable for more accurate sizing, higher system performance and maximum utilization of the costly solar array generator. The quality of load matching depends on the PV array characteristics, the load characteristics, and the insolation profile. A matching factor is defined as the ratio of the load energy to the array maximum energy over a one day period. Optimum matching is achieved by determining the optimal array parameters with respect to the load parameters. Optimization is done using direct-search techniques. Results show that the theoretical optimum matching factor for an ohmic load is 94.34%. For an electrolytic load the matching factor could reach 99.83%. A maximum power tracker can be eliminated if optimum matching is achieved.

Khouzam, K.; Khouzam, L.; Groumpos, P. (Cleveland State Univ., OH (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, with Implications for Structural Controls and Hydrothermal Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Initial Results of Magnetotelluric Array Surveying at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, with Implications for Structural Controls and Hydrothermal Alteration Abstract A new generation MT array measurement system was applied in a contiguous bipole deployment at the Dixie Valley thermal area. Basic goals of the survey area are 1), resolve a fundamental structural ambiguity at the Dixie Valley thermal area (single range front fault versus shallower, stepped pediment; 2) delineate fault zones which have experienced fluid flux as

174

TANGO ARRAY An Air Shower Experiment in Buenos Aires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new Air Shower Observatory has been constructed in Buenos Aires during 1999, and commissioned and set in operation in 2000. The observatory consists of an array of four water \\v{C}erenkov detectors, enclosing a geometrical area of $\\sim$ 30.000 m$^{2}$, and is optimized for the observation of cosmic rays in the ``knee'' energy region. The array detects $\\sim$ 250 to $\\sim$ 1500 showers/day, depending on the selected triggering condition. In this paper, the design and construction of the array, and the automatic system for data adquisition, daily calibration, and monitoring, are described. Also, the Monte Carlo simulations performed to develop a shower database, as well as the studies performed using the database to estimate the response and the angular and energy resolutions of the array, are presented in detail.

P. Bauleo; C. Bonifazi; A. Filevich; A. Reguera

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

Forecasting photovoltaic array power production subject to mismatch losses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of photovoltaic (PV) energy throughout the world this last decade has brought to light the presence of module mismatch losses in most PV applications. Such power losses, mainly occasioned by partial shading of arrays and differences in PV modules, can be reduced by changing module interconnections of a solar array. This paper presents a novel method to forecast existing PV array production in diverse environmental conditions. In this approach, field measurement data is used to identify module parameters once and for all. The proposed method simulates PV arrays with adaptable module interconnection schemes in order to reduce mismatch losses. The model has been validated by experimental results taken on a 2.2 kW{sub p} plant, with three different interconnection schemes, which show reliable power production forecast precision in both partially shaded and normal operating conditions. Field measurements show interest in using alternative plant configurations in PV systems for decreasing module mismatch losses. (author)

Picault, D.; Raison, B.; Bacha, S. [Grenoble Electrical Engineering Laboratory (G2Elab), 961, rue Houille Blanche BP 46, 38402 St Martin d'Heres (France); de la Casa, J.; Aguilera, J. [Grupo de Investigacion IDEA, Departamento de Electronica, Escuela Politecnica Superior, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas, 23071 Jaen (Spain)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Ordered arrays of nanocrystals : synthesis, properties and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoscale materials, including nanocrystals and carbon nanotubes, exhibit an appealing array of physical properties, and provide an interesting prospect for research both from a fundamental as well as a technological ...

Bhaviripudi, Sreekar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Potential technologies based on stamped periodic nanoparticle array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stamped nanoparticle array patterning technology integrating interference lithography, self assembly and soft lithography is assessed. This technology is capable of parallel patterning of nanoparticles at a large scale. ...

Wang, Zongbin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Measurement of plasma flows using Mach probe arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A rectangular array of three-dimensional Mach probes is constructed and installed in the plasma vessel of the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at MIT in order to measure ion flow velocity on the cross section of the VTF. ...

Kardon, Brian (Brian Michael)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

KK8, Aligned Assembly of Nanowire Arrays with Intrinsic Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective conjugation of 1-D nanostructures only onto the lines within the array. 3 . ... CC1, In Situ High-Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Graphene ... Electroluminescent Devices with a Low Turn-on Voltage and High...

180

Halbach array DC motor/generator - Energy Innovation Portal  

A new configuration of DC motor/generator is based on a Halbach array of permanent magnets. This motor does not use ferrous materials so that the only losses are ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

LO Generation and Distribution for 60GHz Phased Array Transceivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LO Generation and Distribution for 60GHz Phased ArrayFall 2011 LO Generation and Distribution for 60GHz PhasedAbstract LO Generation and Distribution for 60GHz Phased

Marcu, Cristian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Coordinated Garbage Collection for RAID Array of Solid State ...  

... in which collection cycles begin on all disks in the array at a scheduled time, or it can query the disks to determine the best time to start a global ...

183

GaN Nanopore Arrays: Fabrication and Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GaN nanopore arrays with pore diameters of approximately 75 nm were fabricated by inductively coupled plasma etching (ICP) using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films as etch masks. Nanoporous AAO films were formed on the GaN ...

Wang, Yadong

184

Trading capacity for performance in a disk array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of performance-enhancing techniques, such as striping, mirroring, and rotational data replication, exist in the disk array literature. Given a fixed budget of disks, one must intelligently choose what combination of these techniques to employ. ...

Xiang Yu; Benjamin Gum; Yuqun Chen; Randolph Y. Wang; Kai Li; Arvind Krishnamurthy; Thomas E. Anderson

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Beam Multiplexing Using the Phased-Array Weather Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently installed S-band phased-array radar (PAR) at the National Weather Radar Testbed (NWRT) offers fast and flexible beam steering through electronic beam forming. This capability allows the implementation of a novel scanning strategy ...

Tian-You Yu; Marko B. Orescanin; Christopher D. Curtis; Dusan S. Zrni?; Douglas E. Forsyth

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Low cost modular designs for photovoltaic array fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Described are the design and development of optimized, modular array fields for photovoltaic (PV) systems. Design criteria and performance requirements have been defined and evaluated for specific array subsystems. These subsystems include support structures, foundations, intermodule connection, field wiring, lightning protection, system grounding, site preparation, and monitoring and control. Fully integrated flat-panel array-field designs, optimized for lowest life-cycle costs, have been developed for systems ranging in size from 20 to 500 kW/sub p/. These designs are applicable for near-term implementation (1982 to 1983) and reduce the array-field balance-of-system (BOS) costs to a fraction of previous costs. Key features, subsystem requirements, and projected costs are presented and discussed.

Post, H.N.; Carmichael, D.C.; Castle, J.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Arrays of probes for positional sequencing by hybridization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to methods and reagents useful for sequencing nucleic acid targets utilizing sequencing by hybridization technology comprising probes, arrays of probes and methods whereby sequence information is obtained rapidly and efficiently in discrete packages. That information can be used for the detection, identification, purification and complete or partial sequencing of a particular target nucleic acid. When coupled with a ligation step, these methods can be performed under a single set of hybridization conditions. The invention also relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for making and replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Prezetakiewiczr, Marek (East Boston, MA); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Waltham, MA)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To investigate electrical properties of rocks associated with thermal phenomena of the Devil's Kitchen-Coso Hot Springs area Notes 18 USGS Schlumberger soundings and 6 Schlumberger soundings by Furgerson (1973) were plotted and automatically processed and interpreted References Jackson, D.B. ODonnell, J.E.; Gregory, D. I. (1 January 1977) Schlumberger soundings, audio-magnetotelluric soundings and telluric mapping in and around the Coso Range, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=DC_Resistivity_Survey_(Schlumberger_Array)_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=591389

189

Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

Moore, Thomas L. (Livermore, CA); Fisher, Karl A. (Brentwood, CA)

2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

190

A New Air Cerenkov Array at the South Pole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Air­ Ÿ Cerenkov Array at the South Pole J.E. Dickinson a J.R. Gill a S.P. Hart b;a G.C. Hill@sun.leeds.ac.uk) PACS codes: 96.40 (cosmic rays) 29.40.K ( Ÿ Cerenkov detectors) Abstract VULCAN comprises a 9 element array of air­ Ÿ Cerenkov radiation detectors estab­ lished at the South Pole. VULCAN operates

Delaware, University of

191

Nondestructive Evaluation: Procedure for Manual Phased Array UT of Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Piping joints in nuclear power plants must be examined periodically using ultrasonic examination technology. Phased array ultrasonic technology has recently become available in a handheld, portable configuration. This technology could increase the speed of the examinations, save costs, reduce radiation exposure, and decrease the cost and difficulty of qualifying personnel to perform the examination. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recently developed ultrasonic phased array inspection methodo...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

192

Dielectrophoresis device and method having nonuniform arrays for manipulating particles  

SciTech Connect

Microfluidic devices according to embodiments of the present invention include an inlet port, an outlet port, and a channel or chamber having a non-uniform array of insulating features on one or more surfaces. Electrodes are provided for generation of a spatially non-uniform electric field across the array. A voltage source, which may be an A.C. and/or a D.C. voltage source may be coupled to the electrodes for the generation of the electric field.

Cummings, Eric B.; Fintschenko, Yolanda; Simmons, Blake A.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

Optical manipulation of intrinsic localized vibrational energy in cantilever arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optically-induced real-time impurity modes are used to shepherd intrinsic localized vibrational modes (discrete breathers) along micromechanical arrays via either attractive or replulsive interactions. Adding an electrode to the cantilever array provides control of the sign of lattice anharmonicity, hence allowing both hard and soft nonlinearities to be studied. A number of dynamical effects are demonstrated and explained, including the optical tweezing of localized vibrational energy in a nonlinear lattice.

M. Sato; B. E. Hubbard; A. J. Sievers; B. Ilic; H. G. Craighead

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

Jaing, C

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Optical Physics of Imaging and Interferometric Phased Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microwave, submillimetre-wave, and far-infrared phased arrays are of considerable importance for astronomy. We consider the behaviour imaging phased arrays and interferometric phased arrays from a functional perspective. It is shown that the average powers, field correlations, power fluctuations, and correlations between power fluctuations at the output ports of an imaging or interferometric phased array can be found once the synthesised reception patterns are known. The reception patterns do not have to be orthogonal or even linearly independent. It is shown that the operation of phased arrays is intimately related to the mathematical theory of frames, and that the theory of frames can be used to determine the degree to which any class of intensity or field distribution can be reconstructed unambiguously from the complex amplitudes of the travelling waves at the output ports. The theory can be used to set up a likelihood function that can, through Fisher information, be used to determine the degree to which a phased array can be used to recover the parameters of a parameterised source. For example, it would be possible to explore the way in which a system, perhaps interferometric, might observe two widely separated regions of the sky simultaneously.

Stafford Withington; George Saklatvala; Michael P. Hobson

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development of impedance matching technologies for ICRF antenna arrays  

SciTech Connect

All high power ICRF heating systems include devices for matching the input impedance of the antenna array to the generator output impedance. For most types of antennas used, the input impedance is strongly time-dependent on timescales as rapid as 10-4 s, while the rf generators used are capable of producing full power only into a stationary load impedance. Hence, the dynamic response of the matching method is of great practical importance. In this paper, world-wide developments in this field over the past decade are reviewed. These techniques may be divided into several classes. The edge plasma parameters that determine the antenna array`s input impedance may be controlled to maintain a fixed load impedance. The frequency of the rf source can be feedback controlled to compensate for changes in the edge plasma conditions, or fast variable tuning elements in the transmission line between the generator output and the antenna input connections can provide the necessary time-varying impedance transformation. In lossy passive schemes, reflected power due to the time-varying impedance of the antenna array is diverted to a dummy load. Each of these techniques can be applied to a pre-existing antenna system. If a new antenna is to be designed, recent advances allow the antenna array to have the intrinsic property of presenting a constant load to the feeding transmission lines despite the varying load seen by each antenna in the array.

Pinsker, R.I.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Reproducible, high performance patch antenna array apparatus and method of fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reproducible, high-performance patch antenna array apparatus includes a patch antenna array provided on a unitary dielectric substrate, and a feed network provided on the same unitary substrate and proximity coupled to the patch antenna array. The reproducibility is enhanced by using photolithographic patterning and etching to produce both the patch antenna array and the feed network.

Strassner, II, Bernd H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

Method and apparatus for synthesis of arrays of DNA probes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The synthesis of arrays of DNA probes sequences, polypeptides, and the like is carried out using a patterning process on an active surface of a substrate. An image is projected onto the active surface of the substrate utilizing an image former that includes a light source that provides light to a micromirror device comprising an array of electronically addressable micromirrors, each of which can be selectively tilted between one of at least two positions. Projection optics receives the light reflected from the micromirrors along an optical axis and precisely images the micromirrors onto the active surface of the substrate, which may be used to activate the surface of the substrate. The first level of bases may then be applied to the substrate, followed by development steps, and subsequent exposure of the substrate utilizing a different pattern of micromirrors, with further repeats until the elements of a two dimensional array on the substrate surface have an appropriate base bound thereto. The micromirror array can be controlled in conjunction with a DNA synthesizer supplying appropriate reagents to a flow cell containing the active substrate to control the sequencing of images presented by the micromirror array in coordination of the reagents provided to the substrate.

Cerrina, Francesco (Madison, WI); Sussman, Michael R. (Madison, WI); Blattner, Frederick R. (Madison, WI); Singh-Gasson, Sangeet (Madison, WI); Green, Roland (Madison, WI)

2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

199

Integrated residential photovoltaic array development. Quarterly report No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Sixteen conceptual designs produced by eight teams are described. Each design concept was evaluated by an industry advisory panel using a comprehensive set of technical, economic and institutional criteria. Key electrical and mechanical concerns that affect further array sub-system development are also discussed. Three integrated array design concepts were selected by the advisory panel for further optimization and development. From these concepts a single one will be selected for detailed analysis and prototype fabrication. The three concepts selected are the following: (1) an array of frameless panels/modules sealed in a T shaped zipperlocking neoprene gasket grid pressure fitted into an extruded aluminum channel grid fastened across the rafters; (2) an array of frameless modules pressure fitted in a series of zipperlocking EPDM rubber extrusions adhesively bonded to the roof. Series string voltage is developed using a set of integral tongue connectors and positioning blocks; (3) an array of frameless modules sealed by a silicone adhesive in a prefabricated grid of rigid tape and sheet metal attached to the roof.

Not Available

1981-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

Amorphous silicon cell array powered solar tracking apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of an even number of amorphous silicon solar cells are serially connected between first and second terminals of opposite polarity. The terminals are connected to one input terminal of a DC motor whose other input terminal is connected to the mid-cell of the serial array. Vane elements are adjacent the end cells to selectively shadow one or the other of the end cells when the array is oriented from a desired attitude relative to the sun. The shadowing of one cell of a group of cells on one side of the mid-cell reduces the power of that group substantially so that full power from the group of cells on the other side of the mid-cell drives the motor to reorient the array to the desired attitude. The cell groups each have a full power output at the power rating of the motor. When the array is at the desired attitude the power output of the two groups of cells balances due to their opposite polarity so that the motor remains unpowered.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Testability of AND-EXOR Based Iterative Logic Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iterative Logic Arrays (ILAs) are ideal as VLSI sub-systems because of their regular structure and its close resemblance with FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays). AND-EXOR based circuits are of interest in the design of very low power circuits where energy loss implied by high frequency switching is of much consideration. This paper examines the testability of AND-EXOR based Iterative Logic Arrays (ILAs). For certain ILAs it is possible to find a test set whose size remains constant irrespective of the size of the ILA, while for others it varies with array size. Former type of ILAs is known as Constant-Testable (C-Testable). It has been shown that AND-EXOR based Logic Arrays are C-Testable and size of test set is equal to number of entries in cell truth table. The test generation problem has been shown to be related to certain properties of cycles in a set of graphs derived from cell truth table. By careful analysis of these cycles an efficient test generation technique that can be easily converted to an A...

Chakraborty, Avik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Injection monitoring with seismic arrays and adaptive noise cancellation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although the application of seismic methods, active and passive, to monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes is not new, seismic arrays and array processing technology coupled with a new noise cancellation method has not been attempted. Successful application of seismic arrays to passively monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes depends on being able to sufficiently cancel the expected large amplitude background seismic noise typical of an oil or geothermal production environment so that small amplitude seismic signals occurring at depth can be detected and located. This report describes the results of a short field experiment conducted to test both the application of seismic arrays for in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring and the active noise cancellation technique in a real reservoir production environment. Although successful application of these techniques to in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring would have the greatest payoff in the oil industry, the proof-of-concept field experiment site was chosen to be the Geysers geothermal field in northern California. This site was chosen because of known high seismicity rates, a relatively shallow production depth, cooperation and some cost sharing the UNOCAL Oil Corporation, and the close proximity of the site to LLNL. The body of this report describes the Geysers field experimental configuration and then discusses the results of the seismic array processing and the results of the seismic noise cancellation followed by a brief conclusion. 2 refs., 11 figs.

Harben, P.E.; Harris, D.B.; Jarpe, S.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Central Laser Facility for the Cherenkov Telescope Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Central Laser Facility is a system often used in astroparticle experiments based on arrays of fluorescence or Cherenkov light detectors. The instrument is based on a laser source positioned at a certain distance from the array, emitting fast light pulses in the vertical direction with the aim of calibrating the array and/or measuring the atmospheric transmission. In view of the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a similar device could provide a calibration of the whole installation, both relative, i.e. each individual telescope with respect to the rest of the array, and absolute, with a precision better than 10%, if certain design requirements are met. Additionally, a precise monitoring of the sensitivity of each telescope can be made on time-scales of days to years. During calibration runs of the central laser facility, all detectors will be pointed towards the same portion of the laser beam at a given altitude. Simulations of the possible configurations of a Central Laser Facility for CTA (varying la...

Gaug, Markus; Cilmo, Marco; Di Pierro, Federico; Tonachini, Aurelio; Vallania, Piero

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array  

SciTech Connect

Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier`s Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings.

Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Reynolds, Gerald D. (Tijeras, NM); Steinfort, Terry D. (Tijeras, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Vertical arrays for fracture mapping in geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In collaboration with UNOCAL Geothermal Operations, Los Alamos National Laboratory assessed the feasibility of using vertical arrays of borehole seismic sensors for mapping of microseismicity in The Geysers geothermal field. Seismicity which arises from minute displacements along fracture or fault surfaces has been shown in studies of seismically active oil reservoirs to be useful in identifying fractures affected by and possibly contributing to production. Use of retrievable borehole seismic packages at The Geysers was found to reduce the threshold for detection of microearthquakes by an estimated 2--3 orders of magnitude in comparison to surface-based sensors. These studies led to the design, materials selection, fabrication, and installation of a permanent array of geophones intended for long term seismic monitoring and mapping of fractures in the vicinity of the array at The Geysers.

Albright, J.N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rutledge, J.T.; Fairbanks, T.D. [Nambe Geophysics, Inc. (United States); Thomson, J.C. [Lithos Inc. (United States); Stevenson, M.A. [Petroleum Geo-Services (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Opto-Electronics in Large Array Gas Detector Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large array gas detector systems are used in particle and nuclear physics experiments involving high-energy nucleon-nucleon and heavy-ion collisions. We have observed that in large array gas detector systems the momentary discharges inside the detector cells result in slowdown of High Voltage conditioning and possible hindrances in signal processing. We have explored the opto-electronic devices like the opto-coupler, optical fibre and signal processing circuit, which provide successful monitoring procedures and preventive measures to overcome the challenges produced in such complex detector systems.

M. R. Dutta Majumdar; Debasish Das; Tapan K. Nayak

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sacramento Municipal Utility District Solar Array | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility District Solar Array Utility District Solar Array Jump to: navigation, search Name Sacramento Municipal Utility District Solar Array Facility Sacramento Municipal Utility District Solar Array Sector Solar Facility Type Ground-mounted fixed tilt Owner EnXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Sacramento Municipal Utility District Location Sacramento County, California Coordinates 38.47467°, -121.3541631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.47467,"lon":-121.3541631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

212

Microprocessor-controlled photovoltaic-array loading unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Described is a microprocessor-controlled test system in operation at the Photovoltaics Advanced Systems Test Facility located at Sandia National Laboratories. The test system is designed to measure the total energy output of photovoltaic arrays. The theory, installation, operation, and calibration of the test system are described.

Russell, D.F.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Small Area Array-Based LED Luminaire Design  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency LED luminaire designs based on small area array-based gallium nitride diodes. Novel GaN-based LED array designs are described, specifically addressing the thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements for the incorporation of such arrays into viable solid-state LED luminaires. This work resulted in the demonstration of an integrated luminaire prototype of 1000 lumens cool white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 89.4 lm/W at CCT of 6000oK and CRI of 73; and performance of 903 lumens warm white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 63.0 lm/W at CCT of 2800oK and CRI of 82. In addition, up to 1275 lumens cool white light output at 114.2 lm/W and 1156 lumens warm white light output at 76.5 lm/W were achieved if the reflector was not used. The success to integrate small area array-based LED designs and address thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements was clearly achieved in these luminaire prototypes with outstanding performance and high efficiency.

Thomas Yuan

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

214

LDRD final report : chromophore-functionalized aligned carbon nanotube arrays.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to expand upon previously demonstrated single carbon nanotube devices by preparing a more practical, multi-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) device. As a late-start, proof-of-concept project, the work focused on the fabrication and testing of chromophore-functionalized aligned SWNT field effect transistors (SWNT-FET). Such devices have not yet been demonstrated. The advantages of fabricating aligned SWNT devices include increased device cross-section to improve sensitivity to light, elimination of increased electrical resistance at nanotube junctions in random mat devices, and the ability to model device responses. The project did not achieve the goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays, but a new SWNT growth capability was established that will benefit future projects. Although the ultimate goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays was not achieved, the work did lead to a new carbon nanotube growth capability at Sandia/CA. The synthesis of dense arrays of horizontally aligned SWNTs is a developing area of research with significant potential for new discoveries. In particular, the ability to prepare arrays of carbon nanotubes of specific electronic types (metallic or semiconducting) could yield new classes of nanoscale devices.

Vance, Andrew L.; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Krafcik, Karen Lee

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling in coupled waveguide arrays  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of direct observation of the nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling effect with a device consisting of two waveguide arrays connected to a tilted reduced refractive index barrier is discussed. Numerical simulations on this realistic setup are interpreted via a simplified double-well system and different asymmetric tunneling scenarios are predicted varying just the injected beam intensity.

Khomeriki, Ramaz [Physics Department, Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze, 0128 Tbilisi (Georgia) and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Noethnitzerstrasse 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Airspeed Corrections for Optical Array Probe Sample Volumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Particle Measuring Systems optical array probes have a sample volume that depends upon the diameter of the particle measured. The sample volume also depends upon the velocity of particles that pass through the probe because of the electronic ...

Darrel Baumgardner; Alexei Korolev

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

MAXIMA: Millimeter-wave anisotropy experiment imaging array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss the status of the data obtained from the first two flights of the MAXIMA balloon-borne experiment. MAXIMA is sensitive to CMB fluctuations on angular scales from 10 arcmin to 5 degrees. The instrument uses a 16 element bolometric array with 3 frequency bands centered at 150

C. Winant; M. Abroe; P. Ade; A. Balbi; D. Barbosa; J. Bock; J. Borrill; A. Boscaleri; J. Collins; P. de Bernardis; P. Ferreira; S. Hanany; V. Hristov; A. H. Jaffe; B. Johnson; A. E. Lange; A. T. Lee; P. D. Mauskopf; C. B. Netterfield; S. Oh; E. Pascale; B. Rabii; P. L. Richards; R. Stompor; G. F. Smoot; J. H. P. Wu

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Coupling to the fast wave via a phased waveguide array  

SciTech Connect

A dielectric-loaded waveguide array has been used to launch fast waves into a plasma in which ..omega../sup pi/ < ..omega.. << ..omega../sub pe/ approx. ..omega../sub ce/. The wave propagates when accessibility and cutoff requirements are satisfied. Reflection coefficients as low as 1% have been measured. Use of the fast wave for steady-state current drive is suggested.

Olson, L.; McWilliams, R.; Glanz, J.; Motley, R.W.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Planning solar array operations on the international space station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flight controllers manage the orientation and modes of eight large solar arrays that power the International Space Station (ISS). The task requires generating plans that balance complex constraints and preferences. These considerations include context-dependent ... Keywords: Planning, constraint satisfaction, optimization, scheduling, space mission operations

Sudhakar Y. Reddy; Jeremy D. Frank; Michael J. Iatauro; Matthew E. Boyce; Elif Krkl; Mitchell Ai-Chang; Ari K. Jnsson

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Use of Phased-Array Doppler Sonars near Shore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phased-array Doppler sonars (PADS) have been used to probe an area several hundred meters on a side with 8-m spatial resolution, sampling every second or less with under 2 cm s?1 rms velocity error per sample. Estimates from two systems were ...

Jerome A. Smith

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Lightning Activity in a Hail-Producing Storm Observed with Phased-Array Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined lightning activity relative to the rapidly evolving kinematics of a hail-producing storm on 15 August 2006. Data were provided by the National Weather Radar Testbed Phased-Array Radar, the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array, and ...

C. Emersic; P. L. Heinselman; D. R. MacGorman; E. C. Bruning

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Catalytic activity of ZrO2 nanotube arrays prepared by anodization method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZrO2 nanotube arrays were prepared by anodization method in aqueous electrolyte containing (NH4)2SO4 and NH4F. The morphology and structure of nanotube arrays were characterized through scanning ...

Xixin Wang; Jianling Zhao; Xiaorui Hou; Qi He; Chengchun Tang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Soft x-ray array system with variable filters for the DIII-D tokamak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent upgrades to the soft x-ray (SXR) array system on the DIII-D tokamak are described. The system consists of two 32-channel arrays at one toroidal location and three toroidally distributed 12-channel arrays. The 32-channel arrays have been completely rebuilt to allow the switching of SXR filters without breaking vacuum. The 12-channel arrays have had upgrades performed to detectors, view slits, and data acquisition. Absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) photodiodes are used as detectors in all arrays, allowing detection of photons ranging in energy from 2 eV to 10 keV. In the fixed-filter arrays, 127 {mu}m Be filters are used. In the variable-filter arrays, filter wheels are used to switch between five different possible pinhole/filter combinations.

Hollmann, E. M.; Chousal, L.; Hernandez, R. [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Fisher, R. K.; Jackson, G. L.; Pidcoe, S. V.; Taussig, D. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Shankara, J. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Scales of Variability in the Equatorial Pacific Inferred form Tropical Atmosphere-Ocean Buoy Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The highly temporally resolved time series from the Tropical Atmosphere-Ocean moored buoy array are used to evaluate the scales of thermal variability in the upper equatorial Pacific. The TAO array consists of nearly 70 deep-ocean moorings ...

William S. Kessler; M. C. Spillane; Michael J. McPhaden; D. E. Harrison

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A flexible underwater pressure sensor array for artificial lateral line applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a flexible elastomer-based underwater pressure sensor array. When mounted onto the hull of an aquatic vehicle, the array enables obstacle detection, identification and tracking, and can help the vehicle ...

Yaul, Frank M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Initial exploration of 21-cm cosmology with imaging and power spectra from the Murchison Widefield Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency radio array under construction in Western Australia with a primary goal of measuring the power spectrum of the 21-cm signal from neutral hydrogen during the Epoch ...

Williams, Christopher Leigh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Simulation of Photovoltaic Array-driven Electric Machines with Power Electronic Interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power electronic interfaces between photovoltaic (PV) arrays and electric machines are necessary in order to match the drive characteristics with the characteristics of the array for efficient utilization of the resource. This paper proposes a model ... Keywords: MATLAB/SIMULINK modeling, electric machines, photovoltaic array, power electronics, simulation

S. Arul Daniel; N. Ammasai Gounden

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Computing the longest common prefix array based on the burrows-wheeler transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many sequence analysis tasks can be accomplished with a suffix array, and several of them additionally need the longest common prefix array. In large scale applications, suffix arrays are being replaced with full-text indexes that are based on the Burrows-Wheeler ...

Timo Beller; Simon Gog; Enno Ohlebusch; Thomas Schnattinger

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

PiCam: an ultra-thin high performance monolithic camera array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present PiCam (Pelican Imaging Camera-Array), an ultra-thin high performance monolithic camera array, that captures light fields and synthesizes high resolution images along with a range image (scene depth) through integrated parallax detection ... Keywords: array camera, computational camera, depth map, light field, parallax detection, plenoptic acquisition, superresolution

Kartik Venkataraman, Dan Lelescu, Jacques Duparr, Andrew McMahon, Gabriel Molina, Priyam Chatterjee, Robert Mullis, Shree Nayar

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The design and implementation of a parallel array operator for the arbitrary remapping of data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gather and scatter are data redistribution functions of long-standing importance to high performance computing. In this paper, we present a highly-general array operator with powerful gather and scatter capabilities unmatched by other array languages. ... Keywords: ZPL, array languages, gather, parallel programming, scatter

Steven J. Deitz; Bradford L. Chamberlain; Sung-Eun Choi; Lawrence Snyder

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Automated control of linear constricted plasma source array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for controlling an array of constricted glow discharge chambers are disclosed. More particularly a linear array of constricted glow plasma sources whose polarity and geometry are set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the sources are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The quality of film along deposition "tracks" opposite the plasma sources can be measured and compared to desired absolute or relative values by optical and/or electrical sensors. Plasma quality can then be adjusted by adjusting the power current values, gas feed pressure/flow, gas mixtures or a combination of some or all of these to improve the match between the measured values and the desired values.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Maschwitz, Peter A. (Martinsville, VA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Matrix-assisted energy conversion in nanostructured piezoelectric arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nanoconverter is capable of directly generating electricity through a nanostructure embedded in a polymer layer experiencing differential thermal expansion in a stress transfer zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or substantially vertically aligned on a substrate. The resulting nanoforest is then embedded with the polymer layer, which transfers stress to the nanostructures in the stress transfer zone, thereby creating a nanostructure voltage output due to the piezoelectric effect acting on the nanostructure. Electrodes attached at both ends of the nanostructures generate output power at densities of .about.20 nW/cm.sup.2 with heating temperatures of .about.65.degree. C. Nanoconverters arrayed in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries.

Sirbuly, Donald J.; Wang, Xianying; Wang, Yinmin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Photovoltaic array with minimally penetrating rooftop support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic array including a plurality of photovoltaic assemblies and a plurality of mounting units. The mounting units each include an elongate rail and a plurality of leg assemblies. The rail is sized and configured to maintain a portion of at least two of the photovoltaic assemblies, with the leg assemblies extending from the rail in a spaced-apart fashion and terminating in a foot for placement against a rooftop structure for minimally penetration installation. Further, at least one of the leg assemblies can include a retractable leg. When the photovoltaic array is installed to a rooftop structure including a membrane intermittently secured to a rooftop deck, the retractable leg accommodates upward billowing of the membrane under windy conditions.

Lenox, Carl J.S.

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

234

Close-packed array of light emitting devices  

SciTech Connect

A close-packed array of light emitting diodes includes a nonconductive substrate having a plurality of elongate channels extending therethrough from a first side to a second side, where each of the elongate channels in at least a portion of the substrate includes a conductive rod therein. The conductive rods have a density over the substrate of at least about 1,000 rods per square centimeter and include first conductive rods and second conductive rods. The close-packed array further includes a plurality of light emitting diodes on the first side of the substrate, where each light emitting diode is in physical contact with at least one first conductive rod and in electrical contact with at least one second conductive rod.

Ivanov, Ilia N.; Simpson, John T.

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

235

DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Raft River Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Area (1974-1975) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1975) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) Activity Date 1974 - 1975 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Hydrogeologic study of the area Notes In 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey made 70 Schlumberger resistivity soundings in the Upper Raft River Valley and in parts of the Raft River Valley. These soundings complement the 79 soundings made previously in the Raft River Valley and bring the total number of soundings to 149. This work was done as part of a hydrogeologic study of the area. The location,

236

A fully microfabricated two-dimensional electrospray array with applications to space propulsion; Fully microfabricated 2D electrospray array with applications to space propulsion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the design, fabrication and testing of a fully-integrated planar electrospray thruster array, which could lead to more efficient and precise thrusters for (more)

Gassend, Blaise L. P. (Blaise Laurent Patrick), 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Minimal Stereoscopic Analysis for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The trajectory of a primary gamma-ray detected with an array of at least four atmospheric Cherenkov imaging telescopes can be reconstructed from the shower image centroid positions and geometrical considerations independent of the primary energy. Using only the image centroid positions some cosmic-ray discrimination is also possible. This minimal approach opens the possibility of pushing the analysis threshold to lower values, close to the hardware threshold.

S. LeBohec; C. Duke; P. Jordan

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Spectroscopy of a Qubit Array via a Single Transmission Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frequency-selective readout for superconducting qubits opens the way towards scaling qubit circuits up without increasing the number of measurement lines. Here we demonstrate the readout of an array of 7 flux qubits located on the same chip. Each qubit is placed near an individual lambda/4 resonator which, in turn, is coupled to a common microwave transmission line. We performed spectroscopy of all qubits and determined their parameters in a single measurement run.

Jerger, M; Macha, P; Huebner, U; Lukashenko, A; Il'ichev, E; Ustinov, A V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Succinct suffix arrays based on run-length encoding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A succinet full-text self-index is a data structure built on a text T = t1t2...tn, which takes little space (ideally close to that of the compressed text), permits efficient search for the ... Keywords: burrows-wheeler transform, compressed full-text self-indexes, empirical k-th order entropy, indexed string matching, run-length compression, suffix arrays, text retrieval

Veli Mkinen; Gonzalo Navarro

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Optical sensors and multisensor arrays containing thin film electroluminescent devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical sensor, probe and array devices for detecting chemical biological, and physical analytes. The devices include an analyte-sensitive layer optically coupled to a thin film electroluminescent layer which activates the analyte-sensitive layer to provide an optical response. The optical response varies depending upon the presence of an analyte and is detected by a photodetector and analyzed to determine the properties of the analyte.

Aylott, Jonathan W. (Ann Arbor, MI); Chen-Esterlit, Zoe (Ann Arbor, MI); Friedl, Jon H. (Ames, IA); Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Savvateev, Vadim N. (Ames, IA); Shinar, Joseph (Ames, IA)

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Investigation of the heat pipe arrays for convective electronic cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to evaluate a heat pipe convective cooling device consisting of sixteen small copper/water heat pipes mounted vertically in a 4x4 array 25.4 mm square. The analytical portion of the investigation focused on determination of the maximum heat transport capacity and the resistance of the individual heat pipes. The resistance of each beat pipe was found to be 2.51 K/Watt, or more than 3 times smaller than the resistance produced by a solid copper rod with the same dimensions. The maximum predicted heat rejection for the module was over 50 Watts, or a power density in excess of 7.75 Watts/CM2. In the experimental portion of the investigation, two different modules were tested. The first module utilized ten circular aluminum fins mounted on the condenser end of each heat pipe to enhance heat rejection, while the second contained only the sixteen copper/water heat pipes. The effects of flow velocity, input power, and base plate temperature on the overall thermal resistance and the heat rejection capacity were determined, as well as the pressure drop resulting from each module. The finned heat pipe array was found to have a lower overall thermal resistance and thus, a higher heat rejection capacity, but also resulted in a significantly larger pressure drop than the array without fins. The results of the heat pipe array experiments were also compared with experimental and empirical results obtained from flow over a flat plate 25.4 mm square.

Howard, Alicia Ann Harris

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Towards a Flexible Array Control and Operation Framework for CTA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) \\cite{CTA:2010} will be the successor to current Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) like H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. CTA will improve in sensitivity by about an order of magnitude compared to the current generation of IACTs. The energy range will extend from well below 100 GeV to above 100 TeV. To accomplish these goals, CTA will consist of two arrays, one in each hemisphere, consisting of 50-80 telescopes and composed of three different telescope types with different mirror sizes. It will be the first open observatory for very high energy $\\gamma$-ray astronomy. The Array Control working group of CTA is currently evaluating existing technologies which are best suited for a project like CTA. The considered solutions comprise the ALMA Common Software (ACS), the OPC Unified Architecture (OPC UA) and the Data Distribution Service (DDS) for bulk data transfer. The first applications, like an automatic observation scheduler and the control software for some prototype instrumentation have been developed.

E. Birsin; J. Colom; D. Hoffmann; H. Koeppel; G. Lamanna; T. Le Flour; A. Lopatin; E. Lyard; D. Melkumyan; I. Oya; J-L. Panazol; S. Schlenstedt; T. Schmidt; U. Schwanke; R. Walter; P. Wegner for the CTA Consortium

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Microhole Arrays Drilled With Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology To Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Drilling Systems Project Description This project proposes to develop a cost-effective microhole drilling and completion technology with the Flash Abrasive Slurry Jet (ASJ) system and optimize it to maximize the efficiency of fluid circulation and heat removal for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The proposed approach is expected to address the key obstacles that currently prevent EGS from becoming a technically feasible, commercially viable major contributor for electricity generation, namely: (1) reduce costs for drilling and well completion and (2) increase the volume of hot rock from which heat can be extracted.

244

Noise Reduction with Microphone Arrays for Speaker Identification  

SciTech Connect

Reducing acoustic noise in audio recordings is an ongoing problem that plagues many applications. This noise is hard to reduce because of interfering sources and non-stationary behavior of the overall background noise. Many single channel noise reduction algorithms exist but are limited in that the more the noise is reduced; the more the signal of interest is distorted due to the fact that the signal and noise overlap in frequency. Specifically acoustic background noise causes problems in the area of speaker identification. Recording a speaker in the presence of acoustic noise ultimately limits the performance and confidence of speaker identification algorithms. In situations where it is impossible to control the environment where the speech sample is taken, noise reduction filtering algorithms need to be developed to clean the recorded speech of background noise. Because single channel noise reduction algorithms would distort the speech signal, the overall challenge of this project was to see if spatial information provided by microphone arrays could be exploited to aid in speaker identification. The goals are: (1) Test the feasibility of using microphone arrays to reduce background noise in speech recordings; (2) Characterize and compare different multichannel noise reduction algorithms; (3) Provide recommendations for using these multichannel algorithms; and (4) Ultimately answer the question - Can the use of microphone arrays aid in speaker identification?

Cohen, Z

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

245

Photodiode arrays having minimized cross-talk between diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photodiode arrays are formed with close diode-to-diode spacing and minimized cross-talk between diodes in the array by isolating the diodes from one another with trenches that are formed between the photodiodes in the array. The photodiodes are formed of spaced regions in a base layer, each spaced region having an impurity type opposite to that of the base layer to define a p-n junction between the spaced regions and the base layer. The base layer meets a substrate at a boundary, with the substrate being much more heavily doped than the base layer with the same impurity type. The trenches extend through the base layer and preferably into the substrate. Minority carriers generated by absorption of light photons in the base layer can only migrate to an adjacent photodiode through the substrate. The lifetime and the corresponding diffusion length of the minority carriers in the substrate is very short so that all minority carriers recombine in the substrate before reaching an adjacent photodiode.

Guckel, Henry (Madison, WI); McNamara, Shamus P. (Madison, WI)

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

246

Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is a 1600 water Cherenkov tank array on a triangular 1.5 km grid. The signals from each tank are read out using three 9'' photomultipliers and processed at a sampling frequency of 40 MHz, from which a local digital trigger efficiently selects shower candidates. GPS signals are used for time synchronization and a wireless communication system connects all tanks to the central data acquisition system. Power is provided by a stand-alone solar panel system. With large ambient temperature variations, that can reach over 20 degrees in 24 hours, high salinity, dusty air, high humidity inside the tank, and remoteness of access, the performance and reliability of the array is a challenge. Several key parameters are constantly monitored to ensure consistent operation. The Surface Array has currently over 750 detectors and has been in reliable operation since January 2004. Good uniformity in the response of different detectors and good long term stability is observed.

The Pierre Auger Collaboration

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is a 1600 water Cherenkov tank array on a triangular 1.5 km grid. The signals from each tank are read out using three 9'' photomultipliers and processed at a sampling frequency of 40 MHz, from which a local digital trigger efficiently selects shower candidates. GPS signals are used for time synchronization and a wireless communication system connects all tanks to the central data acquisition system. Power is provided by a stand-alone solar panel system. With large ambient temperature variations, that can reach over 20 degrees in 24 hours, high salinity, dusty air, high humidity inside the tank, and remoteness of access, the performance and reliability of the array is a challenge. Several key parameters are constantly monitored to ensure consistent operation. The Surface Array has currently over 750 detectors and has been in reliable operation since January 2004. Good uniformity in the response of different detectors and good long term stability is observed.

Bertou, X

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory surface array  

SciTech Connect

The surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is a 1600 water Cherenkov tank array on a triangular 1.5 km grid. The signals from each tank are read out using three 9'' photomultipliers and processed at a sampling frequency of 40MHz, from which a local digital trigger efficiently selects shower candidates. GPS signals are used for time synchronization and a wireless communication system connects all tanks to the central data acquisition system. Power is provided by a stand-alone solar panel system. With large ambient temperature variations, that can reach over 20 degrees in 24 hours, high salinity, dusty air, high humidity inside the tank, and remoteness of access, the performance and reliability of the array is a challenge. Several key parameters are constantly monitored to ensure consistent operation. The Surface Array has currently over 750 detectors and has been in reliable operation since January 2004. Good uniformity in the response of different detectors and good long term stability is observed.

Bertou, Xavier

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Glass for low-cost photovoltaic solar arrays  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In photovoltaic systems, the encapsulant material that protects the solar cells should be highly transparent and very durable. Glass satisfies these two criteria and is considered a primary candidate for low-cost, photovoltaic encapsulation systems. In this report, various aspects of glass encapsulation are treated that are important for the designer of photovoltaic systems. Candidate glasses and available information defining the state of the art of glass encapsulation materials and processes for automated, high volume production of terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications are presented. The criteria for consideration of the glass encapsulation systems were based on the LSA (Low-cost Solar Array) Project goals for arrays: (a) a low degradation rate, (b) high reliability, (c) an efficiency greater than 10 percent, (d) a total array price less than $500/kW, and (e) a production capacity of 5 x 10/sup 5/ kW/yr. The glass design areas treated herein include the types of glass, sources and costs, physical properties and glass modifications, such as antireflection coatings. 78 references.

Bouquet, F.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ballast-mounted PV arrays: Phase 2 final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expansive flat rooftops of industrial and commercial buildings across America offer the largest, most secure, and potentially least-cost real estate opportunity to install massive amounts of solar photovoltaic generation in the building sector. Unfortunately, mechanical penetration of roofing membranes is very expensive and perceived by building owners and operators to increase the likelihood of leaking. In response Ascension Technology has pioneered the development of low-cost ballasted approaches for mounting PV arrays. Recently, however, we have experienced our first two instances in which strong winds have moved our arrays on rooftops and heightened our interest, and the PV industries' need, to develop zero-penetration mounting techniques that are more secure, yet remain low in cost. In this PV BONUS project, Ascension Technology and its partners addressed wind loading on solar panels and the suitability of using frictional forces between ballast trays and roofing materials to resist PV arrays sliding on rooftops. The primary goal of the project is to capture the potential cost savings made possible by ballast-mounting by showing under what conditions it can satisfy wind loading concerns. A secondary goal is to address a more geographically constrained concern regarding withstanding seismic forces.

Edward C. Kern

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Energetics of Marine Turbine Arrays - Extraction, Dissipation and Diminution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-scale modelling approach is discussed to predict the performance and energetics of a large number (more than a few hundred) of marine turbines installed as a power farm in a general coastal environment. The kernel of this approach is that the outer (coastal-scale) model/simulation is to assess the reduction of flow passing through a given farm area as a function of the increase of head loss across the farm, whereas the inner (device-scale) model/simulation uses this function to account for the (otherwise unknown) effect of coastal dynamics for that farm site. Large-eddy simulations (LES) of periodic open channel flow (with a porous plate model representing turbines) are then presented as the device-scale part of such a two-scale model of large marine turbine arrays. Results demonstrate how the energetics of turbine arrays (i.e. extraction, dissipation and diminution of energy in the entire farm area) may change depending on the characteristics of the farm site, array configuration and operating conditio...

Nishino, Takafumi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ballast-mounted PV arrays: Phase 2 final report  

SciTech Connect

The expansive flat rooftops of industrial and commercial buildings across America offer the largest, most secure, and potentially least-cost real estate opportunity to install massive amounts of solar photovoltaic generation in the building sector. Unfortunately, mechanical penetration of roofing membranes is very expensive and perceived by building owners and operators to increase the likelihood of leaking. In response Ascension Technology has pioneered the development of low-cost ballasted approaches for mounting PV arrays. Recently, however, we have experienced our first two instances in which strong winds have moved our arrays on rooftops and heightened our interest, and the PV industries' need, to develop zero-penetration mounting techniques that are more secure, yet remain low in cost. In this PV BONUS project, Ascension Technology and its partners addressed wind loading on solar panels and the suitability of using frictional forces between ballast trays and roofing materials to resist PV arrays sliding on rooftops. The primary goal of the project is to capture the potential cost savings made possible by ballast-mounting by showing under what conditions it can satisfy wind loading concerns. A secondary goal is to address a more geographically constrained concern regarding withstanding seismic forces.

Edward C. Kern

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., CdTe modules and array at NREL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Engineering and Technology Validation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts in-situ technical evaluations of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules and arrays. This paper focuses on the technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., (SCI) cadmium telluride (CdTe) module and array performance by attempting to correlate individual module and array performance. This is done by examining the performance and stability of the modules and array over a period of more than one year. Temperature coefficients for module and array parameters (P{sub max}V{sub oc}, V{sub max}, I{sub sc}, I{sub max}) are also calculated.

Kroposki, B.; Strand, T.; Hansen, R. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described for fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites. A composition includes a vertically aligned nanotube array including a plurality of nanotubes characterized by a property across substantially all of the vertically aligned nanotube array. A method includes depositing a vertically aligned nanotube array that includes a plurality of nanotubes; and controlling a deposition rate of the vertically aligned nanotubes array as a function of an in situ monitored property of the plurality of nanotubes.

Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Ivanov, Ilya N. (Knoxville, TN); Puretzky,; Alexander A. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

255

Residential photovoltaic module and array requirement study. Low-Cost Solar Array Project engineering area. Final report appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the appendices to a study to identify design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in residential applications. Appendices include: (1) codes, standards, and manuals of accepted practice-definition and importance; (2) regional code variations-impact; (3) model and city codes-review; (4) National Electric Code (NEC)-review; (5) types of standards-definition and importance; (6) federal standards-review; (7) standards review method; (8) manuals of accepted practice; (9) codes and referenced standards-summary; (10) public safety testing laboratories; (11) insurance review; (12) studies approach; (13) mounting configurations; (14) module/panel size and shape cost analysis; (15) grounding, wiring, terminal and voltage studies; (16) array installation cost summary; (17) photovoltaic shingle/module comparison; (18) retrofit application; (19) residential photovoltaic module performance criteria; (20) critique of JPL's solar cell module design and test specifications for residential applications; and (21) CSI format specification. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Dong Energy London Array Limited Formerly known as CORE Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dong Energy London Array Limited Formerly known as CORE Ltd Dong Energy London Array Limited Formerly known as CORE Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Dong Energy London Array Limited (Formerly known as CORE Ltd) Place United Kingdom Sector Wind energy Product Dong Energy London Array Limited is a UK Joint Venture between Farm energy and Energi E2, involved in offshore wind farms in the outer Thames Estuary. References Dong Energy London Array Limited (Formerly known as CORE Ltd)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Dong Energy London Array Limited (Formerly known as CORE Ltd) is a company located in United Kingdom . References ↑ "Dong Energy London Array Limited (Formerly known as CORE Ltd)"

257

A return to strong radio flaring by Circinus X-1 observed with the Karoo Array Telescope test array KAT-7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Circinus X-1 is a bright and highly variable X-ray binary which displays strong and rapid evolution in all wavebands. Radio flaring, associated with the production of a relativistic jet, occurs periodically on a ~17-day timescale. A longer-term envelope modulates the peak radio fluxes in flares, ranging from peaks in excess of a Jansky in the 1970s to an historic low of milliJanskys during the years 1994 to 2007. Here we report first observations of this source with the MeerKAT test array, KAT-7, part of the pathfinder development for the African dish component of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), demonstrating successful scientific operation for variable and transient sources with the test array. The KAT-7 observations at 1.9 GHz during the period 13 December 2011 to 16 January 2012 reveal in temporal detail the return to the Jansky-level events observed in the 1970s. We compare these data to contemporaneous single-dish measurements at 4.8 and 8.5 GHz with the HartRAO 26-m telescope and X-ray monitoring from...

Armstrong, R P; Nicolson, G D; Ratcliffe, S; Linares, M; Horrell, J; Richter, L; Schurch, M P E; Coriat, M; Woudt, P; Jonas, J; Booth, R; Fanaroff, B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

259

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

260

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

SciTech Connect

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

SciTech Connect

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

262

Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields. Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a theoretical study of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays. Local pressure distributions and total aerodynamic forces on the arrays are shown. Design loads are presented to cover the conditions of array angles relative to the ground from 20/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/, variable array spacings, a ground clearance gap up to 1.2 m (4 ft) and array slant heights of 2.4 m (8 ft) and 4.8 m (16 ft). Several means of alleviating the wind loads on the arrays are detailed. The expected reduction of the steady state wind velocity with the use of fences as a load alleviation device are indicated to be in excess of a factor of three for some conditions. This yields steady state wind load reductions as much as a factor of ten compared to the load incurred if no fence is used to protect the arrays. This steady state wind load reduction is offset by the increase in turbulence due to the fence but still an overall load reduction of 2.5 can be realized. Other load alleviation devices suggested are the installation of air gaps in the arrays, blocking the flow under the arrays and rounding the edges of the array. Included is an outline of a wind tunnel test plan to supplement the theoretical study and to evaluate the load alleviation devices.

Miller, R.; Zimmerman, D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Central station photovoltaic array-field designs and design practices  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews and critiques the designs of large (1 MW or greater) photovoltaic power systems operating in a utility generating station mode. Four existing installations and eight paper design studies are reviewed. In addition, subsystem-specific studies on grounding and fault protection, lightning protection, array field electrical circuit design, bypass diodes, power conditioning, and utility interfaces were reviewed. Detailed tabular summaries of system design features and characteristics are presented. Based on a critique of the designs and discussions with designers, installers, and operators, recommendations of design practices for future installations are made.

Noel, G.T.; Smith, R.W.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Method of low temperature operation of an electrochemical cell array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for operating an electrochemical cell generator apparatus containing a generator chamber containing an array of cells having interior and exterior electrodes with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where a hot gas contacts the outside of the cells and the generating chamber normally operates at over 850 C, where N[sub 2] gas is fed to contact the interior electrode of the cells in any case when the generating chamber temperature drops for whatever reason to within the range of from 550 C to 800 C, to eliminate cracking within the cells. 2 figures.

Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Bratton, R.J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

265

Narrow-band optical transmission of metallic nanoslit arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metallic nanoslit arrays usually demonstrate wide transmission bands for transverse-magnetic-polarized incidence light. Here, we show that by introducing multi-dielectric layers underneath the metallic structure layer on the substrate, a narrow peak is formed, whose bandwidth can be down to a few nanometers. Three types of resonance modes in the region under the metal layer are identified responsible for the formation of the peak, i.e., a two-dimensional cavity resonance mode, which supports optical transmission, and two in-plane hybrid surface plasmon resonance modes locating on both sides of the peak that suppresses the transmission. Such structures can be applied in advanced photonic devices.

Sun Zhijun; Yang Ying; Zuo Xiaoliu [Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

266

Design of photovoltaic central power station concentrator array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design for a photovoltaic central power station using tracking concentrators has been developed. The 100 MW plant is assumed to be located adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The design assumes an advanced Martin Marietta two-axis tracking fresnel lens concentrator. The concentrators are arrayed in 5 MW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. The photovoltaic plant output is connected to the existing 115 kV switchyard. The site specific design allows detailed cost estimates for engineering, site preparation, and installation. Collector and power conditioning costs have been treated parametrically.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

CONCRETE REFLECTED ARRAYS OF U(93.2) METAL  

SciTech Connect

During the period from 1963 1973, experiments involving highly enriched uranium units were performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility to determine various critical configurations of three-dimensional arrays. The experiments formed a four-part series, and were reported by several different experimenters; the results of interest for this evaluation are those reported for the fourth experimentation, Critical Three-Dimensional Arrays of Neutron Interacting Units: Part IV, published and performed by D.W.Magnuson (Ref 1). Information is also available in the logbook . This set of experiments utilized subcritical metal units on a split table apparatus to determine critical configurations for 222 arrangements of highly enriched uranium reflected by concrete. Magnuson manipulated the configuration of several uranium cylinders and blocks within a concrete reflector. The different permutations utilized uranium cylinders of two different heights in various positions in the three dimensional array; certain cases also placed thin uranium blocks on top of the cylinders. The thickness of the surrounding concrete, as well as the inner dimensions of the concrete reflector was also varied in certain cases. The variations resulted in fourteen different experimental permutations or configurations. All fourteen configurations were judged to be unacceptable for use as criticality safety benchmarks. All experiments were initially evaluated; however only three configurations were evaluated in detail. Configurations 2, 4, 6 and 12 were not evaluated in detail because they are subcritical and configurations 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10 were also were not evaluated in detail because they were supercritical by more than beta effective (~0.007), or prompt critical. The experiments evaluated in detail for this benchmark were configurations 1, 3, and 11. The experimental report also contains the information for HEU-MET-FAST-056. Closely related work has been recorded in HEU-MET-FAST-053, which is a benchmark evaluation of a different series of three dimensional array experiments with four different moderator materials. HEU-MET-FAST-023 and HEU-MET-FAST-026 are also related because they utilize the same metal cylinders as these experiments.

Mackenzie Gorham; John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Virginia Dean; Davis Reed

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Method of low temperature operation of an electrochemical cell array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the method of operating an electrochemical cell generator apparatus containing a generator chamber (20) containing an array of cells (12) having interior and exterior electrodes with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where a hot gas (F) contacts the outside of the cells (12) and the generating chamber normally operates at over 850.degree. C., where N.sub.2 gas is fed to contact the interior electrode of the cells (12) in any case when the generating chamber (20) temperature drops for whatever reason to within the range of from 550.degree. C. to 800.degree. C., to eliminate cracking within the cells (12).

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill Boro, PA); Bratton, Raymond J. (Delmont, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Optimal strategy for controlling linewidth on spherical focal surface arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method for patterning concave spherical substrates based on ion beam proximity lithography. The approach overcomes both the distortion and radial dose variation that are inherent to projecting a flat mask pattern onto a sphere. We use a self-complementary mask (SCM) concept where an array of discrete ion beamlets is scanned across the substrate to expose the circuit pattern. This scanning is implemented by varying the inclination of the incident ion beam with respect to the mask. Pincushion distortion is corrected by applying a global transformation to the centers of the SCM openings while a local transformation

P. Ruchhoeft; J. C. Wolfe

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

An arrayed nanoantenna for broadband light emission and detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest a broadband optical unidirectional arrayed nanoantenna consisting of equally spaced nanorods of gradually varying length. Each nanorod can be driven by near-field quantum emitters radiating at different frequencies or, according to the reciprocity principle, by an incident light at the same frequency. Broadband unidirectional emission and reception characteristics of the nano-antenna open up novel opportunities for subwavelength light manipulation and quantum communication, as well as for enhancing the performance of photoactive devices such as photovoltaic detectors, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells.

Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Davoyan, Arthur R; Simovski, Constantin; Belov, Pavel; Kivshar, Yuri S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

High Density Nano-Electrode Array for Radiation Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk single crystals of Cd1-xZnxTe (x=0.04 to x=0.2) compound semiconductor is used for room temperature radiation detection. The production of large volume of Cd1-xZnxTe with low defect density is expensive. As a result there is a growing research interest in the production of nanostructured compound semiconductors such as Cd1-xZnxTe in an electrochemical route. In this investigation, Cd1-xZnxTe ternary compound semiconductor, referred as CZT, was electrodeposited in the form of nanowires onto a TiO2 nanotubular template from propylene carbonate as the non-aqueous electrolyte, using a pulse-reverse electrodeposition process at 130 C. The template acted as a support in growing ordered nanowire of CZT which acts as a one dimensional conductor. Cyclic Voltammogram (CV) studies were conducted in determining the potentials for the growth of nanowires of uniform stoichiometry. The morphologies and composition of CZT were characterized by using SEM, TEM and XRD. The STEM mapping carried out on the nanowires showed the uniform distribution of Cd, Zn and Te elements. TEM image showed that the nanowires were polycrystalline in nature. The Mott-Schottky analysis carried on the nanowires showed that the nanowires were a p-type semiconductor. The carrier density, band gap and resistivity of the Cd0.9Zn0.1Te nanowires were 4.29x1013 cm-3, 1.56 eV and 2.76x1011?-cm respectively. The high resistivity was attributed to the presence of deep defect states such as cadmium vacancies or Te antisites which were created by the anodic cycle of the pulse-reverse electrodeposition process. Stacks of series connected CZT nanowire arrays were tested with different bias potentials. The background current was in the order of tens of picoamperes. When exposed to radiation source Amerecium-241 (60 KeV, 4 ?Ci), the stacked CZT nanowires arrays showed sensing behavior. The sensitivity of the nanowire arrays increased as the number of stacks increased. The preliminary results indicate that the CZT nanowire arrays can be used as a potential X-ray and low energy gamma ray detector material at room temperature with a much low bias potential (0.7 4V) as against 300 500 V applied in the commercial bulk detector materials.

Mano Misra

2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load.

Muljadi, Eduard (Golden, CO); Taylor, Roger W. (Golden, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ULTRASONIC IMAGING USING A FLEXIBLE ARRAY: IMPROVEMENTS TO THE MAXIMUM CONTRAST AUTOFOCUS ALGORITHM  

SciTech Connect

In previous work, we have presented the maximum contrast autofocus algorithm for estimating unknown imaging parameters, e.g., for imaging through complicated surfaces using a flexible ultrasonic array. This paper details recent improvements to the algorithm. The algorithm operates by maximizing the image contrast metric with respect to the imaging parameters. For a flexible array, the relative positions of the array elements are parameterized using a cubic spline function and the spline control points are estimated by iterative maximisation of the image contrast via simulated annealing. The resultant spline gives an estimate of the array geometry and the profile of the surface that it has conformed to, allowing the generation of a well-focused image. A pre-processing step is introduced to obtain an initial estimate of the array geometry, reducing the time taken for the algorithm to convergence. Experimental results are demonstrated using a flexible array prototype.

Hunter, A. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol (United Kingdom)

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

274

Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load. 20 figs.

Muljadi, E.; Taylor, R.W.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

275

Ion impact distribution over plasma exposed nanocone arrays  

SciTech Connect

The effect of an ordered array of nanocones on a conducting substrate immersed in the plasma on the transport of the plasma ions is investigated. The real conical shape of the cones is rigorously incorporated into the model. The movement of 10{sup 5} CH{sub 3}{sup +} ions in the plasma sheath modified by the nanocone array is simulated. The ions are driven by the electric fields produced by the sheath and the nanostructures. The surface charge density and the total charge on the nanotips with different aspect ratios are computed. The ion transport simulation provides important characteristics of the displacement and velocity of the ions. The relative ion distribution along the lateral surfaces of the carbon nanotips is computed as well. It is shown that a rigorous account of the realistic nanostructure shape leads to very different distribution of the ion fluxes on the nanostructured surfaces compared to the previously reported works. The ion flux distribution is a critical factor in the nucleation process on the substrate and determines the nanostructure growth patterns.

Mehrabian, S. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore); Xu, S. [Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore); Qaemi, A. A. [Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ostrikov, K. [Plasma Nanoscience Center Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218 Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

McGregor, Douglas S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rojeski, Ronald A. (Pleasanton, CA)

2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

277

Science With The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The future of cm and m-wave astronomy lies with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a telescope under development by a consortium of 17 countries that will be 50 times more sensitive than any existing radio facility. Most of the key science for the SKA will be addressed through large-area imaging of the Universe at frequencies from a few hundred MHz to a few GHz. The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a technology demonstrator aimed in the mid-frequency range, and achieves instantaneous wide-area imaging through the development and deployment of phased-array feed systems on parabolic reflectors. The large field-of-view makes ASKAP an unprecedented synoptic telescope that will make substantial advances in SKA key science. ASKAP will be located at the Murchison Radio Observatory in inland Western Australia, one of the most radio-quiet locations on the Earth and one of two sites selected by the international community as a potential location for the SKA. In this paper, we outline an ambitious science program for ASKAP, examining key science such as understanding the evolution, formation and population of galaxies including our own, understanding the magnetic Universe, revealing the transient radio sky and searching for gravitational waves.

Simon Johnston

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

MICRO PIN ARRAY DETECTOR (MIPA): FIRST TEST RESULTS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel gas proportional detector, consisting of an array of pins immersed into a cathode made out of closely packed hexagonals has been developed. The resulting geometry of the detector is 3 dimensional. Electron multiplication is limited to a region in close proximity to the tip of each pin, where the electric field decreases with distance from the pin at a rate faster than l/r, the rate that exists in a traditional wire chamber. The multiplication region is limited to a small part of the detector volume leading to stability of operation up to high charge gas gains. The amplification region is located far enough from any dielectric surface that the gas gain is insensitive to the charge state of the surface, a significant benefit compared with many other micro-pattern detectors. The microscopic dimensions of the individual pins of the array result in signals whose total duration is about a microsecond. Two identical, but opposite polarity signals are detected, one on the pin and one on the cathode. Both signals can be used by two independent, charge division, read-out systems to obtain unambiguous x-y position information of the primary ionization.

REHAK,P.; SMITH,G.C.; WARREN,J.B.; YU,B.

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

MICRO PIN ARRAY DETECTOR (MIPA): FIRST TEST RESULTS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel gas proportional detector, consisting of an array of pins immersed into a cathode made out of closely packed hexagonals has been developed. The resulting geometry of the detector is 3 dimensional. Electron multiplication is limited to a region in close proximity to the tip of each pin, where the electric field decreases with distance from the pin at a rate faster than 1/r, the rate that exists in a traditional wire chamber. The multiplication region is limited to a small part of the detector volume leading to stability of operation up to high charge gas gains. The amplification region is located far enough from any dielectric surface that the gas gain is insensitive to the charge state of the surface, a significant benefit compared with many other micro-pattern detectors. The microscopic dimensions of the individual pins of the array result in signals whose total duration is about a microsecond. Two identical, but opposite polarity signals are detected, one on the pin and one on the cathode. Both signals can be used by two independent, charge division, read-out systems to obtain unambiguous x-y position information of the primary ionization.

REHAK,P.; SMITH,G.C.; WARREN,J.B.; YU,B.

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

280

Gamma Ray Array Detector Trigger Sub-System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma Ray Array Detector (GRAD) is one of External Target Facility (ETF) subsystems at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou. The trigger subsystem of the GRAD has been developed based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs) and PXI interface. The GRAD trigger subsystem makes prompt L1 trigger decisions to select valid events. These decisions are made by processing the hit signals from 1024 CsI scintillators of the GRAD. According to the physical requirements, the GRAD trigger subsystem generates 12-bit trigger signals that are passed to the ETF global trigger system. In addition, the GRAD trigger subsystem generates trigger data that are packed and transmitted to the host computer via PXI bus for off-line analysis. The trigger processing is implemented in the front-end electronics and one FPGA of the trigger module. The logic of PXI transmission and reconfiguration is implemented in the other FPGA of the trigger module. The reliable and efficient performance in the Gamma-ray experiments demonstrates that the GRAD trigger subsystem is capable to satisfy the physical requirements.

Du Zhong-Wei; Su Hong; Qian Yi; Kong Jie

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Photonic devices based on periodic arrays of carbon nanotubes and silicon nanopillars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reflection from Si surfaces. These arrays of Si inverted nanocones displayed a 3 to 4 fold enhanced reflection in the optical regime. These arrays find application in photovoltaic devices for enhancing the reflection of infrared (IR) radiations, which... -optical devices [9], solar cells to increase efficiency [10], optical antenna arrays [11, 12] and photonic crystals Chapter 2: Carbon nanotubes and nanophotonics devices 4 [13]. Carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising materials for device fabrication...

Butt, Haider

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

282

Development of a Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) is a new array of plastic scintillator bars under development for measurements at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The array is highly modular allowing the configuration of the individual elements to be optimized for particular experimental requirements, such as (d,n) and beta-delayed neutron-decay measurements with neutron-rich rare isotope beams.

Matei, C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bardayan, D. W. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Blackmon, J. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge LA 70803 (United States); Cizewski, J. A.; Peters, W. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick NJ 08903 (United States); Grzywacz, R. K.; Liddick, S. N.; Padgett, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Sarazin, F. [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

283

Materials Selection and Processing Techniques for Small Spacecraft Solar Cell Arrays.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Body mounted germanium substrate solar cell arrays form the faces of many small satellite designs to provide the primary power source on orbit. High efficiency (more)

Torabi, Naseem M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Synthesis of ordered large-scale ZnO nanopore arrays  

SciTech Connect

An effective approach is demonstrated for growing ordered large-scale ZnO nanopore arrays through radio-frequency magnetron sputtering deposition on porous alumina membranes (PAMs). The realization of highly ordered hexagonal ZnO nanopore arrays benefits from the unique properties of ZnO (hexagonal structure, polar surfaces, and preferable growth directions) and PAMs (controllable hexagonal nanopores and localized negative charges). Further evidence has been shown through the effects of nanorod size and thermal treatment of PAMs on the yielded morphology of ZnO nanopore arrays. This approach opens the possibility of creating regular semiconducting nanopore arrays for the application of filters, sensors, and templates.

Ding, G.Q.; Shen, W.Z.; Zheng, M.J.; Fan, D.H. [Laboratory of Condensed Matter Spectroscopy and Opto-Electronic Physics, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

NREL Developing a Numerical Simulation Tool to Study Hydrokinetic Energy Conversion Devices and Arrays (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New code will help accelerate design improvements by providing a high-fidelity simulation tool to study power performance, structural loading, and the interactions between devices in arrays.

Not Available

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Some effects of packaging materials on critical arrays of fissile materials  

SciTech Connect

The surface density representation of array criticality provides a comprehensive display of criticality parameters of arrays of packaged fissile materials. The study leads to the following conclusions: (1) The mass limits established by the N 16.5 standard for air-spaced spherical units in water-reflected arrays may be adequate for transportation packages; (2) criticality assessments made for one fissile material can be extended to other materials which have defined equivalent masses for array criticality of air-spaced units; and (3) a uniform minimum margin of subcriticality can be established for transportation of packaged fissile materials.

Thomas, J.T.; Tang, J.S.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hydrothermal Growth of the TiO2 Nanowire Array on Ti Plates for the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of the aligned TiO2 nanowire array were studied in both the photoanalytic mineralization of acetone, benzene and dye molecules in water and the...

288

Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays at TJNAF| U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIRSTTR...

289

Phase 2 of the array automated assembly task for the low cost silicon solar array project. Interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LSA Automated Array Assembly Task has as its goal the manufacture of photovoltaic modules at a capacity of 500 MW per year at a cost of $0.50 per peak watt. Divided between ten solar cell manufacturers, each installation should produce 50 MW per year. This implies that automated machinery would continuously produce 120 solar cells per minute. The purpose of this report is to detail the processes and techniques which are believed to have great promise of accomplishing this task. The initial stages of the program were involved in studying the possibility of automated assembly. Phase 1 reviewed a large cross section of processes, conceptual designs, and innovative technologies in preparation for 1986. Through this documentation, a large amount of comprehensive data has been collected. It is these reports upon which the next phase of the program is based. The purpose of Phase 2 is to propose an automated sequence, verify it and present future cost projections. Utilizing the large amount of information available from Phase 1 and drawing from its own experience Solarex has proposed a process sequence which it is believed has great potential of achieving the LSA goals. This report describes the processes, details, the verification tests performed, and estimates the cost of such an automated array assembly.

Wihl, M.; Toro, J.; Scheinine, A.; Anderson, J.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Structural Impairment Detection Using Arrays of Competitive Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aging railroad bridge infrastructure is subject to increasingly higher demands such as heavier loads, increased speed, and increased frequency of traffic. The challenges facing railroad bridge infrastructure provide an opportunity to develop improved systems of monitoring railroad bridges. This dissertation outlines the development and implementation of a Structural Impairment Detection System (SIDS) that incorporates finite element modeling and instrumentation of a testbed structure, neural algorithm development, and the integration of data acquisition and impairment detection tools. Ultimately, data streams from the Salmon Bay Bridge are autonomously recorded and interrogated by competitive arrays of artificial neural networks for patterns indicative of specific structural impairments. Heel trunnion bascule bridges experience significant stress ranges in critical truss members. Finite element modeling of the Salmon Bay Bridge testbed provided an estimate of nominal structural behavior and indicated types and locations of possible impairments. Analytical modeling was initially performed in SAP2000 and then refined with ABAQUS. Modeling results from the Salmon Bay Bridge were used to determine measureable quantities sensitive to modeled impairments. An instrumentation scheme was designed and installed on the testbed to record these diagnostically significant data streams. Analytical results revealed that main chord members and bracing members of the counterweight truss are sensitive to modeled structural impairments. Finite element models and experimental observations indicated maximum stress ranges of approximately 22 ksi on main chord members of the counterweight truss. A competitive neural algorithm was developed to examine analytical and experimental data streams. Analytical data streams served as training vectors for training arrays of competitive neural networks. A quasi static array of neural networks was developed to provide an indication of the operating condition at specific intervals of the bridge's operation. Competitive neural algorithms correctly classified 94% of simulated data streams. Finally, a stand-alone application was integrated with the Salmon Bay Bridge data acquisition system to autonomously analyze recorded data streams and produce bridge condition reports. Based on neural algorithms trained on modeled impairments, the Salmon Bay Bridge operates in a manner most resembling one of two operating conditions: 1) unimpaired, or 2) impaired embedded member at the southeast corner of the counterweight.

Story, Brett

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A Quantitative Tool for Producing DNA-Based Diagnostic Arrays  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to develop a precise, quantitative method to analyze oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) on an array to enable a systematic approach to quality control issues affecting DNA microarrays. Two types of ODN's were tested; ODN's formed by photolithography and ODN's printed onto microarrays. Initial work in Phase I, performed in conjunction with Affymetrix, Inc. who has a patent on a photolithographic in situ technique for creating DNA arrays, was very promising but did seem to indicate that the atomization process was not complete. Soon after Phase II work was under way, Affymetrix had further developed fluorescent methods and indicated they were no longer interested in our resonance ionization technique. This was communicated to the program manager and it was decided that the project would continue and be focused on printed ODNs. The method being tested is called SIRIS, Sputter-Initiated Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy. SIRIS has been shown to be a highly sensitive, selective, and quantitative tool for atomic species. This project was aimed at determining if an ODN could be labeled in such a way that SIRIS could be used to measure the label and thus provide quantitative measurements of the ODN on an array. One of the largest problems in this study has been developing a method that allows us to know the amount of an ODN on a surface independent of the SIRIS measurement. Even though we could accurately determine the amount of ODN deposited on a surface, the amount that actually attached to the surface is very difficult to measure (hence the need for a quantitative tool). A double-labeling procedure was developed in which 33P and Pt were both used to label ODNs. The radioactive 33P could be measured by a proportional counter that maps the counts in one dimension. This gave a good measurement of the amount of ODN remaining on a surface after immobilization and washing. A second label, Pt, was attached to guanine nucleotides in the ODN. Studies were conducted using this technique and comparing the results of the radioactive label vs SIRIS measurements of Pt as a function of ODN length and distance of the Pt label from the attachment end. The SIRIS signal was not proportional to the amount of oligo attached to the surface as determined by the decay of the 33P label. We intentionally tested conditions under which one might expect the atomization efficiency to change and we believe this is the problem. Different lengths of oligos, and different placement of the label in the oligo affected the final signal. This obviously makes use of SIRIS as a quantitative tool for oligonucleotides problematic except under highly controlled situations.

Tom J. Whitaker

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

292

Array Technologies Inc aka Wattsun | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Inc aka Wattsun Technologies Inc aka Wattsun Jump to: navigation, search Name Array Technologies Inc (aka Wattsun) Place Albuquerque,, New Mexico Zip 87107 Sector Solar Product Manufactures the Wattsun Solar Tracker, a sun-tracking mounting system for PV modules. Coordinates 35.08418°, -106.648639° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.08418,"lon":-106.648639,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

293

Friction Factor Measurements in an Equally Spaced Triangular Tube Array  

SciTech Connect

Friction factor data for adiabatic cross-flow of water in a staggered tube array was obtained over a Reynolds number range (based on hydraulic diameter and gap velocity) of about 10,000 to 250,000. The tubes were 12.7mm (0.5 inch) outer diameter, in a uniformly spaced triangular arrangement with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. The friction factor was compared to several literature correlations, and was found to be best matched by the Idelchik correlation. Other correlations were found to vary significantly from the test data. Based on the test data, a new correlation is proposed for this tube bundle geometry which covers the entire Reynolds number range tested.

Vassallo P, Symolon P

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

294

T-load microchannel array and fabrication method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A three-dimensional (3-D) T-load for planar microchannel arrays for electrophoresis, for example, which enables sample injection directly onto a plane perpendicular to the microchannels' axis, at their ends. This is accomplished by forming input wells that extend beyond the ends of the microchannel thereby eliminating the right angle connection from the input well into the end of the microchannel. In addition, the T-load input well eases the placement of electrode in or adjacent the well and thus enables very efficient reproducible electrokinetic (ek) injection. The T-load input well eliminates the prior input well/microchannel alignment concerns, since the input well can be drilled after the top and bottom microchannel plates are bonded together. The T-load input well may extend partially or entirely through the bottom microchannel plate which enables more efficient gel and solution flushing, and also enables placement of multiple electrodes to assist in the ek sample injection.

Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Coupling Impedance of a Periodic Array of Diaphragms (Erratum)  

SciTech Connect

A method is presented for calculating the high-frequency longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances in a periodic array of diaphragms in a circular perfectly conducting pipe. The method is based on Weinstein's theory of diffraction of a plane electromagnetic wave on a stack of halfplanes. Using Weinstein's solution, it is shown that the problem of finding the beam field in the pipe reduces to an effective boundary condition at the radius of the diaphragms that couples the longitudinal electric field with the azimuthal magnetic one. Solving Maxwell's equations with this boundary condition leads to simple formulae for Z{sub long} and Z{sub tr}. A good agreement with a numerical solution of the problem found by other authors is demonstrated.

Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

Mechanically latchable tiltable platform for forming micromirrors and micromirror arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which includes a platform that can be electrostatically tilted from being parallel to a substrate on which the platform to being tilted at an angle of 1 20 degrees with respect to the substrate. Once the platform has been tilted to a maximum angle of tilt, the platform can be locked in position using an electrostatically-operable latching mechanism which engages a tab protruding below the platform. The platform has a light-reflective upper surface which can be optionally coated to provide an enhanced reflectivity and form a micromirror. An array of such micromirrors can be formed on a common substrate for applications including optical switching (e.g. for fiber optic communications), optical information processing, image projection displays or non-volatile optical memories.

Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM); Polosky, Marc A. (Tijeras, NM); Sleefe, Gerard E. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

297

Seebeck Measurements on Arrays of Embedded Bi Submicron Wires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transport properties of nanoscaled objects can be very different from those of the corresponding bulk material due to the influence of finite-size and quantum-size effects in low-dimensional structures. In 1993, Hicks and Dresselhaus published theoretical investigations on transport properties of one-dimensional conductors, predicting a significantly enhanced thermoelectric efficiency [1]. Because of large effective masses and mean free path of the conduction electrons, Bi is an ideal material for studying the transport properties of nanowires. The electrical conductivity of Bi nanowires was already intensively investigated [2]. Here, a simple method for the measurement of another thermoelectric material property, the Seebeck coefficient S, of arrays of embedded submicron wires is presented. S is defined as proportionality factor between the potential

S. Mller; T. W. Cornelius; D. Huzel; O. Picht; M. Rauber; R. Neumann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Apparatus and method for polymer synthesis using arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymer synthesis apparatus (20) for building a polymer chain including a head assembly (21) having an array of nozzles (22) with each nozzle coupled to a reservoir (23) of liquid reagent (24), and a base assembly (25) having an array of reaction wells (26). A transport mechanism (27) aligns the reaction wells (26) and selected nozzles (22) for deposition of the liquid reagent (24) into selected reaction wells (26). A sliding seal (30) is positioned between the head assembly (21) and the base assembly (25) to form a common chamber (31) enclosing both the reaction well (26) and the nozzles (22) therein. A gas inlet (70) into the common chamber (31), upstream from the nozzles (22), and a gas outlet (71) out of the common chamber (31), downstream from the nozzles (22), sweeps the common chamber (31) of toxic fumes emitted by the reagents. Each reaction well ( 26) includes an orifice (74) extending into the well (26) which is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution (76) in the well (26) for polymer chain growth therein. A pressure regulating device (82 ) is provided for controlling a pressure differential, between a first gas pressure exerted on the reaction well (26) and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit (80) of the orifice, such that upon the pressure differential exceeding a predetermined amount, the reagent solution (76) is expelled from the well (26) through the orifice (74). A method of synthesis of a polymer chain in a synthesis apparatus (20) is also included.

Brennan, Thomas M. (San Francisco, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Apparatus and method for polymer synthesis using arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymer synthesis apparatus (20) for building a polymer chain including a head assembly (21) having an array of nozzles (22) with each nozzle coupled to a reservoir (23) of liquid reagent (24) , and a base assembly (25) having an array of reaction wells (26). A transport mechanism (27) aligns the reaction wells (26) and selected nozzles (22) for deposition of the liquid reagent (24) into selected reaction wells (26). A sliding seal (30) is positioned between the head assembly (21) and the base assembly (25) to form a common chamber (31) enclosing both the reaction well (26) and the nozzles (22) therein. A gas inlet (70) into the common chamber (31), upstream from the nozzles (22), and a gas outlet (71) out of the common chamber (31) , downstream from the nozzles (22) , sweeps the common chamber ( 31 ) of toxic fumes emitted by the reagents. Each reaction well (26) includes an orifice (74) extending into the well (26) which is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution (76) in the well (26) for polymer chain growth therein. A pressure regulating device (82) is provided for controlling a pressure differential, between a first gas pressure exerted on the reaction well (26) and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit (80) of the orifice, such that upon the pressure differential exceeding a predetermined amount, the reagent solution (76) is expelled from the well (26) through the orifice (74). A method of synthesis of a polymer chain in a synthesis apparatus (20) is also included.

Brennan, Thomas M. (San Francisco, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Technical quarterly report No. 2. Motorola report No. 2258/2  

SciTech Connect

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task, LCSSAP, is concerned with a comprehensive assessment of the improvements in existing technology that may be needed in order to develop, by 1985, an industrial capability for low cost, mass production of very durable silicon solar photovoltaic modules and arrays. Both experimental, literature, and theoretical sources are being utilized to evaluate efficient solar cell design criteria and individual and synergistic process effects on the cost effective production and encapsulation of such efficient solar cells.

Coleman, M.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fault Evolution in Photovoltaic Array During Night-to-Day Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arcing in the DC- wiring of photovoltaic systems," in Telecommunications Energy Conference, 2009. INTELECFault Evolution in Photovoltaic Array During Night-to-Day Transition Ye Zhao, Brad Lehman Abstract-- This paper focuses on fault evolution in a photovoltaic array during night-to-day transition

Lehman, Brad

302

DOE/EA-1663: Environmental Assessment for BP Solar Array Project Brookhaven National Laboratory (December 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP SOLAR ARRAY PROJECT BP SOLAR ARRAY PROJECT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK Brookhaven Site Office December 2009 DOE/EA-1663 i Table of Contents 1.0 PREFACE ........................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 SUMMARY.......................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 PURPOSE AND NEED .................................................................................................... 12

303

Mid-infrared nanoantenna arrays on silicon and CaF2 substrates for sensing applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the fabrication and systematic characterization of nanoantenna arrays with several different geometries realized both on standard silicon (Si) substrates and Calcium Fluoride (CaF"2) substrates aimed at the realization of a mid-Infrared ... Keywords: FTIR, Microfluidic devices, Nanoantenna arrays, Plasmon resonance

L. Businaro; O. Limaj; V. Giliberti; M. Ortolani; A. Di Gaspare; G. Grenci; G. Ciasca; A. Gerardino; A. De Ninno; S. Lupi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Ground shock from multiple earth penetrator bursts: Effects for hexagonal weapon arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations have been performed with the HULL hydrocode to study ground shock effects for multiple earth penetrator weapon (EPW) bursts in hexagonal-close-packed (HCP) arrays. Several different calculational approaches were used to treat this problem. The first simulations involved two-dimensional (2D) calculations, where the hexagonal cross-section of a unit-cell in an effectively-infinite HCP array was approximated by an inscribed cylinder. Those calculations showed substantial ground shock enhancement below the center of the array. To refine the analysis, 3D unit-cell calculations were done where the actual hexagonal cross-section of the HCP array was modelled. Results of those calculations also suggested that the multiburst array would enhance ground shock effects over those for a single burst of comparable yield. Finally, 3D calculations were run in which an HCP array of seven bursts was modelled explicitly. In addition, the effects of non-simultaneity were investigated. Results of the seven-burst HCP array calculations were consistent with the unit-cell results and, in addition, provided information on the 3D lethal contour produced by such an array.

Kmetyk, L.N.; Yarrington, P.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Radio Science Bulletin No 326 (September 2008) The Square Kilometer Array (SKA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the telescope have been identified. One site is in the Karoo wilderness of South Africa, while the other.berkeley.edu/ata/. 8.3 meerKAT (extended Karoo Array Telescope) - Brief description: >50 dish ? ~12 m dish synthesis array. - Site: Karoo wilderness, Republic of South Africa. - Main proponent: National Research

Tobar, Michael

306

Aligned carbon nanotubes array by DC glow plasma etching for supercapacitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To open the end of carbon nanotubes and make these ends connect with functional carboxyl group, aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arrays was etched by DC glow oxygen-argon plasma. With these open-ended carbon nanotubes array as electrodematerials to build ...

Yongfeng Luo, Xiaojia Li, Zhiqiang Gong, Zhongzhi Sheng, Xiaofang Peng, Qunying Mou, Mengdong He, Xianjun Li, Hong Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Switched Capacitor Approach to Field-Programmable Analog Array (FPAA) Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a voltage mode switched-capacitor Field Programmable Analog Array (FPAA) to be used to implement various analog circuits. The FPAA consists of uniform configurable analog blocks (CABs) allowing implementation of different functions. Each CAB ... Keywords: configurable analog block, field-programmable analog array, switched-capacitor

Haydar Kutuk; Sung-Mo (Steve) Kang

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Batch fabrication of cantilever array aperture probes for scanning near-field optical microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a novel batch fabrication process for cantilever array aperture probes used in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). The array probes, consisting of 16 parallel cantilevers with each tip having an identical aperture, are proposed ... Keywords: Cantilever probes, Nanofabrication, Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM)

Y. Zhang; K. E. Docherty; J. M. R. Weaver

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Highly ordered TiO2 macropore arrays as transparent photocatalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly ordered transparent TiO2 macropore arrays were synthesized via a simple glass-clamping method at room temperature. The as-synthesized TiO2 macropore arrays show high transmittance in the visible light region and can be used ...

Yuan Dong; Junfeng Chao; Zhong Xie; Xin Xu; Zhuoran Wang; Di Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-modulated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-dimensional nano-structure arrays by passing a pulsed atomic beam through an intensity-modulated continuous of ``cooling'' along the longitudinal direction. This enables fabrication of vertically heterogeneous nano

Zhu, Xiangdong

311

Global Futures: A Multithreaded Execution Model for Global Arrays-based Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present Global Futures (GF), an execution model extension to Global Arrays, which is based on a PGAS-compatible active message-based paradigm. We describe the design and implementation of Global Futures and illustrate its use in a computational chemistry ... Keywords: Global Arrays, multithreading, execution models

Daniel Chavarria-Miranda; Sriram Krishnamoorthy; Abhinav Vishnu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Encoded Fiber-Optic Microsphere Arrays for Probing ProteinCarbohydrate Interactions**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biosensors Encoded Fiber-Optic Microsphere Arrays for Probing Protein­Carbohydrate Interactions, such as robotic printing and fluorescence scanning devices. In the past year, several systems were described that present both natural and synthetically derived carbohydrate structures in array formats.[3] These systems

Ratner, Daniel M.

313

Uniform illumination rendering using an array of LEDs: a signal processing perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An array of a large number of LEDs will be widely used in future indoor illumination systems. In this paper, we investigate the problem of rendering uniform illumination by a regular LED array on the ceiling of a room. We first present two general results ... Keywords: LED illumination, basic illumination pattern, regular grid, two-dimensional signal processing

Hongming Yang; Jan W. M. Bergmans; Tim C. W. Schenk; Jean-Paul M. G. Linnartz; Ronald Rietman

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks.

Hubbell, Earl A. (Mt. View, CA); Lipshutz, Robert J. (Palo Alto, CA); Morris, Macdonald S. (San Jose, CA); Winkler, James L. (Palo Alto, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Flux Distribution of a Single-Axis Tracking Parabolic Trough Array with Photovoltaic Receiver  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux Distribution of a Single-Axis Tracking Parabolic Trough Array with Photovoltaic Receiver G 0200 Australia E-mail: gregory.burgess@anu.edu.au Abstract Single-axis tracking parabolic troughs Long arrays of single-axis tracking parabolic troughs with a fluid filled absorber are a well

316

Vertical Pillar-Superlattice Array and Graphene Hybrid Light Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vertical Pillar-Superlattice Array and Graphene Hybrid Light Emitting Diodes Jung Min Lee, Jae a class of light emitting diode (LED) with interesting mechanical, optical, and electrical characteristics, light-emitting diodes, 3D architectures, transparent electrodes V ertical arrays of one-dimensional (1D

Rogers, John A.

317

Selecting Oligonucleotide Probes for Whole-Genome Tiling Arrays with a Cross-Hybridization Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For designing oligonucleotide tiling arrays popular, current methods still rely on simple criteria like Hamming distance or longest common factors, neglecting base stacking effects which strongly contribute to binding energies. Consequently, probes are ... Keywords: Biology and genetics, DNA microarrays, tiling arrays, oligonucleotide probes, cross hybridization.

Christoph Hafemeister; Roland Krause; Alexander Schliep

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Investigation of radial wire arrays for inertial confinement fusion and radiation effects science.  

SciTech Connect

Radial wire arrays provide an alternative x-ray source for Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. These arrays, where wires are positioned radially outwards from a central cathode to a concentric anode, have the potential to drive a more compact ICF hohlraum. A number of experiments were performed on the 7MA Saturn Generator. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1MA level, where they have been shown to provide similar x-ray outputs to larger diameter cylindrical arrays, to the higher current levels required for ICF. Data indicates that at 7MA radial arrays can obtain higher power densities than cylindrical wire arrays, so may be of use for x-ray driven ICF on future facilities. Even at the 7MA level, data using Saturn's short pulse mode indicates that a radial array should be able to drive a compact hohlraum to temperatures {approx}92eV, which may be of interest for opacity experiments. These arrays are also shown to have applications to jet production for laboratory astrophysics. MHD simulations require additional physics to match the observed behavior.

Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Bland, Simon Nicholas (Imperial College, London); McBride, Ryan D.; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London); Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco Andres (Imperial College, London); Jennings, Christopher A.; Hall, Gareth Neville (Imperial College, London); Ampleford, David J.; Peyton, Bradley Philip; Lebedev, Sergey V. (Imperial College, London); Cleveland, Monica; Rogers, Thomas John; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Self-organizing learning array and its application to economic and financial problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new self-organizing learning array (SOLAR) system has been implemented in software. It is an information theory based learning machine capable of handling a wide variety of classification problems. It has self-reconfigurable processing cells (neurons) ... Keywords: Bankruptcy, Computational intelligence, Credit card and loan decision, Economic and financial problems, Self-organizing learning array, Stock investment classification and prediction

Z. Zhu; H. He; J. A. Starzyk; C. Tseng

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Mobile, Phased-Array, Doppler Radar Observations of Tornadoes at X Band  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mobile, phased-array Doppler radar, the Mobile Weather Radar, 2005 X-band, Phased Array (MWR-05XP), has been used since 2007 to obtain data in supercells and tornadoes. Rapidly-updating, volumetric data of tornadic vortex signatures (TVSs) ...

Michael M. French; Howard B. Bluestein; Ivan PopStefanija; Chad A. Baldi; Robert T. Bluth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Simulating devices with adaptive antenna arrays using OPNET integrated with MATLAB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a way to use adaptive antenna arrays in OPNET (Optimized Network Evaluation Tool) simulations. Adaptive antenna patterns, which are not supported by OPNET directly, can be implemented by interfacing OPNET with MATLAB, which performs ... Keywords: adaptive antennas, antenna array, matlab, opnet, smart antennas

Jaakko M. Seppl; Timo Brysy; Pekka Lilja

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Application of Soft-switching Technology in the Photovoltaic Array Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PV array simulator is the analog DC input device which is indispensable in the development and debugging of the solar PV grid-connected inverter. As the inverter switching frequency becomes larger and larger, the simulator as the analog input also ... Keywords: PV array simulator, Soft-switching technology, Zero-voltage zero-current switching phase-shifted full-bridge circuit

Chen Ya-ai, Shi Yu-teng

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A low-complexity multiuser detector for asynchronous CDMA QPSK adaptive antenna array systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a low complexity joint space-time multiuser detection algorithm for asynchronous DS/CDMA antenna array systems. The proposed multiuser detector is composed of an adaptive antenna array, used as a linear beamformer, and a sliding window ... Keywords: adaptive antenna systems, decorrelating detector, direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA), multiuser detection (MUD)

E. Del Re; R. Fantacci; S. Morosi; S. Marapodi

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

November 21, 2000 PV Lesson Plan 3 PV Array Generating Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 21, 2000 PV Lesson Plan 3 ­ PV Array Generating Electricity Prepared for the Oregon in Arrays: Solar Cells Generating Electricity Lesson Plan Content: In this lesson, students will learn about electricity. Objectives: Students will learn to use a tool called PV WATTS to calculate the output of PV

Oregon, University of

325

System and method for generating a deselect mapping for a focal plane array  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for generating a deselect mapping for a focal plane array according to one embodiment includes gathering a data set for a focal plane array when exposed to light or radiation from a first known target; analyzing the data set for determining which pixels or subpixels of the focal plane array to add to a deselect mapping; adding the pixels or subpixels to the deselect mapping based on the analysis; and storing the deselect mapping. A method for gathering data using a focal plane array according to another embodiment includes deselecting pixels or subpixels based on a deselect mapping; gathering a data set using pixels or subpixels in a focal plane array that are not deselected upon exposure thereof to light or radiation from a target of interest; and outputting the data set.

Bixler, Jay V; Brandt, Timothy G; Conger, James L; Lawson, Janice K

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

U-243: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error Lets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error 3: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service U-243: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service August 24, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: libvirt virTypedParameterArrayClear() Memory Access Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service PLATFORM: Version(s): 0.9.13 and prior ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in libvirt. reference LINKS: libvirt SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027437 Secunia Advisory SA50118 Bugtraq ID: 54748 CVE-2012-3445 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion A remote user can send a specially crafted RPC call with the number of parameters set to zero to libvirtd to trigger a memory access error in virTypedParameterArrayClear() and cause the target service to crash. Impact:

327

A solar array module fabrication process for HALE solar electric UAVs  

SciTech Connect

We describe a fabrication process to manufacture high power to weight ratio flexible solar array modules for use on high altitude long endurance (HALE) solar electric unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). A span-loaded flying wing vehicle, known as the RAPTOR Pathfinder, is being employed as a flying test bed to expand the envelope of solar powered flight to high altitudes. It requires multiple light weight flexible solar array modules able to endure adverse environmental conditions. At high altitudes the solar UV flux is significantly enhanced relative to sea level, and extreme thermal variations occur. Our process involves first electrically interconnecting solar cells into an array followed by laminating them between top and bottom laminated layers into a solar array module. After careful evaluation of candidate polymers, fluoropolymer materials have been selected as the array laminate layers because of their inherent abilities to withstand the hostile conditions imposed by the environment.

Carey, P.G.; Aceves, R.C.; Colella, N.J.; Thompson, J.B.; Williams, K.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Simulations of partially coherent focal plane imaging arrays: Fisher matrix approach to performance evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focal plane arrays of bolometers are increasingly employed in astronomy at far--infrared to millimetre wavelengths. The focal plane fields and the detectors are both partially coherent in these systems, but no account has previously been taken of the effect of partial coherence on array performance. In this paper, we use our recently developed coupled--mode theory of detection together with Fisher information matrix techniques from signal processing to characterize the behaviour of partially coherent imaging arrays. We investigate the effects of the size and coherence length of both the source and the detectors, and the packing density of the array, on the amount of information that can be extracted from observations with such arrays.

George Saklatvala; Michael P. Hobson; Stafford Withington

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Calculation of wake power losses in a two-level array: a simple case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One method of adding capacity is to install another array of turbines whose hub height is above the existing array. This report estimates the wake interference that could be expected in a two-level array. Interference is estimated for a typical situation that may be encountered by a wind farm developer. A modified Lissaman array model is used to make the wake interference calculations. The model calculations show that the wake interference between the two levels is small for the turbine characteristics and turbine layouts considered. (The windwise spacings are about 5.4 and 10.8D for the lower and upper levels of turbines, respectively.) Power losses are about 5% or less at rated speed. Thus, two-level arrays may be a viable way of increasing the generating capacity of existing wind farms.

Barnard, J.C.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Formation of Si-based nano-island array on porous anodic alumina  

SciTech Connect

Si-based nano-island arrays were fabricated on porous anodic alumina by two methods. In the first method, a thick silicon film was first deposited onto the surface with highly ordered bowl array prepared by anodizing an Al foil, followed by the formation of a polycrystalline silicon nano-island array on the surface close to the bowl array after dissolving aluminum. In the second method, porous anodization was performed on an Al thin film on Si and a SiO{sub 2} nano-island array was subsequently formed electrochemically. Time-resolved atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence were used to investigate the growth process as well as the mechanism of the growth process. Our proposed mechanism as well as assumptions made to formulate the model were found to be in agreement with the experimental results.

Mei, Y.F. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: yf.mei@plink.cityu.edu.hk; Huang, G.S. [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Li, Z.M. [Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Siu, G.G. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Fu, Ricky K.Y. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Yang, Y.M. [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, X.L. [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Tang, Z.K. [Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

331

HATS: Field Observations to Obtain Spatially Filtered Turbulence Fields from Crosswind Arrays of Sonic Anemometers in the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) field program utilized horizontal, crosswind arrays of sonic anemometers to calculate estimates of spatially filtered and subfilter-scale (SFS) turbulence, corresponding to its partitioning in large-...

T. W. Horst; J. Kleissl; D. H. Lenschow; C. Meneveau; C.-H. Moeng; M. B. Parlange; P. P. Sullivan; J. C. Weil

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

333

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

334

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

SciTech Connect

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

335

ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated  

SciTech Connect

Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

Connor Flynn

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

336

Unlikely Combination of Experiments With a Novel High-Voltage CIGS Photovoltaic Array: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new high-voltage array comprising bipolar strings of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) modules was inaugurated in 2005. It is equipped with a unique combination of tests, which likely have never before been deployed simultaneously within a single array: full current-voltage (I-V) traces, high-voltage leakage current measurements, and peak-power tracking or temporal stepped-bias profiling. The array nominally produces 1 kW power at 1 sun. The array's electrical characteristics are continuously monitored and controlled with a programmable electronic load interfaced to a data acquisition system (DAS), that also records solar and meteorological data. The modules are mounted with their frames electrically isolated from earth ground, in order to facilitate measurement of the leakage currents that arise between the high voltage bias developed in the series-connected cells and modules and their mounting frames. Because the DAS can perform stepped biasing of the array as a function of time, synchronous detection of the leakage current data with alternating bias is available. Leakage current data and their dependence on temperature and voltage are investigated. Array power data are analyzed across a wide range of varying illuminations and temperatures from the I-V traces. Array performance is also analyzed from an energy output perspective using peak-power tracking data.

del Cueto, J. A.; Sekulic, B. R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The effect of topography on the wavelet response of seismic arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing seismic arrays using their responses to wavelets provides a more convenient and direct method of analysis than using their conventional time-harmonic responses. In this study, the effect of topography on the wavelet response of seismic arrays is investigated using an approach similar to that of Gangi and Benson (1989). The parameters investigated in the study are: the number of elements (24 and 48 elements), the weighting function (equal and triangular), the incident wavelet (Ricker and Klauder), and the error amount (2%, 10%, and 20% standard deviations). The errors are assumed to be stationary, Gaussian random errors. The degradation in the root-mean-squared (RMS) amplitude response of the array generally increased with the error amount and the number of elements. Errors affected triangularly weighted arrays more than equally weighted arrays, and Klauder-wavelet array responses more than Rickerwavelet array responses. The effect of errors in the elements elevations decreased with increasing incidence angle, while the effect of errors in the elements positions increased with increasing incidence angle. Hence, errors in the elements elevations distorted the seismic signals (which arrive at very low incidence angles) more than errors in the elements' positions did.

Al-Shuhail, Abdullatif Abdulrahman

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

An array of low-background $^3$He proportional counters for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An array of Neutral-Current Detectors (NCDs) has been built in order to make a unique measurement of the total active flux of solar neutrinos in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). Data in the third phase of the SNO experiment were collected between November 2004 and November 2006, after the NCD array was added to improve the neutral-current sensitivity of the SNO detector. This array consisted of 36 strings of proportional counters filled with a mixture of $^3$He and CF$_4$ gas capable of detecting the neutrons liberated by the neutrino-deuteron neutral current reaction in the D$_2$O, and four strings filled with a mixture of $^4$He and CF$_4$ gas for background measurements. The proportional counter diameter is 5 cm. The total deployed array length was 398 m. The SNO NCD array is the lowest-radioactivity large array of proportional counters ever produced. This article describes the design, construction, deployment, and characterization of the NCD array, discusses the electronics and data acquisition system, and considers event signatures and backgrounds.

J. F. Amsbaugh; J. M. Anaya; J. Banar; T. J. Bowles; M. C. Browne; T. V. Bullard; T. H. Burritt; G. A. Cox-Mobrand; X. Dai; H. Deng; M. Di Marco; P. J. Doe; M. R. Dragowsky; C. A. Duba; F. A. Duncan; E. D. Earle; S. R. Elliott; E. -I. Esch; H. Fergani; J. A. Formaggio; M. M. Fowler; J. E. Franklin; P. Geissbhler; J. V. Germani; A. Goldschmidt; E. Guillian; A. L. Hallin; G. Harper; P. J. Harvey; R. Hazama; K. M. Heeger; J. Heise; A. Hime; M. A. Howe; M. Huang; L. L. Kormos; C. Kraus; C. B. Krauss; J. Law; I. T. Lawson; K. T. Lesko; J. C. Loach; S. Majerus; J. Manor; S. McGee; K. K. S. Miknaitis; G. G. Miller; B. Morissette; A. Myers; N. S. Oblath; H. M. O'Keeffe; R. W. Ollerhead; S. J. M. Peeters; A. W. P. Poon; G. Prior; S. D. Reitzner; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; P. Skensved; A. R. Smith; M. W. E. Smith; T. D. Steiger; L. C. Stonehill; P. M. Thornewell; N. Tolich; B. A. VanDevender; T. D. Van Wechel; B. L. Wall; H. Wan Chan Tseung; J. Wendland; N. West; J. B. Wilhelmy; J. F. Wilkerson; J. M. Wouters

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Compact High Energy Camera for the Cherenkov Telescope Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Compact High Energy Camera (CHEC) is a camera-development project involving UK, US, Japanese and Dutch institutes for the dual-mirror Small-Sized Telescopes (SST-2M) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Two CHEC prototypes, based on different photosensors are funded and will be assembled and tested in the UK over the next ~18 months. CHEC is designed to record flashes of Cherenkov light lasting from a few to a hundred nanoseconds, with typical RMS image width and length of ~0.2 x 1.0 degrees, and has a 9 degree field of view. The physical camera geometry is dictated by the telescope optics: a curved focal surface with radius of curvature 1m and diameter ~35cm is required. CHEC is designed to work with both the ASTRI and GATE SST-2M telescope structures and will include an internal LED flasher system for calibration. The first CHEC prototype will be based on multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMs) and the second on silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs or MPPCs). The first prototype will soon be installed on the...

Daniel, M K; Berge, D; Buckley, J; Chadwick, P M; Cotter, G; Funk, S; Greenshaw, T; Hidaka, N; Hinton, J; Lapington, J; Markoff, S; Moore, P; Nolan, S; Ohm, S; Okumura, A; Ross, D; Sapozhnikov, L; Schmoll, J; Sutcliffe, P; Sykes, J; Tajima, H; Varner, G S; Vandenbroucke, J; Vink, J; Williams, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy for microfluidic pillar arrayed separation chips  

SciTech Connect

Numerous studies have addressed the challenges of implementing miniaturized microfluidic platforms for chemical and biological separation applications. However, the integration of real time detection schemes capable of providing valuable sample information under continuous, ultra low volume flow regimes has not fully been addressed. In this report we present a chip based chromatography system comprising of a pillar array separation column followed by a reagent channel for passive mixing of a silver colloidal solution into the eluent stream to enable surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) detection. Our design is the first integrated chip based microfluidic device to combine pressure driven separation capability with real time SERS detection. With this approach we demonstrate the ability to collect distinctive SERS spectra with or without complete resolution of chromatographic bands. Computational fluidic dynamic (CFD) simulations are used to model the diffusive mixing behavior and velocity profiles of the two confluent streams in the microfluidic channels. We evaluate the SERS spectral band intensity and chromatographic efficiency of model analytes with respect to kinetic factors as well as signal acquisition rates. Additionally, we discuss the use of a pluronic modified silver colloidal solution as a means of eliminating contamination generally caused by nanoparticle adhesion to channel surfaces.

Taylor, Lisa [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kirchner, Teresa B [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL; Sepaniak, Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Optimal Solar PV Arrays Integration for Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect

Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems hold great potential for distributed energy generation by installing PV panels on rooftops of residential and commercial buildings. Yet challenges arise along with the variability and non-dispatchability of the PV systems that affect the stability of the grid and the economics of the PV system. This paper investigates the integration of PV arrays for distributed generation applications by identifying a combination of buildings that will maximize solar energy output and minimize system variability. Particularly, we propose mean-variance optimization models to choose suitable rooftops for PV integration based on Markowitz mean-variance portfolio selection model. We further introduce quantity and cardinality constraints to result in a mixed integer quadratic programming problem. Case studies based on real data are presented. An efficient frontier is obtained for sample data that allows decision makers to choose a desired solar energy generation level with a comfortable variability tolerance level. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to show the tradeoffs between solar PV energy generation potential and variability.

Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Li, Xueping [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Spatiotemporal phase synchronization in a large array of convective oscillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a quasi-1D thermal convective system consisting of a large array of nonlinearly coupled oscillators, clustering is the way to achieve a regime of mostly antiphase synchronized oscillators. This regime is characterized by a spatiotemporal doubling of traveling modes. As the dynamics is explored beyond a spatiotemporal chaos regime with weak coupling, new interacting modes emerge through a supercritical bifurcation. In this new regime, the system exhibits coherent subsystems of antiphase synchronized oscillators, which are stationary clusters following a spatiotemporal beating phenomena. This regime is the result of a stronger coupling. We show from a phase mismatch model applied to each oscillator, that these phase coherent domains undergo a global phase instability meanwhile the interactions between oscillators become nonlocal. For each value of the control parameter we find out the time-varying topology (link matrix) from the contact interactions between oscillators. The new characteristic spatiotemporal scales are extracted from the antiphase correlations at the time intervals defined by the link matrix. The interpretation of these experimental results contributes to widen the understanding of other complex systems exhibiting similar phase chaotic dynamics in 2D and 3D.

M. A. Miranda; J. Burguete

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

343

Mechanized selection of fiber optic arrays for spectroscopy measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 400-fiber optic bundle has been installed as part of the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic for measuring density fluctuations in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. One hundred bundles, each composed of four 1-mm-diam fibers, transmit {ital H}{sub {alpha}} light 50 m away to 20 detectors located outside the radiation area. To shorten the time spent manually switching the bundles among the 20 detectors, a mechanized fiber selector was installed. The fiber bundles were separated into radial and poloidal groups of 220 and 180 fibers and coupled by a computer-controlled, motorized precision translation stage. The fibers were fastened to a plate and placed less than 0.003 in. from an identical plate that holds a similar array of fibers which transmits the light to the detectors. Holding the fiber spacing tolerance to 0.001 in., and using refractive index matching fluid, the highest measured loss was less than 0.5 dB, and generally was very small compared to the fiber's insertion loss. The stages are actuated with precision encoded micrometers and controlled by the beam emission spectroscopy VAX-resident software via a RS-232/CAMAC interface allowing arbitrary selections of fibers between plasma discharges with a 5 min repetition rate.

Paul, S.F.; Cylinder, D.; Durst, R.D.; Fonck, R.J. (Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The Allen Telescope Array Search for Electrostatic Discharges on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Allen Telescope Array was used to monitor Mars between 9 March and 2 June 2010, over a total of approximately 30 hours, for radio emission indicative of electrostatic discharge. The search was motivated by the report from Ruf et al. (2009) of the detection of non-thermal microwave radiation from Mars characterized by peaks in the power spectrum of the kurtosis, or kurtstrum, at 10 Hz, coinciding with a large dust storm event on 8 June 2006. For these observations, we developed a wideband signal processor at the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER). This 1024-channel spectrometer calculates the accumulated power and power-squared, from which the spectral kurtosis is calculated post-observation. Variations in the kurtosis are indicative of non-Gaussianity in the signal, which can be used to detect variable cosmic signals as well as radio frequency interference (RFI). During the three month period of observations, dust activity occurred on Mars in the form of small-scale d...

Anderson, Marin M; Barott, William C; Bower, Geoffrey C; Delory, Gregory T; de Pater, Imke; Werthimer, Dan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Exploiting first-class arrays in Fortran for accelerator programming  

SciTech Connect

Emerging architectures for high performance computing often are well suited to a data parallel programming model. This paper presents a simple programming methodology based on existing languages and compiler tools that allows programmers to take advantage of these systems. We will work with the array features of Fortran 90 to show how this infrequently exploited, standardized language feature is easily transformed to lower level accelerator code. Our transformations are based on a mapping from Fortran 90 to C++ code with OpenCL extensions. The sheer complexity of programming for clusters of many or multi-core processors with tens of millions threads of execution make the simplicity of the data parallel model attractive. Furthermore, the increasing complexity of todays applications (especially when convolved with the increasing complexity of the hardware) and the need for portability across hardware architectures make a higher-level and simpler programming model like data parallel attractive. The goal of this work has been to exploit source-to-source transformations that allow programmers to develop and maintain programs at a high-level of abstraction, without coding to a specific hardware architecture. Furthermore these transformations allow multiple hardware architectures to be targeted without changing the high-level source. It also removes the necessity for application programmers to understand details of the accelerator architecture or to know OpenCL.

Rasmussen, Craig E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weseloh, Wayne N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Robey, Robert W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matthew, Sottile J [GALORIS, INC.; Quinlan, Daniel [LLNL; Overbye, Jeffrey [INDIANA UNIV.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES  

SciTech Connect

Improved ground-imaging capabilities have enormous potential to increase energy, environmental, and economic benefits by improving exploration accuracy and reducing energy consumption during the mining cycle. Seismic tomography has been used successfully to monitor and evaluate geologic conditions ahead of a mining face. A primary limitation to existing seismic tomography, however, is the placement of sensors. The goal of this project is to develop an array of 24 seismic sensors capable of being mounted in either a vertical or horizontal borehole. Development of this technology reduces energy usage in excavation, transportation, ventilation, and processing phases of the mining operation because less waste is mined and the mining cycle suffers fewer interruptions. This new technology benefits all types of mines, including metal/nonmetal, coal, and quarrying. The primary research tasks focused on sensor placement method, sensor housing and clamping design, and cabling and connector selection. An initial design is described in the report. Following assembly, a prototype was tested in the laboratory as well as at a surface stone quarry. Data analysis and tool performance were used for subsequent design modifications. A final design is described, of which several components are available for patent application. Industry partners have shown clear support for this research and demonstrated an interest in commercialization following project completion.

Erik C. Westman

2003-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

347

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY TO REMOTELY NAVIGATE VERTICAL PIPE ARRAYS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Situations exist around the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) complex where it is advantageous to remotely navigate vertical pipe arrays. Specific examples are waste tanks in the SRS Tank Farms, which contain horizontal cooling coils at the tank bottom, vertical cooling coils throughout and a limited number of access points or ''risers''. These factors limit accessibility to many parts of these tanks by conventional means. Pipe Traveler technology has been developed to address these issues. The Pipe Traveler addresses these issues by using the vertical cooling coils as its medium of travel. The unit operates by grabbing a pipe using dual grippers located on either side of the equipment. Once securely attached to the pipe a drive wheel is extended to come in contact with the pipe. Rotation of the drive wheel causes the unit to rotate around the pipe. This action is continued until the second set of grippers is aligned with the next pipe. Extension pistons are actuated to extend the second set of grippers in contact with a second pipe. The second set of grippers is then actuated to grasp the pipe. The first set of grippers releases the original pipe and the process is repeated until the unit reaches its desired location. Once at the tool deployment location the desired tool may be used. The current design has proven the concept of pipe-to-pipe navigation. Testing of the Pipe Traveler has proven its ability to transfer itself from one pipe to another.

Krementz, D.; Immel, D.; Vrettos, N.; Nance, T.; Marzolf, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on the design of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Flat-Plate Solar Array Project, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, has focused on advancing technologies relevant to the design and construction of megawatt-level central-station systems. Photovoltaic modules and arrays for flat-plate central-station or other large-scale electric power production facilities require the establishment of a technical base that resolves design issues and results in practical and cost-effective configurations. The Central Station Research Forum addressed design, qualification and maintenance issues related to central-station arrays derived from the engineering and operating experiences of early applications and parallel laboratory research activities. Technical issues were examined from the viewpoint of the utility engineer, architect-engineer and laboratory researcher. The forum included presentations on optimum source-circuit designs, module insulation design for high system voltages, array safety, structural interface design, measurements and array operation and maintenance. The Research Forum focused on current capabilities as well as design difficulties requiring additional technological thrusts and/or continued research emphasis. Session topic summaries highlighting major points during group discussions, identifying promising technical approaches or areas of future research, are presented.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

M&A For Lithography Of Sparse Arrays Of Sub-Micrometer Features  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for the exposure of sparse hole and/or mesa arrays with line:space ratios of 1:3 or greater and sub-micrometer hole and/or mesa diameters in a layer of photosensitive material atop a layered material. Methods disclosed include: double exposure interferometric lithography pairs in which only those areas near the overlapping maxima of each single-period exposure pair receive a clearing exposure dose; double interferometric lithography exposure pairs with additional processing steps to transfer the array from a first single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair into an intermediate mask layer and a second single-period interferometric lithography exposure to further select a subset of the first array of holes; a double exposure of a single period interferometric lithography exposure pair to define a dense array of sub-micrometer holes and an optical lithography exposure in which only those holes near maxima of both exposures receive a clearing exposure dose; combination of a single-period interferometric exposure pair, processing to transfer resulting dense array of sub-micrometer holes into an intermediate etch mask, and an optical lithography exposure to select a subset of initial array to form a sparse array; combination of an optical exposure, transfer of exposure pattern into an intermediate mask layer, and a single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair; three-beam interferometric exposure pairs to form sparse arrays of sub-micrometer holes; five- and four-beam interferometric exposures to form a sparse array of sub-micrometer holes in a single exposure. Apparatuses disclosed include arrangements for the three-beam, five-beam and four-beam interferometric exposures.

Brueck, Steven R.J. (Albuquerque, NM); Chen, Xiaolan (Albuquerque, NM); Zaidi, Saleem (Albuquerque, NM); Devine, Daniel J. (Los Gatos, CA)

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

350

Integrated titer plate-injector head for microdrop array preparation, storage and transfer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated titer plate-injector head for preparing and storing two-dimensional (2-D) arrays of microdrops and for ejecting part or all of the microdrops and inserting same precisely into 2-D arrays of deposition sites with micrometer precision. The titer plate-injector head includes integrated precision formed nozzles with appropriate hydrophobic surface features and evaporative constraints. A reusable pressure head with a pressure equalizing feature is added to the titer plate to perform simultaneous precision sample ejection. The titer plate-injector head may be utilized in various applications including capillary electrophoresis, chemical flow injection analysis, microsample array preparation, etc.

Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

V-shaped resonators for addition of broad-area laser diode arrays  

SciTech Connect

A system and method for addition of broad-area semiconductor laser diode arrays are described. The system can include an array of laser diodes, a V-shaped external cavity, and grating systems to provide feedback for phase-locking of the laser diode array. A V-shaped mirror used to couple the laser diode emissions along two optical paths can be a V-shaped prism mirror, a V-shaped stepped mirror or include multiple V-shaped micro-mirrors. The V-shaped external cavity can be a ring cavity. The system can include an external injection laser to further improve coherence and phase-locking.

Liu, Bo; Liu, Yun; Braiman, Yehuda Y.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

Shock model description of the interaction radiation pulse in nested wire array z-pinches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bow shock structures are observed in a nested wire array z-pinch as ablation streams from the outer array pass the inner array. The jump in plasma conditions across these shocks results in an enhancement of snowplow emission from the imploding plasma piston. Results from a snowplow model modified to account for the shock jumps are discussed and compared to experimental data from MAGPIE. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations indicate that this is the primary heating mechanism responsible for the interaction pulse recorded on the Z generator, which is required for pulse shaping for inertial confinement fusion.

Ampleford, D. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Sinars, D. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1106 (United States); Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Palmer, J. B. A.; Chittenden, J. P. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Bott, S. C. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Motorola report No. 2258/1. Technical quarterly report No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task, LCSSAP, is concerned with a comprehensive assessment of the improvements in existing technology that may be needed in order to develop, by 1985, an industrial capability for low cost, mass production of very durable silicon solar photovoltaic modules and arrays. Design criteria for efficient solar cells are discussed, emphasis being given to front metal surface pattern and texture etched front surfaces. A generalized processing matrix, containing competing methods for solar cell manufacturing steps, is outlined. The steps in this processing matrix are discussed and characterized according to immediate and potential usefulness. Representative steps have been chosen for empirical evaluation.

Coleman, M.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Characterization of a multi-axis ion chamber array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this work was to characterize a multi-axis ion chamber array (IC PROFILER; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL USA) that has the potential to simplify the acquisition of LINAC beam data. Methods: The IC PROFILER (or panel) measurement response was characterized with respect to radiation beam properties, including dose, dose per pulse, pulse rate frequency (PRF), and energy. Panel properties were also studied, including detector-calibration stability, power-on time, backscatter dependence, and the panel's agreement with water tank measurements [profiles, fractional depth dose (FDD), and output factors]. Results: The panel's relative deviation was typically within ({+-}) 1% of an independent (or nominal) response for all properties that were tested. Notable results were (a) a detectable relative field shape change of {approx}1% with linear accelerator PRF changes; (b) a large range in backscatter thickness had a minimal effect on the measured dose distribution (typically less than 1%); (c) the error spread in profile comparison between the panel and scanning water tank (Blue Phantom, CC13; IBA Schwarzenbruck, DE) was approximately ({+-}) 0.75%. Conclusions: The ability of the panel to accurately reproduce water tank profiles, FDDs, and output factors is an indication of its abilities as a dosimetry system. The benefits of using the panel versus a scanning water tank are less setup time and less error susceptibility. The same measurements (including device setup and breakdown) for both systems took 180 min with the water tank versus 30 min with the panel. The time-savings increase as the measurement load is increased.

Simon, Thomas A.; Kozelka, Jakub; Simon, William E.; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan; Liu, Chihray [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States) and Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States); Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Imaging the Coso geothermal area crustal structure with an array of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Imaging the Coso geothermal area crustal structure with an array of high-density mini-arrays Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Imaging the Coso geothermal area crustal structure with an array of high-density mini-arrays Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Advances in passive seismic data collecting and processing have produced higher resolution images of the crust and mantle than have been previously obtainable. The Earth is appearing to be more heterogeneous than was thought when only rougher scale observations were available. Here we

356

V-156: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users Gain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users 6: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-156: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges May 15, 2013 - 12:19am Addthis PROBLEM: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: Version(s): 2.6.37 to 3.8.9 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in the Linux Kernel. REFERENCE LINKS: Linux Kernel SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028565 CVE-2013-2094 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: On systems compiled with PERF_EVENTS support, a local user can supply a specially crafted perf_event_open() call to execute arbitrary code on the target system with root privileges. The vulnerability resides in the perf_swevent_init() function in 'kernel/events/core.c'.

357

Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal alteration and deep fluid sources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal alteration and deep fluid sources Authors Philip E. Wannamaker, William M. Doerner and Derrick P. Hasterok Conference proceedings, 32th workshop on geothermal reservoir Engineering, Stanford University; Stanford University; 2007 Published Publisher Not Provided, 2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Integrated dense array and transect MT surveying at dixie valley geothermal area, Nevada- structural controls, hydrothermal

358

V-009: Adobe Shockwave Player Buffer Overflows and Array Error Lets Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09: Adobe Shockwave Player Buffer Overflows and Array Error Lets 09: Adobe Shockwave Player Buffer Overflows and Array Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-009: Adobe Shockwave Player Buffer Overflows and Array Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code October 24, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe Shockwave Player Buffer Overflows and Array Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: Adobe Shockwave Player 11.6.7.637 and earlier versions for Windows and Macintosh ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in Adobe Shockwave. REFERENCE LINKS: Adobe Security bulletin SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027692 CVE-2012-4172 CVE-2012-4173 CVE-2012-4174 CVE-2012-4175 CVE-2012-4176 CVE-2012-5273 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A remote user can create specially crafted content that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a buffer overflow and execute arbitrary code on

359

Multi-array borehole resistivity and induced polarization method with mathematical inversion of redundant data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple arrays of electric or magnetic transmitters and receivers are used in a borehole geophysical procedure to obtain a multiplicity of redundant data suitable for processing into a resistivity or induced polarization model of a subsurface region of the earth.

Ward, Stanley H. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The application of taylor weighting, digital phase shifters, and digital attenuators to phased-array antennas.  

SciTech Connect

Application of Taylor weighting (taper) to an antenna aperture can achieve low peak sidelobes, but combining the Taylor weighting with quantized attenuators and phase shifters at each radiating element will impact the performance of a phased-array antenna. An examination of array performance is undertaken from the simple point of view of the characteristics of the array factor. Design rules and guidelines for determining the Taylor-weighting parameters, the number of bits required for the digital phase shifter, and the dynamic range and number of bits required for the digital attenuator are developed. For a radar application, when each element is fed directly from a transmit/receive module, the total power radiated by the array will be reduced as a result of the taper. Consequently, the issue of whether to apply the taper on both transmit and receive configurations, or only on the receive configuration is examined with respect to two-way sidelobe performance.

Brock, Billy C.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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361

The Performance of the Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking In-Beam Nuclear Array GRETINA  

SciTech Connect

The Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking In-beam Nuclear Array (GRETINA) is a new generation high-resolution -ray spectrometer consisting of electrically segmented high-purity germanium crystals. GRETINA is capable of reconstructing the energy and position of each -ray interaction point inside the crystal with high resolution. This enables -ray energy tracking which in turn provides an array with large photopeak efficiency, high resolution and good peak-to-total ratio. GRETINA is used for nuclear structure studies with demanding -ray detection requirements and it is suitable for experiments with radioactive-ion beams with high recoil velocities. The GRETINA array has a 1 solid angle coverage and constitutes the first stage towards the full 4 array GRETA. We present in this paper the main parts and the performance of the GRETINA system.

Paschalis, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Lee, I. Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Macchiavelli, A. O. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Campbell, C. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, The Scripps Research Institite and The Skaggs Institute; Cromaz, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gros, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Pavin, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Qian, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Clark, R. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Crawford, H. L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Doering, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Fallon, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Lionberger, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Loew, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Petri, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Stezelberger, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Zimmerman, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Radford, David C [ORNL; Lagergren, Karin B [ORNL; Weisshaar, D. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Winkler, R. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Glasmacher, T. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Anderson, J. T, [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Beausang, C. W. [University of Richmond

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

An Optical Array Instrument for Shape and Fall Velocity Measurements of Hydrometeors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ground-based optical array instrument for the measurement of shapes, sizes, and fall velocities of freely falling hydrometeors is presented. The instrument, the Hydrometeor Velocity and Shape Detector (HVSD), is designed to accurately measure ...

E. Barthazy; S. Gke; R. Schefold; D. Hgl

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays at TJNAF| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays at TJNAF Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays at TJNAF Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Detectors for Nuclear Physics and Biological Systems Imaging based on Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays Developed at: Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

364

Diverse Array of Career Resources Help EM Contractor Employees Find New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diverse Array of Career Resources Help EM Contractor Employees Find Diverse Array of Career Resources Help EM Contractor Employees Find New Work Diverse Array of Career Resources Help EM Contractor Employees Find New Work More than 1,640 former Office of Environmental Management (EM) contractor employees have received career and outplacement assistance through a program launched by EM early last year. Under a contract with EM, Professional Services of America, Inc. (PSA) operates the Contractor Transition Service Program. Its services are available to contractor employees across the EM complex, including those who worked in the $6 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program, which largely came to a close in September 2011. Diverse Array of Career Resources Help EM Contractor Employees Find New Work More Documents & Publications

365

TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENTS FOR PV MODULES AND ARRAYS: MEASUREMENT METHODS, DIFFICULTIES, AND RESULTS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENTS FOR PV MODULES AND ARRAYS: TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENTS FOR PV MODULES AND ARRAYS: MEASUREMENT METHODS, DIFFICULTIES, AND RESULTS David L. King, Jay A. Kratochvil, and William E. Boyson Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 0 ABSTRACT The term "temperature coefficient" has been applied to several different photovoltaic performance parameters, including voltage, current, and power. The procedures for measuring the coefficient(s) for modules and arrays are not yet standardized, and systematic influences are common in the test methods used to measure them. There are also misconceptions regarding their application. Yet, temperature coefficients, however obtained, play an important role in PV system design and sizing, where often the worst case operating condition dictates the array

366

DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dipole Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Dipole Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) Activity Date 1977 Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Detailed electrical resistivity survey for a 54 line-km. This survey has defined a bedrock resistivity low at least 4 sq mi (10 sq km) in extent; survey data indicate that a 10 to 20 ohm-meter zone extends from near surface to a depth greater than 750 meters. References Fox, R. C. (1 May 1978) Dipole-dipole resistivity survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo County, California

367

LES Analysis of the Aerodynamic Surface Properties for Turbulent Flows over Building Arrays with Various Geometries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes aerodynamic roughness properties for turbulent flows over various building arrays that represent realistic urban surface geometries. First, building morphological characteristics such as roughness density ?f and building ...

Hiromasa Nakayama; Tetsuya Takemi; Haruyasu Nagai

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Multifunction Phased-Array Radar: Time Balance Scheduler for Adaptive Weather Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phased-array radars (PARs) have the capability of instantaneously and dynamically controlling beam position on a pulse-by-pulse basis, which allows a single radar to perform multiple functions, such as tracking multiple storms or weather and ...

Ricardo Reinoso-Rondinel; Tian-You Yu; Sebastin Torres

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Characterizing (rating) the performance of large photovoltaic arrays for all operating conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new method has been developed for characterizing the electrical performance of photovoltaic arrays. The method provides both a ``rating`` at standard reporting conditions and a rigorous yet straightforward model for predicting array performance at all operating conditions. For the first time, the performance model handles the influences of irradiance, module temperature, solar spectrum, solar angle-of-incidence, and temperature coefficients, in a practical way. Validity of the procedure was confirmed during field testing of a 25-kW array recently installed by Arizona Public Service Co. on Carol Spring Mountain (which powers microwave, ceullular phone, and TV communictions equipment). This paper describes the characterization procedure, measured array performance, and the predictive model.

King, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eckert, P.E. [Arizona Public Service Co., Phoenix, AZ (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

High-Temporal-Resolution Capabilities of the National Weather Radar Testbed Phased-Array Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2007 the advancement of the National Weather Radar Testbed Phased-Array Radar (NWRT PAR) hardware and software capabilities has been supporting the implementation of high-temporal-resolution (1 min) sampling. To achieve the increase in ...

Pamela L. Heinselman; Sebastin M. Torres

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Sparsely faceted arrays : a mechanism supporting the parallel allocation, communication, and garbage collection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional parallel computer architectures do not provide support for non-uniformly distributed objects. In this thesis, I introduce sparsely faceted arrays (SFAs), a new low-level mechanism for naming regions of memory, ...

Brown, Jeremy Hanford, 1972-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Sparsely Faceted Arrays: A Mechanism Supporting Parallel Allocation, Communication, and Garbage Collection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional parallel computer architectures do not provide support for non-uniformly distributed objects. In this thesis, I introduce sparsely faceted arrays (SFAs), a new low-level mechanism for naming regions of memory, ...

Brown, Jeremy Hanford

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Comprehensive analysis of radiative properties of brass and Al arranged in nested cylindrical wire arrays.  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results of nested cylindrical wire arrays (NCWA) consisting of brass (70% Cu and 30% Zn) wires on one array and Al (5056, 5% Mg) wires on the other array performed on the UNR Zebra generator at 1.0 MA current are compared and analyzed. Specifically, radiative properties of K-shell Al and Mg ions and L-shell Cu and Zn ions are compared as functions of the placements of the brass and Al wires on the inner and outer arrays. A full diagnostic set which included more than ten different beam-lines was implemented. Identical loads were fielded to allow the timing of time-gated pinhole and x-ray spectrometers to be shifted to get a more complete understanding of the evolution of plasma parameters over the x-ray pulse. The importance of the study of NCWAs with different wire materials is discussed.

Stafford, A. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Keim, S. F. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Osborne, Glenn C. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Esaulov, Andrey A. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Shrestha, I. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Shlyaptseva, V. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Coverdale, Christine Anne; Williamson, K. M. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Ouart, Nicholas D. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Safronova, Alla S. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Weller, M. E. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

An In Situ Technique for Intercalibrating Temperature or Conductivity Sensors on Towed Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical arrays of temperature and conductivity sensors are towed from research vessels to obtain cross sections of the ocean's internal structure that result from the dynamic finescale and microscale processes. To estimate local water ...

B. W. Stalcup; J. P. Dugan

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Probability Distribution of Wind Power From a Dispersed Array of Wind Turbine Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for estimating the probability distribution of wind power from a dispersed array of wind turbine sites where the correlation between wind speeds at distinct sites is less than unity. The distribution is obtained from a model ...

John Carlin; John Haslett

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Defect-aware logic mapping for nanowire-based programmable logic arrays via satisfiability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programmable logic arrays (PLAs) using self-assembly nanowire crossbars have shown promising potential for future nano-scale circuit design. However, due to the density and size factors of nanowires and molecular switches, the fabrication fault densities ...

Yexin Zheng; Chao Huang

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Wavelength beam combining of quantum cascade laser arrays for remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wavelength beam combining was used to co-propagate beams from 28 elements in a linear array of distributedfeedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCLs). The overlap of the beams in the far-field is improved using wavelength ...

Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio

378

Electronically controllable transmission line design for traveling wave array antenna feed network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, an electronically controllable transmission line (ECTL) is presented. By modulating the conductivity of a doped Si modulator in the ECTL, the wave propagation constant in the ECTL is controlled. Measured results show a phase change in the ECTL at a single frequency when non-zero bias voltage is applied. This ECTL is implemented in order to feed a traveling wave array antenna, which is composed of 8 aperture-coupled microstrip antenna elements. It is demonstrated that phase change in an ECTL feed line has applications as a traveling wave array antenna with beam steering. S-parameter measurements are presented which demonstrate phase change in an ECTL and main beam steering of an 8-element traveling wave array antenna. The design procedure for an aperture-coupled microstrip antenna with a specific input impedance at the resonant frequency and a matching circuit design for a traveling wave array antenna are discussed in detail.

Shin, Chang-Seok

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Simplified Active Array L-Band Radar for Atmospheric Wind Profiling: Initial Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple approach is presented to implement an active aperture radar with a constrained beam-forming network that is adequate enough to generate multiple beams for atmospheric wind profiling. In this approach, elements of the antenna array are fed ...

P. Srinivasulu; P. Yasodha; A. Jayaraman; S. N. Reddy; S. Satyanarayana

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Coastal trapped waves in the East China Sea observed by a mooring array in winter 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using five mooring array observations in the coastal water of the East China Sea (ECS) in winter 2006, we identify three kinds of low-frequency waves using the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) method. The analysis indicates that the ...

Liping Yin; Fangli Qiao; Quanan Zheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Photovoltaic module and array performance characterization methods for all system operating conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides new test methods and analytical procedures for characterizing the electrical performance of photovoltaic modules and arrays. The methods use outdoor measurements to provide performance parameters both at standard reporting conditions and for all operating conditions encountered by typical photovoltaic systems. Improvements over previously used test methods are identified, and examples of the successful application of the methodology are provided for crystalline- and amorphous-silicon modules and arrays. This work provides an improved understanding of module and array performance characteristics, and perhaps most importantly, a straight- forward yet rigorous model for predicting array performance at all operating conditions. For the first time, the influences of solar irradiance, operating temperature, solar spectrum, solar angle-of- incidence, and temperature coefficients are all addressed in a practical way that will benefit both designers and users of photovoltaics.

King, D.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Continuous, Array-Based Estimates of Atlantic Ocean Heat Transport at 26.5N  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous estimates of the oceanic meridional heat transport in the Atlantic are derived from the Rapid Climate ChangeMeridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) and Heatflux Array (RAPIDMOCHA) observing system deployed along 26.5N, for the ...

W. E. Johns; M. O. Baringer; L. M. Beal; S. A. Cunningham; T. Kanzow; H. L. Bryden; J. J. M. Hirschi; J. Marotzke; C. S. Meinen; B. Shaw; R. Curry

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Testing and Performance of Two-Dimensional Optical Array Spectrometers with Greyscale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two laboratory optical array spectrometers with greyscale were evaluated for their sizing, depth of field and timing performance; these three factors are necessary to calculate concentrations and liquid water contents. The probes were of 10 and ...

Paul Joe; Roland List

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

First Results of Experimental Tests of the Newly Developed NARL Phased-Array Doppler Sodar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multifrequency phased-array Doppler sodar system has been installed recently at the National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL) for the continuous observation of the lower atmosphere from near ground to the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). ...

V. K. Anandan; M. Shravan Kumar; I. Srinivasa Rao

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Block-Oriented Language and Runtime System for Tensor Algebra with Very Large Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Important classes of problems in computational chemistry, notably coupled cluster methods, consist of solutions to complicated expressions defined in terms of tensors. Tensors are represented by multidimensional arrays that are typically extremely large, ...

Beverly A. Sanders; Rod Bartlett; Erik Deumens; Victor Lotrich; Mark Ponton

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5x10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

Wang Sigen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Calderon, Xiomara; Peng Rui [Curriculum of Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Schreiber, Eric C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum of Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Total Lightning Observations with the New and Improved Los Alamos Sferic Array (LASA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1998, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has deployed an array of fast electric field change sensors in New Mexico and Florida in support of LANLs satellite lightning observations. In April 2004, all the sensors were significantly ...

Xuan-Min Shao; Mark Stanley; Amy Regan; Jeremiah Harlin; Morrie Pongratz; Michael Stock

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

An Observing System Simulation Experiment for an Optimal Moored Instrument Array in the Tropical Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are used to study the design of a proposed array of instrumented moorings in the Indian Ocean (IO) outlined by the IO panel of the Climate Variability and Predictability (...

Joaquim Ballabrera-Poy; Eric Hackert; Raghu Murtugudde; Antonio J. Busalacchi

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Program on Technology Innovation: Giant Magnetoresistive Array-Based Eddy Current System for Tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update summarizes the project activities involving the fabrication and testing of an array-based giant magnetoresistive (GMR) eddy current probe and the associated instrument for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of tubing flaws.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Model-Based Assessment and Design of a Tropical Indian Ocean Mooring Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are performed for the tropical Indian Ocean (15 from the equator) using a simple analysis system. The analysis system projects an array of observations onto the dominant empirical ...

Peter R. Oke; Andreas Schiller

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Simulated Vortex Detection Using a Four-Face Phased-Array Doppler Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Weather Radar Testbed was established in Norman, Oklahoma, in 2002 to evaluate, in part, the feasibility of eventually replacing mechanically scanned parabolic antennas with electronically scanned phased-array antennas on weather ...

Rodger A. Brown; Vincent T. Wood

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Test of a Phased Array Sodar by Intercomparison with Tower Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phased array sodar PA2 recently manufactured by the French REMTECH enterprise was tested using tower data for comparison. Wind speed, wind direction, and the standard deviation of the horizontal wind direction (??) were measured continuously ...

S. Vogt; P. Thomas

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

'Optical' soft x-ray arrays for fluctuation diagnostics in magnetic fusion energy experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are developing large pixel count, fast ({>=}100 kHz) and continuously sampling soft x-ray (SXR) array for the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and turbulent fluctuations in magnetic fusion energy plasmas. The arrays are based on efficient scintillators, high thoughput multiclad fiber optics, and multichannel light amplification and integration. Compared to conventional x-ray diode arrays, such systems can provide vastly increased spatial coverage, and access to difficult locations with small neutron noise and damage. An eight-channel array has been built using columnar CsI:Tl as an SXR converter and a multianode photomultiplier tube as photoamplifier. The overall system efficiency is measured using laboratory SXR sources, while the time response and signal-to-noise performance have been evaluated by recording MHD activity from the spherical tori (ST) Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade and National Spherical Torus Experiment, both at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

Delgado-Aparicio, L.F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.; Johnson, D.; Majeski, R. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Plasma Spectroscopy Group, Bloomberg Center 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA): VHF Source Retrieval Algorithm and Error Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two approaches are used to characterize how accurately the north Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is able to locate lightning VHF sources in space and time. The first method uses a Monte Carlo computer simulation to estimate source retrieval ...

W. J. Koshak; R. J. Solakiewicz; R. J. Blakeslee; S. J. Goodman; H. J. Christian; J. M. Hall; J. C. Bailey; E. P. Krider; M. G. Bateman; D. J. Boccippio; D. M. Mach; E. W. McCaul; M. F. Stewart; D. E. Buechler; W. A. Petersen; D. J. Cecil

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NPS-SCAT electrical power system ; Naval Postgraduate School Solar Cell Array Tester .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Naval Postgraduate School Solar Cell Array Tester (NPS-SCAT) seeks to expand the CubeSat knowledge base and provide learning possibilities at the Naval Postgraduate School. (more)

Dorn, Lawrence Tyrone.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Design ofWindow Comparators for Integrator-Based Capacitor Array Testing Circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the impact of window comparator threshold variations on the performance of integratorbased programmable capacitor array (PCA) testing circuits. It presents two window comparator designs that take different approaches to address ...

Amit Laknaur; Haibo Wang

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Observations of Large-Amplitude Nonlinear Internal Waves from a Drifting Array: Instruments and Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel methodology applied to the observation of large-amplitude nonlinear internal waves in the upper ocean from an array of drifting instruments. The characteristics of the instrument usedan Autonomous Drifting Ocean ...

L. R. Centurioni

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Multiplexing, scheduling, and multicasting strategies for antenna arrays in wireless networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A transmitter antenna array has the ability to direct data simultaneously to multiple receivers within a wireless network, creating potential for a more integrated view of algorithmic system components. In this thesis, ...

Lopez, Michael J. (Michael John), 1972-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A fully microfabricated two-dimensional electrospray array with applications to space propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the design, fabrication and testing of a fully-integrated planar electrospray thruster array, which could lead to more efficient and precise thrusters for space propulsion applications. The same ...

Gassend, Blaise L. P. (Blaise Laurent Patrick), 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Radial electric field 3D modeling for wire arrays driving dynamic hohlraums on Z.  

SciTech Connect

The anode-cathode structure of the Z-machine wire array results in a higher negative radial electric field (Er) on the wires near the cathode relative to the anode. The magnitude of this field has been shown to anti-correlate with the axial radiation top/bottom symmetry in the DH (Dynamic Hohlraum). Using 3D modeling, the structure of this field is revealed for different wire-array configurations and for progressive mechanical alterations, providing insight for minimizing the negative Er on the wire array in the anode-to-cathode region of the DH. Also, the 3D model is compared to Sasorov's approximation, which describes Er at the surface of the wire in terms of wire-array parameters.

Mock, Raymond Cecil

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Spatiotemporal and geometric optimization of sensor arrays for detecting analytes in fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensor arrays and sensor array systems for detecting analytes in fluids. Sensors configured to generate a response upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more analytes can be located on one or more surfaces relative to one or more fluid channels in an array. Fluid channels can take the form of pores or holes in a substrate material. Fluid channels can be formed between one or more substrate plates. Sensor can be fabricated with substantially optimized sensor volumes to generate a response having a substantially maximized signal to noise ratio upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more target analytes. Methods of fabricating and using such sensor arrays and systems are also disclosed.

Lewis, Nathan S. (La Canada, CA); Freund, Michael S. (Winnipeg, CA); Briglin, Shawn S. (Chittenango, NY); Tokumaru, Phillip (Moorpark, CA); Martin, Charles R. (Gainesville, FL); Mitchell, David (Newtown, PA)

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Microfabricated Planar Electrospray Array Ionic Liquid Ion Source With Integrated Extractor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of a fully microfabricated planar array of externally fed electrospray emitters that produces heavy molecular ions from the ionic liquids ...

Gassend, Blaise

403

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project quarterly report-2, July 1976--September 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LCSSAP) was established in January 1975. The project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance objectives include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-three contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 42 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; contracts have been issued and design development has begun for 130 kW of moderately advanced modules. Efforts of the LCSSA Project are organized into an Analysis and Integration Task, four Technology Development Tasks--covering the areas of Silicon Material, Large Area Silicon Sheet, Encapsulation, and Automated Array Assembly--and a Large Scale Procurement Task, an Engineering Task, and an Operations Task. Research findings are discussed, and project planning is outlined.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project quarterly report-2, July 1976--September 1976  

SciTech Connect

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LCSSAP) was established in January 1975. The project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance objectives include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-three contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 42 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; contracts have been issued and design development has begun for 130 kW of moderately advanced modules. Efforts of the LCSSA Project are organized into an Analysis and Integration Task, four Technology Development Tasks--covering the areas of Silicon Material, Large Area Silicon Sheet, Encapsulation, and Automated Array Assembly--and a Large Scale Procurement Task, an Engineering Task, and an Operations Task. Research findings are discussed, and project planning is outlined.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Microtrap arrays on magnetic film atom chips for quantum information science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present two different strategies for developing a quantum information science platform, based on our experimental results with magnetic microtrap arrays on a magnetic-film atom chip. The first strategy aims for mesoscopic ensemble qubits in a lattice ... Keywords: Atom chip, FePt magnetic film, Lattice, Magnetic potential, Mesoscopic ensemble qubit, Microscale array, Microtrap, Nanofabrication, Quantum information, Quantum simulator, Rydberg gate, Shift register, Single atom detection, Single site addressing, Sub-optical

V. Y. Leung; A. Tauschinsky; N. J. Druten; R. J. Spreeuw

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Nanophotonic production, modulation and switching of ions by silicon microcolumn arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The production and use of silicon microcolumn arrays that harvest light from a laser pulse to produce ions are described. The systems of the present invention seem to behave like a quasi-periodic antenna array with ion yields that show profound dependence on the plane of laser light polarization and the angle of incidence. By providing photonic ion sources, this enables enhanced control of ion production on a micro/nano scale and direct integration with miniaturized analytical devices.

Vertes, Akos; Walker, Bennett N.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

Nanophotonic production, modulation and switching of ions by silicon microcolumn arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production and use of silicon microcolumn arrays that harvest light from a laser pulse to produce ions are described. The systems of the present invention seem to behave like a quasi-periodic antenna array with ion yields that show profound dependence on the plane of laser light polarization and the angle of incidence. By providing photonic ion sources, this enables enhanced control of ion production on a micro/nano scale and direct integration with miniaturized analytical devices.

Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Walker, Bennett N. (Washington, DC)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

408

Analogue Hawking Radiation in a dc-SQUID Array Transmission Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose the use of a superconducting waveguide formed from an array of dc-SQUID's for investigating analogue Hawking radiation. Biasing the array with a space-time varying flux modifies the propagation velocity of the waveguide, leading to an effective metric with an horizon. Being a fundamentally quantum mechanical device, this setup allows for investigations of quantum effects such as back-reaction and analogue space-time fluctuations on the Hawking process.

P. D. Nation; M. P. Blencowe; A. J. Rimberg; E. Buks

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

Real-time scintillation array dosimetry for radiotherapy: The advantages of photomultiplier detectors  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In this paper, a photomultiplier tube (PMT) array dosimetry system has been developed and tested for the real-time readout of multiple scintillation signals from fiber optic dosimeters. It provides array dosimetry with the advantages in sensitivity provided by a PMT, but without the need for a separate PMT for each detector element. Methods: The PMT array system consisted of a multianode PMT, a multichannel data acquisition system, housing and optic fiber connections suitable for clinical use. The reproducibility, channel uniformity, channel crosstalk, acquisition speed, and sensitivity of the PMT array were quantified using a constant light source. Its performance was compared to other readout systems used in scintillation dosimetry. An in vivo HDR brachytherapy treatment was used as an example of a clinical application of the dosimetry system to the measurement of dose at multiple sites in the rectum. The PMT array system was also tested in the pulsed beam of a linear accelerator to test its response speed and its application with two separate methods of Cerenkov background removal. Results: The PMT array dosimetry system was highly reproducible with a measurement uncertainty of 0.13% for a 10 s acquisition period. Optical crosstalk between neighboring channels was accounted for by omitting every second channel. A mathematical procedure was used to account for the crosstalk in next-neighbor channels. The speed and sensitivity of the PMT array system were found be superior to CCD cameras, allowing for measurement of more rapid changes in dose rate. This was further demonstrated by measuring the dose delivered by individual photon pulses of a linear accelerator beam. Conclusions: The PMT array system has advantages over CCD camera-based systems for the readout of scintillation light. It provided a more sensitive, more accurate, and faster response to meet the demands of future developments in treatment delivery.

Liu, Paul Z. Y.; Suchowerska, Natalka; Abolfathi, Peter; McKenzie, David R. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system (100) is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files (104) to design and/or generate lithographic masks (110).

Hubbell, Earl A. (Mt. View, CA); Morris, MacDonald S. (San Jose, CA); Winkler, James L. (Palo Alto, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system (100) is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files (104) to design and/or generate lithographic masks (110).

Hubbell, Earl A. (Mt. View, CA); Morris, MacDonald S. (San Jose, CA); Winkler, James L. (Palo Alto, CA)

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

412

Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

Hubbell, E.A.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

413

Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

Hubbell, E.A.; Lipshutz, R.J.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

Hubbell, E.A.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

1996-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

415

Dielectrophoresis device and method having non-uniform arrays for manipulating particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microfluidic devices according to embodiments of the present invention include an inlet port, an outlet port, and a channel or chamber having a non-uniform array of insulating features on one or more surfaces. Electrodes are provided for generation of a spatially non-uniform electric field across the array. A voltage source, which may be an A.C. and/or a D.C. voltage source may be coupled to the electrodes for the generation of the electric field.

Cummings, Eric B. (Livermore, CA); Fintschenko, Yolanda (Livermore, CA); Simmons, Blake (San Francisco, CA)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

416

Nellis Air Force Base solar array provides model for renewable projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nellis Air Force Base solar array provides model for renewable Nellis Air Force Base solar array provides model for renewable projects Nellis Air Force Base solar array provides model for renewable projects March 24, 2010 - 4:58pm Addthis The solar array at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada consists of 70,000 panels. | Photo by Larry E. Reid Jr./U.S. Air Force The solar array at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada consists of 70,000 panels. | Photo by Larry E. Reid Jr./U.S. Air Force A public-private partnership has helped one Air Force base reduce its energy costs and convert to 25 percent renewable energy. Nellis Air Force Base, just north of Las Vegas, took a big step in 2007 when it installed a 14.2-megawatt, 70,000-panel photovoltaic solar array that reduced carbon dioxide emissions by 24,000 tons a year. Built partly on a landfill, the

417

Triggering GaAs lock-on switches with laser diode arrays  

SciTech Connect

Laser diode arrays have been used to trigger GaAs Photoconducting Semiconductor Switches (PCSS) charged to voltages of up to 60 kV and conducting currents of 580 A. The driving forces behind the use of laser diode arrays are compactness, elimination of complicated optics, and the ability to run at high repetition rates. Laser diode arrays are compactness, elimination of complicated optics, and the ability to run at high repetition rates. Laser diode arrays can trigger GaAs at high fields as the result of a new switching mode (lock-on) with very high carrier number gain. We have achieved switching of up to 10 MW in a 60 {Omega} system, with a pulse rise time of 500 ps. At 1.2 MW we have achieved repetition rates of 1 kHz with switch rise time of 500 ps for 10{sup 5} shots. The laser diode array used for these experiments delivers a 166 W pulse. In a single shot mode we have switched 4 kA with a flash lamp pumped laser and 600 A with the 166 W array. 7 refs., 5 figs.

Loubriel, G.M.; Buttram, M.T.; Helgeson, W.D.; McLaughlin, D.L.; O'Malley, M.W.; Zutavern, F.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Rosen, A.; Stabile, P.J. (David Sarnoff Research Center, Princeton, NJ (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Increase Jc by Improving the Array of Nb3Sn strands for Fusion Application  

SciTech Connect

During Phase I, our efforts were focusing on improving the array of subelement in the tube type strands by hardening the Sn core and the subelement matrix to effectively increase the Jc of the strands. Below is a summary of the results. 1) We were unsuccessful in improving the array using a Cu-Sn matrix approach. 2) We slightly improved the array using Sn with 1.5at%Ti doped core, and a 217-subelement restacked strand was made and drawn down without any breakage. 3) We greatly improved the array using the Glidcop Al-15 to replace the pure Cu sheath in the subelement, and a 217-subelement restacked strand was made and drawn down. Both strands have very good drawability and the array showed good improvement. 4) We also improved the array using improved wire drawing techniques using Hyper Tech?¢????s new caterpillar wire drawing machines to enable straight wire drawing for the entire wire drawing process. 5) The 919-subelement restack strand shows its non-Cu Jc over 2100 A/mm2 at 12 T/4.2 K and AC loss of 508 mJ/cm3.

Dr. Xuan Peng

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

419

Polyethylene-Reflected Arrays of HEU(93.2) Metal Units Separated by Vermiculite  

SciTech Connect

This benchmark details the results of an experiment performed in the early 1970s as part of a series testing critical configurations in three dimensional arrays. For this experiment, cylinders of 93.2% enriched uranium metal were arranged in a 2x2x2 array inside of a polyethylene reflector. Layers of vermiculite of varying heights were surrounding each cylinder to achieve criticality variations. A total of four experimental configurations were tested by D.W. Magnuson, and detailed in his experimental report Critical Three-Dimensional Arrays of Neutron Interacting Units: Part IV. Arrays of U(93.2) Metal Reflected by Concrete and Arrays Separated by Vermiculite and Reflected by Polyethylene. The benchmark HEU-MET-FAST054 is closely related; the results of both experiments are discussed in the same report (Ref. 1) Closely related work has been recorded in HEU-MET-FAST-053, which is a benchmark evaluation of a different series of three dimensional array experiments with four different moderator materials. HEU-MET-FAST-023 and HEU-MET-FAST-026 are also related because they utilize the same metal cylinders as these experiments.

Mackenzie Gorham; J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Virginia Dean; Davis Reed

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Simplified design guide for estimating photovoltaic flat array and system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Simplified, non-computer based methods are presented for predicting photovoltaic array and system performance. The array performance prediction methods are useful for calculating the potential output of passively cooled, flat, south facing max-power tracked arrays. A solar/weather data base for 97 different US and US affiliated stations is provided to aid in these calculations. Also, performance estimates can be made for photovoltaic systems (array, battery, power conditioner) that are backed-up by non-solar reserves capable of meeting the load when the solar system cannot. Such estimates can be made for a total of 41 different sinusoidal, unimodal, and bimodal diurnal load profiles from appropriate graphs included. These allow easy determination of the fraction of the load met by the solar photovoltaic system as a function of array size and (dedicated) battery storage capacity. These performance graphs may also be used for systems without battery storage. Use of array manufacturer's specification sheet data is discussed. Step-by-step procedures, along with suggested worksheets, are provided for carrying out the necessary calculations.

Evans, D.L.; Facinelli, W.A.; Koehler, L.P.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Apparatus and method for imaging metallic objects using an array of giant magnetoresistive sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable, low-power, metallic object detector and method for providing an image of a detected metallic object. In one embodiment, the present portable low-power metallic object detector an array of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors. The array of GMR sensors is adapted for detecting the presence of and compiling image data of a metallic object. In the embodiment, the array of GMR sensors is arranged in a checkerboard configuration such that axes of sensitivity of alternate GMR sensors are orthogonally oriented. An electronics portion is coupled to the array of GMR sensors. The electronics portion is adapted to receive and process the image data of the metallic object compiled by the array of GMR sensors. The embodiment also includes a display unit which is coupled to the electronics portion. The display unit is adapted to display a graphical representation of the metallic object detected by the array of GMR sensors. In so doing, a graphical representation of the detected metallic object is provided.

Chaiken, Alison (Fremont, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly report 3, October 1976--December 1976  

SciTech Connect

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LSSA) was established in January 1975. The activities and progress of the LSSA Project during the months of October, November, and December 1976 are described. The Project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance goals include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-seven contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 58 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; design development is under way for a second block of moderately advanced modules, and planning for subsequent module procurements has begun.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly report 3, October 1976--December 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LSSA) was established in January 1975. The activities and progress of the LSSA Project during the months of October, November, and December 1976 are described. The Project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance goals include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-seven contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 58 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; design development is under way for a second block of moderately advanced modules, and planning for subsequent module procurements has begun.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

SURVEYING THE DYNAMIC RADIO SKY WITH THE LONG WAVELENGTH DEMONSTRATOR ARRAY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a search for radio transients at a frequency of 73.8 MHz (4 m wavelength) using the all-sky imaging capabilities of the Long Wavelength Demonstrator Array (LWDA). The LWDA was a 16-dipole phased array telescope, located on the site of the Very Large Array in New Mexico. The field of view of the individual dipoles was essentially the entire sky, and the number of dipoles was sufficiently small that a simple software correlator could be used to make all-sky images. From 2006 October to 2007 February, we conducted an all-sky transient search program, acquiring a total of 106 hr of data; the time sampling varied, being 5 minutes at the start of the program and improving to 2 minutes by the end of the program. We were able to detect solar flares, and in a special-purpose mode, radio reflections from ionized meteor trails during the 2006 Leonid meteor shower. We detected no transients originating outside of the solar system above a flux density limit of 500 Jy, equivalent to a limit of no more than about 10{sup -2} events yr{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, having a pulse energy density {approx}>1.5 x 10{sup -20} J m{sup -2} Hz{sup -1} at 73.8 MHz for pulse widths of about 300 s. This event rate is comparable to that determined from previous all-sky transient searches, but at a lower frequency than most previous all-sky searches. We believe that the LWDA illustrates how an all-sky imaging mode could be a useful operational model for low-frequency instruments such as the Low Frequency Array, the Long Wavelength Array station, the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array, and potentially the Lunar Radio Array.

Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Lane, W. M.; Gross, C.; Kassim, N. E.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Stewart, K. [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ray, P. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20375-5382 (United States); Wood, D. [Praxis, Inc., 5845 Richmond Highway, Suite 700, Alexandria, VA 22303 (United States); York, J. A.; Kerkhoff, A. [Applied Research Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, P.O. Box 8029, Austin, TX 78713-8029 (United States); Dalal, N. Paravastu [American Society for Engineering Education, Washington, DC 20036 (United States); Cohen, A. S. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Erickson, W. C., E-mail: Joseph.Lazio@jpl.nasa.go [School of Mathematics and Science, University of Tasmania, Churchill Ave., Sandy Bay, Tasmania 7005 (Australia)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Monte Carlo simulation of radiation heat transfer in arrays of fixed discrete surfaces using cell-to-cell photon transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radiation heat transfer in an array of fixed discrete surfaces is an important problem that is particularly difficult to analyze because of the nonhomogeneous and anisotropic optical properties involved. This article presents an efficient Monte Carlo method for evaluating radiation heat transfer in arrays of fixed discrete surfaces. This Monte Carlo model has been optimized to take advantage of the regular arrangement of surfaces often encountered in these arrays. Monte Carlo model predictions have been compared with analytical and experimental results.

Drost, M.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Welty, J.R. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium (UMBC) provides an integrated array of high performance computing and communications products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance computing and communications products and related services to their users, including The University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium (UMBC) provides an integrated array of high

Glaser, Rainer

427

Matrix-addressable III-nitride light emitting diode arrays on silicon substrates by flip-chip technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xiv, 81 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis ECED 2007 Keung Matrix-addressable light emitting diode (LED) micro-arrays on sapphire substrates have (more)

Keung, Chi Wing

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

November 27 Webinar to Feature Broad Array of Tribal Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 27 Webinar to Feature Broad Array of Tribal Energy November 27 Webinar to Feature Broad Array of Tribal Energy Development Resources November 27 Webinar to Feature Broad Array of Tribal Energy Development Resources November 20, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy, the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) Tribal Energy Program, and the Western Area Power Administration (Western) will present the next Tribal Renewable Energy Series webinar, Resources Available for Tribal Energy Project Development, on Wednesday, November 27, 2013. "There is a growing body of knowledge that DOE is has worked diligently to document and make available to Tribes who are looking to move their energy projects forward," said DOE Office of Indian Energy Acting

429

Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2011 Environ. Res. Lett. 6 034001 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/6/3/034001) Download details: IP Address: 98.204.49.123 The article was downloaded on 01/07/2011 at 12:38 Please note that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 6 (2011) 034001 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/6/3/034001 Regional climate consequences of large-scale cool roof and photovoltaic array deployment Dev Millstein and Surabi Menon Lawrence

430

Experimental study of double-{beta} decay modes using a CdZnTe detector array  

SciTech Connect

An array of sixteen 1 cm{sup 3} CdZnTe semiconductor detectors was operated at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS) to further investigate the feasibility of double-{beta} decay searches with such devices. As one of the double-{beta} decay experiments with the highest granularity the 4x4 array accumulated an overall exposure of 18 kg days. The setup and performance of the array is described. Half-life limits for various double-{beta} decay modes of Cd, Zn, and Te isotopes are obtained. No signal has been found, but several limits beyond 10{sup 20} years have been performed. They are an order of magnitude better than those obtained with this technology before and comparable to most other experimental approaches for the isotopes under investigation. An improved limit for the {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of {sup 120}Te is given.

Dawson, J. V. [Laboratoire Astroparticule et Cosmologie, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris (France); Goessling, C.; Koettig, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Rajek, S.; Schulz, O. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Physik IV, Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn Str. 4, D-44227 Dortmund (Germany); Janutta, B.; Zuber, K. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Zellescher Weg 19, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Junker, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Reeve, C. [University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Wilson, J. R. [University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Television interference measurements near the MOD-2 WT array at Goodnoe Hills, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electromagnetic interference to television reception caused by the MOD-2 wind turbine (WT) array at Goodnoe Hills, Washington, was studied by means of detailed measurements at a number of test sites in the vicinity of the WT array. The commercial television signals available in the area were used as the radio frequency sources during the measurements. The dynamic measurements indicated that varying amounts of TVI were produced at all sites and on some or all of the available TV channels; with the directional antenna in use, most of the backward region interference produced video distortion that was judged to be acceptable; at one test location about 1-1/2 miles from the WT array site, forward region interference was observed; when the blades of the WTs rotate in synchronism, they tend to increase the amplitude of the interference pulses, thereby producing more TVI effects; and when the blades do not rotate in synchronism, each WT produces interference effects individually.

Sengupta, D L; Senior, T B.A.; Ferris, J E

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Review of world experience and properties of materials for encapsulation of terrestrial photovoltaic arrays. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Available information defining the state of the art of encapsulation materials and processes for terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications were collected and analyzed. Based on criteria of properties, processability, availability, and cost, candidate materials were identified which have potential for use in encapsulation systems for low-cost, long-life terrestrial photovoltaic arrays manufactured by automated, high-volume processes. The criteria for consideration of the encapsulation systems were based on the goals for arrays with a lifetime of over 20 years high reliability, an efficiency greater than 10 percent, a total array price less than $500/kW, and a production capacity of 5 x 10/sup 5/ kW/yr. (WDM)

Carmichael, D.C.; Gaines, G.B.; Sliemers, F.A.; Kistler, C.W.; Igou, R.D.

1976-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

433

A novel technique for wide-field polarimetry with a radiotelescope array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the use of the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to conduct polarimetric observations of the sky at 5 GHz. The ATCA is normally operated as an interferometer array, but these observations were conducted in a split array mode in which the antenna elements were used as single-dishes with their beams staggered to simultaneously cover a wide area of sky with a resolution of 10 arcmin. The linearly polarized sky radiation was fully characterized from measurements, made over a range of parallactic angles, of the cross correlated signals from the orthogonal linear feeds. We describe the technique and present a polarimetric image of the Vela supernova remnant made as a test of the method. The development of the techniques was motivated by the need for wide-field imaging of the foreground contamination of the polarized component of the cosmic microwave background signal.

D. McConnell; E. Carretti; R. Subrahmanyan

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

Preliminary results of the US pool-boiling coils from the IFSMTF full-array tests  

SciTech Connect

The Large Coil Task to develop superconducting magnets for fusion reactors, is now in the midst of full-array tests in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Included in the test array are two pool-boiling coils designed and fabricated by US manufacturers, General Dynamics/Convair Division and General Electric/Union Carbide Corporation. So far, both coils have been energized to full design currents in the single-coil tests, and the General Dynamics coil has reached the design point in the first Standard-I full-array test. Both coils performed well in the charging experiments. Extensive heating tests and the heavy instrumentation of these coils have, however, revealed some generic limitations of large pool-boiling superconducting coils. Details of these results and their analyses are reported.

Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Lubell, M.S.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Shen, S.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Field experience with a new performance characterization procedure for photovoltaic arrays  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As photovoltaic systems become larger and more numerous, improved methods are needed for testing and modeling their performance. Test methods that successfully separate the interacting, time-of-day dependent influences of solar irradiance, operating temperature, solar spectrum, and solar angle-of-incidence have now been developed. These test methods have resulted in a new array performance model that is reasonably simple, yet accurately predicts performance for all operating conditions. This paper describes the new model, outdoor tests required to implement it, results of field tests for five arrays of different technologies, and the evolution of the model into a numerical tool for designing and sizing photovoltaic arrays based on annual energy production.

King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Influence of the adatom diffusion on selective growth of GaN nanowire regular arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on patterned Si/AlN/Si(111) substrates was used to obtain regular arrays of uniform-size GaN nanowires (NWs). The silicon top layer has been patterned with e-beam lithography, resulting in uniform arrays of holes with different diameters (d{sub h}) and periods (P). While the NW length is almost insensitive to the array parameters, the diameter increases significantly with d{sub h} and P till it saturates at P values higher than 800 nm. A diffusion induced model was used to explain the experimental results with an effective diffusion length of the adatoms on the Si, estimated to be about 400 nm.

Gotschke, T.; Schumann, T.; Limbach, F.; Calarco, R. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Juelich GmbH and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (FIT), 52425 Juelich (Germany); Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Stoica, T. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1), Research Centre Juelich GmbH and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (FIT), 52425 Juelich (Germany)

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

437

Rotating fiber array molecular driver and molecular momentum transfer device constructed therewith  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotating fiber array molecular driver is disclosed which includes a magnetically suspended and rotated central hub to which is attached a plurality of elongated fibers extending radially therefrom. The hub is rotated so as to straighten and axially extend the fibers and to provide the fibers with a tip speed which exceeds the average molecular velocity of fluid molecules entering between the fibers. Molecules colliding with the sides of the rotating fibers are accelerated to the tip speed of the fiber and given a momentum having a directional orientation within a relatively narrow distribution angle at a point radially outward of the hub, which is centered and peaks at the normal to the fiber sides in the direction of fiber rotation. The rotating fiber array may be used with other like fiber arrays or with other stationary structures to form molecular momentum transfer devices such as vacuum pumps, molecular separators, molecular coaters, or molecular reactors.

Milleron, Norman (1854 San Juan, Berkeley, CA 94707)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Standard Test Method for Wet Insulation Integrity Testing of Photovoltaic Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers a procedure to determine the insulation resistance of a photovoltaic (PV) array (or its component strings), that is, the electrical resistance between the array's internal electrical components and is exposed, electrically conductive, non-current carrying parts and surfaces of the array. 1.2 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable results is beyond the scope of this test method. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Clinical prototype of a plastic water-equivalent scintillating fiber dosimeter array for QA applications  

SciTech Connect

A clinical prototype of a scintillating fiber dosimeter array for quality assurance applications is presented. The array consists of a linear array of 29 plastic scintillation detectors embedded in a water-equivalent plastic sheet coupled to optical fibers used to guide optical photons to a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The CCD is packaged in a light-tight, radiation-shielded housing designed for convenient transport. A custom designed connector is used to ensure reproducible mechanical positioning of the optical fibers relative to the CCD. Profile and depth dose characterization measurements are presented and show that the prototype provides excellent dose measurement reproducibility ({+-}0.8%) in-field and good accuracy ({+-}1.6% maximum deviation) relative to the dose measured with an IC10 ionization chamber.

Lacroix, Frederic; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Guillot, Mathieu; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R2J6 (Canada)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Process development for automated solar cell and module production. Task 4. Automated array assembly. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MBA has been working on the automated array assembly task of the Low-Cost Solar Array project. A baseline sequence for the manufacture of solar cell modules is specified. Starting with silicon wafers, the process goes through damage etching, texture etching, junction formation, plasma edge etch, aluminum back surface field formation, and screen printed metallization to produce finished solar cells which are then series connected on a ribbon and bonded into a finished glass, PVB, tedlar module. A number of steps required additional developmental effort to verify technical and economic feasibility. These steps include texture etching, plasma edge etch, aluminum back surface field formation, array layup and interconnect, and module edge sealing and framing.

Witham, C.R.

1979-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Temperature coefficients for PV modules and arrays: Measurement methods, difficulties, and results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The term temperature coefficient has been applied to several different photovoltaic performance parameters, including voltage, current, and power. The procedures for measuring the coefficient(s) for modules and arrays are not yet standardized, and systematic influences are common in the test methods used to measure them. There are also misconceptions regarding their application. Yet, temperature coefficients, however obtained, play an important role in PV system design and sizing, where often the worst case operating condition dictates the array size. This paper describes effective methods for determining temperature coefficients for cells, modules, and arrays; identifies sources of systematic errors in measurements; gives typical measured values for modules; and provides guidance for their application in system engineering.

King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The effect of interelement dipole coupling in patterned ultrathin single crystal Fe square arrays  

SciTech Connect

The correlation between the magnetic properties and the interelement separation in patterned arrays of ultrathin single crystal Fe films of 12 monolayers (ML) grown on GaAs(100) has been studied. The critical condition to form single domain remanent states in the square elements was found to be 10 {mu}m in size and 20 {mu}m for the interelement separation. The coercivity was also found to increase with the increasing interelement separation in the patterned arrays. These results are attributed to the competition between the large in-plane uniaxial anisotropy, the demagnetizing field, and interelement dipole coupling as determined semiqualitatively by the ferromagnetic resonance measurements.

Sun Li; Zhai Ya [Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Department of Electronics, Spintronics and Nanodevice Laboratory, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Wong Pingkwanj; Zhang Wen; Xu Yongbing [Department of Electronics, Spintronics and Nanodevice Laboratory, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Zou Xiao; Wu Jing [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Luo Linqiang; Zhai Hongru [National Laboratory of Solid Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Unlikely Combination of Experiments with a Novel High-Voltage CIGS Photovoltaic Array (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this study are to: (1) parameterize current-voltage (I-V) performance over a wide range of illumination and temperatures: (a) 50-1150 W/m{sup 2} irradiance, 5-65 C; (b) obtain array temperature coefficients; and (c) quantify energy production; (2) investigate high-voltage leakage currents from the CIS modules in a high-voltage array: determine dependence on moisture, temperature, and voltage bias and ascertain corrosion problems if any; and (3) study long-term power and energy production stability.

del Cueto, J. A.; Sekulic, B. R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Resonant Andreev transmission in two-dimensional array of SNS junctions.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an experimental study of transport properties of a large two-dimensional array of superconductor-normal-metal-superconductor (SNS) junctions comprised of the nanopatterned superconducting film, ensuring that NS interfaces of our SNS junctions are highly transparent. We find the anomalously high charge transmission at certain applied voltages commensurate with the magnitude of the gap in superconducting islands. This indicates the nonlocal nature of the charge transfer in multiply connected SNS systems. We propose the mechanism of the correlated transmission of Cooper pairs in large arrays of SNS junctions based on the combined action of the proximity effect and the simultaneous Andreev conversion processes at many NS-interfaces.

Baturina, T. I.; Mironov, A. Yu.; Vinokur, V. M.; Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Glatz, A.; Nasimov, D. A.; Latyshev, A. V.; Materials Science Division; Inst. Semiconductor Physics; Russian Academy of Science; Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Criticality experiments with planar arrays of three-liter bottles containing plutonium nitrate solution  

SciTech Connect

The objective of these experiments was to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in critically safety assessments of plant configurations. Arrays containing up to as many as sixteen three-liter bottles filled with plutonium nitrate were used in the experiments. A split-table device was used in the final assembly of the arrays. Ths planar arrays were reflected with close fitting plexiglas on each side and on the bottom but not the top surface. The experiments addressed a number of factors effecting criticality: the critical air gap between bottles in an array of fixed number of bottles, the number of bottles required for criticality if the bottles were touching, and the effect on critical array spacing and critical bottle number due to the insertion of an hydrogeneous substance into the air gap between bottles. Each bottle contained about 2.4l of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} solution at a Pu concentration of 105g Pu/l, with the {sup 240}Pu content being 2.9 wt% at a free acid molarity H{sup +} of 5.1. After the initial series of experiments were performed with bottles separated by air gaps, plexiglas shells of varying thicknesses were placed around each bottle to investigate how moderation between bottles affects both the number of bottles required for criticality and the critical spacing between each bottle. The minimum of bottles required for criticality was found to be 10.9 bottles, occurring for a square array with bottles in contact. As the bottles were spaced apart, the critical number increased. For sixteen bottles in a square array, the critical separation between surfaces in both x and y direction was 0.96 cm. The addition of plexiglas around each bottle decreased the critical bottle number, compared to those separated in air, but the critical bottle number, even with interstitial plastic in place was always greater than 10.9 bottles. The most reactive configuration was a tightly packed array of bottles with no intervening material.

Durst, B.M.; Clayton, E.D.; Smith, J.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Recurrence in resonant transmission of one-dimensional array of delta potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The resonant transmission of a moving particle which interacts with an one-dimensional array of N delta-function potentials is investigated. A suitable transfer matrix formulation is used to obtain the particle transmission. We give the parameters for perfect tunnelling and the transcendental equation for the quasi-bound state energies for N = 2, 3 and 4. Conditions for perfect tunnelling and resonant transmission are discussed for arrays with arbitrary N. A model to explain how the tunnelling energy filter works in these systems is proposed here.

Guillermo Cordourier-Maruri; Virendra Gupta; Romeo de Coss

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Development of Microfabricated Microbial Fuel Cell Array as a High Throughput Screening Platform for Electrochemically Active Microbes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are novel green technologies that convert chemical energy stored in biomass into electricity through microbial metabolisms. Both fossil fuel depletion and environmental concern have fostered significant interest in MFCs for both wastewater treatment and electricity generation. However, MFCs have not yet been used for practical applications due to their low power outputs and challenges associated with scale-up. High throughput screening devices for parallel studies are highly necessary to significantly improve and optimize MFC working conditions for future practical applications. Here in this research, microfabricated platforms of microbial fuel cell array as high throughput screening devices for MFC parallel studies have been developed. Their utilities were described with environmental sample screening to uncover electricigens with higher electrochemical activities. The first version of the MFC arrays is a batch-mode miniaturized 24-well MFC array using ferricyanide as catholyte. Several environmental species that showed higher electricity generation capabilities than Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SO) were uncovered using the developed MFC array, with one environmental electricigen, Shewanella sp. Hac353 (dq307734.1)(7Ca), showing 2.3-fold higher power output than SO. The second MFC array platform developed is an air-cathode MFC array using oxygen in air as electron acceptor, which is sustainable compared to ferricyanide that depletes over time. Environmental electricigen screenings were also conducted, showing parallel comparison capabilities of the developed array. The third MFC array platform is a microfluidic-cathode MFC array that enables long-term operations of miniature MFC arrays with improved power generation abilities. The capability of the microfluidic-cathode MFC array to support long-term parallel analysis was demonstrated by characterizing power generation of SO and 7Ca, proving extended operation time and improved power outputs compared to batch-mode MFC array. The fourth MFC array platform enables both catholyte and anolyte replenishments for long-term characterization of various carbon substrate performances. Finally, the 24-well microfluidic MFC array was further scaled up to 96 wells, which greatly increased the throughput of MFC parallel studies. The developed MFC arrays as high throughput screening platforms are expected to greatly impact how current MFC studies are conducted and ultimately lead to significant improvement in MFC power output.

Hou, Huijie

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

The Effect of PV Array Size and Battery Size on the Economics of PV/Diesel/Battery Hybrid RAPS Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Effect of PV Array Size and Battery Size on the Economics of PV/Diesel/Battery Hybrid RAPS WA 6150 Abstract This paper focuses on pv/diesel/battery hybrid RAPS systems meeting loads above 50 kWh per day. The effect of varying the size of the pv array and the battery bank in such systems on both

449

Fabrication of Si nano-pillar array through Ni nano-dot mask using inductively coupled plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fabrication of Si nano-pillar array through Ni nano-dot mask using inductively coupled plasma Mun-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon, 440-746, South Korea Available online 9 September 2004 Abstract We formed Si nano-pillar array using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching of Si with Ni nano-dot mask. For the formation

Yeom, Geun Young

450

Multisegmented Au-MnO2/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Coaxial Arrays for High-Power Supercapacitor Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multisegmented Au-MnO2/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Coaxial Arrays for High-Power SupercapacitorVised Manuscript ReceiVed: NoVember 4, 2009 The present work reports on synthesis and supercapacitor applications hybrid coaxial arrays are efficient electrodes for supercapacitor applications. Au-segmented MnO2/CNT

Ajayan, Pulickel M.

451

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL. XX, NO. XX, FEBRUARY 2013 1 The Optimized String Dynamic Photovoltaic Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Photovoltaic Array Jonathan Storey, Peter R. Wilson, Senior Member, IEEE, and Darren Bagnall Abstract--This paper presents a novel system for producing the optimum power output from photovoltaic arrays using dynamic cell reconfiguration. The proposed approach is the first in the literature

452

A field programmable gate array unit for the diagnosis and control of neoclassical tearing modes on MAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A field programmable gate array unit for the diagnosis and control of neoclassical tearing modes OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 10E312 (2012) A field programmable gate array unit for the diagnosis and control, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom 2 EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre

453

Fabrication of nano-hole array patterns on transparent conducting oxide layer using thermally curable nanoimprint lithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, periodic array of nano-sized holes was fabricated in an indium tin oxide (ITO) layer, deposited onto a glass substrate with nanoimprint lithography. As a result of a thermally curing imprint process, hole array patterns with a diameter ... Keywords: Indium tin oxide (ITO), Nanoimprint lithography (NIL), Patterned transparent electrode, Photonic crystals, Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer

Kyeong-Jae Byeon; Seon-Yong Hwang; Heon Lee

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Introduction NMR 2-D Ion Arrays Electronic Networking Conclusions An investigation of precision and scaling issues in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction NMR 2-D Ion Arrays Electronic Networking Conclusions An investigation of precision Department of Physics Massachusetts Institute of Technology 11 March 2009 (1/50) #12;Introduction NMR 2-D Ion precision (2/50) #12;Introduction NMR 2-D Ion Arrays Electronic Networking Conclusions Digital simulation

Raizen, Mark G.

455

Mercury-cadmium-telluride focal plane array performance under non-standard operating conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights a new technique that allows the Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC TCM6604A Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) Focal Plane Array (FPA) to operate at room temperature. 12 The Teledyne MCT FPA has been a standard in Imaging Spectroscopy ...

Brandon S. Richardson; Michael L. Eastwood; Carl F. Bruce; Robert O. Green; J. B. Coles

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Fabrication and characterization of ZnO nanowire arrays with an investigation into electrochemical sensing capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZnO nanowire arrays were grown on a Si (100) substrate using the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method. ZnO nanowires were characterized by XRD, SEM, bright field TEM, and EDS. They were found to have a preferential orientation along the c-axis. The ...

Jessica Weber; Sathyaharish Jeedigunta; Ashok Kumar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Multi-array borehole resistivity and induced polarization method with mathematical inversion of redundant data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple arrays of electric or magnetic transmitters and receivers are used in a borehole geophysical procedure to obtain a multiplicity of redundant data suitable for processing into a resistivity or induced polarization model of a subsurface region of the earth. 30 figs.

Ward, S.H.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

458

Search for ultra-high energy photons using Telescope Array surface detector  

SciTech Connect

We search for ultra-high energy photons by analyzing geometrical properties of shower fronts of events registered by the Telescope Array surface detector. By making use of an event-by-event statistical method, we derive an upper limit on the absolute flux of primary photons with energies above 10{sup 19} eV.

Rubtsov, G. I.; Troitsky, S. V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 117312 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, D.; Stokes, B. T. [Rutgers - State University of New Jersey, Piscataway (United States); Thomson, G. B. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

459

Rapid Sampling of Severe Storms by the National Weather Radar Testbed Phased Array Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key advantage of the National Weather Radar Testbed Phased Array Radar (PAR) is the capability to adaptively scan storms at higher temporal resolution than is possible with the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D): 1 min or less ...

Pamela L. Heinselman; David L. Priegnitz; Kevin L. Manross; Travis M. Smith; Richard W. Adams

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

An efficient approach for designing and minimizing reversible programmable logic arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reversible computing dissipates zero energy in terms of information loss at input and also it can detect error of circuit by keeping unique input-output mapping. In this paper, we have proposed a cost effective design of Reversible Programmable Logic ... Keywords: MUX gate, programmable logic arrays, reversible logic

Sajib Kumar Mitra; Lafifa Jamal; Mineo Kaneko; Hafiz Md. Hasan Babu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Built-In Self-Test of Field Programmable Analog Arrays based on Transient Response Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work a strategy for testing analog networks, known as Transient Response Analysis Method, is applied to test the Configurable Analog Blocks (CABs) of Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAAs). In this method the Circuit Under Test (CUT) is programmed ... Keywords: Analog built-in self-test, FPAA, Transient response analysis

T. R. Balen; J. V. Calvano; M. S. Lubaszewski; M. Renovell

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Single Event Upset in SRAM-based Field Programmable Analog Arrays: Effects and Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work the problem of Single Event Upset (SEU) is considered to a new analog technology: The Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAAs). Some FPAA models are based on SRAM memory cells to implement the user programmability. For this reason, such ...

Tiago R. Balen; Fernanda Lima Kastensmidt; Marcelo S. Lubaszewski; M. Renovell

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Nanopore Patterned Pt Array Electrodes for Triple Phase Boundary Study in Low Temperature SOFC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanopore Patterned Pt Array Electrodes for Triple Phase Boundary Study in Low Temperature SOFC structural integrity and thermal stability at the solid oxide fuel cell SOFC operating temperature of 450, Meeting of the Society, October 4­9, 2009. Solid oxide fuel cells SOFCs are efficient energy conversion

Cui, Yi

464

Electric Field Sensor Array for Node Localization on Two-Dimensional Signal Transmission Sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Field Sensor Array for Node Localization on Two-Dimensional Signal Transmission Sheet Kei). In the method, the sensor node determines its own position by reading the electric field patterns above scanning. In this paper, firstly we introduce the method. Then we describe the structure of an electric

Shinoda, Hiroyuki

465

Nanowire array and nanowire solar cells and methods for forming the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Homogeneous and dense arrays of nanowires are described. The nanowires can be formed in solution and can have average diameters of 40-300 nm and lengths of 1-3 .mu.m. They can be formed on any suitable substrate. Photovoltaic devices are also described.

Yang, Peidong (El Cerrito, CA); Greene, Lori E. (Berkeley, CA); Law, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

466

Nanowire array and nanowire solar cells and methods for forming the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Homogeneous and dense arrays of nanowires are described. The nanowires can be formed in solution and can have average diameters of 40-300 nm and lengths of 1-3 .mu.m. They can be formed on any suitable substrate. Photovoltaic devices are also described.

Yang, Peidong (Berkeley, CA); Greene, Lori (Berkeley, CA); Law, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

467

Modeling acoustic propagation of airgun array pulses recorded on tagged sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus)a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of low- frequency underwater sound for geophysical research and exploration, especially by the oil, 1986 . Airgun arrays are reported to have theoretical on-axis directly downward signatures with peak energy in the 10­200 Hz range, and far-field measure- ments yield typical peak-to-peak source levels

468

Low-Cost Solar Array (LSA) Project. Project quarterly report No. 9, April--June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period April through June 1978 is described. It includes reports on silicon material processing, large-area silicon sheet development, encapsulation materials testing and development, project engineering and operations activities, and manufacturing techniques, plus the steps taken to integrate these efforts.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic conditions with turbine models covering the range of scales important for wind plant dynamics to help address the impacts that upwind turbines have on turbines in their wake and give greater insight into overall wind

470

Field investigation of a wake structure downwind of a VAWT in a windfarm array  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of upwind turbine wakes on the performance of a FloWind 17-m VAWT were investigated through a series of field experiments conducted at the FloWind windfarm on Cameron Ridge, Tehachapi, California. The field experiment was conducted within a VAWT array consisting of more than nine VAWTs with separations 3D crosswised by 8D downwind (where D is the turbine diameter) in a staggered configuration. The array is the upwind three rows of VAWTS in a total of six rows that are on top of the Cameron Ridge plateau. The terrain features in the vicinity are reasonably regular, with an upslope of 7 deg on the average; however, several local irregularities are present. The annual hourly averaged wind speed exceeds 8 m/s at the site. The wind field and the power-outputs of nine turbines within the array were measured with wind sensors and power transducers. Nine Gill propeller and 18 Maximum cup anemometers and one direction sensor were mounted on portable and stack-up towers installed upwind and within the turbine array. From the field measurements, the velocity and power/energy deficits were derived under various turbine on/off configurations. Much information was provided to characterize the structure of VAWT wakes and to assess their effects on the performance of downwind turbines. Recommendations are made for optimizing windfarm design and operations as well as for wind energy management.

Liu, H.T.; Buck, J.W.; Germain, A.C.; Hinchee, M.E.; Solt, T.S.; LeRoy, G.M.; Srnsky, R.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Measuring Upper Ocean Variability from an Array of Surface Moorings in the Subtropical Convergence Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of upper ocean variability were made in the subtropical convergence zone southwest of Bermuda from an array of five surface moorings set with spacings of 16 to 53 km. The intent was to observe oceanic fronts and to quantify the ...

Robert A. Weller; Daniel L. Rudnick; Nancy J. Pennington; Richard P. Trask; James R. Valdes

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Energy Harvesting by Sweeping Voltage-Escalated Charging of a Reconfigurable Supercapacitor Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Harvesting by Sweeping Voltage-Escalated Charging of a Reconfigurable Supercapacitor Array charge pump to perform maximum power-transfer track- ing (MPTT) while charging a reservoir supercapacitor. The supercapacitors in the RSA can be dynamically configured for series or parallel topologies by means of a switch

Shinozuka, Masanobu

473

Synthesis of hybrid nanowire arrays and their application as high power supercapacitor electrodesw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesis of hybrid nanowire arrays and their application as high power supercapacitor electrodesw- plies.2­7 For such applications, it is extremely important to develop supercapacitors with higher power and they have been used as electrodes for supercapacitors.11­14 In spite of having ideal properties, CNT based

Ajayan, Pulickel M.

474

Three dimensional solid-state supercapacitors from aligned single-walled carbon nanotube array templates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three dimensional solid-state supercapacitors from aligned single-walled carbon nanotube array- thermore, modeling of supercapacitor architectures utilizing other dielectric layers suggests the ability, and supercapacitor technologies, are being adapted and optimized with nanostructured compo- nents [1­5]. The promise

Gordon, Roy

475

Errors in Wind Measurements Estimated by Five-Beam Phased Array Doppler Sodar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimation of the errors in sodar wind measurements using the phased array Doppler sodar operated under five-beam observation has been made. When compared with the sonic anemometer on the tower nearby, the variances or second-order moments of ...

Yoshiki Ito

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A generic network interface architecture for a networked processor array (NePA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently Network-on-Chip (NoC) technique has been proposed as a promising solution for on-chip interconnection network. However, different interface specification of integrated components raises a considerable difficulty for adopting NoC techniques. ... Keywords: interconnection network, multiprocessor systemon-chip (MPSoC), network interface, network-on-chip (NoC), networked processor array (NePA)

Seung Eun Lee; Jun Ho Bahn; Yoon Seok Yang; Nader Bagherzadeh

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Gamma Ray Bursts as seen by a Giant Air Shower Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potentiality of a Giant Shower Array to low energy gamma rays from gamma ray bursts is discussed. Effective areas are calculated for different scenarios and the results are encouraging. If gamma ray bursts have a spectrum which continues in the high energy gamma ray region, the Pierre Auger Observatory will be able to detect it.

C. O. Escobar; P. L. Da Silva; R. A. Vzquez

1997-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

478

A Systolic Array Implementation of the One-Shot Decorrelating Detector Used for Mobile CDMA Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systolic array implementation of the one-shot decorrelating detector algorithm designed for Code-Division Multiple-Access (CDMA) spread spectrum communication systems used in mobile communications environments is developed. This detector has ... Keywords: CDMA, detector, implementation, one-shot, systolic

Timothy F. Myers; Mario E. Magaa

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Anomalous vibrational dispersion in holographically trapped colloidal arrays Marco Polin and David G. Grier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the hydrodynamically coupled array's behavior is quantitatively explained by a model based on the Os- een superposition of such a dissipatively cou- pled solid are consistent with a Langevin-Oseen model. This theory further predicts of glycerol (Fisher Scientific Lot number #12;2 04377) in deionized water. Allowing the dispersion

Grier, David

480

Anomalous vibrational dispersion in holographically trapped colloidal arrays Marco Polin and David G. Grier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the hydrodynamically coupled array's behavior is quantitatively explained by a model based on the Os­ een superposition of such a dissipatively cou­ pled solid are consistent with a Langevin­Oseen model. This theory further predicts of glycerol (Fisher Scientific Lot number #12; 2 04377) in deionized water. Allowing the dispersion

Grier, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "array adsc q315r" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.