National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for array adsc q315r

  1. Experimental Station 7-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Beamline 7-1 is a wiggler side-station beamline dedicated for monochromatic, high-throughput, high-resolution macromolecular crystallography. It is SAD and MAD capable and can be run in a full remote access mode. It is equipped with an ADSC Q315R CCD detector. For aditional information about the experimental capabilities, see http://smb.slac.stanford.edu/index.shtml. Status Open Supported Techniques Macromolecular Crystallography Multi wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) Single wavelength

  2. Magnetic arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trumper, David L. (Plaistow, NH); Kim, Won-jong (Cambridge, MA); Williams, Mark E. (Pelham, NH)

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness.

  3. Magnetic arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trumper, D.L.; Kim, W.; Williams, M.E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays are disclosed which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness. 12 figs.

  4. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2007-03-13

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  5. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuominen, Mark (Shutesbury, MA); Schotter, Joerg (Bielefeld, DE); Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas (Freiburg, DE); Russell, Thomas P. (Amherst, MA)

    2009-08-11

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  6. Global Arrays

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-02-23

    The Global Arrays (GA) toolkit provides an efficient and portable “shared-memory” programming interface for distributed-memory computers. Each process in a MIMD parallel program can asynchronously access logical blocks of physically distributed dense multi-dimensional arrays, without need for explicit cooperation by other processes. Unlike other shared-memory environments, the GA model exposes to the programmer the non-uniform memory access (NUMA) characteristics of the high performance computers and acknowledges that access to a remote portion of the sharedmore » data is slower than to the local portion. The locality information for the shared data is available, and a direct access to the local portions of shared data is provided. Global Arrays have been designed to complement rather than substitute for the message-passing programming model. The programmer is free to use both the shared-memory and message-passing paradigms in the same program, and to take advantage of existing message-passing software libraries. Global Arrays are compatible with the Message Passing Interface (MPI).« less

  7. Using PDSF Job Arrays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Job Arrays Using Job Arrays Job arrays have many advantages, including reduced load on the batch system, faster job submission, and easier job management. If you find...

  8. Using Job Arrays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Job Arrays Using Job Arrays Job arrays have many advantages, including reduced load on the batch system, faster job submission, and easier job management. If you find yourself submitting thousands of jobs at a time you should use job arrays. However, the UGE documentation is somewhat lacking and arrays do make job submission more complicated. Below is a description of how UGE job arrays work: Job arrays can be submitted from the command line with the -t option to qsub, e.g.,: qsub -t

  9. Job Arrays on Genepool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Arrays Job Arrays on Genepool Job Arrays Job arrays have many advantages, including reduced load on UGE, faster job submission, and easier job management. If you find yourself submitting thousands of jobs at a time that are largely identical, you should use job arrays. For example, if you have many different data sets, but want to run the same program on all of the data sets, you can either use Perl to generate one script for each data set, or you can use a job array with a single script.

  10. Using Job Arrays on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Job Arrays on Carver Using Job Arrays on Carver Job Arrays Job arrays are a way to submit many jobs using only 1 batch submission script. The term task arrays is often used in documentation for what are called job arrays below. The behavior of the different jobs of the array can be controlled by the different values of the PBS_ARRAYID environment variable for each job in the array. Job Array Example This is an example of a job array that will run several different jobs on the Carver serial

  11. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  12. Integrated avalanche photodiode arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harmon, Eric S.

    2015-07-07

    The present disclosure includes devices for detecting photons, including avalanche photon detectors, arrays of such detectors, and circuits including such arrays. In some aspects, the detectors and arrays include a virtual beveled edge mesa structure surrounded by resistive material damaged by ion implantation and having side wall profiles that taper inwardly towards the top of the mesa structures, or towards the direction from which the ion implantation occurred. Other aspects are directed to masking and multiple implantation and/or annealing steps. Furthermore, methods for fabricating and using such devices, circuits and arrays are disclosed.

  13. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  14. Array for detecting microbes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  15. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blain, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  16. Micromachined electrode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  17. Expandable LED array interconnect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  18. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  19. Random array grid collimator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  20. Plasma gun array

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gun array A rotating conducting wall, according to theory, should stabilize a linear plasma column against certain magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Shown here is a view down the inside of such a wall, in the rotating wall machine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Along its 1-meter length, the 16-cm-diameter, glass- and copper-lined stainless-steel tube reflects the sixfold symmetry of the triangular array of seven plasma "guns" centered at the far end. To study the wall's

  1. Concurrent array-based queue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2015-01-06

    According to one embodiment, a method for implementing an array-based queue in memory of a memory system that includes a controller includes configuring, in the memory, metadata of the array-based queue. The configuring comprises defining, in metadata, an array start location in the memory for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, an array size for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, a queue top for the array-based queue and defining, in the metadata, a queue bottom for the array-based queue. The method also includes the controller serving a request for an operation on the queue, the request providing the location in the memory of the metadata of the queue.

  2. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  3. Solar collector array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  4. CEC Array Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CEC Array Modeling - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  5. Solid state neutron detector array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, John G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ruddy, Frank H. (Monroeville, PA); Brandt, Charles D. (Mount Lebanon, PA); Dulloo, Abdul R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Lott, Randy G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sirianni, Ernest (Monroeville, PA); Wilson, Randall O. (Greensburg, PA)

    1999-01-01

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors.

  6. Solid state neutron detector array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, J.G.; Ruddy, F.H.; Brandt, C.D.; Dulloo, A.R.; Lott, R.G.; Sirianni, E.; Wilson, R.O.

    1999-08-17

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors. 7 figs.

  7. Stability of dendritic arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.A. ); Langer, J.S. )

    1990-09-15

    We propose an approximate method for studying steady-state properties and linear stability of the dendritic arrays that are formed in directional solidification of alloys. Our analysis is valid at high growth rates where the primary spacing between dendrites is larger than the velocity-dependent solutal diffusion length. We compute a neutral stability boundary and find that, in the situations where we expect our results to be valid, the experimental data of Somboonsuk, Mason, and Trivedi (Metall. Trans. A 15A, 967 (1984)) lie in the stable region, well away from the boundary.

  8. Electrode array for neural stimulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM); Stein, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); Yang, Pin (Albuquerque, NM); Cesarano, III, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Dellinger, Jennifer (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-08-16

    An electrode array for neural stimulation is disclosed which has particular applications for use in a retinal prosthesis. The electrode array can be formed as a hermetically-sealed two-part ceramic package which includes an electronic circuit such as a demultiplexer circuit encapsulated therein. A relatively large number (up to 1000 or more) of individually-addressable electrodes are provided on a curved surface of a ceramic base portion the electrode array, while a much smaller number of electrical connections are provided on a ceramic lid of the electrode array. The base and lid can be attached using a metal-to-metal seal formed by laser brazing. Electrical connections to the electrode array can be provided by a flexible ribbon cable which can also be used to secure the electrode array in place.

  9. Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yelton, William G. (Sandia Park, NM); Siegal, Michael P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-12-01

    A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

  10. Light harvesting arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2002-01-01

    A light harvesting array useful for the manufacture of devices such as solar cells comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2, and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  11. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher (Modesto, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA)

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  12. Chunking of Large Multidimensional Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotem, Doron; Otoo, Ekow J.; Seshadri, Sridhar

    2007-02-28

    Data intensive scientific computations as well on-lineanalytical processing applications as are done on very large datasetsthat are modeled as k-dimensional arrays. The storage organization ofsuch arrays on disks is done by partitioning the large global array intofixed size hyper-rectangular sub-arrays called chunks or tiles that formthe units of data transfer between disk and memory. Typical queriesinvolve the retrieval of sub-arrays in a manner that accesses all chunksthat overlap the query results. An important metric of the storageefficiency is the expected number of chunks retrieved over all suchqueries. The question that immediately arises is "what shapes of arraychunks give the minimum expected number of chunks over a query workload?"In this paper we develop two probabilistic mathematical models of theproblem and provide exact solutions using steepest descent and geometricprogramming methods. Experimental results, using synthetic workloads onreal life data sets, show that our chunking is much more efficient thanthe existing approximate solutions.

  13. Microhole Arrays / FLASH | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microhole Arrays / FLASH Microhole Arrays / FLASH Microhole Arrays / FLASH presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon microhole_arrays_peer_2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Microhole Arrays Drilled with Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology to Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems CX-000663: Categorical Exclusion Determination MMW Drilling & Lining

  14. Solar Array Tracking Control

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-06-22

    SolarTrak used in conjunction with various versions of 68HC11-based SolarTrack hardware boards provides control system for one or two axis solar tracking arrays. Sun position is computed from stored position data and time from an on-board clock/calendar chip. Position feedback can be by one or two offset motor turn counter square wave signals per axis, or by a position potentiometer. A limit of 256 counts resolution is imposed by the on-board analog to digital (A/D)more » convertor. Control is provided for one or two motors. Numerous options are provided to customize the controller for specific applications. Some options are imposed at compile time, some are setable during operation. Software and hardware board designs are provided for Control Board and separate User Interface Board that accesses and displays variables from Control Board. Controller can be used with range of sensor options ranging from a single turn count sensor per motor to systems using dual turn-count sensors, limit sensors, and a zero reference sensor. Dual axis trackers oriented azimuth elevation, east west, north south, or polar declination can be controlled. Misalignments from these orientations can also be accommodated. The software performs a coordinate transformation using six parameters to compute sun position in misaligned coordinates of the tracker. Parameters account for tilt of tracker in two directions, rotation about each axis, and gear ration errors in each axis. The software can even measure and compute these prameters during an initial setup period if current from a sun position sensor or output from photovoltaic array is available as an anlog voltage to the control board''s A/D port. Wind or emergency stow to aj present position is available triggered by digital or analog signals. Night stow is also available. Tracking dead band is adjustable from narrow to wide. Numerous features of the hardware and software conserve energy for use with battery powered systems.« less

  15. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M.; Mitra, Robi D.

    2010-08-31

    Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

  16. Using Job Arrays on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This is an example of a job array that will run several different jobs on the Carver serial queue. You can control the working directory, executable name, input file, output...

  17. Coded aperture imaging with uniformly redundant arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, Edward E. (Los Alamos, NM); Cannon, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    A system utilizing uniformly redundant arrays to image non-focusable radiation. The uniformly redundant array is used in conjunction with a balanced correlation technique to provide a system with no artifacts such that virtually limitless signal-to-noise ratio is obtained with high transmission characteristics. Additionally, the array is mosaicked to reduce required detector size over conventional array detectors.

  18. Coded aperture imaging with uniformly redundant arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, Edward E. (Los Alamos, NM); Cannon, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    A system utilizing uniformly redundant arrays to image non-focusable radiation. The uniformly redundant array is used in conjunction with a balanced correlation technique to provide a system with no artifacts such that virtually limitless signal-to-noise ratio is obtained with high transmission characteristics. Additionally, the array is mosaicked to reduce required detector size over conventional array detectors.

  19. Evaporation of multicomponent drop arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annamalai, K.; Ryan, W.; Chandra, S. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The present paper deals with the evaporation of multicomponent fuel droplets in an array using the recently developed point source method (PSM). First, the quasisteady (QS) evaporation of an isolated, multicomponent droplet is briefly analyzed. The resultant governing equations, along with Raoult's law and the Cox-Antoine relation, constitute the set of equations needed to arrive at the solutions for: (1) the droplet surface temperature, (2) the evaporation rate of each species, and (3) the vapor mass fraction of each species at the droplet surface. The PSM, which treats the droplet as a point mass source and heat sink, is then adopted to obtain an analytic expression for the evaporation rate of a multicomponent droplet in an array of liquid droplets. Defining the correction factor ([eta]) as a ratio of the evaporation of a drop in an array to the evaporation rate of a similar isolated multicomponent drop, an expression for the correction factor is obtained. The results of the point source method (PSM) are then compared with those obtained elsewhere for a three-drop array that uses the method of images (MOI). Excellent agreement is obtained. The treatment is then extended to a binary drop array to study the effect of interdrop spacing on vaporization. 20 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Mosaic of coded aperture arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, Edward E. (Los Alamos, NM); Cannon, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a mosaic of coded aperture arrays which is capable of imaging off-axis sources with minimum detector size. Mosaics of the basic array pattern create a circular on periodic correlation of the object on a section of the picture plane. This section consists of elements of the central basic pattern as well as elements from neighboring patterns and is a cyclic version of the basic pattern. Since all object points contribute a complete cyclic version of the basic pattern, a section of the picture, which is the size of the basic aperture pattern, contains all the information necessary to image the object with no artifacts.

  1. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  2. Thermoacoustics in pin-array stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W. ); Keolian, R.M. )

    1993-08-01

    A new thermoacoustic stack geometry, the pin array, is described. Analytical expressions for velocity and temperature in the pin array are derived, and potential advantages of the pin stack are demonstrated. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Solar Array Ventures Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Array Ventures Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Array Ventures Inc Place: Austin, Texas Product: Texas-based start-up thin film PV panel maker, which plans to develop...

  4. Method to fabricate hollow microneedle arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Ingersoll, David; Schmidt, Carrie; Flemming, Jeb

    2006-11-07

    An inexpensive and rapid method for fabricating arrays of hollow microneedles uses a photoetchable glass. Furthermore, the glass hollow microneedle array can be used to form a negative mold for replicating microneedles in biocompatible polymers or metals. These microneedle arrays can be used to extract fluids from plants or animals. Glucose transport through these hollow microneedles arrays has been found to be orders of magnitude more rapid than natural diffusion.

  5. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulkowski, J.E.

    1986-10-21

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will. 3 figs.

  6. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulkowski, John E. (Newark, DE)

    1986-01-01

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will.

  7. High voltage load resistor array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Monty Ray (Smithfield, VA)

    2005-01-18

    A high voltage resistor comprising an array of a plurality of parallel electrically connected resistor elements each containing a resistive solution, attached at each end thereof to an end plate, and about the circumference of each of the end plates, a corona reduction ring. Each of the resistor elements comprises an insulating tube having an electrode inserted into each end thereof and held in position by one or more hose clamps about the outer periphery of the insulating tube. According to a preferred embodiment, the electrode is fabricated from stainless steel and has a mushroom shape at one end, that inserted into the tube, and a flat end for engagement with the end plates that provides connection of the resistor array and with a load.

  8. Means of manufacturing annular arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, R.A.

    1985-10-10

    A method is described for manufacturing an annular acoustic transducer array from a plate of transducer material, which enables production of precision aligned arrays at low cost. The circular plate is sawed along at least two lines that are radial to the axis of the plate. At steps along each radial cut, the plate is rotated first in one direction and then in an opposite direction by a predetermined angle such as slightly less than 90/sup 0/. The cuts result in the forming of several largely ring-shaped lands, each largely ring-shaped land being joined to the other rings of different radii by thin portions of the plate, and each ring being cut into segments. The bridges that join different rings hold the transducer together until it can be mounted on a lens.

  9. Array-based photoacoustic spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Autrey, S. Thomas; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chen, Yu

    2005-03-22

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. A photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array including a body having at least three recesses or affinity masses connected thereto is used in conjunction with a photoacoustic spectroscopy system. At least one acoustic detector is positioned near the recesses or affinity masses for detection of acoustic waves emitted from species of interest within the recesses or affinity masses.

  10. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  11. Double interconnection fuel cell array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; Zymboly, G.E.

    1993-12-28

    A fuel cell array is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes and outer electrodes, with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections contacting the inner electrode, each cell having only three metallic felt electrical connectors which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other. 5 figures.

  12. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2006-12-12

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  13. Double interconnection fuel cell array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); Zymboly, Gregory E. (Murrysville, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A fuel cell array (10) is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells (12) which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes (14) and outer electrodes (18 and 18'), with solid electrolyte (16 and 16') between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections (20 and 20') contacting the inner electrode (14), each cell (12) having only three metallic felt electrical connectors (22) which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other.

  14. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian (Newton, MA); Chen, Jinghua (Chestnut Hill, MA); Huang, Zhongping (Belmont, MA); Wang, Dezhi (Wellesley, MA)

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  15. Reduced-vibration tube array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Bartolomeo, Daniel R.

    2004-07-20

    A reduced-vibration tube array is disclosed. The array includes a plurality of tubes in a fixed arrangement and a plurality of damping members positioned within the tubes. The damping members include contoured interface regions characterized by bracing points that selectively contact the inner surface of an associated tube. Each interface region is sized and shaped in accordance with the associated tube, so that the damping member bracing points are spaced apart a vibration-reducing distance from the associated tube inner surfaces at equilibrium. During operation, mechanical interaction between the bracing points and the tube inner surfaces reduces vibration by a damage-reducing degree. In one embodiment, the interface regions are serpentine shaped. In another embodiment, the interface regions are helical in shape. The interface regions may be simultaneously helical and serpentine in shape. The damping members may be fixed within the associated tubes, and damping member may be customized several interference regions having attributes chosen in accordance with desired flow characteristics and associated tube properties.

  16. Space and power efficient hybrid counters array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY)

    2010-03-30

    A hybrid counter array device for counting events. The hybrid counter array includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each counter device for receiving signals representing occurrences of events from an event source and providing a first count value corresponding to a lower order bits of the hybrid counter array. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory locations in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory location for storing a second count value representing higher order bits of the hybrid counter array. A control device monitors each of the N counter devices of the first counter portion and initiates updating a value of a corresponding second count value stored at the corresponding addressable memory location in the second counter portion. Thus, a combination of the first and second count values provide an instantaneous measure of number of events received.

  17. Space and power efficient hybrid counters array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY)

    2009-05-12

    A hybrid counter array device for counting events. The hybrid counter array includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each counter device for receiving signals representing occurrences of events from an event source and providing a first count value corresponding to a lower order bits of the hybrid counter array. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory locations in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory location for storing a second count value representing higher order bits of the hybrid counter array. A control device monitors each of the N counter devices of the first counter portion and initiates updating a value of a corresponding second count value stored at the corresponding addressable memory location in the second counter portion. Thus, a combination of the first and second count values provide an instantaneous measure of number of events received.

  18. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing a plurality of a nucleic acid array, comprising, in order, the steps of amplifying in situ nucleic acid molecules of a first randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array comprising a heterogeneous pool of nucleic acid molecules affixed to a support, transferring at least a subset of the nucleic acid molecules produced by such amplifying to a second support, and affixing the subset so transferred to the second support to form a second randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array, wherein the nucleic acid molecules of the second array occupy positions that correspond to those of the nucleic acid molecules from which they were amplified on the first array, so that the first array serves as a template to produce a plurality, is disclosed.

  19. Uncooled infrared imaging using bimaterial microcantilever arrays

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Uncooled infrared imaging using bimaterial microcantilever arrays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uncooled infrared imaging using bimaterial microcantilever arrays We report on the fabrication and characterization of microcantilever based uncooled focal plane array (FPA) for infrared imaging. By combining a streamlined design of microcantilever thermal transducers with a highly efficient optical readout, we minimized the fabrication

  20. Graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngil; Jang, Dae -Heung; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-08-10

    Covering arrays relax the condition of orthogonal arrays by only requiring that all combination of levels be covered but not requiring that the appearance of all combination of levels be balanced. This allows for a much larger number of factors to be simultaneously considered but at the cost of poorer estimation of the factor effects. To better understand patterns between sets of columns and evaluate the degree of coverage to compare and select between alternative arrays, we suggest several new graphical methods that show some of the patterns of coverage for different designs. These graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays are illustrated with a few examples.

  1. Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01

    Fact sheet overview of the Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array project implemented by the Department of Energy Golden Office and National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  2. Remotely Monitored Sealing Array Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-12

    The Remotely Monitored Sealing Array (RMSA) utilizes the Secure Sensor Platform (SSP) framework to establish the fundamental operating capabilities for communication, security, power management, and cryptography. In addition to the SSP framework the RMSA software has unique capabilities to support monitoring a fiber optic seal. Fiber monitoring includes open and closed as well as parametric monitoring to detect tampering attacks. The fiber monitoring techniques, using the SSP power management processes, allow the seals to last for years while maintaining the security requirements of the monitoring application. The seal is enclosed in a tamper resistant housing with software to support active tamper monitoring. New features include LED notification of fiber closure, the ability to retrieve the entire fiber optic history via translator command, separate memory storage for fiber optic events, and a more robust method for tracking and resending failed messages.

  3. Remotely Monitored Sealing Array Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-12

    The Remotely Monitored Sealing Array (RMSA) utilizes the Secure Sensor Platform (SSP) framework to establish the fundamental operating capabilities for communication, security, power management, and cryptography. In addition to the SSP framework the RMSA software has unique capabilities to support monitoring a fiber optic seal. Fiber monitoring includes open and closed as well as parametric monitoring to detect tampering attacks. The fiber monitoring techniques, using the SSP power management processes, allow the seals to lastmore » for years while maintaining the security requirements of the monitoring application. The seal is enclosed in a tamper resistant housing with software to support active tamper monitoring. New features include LED notification of fiber closure, the ability to retrieve the entire fiber optic history via translator command, separate memory storage for fiber optic events, and a more robust method for tracking and resending failed messages.« less

  4. Dumand-array data-acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenner, A.E.; Theriot, D.; Dau, W.D.; Geelhood, B.D.; Harris, F.; Learned, J.G.; Stenger, V.; March, R.; Roos, C.; Shumard, E.

    1982-04-01

    An overall data acquisition approach for DUMAND is described. The scheme assumes one array to shore optical fiber transmission line for each string of the array. The basic event sampling period is approx. 13 ..mu..sec. All potentially interesting data is transmitted to shore where the major processing is performed.

  5. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  6. Microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Peter C. (Oakland, CA); Mathies, Richard A. (Moraga, CA); Woolley, Adam T. (Belmont, MA)

    2000-01-01

    A capillary array electrophoresis (CAE) micro-plate with an array of separation channels connected to an array of sample reservoirs on the plate. The sample reservoirs are organized into one or more sample injectors. One or more waste reservoirs are provided to collect wastes from reservoirs in each of the sample injectors. Additionally, a cathode reservoir is also multiplexed with one or more separation channels. To complete the electrical path, an anode reservoir which is common to some or all separation channels is also provided on the micro-plate. Moreover, the channel layout keeps the distance from the anode to each of the cathodes approximately constant.

  7. Microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Peter C.; Mathies, Richard A.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2004-06-15

    A capillary array electrophoresis (CAE) micro-plate with an array of separation channels connected to an array of sample reservoirs on the plate. The sample reservoirs are organized into one or more sample injectors. One or more waste reservoirs are provided to collect wastes from reservoirs in each of the sample injectors. Additionally, a cathode reservoir is also multiplexed with one or more separation channels. To complete the electrical path, an anode reservoir which is common to some or all separation channels is also provided on the micro-plate. Moreover, the channel layout keeps the distance from the anode to each of the cathodes approximately constant.

  8. Planarized arrays of aligned untangled multiwall carbon nanotubes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Planarized arrays of aligned untangled multiwall carbon nanotubes with Ohmic back contacts. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Planarized arrays of aligned untangled...

  9. Wavefront Correction Efficacy : Comparing Arrays of 1-Actuator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wavefront Correction Efficacy : Comparing Arrays of 1-Actuator Micromirrors to Arrays of 3-Actuator Micromirrors. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wavefront Correction...

  10. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This ...

  11. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission You are...

  12. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Authors: Harrison,...

  13. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Mission Authors: Harrison,...

  14. Graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Youngil; Jang, Dae -Heung; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-08-10

    Covering arrays relax the condition of orthogonal arrays by only requiring that all combination of levels be covered but not requiring that the appearance of all combination of levels be balanced. This allows for a much larger number of factors to be simultaneously considered but at the cost of poorer estimation of the factor effects. To better understand patterns between sets of columns and evaluate the degree of coverage to compare and select between alternative arrays, we suggest several new graphical methods that show some of the patterns of coverage for different designs. As a result, these graphical methods formore » evaluating covering arrays are illustrated with a few examples.« less

  15. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng F. (Newton, MA); Tu, Yi (Belmont, MA)

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  16. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freitas, B.L.; Skidmore, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost. 19 figs.

  17. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  18. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freitas, Barry L. (Livermore, CA); Skidmore, Jay A. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost.

  19. Solid waste drum array fire performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louie, R.L.; Haecker, C.F.; Beitel, J.J.; Gottuck, D.T.; Rhodes, B.T.; Bayier, C.L.

    1995-09-01

    Fire hazards associated with drum storage of radioactively contaminated waste are a major concern in DOE waste storage facilities. This report is the second of two reports on fire testing designed to provide data relative to the propagation of a fire among storage drum arrays. The first report covers testing of individual drums subjected to an initiating fire and the development of the analytical methodology to predict fire propagation among storage drum arrays. This report is the second report, which documents the results of drum array fire tests. The purpose of the array tests was to confirm the analytical methodology developed by Phase I fire testing. These tests provide conclusive evidence that fire will not propagate from drum to drum unless an continuous fuel source other than drum contents is provided.

  20. Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    192002 Yun (Helen) He, SC2002 1 MPI and OpenMP Paradigms on Cluster of SMP Architectures: the Vacancy Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition Yun (Helen) He...

  1. Nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R. (Allston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Needham, MA); Misasi, John (Syracuse, NY); Hatch, Anson (Seattle, WA); Cantor, Charles (Del Mar, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to high density nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesizing nucleic acid sequences on a solid surface. Specifically, the present invention contemplates the use of stabilized nucleic acid primer sequences immobilized on solid surfaces, and circular nucleic acid sequence templates combined with the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification to thereby increase nucleic acid sequence concentrations in a sample or on an array of nucleic acid sequences.

  2. Regional Wave Field Modeling and Array Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1C Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation, Measurement & Computer Modeling Workshop - Broomfield, CO July 9 th , 2012 Regional Wave Field Modeling and Array Effects Outline  Overview of SNL's Large-Scale Wave and WEC Array Modeling Activities * WEC Farm Modeling on Roadmap * SNL Current Modeling Capabilities * SNL WEC Farm Model Tool Development WEC Farm Modeling  WEC Farms * Currently focused on improving large scale wave models for environmental assessments WEC Farm Modeling: WEC

  3. Quasi-random array imaging collimator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-20

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes-touching imaging collimator. The quasi-random array imaging collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasing throughput by elimination of a substrate. The present invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  4. Nanotube array controlled carbon plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Shi; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Xuanyong; Ding, Chuanxian

    2013-06-17

    Finding approaches to control the elementary processes of plasma-solid interactions and direct the fluxes of matter at nano-scales becomes an important aspect in science. This letter reports that, by taking advantages of the spacing characteristics of discrete TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays, the flying trajectories and the subsequent implantation and deposition manner of energetic carbon ions can be directed and controlled to fabricate hollow conical arrays. The study provides an alternative method for plasma nano-manufacturing.

  5. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

    1985-09-04

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40/sup 0/C instead of at about 270/sup 0/C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementary particles or cosmic rays.

  6. Silicon ball grid array chip carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, David W.; Gassman, Richard A.; Chu, Dahwey

    2000-01-01

    A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

  7. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tewari, Param H. (Milpitas, CA); Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1986-01-01

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO.sub.2, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO.sub.2, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40.degree. C. instead of at about 270.degree. C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementry particles or cosmic rays.

  8. Wavefront Correction Efficacy : Comparing Arrays of 1-Actuator Micromirrors

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to Arrays of 3-Actuator Micromirrors. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Wavefront Correction Efficacy : Comparing Arrays of 1-Actuator Micromirrors to Arrays of 3-Actuator Micromirrors. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wavefront Correction Efficacy : Comparing Arrays of 1-Actuator Micromirrors to Arrays of 3-Actuator Micromirrors. Abstract not provided. Authors: Sweatt, William C. ; Spahn, Olga Blum ; Cowan, William D. ; Dagel, Daryl James ; Wick, David V. Publication

  9. Method of fabricating a solar cell array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lazzery, Angelo G. (Oaklyn, NJ); Crouthamel, Marvin S. (Pennsauken, NJ); Coyle, Peter J. (Oaklyn, NJ)

    1982-01-01

    A first set of pre-tabbed solar cells are assembled in a predetermined array with at least part of each tab facing upward, each tab being fixed to a bonding pad on one cell and abutting a bonding pad on an adjacent cell. The cells are held in place with a first vacuum support. The array is then inverted onto a second vacuum support which holds the tabs firmly against the cell pads they abut. The cells are exposed to radiation to melt and reflow the solder pads for bonding the tab portions not already fixed to bonding pads to these pads.

  10. Investigating Temperature Effects on PV Arrays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schmidt Unit Title: Circuits and Electricity Subject: Physics Lesson Title: Investigating Temperature Effects on PV Arrays Grade Level(s): 11/12 Date(s): July 18, 2014 Lesson Length: 1 Class Period (65 minutes) * Learning Goal(s) [What should students know, understand, or be able to do as a result of this lab or activity.] Students will be able to measure current and voltage using a Multimeter. Students will be able to calculate the power of a PV array using voltage and current. Students will

  11. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

    1986-09-09

    This patent describes a drying process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing alkoxides to form alcogels, and subsequently removing the alcohol therefrom to form aerogels, the improvement comprising the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol for the alcohol in the alcogels, and drying the resulting gels at a supercritical temperature for the solvent, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced drying time period.

  12. ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-09-01

    In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenters logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

  13. Imaging the Coso geothermal area crustal structure with an array...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Coso geothermal area crustal structure with an array of high-density mini-arrays Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

  14. Energy localization in nonlinear fiber arrays: Collapse-effect compressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, A.B.; Luther, G.G.; De Angelis, C.; Turitsyn, S.K.

    1995-07-03

    We analyze a collapse mechanism of energy localization in nonlinear fiber arrays. The nonlinear fiber array is suggested as a device to amplify and compress optical pulses. Pulse propagation in one-dimensional fiber arrays has features of collapse (self-focusing) dynamics. Collapse-type compression leads to the localization of all energy initially dispersed in array into a few fibers. Numerical simulations demonstrate the robustness of the suggested compression mechanism.

  15. Resonator for Coherent Addition of Semiconductor Laser Arrays and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications for a Solar Pumped Laser Array - Energy Innovation Portal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Resonator for Coherent Addition of Semiconductor Laser Arrays and Applications for a Solar Pumped Laser Array Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryORNL inventors designed a scalable V-shaped resonator for coherent addition of semiconductor laser arrays. A V-shaped external Talbot

  16. Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evaluation System (Patent) | SciTech Connect Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the

  17. Microfabricated wire arrays for Z-pinch. (Technical Report) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...cathode connections in Z. Electroplated gold wire arrays with integrated anodecathode ... GALLIUM ARSENIDES; ALUMINIUM ARSENIDES; GOLD; ELECTROPLATING; COPPER; PLATINUM; ...

  18. Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor A sensor array is configured based upon capacitive sensor techniques to measure stresses at various positions in a sheet simultaneously and allow a stress map to be obtained in near real-time. The device consists of single capacitive elements applied in a one or two dimensional array to measure the

  19. Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantor, C.R.; Przetakiewicz, M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, T.

    1998-08-18

    The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5{prime}- and/or 3{prime}-overhangs. 16 figs.

  20. Method for replicating an array of nucleic acid probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Przetakiewicz, Marek (Boston, MA); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA)

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

  1. Microlens frames for laser diode arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skidmore, J.A.; Freitas, B.L.

    1999-07-13

    Monolithic microlens frames enable the fabrication of monolithic laser diode arrays and are manufactured inexpensively with high registration, and with inherent focal length compensation for any lens diameter variation. A monolithic substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost microlens array. The substrate is wet-etched or sawed with a series of v-grooves. The v-grooves can be created by wet-etching, by exploiting the large etch-rate selectivity of different crystal planes. The v-grooves provide a support frame for either cylindrical or custom-shaped microlenses. Because the microlens frames are formed by photolithographic semiconductor batch-processing techniques, they can be formed inexpensively over large areas with precise lateral and vertical registration. The v-groove has an important advantage for preserving the correct focus for lenses of varying diameter. 12 figs.

  2. Microlens frames for laser diode arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skidmore, Jay A.; Freitas, Barry L.

    1999-01-01

    Monolithic microlens frames enable the fabrication of monolithic laser diode arrays and are manufactured inexpensively with high registration, and with inherent focal length compensation for any lens diameter variation. A monolithic substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost microlens array. The substrate is wet-etched or sawed with a series of v-grooves. The v-grooves can be created by wet-etching, by exploiting the large etch-rate selectivity of different crystal planes. The v-grooves provide a support frame for either cylindrical or custom-shaped microlenses. Because the microlens frames are formed by photolithographic semiconductor batch-processing techniques, they can be formed inexpensively over large areas with precise lateral and vertical registration. The v-groove has an important advantage for preserving the correct focus for lenses of varying diameter.

  3. Integrated field emission array for ion desorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Resnick, Paul J; Hertz, Kristin L; Holland, Christopher; Chichester, David; Schwoebel, Paul

    2013-09-17

    An integrated field emission array for ion desorption includes an electrically conductive substrate; a dielectric layer lying over the electrically conductive substrate comprising a plurality of laterally separated cavities extending through the dielectric layer; a like plurality of conically-shaped emitter tips on posts, each emitter tip/post disposed concentrically within a laterally separated cavity and electrically contacting the substrate; and a gate electrode structure lying over the dielectric layer, including a like plurality of circular gate apertures, each gate aperture disposed concentrically above an emitter tip/post to provide a like plurality of annular gate electrodes and wherein the lower edge of each annular gate electrode proximate the like emitter tip/post is rounded. Also disclosed herein are methods for fabricating an integrated field emission array.

  4. Annular array and method of manufacturing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, Robert A. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A method for manufacturing an annular acoustic transducer array from a plate of transducer material, which enables production of precision aligned arrays at low cost. The circular plate is sawed along at least two lines that are radial to the axis of the plate. At steps along each radial cut, the plate is rotated first in one direction and then in an opposite direction by a predetermined angle such as slightly less than 90.degree.. The cuts result in the forming of several largely ring-shaped lands, each largely ring-shaped land being joined to the other rings of different radii by thin portions of the plate, and each ring being cut into segments. The bridges that join different rings, hold the transducer together until it can be mounted on a lens.

  5. Generation of High Density Sample Array

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-08-15

    An analytical procedure was developed for manipulation of a large number of samples using the Beckman BIOMEK 1000 workstation. The RUR software was written to create a number of different script files for control of robotic movement commands, which are read and executed via the Beckman Biorun3 program. This setup has the capability of creating arrays of as many as one million samples per day.

  6. Bipolar battery with array of sealed cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Smaga, John A. (Lemont, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery as a dipolar battery is disclosed with an array of stacked cells with the anode and cathode electrode materials in each cell sealed in a confining structure and separated from one another except across separator material interposed therebetween. The separator material is contained in a module having separate perforated metallic sheets that sandwich opposite sides of the separator material for the cell and an annular insulating spacer that surrounds the separator material beyond the perforations and is also sandwiched between and sealed to the sheets. The peripheral edges of the sheets project outwardly beyond the spacer, traverse the side edges of the adjacent electrode material to form cup-like electrode holders, and are fused to the adjacent current collector or end face members of the array. Electrolyte is infused into the electrolyte cavity through the perforations of one of the metallic sheets with the perforations also functioning to allow ionic conductance across the separator material between the adjacent electrodes. A gas-tight housing provides an enclosure of the array.

  7. Parallel Access of Out-Of-Core Dense Extendible Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otoo, Ekow J; Rotem, Doron

    2007-07-26

    Datasets used in scientific and engineering applications are often modeled as dense multi-dimensional arrays. For very large datasets, the corresponding array models are typically stored out-of-core as array files. The array elements are mapped onto linear consecutive locations that correspond to the linear ordering of the multi-dimensional indices. Two conventional mappings used are the row-major order and the column-major order of multi-dimensional arrays. Such conventional mappings of dense array files highly limit the performance of applications and the extendibility of the dataset. Firstly, an array file that is organized in say row-major order causes applications that subsequently access the data in column-major order, to have abysmal performance. Secondly, any subsequent expansion of the array file is limited to only one dimension. Expansions of such out-of-core conventional arrays along arbitrary dimensions, require storage reorganization that can be very expensive. Wepresent a solution for storing out-of-core dense extendible arrays that resolve the two limitations. The method uses a mapping function F*(), together with information maintained in axial vectors, to compute the linear address of an extendible array element when passed its k-dimensional index. We also give the inverse function, F-1*() for deriving the k-dimensional index when given the linear address. We show how the mapping function, in combination with MPI-IO and a parallel file system, allows for the growth of the extendible array without reorganization and no significant performance degradation of applications accessing elements in any desired order. We give methods for reading and writing sub-arrays into and out of parallel applications that run on a cluster of workstations. The axial-vectors are replicated and maintained in each node that accesses sub-array elements.

  8. Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Simpson, John T; Hendricks, Troy R

    2013-06-11

    An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

  9. Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN); Hendricks, Troy R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-06-19

    An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

  10. Photovoltaic array mounting apparatus, systems, and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Jack Raymond; Atchley, Brian; Hudson, Tyrus Hawkes; Johansen, Emil

    2015-04-14

    A photovoltaic array, including: (a) supports laid out on a surface in rows and columns; (b) photovoltaic modules positioned on top of the supports; and (c) fasteners connecting the photovoltaic modules to the supports, wherein the supports have an upper pedestal surface and a lower pedestal surface such that the photovoltaic modules are positioned at a non-horizontal angle when edges of the photovoltaic modules are positioned on top of the upper and lower pedestal surfaces, and wherein a portion of the fasteners rotate to lock the photovoltaic modules onto the supports.

  11. Plasmon resonant cavities in vertical nanowire arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.; Fasenfest, Benjamin J.; Behymer, Elaine M.

    2014-07-15

    Tunable plasmon resonant cavity arrays in paired parallel nanowire waveguides are presented. Resonances can be observed when the waveguide length is an odd multiple of quarter plasmon wavelengths, consistent with boundary conditions of node and antinode at the ends. Two nanowire waveguides can satisfy the dispersion relation of a planar metal-dielectric-metal waveguide of equivalent width equal to the square field average weighted gap. Confinement factors of over 10.sup.3 are possible due to plasmon focusing in the inter-wire space.

  12. Halbach array DC motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.; Post, R.F.

    1998-01-06

    A new configuration of DC motor/generator is based on a Halbach array of permanent magnets. This motor does not use ferrous materials so that the only losses are winding losses and losses due to bearings and windage. An ``inside-out`` design is used as compared to a conventional motor/generator design. The rotating portion, i.e., the rotor, is on the outside of the machine. The stationary portion, i.e., the stator, is formed by the inside of the machine. The rotor contains an array of permanent magnets that provide a uniform field. The windings of the motor are placed in or on the stator. The stator windings are then ``switched`` or ``commutated`` to provide a DC motor/generator much the same as in a conventional DC motor. The commutation can be performed by mechanical means using brushes or by electronic means using switching circuits. The invention is useful in electric vehicles and adjustable speed DC drives. 17 figs.

  13. Method and apparatus for laying wire arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Seymour M. (6525 Swainland Dr., Oakland, CA 94611); Nesbitt, Dale D. (1712 Marin Ave., Berkeley, CA 94707)

    1986-01-01

    Wire arrays (11) having a continuous wire (12) which is formed into a predetermined pattern and adhered to a backing material or substrate (13) are fabricated by applying adhesive material (16a, 16b) along opposite edge portions (17, 18) of the substrate, positioning a row of winding spools (21) along each of the edge portions and repeatedly extending the wire between and around successive spools at the opposite edge portions. The wound wire is then traveled along each spool toward the substrate and into contact with the adhesive. The spools are then removed and a coating of hardenable material (54) is applied to secure the wound wire to the substrate. Tension in the wire is relieved prior to contact of the wire with the adhesive and a small amount of slack is introduced into the wire before the final coating step. Mechanism (32) is provided for lifting the spools away from the substrate without disturbing the wound wire. The method and apparatus enable manufacture of precisely configured wire arrays without complex or costly equipment and do not require structural alterations in the substrate for the purpose of accommodating to fabrication equipment.

  14. Synthesis and screening combinatorial arrays of zeolites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiaodong; Goldwasser, Isy

    2003-11-18

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  15. Halbach array DC motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA); Dreifuerst, Gary R. (Livermore, CA); Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A new configuration of DC motor/generator is based on a Halbach array of permanent magnets. This motor does not use ferrous materials so that the only losses are winding losses and losses due to bearings and windage. An "inside-out" design is used as compared to a conventional motor/generator design. The rotating portion, i.e., the rotor, is on the outside of the machine. The stationary portion, i.e., the stator, is formed by the inside of the machine. The rotor contains an array of permanent magnets that provide a uniform field. The windings of the motor are placed in or on the stator. The stator windings are then "switched" or "commutated" to provide a DC motor/generator much the same as in a conventional DC motor. The commutation can be performed by mechanical means using brushes or by electronic means using switching circuits. The invention is useful in electric vehicles and adjustable speed DC drives.

  16. Acoustic Array Development for Wind Turbine Noise Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, S.; Roadman, J.; Moriarty, P.; Palo, S.

    2013-11-01

    This report discusses the design and use of a multi-arm, logarithmic spiral acoustic array by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for measurement and characterization of wind turbine-generated noise. The array was developed in collaboration with a team from the University of Colorado Boulder. This design process is a continuation of the elliptical array design work done by Simley. A description of the array system design process is presented, including array shape design, mechanical design, design of electronics and the data acquisition system, and development of post-processing software. System testing and calibration methods are detailed. Results from the initial data acquisition campaign are offered and discussed. Issues faced during this initial deployment of the array are presented and potential remedies discussed.

  17. 24 CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik C. Westman

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method of emplacing the array in a long, horizontal borehole. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  18. Low power integrated pumping and valving arrays for microfluidic systems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Patent) | SciTech Connect Low power integrated pumping and valving arrays for microfluidic systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low power integrated pumping and valving arrays for microfluidic systems Low power integrated pumping and valving arrays which provide a revolutionary approach for performing pumping and valving approach for performing pumping and valving operations in microfabricated fluidic systems for applications such as medical diagnostic microchips. Traditional

  19. Coordinated garbage collection for raid array of solid state disks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dillow, David A; Ki, Youngjae; Oral, Hakki S; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi

    2014-04-29

    An optimized redundant array of solid state devices may include an array of one or more optimized solid-state devices and a controller coupled to the solid-state devices for managing the solid-state devices. The controller may be configured to globally coordinate the garbage collection activities of each of said optimized solid-state devices, for instance, to minimize the degraded performance time and increase the optimal performance time of the entire array of devices.

  20. Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade A new compact, multi-channel Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) diagnostic based on silicon photodiode array has been designed and is being fabricated for the National

  1. Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostics. Abstract not provided. Authors: Harper, Jason C. ; Edwards, Thayne L. ; Polsky, Ronen ; Wheeler, ...

  2. Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostics and Environmental Monitoring. Abstract not provided. Authors: Harper, Jason C. ; Edwards, Thayne L. ; ...

  3. Prediction of ordered arrays of nanoparticle superlattices by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prediction of ordered arrays of nanoparticle superlattices by self-assembly Engineering the interfaces that will solve the technological challenges of this century requires an...

  4. Nanoimprint-lithography Patterned Epitaxial Fe Nanowire Arrays...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    epitaxial Fe nanowire arrays on MgO(001) substrates by nanoimprint lithography with a direct metallization of epitaxial materials through a metallic mask, which avoided the...

  5. Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design of solid state neutral particle analyzer array for National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design of solid state neutral ...

  6. Sacramento Municipal Utility District Solar Array | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Municipal Utility District Solar Array Sector Solar Facility Type Ground-mounted fixed tilt Owner EnXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Sacramento Municipal Utility District...

  7. Temperature coefficients for PV modules and arrays: Measurement...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    methods, difficulties, and results King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E. 14 SOLAR ENERGY; SOLAR CELL ARRAYS; SOLAR CELLS; MEASURING METHODS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE;...

  8. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays as tunable acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lani, Shane W. E-mail: karim.sabra@me.gatech.edu Sabra, Karim G.; Wasequr Rashid, M.; Hasler, Jennifer; Levent Degertekin, F.

    2014-02-03

    Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs) operating in immersion support dispersive evanescent waves due to the subwavelength periodic structure of electrostatically actuated membranes in the array. Evanescent wave characteristics also depend on the membrane resonance which is modified by the externally applied bias voltage, offering a mechanism to tune the CMUT array as an acoustic metamaterial. The dispersion and tunability characteristics are examined using a computationally efficient, mutual radiation impedance based approach to model a finite-size array and realistic parameters of variation. The simulations are verified, and tunability is demonstrated by experiments on a linear CMUT array operating in 2-12?MHz range.

  9. Detecting and correcting hard errors in a memory array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalamatianos, John; John, Johnsy Kanjirapallil; Gelinas, Robert; Sridharan, Vilas K.; Nevius, Phillip E.

    2015-11-19

    Hard errors in the memory array can be detected and corrected in real-time using reusable entries in an error status buffer. Data may be rewritten to a portion of a memory array and a register in response to a first error in data read from the portion of the memory array. The rewritten data may then be written from the register to an entry of an error status buffer in response to the rewritten data read from the register differing from the rewritten data read from the portion of the memory array.

  10. DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) At Coso Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) At Coso Geothermal Area...

  11. Chemical Free Water Analysis with Nanoelectrode Arrays - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Find More Like This Return to Search Chemical Free Water Analysis with Nanoelectrode Arrays Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This ...

  12. Sandia Energy - Sandia Develops Phased-Array Sources Based on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operate through simple linear scattering of an incident laser beam. In a paper in Nature Communications, our research team demonstrates a new, nonlinear phased-array source at...

  13. DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Raft River Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1975) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Raft River...

  14. Methods for validating the presence of and characterizing proteins deposited onto an array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabacker, Daniel S.

    2010-09-21

    A method of determining if proteins have been transferred from liquid-phase protein fractions to an array comprising staining the array with a total protein stain and imaging the array, optionally comparing the staining with a standard curve generated by staining known amounts of a known protein on the same or a similar array; a method of characterizing proteins transferred from liquid-phase protein fractions to an array including staining the array with a post-translational modification-specific (PTM-specific) stain and imaging the array and, optionally, after staining the array with a PTM-specific stain and imaging the array, washing the array, re-staining the array with a total protein stain, imaging the array, and comparing the imaging with the PTM-specific stain with the imaging with the total protein stain; stained arrays; and images of stained arrays.

  15. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  16. Pin stack array for thermoacoustic energy conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keolian, Robert M.; Swift, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    A thermoacoustic stack for connecting two heat exchangers in a thermoacoustic energy converter provides a convex fluid-solid interface in a plane perpendicular to an axis for acoustic oscillation of fluid between the two heat exchangers. The convex surfaces increase the ratio of the fluid volume in the effective thermoacoustic volume that is displaced from the convex surface to the fluid volume that is adjacent the surface within which viscous energy losses occur. Increasing the volume ratio results in an increase in the ratio of transferred thermal energy to viscous energy losses, with a concomitant increase in operating efficiency of the thermoacoustic converter. The convex surfaces may be easily provided by a pin array having elements arranged parallel to the direction of acoustic oscillations and with effective radial dimensions much smaller than the thicknesses of the viscous energy loss and thermoacoustic energy transfer volumes.

  17. Thermal microphotonic sensor and sensor array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM); Lentine, Anthony L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-02-23

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is disclosed for detecting infrared radiation using heat generated by the infrared radiation to shift the resonant frequency of an optical resonator (e.g. a ring resonator) to which the heat is coupled. The shift in the resonant frequency can be determined from light in an optical waveguide which is evanescently coupled to the optical resonator. An infrared absorber can be provided on the optical waveguide either as a coating or as a plate to aid in absorption of the infrared radiation. In some cases, a vertical resonant cavity can be formed about the infrared absorber to further increase the absorption of the infrared radiation. The sensor can be formed as a single device, or as an array for imaging the infrared radiation.

  18. Alignment method for solar collector arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Driver, Jr., Richard B

    2012-10-23

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for establishing camera fixture location for aligning mirrors on a solar collector array (SCA) comprising multiple mirror modules. The method aligns the mirrors on a module by comparing the location of the receiver image in photographs with the predicted theoretical receiver image location. To accurately align an entire SCA, a common reference is used for all of the individual module images within the SCA. The improved method can use relative pixel location information in digital photographs along with alignment fixture inclinometer data to calculate relative locations of the fixture between modules. The absolute locations are determined by minimizing alignment asymmetry for the SCA. The method inherently aligns all of the mirrors in an SCA to the receiver, even with receiver position and module-to-module alignment errors.

  19. Composite arrays of superconducting microstrip line resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohebbi, H. R. Miao, G. X.; Benningshof, O. W. B.; Taminiau, I. A. J.; Cory, D. G.

    2014-03-07

    A novel design of an array of half-wave superconductive microstrip resonators is described. The resonator is intended to be useful for electron spin resonance studies of thin film samples at cryogenic temperatures. It achieves a high quality factor, has a small mode-volume, and creates a uniform magnetic field in a plane above the resonator. The device is made of thin film Niobium on sapphire wafer and is tested with a static magnetic field. Variation of Q-factor versus the magnetic field's strength at different temperatures is reported and is in a good agreement with simulation when the loss due to the vortices is included. Also, the power-dependence response of the resonator is shown in experiments and is verified by capturing the nonlinearity associated with the surface impedance of the superconducting film into the circuit model of the device.

  20. Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Meyer, Gerald J.

    2003-07-22

    A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: ##EQU1## wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  1. Analog circuit for controlling acoustic transducer arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A simplified ananlog circuit is presented for controlling electromechanical transducer pairs in an acoustic telemetry system. The analog circuit of this invention comprises a single electrical resistor which replaces all of the digital components in a known digital circuit. In accordance with this invention, a first transducer in a transducer pair of array is driven in series with the resistor. The voltage drop across this resistor is then amplified and used to drive the second transducer. The voltage drop across the resistor is proportional and in phase with the current to the transducer. This current is approximately 90 degrees out of phase with the driving voltage to the transducer. This phase shift replaces the digital delay required by the digital control circuit of the prior art.

  2. Sensor array for toxic gas detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL); Penrose, William R. (Naperville, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting and identifying a hazardous component in air or other gas including an array of small sensors which upon exposure to the gas from a pattern of electrical responses, a source of standard response patterns characteristic of various components, and microprocessor means for comparing the sensor-formed response pattern with one or more standard patterns to thereby identify the component on a display. The number of responses may be increased beyond the number of sensors by changing the operating voltage, temperature or other condition associated with one or more sensors to provide a plurality of responses from each of one or more of the sensors. In one embodiment, the instrument is capable of identifying anyone of over 50-100 hazardous components.

  3. Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC); Meyer, Gerald J. (Baltimore, MD)

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  4. Ablation dynamics in coiled wire-array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G. N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Swadling, G.; Chittenden, J. P.; Bland, S. N.; Harvey-Thompson, A.; Knapp, P. F.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Chalenski, D. A.; Blesener, K. S.; Greenly, J. B.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2013-02-15

    Experiments to study the ablation dynamics of coiled wire arrays were performed on the MAGPIE generator (1 MA, 240 ns) at Imperial College, and on the COBRA generator at Cornell University's Laboratory of Plasma Studies (1 MA, 100 ns). The MAGPIE generator was used to drive coiled wires in an inverse array configuration to study the distribution of ablated plasma. Using interferometry to study the plasma distribution during the ablation phase, absolute quantitative measurements of electron line density demonstrated very high density contrasts between coiled ablation streams and inter-stream regions many millimetres from the wire. The measured density contrasts for a coiled array were many times greater than that observed for a conventional array with straight wires, indicating that a much greater axial modulation of the ablated plasma may be responsible for the unique implosion dynamics of coiled arrays. Experiments on the COBRA generator were used to study the complex redirection of plasma around a coiled wire that gives rise to the ablation structure exhibited by coiled arrays. Observations of this complex 3D plasma structure were used to validate the current model of coiled array ablation dynamics [Hall et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 065003 (2008)], demonstrating irrefutably that plasma flow from the wires behaves as predicted. Coiled wires were observed to ablate and implode in the same manner on both machines, indicating that current rise time should not be an issue for the scaling of coiled arrays to larger machines with fast current rise times.

  5. Method for the electro-addressable functionalization of electrode arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Dirk, Shawn M.; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan M.

    2015-12-15

    A method for preparing an electrochemical biosensor uses bias-assisted assembly of unreactive -onium molecules on an electrode array followed by post-assembly electro-addressable conversion of the unreactive group to a chemical or biological recognition group. Electro-addressable functionalization of electrode arrays enables the multi-target electrochemical sensing of biological and chemical analytes.

  6. Arrays of nucleic acid probes on biological chips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chee, Mark (Palo Alto, CA); Cronin, Maureen T. (Los Altos, CA); Fodor, Stephen P. A. (Palo Alto, CA); Huang, Xiaohua X. (Mt. View, CA); Hubbell, Earl A. (Mt. View, CA); Lipshutz, Robert J. (Palo Alto, CA); Lobban, Peter E. (Palo Alto, CA); Morris, MacDonald S. (San Jose, CA); Sheldon, Edward L. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1998-11-17

    DNA chips containing arrays of oligonucleotide probes can be used to determine whether a target nucleic acid has a nucleotide sequence identical to or different from a specific reference sequence. The array of probes comprises probes exactly complementary to the reference sequence, as well as probes that differ by one or more bases from the exactly complementary probes.

  7. Current isolating epitaxial buffer layers for high voltage photodiode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Cooper, Gregory A. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    2002-01-01

    An array of photodiodes in series on a common semi-insulating substrate has a non-conductive buffer layer between the photodiodes and the semi-insulating substrate. The buffer layer reduces current injection leakage between the photodiodes of the array and allows optical energy to be converted to high voltage electrical energy.

  8. Photonic Doppler velocimetry lens array probe incorporating stereo imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malone, Robert M.; Kaufman, Morris I.

    2015-09-01

    A probe including a multiple lens array is disclosed to measure velocity distribution of a moving surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed to the moving surface is reflected back from the surface and is Doppler shifted, collected into the array, and then directed to detection equipment through optic fibers. The received light is mixed with reference laser light and using photonic Doppler velocimetry, a continuous time record of the surface movement is obtained. An array of single-mode optical fibers provides an optic signal to the multiple lens array. Numerous fibers in a fiber array project numerous rays to establish many measurement points at numerous different locations. One or more lens groups may be replaced with imaging lenses so a stereo image of the moving surface can be recorded. Imaging a portion of the surface during initial travel can determine whether the surface is breaking up.

  9. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  10. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-07-14

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  11. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  12. GAiN: Distributed Array Computation with Python

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2009-04-24

    Scientific computing makes use of very large, multidimensional numerical arrays - typically, gigabytes to terabytes in size - much larger than can fit on even the largest single compute node. Such arrays must be distributed across a "cluster" of nodes. Global Arrays is a cluster-based software system from Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that enables an efficient, portable, and parallel shared-memory programming interface to manipulate these arrays. Written in and for the C and FORTRAN programming languages, it takes advantage of high-performance cluster interconnections to allow any node in the cluster to access data on any other node very rapidly. The "numpy" module is the de facto standard for numerical calculation in the Python programming language, a language whose use is growing rapidly in the scientific and engineering communities. numpy provides a powerful N-dimensional array class as well as other scientific computing capabilities. However, like the majority of the core Python modules, numpy is inherently serial. Our system, GAiN (Global Arrays in NumPy), is a parallel extension to Python that accesses Global Arrays through numpy. This allows parallel processing and/or larger problem sizes to be harnessed almost transparently within new or existing numpy programs.

  13. Designing arrays for modern high-resolution methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowla, F.U.

    1987-10-01

    A bearing estimation study of seismic wavefields propagating from a strongly heterogeneous media shows that with the high-resolution MUSIC algorithm the bias of the direction estimate can be reduced by adopting a smaller aperture sub-array. Further, on this sub-array, the bias of the MUSIC algorithm is less than those of the MLM and Bartlett methods. On the full array, the performance for the three different methods are comparable. Improvement in bearing estimation in MUSIC with a reduced aperture might be attributed to increased signal coherency in the array. For methods with less resolution, the improved signal coherency in the smaller array is possible being offset by severe loss of resolution and the presence of weak secondary sources. Building upon the characteristics of real seismic wavefields, a design language has been developed to generate, modify, and test other arrays. Eigenstructures of wavefields and arrays have been studied empirically by simulation of a variety of realistic signals. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Compensated individually addressable array technology for human breast imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, D. Kent (San Francisco, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming broad bandwidth acoustic or microwave beams which encompass array design, array excitation, source signal preprocessing, and received signal postprocessing. This technique uses several different methods to achieve improvement over conventional array systems. These methods are: 1) individually addressable array elements; 2) digital-to-analog converters for the source signals; 3) inverse filtering from source precompensation; and 4) spectral extrapolation to expand the bandwidth of the received signals. The components of the system will be used as follows: 1) The individually addressable array allows scanning around and over an object, such as a human breast, without any moving parts. The elements of the array are broad bandwidth elements and efficient radiators, as well as detectors. 2) Digital-to-analog converters as the source signal generators allow virtually any radiated field to be created in the half-space in front of the array. 3) Preprocessing allows for corrections in the system, most notably in the response of the individual elements and in the ability to increase contrast and resolution of signal propagating through the medium under investigation. 4) Postprocessing allows the received broad bandwidth signals to be expanded in a process similar to analytic continuation. Used together, the system allows for compensation to create beams of any desired shape, control the wave fields generated to correct for medium differences, and improve contract and resolution in and through the medium.

  15. Coded aperture imaging with self-supporting uniformly redundant arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, Edward E.

    1983-01-01

    A self-supporting uniformly redundant array pattern for coded aperture imaging. The present invention utilizes holes which are an integer times smaller in each direction than holes in conventional URA patterns. A balance correlation function is generated where holes are represented by 1's, nonholes are represented by -1's, and supporting area is represented by 0's. The self-supporting array can be used for low energy applications where substrates would greatly reduce throughput. The balance correlation response function for the self-supporting array pattern provides an accurate representation of the source of nonfocusable radiation.

  16. V-156: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-156: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges May...

  17. Team develops 3-D sensor array for detection of neural responses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3-D sensor array for detection of neural responses Team develops 3-D sensor array for detection of neural responses Los Alamos researchers and collaborators have demonstrated a...

  18. Dong Energy London Array Limited Formerly known as CORE Ltd ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limited is a UK Joint Venture between Farm energy and Energi E2, involved in offshore wind farms in the outer Thames Estuary. References: Dong Energy London Array Limited...

  19. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John Frederick; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (~5 ?m): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. As a result, proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.

  20. Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    real-time. The device consists of single capacitive elements applied in a one or two dimensional array to measure the distribution of stresses across a mat surface in real-time ...

  1. Preparation of array of long carbon nanotubes and fibers therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arendt, Paul N.; DePaula, Ramond F.; Zhu, Yuntian T.; Usov, Igor O.

    2015-11-19

    An array of carbon nanotubes is prepared by exposing a catalyst structure to a carbon nanotube precursor. Embodiment catalyst structures include one or more trenches, channels, or a combination of trenches and channels. A system for preparing the array includes a heated surface for heating the catalyst structure and a cooling portion that cools gas above the catalyst structure. The system heats the catalyst structure so that the interaction between the precursor and the catalyst structure results in the formation of an array of carbon nanotubes on the catalyst structure, and cools the gas near the catalyst structure and also cools any carbon nanotubes that form on the catalyst structure to prevent or at least minimize the formation of amorphous carbon. Arrays thus formed may be used for spinning fibers of carbon nanotubes.

  2. Fixed-rate compressed floating-point arrays

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-03-30

    ZFP is a library for lossy compression of single- and double-precision floating-point data. One of the unique features of ZFP is its support for fixed-rate compression, which enables random read and write access at the granularity of small blocks of values. Using a C++ interface, this allows declaring compressed arrays (1D, 2D, and 3D arrays are supported) that through operator overloading can be treated just like conventional, uncompressed arrays, but which allow the user tomore » specify the exact number of bits to allocate to the array. ZFP also has variable-rate fixed-precision and fixed-accuracy modes, which allow the user to specify a tolerance on the relative or absolute error.« less

  3. Sandia Energy - Current Energy Converter Array Optimization Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The CEC array optimization framework was applied to Cobscook Bay, Maine, the first deployment site of the Ocean Renewable Power Company's (ORPC) TidGen(tm) CEC device. The...

  4. Arrays of probes for positional sequencing by hybridization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Prezetakiewiczr, Marek (East Boston, MA); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Waltham, MA)

    2008-01-15

    This invention is directed to methods and reagents useful for sequencing nucleic acid targets utilizing sequencing by hybridization technology comprising probes, arrays of probes and methods whereby sequence information is obtained rapidly and efficiently in discrete packages. That information can be used for the detection, identification, purification and complete or partial sequencing of a particular target nucleic acid. When coupled with a ligation step, these methods can be performed under a single set of hybridization conditions. The invention also relates to the replication of probe arrays and methods for making and replicating arrays of probes which are useful for the large scale manufacture of diagnostic aids used to screen biological samples for specific target sequences. Arrays created using PCR technology may comprise probes with 5'- and/or 3'-overhangs.

  5. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik C. Westman

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the development of simple, robust, MSHA-acceptable clamping unit. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  6. 24 CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik C. Westman

    2003-07-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multichannel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. No work was completed during this reporting period as project personnel are waiting for the mine to become available for final field testing of the array. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  7. Josephson oscillations in a series array Josephson voltage standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, H.G.; Krech, W.; Mikolajczak, B.

    1989-06-01

    Josephson oscillations in a large series array of Josephson junctions designed as a superconducting microwave transmission line are studied. For descriptions of the Josephson junctions both the Stewart--McCumber model and the Werthamer model are used. The attenuation of the Josephson oscillations in the considered array is composed of two terms rising from the stripline and from the Josephson junctions. The latter one is of increasing significance for lower than usually applied drive frequencies.

  8. Particle Identification in the NIMROD-ISiS Detector Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuenschel, S.; Hagel, K.; May, L. W.; Wada, R.; Yennello, S. J.

    2009-03-10

    Interest in the influence of the neutron-to-proton (N/Z) ratio on multifragmenting nuclei has demanded an improvement in the capabilities of multi-detector arrays as well as the companion analysis methods. The particle identification method used in the NIMROD-ISiS 4{pi} array is described. Performance of the detectors and the analysis method are presented for the reaction of {sup 86}Kr+{sup 64}Ni at 35 MeV/u.

  9. DETECTION OF FAST TRANSIENTS WITH RADIO INTERFEROMETRIC ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Chengalur, J. N.; Gupta, Y.; Prasad, J.; Roy, J.; Kudale, S. S.; Cox, P. J.; Bailes, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Van Straten, W.

    2013-05-01

    Next-generation radio arrays, including the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its pathfinders, will open up new avenues for exciting transient science at radio wavelengths. Their innovative designs, comprising a large number of small elements, pose several challenges in digital processing and optimal observing strategies. The Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) presents an excellent test-bed for developing and validating suitable observing modes and strategies for transient experiments with future arrays. Here we describe the first phase of the ongoing development of a transient detection system for GMRT that is planned to eventually function in a commensal mode with other observing programs. It capitalizes on the GMRT's interferometric and sub-array capabilities, and the versatility of a new software backend. We outline considerations in the plan and design of transient exploration programs with interferometric arrays, and describe a pilot survey that was undertaken to aid in the development of algorithms and associated analysis software. This survey was conducted at 325 and 610 MHz, and covered 360 deg{sup 2} of the sky with short dwell times. It provides large volumes of real data that can be used to test the efficacies of various algorithms and observing strategies applicable for transient detection. We present examples that illustrate the methodologies of detecting short-duration transients, including the use of sub-arrays for higher resilience to spurious events of terrestrial origin, localization of candidate events via imaging, and the use of a phased array for improved signal detection and confirmation. In addition to demonstrating applications of interferometric arrays for fast transient exploration, our efforts mark important steps in the roadmap toward SKA-era science.

  10. Compact antenna arrays with wide bandwidth and low sidelobe levels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strassner, II, Bernd H.

    2014-09-09

    Highly efficient, low cost, easily manufactured SAR antenna arrays with lightweight low profiles, large instantaneous bandwidths and low SLL are disclosed. The array topology provides all necessary circuitry within the available antenna aperture space and between the layers of material that comprise the aperture. Bandwidths of 15.2 GHz to 18.2 GHz, with 30 dB SLLs azimuthally and elevationally, and radiation efficiencies above 40% may be achieved. Operation over much larger bandwidths is possible as well.

  11. CMI Unique Facility: Rapid Analysis of Combinatoric Sample Arrays |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute Rapid Analysis of Combinatoric Sample Arrays The Rapid Analysis of Combinatoric Sample Arrays is one of half a dozen unique facilities developed by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub of the U.S. Department of Energy. Combinatorial 'libraries' of newly synthesized experimental compounds are assessed in a facility at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). Serving three Energy Innovation Hubs - Joint Center f rapid analysis of

  12. Dielectrophoresis device and method having nonuniform arrays for manipulating particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cummings, Eric B.; Fintschenko, Yolanda; Simmons, Blake A.

    2012-09-04

    Microfluidic devices according to embodiments of the present invention include an inlet port, an outlet port, and a channel or chamber having a non-uniform array of insulating features on one or more surfaces. Electrodes are provided for generation of a spatially non-uniform electric field across the array. A voltage source, which may be an A.C. and/or a D.C. voltage source may be coupled to the electrodes for the generation of the electric field.

  13. Planarized Unentangled Carbon Nanotube Arrays. (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Planarized Unentangled Carbon Nanotube Arrays. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Planarized Unentangled Carbon Nanotube Arrays. Abstract not provided. Authors: Friedman, Caitlin Anne Rochford ; Limmer, Steven J ; Siegal, Michael P. ; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin Publication Date: 2014-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 1143007 Report Number(s): SAND2014-3298C 511751 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: 2014 MRS Spring Meeting &

  14. Planarized arrays of aligned untangled multiwall carbon nanotubes with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ohmic back contacts. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Planarized arrays of aligned untangled multiwall carbon nanotubes with Ohmic back contacts. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Planarized arrays of aligned untangled multiwall carbon nanotubes with Ohmic back contacts. Abstract not provided. Authors: Friedman, Caitlin Anne Rochford ; Limmer, Steven J ; Howell, Stephen W. ; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin ; Siegal, Michael P. Publication Date: 2014-09-01 OSTI

  15. Interconnection arrangement of routers of processor boards in array of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cabinets supporting secure physical partition (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Interconnection arrangement of routers of processor boards in array of cabinets supporting secure physical partition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interconnection arrangement of routers of processor boards in array of cabinets supporting secure physical partition A multiple processor computing apparatus includes a physical interconnect structure that is flexibly configurable to support selective

  16. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production | Department of Energy High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon csp_review_meeting_042413_obrey.pdf More Documents & Publications A Method for Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single

  17. Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostics and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Environmental Monitoring. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostics and Environmental Monitoring. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostics and Environmental Monitoring. Abstract not provided. Authors: Harper, Jason C. ; Edwards, Thayne L. ; Polsky, Ronen ; Wheeler, David Roger ; Brozik, Susan Marie Publication Date: 2011-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1120360 Report

  18. Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostics.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostics. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostics. Abstract not provided. Authors: Harper, Jason C. ; Edwards, Thayne L. ; Polsky, Ronen ; Wheeler, David Roger ; Brozik, Susan Marie Publication Date: 2011-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 1109401 Report Number(s): SAND2011-0881C 473595 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type:

  19. Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Thomas L.; Fisher, Karl A.

    2005-08-09

    An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

  20. Coherent optical monolithic phased-array antenna steering system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01

    An optical-based RF beam steering system for phased-array antennas comprising a photonic integrated circuit (PIC). The system is based on optical heterodyning employed to produce microwave phase shifting by a monolithic PIC constructed entirely of passive components. Microwave power and control signal distribution to the antenna is accomplished by optical fiber, permitting physical separation of the PIC and its control functions from the antenna. The system reduces size, weight, complexity, and cost of phased-array antenna systems.

  1. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaing, C

    2007-11-01

    We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

  2. Optimal Chunking of Large Multidimensional Arrays for Data Warehousing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otoo, Ekow J; Otoo, Ekow J.; Rotem, Doron; Seshadri, Sridhar

    2008-02-15

    Very large multidimensional arrays are commonly used in data intensive scientific computations as well as on-line analytical processingapplications referred to as MOLAP. The storage organization of such arrays on disks is done by partitioning the large global array into fixed size sub-arrays called chunks or tiles that form the units of data transfer between disk and memory. Typical queries involve the retrieval of sub-arrays in a manner that access all chunks that overlap the query results. An important metric of the storage efficiency is the expected number of chunks retrieved over all such queries. The question that immediately arises is"what shapes of array chunks give the minimum expected number of chunks over a query workload?" The problem of optimal chunking was first introduced by Sarawagi and Stonebraker who gave an approximate solution. In this paper we develop exact mathematical models of the problem and provide exact solutions using steepest descent and geometric programming methods. Experimental results, using synthetic and real life workloads, show that our solutions are consistently within than 2.0percent of the true number of chunks retrieved for any number of dimensions. In contrast, the approximate solution of Sarawagi and Stonebraker can deviate considerably from the true result with increasing number of dimensions and also may lead to suboptimal chunk shapes.

  3. Modular package for cooling a laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mundinger, David C. (Stockton, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A laser diode array is disclosed that includes a plurality of planar packages and active cooling. The laser diode array may be operated in a long duty cycle, or in continuous operation. A laser diode bar and a microchannel heat sink are thermally coupled in a compact, thin planar package having the laser diode bar located proximate to one edge. In an array, a number of such thin planar packages are secured together in a stacked configuration, in close proximity so that the laser diodes are spaced closely. The cooling means includes a microchannel heat sink that is attached proximate to the laser bar so that it absorbs heat generated by laser operation. To provide the coolant to the microchannels, each thin planar package comprises a thin inlet manifold and a thin outlet manifold connected to an inlet corridor and an outlet corridor. The inlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array, and the outlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array. The inlet and outlet corridors are connected to a conventional coolant circulation system. The laser diode array with active cooling has application as an optical pump for high power solid state lasers. Further, it can be incorporated in equipment such as communications devices and active sensors, and in military and space applications, and it can be useful in applications having space constraints and energy limitations.

  4. Reproducible, high performance patch antenna array apparatus and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strassner, II, Bernd H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-01-23

    A reproducible, high-performance patch antenna array apparatus includes a patch antenna array provided on a unitary dielectric substrate, and a feed network provided on the same unitary substrate and proximity coupled to the patch antenna array. The reproducibility is enhanced by using photolithographic patterning and etching to produce both the patch antenna array and the feed network.

  5. Method and apparatus for synthesis of arrays of DNA probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cerrina, Francesco (Madison, WI); Sussman, Michael R. (Madison, WI); Blattner, Frederick R. (Madison, WI); Singh-Gasson, Sangeet (Madison, WI); Green, Roland (Madison, WI)

    2002-04-23

    The synthesis of arrays of DNA probes sequences, polypeptides, and the like is carried out using a patterning process on an active surface of a substrate. An image is projected onto the active surface of the substrate utilizing an image former that includes a light source that provides light to a micromirror device comprising an array of electronically addressable micromirrors, each of which can be selectively tilted between one of at least two positions. Projection optics receives the light reflected from the micromirrors along an optical axis and precisely images the micromirrors onto the active surface of the substrate, which may be used to activate the surface of the substrate. The first level of bases may then be applied to the substrate, followed by development steps, and subsequent exposure of the substrate utilizing a different pattern of micromirrors, with further repeats until the elements of a two dimensional array on the substrate surface have an appropriate base bound thereto. The micromirror array can be controlled in conjunction with a DNA synthesizer supplying appropriate reagents to a flow cell containing the active substrate to control the sequencing of images presented by the micromirror array in coordination of the reagents provided to the substrate.

  6. Manycore Performance-Portability: Kokkos Multidimensional Array Library

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Edwards, H. Carter; Sunderland, Daniel; Porter, Vicki; Amsler, Chris; Mish, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Large, complex scientific and engineering application code have a significant investment in computational kernels to implement their mathematical models. Porting these computational kernels to the collection of modern manycore accelerator devices is a major challenge in that these devices have diverse programming models, application programming interfaces (APIs), and performance requirements. The Kokkos Array programming model provides library-based approach to implement computational kernels that are performance-portable to CPU-multicore and GPGPU accelerator devices. This programming model is based upon three fundamental concepts: (1) manycore compute devices each with its own memory space, (2) data parallel kernels and (3) multidimensional arrays. Kernel executionmore » performance is, especially for NVIDIA® devices, extremely dependent on data access patterns. Optimal data access pattern can be different for different manycore devices – potentially leading to different implementations of computational kernels specialized for different devices. The Kokkos Array programming model supports performance-portable kernels by (1) separating data access patterns from computational kernels through a multidimensional array API and (2) introduce device-specific data access mappings when a kernel is compiled. An implementation of Kokkos Array is available through Trilinos [Trilinos website, http://trilinos.sandia.gov/, August 2011].« less

  7. Injection monitoring with seismic arrays and adaptive noise cancellation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harben, P.E.; Harris, D.B.; Jarpe, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Although the application of seismic methods, active and passive, to monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes is not new, seismic arrays and array processing technology coupled with a new noise cancellation method has not been attempted. Successful application of seismic arrays to passively monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes depends on being able to sufficiently cancel the expected large amplitude background seismic noise typical of an oil or geothermal production environment so that small amplitude seismic signals occurring at depth can be detected and located. This report describes the results of a short field experiment conducted to test both the application of seismic arrays for in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring and the active noise cancellation technique in a real reservoir production environment. Although successful application of these techniques to in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring would have the greatest payoff in the oil industry, the proof-of-concept field experiment site was chosen to be the Geysers geothermal field in northern California. This site was chosen because of known high seismicity rates, a relatively shallow production depth, cooperation and some cost sharing the UNOCAL Oil Corporation, and the close proximity of the site to LLNL. The body of this report describes the Geysers field experimental configuration and then discusses the results of the seismic array processing and the results of the seismic noise cancellation followed by a brief conclusion. 2 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Method for fabricating arrays of micro-needles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kenney, Christopher J.

    2003-04-22

    An array of micro-needles is created by forming an array pattern on the upper surface of a silicon wafer and etching through openings in the pattern to define micro-needle sized cavities having a desired depth. The mold thus formed may be filled with electrically conductive material, after which a desired fraction of the silicon wafer bulk is removed from the bottom-up by etching, to expose an array of projecting micro-needles. The mold may instead be filled with a flexible material to form a substrate useful in gene cell probing. An array of hollow micro-needles may be formed by coating the lower wafer surface with SiN, and etching through pattern openings in the upper surface down to the SiN layer, and then conformally coating the upper surface with thermal silicon dioxide. The SiN layer is then stripped away and a desired fraction of the bulk of the wafer removed from the bottom-up to expose an array of projecting hollow micro-needles.

  9. Amorphous silicon cell array powered solar tracking apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    An array of an even number of amorphous silicon solar cells are serially connected between first and second terminals of opposite polarity. The terminals are connected to one input terminal of a DC motor whose other input terminal is connected to the mid-cell of the serial array. Vane elements are adjacent the end cells to selectively shadow one or the other of the end cells when the array is oriented from a desired attitude relative to the sun. The shadowing of one cell of a group of cells on one side of the mid-cell reduces the power of that group substantially so that full power from the group of cells on the other side of the mid-cell drives the motor to reorient the array to the desired attitude. The cell groups each have a full power output at the power rating of the motor. When the array is at the desired attitude the power output of the two groups of cells balances due to their opposite polarity so that the motor remains unpowered.

  10. Microchannel cross load array with dense parallel input

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Stefan P.

    2004-04-06

    An architecture or layout for microchannel arrays using T or Cross (+) loading for electrophoresis or other injection and separation chemistry that are performed in microfluidic configurations. This architecture enables a very dense layout of arrays of functionally identical shaped channels and it also solves the problem of simultaneously enabling efficient parallel shapes and biasing of the input wells, waste wells, and bias wells at the input end of the separation columns. One T load architecture uses circular holes with common rows, but not columns, which allows the flow paths for each channel to be identical in shape, using multiple mirror image pieces. Another T load architecture enables the access hole array to be formed on a biaxial, collinear grid suitable for EDM micromachining (square holes), with common rows and columns.

  11. Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

    2009-06-01

    Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

  12. Virtual electrodes for high-density electrode arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cela, Carlos J.; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2015-10-13

    The present embodiments are directed to implantable electrode arrays having virtual electrodes. The virtual electrodes may improve the resolution of the implantable electrode array without the burden of corresponding complexity of electronic circuitry and wiring. In a particular embodiment, a virtual electrode may include one or more passive elements to help steer current to a specific location between the active electrodes. For example, a passive element may be a metalized layer on a substrate that is adjacent to, but not directly connected to an active electrode. In certain embodiments, an active electrode may be directly coupled to a power source via a conductive connection. Beneficially, the passive elements may help to increase the overall resolution of the implantable array by providing additional stimulation points without requiring additional wiring or driver circuitry for the passive elements.

  13. Array design and expression evaluation in POOMA II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karmesin, S.; Crotinger, J.; Cummings, J.; Haney, S.; Humphrey, W.; Reynders, J.; Smith, S.; Williams, T.J.

    1998-12-31

    POOMA is a templated C++ class library for use in the development of large-scale scientific simulations on serial and parallel computers. POOMA II is a new design and implementation of POOMA intended to add richer capabilities and greater flexibility to the framework. The new design employs a generic Array class that acts as an interface to, or view on, a wide variety of data representation objects referred to as engines. This design separates the interface and the representation of multidimensional arrays. The separation is achieved using compile-time techniques rather than virtual functions, and thus code efficiency is maintained. POOMA II uses PETE, the Portable Expression Template Engine, to efficiently represent complex mathematical expressions involving arrays and other objects. The representation of expressions is kept separate from expression evaluation, allowing the use of multiple evaluator mechanisms that can support nested where-block constructs, hardware-specific optimizations and different run-time environments.

  14. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Hardee, Harry C.; Reynolds, Gerald D.; Steinfort, Terry D.

    1992-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings.

  15. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

  16. Performance parameters of a liquid filled ionization chamber array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppe, B.; Stelljes, T. S.; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Harder, D.; Willborn, K.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: In this work, the properties of the two-dimensional liquid filled ionization chamber array Octavius 1000SRS (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) for use in clinical photon-beam dosimetry are investigated.Methods: Measurements were carried out at an Elekta Synergy and Siemens Primus accelerator. For measurements of stability, linearity, and saturation effects of the 1000SRS array a Semiflex 31013 ionization chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used as a reference. The effective point of measurement was determined by TPR measurements of the array in comparison with a Roos chamber (type 31004, PTW-Freiburg, Germany). The response of the array with varying field size and depth of measurement was evaluated using a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber as a reference. Output factor measurements were carried out with a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber, a diode (type 60012, PTW-Freiburg, Germany), and the detector array under investigation. The dose response function for a single detector of the array was determined by measuring 1 cm wide slit-beam dose profiles and comparing them against diode-measured profiles. Theoretical aspects of the low pass properties and of the sampling frequency of the detector array were evaluated. Dose profiles measured with the array and the diode detector were compared, and an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) field was verified using the Gamma-Index method and the visualization of line dose profiles.Results: The array showed a short and long term stability better than 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Fluctuations in linearity were found to be within 0.2% for the vendor specified dose range. Saturation effects were found to be similar to those reported in other studies for liquid-filled ionization chambers. The detector's relative response varied with field size and depth of measurement, showing a small energy dependence accounting for maximum signal deviations of 2.6% from the reference condition for the setup used. The ?-values of the Gaussian dose response function for a single detector of the array were found to be (0.72 0.25) mm at 6 MV and (0.74 0.25) mm at 15 MV and the corresponding low pass cutoff frequencies are 0.22 and 0.21 mm{sup ?1}, respectively. For the inner 5 5 cm{sup 2} region and the outer 11 11 cm{sup 2} region of the array the Nyquist theorem is fulfilled for maximum sampling frequencies of 0.2 and 0.1 mm{sup ?1}, respectively. An IMRT field verification with a Gamma-Index analysis yielded a passing rate of 95.2% for a 3 mm/3% criterion with a TPS calculation as reference.Conclusions: This study shows the applicability of the Octavius 1000SRS in modern dosimetry. Output factor and dose profile measurements illustrated the applicability of the array in small field and stereotactic dosimetry. The high spatial resolution ensures adequate measurements of dose profiles in regular and intensity modulated photon-beam fields.

  17. Optical phased arrays with evanescently-coupled antennas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Jie; Watts, Michael R; Yaacobi, Ami; Timurdogan, Erman

    2015-03-24

    An optical phased array formed of a large number of nanophotonic antenna elements can be used to project complex images into the far field. These nanophotonic phased arrays, including the nanophotonic antenna elements and waveguides, can be formed on a single chip of silicon using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Directional couplers evanescently couple light from the waveguides to the nanophotonic antenna elements, which emit the light as beams with phases and amplitudes selected so that the emitted beams interfere in the far field to produce the desired pattern. In some cases, each antenna in the phased array may be optically coupled to a corresponding variable delay line, such as a thermo-optically tuned waveguide or a liquid-filled cell, which can be used to vary the phase of the antenna's output (and the resulting far-field interference pattern).

  18. 24 CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik C. Westman

    2003-06-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multichannel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  19. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik C. Westman

    2002-08-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  20. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik C. Westman

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multichannel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  1. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik C. Westman

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  2. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik C. Westman

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for orienting the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) do not have the same orientation, the data will be essentially worthless. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  3. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R. (Tijeras, NM); Michie, Robert B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems.

  4. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Michie, R.B.

    1996-02-20

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems. 8 figs.

  5. Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Rudnick, Thomas Jeffery

    2005-07-05

    A sensor array is configured based upon capacitive sensor techniques to measure stresses at various positions in a sheet simultaneously and allow a stress map to be obtained in near real-time. The device consists of single capacitive elements applied in a one or two dimensional array to measure the distribution of stresses across a mat surface in real-time as a function of position for manufacturing and test applications. In-plane and normal stresses in rolling bodies such as tires may thus be monitored.

  6. Piezoresistive cantilever array sensor for consolidated bioprocess monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Seonghwan Sam; Rahman, Touhidur; Senesac, Larry R; Davison, Brian H; Thundat, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Cellulolytic microbes occur in diverse natural niches and are being screened for industrial modification and utility. A microbe for Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) development can rapidly degrade pure cellulose and then ferment the resulting sugars into fuels. To identify and screen for novel microbes for CBP, we have developed a piezoresistive cantilever array sensor which is capable of simultaneous monitoring of glucose and ethanol concentration changes in a phosphate buffer solution. 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid (4-MPBA) and polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-thiol are employed to functionalize each piezoresistive cantilever for glucose and ethanol sensing, respectively. Successful concentration measurements of glucose and ethanol with minimal interferences are obtained with our cantilever array sensor.

  7. High power density fuel cell comprising an array of microchannels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2013-10-15

    A fuel cell according to one embodiment includes a porous electrolyte support structure defining an array of microchannels, the microchannels including fuel and oxidant microchannels; fuel electrodes formed along some of the microchannels; and oxidant electrodes formed along other of the microchannels. A method of making a fuel cell according to one embodiment includes forming an array of walls defining microchannels therebetween using at least one of molding, stamping, extrusion, injection and electrodeposition; processing the walls to make the walls porous, thereby creating a porous electrolyte support structure; forming anode electrodes along some of the microchannels; and forming cathode electrodes along other of the microchannels. Additional embodiments are also disclosed.

  8. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John Frederick; Sinclair, Michael B.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization.more » As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (~5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. As a result, proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.« less

  9. Unidirectional transmission using array of zero-refractive-index metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Yangyang; Xu, Lin; Hong Hang, Zhi; Chen, Huanyang

    2014-05-12

    In this Letter, we find that high efficient unidirectional transmission occurs for an array of prisms made of zero-refractive-index metamaterials. As a specific demonstration, we further design the device using Dirac-cone-like photonic crystals. The device can function for a broadband of spectrum. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the one-way wave functionality.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of nano-gas sensor arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, H. S. Kashyout, A. B.; Morsi, I. Nasser, A. A. A. Raafat, A.

    2015-03-30

    A novel structures of Nanomaterials gas sensors array constructed using ZnO, and ZnO doped with Al via sol-gel technique. Two structure arrays are developed; the first one is a double sensor array based on doping with percentages of 1% and 5%. The second is a quadrature sensor array based on several doping ratios concentrations (0%, 1%, 5% and 10%). The morphological structures of prepared ZnO were revealed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns reveal a highly crystallized wurtzite structure and used for identifying phase structure and chemical state of both ZnO and ZnO doped with Al under different preparation conditions and different doping ratios. Chemical composition of Al-doped ZnO nanopowders was performed using energy dispersive x-ray (EDS) analysis. The electrical characteristics of the sensor are determined by measuring the two terminal sensors output resistance for O{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases as a function of temperature.

  11. Phased laser array with tailored spectral and coherence properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Messerly, Michael J; Dawson, Jay W; Beach, Raymond J

    2014-05-20

    Architectures for coherently combining an array of fiber-based lasers are provided. By matching their lengths to within a few integer multiples of a wavelength, the spatial and temporal properties of a single large laser are replicated, while extending the average or peak pulsed power limit.

  12. Phased laser array with tailored spectral and coherence properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Messerly, Michael J (Danville, CA); Dawson, Jay W (Livermore, CA); Beach, Raymond J (Livermore, CA)

    2011-03-29

    Architectures for coherently combining an array of fiber-based lasers are provided. By matching their lengths to within a few integer multiples of a wavelength, the spatial and temporal properties of a single large laser are replicated, while extending the average or peak pulsed power limit.

  13. Position sensor for linear synchronous motors employing halbach arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard Freeman

    2014-12-23

    A position sensor suitable for use in linear synchronous motor (LSM) drive systems employing Halbach arrays to create their magnetic fields is described. The system has several advantages over previously employed ones, especially in its simplicity and its freedom from being affected by weather conditions, accumulated dirt, or electrical interference from the LSM system itself.

  14. The TIARA Array for the Study of Nucleon Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catford, W.N.; Timis, C.N.; Labiche, M.; Moores, G.; Chapman, R.; Lemmon, R.C.

    2003-08-26

    The TIARA array is designed for the study of nucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics, using radioactive beams. Crucially, the energies of coincident gamma-rays will be used to give better energy resolution for final excited states than can be achieved by measuring the energies of particles alone. Thus, an extremely compact array of position sensitive silicon strips will fit inside an array of four segmented clover EXOGAM Ge detectors which can each be mounted as close as 50mm from the target. Approximately 90% of 4{pi} is covered by 400{mu}m silicon detectors manufactured using 6-inch technology. Particle ID is by the kinematical correlation between the angle and the deposited energy, measured in coincidence with the beam-like particle recorded near zero degrees. Construction will be complete early in 2003 and the array will be deployed initially at GANIL, in front of the VAMOS spectrometer. An early application will be the reaction d(56Ni,55Ni)t.

  15. Small Area Array-Based LED Luminaire Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Yuan

    2008-01-09

    This report contains a summary of technical achievements during a three-year project to demonstrate high efficiency LED luminaire designs based on small area array-based gallium nitride diodes. Novel GaN-based LED array designs are described, specifically addressing the thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements for the incorporation of such arrays into viable solid-state LED luminaires. This work resulted in the demonstration of an integrated luminaire prototype of 1000 lumens cool white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 89.4 lm/W at CCT of 6000oK and CRI of 73; and performance of 903 lumens warm white light output with reflector shaped beams and efficacy of 63.0 lm/W at CCT of 2800oK and CRI of 82. In addition, up to 1275 lumens cool white light output at 114.2 lm/W and 1156 lumens warm white light output at 76.5 lm/W were achieved if the reflector was not used. The success to integrate small area array-based LED designs and address thermal, optical, electrical and mechanical requirements was clearly achieved in these luminaire prototypes with outstanding performance and high efficiency.

  16. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  17. Project Profile: High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next-Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Profile: High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next-Generation Solar Thermal Power ... The technology, called the high-temperature thermal array, aims to achieve the SunShot ...

  18. Dose distribution from x-ray microbeam arrays applied to radiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and an array of parallel planar microbeams as used in radiation therapy research. ... also was studied for a single pencil beam and for an array of parallel planar microbeams. ...

  19. A Compact, Low-Power Cantilever-Based Sensor Array for Chemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: A Compact, Low-Power Cantilever-Based Sensor Array for Chemical Detection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Compact, Low-Power Cantilever-Based Sensor Array ...

  20. Ultra-efficient, Robust and Well-defined Nano-Array based Monolithic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ultra-efficient, Robust and Well-defined Nano-Array based Monolithic Catalysts Ultra-efficient, Robust and Well-defined Nano-Array based Monolithic Catalysts This presentation ...

  1. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY...

  2. Standard, Random, and Optimum Array conversions from Two-Pole resistance data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rucker, D. F.; Glaser, Danney R.

    2014-09-01

    We present an array evaluation of standard and nonstandard arrays over a hydrogeological target. We develop the arrays by linearly combining data from the pole-pole (or 2-pole) array. The first test shows that reconstructed resistances for the standard Schlumberger and dipoledipole arrays are equivalent or superior to the measured arrays in terms of noise, especially at large geometric factors. The inverse models for the standard arrays also confirm what others have presented in terms of target resolvability, namely the dipole-dipole array has the highest resolution. In the second test, we reconstruct random electrode combinations from the 2-pole data segregated intomore » inner, outer, and overlapping dipoles. The resistance data and inverse models from these randomized arrays show those with inner dipoles to be superior in terms of noise and resolution and that overlapping dipoles can cause model instability and low resolution. Finally, we use the 2-pole data to create an optimized array that maximizes the model resolution matrix for a given electrode geometry. The optimized array produces the highest resolution and target detail. Thus, the tests demonstrate that high quality data and high model resolution can be achieved by acquiring field data from the pole-pole array.« less

  3. Automated control of linear constricted plasma source array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Maschwitz, Peter A. (Martinsville, VA)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling an array of constricted glow discharge chambers are disclosed. More particularly a linear array of constricted glow plasma sources whose polarity and geometry are set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the sources are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The quality of film along deposition "tracks" opposite the plasma sources can be measured and compared to desired absolute or relative values by optical and/or electrical sensors. Plasma quality can then be adjusted by adjusting the power current values, gas feed pressure/flow, gas mixtures or a combination of some or all of these to improve the match between the measured values and the desired values.

  4. Close-packed array of light emitting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Simpson, John T.

    2013-04-09

    A close-packed array of light emitting diodes includes a nonconductive substrate having a plurality of elongate channels extending therethrough from a first side to a second side, where each of the elongate channels in at least a portion of the substrate includes a conductive rod therein. The conductive rods have a density over the substrate of at least about 1,000 rods per square centimeter and include first conductive rods and second conductive rods. The close-packed array further includes a plurality of light emitting diodes on the first side of the substrate, where each light emitting diode is in physical contact with at least one first conductive rod and in electrical contact with at least one second conductive rod.

  5. Photovoltaic array with minimally penetrating rooftop support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenox, Carl J.S.

    2012-10-23

    A photovoltaic array including a plurality of photovoltaic assemblies and a plurality of mounting units. The mounting units each include an elongate rail and a plurality of leg assemblies. The rail is sized and configured to maintain a portion of at least two of the photovoltaic assemblies, with the leg assemblies extending from the rail in a spaced-apart fashion and terminating in a foot for placement against a rooftop structure for minimally penetration installation. Further, at least one of the leg assemblies can include a retractable leg. When the photovoltaic array is installed to a rooftop structure including a membrane intermittently secured to a rooftop deck, the retractable leg accommodates upward billowing of the membrane under windy conditions.

  6. Matrix-assisted energy conversion in nanostructured piezoelectric arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sirbuly, Donald J.; Wang, Xianying; Wang, Yinmin

    2013-01-01

    A nanoconverter is capable of directly generating electricity through a nanostructure embedded in a polymer layer experiencing differential thermal expansion in a stress transfer zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or substantially vertically aligned on a substrate. The resulting nanoforest is then embedded with the polymer layer, which transfers stress to the nanostructures in the stress transfer zone, thereby creating a nanostructure voltage output due to the piezoelectric effect acting on the nanostructure. Electrodes attached at both ends of the nanostructures generate output power at densities of .about.20 nW/cm.sup.2 with heating temperatures of .about.65.degree. C. Nanoconverters arrayed in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries.

  7. Structure of stagnated plasma in aluminum wire array Z pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G. N.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Bland, S. N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Ampleford, D. J.; Palmer, J. B. A.; Bott, S. C.; Rapley, J.; Chittenden, J. P.; Apruzese, J. P.

    2006-08-15

    Experiments with aluminum wire array Z pinches have been carried out on the mega-ampere generator for plasma implosion experiments (MAGPIE) at Imperial College London [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (1996)]. It has been shown that in these arrays, there are two intense sources of radiation during stagnation; Al XII line emission from a precursor-sized object, and both continuum and Al XIII radiation from bright spots of either significantly higher temperature or density randomly distributed around this object so as to produce a hollow emission profile. Spatially resolved spectra produced by spherically bent crystals were recorded, both time-integrated and time-resolved, and were used to show that these two sources of radiation peak at the same time.

  8. Blocked impurity band hybrid infrared focal plane arrays for astronomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D.B.; Seib, D.H.; Stetson, S.B.; Herter, T.; Rowlands, N.; Schoenwald, J.

    1989-02-01

    High-performance infrared hybrid focal plane arrays using 10 x 50 element Si:As Blocked-Impurity-Band (BIB) detectors (cut-off wavelength = 28 ..mu..m) and matching switched MOSFET multiplexers have been developed and characterized for space astronomy. Use of impurity band conduction technology provides detectors which are nuclear radiation hard and free of the many anomalies associated with conventional silicon photoconductive detectors. Emphasis in this paper is on recent advances in detector material quality which have led to significantly improved detector and hybrid characteristics. Results demonstrating increase quantum efficiency (particular at short wavelength infrared), obtained by varying the Blocked-Impurity-Band detector properties (infrared active layer thickness and arsenic doping profile), are summarized. Read noise and dark current for different temperatures have been measured and are also described. The hybrid array performance achieved clearly demonstrates that BIB detectors are well suited for use in astronomical instrumentation.

  9. High power density fuel cell comprising an array of microchannels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopchak, David A; Morse, Jeffrey D; Upadhye, Ravindra S; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T

    2014-05-06

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell according to one embodiment includes an array of microchannels defined by a porous electrolyte support structure extending between bottom and upper support layers, the microchannels including fuel and oxidant microchannels; fuel electrodes formed along some of the microchannels; and air electrodes formed along other of the microchannels. A method of making a phosphoric acid fuel cell according to one embodiment includes etching an array of microchannels in a substrate, thereby forming walls between the microchannels; processing the walls to make the walls porous, thereby forming a porous electrolyte support structure; forming anode electrodes along some of the walls; forming cathode electrodes along other of the walls; and filling the porous electrolyte support structure with a phosphoric acid electrolyte. Additional embodiments are also disclosed.

  10. Strained layer superlattice focal plane array having a planar structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin K; Carroll, Malcolm S; Gin, Aaron; Marsh, Phillip F; Young, Erik W; Cich, Michael J

    2012-10-23

    An infrared focal plane array (FPA) is disclosed which utilizes a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5 epitaxially grown on a GaSb substrate. The FPA avoids the use of a mesa structure to isolate each photodetector element and instead uses impurity-doped regions formed in or about each photodetector for electrical isolation. This results in a substantially-planar structure in which the SLS is unbroken across the entire width of a 2-D array of the photodetector elements which are capped with an epitaxially-grown passivation layer to reduce or eliminate surface recombination. The FPA has applications for use in the wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m.

  11. Versatile, high-sensitivity faraday cup array for ion implanters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musket, Ronald G. (Danville, CA); Patterson, Robert G. (Dublin, CA)

    2003-01-01

    An improved Faraday cup array for determining the dose of ions delivered to a substrate during ion implantation and for monitoring the uniformity of the dose delivered to the substrate. The improved Faraday cup array incorporates a variable size ion beam aperture by changing only an insertable plate that defines the aperture without changing the position of the Faraday cups which are positioned for the operation of the largest ion beam aperture. The design enables the dose sensitivity range, typically 10.sup.11 -10.sup.18 ions/cm.sup.2 to be extended to below 10.sup.6 ions/cm.sup.2. The insertable plate/aperture arrangement is structurally simple and enables scaling to aperture areas between <1 cm.sup.2 and >750 cm.sup.2, and enables ultra-high vacuum (UHV) applications by incorporation of UHV-compatible materials.

  12. 3D target array for pulsed multi-sourced radiography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Le Galloudec, Nathalie Joelle

    2016-02-23

    The various technologies presented herein relate to the generation of x-rays and other charged particles. A plurality of disparate source materials can be combined on an array to facilitate fabrication of co-located mixed tips (point sources) which can be utilized to form a polychromatic cloud, e.g., a plurality of x-rays having a range of energies and or wavelengths, etc. The tips can be formed such that the x-rays are emitted in a direction different to other charged particles to facilitate clean x-ray sourcing. Particles, such as protons, can be directionally emitted to facilitate generation of neutrons at a secondary target. The various particles can be generated by interaction of a laser irradiating the array of tips. The tips can be incorporated into a plurality of 3D conical targets, the conical target sidewall(s) can be utilized to microfocus a portion of a laser beam onto the tip material.

  13. Small nickel nanoparticle arrays from long chain imidazolium ionic liquids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Mei; Campbell, Paul S.; Santini, Catherine C.; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2013-11-08

    A series of six long chain alkyl mono- and bi-cationic imidazolium based salts with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (NTf2–) as the anion were synthesized and characterized. Single crystal structure of 1-methyl-3-octadecylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide could be obtained by X-ray analysis. All these long chain alkyl imidazolium based ILs were applied in the synthesis of nickel nanoparticles via chemical decomposition of an organometallic precursor of nickel. In these media, spontaneous decomposition of Ni(COD)2 (COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) in the absence of H2 occurred giving small NPs (≤4 nm) with narrow size distributions. Interestingly, formation of regularly interspaced NP arrays was also observed in long chain ILs. Lastly,more » such array formation could be interesting for potential applications such as carbon nanotube growth.« less

  14. Combustion measurements of an array of radial jet reattachment flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.

    1999-07-01

    Radial Jet Reattachment Combustion (RJRC) nozzle provides improved fuel/air mixing for use in impingement flame heating. The RJRC nozzle produces a very stable flame with a circumferentially symmetric surface temperature profile and low coefficients of pressure on the impingement surface. The RJRC also produces very little soot. To characterize the performance of an array of RJRC nozzles from combustion point of view, exhaust gas analyses are presented through CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NO{sub x} measurements. The results are also compared to the single RJRC nozzle combustion characteristics. In the array configuration, the highly, moderately, and weakly interactive RJRC nozzles are considered. The interaction among nozzles is highly dependent upon the between-nozzle spacing.

  15. Adaptive array technique for differential-phase reflectometry in QUEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idei, H. Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Nagata, K.; Mishra, K.; Itado, T.; Akimoto, R.; Yamamoto, M. K.

    2014-11-15

    A Phased Array Antenna (PAA) was considered as launching and receiving antennae in reflectometry to attain good directivity in its applied microwave range. A well-focused beam was obtained in a launching antenna application, and differential-phase evolution was properly measured by using a metal reflector plate in the proof-of-principle experiment at low power test facilities. Differential-phase evolution was also evaluated by using the PAA in the Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak (QUEST). A beam-forming technique was applied in receiving phased-array antenna measurements. In the QUEST device that should be considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave effect was significantly observed with perturbed phase evolution. A new approach using derivative of measured field on propagating wavenumber was proposed to eliminate the standing wave effect.

  16. Precise annealing of focal plane arrays for optical detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, Daniel A.

    2015-09-22

    Precise annealing of identified defective regions of a Focal Plane Array ("FPA") (e.g., exclusive of non-defective regions of the FPA) facilitates removal of defects from an FPA that has been hybridized and/or packaged with readout electronics. Radiation is optionally applied under operating conditions, such as under cryogenic temperatures, such that performance of an FPA can be evaluated before, during, and after annealing without requiring thermal cycling.

  17. Sandia Develops Phased-Array Sources Based on Nonlinear Metamaterial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanocavities Phased-Array Sources Based on Nonlinear Metamaterial Nanocavities - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing

  18. The NSLS 100 element solid state array detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furenlid, L.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Stephani, D.; Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Beren, J. ); Cramer, S.P. . Dept. of Applied Science)

    1991-01-01

    X-ray absorption studies of dilute samples require fluorescence detection techniques. Since signal-to-noise ratios are governed by the ratio of fluorescent to scattered photons counted by a detector, solid state detectors which can discriminate between fluorescence and scattered photons have become the instruments of choice for trace element measurements. Commercially available 13 element Ge array detectors permitting total count rates < 500,000 counts per second are now in routine use. Since x-ray absorption beamlines at high brightness synchrotron sources can already illuminate most dilute samples with enough flux to saturate the current generation of solid state detectors, the development of next-generation instruments with significantly higher total count rates is essential. We present the design and current status of the 100 element Si array detector being developed in a collaboration between the NSLS and the Instrumentation Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detecting array consists of a 10*10 matrix of 4mm * 4mm elements laid out on a single piece of ultra-high purity silicon mounted at the front end of a liquid nitrogen dewar assembly. A matrix of charge sensitive integrating preamplifiers feed signals to an array of shaping amplifiers, single channel analyzers, and scalers. An electronic switch, delay amplifier, linear gate, digital scope, peak sensing A to D converter, and histogramming memory module provide for complete diagnostics and channel calibration. The entire instrument is controlled by a LabView 2 application on a MacII ci; the software also provides full control over beamline hardware and performs the data collection.

  19. The NSLS 100 element solid state array detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furenlid, L.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Stephani, D.; Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Beren, J.; Cramer, S.P.

    1991-12-31

    X-ray absorption studies of dilute samples require fluorescence detection techniques. Since signal-to-noise ratios are governed by the ratio of fluorescent to scattered photons counted by a detector, solid state detectors which can discriminate between fluorescence and scattered photons have become the instruments of choice for trace element measurements. Commercially available 13 element Ge array detectors permitting total count rates < 500,000 counts per second are now in routine use. Since x-ray absorption beamlines at high brightness synchrotron sources can already illuminate most dilute samples with enough flux to saturate the current generation of solid state detectors, the development of next-generation instruments with significantly higher total count rates is essential. We present the design and current status of the 100 element Si array detector being developed in a collaboration between the NSLS and the Instrumentation Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detecting array consists of a 10*10 matrix of 4mm * 4mm elements laid out on a single piece of ultra-high purity silicon mounted at the front end of a liquid nitrogen dewar assembly. A matrix of charge sensitive integrating preamplifiers feed signals to an array of shaping amplifiers, single channel analyzers, and scalers. An electronic switch, delay amplifier, linear gate, digital scope, peak sensing A to D converter, and histogramming memory module provide for complete diagnostics and channel calibration. The entire instrument is controlled by a LabView 2 application on a MacII ci; the software also provides full control over beamline hardware and performs the data collection.

  20. Optical sensors and multisensor arrays containing thin film electroluminescent devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aylott, Jonathan W. (Ann Arbor, MI); Chen-Esterlit, Zoe (Ann Arbor, MI); Friedl, Jon H. (Ames, IA); Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Savvateev, Vadim N. (Ames, IA); Shinar, Joseph (Ames, IA)

    2001-12-18

    Optical sensor, probe and array devices for detecting chemical biological, and physical analytes. The devices include an analyte-sensitive layer optically coupled to a thin film electroluminescent layer which activates the analyte-sensitive layer to provide an optical response. The optical response varies depending upon the presence of an analyte and is detected by a photodetector and analyzed to determine the properties of the analyte.

  1. Physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V; Clague, David S; Lee, Christopher L; Rudd, Robert E; Burnham, Alan K; Tringe, Joseph W

    2013-11-19

    A method of using physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays. The methods utilize deflection of a micromachined cantilever that represents the chemical, biological, or physical element being detected. One embodiment of the method comprises the steps of modeling the deflection of the micromachined cantilever producing a deflection model, sensing the deflection of the micromachined cantilever and producing a signal representing the deflection, and comparing the signal representing the deflection with the deflection model.

  2. Nanotube Arrays for Advanced Lithium-ion Batteries - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Energy Storage Energy Storage Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Nanotube Arrays for Advanced Lithium-ion Batteries National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary The development of high-power, high-energy, long-life, and low-cost rechargeable batteries is critical for the next-generation electric and hybrid electric vehicles. Among various battery

  3. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayramian, Andy J

    2013-10-01

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  4. Co-arrays in the Next Fortran Standard

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reid, John; Numrich, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    The WG5 committee, at its meeting in Delft, May 2005, decided to include co-arrays in the next Fortran Standard. A Fortran program containing co-arrays is interpreted as if it were replicated a fixed number of times and all copies were executed asynchronously. Each copy has its own set of data objects and is called an image. The array syntax of Fortran is extended with additional trailing subscripts in square brackets to give a clear and straightforward representation of access to data on other images. References without square brackets are to local data, so code that can run independently is uncluttered.more » Any occurrence of square brackets is a warning about communication between images. The additional syntax requires support in the compiler, but it has been designed to be easy to implement and to give the compiler scope both to apply its optimizations within each image and to optimize the communication between images. The extension includes execution control statements for synchronizing images and intrinsic procedures to return the number of images, to return the index of the current image, and to perform collective operations. The paper does not attempt to describe the full details of the feature as it now appears in the draft of the new standard. Instead, we describe a subset and demonstrate the use of this subset with examples.« less

  5. Noise Reduction with Microphone Arrays for Speaker Identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Z

    2011-12-22

    Reducing acoustic noise in audio recordings is an ongoing problem that plagues many applications. This noise is hard to reduce because of interfering sources and non-stationary behavior of the overall background noise. Many single channel noise reduction algorithms exist but are limited in that the more the noise is reduced; the more the signal of interest is distorted due to the fact that the signal and noise overlap in frequency. Specifically acoustic background noise causes problems in the area of speaker identification. Recording a speaker in the presence of acoustic noise ultimately limits the performance and confidence of speaker identification algorithms. In situations where it is impossible to control the environment where the speech sample is taken, noise reduction filtering algorithms need to be developed to clean the recorded speech of background noise. Because single channel noise reduction algorithms would distort the speech signal, the overall challenge of this project was to see if spatial information provided by microphone arrays could be exploited to aid in speaker identification. The goals are: (1) Test the feasibility of using microphone arrays to reduce background noise in speech recordings; (2) Characterize and compare different multichannel noise reduction algorithms; (3) Provide recommendations for using these multichannel algorithms; and (4) Ultimately answer the question - Can the use of microphone arrays aid in speaker identification?

  6. Holographic arrays for multi-path imaging artifact reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMakin, Douglas L. (Richland, WA); Sheen, David M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Thomas E. (Kennewick, WA)

    2007-11-13

    A method and apparatus to remove human features utilizing at least one transmitter transmitting a signal between 200 MHz and 1 THz, the signal having at least one characteristic of elliptical polarization, and at least one receiver receiving the reflection of the signal from the transmitter. A plurality of such receivers and transmitters are arranged together in an array which is in turn mounted to a scanner, allowing the array to be passed adjacent to the surface of the item being imaged while the transmitter is transmitting electromagnetic radiation. The array is passed adjacent to the surface of the item, such as a human being, that is being imaged. The portions of the received signals wherein the polarity of the characteristic has been reversed and those portions of the received signal wherein the polarity of the characteristic has not been reversed are identified. An image of the item from those portions of the received signal wherein the polarity of the characteristic was reversed is then created.

  7. Photodiode arrays having minimized cross-talk between diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guckel, Henry (Madison, WI); McNamara, Shamus P. (Madison, WI)

    2000-10-17

    Photodiode arrays are formed with close diode-to-diode spacing and minimized cross-talk between diodes in the array by isolating the diodes from one another with trenches that are formed between the photodiodes in the array. The photodiodes are formed of spaced regions in a base layer, each spaced region having an impurity type opposite to that of the base layer to define a p-n junction between the spaced regions and the base layer. The base layer meets a substrate at a boundary, with the substrate being much more heavily doped than the base layer with the same impurity type. The trenches extend through the base layer and preferably into the substrate. Minority carriers generated by absorption of light photons in the base layer can only migrate to an adjacent photodiode through the substrate. The lifetime and the corresponding diffusion length of the minority carriers in the substrate is very short so that all minority carriers recombine in the substrate before reaching an adjacent photodiode.

  8. Field emission properties of ZnO nanosheet arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naik, Kusha Kumar; Rout, Chandra Sekhar E-mail: dj.late@ncl.res.in E-mail: csrout@iitbbs.ac.in; Khare, Ruchita; More, Mahendra A.; Chakravarty, Disha; Late, Dattatray J. E-mail: dj.late@ncl.res.in E-mail: csrout@iitbbs.ac.in; Thapa, Ranjit E-mail: dj.late@ncl.res.in E-mail: csrout@iitbbs.ac.in

    2014-12-08

    Electron emission properties of electrodeposited ZnO nanosheet arrays grown on Indium tin oxide coated glass substrates have been studied. Influence of oxygen vacancies on electronic structures and field emission properties of ZnO nanosheets are investigated using density functional theory. The oxygen vacancies produce unshared d electrons which form an impurity energy state; this causes shifting of Fermi level towards the vacuum, and so the barrier energy for electron extraction reduces. The ZnO nanosheet arrays exhibit a low turn-on field of 2.4?V/?m at 0.1??A/cm{sup 2} and current density of 50.1??A/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 6.4?V/?m with field enhancement factor, ??=?5812 and good field emission current stability. The nanosheet arrays grown by a facile electrodeposition process have great potential as robust high performance vertical structure electron emitters for future flat panel displays and vacuum electronic device applications.

  9. Fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilya N. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Puretzky, Alexander A [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-27

    Methods and apparatus are described for fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites. A composition includes a vertically aligned nanotube array including a plurality of nanotubes characterized by a property across substantially all of the vertically aligned nanotube array. A method includes depositing a vertically aligned nanotube array that includes a plurality of nanotubes; and controlling a deposition rate of the vertically aligned nanotubes array as a function of an in situ monitored property of the plurality of nanotubes.

  10. High Density Nano-Electrode Array for Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mano Misra

    2010-05-07

    Bulk single crystals of Cd1-xZnxTe (x=0.04 to x=0.2) compound semiconductor is used for room temperature radiation detection. The production of large volume of Cd1-xZnxTe with low defect density is expensive. As a result there is a growing research interest in the production of nanostructured compound semiconductors such as Cd1-xZnxTe in an electrochemical route. In this investigation, Cd1-xZnxTe ternary compound semiconductor, referred as CZT, was electrodeposited in the form of nanowires onto a TiO2 nanotubular template from propylene carbonate as the non-aqueous electrolyte, using a pulse-reverse electrodeposition process at 130 C. The template acted as a support in growing ordered nanowire of CZT which acts as a one dimensional conductor. Cyclic Voltammogram (CV) studies were conducted in determining the potentials for the growth of nanowires of uniform stoichiometry. The morphologies and composition of CZT were characterized by using SEM, TEM and XRD. The STEM mapping carried out on the nanowires showed the uniform distribution of Cd, Zn and Te elements. TEM image showed that the nanowires were polycrystalline in nature. The Mott-Schottky analysis carried on the nanowires showed that the nanowires were a p-type semiconductor. The carrier density, band gap and resistivity of the Cd0.9Zn0.1Te nanowires were 4.29x1013 cm-3, 1.56 eV and 2.76x1011?-cm respectively. The high resistivity was attributed to the presence of deep defect states such as cadmium vacancies or Te antisites which were created by the anodic cycle of the pulse-reverse electrodeposition process. Stacks of series connected CZT nanowire arrays were tested with different bias potentials. The background current was in the order of tens of picoamperes. When exposed to radiation source Amerecium-241 (60 KeV, 4 ?Ci), the stacked CZT nanowires arrays showed sensing behavior. The sensitivity of the nanowire arrays increased as the number of stacks increased. The preliminary results indicate that the CZT nanowire arrays can be used as a potential X-ray and low energy gamma ray detector material at room temperature with a much low bias potential (0.7 4V) as against 300 500 V applied in the commercial bulk detector materials.

  11. Thermoacoustic relaxation in a pin-array stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, M.E.; Swift, G.W.

    1997-11-01

    The pressure response p{sub 1} of a fixed quantity of {sup 4}He gas subjected to sinusoidal volume perturbations is studied experimentally. Thermal diffusion near solid boundaries causes the gas response to be neither adiabatic nor isothermal. The data are interpreted in terms of the thermal relaxation function f{sub {kappa}} which relates p{sub 1} to the spatial average of the acoustic temperature profile. Comparison of a number of geometries allows us to accurately determine f{sub {kappa}} for a thermoacoustic pin-array stack. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  12. Narrow-band optical transmission of metallic nanoslit arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Zhijun; Yang Ying; Zuo Xiaoliu

    2012-10-22

    Metallic nanoslit arrays usually demonstrate wide transmission bands for transverse-magnetic-polarized incidence light. Here, we show that by introducing multi-dielectric layers underneath the metallic structure layer on the substrate, a narrow peak is formed, whose bandwidth can be down to a few nanometers. Three types of resonance modes in the region under the metal layer are identified responsible for the formation of the peak, i.e., a two-dimensional cavity resonance mode, which supports optical transmission, and two in-plane hybrid surface plasmon resonance modes locating on both sides of the peak that suppresses the transmission. Such structures can be applied in advanced photonic devices.

  13. Method of low temperature operation of an electrochemical cell array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Bratton, R.J.

    1994-04-26

    A method is described for operating an electrochemical cell generator apparatus containing a generator chamber containing an array of cells having interior and exterior electrodes with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where a hot gas contacts the outside of the cells and the generating chamber normally operates at over 850 C, where N[sub 2] gas is fed to contact the interior electrode of the cells in any case when the generating chamber temperature drops for whatever reason to within the range of from 550 C to 800 C, to eliminate cracking within the cells. 2 figures.

  14. Method of low temperature operation of an electrochemical cell array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill Boro, PA); Bratton, Raymond J. (Delmont, PA)

    1994-01-01

    In the method of operating an electrochemical cell generator apparatus containing a generator chamber (20) containing an array of cells (12) having interior and exterior electrodes with solid electrolyte between the electrodes, where a hot gas (F) contacts the outside of the cells (12) and the generating chamber normally operates at over 850.degree. C., where N.sub.2 gas is fed to contact the interior electrode of the cells (12) in any case when the generating chamber (20) temperature drops for whatever reason to within the range of from 550.degree. C. to 800.degree. C., to eliminate cracking within the cells (12).

  15. CONCRETE REFLECTED ARRAYS OF U(93.2) METAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackenzie Gorham; John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Virginia Dean; Davis Reed

    2010-09-01

    During the period from 1963 1973, experiments involving highly enriched uranium units were performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility to determine various critical configurations of three-dimensional arrays. The experiments formed a four-part series, and were reported by several different experimenters; the results of interest for this evaluation are those reported for the fourth experimentation, Critical Three-Dimensional Arrays of Neutron Interacting Units: Part IV, published and performed by D.W.Magnuson (Ref 1). Information is also available in the logbook . This set of experiments utilized subcritical metal units on a split table apparatus to determine critical configurations for 222 arrangements of highly enriched uranium reflected by concrete. Magnuson manipulated the configuration of several uranium cylinders and blocks within a concrete reflector. The different permutations utilized uranium cylinders of two different heights in various positions in the three dimensional array; certain cases also placed thin uranium blocks on top of the cylinders. The thickness of the surrounding concrete, as well as the inner dimensions of the concrete reflector was also varied in certain cases. The variations resulted in fourteen different experimental permutations or configurations. All fourteen configurations were judged to be unacceptable for use as criticality safety benchmarks. All experiments were initially evaluated; however only three configurations were evaluated in detail. Configurations 2, 4, 6 and 12 were not evaluated in detail because they are subcritical and configurations 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10 were also were not evaluated in detail because they were supercritical by more than beta effective (~0.007), or prompt critical. The experiments evaluated in detail for this benchmark were configurations 1, 3, and 11. The experimental report also contains the information for HEU-MET-FAST-056. Closely related work has been recorded in HEU-MET-FAST-053, which is a benchmark evaluation of a different series of three dimensional array experiments with four different moderator materials. HEU-MET-FAST-023 and HEU-MET-FAST-026 are also related because they utilize the same metal cylinders as these experiments.

  16. A novel electron gun with an independently addressable cathode array.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudys, Joseph Matthew; Reed, Kim Warren; Pea, Gary Edward; Schneider, Larry X.

    2006-08-01

    The design of a novel electron gun with an array of independently addressable cathode elements is presented. Issues relating to operation in a 6.5 Tesla axial magnetic field are discussed. Simulations with the TriComp [1] electromagnetic field code that were used to determine the space charge limited tube characteristic and to model focusing of the electron beam in the magnetic field are reviewed. Foil heating and stress calculations are discussed. The results of CYLTRAN [2] simulations yielding the energy spectrum of the electron beam and the current transmitted through the foil window are presented.

  17. Design of photovoltaic central power station concentrator array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    A design for a photovoltaic central power station using tracking concentrators has been developed. The 100 MW plant is assumed to be located adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The design assumes an advanced Martin Marietta two-axis tracking fresnel lens concentrator. The concentrators are arrayed in 5 MW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. The photovoltaic plant output is connected to the existing 115 kV switchyard. The site specific design allows detailed cost estimates for engineering, site preparation, and installation. Collector and power conditioning costs have been treated parametrically.

  18. Study of the precursor and non-precursor implosion regimes in wire array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papp, D.; Ivanov, V. V.; Anderson, A. A.; Altemara, S. D.; Talbot, B. R.; Jones, B.; Haboub, A.

    2012-09-15

    Star-like and closely spaced nested wire array configurations were investigated in precursor and non-precursor implosions. Closely spaced nested cylindrical arrays have inner and outer arrays with equal wire numbers, and inner and outer wires aligned to each other. The gap between the outer and inner wires is not more than 1 mm. Calculation of magnetic fields shows that the small gap results in a reversed, outward j Multiplication-Sign B force on the inner wires. Closely spaced arrays of 6-16 wires with outer diameter of 16 mm and with gaps of {Delta}R = 0.25-1 mm were tested. 6-8-wire arrays with a gap of {Delta}R = 0.4-1 mm imploded without precursor, but precursor was present in loads with 12-16 wires and {Delta}R = 0.25-1 mm. Implosion dynamics of closely spaced arrays was similar to that of star-like arrays. Implosion time was found to decrease with decreased wire numbers. Star array configurations were designed with a numerical scheme to implode with or without precursor. The lack of precursor resulted in a marginal improvement in total x-ray yield and power, and up to 20% increase in Al K-shell yield. The Al K-shell radiated energy was found to increase with decreasing the number of arrays in closely spaced and star-like wire arrays.

  19. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  20. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  1. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    1990-01-01

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  2. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    2011-03-22

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  3. Designing of sparse 2D arrays for Lamb wave imaging using coarray concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrozi?ski, ?ukasz Stepinski, Tadeusz Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-03-31

    2D ultrasonic arrays have considerable application potential in Lamb wave based SHM systems, since they enable equivocal damage imaging and even in some cases wave-mode selection. Recently, it has been shown that the 2D arrays can be used in SHM applications in a synthetic focusing (SF) mode, which is much more effective than the classical phase array mode commonly used in NDT. The SF mode assumes a single element excitation of subsequent transmitters and off-line processing the acquired data. In the simplest implementation of the technique, only single multiplexed input and output channels are required, which results in significant hardware simplification. Application of the SF mode for 2D arrays creates additional degrees of freedom during the design of the array topology, which complicates the array design process, however, it enables sparse array designs with performance similar to that of the fully populated dense arrays. In this paper we present the coarray concept to facilitate synthesis process of an arrays aperture used in the multistatic synthetic focusing approach in Lamb waves-based imaging systems. In the coherent imaging, performed in the transmit/receive mode, the sum coarray is a morphological convolution of the transmit/receive sub-arrays. It can be calculated as the set of sums of the individual sub-arrays elements locations. The coarray framework will be presented here using a an example of a star-shaped array. The approach will be discussed in terms of beampatterns of the resulting imaging systems. Both simulated and experimental results will be included.

  4. Polymer arrays from the combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Goldwasser, Isy; Briceno, Gabriel; Sun, Xiao-Dong

    2004-09-21

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  5. Ion impact distribution over plasma exposed nanocone arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrabian, S. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore); Xu, S. [Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore); Qaemi, A. A. [Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ostrikov, K. [Plasma Nanoscience Center Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218 Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Plasma Sources and Applications Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 Singapore (Singapore)

    2013-03-15

    The effect of an ordered array of nanocones on a conducting substrate immersed in the plasma on the transport of the plasma ions is investigated. The real conical shape of the cones is rigorously incorporated into the model. The movement of 10{sup 5} CH{sub 3}{sup +} ions in the plasma sheath modified by the nanocone array is simulated. The ions are driven by the electric fields produced by the sheath and the nanostructures. The surface charge density and the total charge on the nanotips with different aspect ratios are computed. The ion transport simulation provides important characteristics of the displacement and velocity of the ions. The relative ion distribution along the lateral surfaces of the carbon nanotips is computed as well. It is shown that a rigorous account of the realistic nanostructure shape leads to very different distribution of the ion fluxes on the nanostructured surfaces compared to the previously reported works. The ion flux distribution is a critical factor in the nucleation process on the substrate and determines the nanostructure growth patterns.

  6. Screening combinatorial arrays of inorganic materials with spectroscopy or microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiaodong; Goldwasser, Isy

    2004-02-03

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  7. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGregor, Douglas S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rojeski, Ronald A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  8. Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muljadi, E.; Taylor, R.W.

    1998-05-05

    A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load. 20 figs.

  9. Apparatus and method for maximizing power delivered by a photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muljadi, Eduard (Golden, CO); Taylor, Roger W. (Golden, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for maximizing the electric power output of a photovoltaic array connected to a battery where the voltage across the photovoltaic array is adjusted through a range of voltages to find the voltage across the photovoltaic array that maximizes the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array and then is held constant for a period of time. After the period of time has elapsed, the electric voltage across the photovoltaic array is again adjusted through a range of voltages and the process is repeated. The electric energy and the electric power generated by the photovoltaic array is delivered to the battery which stores the electric energy and the electric power for later delivery to a load.

  10. A Compact, Low-Power Cantilever-Based Sensor Array for Chemical Detection

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: A Compact, Low-Power Cantilever-Based Sensor Array for Chemical Detection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Compact, Low-Power Cantilever-Based Sensor Array for Chemical Detection A compact and low-power cantilever-based sensor array has been developed and used to detect various vapor analytes. This device employs sorptive polymers that are deposited onto piezoresistive cantilevers. We have successfully detected several organic vapors,

  11. Arrays of SiO(2) Substrate-Free Micromechanical Uncooled THz and Infrared

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Detectors (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Arrays of SiO(2) Substrate-Free Micromechanical Uncooled THz and Infrared Detectors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Arrays of SiO(2) Substrate-Free Micromechanical Uncooled THz and Infrared Detectors We describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of arrays of uncooled infrared and terahertz micromechanical detectors that utilize SiO2 as a main structural material. Materials with highly dissimilar

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Metal Oxide Nano-Array

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysts for Low Temperature Diesel Oxidation | Department of Energy Metal Oxide Nano-Array Catalysts for Low Temperature Diesel Oxidation Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Metal Oxide Nano-Array Catalysts for Low Temperature Diesel Oxidation Presentation given by U. Conn at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about metal oxide nano-array catalysts for low temperature diesel oxidation. PDF icon

  13. AHF: Array-Based Half-Facet Data Structure for Mixed-Dimensional and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Non-Manifold Meshes (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: AHF: Array-Based Half-Facet Data Structure for Mixed-Dimensional and Non-Manifold Meshes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AHF: Array-Based Half-Facet Data Structure for Mixed-Dimensional and Non-Manifold Meshes We present an Array-based Half-Facet mesh data structure, or AHF, for efficient mesh query and modification operations. The AHF extends the compact array-based half-edge and half-face data structures (T.J.

  14. Ultra-efficient, Robust and Well-defined Nano-Array based Monolithic Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation demonstrates how nano-array catalysts have excellent robustness, use ultra-low amounts of PGM, and can be tuned for optimum performance.

  15. ARRAY OPTIMIZATION FOR TIDAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN A TIDAL CHANNEL A NUMERICAL MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    2014-04-18

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of multiple factors. Numerical models can be used effectively to assist turbine siting and array arrangement in a tidal turbine farm for tidal energy extraction.

  16. NREL Developing a Numerical Simulation Tool to Study Hydrokinetic Energy Conversion Devices and Arrays (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    New code will help accelerate design improvements by providing a high-fidelity simulation tool to study power performance, structural loading, and the interactions between devices in arrays.

  17. Microhole Arrays Drilled with Advanced Abrasive Slurry Jet Technology to Efficiently Exploit Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advance & adapt microhole & ASJ/FLASH ASJTMdrilling for EGS; optimize microhole array configurations to maximize heat removal from expanded volume of reservoir rock.

  18. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuwahara, D.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Sugito, S.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A.

    2014-11-15

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array.

  19. Low power integrated pumping and valving arrays for microfluidic systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Rose, Klint A. (Livermore, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA); Maghribi, Mariam (Davis, CA)

    2006-04-11

    Low power integrated pumping and valving arrays which provide a revolutionary approach for performing pumping and valving approach for performing pumping and valving operations in microfabricated fluidic systems for applications such as medical diagnostic microchips. Traditional methods rely on external, large pressure sources that defeat the advantages of miniaturization. Previously demonstrated microfabrication devices are power and voltage intensive, only function at sufficient pressure to be broadly applicable. This approach integrates a lower power, high-pressure source with a polymer, ceramic, or metal plug enclosed within a microchannel, analogous to a microsyringe. When the pressure source is activated, the polymer plug slides within the microchannel, pumping the fluid on the opposite side of the plug without allowing fluid to leak around the plug. The plugs also can serve as microvalves.

  20. Cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kireev, Vassili [Sunnyvale, CA; Liu, Yun; Protopopescu, Vladimir [Knoxville, TN; Braiman, Yehuda [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-10-21

    The invention provides a cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays. The resonator comprises a plurality of laser emitters arranged along at least one plane and a beam sampler for reflecting at least a portion of each laser beam that impinges on the beam sampler, the portion of each laser beam from one of the laser emitters being reflected back to another one of the laser emitters to cause a beam to be generated from the other one of the laser emitters to the beam reflector. The beam sampler also transmits a portion of each laser beam to produce a laser output beam such that a plurality of laser output beams of the same frequency are produced. An injection laser beam is directed to a first laser emitter to begin a process of generating and reflecting a laser beam from one laser emitter to another laser emitter in the plurality. A method of practicing the invention is also disclosed.

  1. Transverse commensurability effect for vortices on periodic pinning arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J

    2008-01-01

    Using computer simulations, we demonstrate a type of commensurability that occurs for vortices moving longitudinally through periodic pinning arrays in the presence of an additional transverse driving force. As a function of vortex density, there is a series of broad maxima in the transverse critical depinning force that do not fall at the matching fields where the number of vortices equals an integer multiple of the number of pinning sites. The commensurability effects are associated with dynamical states in which evenly spaced structures consisting of one or more moving rows of vortices form between rows of pinning sites. Remarkably, the critical transverse depinning force can be more than an order of magnitude larger than the longitudinal depinning force.

  2. Time-delayed directional beam phased array antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fund, Douglas Eugene; Cable, John William; Cecil, Tony Myron

    2004-10-19

    An antenna comprising a phased array of quadrifilar helix or other multifilar antenna elements and a time-delaying feed network adapted to feed the elements. The feed network can employ a plurality of coaxial cables that physically bridge a microstrip feed circuitry to feed power signals to the elements. The cables provide an incremental time delay which is related to their physical lengths, such that replacing cables having a first set of lengths with cables having a second set of lengths functions to change the time delay and shift or steer the antenna's main beam. Alternatively, the coaxial cables may be replaced with a programmable signal processor unit adapted to introduce the time delay using signal processing techniques applied to the power signals.

  3. Strain-compensated infrared photodetector and photodetector array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin K; Hawkins, Samuel D; Klem, John F; Cich, Michael J

    2013-05-28

    A photodetector is disclosed for the detection of infrared light with a long cutoff wavelength in the range of about 4.5-10 microns. The photodetector, which can be formed on a semiconductor substrate as an nBn device, has a light absorbing region which includes InAsSb light-absorbing layers and tensile-strained layers interspersed between the InAsSb light-absorbing layers. The tensile-strained layers can be formed from GaAs, InAs, InGaAs or a combination of these III-V compound semiconductor materials. A barrier layer in the photodetector can be formed from AlAsSb or AlGaAsSb; and a contact layer in the photodetector can be formed from InAs, GaSb or InAsSb. The photodetector is useful as an individual device, or to form a focal plane array.

  4. Fabrication of thermal microphotonic sensors and sensor arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-26

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is fabricated on a silicon substrate by etching an opening and a trench into the substrate, and then filling in the opening and trench with silicon oxide which can be deposited or formed by thermally oxidizing a portion of the silicon substrate surrounding the opening and trench. The silicon oxide forms a support post for an optical resonator which is subsequently formed from a layer of silicon nitride, and also forms a base for an optical waveguide formed from the silicon nitride layer. Part of the silicon substrate can be selectively etched away to elevate the waveguide and resonator. The thermal microphotonic sensor, which is useful to detect infrared radiation via a change in the evanescent coupling of light between the waveguide and resonator, can be formed as a single device or as an array.

  5. Parallel vacuum arc discharge with microhollow array dielectric and anode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Jinghua; Zhou, Lin; Fu, Yuecheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Rongkun; Chen, Faxin; Li, Linbo; Meng, Shijian

    2014-07-15

    An electrode configuration with microhollow array dielectric and anode was developed to obtain parallel vacuum arc discharge. Compared with the conventional electrodes, more than 10 parallel microhollow discharges were ignited for the new configuration, which increased the discharge area significantly and made the cathode eroded more uniformly. The vacuum discharge channel number could be increased effectively by decreasing the distances between holes or increasing the arc current. Experimental results revealed that plasmas ejected from the adjacent hollow and the relatively high arc voltage were two key factors leading to the parallel discharge. The characteristics of plasmas in the microhollow were investigated as well. The spectral line intensity and electron density of plasmas in microhollow increased obviously with the decease of the microhollow diameter.

  6. Array-type NH.sub.3 sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, David Lawrence; Montgomery, Frederick Charles; Armstrong, Timothy R; Warmack, Robert J

    2013-12-31

    An array-type sensor that senses NH.sub.3 includes non-Nernstian sensing elements constructed from metal and/or metal-oxide electrodes on an O.sub.2 ion conducting substrate. In one example sensor, one electrode may be made of platinum, another electrode may be made of manganese (III) oxide (Mn.sub.2O.sub.3), and another electrode may be made of tungsten trioxide (WO.sub.3). Some sensing elements may further include an electrode made of La.sub.0.6Sr.sub.0.4Co.sub.0.2Fe.sub0.8O.sub.3 and another electrode made of LaCr.sub.0.95.Mg.sub.0.05O.sub.3.

  7. Quasi-periodic quantum dot arrays produced by electrochemical synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Miller, A.E.; Yue, D.F.; Banerjee, G.; Ricker, R.E.; Jones, S.; Eastman, J.A.; Baugher, E.; Chandrasekhar, M.

    1994-06-01

    We discuss a ``gentle`` electrochemical technique for fabricating quasi-periodic quantum dot arrays. The technique exploits a self-organizing phenomenon to produce quasi-periodic arrangement of dots and provides excellent control over dot size and interdot spacing. Unlike conventional nanolithography, it does not cause radiation damage to the structures during exposure to pattern delineating beams (e-beam, ion-beam or x-ray). Moreover, it does not require harsh processing steps like reactive ion etching, offers a minimum feature size of {approximately}40 {angstrom}, allows the fabrication of structures on nonplanar surfaces (e.g. spherical or cylindrical substrates), is amenable to mass production (millions of wafers can be processed simultaneously) and is potentially orders of magnitude cheaper than conventional nanofabrication. In this paper, we describe our initial results and show the promise of this technique for low-cost and high-yield nanosynthesis.

  8. T-load microchannel array and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Stefan P.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) T-load for planar microchannel arrays for electrophoresis, for example, which enables sample injection directly onto a plane perpendicular to the microchannels' axis, at their ends. This is accomplished by forming input wells that extend beyond the ends of the microchannel thereby eliminating the right angle connection from the input well into the end of the microchannel. In addition, the T-load input well eases the placement of electrode in or adjacent the well and thus enables very efficient reproducible electrokinetic (ek) injection. The T-load input well eliminates the prior input well/microchannel alignment concerns, since the input well can be drilled after the top and bottom microchannel plates are bonded together. The T-load input well may extend partially or entirely through the bottom microchannel plate which enables more efficient gel and solution flushing, and also enables placement of multiple electrodes to assist in the ek sample injection.

  9. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  10. Mechanically latchable tiltable platform for forming micromirrors and micromirror arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM); Polosky, Marc A. (Tijeras, NM); Sleefe, Gerard E. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2006-12-12

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which includes a platform that can be electrostatically tilted from being parallel to a substrate on which the platform to being tilted at an angle of 1 20 degrees with respect to the substrate. Once the platform has been tilted to a maximum angle of tilt, the platform can be locked in position using an electrostatically-operable latching mechanism which engages a tab protruding below the platform. The platform has a light-reflective upper surface which can be optionally coated to provide an enhanced reflectivity and form a micromirror. An array of such micromirrors can be formed on a common substrate for applications including optical switching (e.g. for fiber optic communications), optical information processing, image projection displays or non-volatile optical memories.

  11. Object detection with a multistatic array using singular value decomposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hallquist, Aaron T.; Chambers, David H.

    2014-07-01

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across a surface and that travels down the surface. The detection system converts the return signals from a time domain to a frequency domain, resulting in frequency return signals. The detection system then performs a singular value decomposition for each frequency to identify singular values for each frequency. The detection system then detects the presence of a subsurface object based on a comparison of the identified singular values to expected singular values when no subsurface object is present.

  12. Apparatus and method for polymer synthesis using arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, Thomas M.

    1996-01-01

    A polymer synthesis apparatus (20) for building a polymer chain including a head assembly (21) having an array of nozzles (22) with each nozzle coupled to a reservoir (23) of liquid reagent (24), and a base assembly (25) having an array of reaction wells (26). A transport mechanism (27) aligns the reaction wells (26) and selected nozzles (22) for deposition of the liquid reagent (24) into selected reaction wells (26). A sliding seal (30) is positioned between the head assembly (21) and the base assembly (25) to form a common chamber (31) enclosing both the reaction well (26) and the nozzles (22) therein. A gas inlet (70) into the common chamber (31), upstream from the nozzles (22), and a gas outlet (71) out of the common chamber (31), downstream from the nozzles (22), sweeps the common chamber (31) of toxic fumes emitted by the reagents. Each reaction well ( 26) includes an orifice (74) extending into the well (26) which is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution (76) in the well (26) for polymer chain growth therein. A pressure regulating device (82 ) is provided for controlling a pressure differential, between a first gas pressure exerted on the reaction well (26) and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit (80) of the orifice, such that upon the pressure differential exceeding a predetermined amount, the reagent solution (76) is expelled from the well (26) through the orifice (74). A method of synthesis of a polymer chain in a synthesis apparatus (20) is also included.

  13. Apparatus and method for polymer synthesis using arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    A polymer synthesis apparatus (20) for building a polymer chain including a head assembly (21) having an array of nozzles (22) with each nozzle coupled to a reservoir (23) of liquid reagent (24) , and a base assembly (25) having an array of reaction wells (26). A transport mechanism (27) aligns the reaction wells (26) and selected nozzles (22) for deposition of the liquid reagent (24) into selected reaction wells (26). A sliding seal (30) is positioned between the head assembly (21) and the base assembly (25) to form a common chamber (31) enclosing both the reaction well (26) and the nozzles (22) therein. A gas inlet (70) into the common chamber (31), upstream from the nozzles (22), and a gas outlet (71) out of the common chamber (31) , downstream from the nozzles (22) , sweeps the common chamber ( 31 ) of toxic fumes emitted by the reagents. Each reaction well (26) includes an orifice (74) extending into the well (26) which is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution (76) in the well (26) for polymer chain growth therein. A pressure regulating device (82) is provided for controlling a pressure differential, between a first gas pressure exerted on the reaction well (26) and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit (80) of the orifice, such that upon the pressure differential exceeding a predetermined amount, the reagent solution (76) is expelled from the well (26) through the orifice (74). A method of synthesis of a polymer chain in a synthesis apparatus (20) is also included.

  14. The application of sparse arrays in high frequency transcranial focused ultrasound therapy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pajek, Daniel Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Transcranial focused ultrasound is an emerging therapeutic modality that can be used to perform noninvasive neurosurgical procedures. The current clinical transcranial phased array operates at 650 kHz, however the development of a higher frequency array would enable more precision, while reducing the risk of standing waves. However, the smaller wavelength and the skull's increased distortion at this frequency are problematic. It would require an order of magnitude more elements to create such an array. Random sparse arrays enable steering of a therapeutic array with fewer elements. However, the tradeoffs inherent in the use of sparsity in a transcranial phased array have not been systematically investigated and so the objective of this simulation study is to investigate the effect of sparsity on transcranial arrays at a frequency of 1.5 MHz that provides small focal spots for precise exposure control. Methods: Transcranial sonication simulations were conducted using a multilayer Rayleigh-Sommerfeld propagation model. Element size and element population were varied and the phased array's ability to steer was assessed. Results: The focal pressures decreased proportionally as elements were removed. However, off-focus hotspots were generated if a high degree of steering was attempted with very sparse arrays. A phased array consisting of 1588 elements 3 mm in size, a 10% population, was appropriate for steering up to 4 cm in all directions. However, a higher element population would be required if near-skull sonication is desired. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the development of a sparse, hemispherical array at 1.5 MHz could enable more precision in therapies that utilize lower intensity sonications.

  15. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Morris, Macdonald S.; Winkler, James L.

    1997-01-01

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks.

  16. Broadband optical absorption by tunable Mie resonances in silicon nanocone arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z. Y.; Zhang, R. J.; Wang, S. Y.; Lu, M.; Chen, X.; Zheng, Y. X.; Chen, L. Y.; Ye, Z.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-01-15

    Nanostructure arrays such as nanowire, nanopillar, and nanocone arrays have been proposed to be promising antireflection structures for photovoltaic applications due to their great light trapping ability. In this paper, the optical properties of Si nanopillar and nanocone arrays in visible and infrared region were studied by both theoretical calculations and experiments. The results show that the Mie resonance can be continuously tuned across a wide range of wavelength by varying the diameter of the nanopillars. However, Si nanopillar array with uniform diameter exhibits only discrete resonance mode, thus can't achieve a high broadband absorption. On the other hand, the Mie resonance wavelength in a Si nanocone array can vary continuously as the diameters of the cross sections increase from the apex to the base. Therefore Si nanocone arrays can strongly interact with the incident light in the broadband spectrum and the absorbance by Si nanocone arrays is higher than 95% over the wavelength from 300 to 2000 nm. In addition to the Mie resonance, the broadband optical absorption of Si nanocone arrays is also affected by Wood-Rayleigh anomaly effect and metal impurities introduced in the fabrication process.

  17. Broadband optical absorption by tunable Mie resonances in silicon nanocone arrays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Z. Y.; Zhang, R. J.; Wang, S. Y.; Lu, M.; Chen, X.; Zheng, Y. X.; Chen, L. Y.; Ye, Z.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-01-15

    Nanostructure arrays such as nanowire, nanopillar, and nanocone arrays have been proposed to be promising antireflection structures for photovoltaic applications due to their great light trapping ability. In this paper, the optical properties of Si nanopillar and nanocone arrays in visible and infrared region were studied by both theoretical calculations and experiments. The results show that the Mie resonance can be continuously tuned across a wide range of wavelength by varying the diameter of the nanopillars. However, Si nanopillar array with uniform diameter exhibits only discrete resonance mode, thus can't achieve a high broadband absorption. On the other hand, themore » Mie resonance wavelength in a Si nanocone array can vary continuously as the diameters of the cross sections increase from the apex to the base. Therefore Si nanocone arrays can strongly interact with the incident light in the broadband spectrum and the absorbance by Si nanocone arrays is higher than 95% over the wavelength from 300 to 2000 nm. In addition to the Mie resonance, the broadband optical absorption of Si nanocone arrays is also affected by Wood-Rayleigh anomaly effect and metal impurities introduced in the fabrication process.« less

  18. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel and photoacoustic spectroscopy method for using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.; Green, David

    2005-03-29

    Methods and apparatus for analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically coupled with the vessel body. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  19. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessels and photoacoustic spectroscopy methods for using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.

    2006-02-14

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically positioned near the sample cells. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  20. Collective photonic-plasmonic resonances in noble metal - dielectric nanoparticle hybrid arrays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hong, Yan; Reinhard, Bjrn M.

    2014-10-27

    Coherent scattering of gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs) in regular arrays can generate Surface Lattice Resonances (SLRs) with characteristically sharp spectral features. Herein, we investigate collective resonances in compositionally more complex arrays comprising NP clusters and NPs with different chemical compositions at pre-defined lattice sites. We first characterize the impact of NP clustering by exchanging individual gold NPs in the array through dimers of electromagnetically strongly coupled gold NPs. Then, we analyze hybrid arrays that contain both gold metal NP dimers and high refractive index dielectric NPs as building blocks. We demonstrate that the integration of gold NP clusters andmoredielectric NPs into one array enhances E-field intensities not only in the vicinity of the NPs but also in the ambient medium of the entire array. In addition, this work shows that the ability to integrate multiple building blocks with different resonance conditions in one array provides new degrees of freedom for engineering optical fields in the array plane with variable amplitude and phase.less

  1. Delivering both sum and difference beam distributions to a planar monopulse antenna array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strassner II, Bernd H.

    2015-12-22

    A planar monopulse radar apparatus includes a planar distribution matrix coupled to a planar antenna array having a linear configuration of antenna elements. The planar distribution matrix is responsive to first and second pluralities of weights applied thereto for providing both sum and difference beam distributions across the antenna array.

  2. Terahertz spectroscopy with a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer plus array detector using coherent synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolay I. Agladz, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Albert J. Sievers

    2010-06-01

    By use of coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation, we experimentally tested a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer coupled to an array detector to determine its viability as a spectral device. Somewhat surprisingly, the overall performance strongly depends on the absorptivity of the birefringent lithium tantalate pixels in the array detector.

  3. Method and apparatus for in-system redundant array repair on integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bright, Arthur A. (Croton-on-Hudson, NY); Crumley, Paul G. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Dombrowa, Marc B. (Bronx, NY); Douskey, Steven M. (Rochester, MN); Haring, Rudolf A. (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Oakland, Steven F. (Colchester, VT); Ouellette, Michael R. (Westford, VT); Strissel, Scott A. (Byron, MN)

    2008-07-08

    Disclosed is a method of repairing an integrated circuit of the type comprising of a multitude of memory arrays and a fuse box holding control data for controlling redundancy logic of the arrays. The method comprises the steps of providing the integrated circuit with a control data selector for passing the control data from the fuse box to the memory arrays; providing a source of alternate control data, external of the integrated circuit; and connecting the source of alternate control data to the control data selector. The method comprises the further step of, at a given time, passing the alternate control data from the source thereof, through the control data selector and to the memory arrays to control the redundancy logic of the memory arrays.

  4. Method and apparatus for in-system redundant array repair on integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bright, Arthur A. (Croton-on-Hudson, NY); Crumley, Paul G. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Dombrowa, Marc B. (Bronx, NY); Douskey, Steven M. (Rochester, MN); Haring, Rudolf A. (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Oakland, Steven F. (Colchester, VT); Ouellette, Michael R. (Westford, VT); Strissel, Scott A. (Byron, MN)

    2007-12-18

    Disclosed is a method of repairing an integrated circuit of the type comprising of a multitude of memory arrays and a fuse box holding control data for controlling redundancy logic of the arrays. The method comprises the steps of providing the integrated circuit with a control data selector for passing the control data from the fuse box to the memory arrays; providing a source of alternate control data, external of the integrated circuit; and connecting the source of alternate control data to the control data selector. The method comprises the further step of, at a given time, passing the alternate control data from the source thereof, through the control data selector and to the memory arrays to control the redundancy logic of the memory arrays.

  5. Method and apparatus for in-system redundant array repair on integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bright, Arthur A. (Croton-on-Hudson, NY); Crumley, Paul G. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Dombrowa, Marc B. (Bronx, NY); Douskey, Steven M. (Rochester, MN); Haring, Rudolf A. (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Oakland, Steven F. (Colchester, VT); Ouellette, Michael R. (Westford, VT); Strissel, Scott A. (Byron, MN)

    2008-07-29

    Disclosed is a method of repairing an integrated circuit of the type comprising of a multitude of memory arrays and a fuse box holding control data for controlling redundancy logic of the arrays. The method comprises the steps of providing the integrated circuit with a control data selector for passing the control data from the fuse box to the memory arrays; providing a source of alternate control data, external of the integrated circuit; and connecting the source of alternate control data to the control data selector. The method comprises the further step of, at a given time, passing the alternate control data from the source thereof, through the control data selector and to the memory arrays to control the redundancy logic of the memory arrays.

  6. Design structure for in-system redundant array repair in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bright, Arthur A.; Crumley, Paul G.; Dombrowa, Marc; Douskey, Steven M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Oakland, Steven F.; Quellette, Michael R.; Strissel, Scott A.

    2008-11-25

    A design structure for repairing an integrated circuit during operation of the integrated circuit. The integrated circuit comprising of a multitude of memory arrays and a fuse box holding control data for controlling redundancy logic of the arrays. The design structure provides the integrated circuit with a control data selector for passing the control data from the fuse box to the memory arrays; providing a source of alternate control data, external of the integrated circuit; and connecting the source of alternate control data to the control data selector. The design structure further passes the alternate control data from the source thereof, through the control data selector and to the memory arrays to control the redundancy logic of the memory arrays.

  7. System and method for generating a deselect mapping for a focal plane array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bixler, Jay V; Brandt, Timothy G; Conger, James L; Lawson, Janice K

    2013-05-21

    A method for generating a deselect mapping for a focal plane array according to one embodiment includes gathering a data set for a focal plane array when exposed to light or radiation from a first known target; analyzing the data set for determining which pixels or subpixels of the focal plane array to add to a deselect mapping; adding the pixels or subpixels to the deselect mapping based on the analysis; and storing the deselect mapping. A method for gathering data using a focal plane array according to another embodiment includes deselecting pixels or subpixels based on a deselect mapping; gathering a data set using pixels or subpixels in a focal plane array that are not deselected upon exposure thereof to light or radiation from a target of interest; and outputting the data set.

  8. Wave forces on an array of oscillating water column type free standing wave energy caissons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neelamani, S.; Thiruvenkatasamy, K.

    1995-12-31

    The wave induced in-line forces on a 1:50 scale model of an array of Multi resonant Oscillating Water Column (MOWC) type free standing wave energy caisson were experimentally investigated. A range of hydrodynamic parameters with different damping of oscillating water column (OWC) chamber and various center to center spacings between the caissons were used. In general, the force on the MOWC caisson array is two times that of a vertical wall, for maximum damping of OWC chamber. Reduction of damping of the OWC air chamber reduces the force on the array of caissons. With reduced damping, forces on OWC array can even be smaller than that the ones on a vertical wall. For smaller center to center (C/C) spacing between the caissons with respect to its harbor width, OWC array acts like a perforated breakwater, attracting smaller wave forces and for higher C/C spacing, it behaves like a vertical wall.

  9. Miniaturized, high-density, bead-based arrays are provided. Methods of producing and using clonal beads and producing and using miniaturized, high density, bead-based arrays are also provided.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M.; Shendure, Jay; Porreca, Gregory J.; Zhu, Jun

    2008-09-16

    Miniaturized, high-density, bead-based arrays are provided. Methods of producing and using clonal beads and producing and using miniaturized, high density, bead-based arrays are also provided.

  10. Patterned Arrays of Lateral Heterojunctions within Monolayer 2D Semiconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Lin, Ming-Wei; Wang, Kai; Lupini, Andrew R; Lee, Jaekwang; Basile Carrasco, Leonardo A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Puretzky, Alexander A; Ivanov, Ilia N; et al

    2015-01-01

    The formation of semiconductor heterojunctions and their high density integration are foundations of modern electronics and optoelectronics. To enable two-dimensional (2D) crystalline semiconductors as building blocks in next generation electronics, developing methods to deterministically form lateral heterojunctions is crucial. Here we demonstrate a process strategy for the formation of lithographically-patterned lateral semiconducting heterojunctions within a single 2D crystal. E-beam lithography is used to pattern MoSe2 monolayer crystals with SiO2, and the exposed locations are selectively and totally converted to MoS2 using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of sulfur in order to form MoSe2/MoS2 heterojunctions in predefined patterns. The junctions and conversionmoreprocess are characterized by atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. This demonstration of lateral semiconductor heterojunction arrays within a single 2D crystal is an essential step for the lateral integration of 2D semiconductor building blocks with different electronic and optoelectronic properties for high-density, ultrathin circuitry.less

  11. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guise, Nicholas D. Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-07

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions in a second BGA trap.

  12. Porosity in collapsible Ball Grid Array solder joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, C.A. |

    1998-05-01

    Ball Grid Array (BGA) technology has taken off in recent years due to the increased need for high interconnect density. Opposite to all the advantages BGA packages offer, porosity in collapsible BGA solder joints is often a major concern in the reliability of such packages. The effect of pores on the strength of collapsible BGA solder-joints was studied by manufacturing samples with different degrees of porosity and testing them under a shear load. It was found that the shear strength of the solder joints decreased in a linear fashion with increasing porosity. Failure occurred by internal necking of the interpore matrix. It was confirmed that entrapment of flux residues leads to porosity by manufacturing fluxless samples in a specially made furnace, and comparing them with samples assembled using flux. Also, contamination of Au electrodeposits (in substrate metallization) was determined to cause significant porosity. It was found that hard-Au (Co hardened Au) electrodeposits produce high degrees of porosity even in the absence of flux. Finally, increasing the time the solder spends in the molten state was proven to successfully decrease porosity.

  13. Close-packed-array (CPA) thermoelectric module development status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brittain, W.M. )

    1991-01-05

    Prior effort on the U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Special Applications Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Technology Program and Two-Watt RTG Program has focused on terrestrial applications where the RTG will be exposed to relatively low temperature thermal environments (subsea). Thus, effort has been oriented towards design optimization at cold junction temperatures in the 10 to 93 {degree}C (50 to 200 {degree}F) range. However, for other more severe design environments (such as space applications where a high heat rejection radiator temperature in the 177 to 204 {degree}C (350 to 400 {degree}F) range is required to minimize RTG size and weight, and high g shock/vibration capability is necessary) a modified thermoelectric module design is dictated. In order to minimize the RTG system size and weight, and to increase the mechanical strength of the thermoelectric module to withstand increased dynamic loads, a close-packed-array (CPA) module configuration is desirable. The monolithic nature of such a module generally results in greater shear and compression load capability than free-standing individual couples. A CPA module is especially attractive for terrestrial and space applications where severe structural loads will be imposed such as airborne deployment or planetary landers and penetrators.

  14. Optimal Solar PV Arrays Integration for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Li, Xueping

    2012-01-01

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems hold great potential for distributed energy generation by installing PV panels on rooftops of residential and commercial buildings. Yet challenges arise along with the variability and non-dispatchability of the PV systems that affect the stability of the grid and the economics of the PV system. This paper investigates the integration of PV arrays for distributed generation applications by identifying a combination of buildings that will maximize solar energy output and minimize system variability. Particularly, we propose mean-variance optimization models to choose suitable rooftops for PV integration based on Markowitz mean-variance portfolio selection model. We further introduce quantity and cardinality constraints to result in a mixed integer quadratic programming problem. Case studies based on real data are presented. An efficient frontier is obtained for sample data that allows decision makers to choose a desired solar energy generation level with a comfortable variability tolerance level. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to show the tradeoffs between solar PV energy generation potential and variability.

  15. Laser metrology for coherent multi-telescope arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shao, M.; Massie, N.A.

    1993-05-04

    In multi-telescope arrays that comprise multiple telescopes, a beam-combining module, and flat mirrors for directing light beams from the multiple telescopes to the beam combining module, a laser metrology system is used for monitoring various pathlengths along a beam path where deviations are likely. Some pathlengths are defined simply by a pair of retroreflectors or reflectors at both ends. Lengths between pairs of retroreflectors are measured and monitored by laser interferometers. One critical pathlength deviation is related to the displacement of the flat mirror. A reference frame is set up relative to the beam-combining module to form and define the coordinate system within which the positions of the flat mirrors are measured and monitored. In the preferred embodiment, a pair of retroreflectors along the optical axis of the beam-combining module defines a reference frame. A triangle is formed by the reference frame as the base and another retroreflector at the flat mirror as the vertex. The triangle is used to monitor the position of the flat mirror. A beam's pathlength is dynamically corrected in response to the monitored deviations.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of anodized titanium-oxide nanotube arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Michael Z.; Lai, Peng; Bhuiyan, Md S; Tsouris, Costas; Gu, Baohua; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Gabitto, Jorge; Harrison, L. D.

    2009-01-01

    Anodized titanium-oxide containing highly ordered, vertically oriented TiO2 nanotube arrays is a nanomaterial architecture that shows promise for diverse applications. In this paper, an anodization synthesis using HF-free aqueous solution is described. The anodized TiO2 film samples (amorphous, anatase, and rutile) on titanium foils were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Additional characterization in terms of photocurrent generated by an anode consisting of a titanium foil coated by TiO2 nanotubes was performed using an electrochemical cell. A platinum cathode was used in the electrochemical cell. Results were analyzed in terms of the efficiency of the current generated, defined as the ratio of the difference between the electrical energy output and the electrical energy input divided by the input radiation energy, with the goal of determining which phase of TiO2 nanotubes leads to more efficient hydrogen production. It was determined that the anatase crystalline structure converts light into current more efficiently and is therefore a better photocatalytic material for hydrogen production via photoelectrochemical splitting of water.

  17. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik C. Westman

    2003-10-24

    Improved ground-imaging capabilities have enormous potential to increase energy, environmental, and economic benefits by improving exploration accuracy and reducing energy consumption during the mining cycle. Seismic tomography has been used successfully to monitor and evaluate geologic conditions ahead of a mining face. A primary limitation to existing seismic tomography, however, is the placement of sensors. The goal of this project is to develop an array of 24 seismic sensors capable of being mounted in either a vertical or horizontal borehole. Development of this technology reduces energy usage in excavation, transportation, ventilation, and processing phases of the mining operation because less waste is mined and the mining cycle suffers fewer interruptions. This new technology benefits all types of mines, including metal/nonmetal, coal, and quarrying. The primary research tasks focused on sensor placement method, sensor housing and clamping design, and cabling and connector selection. An initial design is described in the report. Following assembly, a prototype was tested in the laboratory as well as at a surface stone quarry. Data analysis and tool performance were used for subsequent design modifications. A final design is described, of which several components are available for patent application. Industry partners have shown clear support for this research and demonstrated an interest in commercialization following project completion.

  18. Laser metrology for coherent multi-telescope arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shao, Michael (Pasadena, CA); Massie, Norbert A. (San Ramon, CA)

    1993-01-01

    In multi-telescope arrays that comprise multiple telescopes, a beam-combining module, and flat mirrors for directing light beams from the multiple telescopes to the beam combining module, a laser metrology system is used for monitoring various pathlengths along a beam path where deviations are likely. Some pathlengths are defined simply by a pair of retroreflectors or reflectors at both ends. Lengths between pairs of retroreflectors are measured and monitored by laser interferometers. One critical pathlength deviation is related to the displacement of the flat mirror. A reference frame is set up relative to the beam-combining module to form and define the coordinate system within which the positions of the flat mirrors are measured and monitored. In the preferred embodiment, a pair of retroreflectors along the optical axis of the beam-combining module defines a reference frame. A triangle is formed by the reference frame as the base and another retroreflector at the flat mirror as the vertex. The triangle is used to monitor the position of the flat mirror. A beam's pathlength is dynamically corrected in response to the monitored deviations.

  19. Patterned Arrays of Lateral Heterojunctions within Monolayer 2D Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Lin, Ming-Wei; Wang, Kai; Lupini, Andrew R; Lee, Jaekwang; Basile Carrasco, Leonardo A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Puretzky, Alexander A; Ivanov, Ilia N; Xiao, Kai; Yoon, Mina; Geohegan, David B

    2015-01-01

    The formation of semiconductor heterojunctions and their high density integration are foundations of modern electronics and optoelectronics. To enable two-dimensional (2D) crystalline semiconductors as building blocks in next generation electronics, developing methods to deterministically form lateral heterojunctions is crucial. Here we demonstrate a process strategy for the formation of lithographically-patterned lateral semiconducting heterojunctions within a single 2D crystal. E-beam lithography is used to pattern MoSe2 monolayer crystals with SiO2, and the exposed locations are selectively and totally converted to MoS2 using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of sulfur in order to form MoSe2/MoS2 heterojunctions in predefined patterns. The junctions and conversion process are characterized by atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. This demonstration of lateral semiconductor heterojunction arrays within a single 2D crystal is an essential step for the lateral integration of 2D semiconductor building blocks with different electronic and optoelectronic properties for high-density, ultrathin circuitry.

  20. Evolutionary Adaptive Discovery of Phased Array Sensor Signal Identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R. McJunkin; Milos Manic

    2011-05-01

    Tomography, used to create images of the internal properties and features of an object, from phased array ultasonics is improved through many sophisiticated methonds of post processing of data. One approach used to improve tomographic results is to prescribe the collection of more data, from different points of few so that data fusion might have a richer data set to work from. This approach can lead to rapid increase in the data needed to be stored and processed. It also does not necessarily lead to have the needed data. This article describes a novel approach to utilizing the data aquired as a basis for adapting the sensors focusing parameters to locate more precisely the features in the material: specifically, two evolutionary methods of autofocusing on a returned signal are coupled with the derivations of the forumulas for spatially locating the feature are given. Test results of the two novel methods of evolutionary based focusing (EBF) illustrate the improved signal strength and correction of the position of feature using the optimized focal timing parameters, called Focused Delay Identification (FoDI).

  1. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  2. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  3. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    2011-03-22

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  4. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    1990-01-01

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, Near-InfraRed channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  5. Thin planar package for cooling an array of edge-emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mundinger, David C. (Stockton, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    A laser diode array is disclosed that includes a plurality of planar assemblies and active cooling of each assembly. The laser diode array may be operated in a long duty cycle, or in continuous operation. A laser diode bar and a microchannel heat sink are thermally coupled in a compact, thin planar assembly having the laser diode bar located proximate to one edge. In an array, a number of such thin planar assemblies are secured together in a stacked configuration, in close proximity so that the laser diodes are spaced closely. The cooling means includes a microchannel heat sink proximate to the laser diode bar to absorb heat generated by laser operation. To provide the coolant to the microchannels, each thin planar assembly comprises passageways that connect the microchannels to inlet and outlet corridors. Each inlet passageway may comprise a narrow slot that directs coolant into the microchannels and increases the velocity of flow therethrough. The corridors comprises holes extending through each of the assemblies in the array. The inlet and outlet corridors are connected to a conventional coolant circulation system. The laser diode array with active cooling has applications as an optical pump for high power solid state lasers, or by mating the diodes with fiber optic lenses. Further, the arrays can be useful in applications having space constraints and energy limitations, and in military and space applications. The arrays can be incorporated in equipment such as communications devices and active sensors.

  6. Graphene oxide modified TiO2 nanotube arrays?enhanced visible light photoelectrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Mingxun; Cui, Xiao-Li; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-03-01

    Novel nanocomposite films based on graphene oxide (GO) and TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were synthesized by assembling GO on the surface of self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays through a simple assembling method. The composite films were characterized with field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Photoelectrochemical properties of the composite nanotube arrays were investigated under visible light illumination. Remarkably enhanced visible light photoelectrochemical response was observed for the GO decorated TiO{sub 2} nanotube composite electrode compared with pristine TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays. Sensitizing effect of GO on the photoelectrochemical response of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays was demonstrated and about 15 times enhanced maximum photoconversion efficiency was obtained with the presence of GO. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays towards degradation of methyl blue was also demonstrated after modification of GO. The results presented here demonstrate GO to be efficient for the improvement of utilization of visible light for TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays.

  7. Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on the design of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1983-01-01

    The Flat-Plate Solar Array Project, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, has focused on advancing technologies relevant to the design and construction of megawatt-level central-station systems. Photovoltaic modules and arrays for flat-plate central-station or other large-scale electric power production facilities require the establishment of a technical base that resolves design issues and results in practical and cost-effective configurations. The Central Station Research Forum addressed design, qualification and maintenance issues related to central-station arrays derived from the engineering and operating experiences of early applications and parallel laboratory research activities. Technical issues were examined from the viewpoint of the utility engineer, architect-engineer and laboratory researcher. The forum included presentations on optimum source-circuit designs, module insulation design for high system voltages, array safety, structural interface design, measurements and array operation and maintenance. The Research Forum focused on current capabilities as well as design difficulties requiring additional technological thrusts and/or continued research emphasis. Session topic summaries highlighting major points during group discussions, identifying promising technical approaches or areas of future research, are presented.

  8. M&A For Lithography Of Sparse Arrays Of Sub-Micrometer Features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brueck, Steven R.J.; Chen, Xiaolan; Zaidi, Saleem; Devine, Daniel J.

    1998-06-02

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for the exposure of sparse hole and/or mesa arrays with line:space ratios of 1:3 or greater and sub-micrometer hole and/or mesa diameters in a layer of photosensitive material atop a layered material. Methods disclosed include: double exposure interferometric lithography pairs in which only those areas near the overlapping maxima of each single-period exposure pair receive a clearing exposure dose; double interferometric lithography exposure pairs with additional processing steps to transfer the array from a first single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair into an intermediate mask layer and a second single-period interferometric lithography exposure to further select a subset of the first array of holes; a double exposure of a single period interferometric lithography exposure pair to define a dense array of sub-micrometer holes and an optical lithography exposure in which only those holes near maxima of both exposures receive a clearing exposure dose; combination of a single-period interferometric exposure pair, processing to transfer resulting dense array of sub-micrometer holes into an intermediate etch mask, and an optical lithography exposure to select a subset of initial array to form a sparse array; combination of an optical exposure, transfer of exposure pattern into an intermediate mask layer, and a single-period interferometric lithography exposure pair; three-beam interferometric exposure pairs to form sparse arrays of sub-micrometer holes; five- and four-beam interferometric exposures to form a sparse array of sub-micrometer holes in a single exposure. Apparatuses disclosed include arrangements for the three-beam, five-beam and four-beam interferometric exposures.

  9. V-shaped resonators for addition of broad-area laser diode arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yun; Braiman, Yehuda Y.

    2012-12-25

    A system and method for addition of broad-area semiconductor laser diode arrays are described. The system can include an array of laser diodes, a V-shaped external cavity, and grating systems to provide feedback for phase-locking of the laser diode array. A V-shaped mirror used to couple the laser diode emissions along two optical paths can be a V-shaped prism mirror, a V-shaped stepped mirror or include multiple V-shaped micro-mirrors. The V-shaped external cavity can be a ring cavity. The system can include an external injection laser to further improve coherence and phase-locking.

  10. Integrated titer plate-injector head for microdrop array preparation, storage and transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An integrated titer plate-injector head for preparing and storing two-dimensional (2-D) arrays of microdrops and for ejecting part or all of the microdrops and inserting same precisely into 2-D arrays of deposition sites with micrometer precision. The titer plate-injector head includes integrated precision formed nozzles with appropriate hydrophobic surface features and evaporative constraints. A reusable pressure head with a pressure equalizing feature is added to the titer plate to perform simultaneous precision sample ejection. The titer plate-injector head may be utilized in various applications including capillary electrophoresis, chemical flow injection analysis, microsample array preparation, etc.

  11. Anomalous complete opaqueness in a sparse array of gold nanoparticle chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Benfeng; Li Xiaowei; Vartiainen, Ismo; Lehmuskero, Anni; Turunen, Jari; Kuittinen, Markku; Vahimaa, Pasi; Kang Guoguo

    2011-08-22

    We report on an anomalous polarization-switching extinction effect in a sparse array of gold nanoparticle chains: under normal incidence of light, the array is almost transparent for one polarization; whereas it is fully opaque (with nearly zero transmittance) for the orthogonal polarization within a narrow band, even though the nanoparticles cover only a tiny fraction (say, 3.5%) of the transparent substrate surface. We reveal that the strong polarization-dependent short-range dipolar coupling and long-range radiative coupling of gold nanoparticles in this highly asymmetric array is responsible for this extraordinary effect.

  12. Dose distribution from x-ray microbeam arrays applied to radiation therapy:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An EGS4 Monte Carlo study (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dose distribution from x-ray microbeam arrays applied to radiation therapy: An EGS4 Monte Carlo study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dose distribution from x-ray microbeam arrays applied to radiation therapy: An EGS4 Monte Carlo study We present EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations of the spatial distribution of the dose deposited by a single x-ray pencil beam, a planar microbeam, and an array of parallel planar microbeams as

  13. Array of virtual Frisch-grid CZT detectors with common cathode readout and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pulse-height correction (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Array of virtual Frisch-grid CZT detectors with common cathode readout and pulse-height correction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Array of virtual Frisch-grid CZT detectors with common cathode readout and pulse-height correction We present our new results from testing 15-mm-long virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors with a common-cathode readout for correcting pulse-height distortions. The array employs

  14. Method and apparatus for enhancing vortex pinning by conformal crystal arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janko, Boldizsar; Reichhardt, Cynthia; Reichhardt, Charles; Ray, Dipanjan

    2015-07-14

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for strongly enhancing vortex pinning by conformal crystal arrays. The conformal crystal array is constructed by a conformal transformation of a hexagonal lattice, producing a non-uniform structure with a gradient where the local six-fold coordination of the pinning sites is preserved, and with an arching effect. The conformal pinning arrays produce significantly enhanced vortex pinning over a much wider range of field than that found for other vortex pinning geometries with an equivalent number of vortex pinning sites, such as random, square, and triangular.

  15. Characterization of a multi-axis ion chamber array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kozelka, Jakub; Simon, William E.; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan; Liu, Chihray

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to characterize a multi-axis ion chamber array (IC PROFILER; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL USA) that has the potential to simplify the acquisition of LINAC beam data. Methods: The IC PROFILER (or panel) measurement response was characterized with respect to radiation beam properties, including dose, dose per pulse, pulse rate frequency (PRF), and energy. Panel properties were also studied, including detector-calibration stability, power-on time, backscatter dependence, and the panel's agreement with water tank measurements [profiles, fractional depth dose (FDD), and output factors]. Results: The panel's relative deviation was typically within ({+-}) 1% of an independent (or nominal) response for all properties that were tested. Notable results were (a) a detectable relative field shape change of {approx}1% with linear accelerator PRF changes; (b) a large range in backscatter thickness had a minimal effect on the measured dose distribution (typically less than 1%); (c) the error spread in profile comparison between the panel and scanning water tank (Blue Phantom, CC13; IBA Schwarzenbruck, DE) was approximately ({+-}) 0.75%. Conclusions: The ability of the panel to accurately reproduce water tank profiles, FDDs, and output factors is an indication of its abilities as a dosimetry system. The benefits of using the panel versus a scanning water tank are less setup time and less error susceptibility. The same measurements (including device setup and breakdown) for both systems took 180 min with the water tank versus 30 min with the panel. The time-savings increase as the measurement load is increased.

  16. Phased-array ultrasonic surface contour mapping system. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasching, G.E.; Loudin, W.J.; Paton, D.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The development of reliable mechanistic models for prediction of conventional and fluidized-bed combustor and gasifier operation and solids flow behavior in silos or other solids handling and storage components requires knowledge of the contained solids flow characteristics. This knowledge is gained from dynamic experimental measurements of bed top surface contours in addition to measurements of bulk bed properties. The surface contour mapping system (SCMS) provides a means of generating surface contour maps in real time with a unique, automatically focused, density-compensated, digital phased-array scanning, ultrasonic-range measurement system. The system is designed to operate in environments having gas temperatures up to 1,600 {degree}F and pressures to 1,000 psig. Computer simulation of several SCMS candidates and acoustic carrier modulation techniques indicates that a surface measurement resolution of {plus_minus}2 inches over a range of 5 to 20 feet distance between the transmit/receive (T/R) transducers and the bed surface can be expected. The simulation of a particular design, a 9-T/R, 25-pixel bed surface, in which the level of each pixel was randomly set between 5 and 7 feet below the plane of the T/R transducers, then measured using two different modulation techniques, produced excellent results. The simulation of this surface contour mapping system determined the value of the level of each of the 25 pixels to within {plus_minus}1 inch for over 95 percent of more than 100 test cases for one of the modulation techniques, and for over 99 percent of about 100 test cases for a second modulation technique. A hardware implementation of the design simulated but using only a two-T/R, three-pixel SCMS produced results very closely approximating those obtained during the simulation.

  17. Report for Development of a Census Array and Evaluation of the Array to Detect Biothreat Agents and Environmental Samples for DHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaing, C; Jackson, P

    2011-04-14

    The objective of this project is to provide DHS a comprehensive evaluation of the current genomic technologies including genotyping, Taqman PCR, multiple locus variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing in the analysis of biothreat agents from complex environmental samples. This report focuses on the design, testing and results of samples on the Census Array. We designed a Census/Detection Array to detect all sequenced viruses (including phage), bacteria (eubacteria), and plasmids. Family-specific probes were selected for all sequenced viral and bacterial complete genomes, segments, and plasmids. Probes were designed to tolerate some sequence variation to enable detection of divergent species with homology to sequenced organisms, and to be unique relative to the human genome. A combination of 'detection' probes with high levels of conservation within a family plus 'census' probes targeting strain/isolate specific regions enabled detection and taxonomic classification from the level of family down to the strain. The array has wider coverage of bacterial and viral targets based on more recent sequence data and more probes per target than other microbial detection/discovery arrays in the literature. We tested the array with purified bacterial and viral DNA/RNA samples, artificial mixes of known bacterial/viral samples, spiked DNA against complex background including BW aerosol samples and soil samples, and environmental samples to evaluate the array's sensitivity and forensic capability. The data were analyzed using our novel maximum likelihood software. For most of the organisms tested, we have achieved at least species level discrimination.

  18. Array of virtual Frisch-grid detectors with common cathode and reduced length of shielding electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey; James, Ralph B.; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Vernon, Emerson

    2015-09-15

    A radiation detector system that effectively solves the electron trapping problem by optimizing shielding of individual virtual Frisch-grid detectors in an array configuration with a common cathode.

  19. Array of virtual Frisch-grid detectors with common cathode and reduced length of shielding electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Yang, Ge; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; James, Ralph B.

    2015-09-01

    A radiation detector system that solves the electron trapping problem by optimizing shielding of the individual virtual Frisch-grid detectors in an array configuration with a common cathode.

  20. Ion Trap Array-Based Systems And Methods For Chemical Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitten, William B [Oak Ridge, TN; Ramsey, J Michael [Knoxville, TN

    2005-08-23

    An ion trap-based system for chemical analysis includes an ion trap array. The ion trap array includes a plurality of ion traps arranged in a 2-dimensional array for initially confining ions. Each of the ion traps comprise a central electrode having an aperture, a first and second insulator each having an aperture sandwiching the central electrode, and first and second end cap electrodes each having an aperture sandwiching the first and second insulator. A structure for simultaneously directing a plurality of different species of ions out from the ion traps is provided. A spectrometer including a detector receives and identifies the ions. The trap array can be used with spectrometers including time-of-flight mass spectrometers and ion mobility spectrometers.

  1. Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays at TJNAF| U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    A small 18x18x5 mm3 array of pixilated LYSO scintillator was used as test light source. The 1x1 mm2 size of the pixels were known to be a challenging system to resolve ...

  2. Embedded arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotube carpets and methods for making them

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Jong; Nicholas, Nolan Walker; Kittrell, W. Carter; Schmidt, Howard K.

    2015-06-30

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a system and method for supporting a carbon nanotube array that involve an entangled carbon nanotube mat integral with the array, where the mat is embedded in an embedding material. The embedding material may be depositable on a carbon nanotube. A depositable material may be metallic or nonmetallic. The embedding material may be an adhesive material. The adhesive material may optionally be mixed with a metal powder. The embedding material may be supported by a substrate or self-supportive. The embedding material may be conductive or nonconductive. The system and method provide superior mechanical and, when applicable, electrical, contact between the carbon nanotubes in the array and the embedding material. The optional use of a conductive material for the embedding material provides a mechanism useful for integration of carbon nanotube arrays into electronic devices.

  3. Spatiotemporal and geometric optimization of sensor arrays for detecting analytes in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Nathan S. (La Canada, CA); Freund, Michael S. (Winnipeg, CA); Briglin, Shawn S. (Chittenango, NY); Tokumaru, Phillip (Moorpark, CA); Martin, Charles R. (Gainesville, FL); Mitchell, David (Newtown, PA)

    2009-09-29

    Sensor arrays and sensor array systems for detecting analytes in fluids. Sensors configured to generate a response upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more analytes can be located on one or more surfaces relative to one or more fluid channels in an array. Fluid channels can take the form of pores or holes in a substrate material. Fluid channels can be formed between one or more substrate plates. Sensor can be fabricated with substantially optimized sensor volumes to generate a response having a substantially maximized signal to noise ratio upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more target analytes. Methods of fabricating and using such sensor arrays and systems are also disclosed.

  4. Semiconductor wire array structures, and solar cells and photodetectors based on such structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Atwater, Harry A.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Petykiewicz, Jan A.

    2014-08-19

    A structure comprising an array of semiconductor structures, an infill material between the semiconductor materials, and one or more light-trapping elements is described. Photoconverters and photoelectrochemical devices based on such structure also described.

  5. Phased Array Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Larche, Michael R.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-05-31

    This study maps the phased array-generated acoustic sound fields through three types of CASS microstructure in four specimens to quantitatively assess the beam formation effectiveness in these materials.

  6. Radial electric field 3D modeling for wire arrays driving dynamic hohlraums on Z.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mock, Raymond Cecil

    2007-06-01

    The anode-cathode structure of the Z-machine wire array results in a higher negative radial electric field (Er) on the wires near the cathode relative to the anode. The magnitude of this field has been shown to anti-correlate with the axial radiation top/bottom symmetry in the DH (Dynamic Hohlraum). Using 3D modeling, the structure of this field is revealed for different wire-array configurations and for progressive mechanical alterations, providing insight for minimizing the negative Er on the wire array in the anode-to-cathode region of the DH. Also, the 3D model is compared to Sasorov's approximation, which describes Er at the surface of the wire in terms of wire-array parameters.

  7. Multi-array borehole resistivity and induced polarization method with mathematical inversion of redundant data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Stanley H. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    1989-01-01

    Multiple arrays of electric or magnetic transmitters and receivers are used in a borehole geophysical procedure to obtain a multiplicity of redundant data suitable for processing into a resistivity or induced polarization model of a subsurface region of the earth.

  8. IR Imaging Using Arrays of SiO2 Micromechanical Detectors (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    All the substrate material underneath the active area of each ... to a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 2.9 mK. In the present work the array was used to capture ...

  9. Spatiotemporal and geometric optimization of sensor arrays for detecting analytes fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Nathan S.; Freund, Michael S.; Briglin, Shawn M.; Tokumaru, Phil; Martin, Charles R.; Mitchell, David T.

    2006-10-17

    Sensor arrays and sensor array systems for detecting analytes in fluids. Sensors configured to generate a response upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more analytes can be located on one or more surfaces relative to one or more fluid channels in an array. Fluid channels can take the form of pores or holes in a substrate material. Fluid channels can be formed between one or more substrate plates. Sensor can be fabricated with substantially optimized sensor volumes to generate a response having a substantially maximized signal to noise ratio upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more target analytes. Methods of fabricating and using such sensor arrays and systems are also disclosed.

  10. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Array Effects on Wave Current and Sediment Circulation: Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jones, Craig; Magalen, Jason

    2014-09-01

    The goal s of this study were to develop tools to quantitatively characterize environments where wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices may be installed and to assess e ffects on hydrodynamics and lo cal sediment transport. A large hypothetical WEC array was investigated using wave, hydrodynamic, and sediment transport models and site - specific average and storm conditions as input. The results indicated that there were significant changes in sediment s izes adjacent to and in the lee of the WEC array due to reduced wave energy. The circulation in the lee of the array was also altered; more intense onshore currents were generated in the lee of the WECs . In general, the storm case and the average case show ed the same qualitative patterns suggesting that these trends would be maintained throughout the year. The framework developed here can be used to design more efficient arrays while minimizing impacts on nearshore environmen ts.

  11. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Winkler, James L.

    1996-01-01

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system (100) is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files (104) to design and/or generate lithographic masks (110).

  12. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, E.A.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

    1996-11-05

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

  13. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, E.A.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

    1999-01-05

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

  14. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Earl A.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Winkler, James L.

    1999-01-05

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system (100) is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files (104) to design and/or generate lithographic masks (110).

  15. Computer-aided engineering system for design of sequence arrays and lithographic masks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, E.A.; Lipshutz, R.J.; Morris, M.S.; Winkler, J.L.

    1997-01-14

    An improved set of computer tools for forming arrays is disclosed. According to one aspect of the invention, a computer system is used to select probes and design the layout of an array of DNA or other polymers with certain beneficial characteristics. According to another aspect of the invention, a computer system uses chip design files to design and/or generate lithographic masks. 14 figs.

  16. Dielectrophoresis device and method having non-uniform arrays for manipulating particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cummings, Eric B. (Livermore, CA); Fintschenko, Yolanda (Livermore, CA); Simmons, Blake (San Francisco, CA)

    2008-09-02

    Microfluidic devices according to embodiments of the present invention include an inlet port, an outlet port, and a channel or chamber having a non-uniform array of insulating features on one or more surfaces. Electrodes are provided for generation of a spatially non-uniform electric field across the array. A voltage source, which may be an A.C. and/or a D.C. voltage source may be coupled to the electrodes for the generation of the electric field.

  17. National Science Foundation awards $3.1 million to Chicago's Array of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Things Project | Argonne National Laboratory National Science Foundation awards $3.1 million to Chicago's Array of Things Project September 14, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint This press release was originally printed by the Computation Institute. CHICAGO -The University of Chicago (UChicago) announced today that the National Science Foundation has awarded a $3.1 million grant to support the development of Array of Things, an urban sensing instrument that will serve as a fitness tracker for the city.

  18. Ruggedized microchannel-cooled laser diode array with self-aligned microlens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freitas, Barry L.; Skidmore, Jay A.

    2003-11-11

    A microchannel-cooled, optically corrected, laser diode array is fabricated by mounting laser diode bars onto Si surfaces. This approach allows for the highest thermal impedance, in a ruggedized, low-cost assembly that includes passive microlens attachment without the need for lens frames. The microlensed laser diode array is usable in all solid-state laser systems that require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

  19. Coded aperture imaging with self-supporting uniformly redundant arrays. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-09-26

    A self-supporting uniformly redundant array pattern for coded aperture imaging. The invention utilizes holes which are an integer times smaller in each direction than holes in conventional URA patterns. A balance correlation function is generated where holes are represented by 1's, nonholes are represented by -1's, and supporting area is represented by 0's. The self-supporting array can be used for low energy applications where substrates would greatly reduce throughput.

  20. Planarized un-entangled carbon nanotube arrays. (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Planarized un-entangled carbon nanotube arrays. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Planarized un-entangled carbon nanotube arrays. Abstract not provided. Authors: Siegal, Michael P. ; Limmer, Steven J ; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin Publication Date: 2013-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1117386 Report Number(s): SAND2013-9500C 481043 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Materials Research Society Spring Meeting held April 21-25, 2014

  1. Generation of steep phase anisotropy with zero-backscattering by arrays of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    coupled dielectric nano-resonators (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Generation of steep phase anisotropy with zero-backscattering by arrays of coupled dielectric nano-resonators Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Generation of steep phase anisotropy with zero-backscattering by arrays of coupled dielectric nano-resonators The interaction of light with high-permittivity dielectric nano-resonators can lead to zero-backscattering (i.e., full transmission), attributed to the

  2. Nanophotonic production, modulation and switching of ions by silicon microcolumn arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Walker, Bennett N.

    2013-09-10

    The production and use of silicon microcolumn arrays that harvest light from a laser pulse to produce ions are described. The systems of the present invention seem to behave like a quasi-periodic antenna array with ion yields that show profound dependence on the plane of laser light polarization and the angle of incidence. By providing photonic ion sources, this enables enhanced control of ion production on a micro/nano scale and direct integration with miniaturized analytical devices.

  3. Nanophotonic production, modulation and switching of ions by silicon microcolumn arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Walker, Bennett N. (Washington, DC)

    2012-02-07

    The production and use of silicon microcolumn arrays that harvest light from a laser pulse to produce ions are described. The systems of the present invention seem to behave like a quasi-periodic antenna array with ion yields that show profound dependence on the plane of laser light polarization and the angle of incidence. By providing photonic ion sources, this enables enhanced control of ion production on a micro/nano scale and direct integration with miniaturized analytical devices.

  4. Nanophotonic production, modulation and switching of ions by silicon microcolumn arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Walker, Bennett N

    2015-04-07

    The production and use of silicon microcolumn arrays that harvest light from a laser pulse to produce ions are described. The systems of the present invention seem to behave like a quasi-periodic antenna array with ion yields that show profound dependence on the plane of laser light polarization and the angle of incidence. By providing photonic ion sources, this enables enhanced control of ion production on a micro/nano scale and direct integration with miniaturized analytical devices.

  5. Enhancement of concentration range of chromatographically detectable components with array detector mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Enke, Christie

    2013-02-19

    Methods and instruments for high dynamic range analysis of sample components are described. A sample is subjected to time-dependent separation, ionized, and the ions dispersed with a constant integration time across an array of detectors according to the ions m/z values. Each of the detectors in the array has a dynamically adjustable gain or a logarithmic response function, producing an instrument capable of detecting a ratio of responses or 4 or more orders of magnitude.

  6. Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Targeted Gas Detection (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection The ability to monitor the integrity of gas volumes is of interest to the stockpile surveillance community. Specifically, the leak detection of noble gases, at relevant

  7. TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENTS FOR PV MODULES AND ARRAYS: MEASUREMENT METHODS, DIFFICULTIES, AND RESULTS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENTS FOR PV MODULES AND ARRAYS: MEASUREMENT METHODS, DIFFICULTIES, AND RESULTS David L. King, Jay A. Kratochvil, and William E. Boyson Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 0 ABSTRACT The term "temperature coefficient" has been applied to several different photovoltaic performance parameters, including voltage, current, and power. The procedures for measuring the coefficient(s) for modules and arrays are not yet standardized, and systematic influences are

  8. Chip-Scale Nanofabrication of Single Spins and Spin Arrays in Diamond

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Chip-Scale Nanofabrication of Single Spins and Spin Arrays in Diamond Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chip-Scale Nanofabrication of Single Spins and Spin Arrays in Diamond We demonstrate a technique to nanofabricate nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond based on broad-beam nitrogen implantation through apertures in electron beam lithography resist. This method enables high-throughput nanofabrication of single NV centers on sub-100-nm length

  9. Large scale two-dimensional arrays of magnesium diboride superconducting quantum interference devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cybart, Shane A. Dynes, R. C.; Wong, T. J.; Cho, E. Y.; Beeman, J. W.; Yung, C. S.; Moeckly, B. H.

    2014-05-05

    Magnetic field sensors based on two-dimensional arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices were constructed from magnesium diboride thin films. Each array contained over 30?000 Josephson junctions fabricated by ion damage of 30?nm weak links through an implant mask defined by nano-lithography. Current-biased devices exhibited very large voltage modulation as a function of magnetic field, with amplitudes as high as 8?mV.

  10. NREL Simulates Shade Conditions in Repeatable Test for Solar Arrays - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Simulates Shade Conditions in Repeatable Test for Solar Arrays New protocol finds microinverters can improve performance under shaded conditions more than 12% May 14, 2012 The US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has released a new repeatable test protocol that simulates real shade conditions and can predict with much greater precision the effects of shade on a solar array. The new test demonstrated that under heavy shading conditions

  11. November 27 Webinar to Feature Broad Array of Tribal Energy Development

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Resources | Department of Energy November 27 Webinar to Feature Broad Array of Tribal Energy Development Resources November 27 Webinar to Feature Broad Array of Tribal Energy Development Resources November 20, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy, the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) Tribal Energy Program, and the Western Area Power Administration (Western) will present the next Tribal Renewable Energy Series webinar,

  12. Project Profile: High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next-Generation Solar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Power Production | Department of Energy Thermal Array for Next-Generation Solar Thermal Power Production Project Profile: High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next-Generation Solar Thermal Power Production Los Alamos National Laboratory logo The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), under the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, is developing a megawatt-scale heat pipe-based technology designed to bridge the heliostat reflector field and the power cycle by

  13. Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Targeted Gas Detection (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection The ability to monitor the integrity of gas volumes is of interest to the stockpile surveillance community. Specifically, the leak detection of noble gases, at relevant concentration ranges and

  14. Sensitivity enhancement of grating interferometer based two-dimensional sensor arrays using two-wavelength readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferhanoglu, Onur; Urey, Hakan

    2011-07-01

    Diffraction gratings integrated with microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors offer displacement measurements with subnanometer sensitivity. However, the sensitivity of the interferometric readout may drop significantly based on the gap between the grating and the reference surface. A two-wavelength (2-{lambda}) readout method was previously tested using a single MEMS sensor for illustrating increased displacement measurement capability. This work demonstrates sensitivity enhancement on a sensor array with large scale parallelization ({approx}20,000 sensors). The statistical representation, which is developed to model sensitivity enhancement within a grating based sensor array, is supported by experimental results using a thermal sensor array. In the experiments, two lasers at different wavelengths (633 and 650 nm) illuminate the thermal sensor array from the backside, time-sequentially. The diffracted first order light from the array is imaged onto a single CCD camera. The target scene is reconstructed by observing the change in the first diffracted order diffraction intensity for both wavelengths. Merging of the data from two measurements with two lasers was performed by taking the larger of the two CCD measurements with respect to the reference image for each sensor. {approx}30% increase in the average sensitivity was demonstrated for a 160x120 pixel IR sensor array. Proposed architecture is also applicable to a variety of sensing applications, such as parallel biosensing and atomic force microscopy, for improved displacement measurements and enhanced sensitivity.

  15. Porous SiC nanowire arrays as stable photocatalyst for water splitting under UV irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hailong; She, Guangwei; Mu, Lixuan; Shi, Wensheng

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrays of porous SiC nanowires prepared by a facile in situ carbonizing method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Utilizing the SiC nanowire arrays as photocatalysis for water splitting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent photocatalytic performance under the UV irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very high stability of the SiC nanowire photocatalyst. -- Abstract: In this study, we report the fabrication and photocatalytic properties of the oriented arrays of SiC nanowires on the Si substrate. The SiC nanowire arrays were prepared by carbonizing the Si nanowire arrays with the graphite powder at 1250 Degree-Sign C. The as-prepared SiC nanowires are highly porous, which endows them with a high surface-to-volume ratio. Considering the large surface areas and the high stability, the porous SiC nanowire arrays were used as photocatalyst for water splitting under UV irradiation. It was found that such porous SiC structure exhibited an enhanced and extremely stable photocatalytic performance.

  16. Apparatus and method for imaging metallic objects using an array of giant magnetoresistive sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiken, Alison (Fremont, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A portable, low-power, metallic object detector and method for providing an image of a detected metallic object. In one embodiment, the present portable low-power metallic object detector an array of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors. The array of GMR sensors is adapted for detecting the presence of and compiling image data of a metallic object. In the embodiment, the array of GMR sensors is arranged in a checkerboard configuration such that axes of sensitivity of alternate GMR sensors are orthogonally oriented. An electronics portion is coupled to the array of GMR sensors. The electronics portion is adapted to receive and process the image data of the metallic object compiled by the array of GMR sensors. The embodiment also includes a display unit which is coupled to the electronics portion. The display unit is adapted to display a graphical representation of the metallic object detected by the array of GMR sensors. In so doing, a graphical representation of the detected metallic object is provided.

  17. Inspection design using 2D phased array, TFM and cueMAP software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGilp, Ailidh; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Lardner, Tim; Mackersie, John; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-02-18

    A simulation suite, cueMAP, has been developed to facilitate the design of inspection processes and sparse 2D array configurations. At the core of cueMAP is a Total Focusing Method (TFM) imaging algorithm that enables computer assisted design of ultrasonic inspection scenarios, including the design of bespoke array configurations to match the inspection criteria. This in-house developed TFM code allows for interactive evaluation of image quality indicators of ultrasonic imaging performance when utilizing a 2D phased array working in FMC/TFM mode. The cueMAP software uses a series of TFM images to build a map of resolution, contrast and sensitivity of imaging performance of a simulated reflector, swept across the inspection volume. The software takes into account probe properties, wedge or water standoff, and effects of specimen curvature. In the validation process of this new software package, two 2D arrays have been evaluated on 304n stainless steel samples, typical of the primary circuit in nuclear plants. Thick section samples have been inspected using a 1MHz 2D matrix array. Due to the processing efficiency of the software, the data collected from these array configurations has been used to investigate the influence sub-aperture operation on inspection performance.

  18. Efficient Memory Access with NumPy Global Arrays using Local Memory Access

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily, Jeffrey A.; Berghofer, Dan C.

    2013-08-03

    This paper discusses the work completed working with Global Arrays of data on distributed multi-computer systems and improving their performance. The tasks completed were done at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in the Science Undergrad Laboratory Internship program in the summer of 2013 for the Data Intensive Computing Group in the Fundamental and Computational Sciences DIrectorate. This work was done on the Global Arrays Toolkit developed by this group. This toolkit is an interface for programmers to more easily create arrays of data on networks of computers. This is useful because scientific computation is often done on large amounts of data sometimes so large that individual computers cannot hold all of it. This data is held in array form and can best be processed on supercomputers which often consist of a network of individual computers doing their computation in parallel. One major challenge for this sort of programming is that operations on arrays on multiple computers is very complex and an interface is needed so that these arrays seem like they are on a single computer. This is what global arrays does. The work done here is to use more efficient operations on that data that requires less copying of data to be completed. This saves a lot of time because copying data on many different computers is time intensive. The way this challenge was solved is when data to be operated on with binary operations are on the same computer, they are not copied when they are accessed. When they are on separate computers, only one set is copied when accessed. This saves time because of less copying done although more data access operations were done.

  19. SURVEYING THE DYNAMIC RADIO SKY WITH THE LONG WAVELENGTH DEMONSTRATOR ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Lane, W. M.; Gross, C.; Kassim, N. E.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Stewart, K.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, D.; York, J. A.; Kerkhoff, A.; Dalal, N. Paravastu; Cohen, A. S.; Erickson, W. C.

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents a search for radio transients at a frequency of 73.8 MHz (4 m wavelength) using the all-sky imaging capabilities of the Long Wavelength Demonstrator Array (LWDA). The LWDA was a 16-dipole phased array telescope, located on the site of the Very Large Array in New Mexico. The field of view of the individual dipoles was essentially the entire sky, and the number of dipoles was sufficiently small that a simple software correlator could be used to make all-sky images. From 2006 October to 2007 February, we conducted an all-sky transient search program, acquiring a total of 106 hr of data; the time sampling varied, being 5 minutes at the start of the program and improving to 2 minutes by the end of the program. We were able to detect solar flares, and in a special-purpose mode, radio reflections from ionized meteor trails during the 2006 Leonid meteor shower. We detected no transients originating outside of the solar system above a flux density limit of 500 Jy, equivalent to a limit of no more than about 10{sup -2} events yr{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, having a pulse energy density {approx}>1.5 x 10{sup -20} J m{sup -2} Hz{sup -1} at 73.8 MHz for pulse widths of about 300 s. This event rate is comparable to that determined from previous all-sky transient searches, but at a lower frequency than most previous all-sky searches. We believe that the LWDA illustrates how an all-sky imaging mode could be a useful operational model for low-frequency instruments such as the Low Frequency Array, the Long Wavelength Array station, the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array, and potentially the Lunar Radio Array.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of large arrays of mesoscopic gold rings on large-aspect-ratio cantilevers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngo, D. Q.; Petkovi?, I. Lollo, A.; Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2014-10-15

    We have fabricated large arrays of mesoscopic metal rings on ultrasensitive cantilevers. The arrays are defined by electron beam lithography and contain up to 10{sup 5} rings. The rings have a circumference of 1 ?m, and are made of ultrapure (6N) Au that is deposited onto a silicon-on-insulator wafer without an adhesion layer. Subsequent processing of the SOI wafer results in each array being supported at the end of a free-standing cantilever. To accommodate the large arrays while maintaining a low spring constant, the cantilevers are nearly 1 mm in both lateral dimensions and 100 nm thick. The extreme aspect ratio of the cantilevers, the large array size, and the absence of a sticking layer are intended to enable measurements of the rings' average persistent current in the presence of relatively small magnetic fields. We describe the motivation for these measurements, the fabrication of the devices, and the characterization of the cantilevers' mechanical properties. We also discuss the devices' expected performance in measurements of .

  1. Numeric-modeling sensitivity analysis of the performance of wind turbine arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lissaman, P.B.S.; Gyatt, G.W.; Zalay, A.D.

    1982-06-01

    An evaluation of the numerical model created by Lissaman for predicting the performance of wind turbine arrays has been made. Model predictions of the wake parameters have been compared with both full-scale and wind tunnel measurements. Only limited, full-scale data were available, while wind tunnel studies showed difficulties in representing real meteorological conditions. Nevertheless, several modifications and additions have been made to the model using both theoretical and empirical techniques and the new model shows good correlation with experiment. The larger wake growth rate and shorter near wake length predicted by the new model lead to reduced interference effects on downstream turbines and hence greater array efficiencies. The array model has also been re-examined and now incorporates the ability to show the effects of real meteorological conditions such as variations in wind speed and unsteady winds. The resulting computer code has been run to show the sensitivity of array performance to meteorological, machine, and array parameters. Ambient turbulence and windwise spacing are shown to dominate, while hub height ratio is seen to be relatively unimportant. Finally, a detailed analysis of the Goodnoe Hills wind farm in Washington has been made to show how power output can be expected to vary with ambient turbulence, wind speed, and wind direction.

  2. Plasma formation and dynamics in conical wire arrays in the Llampudken pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muoz, C. Gonzalo E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Valenzuela, Vicente E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Veloso, Felipe E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Favre, Mario E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Wyndham, Edmund E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl

    2014-12-15

    Plasma formation and dynamics from conical wire array is experimentally studied. Ablation from the wires is observed, forming plasma accumulation at the array axis and subsequently a jet outflow been expelled toward the top of the array. The arrays are composed by 16 equally spaced 25? diameter tungsten wires. Their dimensions are 20mm height, with base diameters of 8mm and 16mm top diameter. The array loads are design to be overmassed, hence no complete ablation of the wires is observed during the current rise. The experiments have been carried out in the Llampudken. pulsed power generator (?350kA in ?350ns). Plasma dynamics is studied in both side-on and end-on directions. Laser probing (shadowgraphy) is achieved using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532nm, 12ps FWHM) captured by CCD cameras. Pinhole XUV imaging is captured using gated microchannel plate cameras with time resolution ?5ns. Results on the jet velocity and the degree of collimation indicating the plausibility on the use of these jets as comparable to the study astrophysically produced jets are presented and discussed.

  3. Study of transparent and nontransparent regimes of implosion in star wire arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Papp, D.; Altemara, S. D.; Chittenden, J. P.; Bland, S. N.; Jones, B.

    2010-10-15

    Star wire arrays were used to control the imploding plasma flows and study plasma interpenetration. These arrays consisted of linear 'rays' aligned azimuthally and extending from the vertical axis. Star arrays with two close located wires ('gates') instead of a single wire on the inner cylinder were studied for transparent and nontransparent regimes of propagation of imploding plasma through the gates. Nontransparent mode of collision is typical for regular star wire arrays and it was also observed in Al stars with gate wires of regular length and with the gate width of 0.3-2 mm. The cascade process of implosion in stars and trapping of imploding plasma in 1-2 mm gates were modeled with the three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamics code. The intermediate semitransparent mode of collision was observed in Al stars with long Al 'gate' wires. A transparent mode was observed in Al stars with long stainless steel or W gate wires. Applications of wire arrays with controlled plasma flows are discussed.

  4. Controlled Growth of Ordered III-Nitride Core-Shell Nanostructure Arrays for Visible Optoelectronic Devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rishinaramangalam, Ashwin K.; Mishkat Ul Masabih, Saadat; Fairchild, Michael N.; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Shima, Darryl M.; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Brener, Igal; Brueck, Steven R.J.; Feezell, Daniel F.

    2014-10-21

    In our paper, we demonstrate the growth of ordered arrays of nonpolar {101 ¯ 0} core–shell nanowalls and semipolar {101 ¯ 1} core–shell pyramidal nanostripes on c-plane (0001) sapphire substrates using selective-area epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure arrays are controllably patterned into LED mesa regions, demonstrating a technique to impart secondary lithography features into the arrays. Moreover, we study the dependence of the nanostructure cores on the epitaxial growth conditions and show that the geometry and morphology are strongly influenced by growth temperature, V/III ratio, and pulse interruption time. We also demonstrate the growth of InGaNmore » quantum well shells on the nanostructures and characterize the structures by using micro-photoluminescence and cross-section scanning tunneling electron microscopy.« less

  5. Large-scale fabrication of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L; Das, Suman; Xu, Sheng; Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui; Wei, Yaguang; Wu, Wenzhuo

    2013-02-05

    In a method for growing a nanowire array, a photoresist layer is placed onto a nanowire growth layer configured for growing nanowires therefrom. The photoresist layer is exposed to a coherent light interference pattern that includes periodically alternately spaced dark bands and light bands along a first orientation. The photoresist layer exposed to the coherent light interference pattern along a second orientation, transverse to the first orientation. The photoresist layer developed so as to remove photoresist from areas corresponding to areas of intersection of the dark bands of the interference pattern along the first orientation and the dark bands of the interference pattern along the second orientation, thereby leaving an ordered array of holes passing through the photoresist layer. The photoresist layer and the nanowire growth layer are placed into a nanowire growth environment, thereby growing nanowires from the nanowire growth layer through the array of holes.

  6. Coherent imaging with two-dimensional focal-plane arrays: design and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, M.L.; Bennett, C.A.; Emery, M.S.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Miller, G.H.; Richards, R.K.; Sitter, D.N.

    1997-09-01

    Scanned, single-channel optical heterodyne detection has been used in a variety of lidar applications from ranging and velocity measurements to differential absorption spectroscopy. We describe the design of a coherent camera system that is based on a two-dimensional staring array of heterodyne receivers for coherent imaging applications. Experimental results with a single HgCdTe detector translated in the image plane to form a synthetic two-dimensional array demonstrate the ability to obtain passive heterodyne images of chemical vapor plumes that are invisible to normal video infrared cameras. We describe active heterodyne imaging experiments with use of focal-plane arrays that yield hard-body Doppler lidar images and also demonstrate spatial averaging to reduce speckle effects in static coherent images. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  7. Method and system for gathering a library of response patterns for sensor arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A method of gathering a library of response patterns for one or more sensor arrays used in the detection and identification of chemical components in a fluid includes the steps of feeding samples of fluid with time-spaced separation of known components to the sensor arrays arranged in parallel or series configurations. Modifying elements such as heating filaments of differing materials operated at differing temperatures are included in the configurations to duplicate operational modes designed into the portable detection systems with which the calibrated sensor arrays are to be used. The response patterns from the known components are collected into a library held in the memory of a microprocessor for comparison with the response patterns of unknown components.

  8. Tunable and angle-insensitive plasmon resonances in graphene ribbon arrays with multispectral diffraction response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Kangwen; Ma, Xunpeng; Zhang, Zuyin; Xu, Yun, E-mail: xuyun@semi.ac.cn; Song, Guofeng [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2014-03-14

    Plasmon resonances in graphene ribbon arrays are investigated numerically by means of the Finite Element Method. Numerical analysis shows that a series of multipolar resonances take place when graphene ribbon arrays are illuminated by a TM polarized electromagnetic wave. Moreover, these resonances are angle-independent, and can be tuned greatly by the width and the doping level of the graphene ribbons. Specifically, we demonstrate that for graphene arrays with several sets of graphene ribbons, which have different widths or doping levels, each of these multipolar resonances will be split into several ones. In addition, as plasmon resonances can confine electromagnetic field at the ribbon edges, graphene ribbons with different widths or doping levels offer intriguing application for electrically tunable spectral imaging.

  9. Ion cyclotron and lower hybrid arrays applicable to current drive in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosia, G.; Ragona, R.; Helou, W.; Goniche, M.; Hillaret, J.

    2014-02-12

    This paper presents concepts for Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Current Drive arrays applicable to fusion reactors and based on periodically loaded line power division. It is shown that, in large arrays, such as the ones proposed for fusion reactor applications, these schemes can offer, in principle, a number of practical advantages, compared with currently adopted ones, such as in-blanket operation at significantly reduced power density, lay out suitable for water cooling, single ended or balanced power feed, simple and load independent impedance matching In addition, a remote and accurate real time measurement of the complex impedance of all array elements as well as detection, location, and measurement of the complex admittance of a single arc occurring anywhere in the structure is possible.

  10. Multi-particle trapping and manipulation by a high-frequency array transducer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Changhan; Kang, Bong Jin; Lee, Changyang; Kim, Hyung Ham Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-11-24

    We report the multiple micro-particle trapping and manipulation by a single-beam acoustic tweezer using a high-frequency array transducer. A single acoustic beam generated by a 30 MHz ultrasonic linear array transducer can entrap and transport multiple micro-particles located at the main lobe and the grating lobes. The distance between trapped particles can be adjusted by changing the transmit arrangement of array-based acoustic tweezers and subsequently the location of grating lobes. The experiment results showed that the proposed method can trap and manipulate multiple particles within a range of hundreds of micrometers. Due to its simplicity and low acoustic power, which is critical to protect cells from any thermal and mechanical damages, the technique may be used for transportation of cells in cell biology, biosensors, and tissue engineering.

  11. Rotating fiber array molecular driver and molecular momentum transfer device constructed therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milleron, Norman (1854 San Juan, Berkeley, CA 94707)

    1983-01-01

    A rotating fiber array molecular driver is disclosed which includes a magnetically suspended and rotated central hub to which is attached a plurality of elongated fibers extending radially therefrom. The hub is rotated so as to straighten and axially extend the fibers and to provide the fibers with a tip speed which exceeds the average molecular velocity of fluid molecules entering between the fibers. Molecules colliding with the sides of the rotating fibers are accelerated to the tip speed of the fiber and given a momentum having a directional orientation within a relatively narrow distribution angle at a point radially outward of the hub, which is centered and peaks at the normal to the fiber sides in the direction of fiber rotation. The rotating fiber array may be used with other like fiber arrays or with other stationary structures to form molecular momentum transfer devices such as vacuum pumps, molecular separators, molecular coaters, or molecular reactors.

  12. Graphical Environment Tools for Application to Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, Richard A.; Radford, David C.

    2013-12-30

    Highly segmented, position-sensitive germanium detector systems are being developed for nuclear physics research where traditional electronic signal processing with mixed analog and digital function blocks would be enormously complex and costly. Future systems will be constructed using pipelined processing of high-speed digitized signals as is done in the telecommunications industry. Techniques which provide rapid algorithm and system development for future systems are desirable. This project has used digital signal processing concepts and existing graphical system design tools to develop a set of re-usable modular functions and libraries targeted for the nuclear physics community. Researchers working with complex nuclear detector arrays such as the Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETA) have been able to construct advanced data processing algorithms for implementation in field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) through application of these library functions using intuitive graphical interfaces.

  13. Multi-spectral optical absorption in substrate-free nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Junpeng; Chia, Andrew; Boulanger, Jonathan; LaPierre, Ray; Dhindsa, Navneet; Khodadad, Iman; Saini, Simarjeet

    2014-09-22

    A method is presented of fabricating gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowire arrays of controlled diameter and period by reactive ion etching of a GaAs substrate containing an indium gallium arsenide (InGaP) etch stop layer, allowing the precise nanowire length to be controlled. The substrate is subsequently removed by selective etching, using the same InGaP etch stop layer, to create a substrate-free GaAs nanowire array. The optical absorptance of the nanowire array was then directly measured without absorption from a substrate. We directly observe absorptance spectra that can be tuned by the nanowire diameter, as explained with rigorous coupled wave analysis. These results illustrate strong optical absorption suitable for nanowire-based solar cells and multi-spectral absorption for wavelength discriminating photodetectors. The solar-weighted absorptance above the bandgap of GaAs was 94% for a nanowire surface coverage of only 15%.

  14. Methods for the Precise Locating and Forming of Arrays of Curved Features into a Workpiece

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gill, David Dennis (Albuquerque, NM); Keeler, Gordon A. (Albuquerque, NM); Serkland, Darwin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Mukherjee, Sayan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-10-14

    Methods for manufacturing high precision arrays of curved features (e.g. lenses) in the surface of a workpiece are described utilizing orthogonal sets of inter-fitting locating grooves to mate a workpiece to a workpiece holder mounted to the spindle face of a rotating machine tool. The matching inter-fitting groove sets in the workpiece and the chuck allow precisely and non-kinematically indexing the workpiece to locations defined in two orthogonal directions perpendicular to the turning axis of the machine tool. At each location on the workpiece a curved feature can then be on-center machined to create arrays of curved features on the workpiece. The averaging effect of the corresponding sets of inter-fitting grooves provide for precise repeatability in determining, the relative locations of the centers of each of the curved features in an array of curved features.

  15. Controlled Growth of Ordered III-Nitride Core-Shell Nanostructure Arrays for Visible Optoelectronic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rishinaramangalam, Ashwin K.; Mishkat Ul Masabih, Saadat; Fairchild, Michael N.; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Shima, Darryl M.; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Brener, Igal; Brueck, Steven R.J.; Feezell, Daniel F.

    2014-10-21

    In our paper, we demonstrate the growth of ordered arrays of nonpolar {101 0} coreshell nanowalls and semipolar {101 1} coreshell pyramidal nanostripes on c-plane (0001) sapphire substrates using selective-area epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure arrays are controllably patterned into LED mesa regions, demonstrating a technique to impart secondary lithography features into the arrays. Moreover, we study the dependence of the nanostructure cores on the epitaxial growth conditions and show that the geometry and morphology are strongly influenced by growth temperature, V/III ratio, and pulse interruption time. We also demonstrate the growth of InGaN quantum well shells on the nanostructures and characterize the structures by using micro-photoluminescence and cross-section scanning tunneling electron microscopy.

  16. Planarized arrays of aligned, untangled multiwall carbon nanotubes with Ohmic back contacts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rochford, C.; Limmer, S. J.; Howell, S. W.; Beechem, T. E.; Siegal, M. P.

    2014-11-26

    Vertically aligned, untangled planarized arrays of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with Ohmic back contacts were grown in nanopore templates on arbitrary substrates. The templates were prepared by sputter depositing Nd-doped Al films onto W-coated substrates, followed by anodization to form an aluminum oxide nanopore array. The W underlayer helps eliminate the aluminum oxide barrier that typically occurs at the nanopore bottoms by instead forming a thin WO3 layer. The WO3 can be selectively etched to enable electrodeposition of Co catalysts with control over the Co site density. This led to control of the site density of MWNTs grown by thermalmore » chemical vapor deposition, with the W also serving as a back electrical contact. As a result, Ohmic contact to MWNTs was confirmed, even following ultrasonic cutting of the entire array to a uniform height.« less

  17. Investigating radial wire array Z pinches as a compact x-ray source on the Saturn generator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ampleford, David J.; Bland, S. N.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P.; Cuneo, Michael E.; McBride, Ryan D.; Jones, Brent Manley; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; et al

    2015-08-27

    Radial wire array z pinches, where wires are positioned radially outward from a central cathode to a concentric anode, can act as a compact bright x-ray source that could potentially be used to drive a hohlraum. Experiments were performed on the 7-MA Saturn generator using radial wire arrays. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1-MA level, where they have been shown to be a promising compact X-ray source. Data indicates that at 7 MA, radial wire arrays can radiate ~9 TW with 10-ns full-width at half-maximum from a compact pinch.

  18. Plasmonic Based Sensing Using an Array of Au-Metal Oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, N.; Rogers, Phillip H.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    An optical plasmonic-based sensing array has been developed and tested for the selective and sensitive detection of H2, CO, and NO2 at a temperature of 500C in an oxygen-containing background. The three element sensing array used Au nanoparticles embedded in separate thin films of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), CeO2, and TiO2. A peak in the absorbance spectrum due to a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) on the Au nanoparticles was monitored for each film during gas exposures and showed a blue shift in the peak positions for the reducing gases, H2 and CO, and a red shift for the oxidizing gas NO2. A more in-depth look at the sensing response was performed using the multivariate methods of principal component analysis (PCA) analysis and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on data from across the entire absorbance spectrum range. Qualitative results from both methods showed good separation between the three analytes for both the full array and the Au-TiO2 sample. Quantification of LDA cluster separation using the Mahalanobis distance showed better cluster separation for the array, but there were some instances with the lowest concentrations where the single Au-TiO2 film had better separation than the array. A second method to quantify cluster separation in LDA space was developed using multidimensional volume analysis of the individual cluster volume, overlapped cluster volume and empty volume between clusters. Compared to the individual sensing elements, the array showed less cluster overlap, smaller cluster volumes, and more space between clusters, all of which were expected for improved separability between the analytes.

  19. Halbach array generator/motor having an automatically regulated output voltage and mechanical power output

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    2005-02-22

    A motor/generator having its stationary portion, i.e., the stator, positioned concentrically within its rotatable element, i.e., the rotor, along its axis of rotation. The rotor includes a Halbach array. The stator windings are switched or commutated to provide a DC motor/generator much the same as in a conventional DC motor/generator. The voltage and power are automatically regulated by using centrifugal force to change the diameter of the rotor, and thereby vary the radial gap in between the stator and the rotating Halbach array, as a function of the angular velocity of the rotor.

  20. Hard X-ray spatial array diagnostics on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, D. W.; Chen, Z. Y. Luo, Y. H.; Tong, R. H.; Yan, W.; Jin, W.; Zhuang, G.

    2014-11-15

    A spatially distributed hard X-ray detection array has been developed to diagnose the loss of runaway electron with toroidal and poloidal resolution. The hard X-ray radiation in the energy ranges of 0.31 MeV resulted from runaway electrons can be measured. The detection array consists of 12 CdTe detectors which are arranged surrounding the tokamak. It is found that most runaway electrons which transport to plasma boundary tend to loss on limiters. The application of electrode biasing probe resulted in enhancement of local runaway loss. Resonant magnetic perturbations enhanced the runaway electrons diffusion and showed an asymmetric poloidal loss rate.

  1. Structure of Stagnated Plasma in Aluminium Wire Array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G.N.; Bland, S.N.; Lebedev, S.V.; Ampleford, D.J.; Palmer, J.B.A.; Bott, S.C.; Rapley, J.; Chittenden, J.P.; Pikuz, S.A.; Shelkovenko, T.A.

    2006-01-05

    Experiments with aluminium wire array Z-pinches have been carried out on the MAGPIE generator (1MA, 240ns) at Imperial College London. It has been shown that in these arrays there are two intense sources of radiation during stagnation: line emission from a precursor-sized object and continuum radiation from bright-spots of significantly higher temperature randomly distributed around this object such as to produce a hollow emission profile. Spatially resolved spectra produced by spherically-bent crystals were recorded, both time-integrated and time-resolved, and were used to show that these two sources of radiation peak at the same time.

  2. Halbach array generator/motor having mechanically regulated output voltage and mechanical power output

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    2005-06-14

    A motor/generator has its stationary portion, i.e., the stator, positioned concentrically within its rotatable element, i.e., the rotor, along the axis of rotation of the rotor. The rotor includes a Halbach array of magnets. The voltage and power outputs are regulated by varying the radial gap in between the stator windings and the rotating Halbach array. The gap is varied by extensible and retractable supports attached to the stator windings that can move the windings in a radial direction.

  3. Criticality experiments with planar arrays of three-liter bottles containing plutonium nitrate solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durst, B.M.; Clayton, E.D.; Smith, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of these experiments was to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in critically safety assessments of plant configurations. Arrays containing up to as many as sixteen three-liter bottles filled with plutonium nitrate were used in the experiments. A split-table device was used in the final assembly of the arrays. Ths planar arrays were reflected with close fitting plexiglas on each side and on the bottom but not the top surface. The experiments addressed a number of factors effecting criticality: the critical air gap between bottles in an array of fixed number of bottles, the number of bottles required for criticality if the bottles were touching, and the effect on critical array spacing and critical bottle number due to the insertion of an hydrogeneous substance into the air gap between bottles. Each bottle contained about 2.4l of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} solution at a Pu concentration of 105g Pu/l, with the {sup 240}Pu content being 2.9 wt% at a free acid molarity H{sup +} of 5.1. After the initial series of experiments were performed with bottles separated by air gaps, plexiglas shells of varying thicknesses were placed around each bottle to investigate how moderation between bottles affects both the number of bottles required for criticality and the critical spacing between each bottle. The minimum of bottles required for criticality was found to be 10.9 bottles, occurring for a square array with bottles in contact. As the bottles were spaced apart, the critical number increased. For sixteen bottles in a square array, the critical separation between surfaces in both x and y direction was 0.96 cm. The addition of plexiglas around each bottle decreased the critical bottle number, compared to those separated in air, but the critical bottle number, even with interstitial plastic in place was always greater than 10.9 bottles. The most reactive configuration was a tightly packed array of bottles with no intervening material.

  4. Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Targeted Gas Detection (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a

  5. Transparently wrap-gated semiconductor nanowire arrays for studies of gate-controlled photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nylund, Gustav; Storm, Kristian; Torstensson, Henrik; Wallentin, Jesper; Borgstrm, Magnus T.; Hessman, Dan; Samuelson, Lars

    2013-12-04

    We present a technique to measure gate-controlled photoluminescence (PL) on arrays of semiconductor nanowire (NW) capacitors using a transparent film of Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) wrapping around the nanowires as the gate electrode. By tuning the wrap-gate voltage, it is possible to increase the PL peak intensity of an array of undoped InP NWs by more than an order of magnitude. The fine structure of the PL spectrum reveals three subpeaks whose relative peak intensities change with gate voltage. We interpret this as gate-controlled state-filling of luminescing quantum dot segments formed by zincblende stacking faults in the mainly wurtzite NW crystal structure.

  6. The Use of Triangular-Shaped PV Arrays to Better Blend into Historical Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When considering the installation of a solar PV array on a designated historical structure, placement of each solar panel requires extra attention to aesthetic considerations. If the solar array cannot be installed behind the structure or “hidden” on a roof plane that is not visible from the public street or sidewalk, it can sometimes be installed as an architectural feature that blends into the historical structure. One way to do this is to utilize triangular-shaped PV panels that conform with the building’s roof lines.

  7. Laser-ablative engineering of phase singularities in plasmonic metamaterial arrays for biosensing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aristov, Andrey I.; Kabashin, Andrei V.; Zywietz, Urs; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.; Reinhardt, Carsten; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2014-02-17

    By using methods of laser-induced transfer combined with nanoparticle lithography, we design and fabricate large-area gold nanoparticle-based metamaterial arrays exhibiting extreme Heaviside-like phase jumps in reflected light due to a strong diffractive coupling of localized plasmons. When employed in sensing schemes, these phase singularities provide the sensitivity of 5??10{sup 4} deg. of phase shift per refractive index unit change that is comparable with best values reported for plasmonic biosensors. The implementation of sensor platforms on the basis of such metamaterial arrays promises a drastic improvement of sensitivity and cost efficiency of plasmonic biosensing devices.

  8. Transparent TiO2 nanotube array photoelectrodes prepared via two-step anodization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Jin Young; Zhu, Kai; Neale, Nathan R.; Frank, Arthur J.

    2014-04-04

    Two-step anodization of transparent TiO2 nanotube arrays has been demonstrated with aid of a Nb-doped TiO2 buffer layer deposited between the Ti layer and TCO substrate. Enhanced physical adhesion and electrochemical stability provided by the buffer layer has been found to be important for successful implementation of the two-step anodization process. As a result, with the proposed approach, the morphology and thickness of NT arrays could be controlled very precisely, which in turn, influenced their optical and photoelectrochemical properties.

  9. Large oriented arrays and continuous films of TiO2 based nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Huifang; Liu, Jun; Voigt, James A.; Tian, Zhengrong Ryan; McKenzie, Bonnie Beth

    2003-08-01

    We report for the first time a one-step, templateless method to directly prepare large arrays of oriented TiO{sub 2}-based nanotubes and continuous films. These titania nanostructures can also be easily prepared as conformal coatings on a substrate. The nanostructured films were formed on a Ti substrate seeded with TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. SEM and TEM results suggested that a folding mechanism of sheetlike structures was involved in the formation of the nanotubes. The oriented arrays of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, continuous films, and coatings are expected to have potentials for applications in catalysis, filtration, sensing, photovoltaic cells, and high surface area electrodes.

  10. Plasma/ion-controlled metal catalyst saturation: Enabling simultaneous growth of carbon nanotube/nanocone arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.

    2008-02-11

    It is shown that the simultaneous saturation of Ni nanoparticles used as catalyst for vertically aligned carbon nanotube and nanocone arrays can be improved in low-temperature plasma- or ion-assisted processes compared with neutral gas-based routes. The results of hybrid multiscale numerical simulations of the catalyst nanoarrays (particle sizes of 2 and 10 nm) saturation with carbon show the possibility of reducing the difference in catalyst incubation times for smallest and largest catalyst particles by up to a factor of 2. This approach is generic and provides process conditions for simultaneous nucleation and growth of uniform arrays of vertically aligned nanostructures.

  11. The effect of interelement dipole coupling in patterned ultrathin single crystal Fe square arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Li; Zhai Ya; Wong Pingkwanj; Zhang Wen; Xu Yongbing; Zou Xiao; Wu Jing; Luo Linqiang; Zhai Hongru

    2011-02-01

    The correlation between the magnetic properties and the interelement separation in patterned arrays of ultrathin single crystal Fe films of 12 monolayers (ML) grown on GaAs(100) has been studied. The critical condition to form single domain remanent states in the square elements was found to be 10 {mu}m in size and 20 {mu}m for the interelement separation. The coercivity was also found to increase with the increasing interelement separation in the patterned arrays. These results are attributed to the competition between the large in-plane uniaxial anisotropy, the demagnetizing field, and interelement dipole coupling as determined semiqualitatively by the ferromagnetic resonance measurements.

  12. Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Targeted Gas Detection (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Research and Development of Non-Spectroscopic MEMS-Based Sensor Arrays for Targeted Gas Detection Authors: Loui, A ; McCall, S K ; Zumstein, J M Publication Date: 2012-11-21 OSTI Identifier: 1059450 Report Number(s): LLNL-TR-606593 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Technical

  13. Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    radars. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array radars. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array radars. An ultra-compact optical true time delay device is demonstrated that can support 112 antenna elements with better than six bits of delay in a volume 16-inch x 5-inch x 4-inch including the box and electronics. Free-space beams circulate in a White cell,

  14. Multi-array borehole resistivity and induced polarization method with mathematical inversion of redundant data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    Multiple arrays of electric or magnetic transmitters and receivers are used in a borehole geophysical procedure to obtain a multiplicity of redundant data suitable for processing into a resistivity or induced polarization model of a subsurface region of the earth. 30 figs.

  15. Nanowire array and nanowire solar cells and methods for forming the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong; Greene, Lori E.; Law, Matthew

    2009-06-09

    Homogeneous and dense arrays of nanowires are described. The nanowires can be formed in solution and can have average diameters of 40-300 nm and lengths of 1-3 .mu.m. They can be formed on any suitable substrate. Photovoltaic devices are also described.

  16. Nanowire array and nanowire solar cells and methods for forming the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong; Greene, Lori; Law, Matthew

    2007-09-04

    Homogeneous and dense arrays of nanowires are described. The nanowires can be formed in solution and can have average diameters of 40-300 nm and lengths of 1-3 .mu.m. They can be formed on any suitable substrate. Photovoltaic devices are also described.

  17. A comparison of spatial averaging and Cadzow's method for array wavenumber estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, D.B.; Clark, G.A.

    1989-10-31

    We are concerned with resolving superimposed, correlated seismic waves with small-aperture arrays. The limited time-bandwidth product of transient seismic signals complicates the task. We examine the use of MUSIC and Cadzow's ML estimator with and without subarray averaging for resolution potential. A case study with real data favors the MUSIC algorithm and a multiple event covariance averaging scheme.

  18. Larger sized wire arrays on 1.5 MA Z-pinch generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safronova, A. S. Kantsyrev, V. L. Weller, M. E. Shlyaptseva, V. V. Shrestha, I. K. Esaulov, A. A. Stafford, A.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Coverdale, C. A.; Jones, B.

    2014-12-15

    Experiments on the UNR Zebra generator with Load Current Multiplier (LCM) allow for implosions of larger sized wire array loads than at standard current of 1 MA. Advantages of larger sized planar wire array implosions include enhanced energy coupling to plasmas, better diagnostic access to observable plasma regions, and more complex geometries of the wire loads. The experiments with larger sized wire arrays were performed on 1.5 MA Zebra with LCM (the anode-cathode gap was 1 cm, which is half the gap used in the standard mode). In particular, larger sized multi-planar wire arrays had two outer wire planes from mid-atomic-number wires to create a global magnetic field (gmf) and plasma flow between them. A modified central plane with a few Al wires at the edges was put in the middle between outer planes to influence gmf and to create Al plasma flow in the perpendicular direction (to the outer arrays plasma flow). Such modified plane has different number of empty slots: it was increased from 6 up to 10, hence increasing the gap inside the middle plane from 4.9 to 7.7 mm, respectively. Such load configuration allows for more independent study of the flows of L-shell mid-atomic-number plasma (between the outer planes) and K-shell Al plasma (which first fills the gap between the edge wires along the middle plane) and their radiation in space and time. We demonstrate that such configuration produces higher linear radiation yield and electron temperatures as well as advantages of better diagnostics access to observable plasma regions and how the load geometry (size of the gap in the middle plane) influences K-shell Al radiation. In particular, K-shell Al radiation was delayed compared to L-shell mid-atomic-number radiation when the gap in the middle plane was large enough (when the number of empty slots was increased up to ten)

  19. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 °C inlet temperature. We investigated flowmore » perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area. For the 30 MW/m2 case, the micro-jet array absorbed 750 W in the helium with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1280 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 801 °C. The HEMJ absorbed 750 W with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1411 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 844 °C. For comparison, both the single HEMJ finger and the micro-jet array used 5-mm-thick tungsten armor. The ratio of maximum to average temperature and variations in the local heat transfer coefficient were lower for the micro-jet array compared to the HEMJ device. Although high heat flux testing is required to validate the results obtained in these simulations, the results provide important guidance in jet design and manifolding to increase heat removal while providing more even temperature distribution and minimizing non-uniformity in the gas flow and thermal stresses at the armor joint.« less

  20. Preparation and characterization of SiO?:Sm? nanotube arrays with 1.06 ?m laser antireflective property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Wei-min; Huang, Ning; Wang, Li-jun; Song, Tian-shun; Lu, Chun-hua; Wang, Liu-fang; Zhang, Jun-zhi

    2013-05-01

    SiO?: Sm? nanotube arrays with excellent antireflective property at 1.06 ?m were synthesized by a template-assisted solgel process. The molecular structure, morphology and optical properties of the fabricated SiO?:Sm? nanotube arrays were investigated by a Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR), a Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and a spectro-fluorometer, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that the SiO?:Sm? nanotube arrays were formed via the AAO membrane during the solgel process. The remarkable antireflective characteristic of about 0.166% at 1.06 ?m was attributed to the drastic decrease of effective refraction index which enhances the matching effect between air and substrate. As well as the absorption performance of Sm? at 1.06 ?m which consumes the energies of incident light. - Graphical abstract: Directional aligned SiO?:Sm? nanotube arrays were synthesized in AAO template by solgel process, and the antiflective performance of arrays is prominent comparing to the blank AAO template. Highlights: SiO?:Sm? nanotube arrays are synthesized by a template-assisted solgel process. SiO?:Sm? nanotube arrays have remarkable antireflective properties at 1.06 ?m. The subwavelength structure results in a decrease of effective refraction index. The absorption performance of Sm? at 1.06 ?m consume the energies of incident light.

  1. An electrically tunable plenoptic camera using a liquid crystal microlens array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Yu; Tong, Qing; Zhang, Xinyu; Sang, Hongshi; Ji, An; Xie, Changsheng

    2015-05-15

    Plenoptic cameras generally employ a microlens array positioned between the main lens and the image sensor to capture the three-dimensional target radiation in the visible range. Because the focal length of common refractive or diffractive microlenses is fixed, the depth of field (DOF) is limited so as to restrict their imaging capability. In this paper, we propose a new plenoptic camera using a liquid crystal microlens array (LCMLA) with electrically tunable focal length. The developed LCMLA is fabricated by traditional photolithography and standard microelectronic techniques, and then, its focusing performance is experimentally presented. The fabricated LCMLA is directly integrated with an image sensor to construct a prototyped LCMLA-based plenoptic camera for acquiring raw radiation of targets. Our experiments demonstrate that the focused region of the LCMLA-based plenoptic camera can be shifted efficiently through electrically tuning the LCMLA used, which is equivalent to the extension of the DOF.

  2. Strained-layer superlattice focal plane array having a planar structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM); Gin, Aaron (Albuquerque, NM); Marsh, Phillip F. (Lowell, MA); Young, Erik W. (Albuquerque, NM); Cich, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-07-13

    An infrared focal plane array (FPA) is disclosed which utilizes a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5 epitaxially grown on a GaSb substrate. The FPA avoids the use of a mesa structure to isolate each photodetector element and instead uses impurity-doped regions formed in or about each photodetector for electrical isolation. This results in a substantially-planar structure in which the SLS is unbroken across the entire width of a 2-D array of the photodetector elements which are capped with an epitaxially-grown passivation layer to reduce or eliminate surface recombination. The FPA has applications for use in the wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m.

  3. Versioned distributed arrays for resilience in scientific applications: Global view resilience

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chien, A.; Balaji, P.; Beckman, P.; Dun, N.; Fang, A.; Fujita, H.; Iskra, K.; Rubenstein, Z.; Zheng, Z.; Schreiber, R.; et al

    2015-06-01

    Exascale studies project reliability challenges for future high-performance computing (HPC) systems. We propose the Global View Resilience (GVR) system, a library that enables applications to add resilience in a portable, application-controlled fashion using versioned distributed arrays. We describe GVR’s interfaces to distributed arrays, versioning, and cross-layer error recovery. Using several large applications (OpenMC, the preconditioned conjugate gradient solver PCG, ddcMD, and Chombo), we evaluate the programmer effort to add resilience. The required changes are small (<2% LOC), localized, and machine-independent, requiring no software architecture changes. We also measure the overhead of adding GVR versioning and show that generally overheads <2%more » are achieved. We conclude that GVR’s interfaces and implementation are flexible and portable and create a gentle-slope path to tolerate growing error rates in future systems.« less

  4. Simplified Method for Modeling the Impact of Arbitrary Partial Shading Conditions on PV Array Performance: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacAlpine, Sara; Deline, Chris

    2015-09-15

    It is often difficult to model the effects of partial shading conditions on PV array performance, as shade losses are nonlinear and depend heavily on a system's particular configuration. This work describes and implements a simple method for modeling shade loss: a database of shade impact results (loss percentages), generated using a validated, detailed simulation tool and encompassing a wide variety of shading scenarios. The database is intended to predict shading losses in crystalline silicon PV arrays and is accessed using basic inputs generally available in any PV simulation tool. Performance predictions using the database are within 1-2% of measured data for several partially shaded PV systems, and within 1% of those predicted by the full, detailed simulation tool on an annual basis. The shade loss database shows potential to considerably improve performance prediction for partially shaded PV systems.

  5. Radial arrays of nano-electrospray ionization emitters and methods of forming electrosprays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-10-19

    Electrospray ionization emitter arrays, as well as methods for forming electrosprays, are described. The arrays are characterized by a radial configuration of three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters without an extractor electrode. The methods are characterized by distributing fluid flow of the liquid sample among three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters, forming an electrospray at outlets of the emitters without utilizing an extractor electrode, and directing the electrosprays into an entrance to a mass spectrometry device. Each of the nano-electrospray ionization emitters can have a discrete channel for fluid flow. The nano-electrospray ionization emitters are circularly arranged such that each is shielded substantially equally from an electrospray-inducing electric field.

  6. Telescope Array Radar (TARA) Observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Takai, H.; Allen, C.; Beard, L.; Belz, J.; Besson, D.; Byrne, M.; Abou Bakr Othman, M.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Gardner, A.; Gillman, W.H.; Hanlon, W.; Hanson, J.; Jayanthmurthy, C.; Kunwar, S.; Larson, S. L.; Myers, I.; Prohira, S.; Ratzlaff, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Thomson, G. B.; Von Maluski, D.

    2014-08-19

    Construction was completed during summer 2013 on the Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) bi-static radar observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). TARA is co-located with the Telescope Array, the largest conventional cosmic ray detector in the Northern Hemisphere, in radio-quiet Western Utah. TARA employs an 8 MW Effective Radiated Power (ERP) VHF transmitter and smart receiver system based on a 250 MS/s data acquisition system in an effort to detect the scatter of sounding radiation by UHECR-induced atmospheric ionization. TARA seeks to demonstrate bi-static radar as a useful new remote sensing technique for UHECRs. In this report, we describe the design and performance of the TARA transmitter and receiver systems.

  7. Guiding and collimating fast electron beam by the quasi-static electromagnetic field array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; He, W. H.; Dong, K. G.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, T. K.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, Z. M.; Gu, Y. Q.; Cao, L. H.

    2014-10-15

    A guidance and collimation scheme for fast electron beam in a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array is proposed with the semi-analytic method and the particle-in-cell simulation. The sheath electric fields on the surfaces of nanowires and the magnetic fields around the nanowires form a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array. Therefore, most of the fast electrons are confined at the nanowire surfaces and transport forward. More importantly, due to the divergent property of the beams, the magnitudes of the generated fields decrease with the target depth. The lateral momenta of the electrons convert into the forward momenta through Lorenz force, and they cannot recover their initial values. Therefore, the fast electrons can be guided and collimated efficiently in the gaps between the nanowires. In our particle-in-cell simulations, the observed guiding efficiency exceeds 80% compared with the reference target.

  8. Optimization of ultrasonic array inspections using an efficient hybrid model and real crack shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim; Dunhill, Tony

    2015-03-31

    Models which simulate the interaction of ultrasound with cracks can be used to optimize ultrasonic array inspections, but this approach can be time-consuming. To overcome this issue an efficient hybrid model is implemented which includes a finite element method that requires only a single layer of elements around the crack shape. Scattering Matrices are used to capture the scattering behavior of the individual cracks and a discussion on the angular degrees of freedom of elastodynamic scatterers is included. Real crack shapes are obtained from X-ray Computed Tomography images of cracked parts and these shapes are inputted into the hybrid model. The effect of using real crack shapes instead of straight notch shapes is demonstrated. An array optimization methodology which incorporates the hybrid model, an approximate single-scattering relative noise model and the real crack shapes is then described.

  9. Interconnection arrangement of routers of processor boards in array of cabinets supporting secure physical partition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomkins, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Camp, William J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-17

    A multiple processor computing apparatus includes a physical interconnect structure that is flexibly configurable to support selective segregation of classified and unclassified users. The physical interconnect structure includes routers in service or compute processor boards distributed in an array of cabinets connected in series on each board and to respective routers in neighboring row cabinet boards with the routers in series connection coupled to routers in series connection in respective neighboring column cabinet boards. The array can include disconnect cabinets or respective routers in all boards in each cabinet connected in a toroid. The computing apparatus can include an emulator which permits applications from the same job to be launched on processors that use different operating systems.

  10. Versioned distributed arrays for resilience in scientific applications: Global view resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chien, A.; Balaji, P.; Beckman, P.; Dun, N.; Fang, A.; Fujita, H.; Iskra, K.; Rubenstein, Z.; Zheng, Z.; Schreiber, R.; Hammond, J.; Dinan, J.; Laguna, I.; Richards, D.; Dubey, A.; van Straalen, B.; Hoemmen, M.; Heroux, M.; Teranishi, K.; Siegel, A.

    2015-06-01

    Exascale studies project reliability challenges for future high-performance computing (HPC) systems. We propose the Global View Resilience (GVR) system, a library that enables applications to add resilience in a portable, application-controlled fashion using versioned distributed arrays. We describe GVRs interfaces to distributed arrays, versioning, and cross-layer error recovery. Using several large applications (OpenMC, the preconditioned conjugate gradient solver PCG, ddcMD, and Chombo), we evaluate the programmer effort to add resilience. The required changes are small (<2% LOC), localized, and machine-independent, requiring no software architecture changes. We also measure the overhead of adding GVR versioning and show that generally overheads <2% are achieved. We conclude that GVRs interfaces and implementation are flexible and portable and create a gentle-slope path to tolerate growing error rates in future systems.

  11. Telescope Array Radar (TARA) Observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abbasi, R.; Takai, H.; Allen, C.; Beard, L.; Belz, J.; Besson, D.; Byrne, M.; Abou Bakr Othman, M.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Gardner, A.; et al

    2014-08-19

    Construction was completed during summer 2013 on the Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) bi-static radar observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). TARA is co-located with the Telescope Array, the largest “conventional” cosmic ray detector in the Northern Hemisphere, in radio-quiet Western Utah. TARA employs an 8 MW Effective Radiated Power (ERP) VHF transmitter and smart receiver system based on a 250 MS/s data acquisition system in an effort to detect the scatter of sounding radiation by UHECR-induced atmospheric ionization. TARA seeks to demonstrate bi-static radar as a useful new remote sensing technique for UHECRs. In this report, we describe themore »design and performance of the TARA transmitter and receiver systems.« less

  12. Black GE based on crystalline/amorphous core/shell nanoneedle arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Javey, Ali; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Fan, Zhiyong

    2014-03-04

    Direct growth of black Ge on low-temperature substrates, including plastics and rubber is reported. The material is based on highly dense, crystalline/amorphous core/shell Ge nanoneedle arrays with ultrasharp tips (.about.4 nm) enabled by the Ni catalyzed vapor-solid-solid growth process. Ge nanoneedle arrays exhibit remarkable optical properties. Specifically, minimal optical reflectance (<1%) is observed, even for high angles of incidence (.about.75.degree.) and for relatively short nanoneedle lengths (.about.1 .mu.m). Furthermore, the material exhibits high optical absorption efficiency with an effective band gap of .about.1 eV. The reported black Ge can have important practical implications for efficient photovoltaic and photodetector applications on nonconventional substrates.

  13. A time-resolved spectroscopic diagnostic based on fast scintillator and optical fiber array for z-pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye Fan; Qin Yi; Jiang Shuqing; Xue Feibiao; Li Zhenghong; Yang Jianlun; Xu Rongkun; Anan'ev, S. S.; Dan'ko, S. A.; Kalinin, Yu. G.

    2009-10-15

    We report a specially designed type of temporal resolved x-ray spectroscopic diagnostic using a spherically bent quartz crystal for z-pinch plasmas. Registration of time-resolved spectra was accomplished by coupling fast plastic scintillator, an optical fiber array, an optical streak camera, and a charge coupled device as the recording medium of this diagnostic. The diagnostic has been tested in imploding wire array experiments on S-300 pulsed power facility. Time-resolved K-shell lines were successfully obtained for aluminum wire array implosion plasmas.

  14. Controlled growth and multi-photon luminescence of hexagonal arrays of Au nanoparticles on anodic aluminum oxide templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jianbo; Yu Ying; Peng Xiaoniu; Yang Zhongjian; Zhou Li; Zhou Zhangkai

    2012-06-15

    Au nanoparticles were deposited onto anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates by using a rotating sputtering technique. Interestingly, hexagonal arrays of Au nanoparticles were obtained at an appropriate rotating rate and deposition time. Strong three-photon luminescence was observed from the hexagonally arrayed Au nanoparticles, which is attributed to the strong enhancements of local electromagnetic fields at both excitation and emission wavelengths. Our findings provide a new method to prepare Au nanoparticle arrays with large field enhancements and could have prospective applications in plasmonic nanodevices, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates, and biosensors.

  15. Reconfigurable site-selective manipulation of atomic quantum systems in two-dimensional arrays of dipole traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, J.; Gierl, C.; Schlosser, M.; Birkl, G.

    2010-06-15

    We trap atoms in versatile two-dimensional (2D) arrays of optical potentials, prepare flexible 2D spin configurations, perform site-selective coherent manipulation, and demonstrate the implementation of simultaneous measurements of different system properties, such as dephasing and decoherence. This approach for the flexible manipulation of atomic quantum systems is based on the combination of 2D arrays of microlenses and 2D arrays of liquid crystal light modulators. This offers extended types of control for the investigation of quantum degenerate gases, quantum information processing, and quantum simulations.

  16. Long range heliostat target using array of normal incidence pyranometers to evaluate a beam of solar radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghanbari, Cheryl M; Ho, Clifford K; Kolb, Gregory J

    2014-03-04

    Various technologies described herein pertain to evaluating a beam reflected by a heliostat. A portable target that has an array of sensors mounted thereupon is configured to capture the beam reflected by the heliostat. The sensors in the array output measured values indicative of a characteristic of the beam reflected by the heliostat. Moreover, a computing device can generate and output data corresponding to the beam reflected by the heliostat based on the measured values indicative of the characteristic of the beam received from the sensors in the array.

  17. Proceedings of the flat-plate solar array project research forum on photovoltaic metallization systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1983-11-15

    A Photovoltaic Metallization Research Forum, under the sponsorship of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Flat-Plate Solar Array Project and the US Department of Energy, was held March 16-18, 1983 at Pine Mountain, Georgia. The Forum consisted of five sessions, covering (1) the current status of metallization systems, (2) system design, (3) thick-film metallization, (4) advanced techniques and (5) future metallization challenges. Twenty-three papers were presented.

  18. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freitas, B.L.

    1998-10-27

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver > 4kW/cm{sup 2} of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources. 13 figs.

  19. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freitas, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver>4kW/cm2 of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

  20. A switched capacitor array based system for high-speed calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levi, M.; Bebek, C.; Ely, R.; Jared, R.; Kipnis, I.; Kirsten, F.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Milgrome, O.

    1991-12-01

    A sixteen channel analog transient recorder with 256 cells per channel has been fabricated as an integrated circuit. The circuit uses switched capacitor array technology to achieve simultaneous read/write capability and twelve bit dynamic range. Combined with highly parallel analog-to-digital converter and readout control circuitry being developed this system should satisfy the demanding electronics requirements for calorimeter detectors at the SSC. The system design and test results are presented.

  1. Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays at TJNAF| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation / Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301)

  2. Coordinated Garbage Collection for RAID Array of Solid State Disks - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Coordinated Garbage Collection for RAID Array of Solid State Disks Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication 11-G00261_ID2411-final.pdf (734 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryAn ORNL invention that replaces existing magnetic disks with solid state disks, which have no mechanical moving parts,

  3. Two-dimensional fluid droplet arrays generated using a single nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Eric R.; Perl, Martin L.

    1999-11-02

    Amplitudes of drive pulses received by a horizontally-placed dropper determine the horizontal displacements of droplets relative to an ejection aperture of the dropper. The drive pulses are varied such that the dropper generates a two-dimensional array of vertically-falling droplets. Vertical and horizontal interdroplet spacings may be varied in real time. Applications include droplet analysis experiments such as Millikan fractional charge searches and aerosol characterization, as well as material deposition applications.

  4. Impingement heat transfer within arrays of circular jets including the effect of crossflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumoto, Ryosuke; Ishihara, Isao; Yabe, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Keita; Kikkawa, Shinzo; Senda, Mamoru

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the heat transfer and the flow characteristics for the arrays of impingement jets taking into consideration the effect of the crossflow. In this experiment, two types of the crossflow schemes, referred to as the minimum crossflow and the maximum crossflow by the Obot et al. (1987), were examined. In the case of the maximum crossflow, the exhaust air was restricted by the side wall to leave through one side of the jet array. In the case of the minimum crossflow, the side wall was removed, and the exhaust air flowed away through all four edges of the jet array. To examine the flow pattern of the exhaust air, the flow visualization by the smoke flow was carried out. The air after impinging to the target surface was entrained into the downstream adjacent jet. The exhaust air was discharged to the outside of array through two ways: One was that the air was discharged to outside by entraining into the downstream adjacent jet. The other was that the exhaust air was discharged along the endwall surface on the mid-span of adjacent jets. The thermosensitive liquid crystal sheet was applied to measure the temperature distributions and to obtain the local heat transfer coefficients on the impingement surface. The local Nusselt number distribution for the maximum crossflow was hardly decreased in the downstream rows, although the velocity of the exhaust air increased. In the downstream row, however, the distribution of the local Nusselt number is non-circular shape because of the exhaust air. The averaged Nusselt number for the maximum crossflow was slightly lower than that in the case of minimum crossflow.

  5. Photon sorting in the near field using subwavelength cavity arrays in the near-infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandel, Isroel M. Lansey, Eli; Gollub, Jonah N.; Sarantos, Chris H.; Akhmechet, Roman; Golovin, Andrii B.; Crouse, David T.

    2013-12-16

    A frequency selective metasurface capable of sorting photons in the near-infrared spectral range is designed, fabricated, and characterized. The metasurface, a periodic array of dielectric cylindrical cavities in a gold film, localizes and transmits light of two spectral frequency bands into spatially separated cavities, resulting in near-field light splitting. The design and fabrication methodologies of the metasurface are discussed. The transmittance and photon sorting properties of the designed structure is simulated numerically and the measured transmission is presented.

  6. Formation of long-range ordered quantum dots arrays in amorphous matrix by ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Karlusic, M.; Desnica, U. V.; Radic, N.; Dubcek, P.; Drazic, G.; Salamon, K.; Bernstorff, S.; Holy, V.

    2009-08-10

    We demonstrate the production of a well ordered three-dimensional array of Ge quantum dots in amorphous silica matrix. The ordering is achieved by ion beam irradiation and annealing of a multilayer film. Structural analysis shows that quantum dots nucleate along the direction of the ion beam used for irradiation, while the mutual distance of the quantum dots is determined by the diffusion properties of the multilayer material rather than the distances between traces of ions that are used for irradiation.

  7. Metamaterial-based theoretical description of light scattering by metallic nano-hole array structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Najiminaini, Mohamadreza; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Balakrishnan, Shankar

    2015-05-14

    We have experimentally and theoretically investigated the light-matter interaction in metallic nano-hole array structures. The scattering cross section spectrum was measured for three samples each having a unique nano-hole array radius and periodicity. Each measured spectrum had several peaks due to surface plasmon polaritons. The dispersion relation and the effective dielectric constant of the structure were calculated using transmission line theory and Bloch's theorem. Using the effective dielectric constant and the transfer matrix method, the surface plasmon polariton energies were calculated and found to be quantized. Using these quantized energies, a Hamiltonian for the surface plasmon polaritons was written in the second quantized form. Working with the Hamiltonian, a theory of scattering cross section was developed based on the quantum scattering theory and Green's function method. For both theory and experiment, the location of the surface plasmon polariton spectral peaks was dependant on the array periodicity and radii of the nano-holes. Good agreement was observed between the experimental and theoretical results. It is proposed that the newly developed theory can be used to facilitate optimization of nanosensors for medical and engineering applications.

  8. Graphene based tunable fractal Hilbert curve array broadband radar absorbing screen for radar cross section reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xianjun; Hu, Zhirun; Liu, Peiguo

    2014-11-15

    This paper proposes a new type of graphene based tunable radar absorbing screen. The absorbing screen consists of Hilbert curve metal strip array and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene sheet. The graphene based screen is not only tunable when the chemical potential of the graphene changes, but also has broadband effective absorption. The absorption bandwidth is from 8.9GHz to 18.1GHz, ie., relative bandwidth of more than 68%, at chemical potential of 0eV, which is significantly wider than that if the graphene sheet had not been employed. As the chemical potential varies from 0 to 0.4eV, the central frequency of the screen can be tuned from 13.5GHz to 19.0GHz. In the proposed structure, Hilbert curve metal strip array was designed to provide multiple narrow band resonances, whereas the graphene sheet directly underneath the metal strip array provides tunability and averagely required surface resistance so to significantly extend the screen operation bandwidth by providing broadband impedance matching and absorption. In addition, the thickness of the screen has been optimized to achieve nearly the minimum thickness limitation for a nonmagnetic absorber. The working principle of this absorbing screen is studied in details, and performance under various incident angles is presented. This work extends applications of graphene into tunable microwave radar cross section (RCS) reduction applications.

  9. Multifunctional potentiometric gas sensor array with an integrated temperature control and temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackburn, Bryan M; Wachsman, Eric D

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the subject invention relate to a gas sensor and method for sensing one or more gases. An embodiment incorporates an array of sensing electrodes maintained at similar or different temperatures, such that the sensitivity and species selectivity of the device can be fine tuned between different pairs of sensing electrodes. A specific embodiment pertains to a gas sensor array for monitoring combustion exhausts and/or chemical reaction byproducts. An embodiment of the subject device related to this invention operates at high temperatures and can withstand harsh chemical environments. Embodiments of the device are made on a single substrate. The devices can also be made on individual substrates and monitored individually as if they were part of an array on a single substrate. The device can incorporate sensing electrodes in the same environment, which allows the electrodes to be coplanar and, thus, keep manufacturing costs low. Embodiments of the device can provide improvements to sensitivity, selectivity, and signal interference via surface temperature control.

  10. Spatial light modulator array with heat minimization and image enhancement features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jain, Kanti (Briarcliff Manor, NY); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Zemel, Marc (New Rochelle, NY)

    2007-01-30

    An enhanced spatial light modulator (ESLM) array, a microelectronics patterning system and a projection display system using such an ESLM for heat-minimization and resolution enhancement during imaging, and the method for fabricating such an ESLM array. The ESLM array includes, in each individual pixel element, a small pixel mirror (reflective region) and a much larger pixel surround. Each pixel surround includes diffraction-grating regions and resolution-enhancement regions. During imaging, a selected pixel mirror reflects a selected-pixel beamlet into the capture angle of a projection lens, while the diffraction grating of the pixel surround redirects heat-producing unused radiation away from the projection lens. The resolution-enhancement regions of selected pixels provide phase shifts that increase effective modulation-transfer function in imaging. All of the non-selected pixel surrounds redirect all radiation energy away from the projection lens. All elements of the ESLM are fabricated by deposition, patterning, etching and other microelectronic process technologies.

  11. A Robust MEMS Based Multi-Component Sensor for 3D Borehole Seismic Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulsson Geophysical Services

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop, prototype and test a robust multi-component sensor that combines both Fiber Optic and MEMS technology for use in a borehole seismic array. The use such FOMEMS based sensors allows a dramatic increase in the number of sensors that can be deployed simultaneously in a borehole seismic array. Therefore, denser sampling of the seismic wave field can be afforded, which in turn allows us to efficiently and adequately sample P-wave as well as S-wave for high-resolution imaging purposes. Design, packaging and integration of the multi-component sensors and deployment system will target maximum operating temperature of 350-400 F and a maximum pressure of 15000-25000 psi, thus allowing operation under conditions encountered in deep gas reservoirs. This project aimed at using existing pieces of deployment technology as well as MEMS and fiber-optic technology. A sensor design and analysis study has been carried out and a laboratory prototype of an interrogator for a robust borehole seismic array system has been assembled and validated.

  12. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 C inlet temperature. We investigated flow perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area.

  13. Comparing Coordinated Garbage Collection Algorithms for Arrays of Solid-state Drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Junghee; Kim, Youngjae; Oral, H Sarp; Shipman, Galen M; Dillow, David A; Wang, Feiyi

    2012-01-01

    Solid-State Drives (SSDs) offer significant performance improvements over hard disk drives (HDD) on a number of workloads. The frequency of garbage collection (GC) activity is directly correlated with the pattern, frequency, and volume of write requests, and scheduling of GC is controlled by logic internal to the SSD. SSDs can exhibit significant performance degradations when garbage collection (GC) conflicts with an ongoing I/O request stream. When using SSDs in a RAID array, the lack of coordination of the local GC processes amplifies these performance degradations. No RAID controller or SSD available today has the technology to overcome this limitation. In our previous work, we presented a Global Garbage Collection (GGC) mechanism to improve response times and reduce performance variability for a RAID array of SSDs. A coordination method is employed so that GCs in the array can run at the same time. The coordination can exhibit substantial performance improvement. In this paper, we explore various GC coordination algorithms. We develop reactive and proactive GC coordination algorithms and evaluate their I/O performance and block erase counts for various workloads. We show that a proactive GC coordination algorithm can improve the I/O response times by up to 9% further and increase the lifetime of SSDs by reducing the number of block erase counts by up to 79% compared to a reactive algorithm.

  14. Development of a 1 x N Fiber Optic Sensor Array for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Repasky, Kevin

    2013-09-30

    A fiber sensor array for sub-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations measurements was developed for monitoring geologic carbon sequestration sites. The fiber sensor array uses a single temperature tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating with a nominal wavelength of 2.004 􀁐m. Light from this DFB laser is direct to one of the 4 probes via an in-line 1 x 4 fiber optic switch. Each of the 4 probes are buried and allow the sub-surface CO{sub 2} to enter the probe through Millipore filters that allow the soil gas to enter the probe but keeps out the soil and water. Light from the DFB laser interacts with the CO{sub 2} before it is directed back through the in-line fiber optic switch. The DFB laser is tuned across two CO{sub 2} absorption features where a transmission measurement is made allowing the CO{sub 2} concentration to be retrieved. The fiber optic switch then directs the light to the next probe where this process is repeated allowing sub-surface CO{sub 2} concentration measurements at each of the probes to be made as a function of time. The fiber sensor array was deployed for fifty-eight days beginning June 19, 2012 at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site where sub-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations were monitored. Background measurements indicate the fiber sensor array can monitor background levels as low as 1,000 parts per million (ppm). A thirty four day sub-surface release of 0.15 tones CO{sub 2}/day began on July 10, 2012. The elevated subsurface CO{sub 2} concentration was easily detected by each of the four probes with values ranging to over 60,000 ppm, a factor of greater than 6 higher than background measurements. The fiber sensor array was also deploy at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) site in north-central Montana between July 9th and August 7th, 2013 where background measurements were made in a remote sequestration site with minimal infrastructure. The project provided opportunities for two graduate students to participate in research directly related to geologic carbon sequestration. Furthermore, commercialization of the technology developed is being pursued with five different companies via the Department of energy SBIR/STTR program

  15. DETECTION OF FAST RADIO TRANSIENTS WITH MULTIPLE STATIONS: A CASE STUDY USING THE VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.; Brisken, Walter F.; Deller, Adam T.; Tingay, Steven J.; Wayth, Randall B.

    2011-07-10

    Recent investigations reveal an important new class of transient radio phenomena that occur on submillisecond timescales. Often, transient surveys' data volumes are too large to archive exhaustively. Instead, an online automatic system must excise impulsive interference and detect candidate events in real time. This work presents a case study using data from multiple geographically distributed stations to perform simultaneous interference excision and transient detection. We present several algorithms that incorporate dedispersed data from multiple sites, and report experiments with a commensal real-time transient detection system on the Very Long Baseline Array. We test the system using observations of pulsar B0329+54. The multiple-station algorithms enhanced sensitivity for detection of individual pulses. These strategies could improve detection performance for a future generation of geographically distributed arrays such as the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder and the Square Kilometre Array.

  16. Pixel Array Detector for Time-Resolved X-ray Science, September 1, 1997 - September 14, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruner, Sol M.

    2000-11-07

    Progress on the design, fabrication, testing and assembly of two-layer Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) is described. The PADs are developed for challenging time-resolved X-ray imaging applications at synchrotron radiation X-ray sources.

  17. Environmental Evaluation for Installation of Solar Arrays at San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this technical memorandum (TM) is to review the options to develop a potential solar array development (Project) within or adjacent to western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) habitat in the buffer lands that surround the San José/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and to determine if there is a ground-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) configuration that would enable a workable co-existence between the burrowing owl habitat and the PV arrays.

  18. Improving the Sensitivity of Mass Spectrometry by Using a New Sheath Flow Electrospray Emitter Array at Subambient Pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi

    2014-12-01

    Arrays of chemically etched emitters with individualized sheath gas capillaries have been developed to enhance electrospray ionization (ESI) at subambient pressures. By including an emitter array in a subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) source, ionization and transmission efficiency can be maximized allowing for increased sensitivity in mass spectrometric analyses. The SPIN source eliminates the major ion losses at conventional ESI-mass spectrometry (MS) interface by placing the emitter in the first vacuum region of the instrument. To facilitate stable electrospray currents in such conditions we have developed an improved emitter array with individualized sheath gas around each emitter. The utility of the new emitter arrays for generating stable multi-electrosprays at subambient pressures was probed by coupling the emitter array/SPIN source with a time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The instrument sensitivity was compared between single emitter/SPIN-MS and multi-emitter/SPIN-MS configurations using an equimolar solution of 9 peptides. An increase in sensitivity correlative to the number of emitters in the array was observed.

  19. Using Bayesian Inference Framework towards Identifying Gas Species and Concentration from High Temperature Resistive Sensor Array Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Yixin; Zhou, Kai; Lei, Yu

    2015-01-01

    High temperature gas sensors have been highly demanded for combustion process optimization and toxic emissions control, which usually suffer from poor selectivity. In order to solve this selectivity issue and identify unknown reducing gas species (CO, CH 4 , and CH 8 ) and concentrations, a high temperature resistive sensor array data set was built in this study based on 5 reported sensors. As each sensor showed specific responses towards different types of reducing gas with certain concentrations, based on which calibration curves were fitted, providing benchmark sensor array response database, then Bayesian inference framework was utilized to processmore » the sensor array data and build a sample selection program to simultaneously identify gas species and concentration, by formulating proper likelihood between input measured sensor array response pattern of an unknown gas and each sampled sensor array response pattern in benchmark database. This algorithm shows good robustness which can accurately identify gas species and predict gas concentration with a small error of less than 10% based on limited amount of experiment data. These features indicate that Bayesian probabilistic approach is a simple and efficient way to process sensor array data, which can significantly reduce the required computational overhead and training data.« less

  20. Benchmark Modeling of the Near-Field and Far-Field Wave Effects of Wave Energy Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E.; Haller, Merrick C.; Ozkan-Haller, H. Tuba

    2013-01-26

    This project is an industry-led partnership between Columbia Power Technologies and Oregon State University that will perform benchmark laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of the near-field and far-field impacts of wave scattering from an array of wave energy devices. These benchmark experimental observations will help to fill a gaping hole in our present knowledge of the near-field effects of multiple, floating wave energy converters and are a critical requirement for estimating the potential far-field environmental effects of wave energy arrays. The experiments will be performed at the Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (Oregon State University) and will utilize an array of newly developed Buoys that are realistic, lab-scale floating power converters. The array of Buoys will be subjected to realistic, directional wave forcing (1:33 scale) that will approximate the expected conditions (waves and water depths) to be found off the Central Oregon Coast. Experimental observations will include comprehensive in-situ wave and current measurements as well as a suite of novel optical measurements. These new optical capabilities will include imaging of the 3D wave scattering using a binocular stereo camera system, as well as 3D device motion tracking using a newly acquired LED system. These observing systems will capture the 3D motion history of individual Buoys as well as resolve the 3D scattered wave field; thus resolving the constructive and destructive wave interference patterns produced by the array at high resolution. These data combined with the device motion tracking will provide necessary information for array design in order to balance array performance with the mitigation of far-field impacts. As a benchmark data set, these data will be an important resource for testing of models for wave/buoy interactions, buoy performance, and far-field effects on wave and current patterns due to the presence of arrays. Under the proposed project we will initiate high-resolution (fine scale, very near-field) fluid/structure interaction simulations of buoy motions, as well as array-scale, phase-resolving wave scattering simulations. These modeling efforts will utilize state-of-the-art research quality models, which have not yet been brought to bear on this complex problem of large array wave/structure interaction problem.

  1. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe (San Francisco, CA); Albertson, Donna G. (Lafayette, CA)

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  2. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe (San Francisco, CA); Albertson, Donna G. (Lafayette, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  3. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Gray, Joe (San Francisco, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  4. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.

    1997-11-25

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its ``sensor end`` biological ``binding partners`` (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor. 9 figs.

  5. Development of a pseudo phased array technique using EMATs for DM weld testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, Adam C. Fisher, Jay L.; Shiokawa, Nobuyuki; Hamano, Toshiaki; Horikoshi, Ryoichi; Ido, Nobukazu

    2015-03-31

    Ultrasonic inspection of dissimilar metal (DM) welds in piping with cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) has been an area ongoing research for many years given its prevalence in the petrochemical and nuclear industries. A typical inspection strategy for pipe welds is to use an ultrasonic phased array system to scan the weld from a sensor located on the outer surface of the pipe. These inspection systems generally refract either longitudinal or shear vertical (SV) waves at varying angles to inspect the weld radially. In DM welds, however, the welding process can produce a columnar grain structure in the CASS material in a specific orientation. This columnar grain structure can skew ultrasonic waves away from their intended path, especially for SV and longitudinal wave modes. Studies have shown that inspection using the shear horizontal (SH) wave mode significantly reduces the effect of skewing. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) are known to be effective for producing SH waves in field settings. This paper presents an inspection strategy that seeks to reproduce the scanning and imaging capabilities of a commercial phase array system using EMATs. A custom-built EMAT was used to collect data at multiple propagation angles, and a processing strategy known as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) was used to combine the data to produce an image. Results are shown using this pseudo phased array technique to inspect samples with a DM weld and artificial defects, demonstrating the potential of this approach in a laboratory setting. Recommendations for future work to transition the technique to the field are also provided.

  6. A 1-V series-array Josephson voltage standard operated at 35 GHz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, F.; Koehler, H.; Weber, P.; Bluethner, K.; Meyer, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Josephson voltage standards utilize microwave-induced constant voltage steps in the dc characteristic of Josephson tunnel junctions. This paper describes the design and operation of array circuits with 108 and 2000 junctions connected in series. In contrast with similar realizations, simple {ital Q}-band equipment is used for the microwave supply. The microwave attenuation of 1000 junctions was about 1 dB. The version with 2000 junctions generated Josephson voltages up to 1.2 V when operated at 35 GHz. The stability times of the quantized levels were, under normal laboratory conditions (unshielded room), better than 10 min.

  7. Detection of foreign body using fast thermoacoustic tomography with a multielement linear transducer array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie Liming; Xing Da; Yang Diwu; Zeng Lvming; Zhou Quan

    2007-04-23

    Current imaging modalities face challenges in clinical applications due to limitations in resolution or contrast. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging may provide a complementary modality for medical imaging, particularly for detecting foreign objects due to their different absorption of electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies. A thermoacoustic tomography system with a multielement linear transducer array was developed and used to detect foreign objects in tissue. Radiography and thermoacoustic images of objects with different electromagnetic properties, including glass, sand, and iron, were compared. The authors' results demonstrate that thermoacoustic imaging has the potential to become a fast method for surgical localization of occult foreign objects.

  8. Note: Design principles of a linear array multi-channel effusive metal-vapor atom source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jana, B.; Majumder, A.; Thakur, K. B.; Das, A. K.

    2013-10-15

    Atomic beams can easily be produced by allowing atoms to effuse through a channel. In an earlier investigation [A. Majumder et al., Vacuum 83, 989 (2009)], we had designed, fabricated, and characterized an effusive metal-vapor source using collinear-array of multi-channel. In this note, we describe the theoretical basis of designing the source. Atom density in atomic beam has been estimated using a set of analytical expressions for long-channel operated in transparent mode. Parametric studies on aspect ratio of channel, inter-channel separation, beam width, and vertical distance from the source are carried out. They are useful in providing physical picture and optimizing design parameters.

  9. Persistent currents in a circular array of Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paraoanu, Gh.-S.

    2003-02-01

    A ring-shaped array of Bose-Einstein condensed atomic gases can display circular currents if the relative phase of neighboring condensates becomes locked to certain values. It is shown that, irrespective of the mechanism responsible for generating these states, only a restricted set of currents are stable, depending on the number of condensates, on the interaction and tunneling energies, and on the total number of particles. Different instabilities due to quasiparticle excitations are characterized, and possible experimental setups for testing the stability prediction are also discussed.

  10. Unpaired Majorana modes in Josephson-Junction Arrays with gapless bulk excitations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pino, M.; Tsvelik, A.; Ioffe, L. B.

    2015-11-06

    In this study, the search for Majorana bound states in solid-state physics has been limited to materials that display a gap in their bulk spectrum. We show that such unpaired states appear in certain quasi-one-dimensional Josephson-junction arrays with gapless bulk excitations. The bulk modes mediate a coupling between Majorana bound states via the Ruderman-Kittel-Yosida-Kasuya mechanism. As a consequence, the lowest energy doublet acquires a finite energy difference. For a realistic set of parameters this energy splitting remains much smaller than the energy of the bulk eigenstates even for short chains of length L~10.

  11. Defect-engineered GaN:Mg nanowire arrays for overall water splitting under violet light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kibria, M. G.; Chowdhury, F. A.; Zhao, S.; Mi, Z.; Trudeau, M. L.; Guo, H.

    2015-03-16

    We report that by engineering the intra-gap defect related energy states in GaN nanowire arrays using Mg dopants, efficient and stable overall neutral water splitting can be achieved under violet light. Overall neutral water splitting on Rh/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} co-catalyst decorated Mg doped GaN nanowires is demonstrated with intra-gap excitation up to 450?nm. Through optimized Mg doping, the absorbed photon conversion efficiency of GaN nanowires reaches ?43% at 375450?nm, providing a viable approach to extend the solar absorption of oxide and non-oxide photocatalysts.

  12. Laser desorption ionization and peptide sequencing on laser induced silicon microcolumn arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Chen, Yong (San Diego, CA)

    2011-12-27

    The present invention provides a method of producing a laser-patterned silicon surface, especially silicon wafers for use in laser desorption ionization (LDI-MS) (including MALDI-MS and SELDI-MS), devices containing the same, and methods of testing samples employing the same. The surface is prepared by subjecting a silicon substrate to multiple laser shots from a high-power picosecond or femtosecond laser while in a processing environment, e.g., underwater, and generates a remarkable homogenous microcolumn array capable of providing an improved substrate for LDI-MS.

  13. Use of spherically bent crystals to diagnose wire array z pinches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelkovenko, T.A.; Pikuz, S.A.; Hammer, D.A.; Ampleford, D.J.; Bland, S.N.; Bott, S.C.; Chittenden, J.P.; Lebedev, S.V.

    2004-10-01

    Spherically bent mica and quartz crystals have provided time-integrated spectra and monochromatic images in self-radiation of wire array z-pinch implosions on the MAGPIE generator (1 MA, 240 ns) at Imperial College. Diagnostics based on spherically bent crystals offer higher efficiencies than those based on flat or convex dispersion elements, allowing positioning far from the pinch with good debris shielding. A mica crystal spectrometer produced an image of the pinch in each emission line with about 100 {mu}m axial resolution. Combining the results of monochromatic imaging and spectra confirmed the presence of bright spots, probably generated by energetic electrons inside the pinch.

  14. Indium tin oxide and indium phosphide heterojunction nanowire array solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Masatoshi Nakai, Eiji; Fukui, Takashi; Tomioka, Katsuhiro; PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency , Honcho Kawaguchi, 3320012 Saitama

    2013-12-09

    Heterojunction solar cells were formed with a position-controlled InP nanowire array sputtered with indium tin oxide (ITO). The ITO not only acted as a transparent electrode but also as forming a photovoltaic junction. The devices exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 0.436?V, short-circuit current of 24.8?mA/cm{sup 2}, and fill factor of 0.682, giving a power conversion efficiency of 7.37% under AM1.5?G illumination. The internal quantum efficiency of the device was higher than that of the world-record InP cell in the short wavelength range.

  15. Patch-clamp array with on-chip electronics, optics, flow control and mechanical actuation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Conrad D.; Okandan, Murat; Draper, Bruce Leroy; Mani, Seethambal S.

    2003-07-01

    Fast and quantitative analysis of cellular activity, signaling and responses to external stimuli is a crucial capability and it has been the goal of several projects focusing on patch clamp measurements. To provide the maximum functionality and measurement options, we have developed a patch clamp array device that incorporates on-chip electronics, mechanical, optical and microfluidic coupling as well as cell localization through fluid flow. The preliminary design, which integrated microfluidics, electrodes and optical access, was fabricated and tested. In addition, new designs which further combine mechanical actuation, on-chip electronics and various electrode materials with the previous designs are currently being fabricated.

  16. Field programmable gate array-assigned complex-valued computation and its limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard-Schwarz, Maria, E-mail: maria.bernardschwarz@ni.com [National Instruments, Ganghoferstrasse 70b, 80339 Munich (Germany); Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8, 1040 Wien (Austria); Zwick, Wolfgang; Klier, Jochen [National Instruments, Ganghoferstrasse 70b, 80339 Munich (Germany); Wenzel, Lothar [National Instruments, 11500 N MOPac Expy, Austin, Texas 78759 (United States); Grschl, Martin [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8, 1040 Wien (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    We discuss how leveraging Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology as part of a high performance computing platform reduces latency to meet the demanding real time constraints of a quantum optics simulation. Implementations of complex-valued operations using fixed point numeric on a Virtex-5 FPGA compare favorably to more conventional solutions on a central processing unit. Our investigation explores the performance of multiple fixed point options along with a traditional 64 bits floating point version. With this information, the lowest execution times can be estimated. Relative error is examined to ensure simulation accuracy is maintained.

  17. High performing phase-based surface plasmon resonance sensing from metallic nanohole arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Z. L.; Wong, S. L.; Ong, H. C.; Wu, S. Y.; Ho, H. P.

    2014-04-28

    We show the spectral figure-of-merit (FOM) from nanohole arrays can be larger than 1900/RIU by phase-based surface plasmon resonance. By using temporal coupled mode theory, we find the p-s polarization phase jump is the sharpest when both the absorption and radiative decay rates of surface plasmon polaritons are matched, yielding an extremely small spectral differential phase linewidth and thus superior FOM. The result is supported by numerical simulation and experiment. As a demonstration, we show the phase detection outperforms the conventional spectral counterpart significantly by sensing the binding of bovine serum albumin antibodies under identical condition.

  18. Low-jitter high-power thyristor array pulse driver and generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanks, Roy L. (Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for generating low-jitter, high-voltage and high-current pulses for driving low impedance loads such as detonator fuses uses a MOSFET driver which, when triggered, discharges a high-voltage pre-charged capacitor into the primary of a toroidal current-multiplying transformer with multiple isolated secondary windings. The secondary outputs are suitable for driving an array of thyristors that discharge a precharged high-voltage capacitor and thus generating the required high-voltage and high-current pulse.

  19. Triangular lattice of carbon nanotube arrays for negative index of refraction and subwavelength lensing effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, X.; Rybczynski, J.; Wang, D.Z.; Kempa, K.; Ren, Z.F.

    2005-04-11

    Self-assembly of polystyrene microspheres has been utilized in a two-step masking technique to prepare triangular lattices of catalytic nanodots at low cost. Subsequent triangular lattices of aligned carbon nanotubes on a silicon substrate are achieved by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Nickel is used both in the nanodots and in the secondary mask. The triangular lattices of carbon nanotube arrays as two-dimensional photonic crystals show higher geometrical symmetry than the hexagonal lattices previously reported, enabling broader applications including negative index of refraction and subwavelength lensing effect.

  20. Polymer-assisted deposition of films and preparation of carbon nanotube arrays using the films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luo, Hongmei; Li, Qingwen; Bauer, Eve; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi

    2013-07-16

    Carbon nanotubes were prepared by coating a substrate with a coating solution including a suitable solvent, a soluble polymer, a metal precursor having a first metal selected from iron, nickel, cobalt, and molybdenum, and optionally a second metal selected from aluminum and magnesium, and also a binding agent that forms a complex with the first metal and a complex with the second metal. The coated substrate was exposed to a reducing atmosphere at elevated temperature, and then to a hydrocarbon in the reducing atmosphere. The result was decomposition of the polymer and formation of carbon nanotubes on the substrate. The carbon nanotubes were often in the form of an array on the substrate.

  1. Fiber optic coupling of a microlens conditioned, stacked semiconductor laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Mills, Steven T. (Antioch, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The output radiation from the two-dimensional aperture of a semiconductor laser diode array is efficiently coupled into an optical fiber. The two-dimensional aperture is formed by stacking individual laser diode bars on top of another in a "rack and stack" configuration. Coupling into the fiber is then accomplished using individual microlenses to condition the output radiation of the laser diode bars. A lens that matches the divergence properties and wavefront characteristics of the laser light to the fiber optic is used to focus this conditioned radiation into the fiber.

  2. Fiber optic coupling of a microlens conditioned, stacked semiconductor laser diode array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, R.J.; Benett, W.J.; Mills, S.T.

    1997-04-01

    The output radiation from the two-dimensional aperture of a semiconductor laser diode array is efficiently coupled into an optical fiber. The two-dimensional aperture is formed by stacking individual laser diode bars on top of another in a ``rack and stack`` configuration. Coupling into the fiber is then accomplished using individual microlenses to condition the output radiation of the laser diode bars. A lens that matches the divergence properties and wavefront characteristics of the laser light to the fiber optic is used to focus this conditioned radiation into the fiber. 3 figs.

  3. Ultra-efficient, Robust and Well-defined Nano-Array based Monolithic Catalysts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ultra-efficient, Robust and Well-defined Nano-Array based Monolithic Catalysts Yanbing Guo, Zheng Ren, and Pu-Xian Gao � Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering & � Institute of Materials Science � University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 � 18 th DEER Conference, Dearborn, Michigan October 19, 2012 This work is funded by DoE/NETL through Award: DE-EE0000210 � 1 Outline � 1 2 3 5 4 2 _ Motivations and Goals � Images from:

  4. A Microcantilever Sensor Array for the Detection and Inventory of Desert Tortoises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venedam, R. J.; Dillingham, T. R.

    2008-07-01

    Wehavedesignedandtestedaportableinstrumentconsistingofasmallinfraredcameracoupledwithanarrayofpiezoresistivemicrocantileversensorsthatisusedtoprovidereal-time,non-invasive data on desert tortoise den occupancy. The piezoresistive microcantilever (PMC) sensors are used to obtain a chemical signature of tortoise presence from the air deep within the dens, and provide data in cases where the camera cannot extend deep enough into the den to provide visual evidence of tortoise presence. The infrared camera was used to verify the PMC data during testing, and in many cases, such as shallower dens, may be used to provide exact numbers on den populations.

  5. Design of a photovoltaic central power station: flat-plate array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    A design for a photovoltaic central power station using fixed flat-panel arrays has been developed. The 100 MW plant is assumed to be located adjacent to the Saguaro Power Station of Arizona Public Service. The design assumes high-efficiency photovoltaic modules using dendritic web cells. The modules are arranged in 5 MW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. The photovoltaic output is connected to the existing 115 kV utility switchyard. The site specific design allows detailed cost estimates for engineering, site preparation, and installation. Collector and power conditioning costs have been treated parametrically.

  6. A VIRTUAL SKY WITH EXTRAGALACTIC H I AND CO LINES FOR THE SQUARE KILOMETRE ARRAY AND THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreschkow, D.; Kloeckner, H.-R.; Heywood, I.; Rawlings, S.; Levrier, F.

    2009-10-01

    We present a sky simulation of the atomic H I-emission line and the first 10 {sup 12}C{sup 16}O rotational emission lines of molecular gas in galaxies beyond the Milky Way. The simulated sky field has a comoving diameter of 500 h {sup -1} Mpc; hence, the actual field of view depends on the (user-defined) maximal redshift z {sub max}; e.g., for z {sub max} = 10, the field of view yields approx4 x 4 deg{sup 2}. For all galaxies, we estimate the line fluxes, line profiles, and angular sizes of the H I and CO-emission lines. The galaxy sample is complete for galaxies with cold hydrogen masses above 10{sup 8} M {sub sun}. This sky simulation builds on a semi-analytic model of the cosmic evolution of galaxies in a LAMBDA cold dark matter (LAMBDACDM) cosmology. The evolving CDM distribution was adopted from the Millennium Simulation, an N-body CDM simulation in a cubic box with a side length of 500 h {sup -1} Mpc. This side length limits the coherence scale of our sky simulation: it is long enough to allow the extraction of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the galaxy power spectrum, yet the position and amplitude of the first acoustic peak will be imperfectly defined. This sky simulation is a tangible aid to the design and operation of future telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array, Large Millimeter Telescope, and Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. The results presented in this paper have been restricted to a graphical representation of the simulated sky and fundamental dN/dz analyses for peak flux density limited and total flux limited surveys of H I and CO. A key prediction is that H I will be harder to detect at redshifts z approx> 2 than predicted by a no-evolution model. The future verification or falsification of this prediction will allow us to qualify the semi-analytic models.

  7. Vertical group III-V nanowires on si, heterostructures, flexible arrays and fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli; Soci, Cesare; Bao, Xinyu; Wei, Wei; Jing, Yi; Sun, Ke

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the invention provide a method for direct heteroepitaxial growth of vertical III-V semiconductor nanowires on a silicon substrate. The silicon substrate is etched to substantially completely remove native oxide. It is promptly placed in a reaction chamber. The substrate is heated and maintained at a growth temperature. Group III-V precursors are flowed for a growth time. Preferred embodiment vertical Group III-V nanowires on silicon have a core-shell structure, which provides a radial homojunction or heterojunction. A doped nanowire core is surrounded by a shell with complementary doping. Such can provide high optical absorption due to the long optical path in the axial direction of the vertical nanowires, while reducing considerably the distance over which carriers must diffuse before being collected in the radial direction. Alloy composition can also be varied. Radial and axial homojunctions and heterojunctions can be realized. Embodiments provide for flexible Group III-V nanowire structures. An array of Group III-V nanowire structures is embedded in polymer. A fabrication method forms the vertical nanowires on a substrate, e.g., a silicon substrate. Preferably, the nanowires are formed by the preferred methods for fabrication of Group III-V nanowires on silicon. Devices can be formed with core/shell and core/multi-shell nanowires and the devices are released from the substrate upon which the nanowires were formed to create a flexible structure that includes an array of vertical nanowires embedded in polymer.

  8. Testing of a Hydrogen Diffusion Flame Array Injector at Gas Turbine Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Nathan T.; Sidwell, Todd G.; Strakey, Peter A.

    2013-07-03

    High-hydrogen gas turbines enable integration of carbon sequestration into coal-gasifying power plants, though NO{sub x} emissions are often high. This work explores nitrogen dilution of hydrogen diffusion flames to reduce thermal NO{sub x} emissions and avoid problems with premixing hydrogen at gas turbine pressures and temperatures. The burner design includes an array of high-velocity coaxial fuel and air injectors, which balances stability and ignition performance, combustor pressure drop, and flame residence time. Testing of this array injector at representative gas turbine conditions (16 atm and 1750 K firing temperature) yields 4.4 ppmv NO{sub x} at 15% O{sub 2} equivalent. NO{sub x} emissions are proportional to flame residence times, though these deviate from expected scaling due to active combustor cooling and merged flame behavior. The results demonstrate that nitrogen dilution in combination with high velocities can provide low NO{sub x} hydrogen combustion at gas turbine conditions, with significant potential for further NO{sub x} reductions via suggested design changes.

  9. Ultrasonic Phased Array Evaluation of Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) Nozzle Interference Fit and Weld Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mathews, Royce; Hanson, Brady D.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2011-07-31

    Ultrasonic phased array data were collected on a removed-from-service CRDM nozzle specimen to assess a previously reported leak path. First a mock-up CRDM specimen was evaluated that contained two 0.076-mm (3.0-mil) interference fit regions formed from an actual Inconel CRDM tube and two 152.4-mm (6.0-in.) thick carbon steel blocks. One interference fit region has a series of precision crafted electric discharge machining (EDM) notches at various lengths, widths, depths, and spatial separations for establishing probe sensitivity, resolution and calibration. The other interference fit has zones of boric acid (crystal form) spaced periodically between the tube and block to represent an actively leaking CRDM nozzle assembly in the field. Ultrasonic phased-array evaluations were conducted using an immersion 8-element annular 5.0-MHz probe from the tube inner diameter (ID). A variety of focal laws were employed to evaluate the interference fit regions and J grove weld, where applicable. Responses from the mock-up specimen were evaluated to determine detection limits and characterization ability as well as contrast the ultrasonic response differences with the presence of boric acid in the fit region. Nozzle 63, from the North Anna Unit-2 nuclear power plant, was evaluated to assess leakage path(s) and was destructively dismantled to allow a visual verification of the leak path(s).

  10. Defect level characterization of silicon nanowire arrays: Towards novel experimental paradigms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carapezzi, Stefania; Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna

    2014-02-21

    The huge amount of knowledge, and infrastructures, brought by silicon (Si) technology, make Si Nanowires (NWs) an ideal choice for nano-electronic Si-based devices. This, in turn, challenges the scientific research to adapt the technical and theoretical paradigms, at the base of established experimental techniques, in order to probe the properties of these systems. Metal-assisted wet-Chemical Etching (MaCE) [1, 2] is a promising fast, easy and cheap method to grow high aspect-ratio aligned Si NWs. Further, contrary to other fabrication methods, this method avoids the possible detrimental effects related to Au diffusion into NWs. We investigated the bandgap level diagram of MaCE Si NW arrays, phosphorous-doped, by means of Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy. The presence of both shallow and deep levels has been detected. The results have been examined in the light of the specificity of the MaCE growth. The study of the electronic levels in Si NWs is, of course, of capital importance in view of the integration of Si NW arrays as active layers in actual devices.

  11. Impact of high-order moments on the statistical modeling of transition arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilleron, Franck; Pain, Jean-Christophe; Bauche, Jacques; Bauche-Arnoult, Claire

    2008-02-15

    The impact of high-order moments on the statistical modeling of transition arrays in complex spectra is studied. It is shown that a departure from the Gaussian, which is usually employed in such an approach, may be observed even in the shape of unresolved spectra due to the large value of the kurtosis coefficient. The use of a Gaussian shape may also overestimate the width of the spectra in some cases. Therefore, it is proposed to simulate the statistical shape of the transition arrays by the more flexible generalized Gaussian distribution which introduces an additional parameter--the power of the argument in the exponential--that can be constrained by the kurtosis value. The relevance of the statistical line distribution is checked by comparisons with smoothed spectra obtained from detailed line-by-line calculations. The departure from the Gaussian is also confirmed through the analysis of 2p-3d transitions of recent absorption measurements. A numerical fit is proposed for an easy implementation of the statistical profile in atomic-structure codes.

  12. Data base on batteries, power-conditioning equipment, and photovoltaic arrays. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podder, A; Kapner, M; Morse, T

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compile an up-to-date comprehensive data base for research, design, and development of photovoltaic systems, primarily in the areas of applications and battery technology, and secondarily in the area of power conditioning and photovoltaic array technology. This volume contains the data base used to develop the end-use scenarios and identify the R and D needed for batteries to be used in photovoltaic power systems. In addition to its specific application to the present study, this data base is intended to provide state-of-the-art information to manufacturers of the various components of photovoltaic power systems, system designers, and researchers in this field. An extensive literature search was conducted to obtain technical data on batteries, power conditioners, and photovoltaic arrays. The data obtained from published technical literature and direct communication with manufacturers and developers are compiled. Principles of operation, types of systems, performance characteristics, test data, and cost data are included for each of the components. (WHK)

  13. Pseudocapacitive Lithium-Ion Storage in Oriented Anatase TiO2 Nanotube Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, K.; Wang, Q.; Kim, J. H.; Pesaran, A. A.; Frank, A. J.

    2012-06-07

    We report on the synthesis and electrochemical properties of oriented anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotube (NT) arrays as electrodes for Li-ion batteries. The TiO{sub 2} NT electrodes displayed both pseudocapacitive Li{sup +} storage associated with the NT surface and the Li{sup +} storage within the bulk material. The relative contribution of the pseudocapacitive and bulk storages depends strongly on the scan rate. While the charges are stored primarily in the bulk at low scan rates (<< 1 mV/s), the surface storage dominates the total storage capacity at higher scan rates (>1 mV/s). The storage capacity of the NT electrodes as a function of charge/discharge rates showed no dependence on the NT film thickness, suggesting that the Li{sup +} insertion/extraction processes occur homogeneously across the entire length of NT arrays. These results indicated that the electron conduction along the NT walls and the ion conduction within the electrolyte do not cause significant hindering of the charge/discharge kinetics for NT electrode architectures. As a result of the surface pseudocapacitive storage, the reversible Li{sup +} storage capacities for TiO{sub 2} NT electrodes were higher than the theoretical storage capacity for bulk anatase TiO{sub 2} materials.

  14. Nellis Air Force Base solar array provides model for renewable projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A public-private partnership has helped one Air Force base reduce its energy costs and convert to 25 percent renewable energy. Nellis Air Force Base, just north of Las Vegas, took a big step in 2007 when it installed a 14.2-megawatt, 70,000-panel photovoltaic solar array that reduced carbon dioxide emissions by 24,000 tons a year. Built partly on a landfill, the field of solar panels takes advantage of two resources plentiful in Nevada: sunshine and empty land. At its unveiling in December of 2007, the Nellis array was the largest solar panel installation in North America. The project was originally expected to produce about 30,000 megawatt-hours of electricity per year, but Steven Dumont, Air Combat Command Energy Manager, says its actually producing closer to 32,000 megawatt-hours, which is about 8 percent above expectations. Despite this success, Dumont said he nearly didnt pursue the project.

  15. Radiative cooling of two-component wire-array Z-pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Mancini, R. C.; Papp, D.; Hakel, P.; Durmaz, T.; Florido, R.

    2014-08-15

    Wire-array two-component Z-pinch plasmas containing Al and other elements were studied experimentally and the observations interpreted with the help of theoretical modeling. Special attention was given to achieving reproducible implosions. Cascading implosions in star wire arrays mix components during the implosion phase and implosion dynamics were not affected by changes in concentration. A reduction in Al K-shell radiation and an increase in soft x-ray radiation emission were observed in Al-W plasma with 84% concentration of Al ions compared to only-Al plasma. Plasma with 84% of Al ions has radiative properties like those of W Z-pinches. The analysis of Al K-shell x-ray spectra with a collisional-radiative atomic kinetics model shows a drop of the electron temperature from 400?eV in pure Al plasma to below 300?eV in the Al-W mix. Al-Au Z-pinches present radiation features similar to Al-W plasma. This is indicative of a similar plasma cooling effect due to the presence of a high-Z element.

  16. Harmonia: A Globally Coordinated Garbage Collector for Arrays of Solid-state Drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngjae; Oral, H Sarp; Shipman, Galen M; Lee, Junghee; Dillow, David A; Wang, Feiyi

    2011-01-01

    Solid-State Drives (SSDs) offer significant performance improvements over hard disk drives (HDD) on a number of workloads. The frequency of garbage collection (GC) activity is directly correlated with the pattern, frequency, and volume of write requests, and scheduling of GC is controlled by logic internal to the SSD. SSDs can exhibit significant performance degradations when garbage collection (GC) conflicts with an ongoing I/O request stream. When using SSDs in a RAID array, the lack of coordination of the local GC processes amplifies these performance degradations. No RAID controller or SSD available today has the technology to overcome this limitation. This paper presents Harmonia, a Global Garbage Collection (GGC) mechanism to improve response times and reduce performance variability for a RAID array of SSDs. Our proposal includes a high-level design of SSD-aware RAID controller and GGC-capable SSD devices, as well as algorithms to coordinate the global GC cycles. Our simulations show that this design improves response time and reduces performance variability for a wide variety of enterprise workloads. For bursty, write dominant workloads response time was improved by 69% while performance variability was reduced by 71%.

  17. Apparatus and method for heterodyne-generated two-dimensional detector array using a single element detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strauss, C.E.

    1997-11-18

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for heterodyne-generated, two-dimensional detector array using a single detector. Synthetic-array heterodyne detection, permits a single-element optical detector to behave as though it were divided into an array of separate heterodyne detector elements. A fifteen-element synthetic array has successfully been experimentally realized on a single-element detector, permitting all of the array elements to be read out continuously and in parallel from one electrical connection. A CO{sub 2} laser and a single-element HgCdTe photodiode are employed. A different heterodyne local oscillator frequency is incident upon the spatially resolvable regions of the detector surface. Thus, different regions are mapped to different heterodyne beat frequencies. One can determine where the photons were incident on the detector surface even though a single electrical connection to the detector is used. This also prevents the destructive interference that occurs when multiple speckles are imaged (similar to spatial diversity), In coherent LIDAR this permits a larger field of view. An acoustooptic modulator generates the local oscillator frequencies and can achieve adequate spatial separation of optical frequencies of the order of a megahertz apart. 4 figs.

  18. Performance and energy costs associated with scaling infrared heater arrays for warming field plots from 1 to 100 m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimball B. A.; Lewin K.; Conley, M. M.

    2012-04-01

    To study the likely effects of global warming on open-field vegetation, hexagonal arrays of infrared heaters are currently being used for low-stature (<1 m) plants in small ({le}3 m) plots. To address larger ecosystem scales, herein we show that excellent uniformity of the warming can be achieved using nested hexagonal and rectangular arrays. Energy costs depend on the overall efficiency (useable infrared energy on the plot per electrical energy in), which varies with the radiometric efficiency (infrared radiation out per electrical energy in) of the individual heaters and with the geometric efficiency (fraction of thermal radiation that falls on useable plot area) associated with the arrangement of the heaters in an array. Overall efficiency would be about 26% at 4 ms{sup -1} wind speed for a single hexagonal array over a 3-m-diameter plot and 67% for a 199-hexagon honeycomb array over a 100-m-diameter plot, thereby resulting in an economy of scale.

  19. The photoluminescence properties of Er{sup 3+}-doped ZrO{sub 2} nanotube arrays prepared by anodization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xixin; Zhao, Jianling; Du, Peng; Guo, Limin; Xu, Xuewen; Tang, Chengchun

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Er{sup 3+}-doped ZrO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were prepared by anodization of ZrEr alloy. ? Small tetragonal zirconia crystallites are tended to be formed due to the doping of Er{sup 3+}. ? Under excitation at 317 nm, the ZrO{sub 2} nantube arrays have strongest photoluminescence intensity. -- Abstract: Er{sup 3+}-doped ZrO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were prepared by anodization of ZrEr alloy which was obtained by melting zirconium with 1.0 wt% erbium. The morphology, structure and photoluminescence properties were studied through scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence analyzer. X-ray diffraction results indicate that doping of Er{sup 3+} affects the crystal structure and grain size obviously and the Er{sup 3+}-doped samples tend to form small tetragonal grains. Photoluminescence analyses show that when Er{sup 3+}-doped zirconia nanotube arrays are excited at 317 nm, there are two strong photoluminescence emission peaks at 373 nm and 415 nm. When the excitation wavelength is 257 nm, a photoluminescence emission peak appears at 363 nm. Under same measurement conditions, emission peaks of the undoped ZrO{sub 2} nanotube arrays are very weak.

  20. Electrostatically focused addressable field emission array chips (AFEA's) for high-speed massively parallel maskless digital E-beam direct write lithography and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Voelkl, Edgar; Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Whealton, John H.; Whitson, John C.; Wilgen, John B.

    2002-12-24

    Systems and methods are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A method of operating an addressable field-emission array, includes: generating a plurality of electron beams from a pluralitly of emitters that compose the addressable field-emission array; and focusing at least one of the plurality of electron beams with an on-chip electrostatic focusing stack. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.