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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.2 Anthropogenic emissions 28 2.3 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons 30 2.3.1 Sources of PAHs 30 2.3.2 Gas to particle distribution in atmosphere 32 2.3.3 Gas to particle distribution in atmosphere 32 CHAPTER THREE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

2

Literature Review of Background Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) continuously move through the environment, often via atmospheric transport. The subsequent deposition of particulates containing PAHs along with other sources of PAHs, such as natural vegetative decay, result in "background" PAHs in surficial soils. Even in pristine areas, surface and near surface soils can contain detectable levels of PAHs. This study provides data on the concentrations and distributions of background PAHs observed in environmental media. Such inf...

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

3

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure in German Coke Oven Workers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are formed whenever there is incomplete combustion of carbonaceous material. They are ubiquitous in the environment and background levels are found (more)

Thoroman, Jeffrey S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Toxicity Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment and are generated by many sources. Though the potential of PAH-rich mixtures to cause health effects has been known for almost a century, there are still unanswered questions about the levels of PAHs in the environment, the potential for human exposure to PAHs, the health effects associated with exposure, and how genetic susceptibility influences the extent of health effects in individuals. The first objective of this research was to quantify concentrations of PAHs in samples of settled house dust collected from homes in Azerbaijan, China, and Texas. The trends of PAH surface loadings and percentage of carcinogenic PAHs were China > Azerbaijan > Texas, indicating that the risk of health effects from exposure to PAHs in house dust is highest in the Chinese population and lowest in the Texas population. PAHs in China and Azerbaijan were derived mainly from combustion sources; Texas PAHs were derived from unburned fossil fuels such as petroleum. The second objective of this research was to investigate the effect of pregnane X receptor (PXR) on the genotoxicity of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). BaP treatment resulted in significantly lower DNA adduct levels in PXR-transfected HepG2 cells than in parental HepG2 cells. Total GST enzymatic activity and mRNA levels of several metabolizing enyzmes were significantly higher in cells overexpressing PXR. These results suggest that PXR protects cells against DNA damage by PAHs such as BaP, possibly through a coordinated regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The third objective of this research was to investigate biomarkers of exposure in house mice (Mus musculus) exposed to PAH mixtures in situ. Mice and soil were collected near homes in Sumgayit and Khizi, Azerbaijan. Mean liver adduct levels were significantly higher in Khizi than in Sumgayit. Mean lung and kidney adduct levels were similar in the two regions. The DNA lesions detected may be a combination of environmentally-induced DNA adducts and naturally-occurring I-compounds. PAHs were present at background levels in soils from both Khizi and Sumgayit. It appears that health risks posed to rodents by soil-borne PAHs are low in these two areas.

Naspinski, Christine S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Biodegradation and phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using mushroom compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Soils contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are commonly found in petroleum, gas-work and wood-impregnation sites. Interest in the biodegradation and environmental fate of PAHs (more)

Kodjo-Wayo, Lina Korkor

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of research on the development of new catalytic pathways for the hydrogenation of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons and the hydrotreating of coal liquids at The University of Chicago under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC91056. The work, which is described in three parts, is primarily concerned with the research on the development of new catalytic systems for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen. Part A discusses the activation of dihydrogen by very basic molecular reagents to form adducts that can facilitate the reduction of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons. Part B examines the hydrotreating of coal liquids catalyzed by the same base-activated dihydrogen complexes. Part C concerns studies of molecular organometallic catalysts for the hydrogenation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under mild conditions.

Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

9

Examination of the Sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) in Urban Background Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between 2000 and 2005, EPRI collected several hundred soil samples from urban background locations in three States and analyzed them for 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). This report presents the initial results of efforts to extract additional chemical data from the urban background PAH database and to explore those data using chemical forensic methods for statistical properties and trends.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

Determining Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Background in Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sediment remediation challenges at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites include defining sediment remedial zones, establishing risk-based remedial goals for specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and determining background conditions in what are often highly industrialized waterways. This technical update describes the various tools and approaches developed over approximately the past decade to determine site-specific background PAH concentrations in sediments attributable to ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHS) in Surface Soil in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred sixty soil samples were collected and analyzed from sites in the State of Illinois as part of EPRI's nationwide study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface soil. The samples were collected from 10 pseudo-randomly selected locations in 16 pseudo-randomly selected populated areas throughout the State, excluding the City of Chicago. At each location, the soils were logged and samples were collected from 0 to 15 cm below ground surface. At the laboratory, the soil samples were ana...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

12

Understanding the Adsorption of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Aqueous Phase onto Activated Carbon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-competitive adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water onto activated carbon was studied alongside the performance of CO2-activated petroleum coke as a low-cost adsorbent. (more)

Awoyemi, Ayodeji

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Black carbon in marine sediments : quantification and implications for the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption is a key factor in determining the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Here, PAH sorption is proposed as the sum of two mechanisms: absorption into a biogenic, organic carbon (OC) ...

Accardi-Dey, AmyMarie, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Process for removal of polynuclear aromatics from a hydrocarbon in an endothermic reformer reaction system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is described for reforming a hydrocarbon in a multi-stage endothermic reforming series of catalytic reforming reactors where the hydrocarbon is passed through the series of catalytic reforming reactors to form a reformate. The hydrocarbon is heated prior to entry to the next catalytic reforming reactor in the series, which process comprises contact of the hydrocarbon intermediate from the series of catalytic reforming reactors containing reforming catalyst with a polynuclear aromatic adsorbent to adsorb at least a portion of the polynuclear aromatic content from the hydrocarbon prior to entry to each of the next catalytic reforming reactor in the series and recovering a reformate from the last catalytic reforming reactor in the series, the recovered reformate having a reduced content of polynuclear aromatics.

Ngan, D.Y.

1989-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

15

Numerical Simulation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Formation in n-Heptane HCCI Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By modifying the SENKIN code of CHEMKIN chemical kinetics package, the combustion processes and the characteristics of hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide(CO) emissions of a HCCI engine were simulated. Furthermore, the formation of benzene (A1) and ... Keywords: n-neptane, HCCI, multi-zone model, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Zeng Wen; Ma Hong-an

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Modeling the biodegradability and physicochemical properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biodegradability and physicochemical properties of unsubstituted and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated. The focus was on the development of models expressing the influence of molecular structure and properties on observed behavior. Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) were developed for the estimation of aqueous solubilities, octanol/water partition coefficients, and vapor pressures as functions of chromatographic retention time. LFERs were tested in the estimation of physicochemical properties for twenty methylated naphthalenes containing up to four methyl substituents. It was determined that LFERs can accurately estimate physicochemical properties for methylated naphthalenes. Twenty unsubstituted and methylated PAHs containing up to four aromatic rings were biodegraded individually by Sphingomonas paucimobilis strain EPA505, and Monod-type kinetic coefficients were estimated for each PAH using the integral method. Estimated extant kinetic parameters included the maximal specific biodegradation rate, the affinity coefficient, and the inhibition coefficient. The generic Andrews model adequately simulated kinetic data. The ability of PAHs to serve as sole energy and carbon sources was also evaluated. Quantitative structure-biodegradability relationships (QSBRs) were developed based on the estimates of the kinetic and growth parameters. A genetic algorithm was used for QSBR development. Statistical analysis and validation demonstrated the predictive value of the QSBRs. Spatial and topological molecular descriptors were essential in explaining biodegradability. Mechanistic interpretation of the kinetic data and the QSBRs provided evidence that simple or facilitated diffusion through the cell membranes is the rate-determining step in PAH biodegradation by strain EPA505. A kinetic experiment was conducted to investigate biodegradation of PAH mixtures by strain EPA505. The investigation focused on 2-methylphenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene, and their mixtures. Integrated material balance equations describing different interaction types were fitted to the depletion data and evaluated on a statistical and probabilistic basis. Mixture degradation was most adequately described by a pure competitive interaction model with mutual substrate exclusivity, a fully predictive model utilizing parameters estimated in the sole-PAH experiments only. The models developed in this research provide insight into how molecular structure and properties influence physicochemical properties and biodegradability of PAHs. The models have considerable predictive value and could reduce the need for laboratory testing.

Dimitriou-Christidis, Petros

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Biodegradability of select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pah) mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmentally significant because of their ubiquity and the toxicity of some. Their recalcitrance and persistence makes them problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered to be the primary mechanism of PAH removal from the environment. Biodegradation kinetics of individual PAHs by pure and mixed cultures have been reported by several researchers. However, contaminated sites commonly have complex mixtures of PAHs whose individual biodegradability may be altered in mixtures. Biodegradation kinetics for fluorene, naphthalene, 1,5-dimethylnaphthalene and 1- methylfluorene were evaluated in sole substrate systems, binary and ternary systems using Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA505. The Monod model was fitted to the data from the sole substrate experiments to yield biokinetic parameters, (qmax and Ks). The first order rate constants (qmax/Ks) for fluorene, naphthalene and 1,5- dimethylnaphthalene were comparable, although statistically different. However, affinity constants for the three compounds were not comparable. Binary and ternary experiments indicated that the presence of another PAH retards the biodegradation of the co-occurring PAH. Antagonistic interactions between substrates were evident in the form of competitive inhibition, demonstrated mathematically by the Monod multisubstrate model. This model appropriately predicted the biodegradation kinetics in mixtures using the sole substrate parameters, validating the hypothesis of common enzyme systems. Competitive inhibition became pronounced under conditions of: Ks1 > Ks1 and S1 >> S. Experiments with equitable concentrations of substrates demonstrated the effect of concentration on competitive inhibition. Ternary experiments with naphthalene, 1,5-dimethylnapthalene and 1-methylfluorene revealed preferential degradation, where depletion of naphthalene and 1,5-dimethylnapthalene proceeded only after the complete removal of 1-methylfluorene. The substrate interactions observed in binary and ternary mixtures require a multisubstrate model to account for simultaneous degradation of substrates. However, developing models that account for sequential degradation may be useful in scenarios where PAHs may not be competitive substrates. These mixture results prove that substrate interactions must be considered in designing effective bioremediation strategies and that sole substrate performance is limited in predicting biodegradation kinetics of complex mixtures.

Desai, Anuradha M.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Biodegradation of volatile aromatic hydrocarbons by native soil and groundwater microorganisms: Microcosm studies  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was twofold: to develop and test strategies for enhancing the microbial degradation of hydrocarbon contaminants in subsurface soil and groundwater, and to understand why and under what conditions these strategies can be successful. The work deals primarily with what are generally considered the highest priority contaminants, from a toxicological point of view, in a typical hydrocarbon remediation site -- the aromatic fraction, including benzene and related compounds. The work involved the determination of the relative degradation rates of aromatic, as well as several nonaromatic constituents, in conjunction with an analysis of the effect of oxygen concentration and with an extensive microbiological characterization.

Rai, D.N.; Dasch, J.M.; Gibson, T.L.; Ang, C.C.; Abdul, A.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Attenuation of dilute aromatic hydrocarbon transport by a block copolymer in a compacted vertisol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste landfills in the United States are built with a composite bottom liner consisting of a flexible membrane liner of high-density polyethylene overlying a compacted soil liner. Hydrocarbons have been shown to pass through the flexible membrane liner by diffusion. Flexible membrane liners often have flaws allowing direct contact between the leachate and the compacted soil liner. The transmission of hydrocarbons to the compacted soil liner presents a threat to groundwater supplies. The study was performed to determine if the modification of a compacted soil liner with a thermoplastic elastomer block copolymer could successfully sequester benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and meet the United States Environmental Protection Agency's saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement of 1x10?? cm sec?. Compacted Ships clay modified with 0, 1, 3, 5, and 10% weight of a thermoplastic elastomer block copolymer was tested for saturated hydraulic conductivity using 10.2 cm fixed wall permeameters. The compacted Ships clay met the United States Environmental Protection Agency's mandated saturated hydraulic conductivity of 10?? cm sec? at polymer contents of 3% (wt) polymer or less. The presence of dissolved aromatic hydrocarbons had no effect on the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The ability of the polymer to attenuate the transport of dilute aromatic hydrocarbons was tested by permeating the compacted soil/polymer treatments with a 0.01N CaSO4 solution contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes. Leachate from permeameters packed with soil containing more than 1% (wt) polymer had BTEX concentrations below the drinking water standard for 3 or more pore volumes. The findings of this research were applied to a hypothetical compacted soil liner constructed with Ships clay modified to include 3% (wt) polymer and having a saturated hydraulic conductivity of 4.23 x 10?? cm sec?. It was assumed that the soil liner was in direct contact with landfill leachate. The hypothetical liner would protect the groundwater from contamination above the maximum contamination limit for drinking water by benzene for 350 years, toluene for 140 years, and ethylbenzene for 260 years.

Akin, James Browning

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce volume, remove pathogens, and to gain energy. Anaerobic digestion is by far the most commonRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N treatment in a wastewater treatment plant. They therefore proceed directly to the anaerobic post treatment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) known for their harmful health effects undergo long-range transport (LRT) when adsorbed on and/or absorbed in atmospheric particles. The association between atmospheric particles, PAHs, and their LRT has been the subject of many studies, yet remains poorly understood. Current models assume PAHs instantaneously attain reversible gas-particle equilibrium. In this paradigm, during LRT, as gas-phase PAHs concentrations are depleted due to oxidation and dilution, particle-bound PAHs rapidly evaporate to re-establish equilibrium, leading to severe underpredictions of LRT potential of particle-bound PAHs. Here we present a new, experimentally based picture, in which the PAHs become trapped inside highly viscous quasi-solid secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles during particle formation, and thus prevented from evaporation, and shielded from oxidation. In contrast, surface-adsorbed PAHs rapidly evaporate, leaving no trace behind. We find synergetic effects between PAHs and SOA, in that the presence of PAHs inside SOA particles drastically slows SOA evaporation to the point that it can be ignored, and the highly viscous SOA prevents PAHs evaporation assuring efficient LRT. The data show that the assumptions of instantaneous reversible gas-particle equilibrium for PAHs and for SOA are fundamentally flawed, providing explanation for the persistent discrepancy between observed and predicted particle-bound PAHs.

Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Abramson, Evan H.; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

22

Allocating the Sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Surficial Sediments from the Washington, DC Region with Particular Emphasis on Coal Tar Sealcoat .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Various sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed that potentially influenced contamination levels in sediments from the Anacostia River in Washington, DC and surrounding (more)

Nadrchal, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Assessment of dosimetry requirements and techniques for measuring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. [13 refs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prediction by ERDA is that, within a decade, 10/sup 6/ barrels/day of synthetic fuel will come from liquefaction of coal. The coproduction of highly carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) will necessitate much better dosimetry and means of personnel protection than exist today. Traditional techniques for measuring PAH are gas chromatography with mass spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Several newly developed, or developing techniques, may also lend themselves to PAH dosimetry. These include low-temperature Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, time-resolved fluorescence, room-temperature phosphorescence, portable mass spectrometry, and second derivative spectrometry. Special emphasis is given to potential use of the second derivative spectrometer for dosimetry purposes. Some of the advantages and limitations of these techniques for characterizing and measuring PAH under various conditions (vapor, liquid, solid, or aerosol) are discussed.

Hawthorne, A R; Gammage, R B; Simpkin, D J

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Catalytic cracking of aromatic hydrocarbons. Final report, October 1984-March 1986  

SciTech Connect

Iron containing minerals and chars were screened as cracking catalysts for aromatic hydrocarbons (AHC) in simulated gasifier effluents. Catalytic activities of six minerals and two chars were measured and used to infer fundamental hetereogeneous rate constants using measured properties of the pore structure of the solids. Measurements were made for 200 ppM and 2000 ppM benzene cracking over the temperature range 400 to 1000/sup 0/C. The active catalyst under gasifier conditions was found to be FeO. The minerals have a higher reactivity per unit mass in chars than in a pure form. H/sub 2/S was found to reduce the catalytic activity to one third of the unpoisoned value, but the catalysts maintained this reduced activity. These minerals have the potential to be economically feasible, disposable catalysts in a fixed bed or fluidized bed process if they can survive for ten hours. 8 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs.

Simons, G.A.; Ham, D.O.; Moniz, G.A.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Air pollution from a large steel factory: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from coke-oven batteries  

SciTech Connect

A systematic investigation of solid and gaseous atmospheric emissions from some coke-oven batteries of one of Europe's largest integrated steel factory (Taranto, Italy) has been carried out. These emissions, predominantly diffuse, originate from oven leakages, as well as from cyclic operations of coal loading and coke unloading. In air monitoring samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were consistently detected at concentrations largely exceeding threshold limit values. By means of PAHs speciation profile and benzo-(a)pyrene (BaP) equivalent dispersion modeling from diffuse sources, the study indicated that serious health risks exist not only in working areas, but also in a densely populated residential district near the factory. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lorenzo Liberti; Michele Notarnicola; Roberto Primerano; Paolo Zannetti [Technical University of Bari, Bari (Italy). Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Development

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells. Annual report, fiscal 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Samples of cryocondensates - materials condensed at - 78.5/sup 0/C were taken on a regular basis from the gas stream for the USDOE geopressured wells. Most of the data has been taken from the Gladys McCall well as it has flowed on a regular and almost continous basis. The cryocondensates, not the ''condensate'' from gas wells, are almost exclusively aromatic hydrocarbons, primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes, but contain over 95 compounds, characterized using gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopy. The solubility in water and brine of benezene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene, some of the components of the cryocondensate, as well as distribution coefficients between water or brine and a standard oil have been measured. 25 refs.

Keeley, D.F.; Meriwether, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR OUTFLOWS OF CARBON STARS  

SciTech Connect

The formation and destruction mechanisms of interstellar dust analogs formed from a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and hydrocarbon molecular precursors are studied in the laboratory. We used the newly developed facility COSmIC, which simulates interstellar and circumstellar environments, to investigate both PAHs and species that include the cosmically abundant atoms O, N, and S. The species generated in a discharge plasma are detected, monitored, and characterized in situ using highly sensitive techniques that provide both spectral and ion mass information. We report here the first series of measurements obtained in these experiments which focus on the characterization of the most efficient molecular precursors in the chemical pathways that eventually lead to the formation of carbonaceous grains in the stellar envelopes of carbon stars. We compare and discuss the relative efficiencies of the various molecular precursors that lead to the formation of the building blocks of carbon grains. We discuss the most probable molecular precursors in terms of size and structure and the implications for the expected growth and destruction processes of interstellar carbonaceous dust.

Contreras, Cesar S.; Salama, Farid, E-mail: cesar.contreras@nasa.gov, E-mail: Farid.Salama@nasa.gov [Space Science and Astrobiology Division, NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Grating light reflection spectroelectrochemistry for detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons in water  

SciTech Connect

Grating light reflection spectroscopy (GLRS) is an emerging technique for spectroscopic analysis and sensing. A transmission diffraction grating is placed in contact with the sample to be analyzed, and an incident light beam is directed onto the grating. At certain angles of incidence, some of the diffracted orders are transformed from traveling waves to evanescent waves. This occurs at a specific wavelength that is a function of the grating period and the complex index of refraction of the sample. The intensities of diffracted orders are also dependent on the sample's complex index of refraction. The authors describe the use of GLRS, in combination with electrochemical modulation of the grating, for the detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons. The diffraction grating consisted of chromium lines on a fused silica substrate. The depth of the grating lines was 1 {micro}m, the grating period was 1 {micro}m, and the duty cycle was 50%. Since chromium was not suitable for electrochemical modulation of the analyte concentration, a 200 nm gold layer was deposited over the entire grating. This gold layer slightly degraded the transmission of the grating, but provided satisfactory optical transparency for the spectroelectrochemical experiments. The grating was configured as the working electrode in an electrochemical cell containing water plus trace amounts of the aromatic hydrocarbon analytes. The grating was then electrochemically modulated via cyclic voltammetry waveforms, and the normalized intensity of the zero order reflection was simultaneously measured. The authors discuss the lower limits of detection (LLD) for two analytes, 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine (Meldola's Blue dye) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), probed with an incident HeNe laser beam ({lambda} = 543.5 nm) at an incident angle of 52.5{degree}. The LLD for 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine is approximately 50 parts per billion (ppb), while the LLD for TNT is approximately 50 parts per million (ppm). The possible factors contributing to the differences in LLD for these analytes are discussed. This is the final report for a Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project conducted during fiscal years 1998 and 1999 (case number 3518.190).

KELLY,MICHAEL J.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; KEMME,SHANALYN A.; KASUNIC,K.J.; BLAIR,DIANNA S.; ZAIDI,S.H.; MCNEIL,J.R.; BURGESS,L.W.; BRODSKY,A.M.; SMITH,S.A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements made by PTR-MS, DOAS and GC-FID during the MCMA 2003 Field Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements is reported for the CENICA supersite in the district of Iztapalapa during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field experiment in April 2003 (MCMA 2003). Data from three ...

Jobson, B. T.

30

A survey on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in soil in Chiang-Mai, Thailand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil samples were collected at 30 sampling sites along roadsides in the city of Chiang-Mai, Thailand, in February 1996, and concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined. The distribution of PAH concentration in the soil samples was almost log-normal for all PAHs. Concentrations of pyrene (Py) and fluoranthene (Fluor) were the highest, followed by those of benzo[ghi]perylene and coronene (Cor). Since PAH concentrations were highest on the roadside where the traffic density was high, vehicles were the main determinants of PAH concentration in soil in Chiang-Mai. Significant correlations among PAH concentrations were found for almost all PAHs. PAH profiles in the air were different from those in the soil. For example, relative benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) concentration in the soil was significantly lower than that in the air. Relative concentrations of Fluor, Py, chrysene, and Cor in the soil were considerably higher than those in the air, due presumably to their difference in photochemical reactivities and in sources. The sampling of soil has advantages relative to that of air: (1) collection of soil is easy; (2) it needs no special equipment and electricity; (3) it takes little time; and (4) it can be collected anywhere. Therefore PAH analysis in soil was useful as a proxy-screening tool for air pollution levels with consideration of compositional differences between soil and air samples.

Amagai, Takashi; Takahashi, Yukari; Matsushita, Hidetsuru [Univ. of Shizuoka (Japan); Morknoy, D.; Sukasem, P.; Taucanon, M. [Technopolis, Pathumthani (Thailand). Environmental Research and Training Center

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Partition behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between aged coal tar and water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal tar aged in a large-scale, artificial aquifer experiment for five years was subsequently investigated for leaching behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). After five years, the initially liquid coal tar had solidified and formed segregated particles with a grain size similar to that of the sandy aquifer material. The composition of the aged coal tar (ACT) with regard to PAHs was remarkably different from that of the original bulk coal tar (BCT), because most of the low-molecular-weight compounds had been depleted. Equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations of 17 PAHs leaching from the aquifer material containing the ACT were measured from consecutive equilibration steps at increasing temperatures of between 25 and 100 {sup o}C using accelerated solvent extraction. The results showed 2-to 5,000-fold lower concentrations than those from BCT, indicating dramatic changes of dissolution behavior of PAHs from coal tar after the five-year aging period. Predictions based on Raoult's law with the subcooled liquid solubilities substantially overestimated the equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations of the PAHs from ACT, whereas the estimations were reasonable if the solid solubilities were employed instead. The enthalpies of phase transfer from ACT to water were determined based on the van't Hoff equation. The resulting values agreed with the dissolution enthalpies of pure solid rather than subcooled liquid PAHs.

Liu, L.H.; Endo, S.; Eberhardt, C.; Grathwohl, P.; Schmidt, T.C. [University of Tubingen, Tubingen (Germany)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

SURFACE LAYER ACCRETION IN TRANSITIONAL AND CONVENTIONAL DISKS: FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS TO PLANETS  

SciTech Connect

'Transitional' T Tauri disks have optically thin holes with radii {approx}>10 AU, yet accrete up to the median T Tauri rate. Multiple planets inside the hole can torque the gas to high radial speeds over large distances, reducing the local surface density while maintaining accretion. Thus multi-planet systems, together with reductions in disk opacity due to grain growth, can explain how holes can be simultaneously transparent and accreting. There remains the problem of how outer disk gas diffuses into the hole. Here it has been proposed that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) erodes disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays. In contrast to previous work, we find that the extent to which surface layers are MRI-active is limited not by ohmic dissipation but by ambipolar diffusion, the latter measured by Am: the number of times a neutral hydrogen molecule collides with ions in a dynamical time. Simulations by Hawley and Stone showed that Am {approx} 100 is necessary for ions to drive MRI turbulence in neutral gas. We calculate that in X-ray-irradiated surface layers, Am typically varies from {approx}10{sup -3} to 1, depending on the abundance of charge-adsorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whose properties we infer from Spitzer observations. We conclude that ionization of H{sub 2} by X-rays and cosmic rays can sustain, at most, only weak MRI turbulence in surface layers 1-10 g cm{sup -2} thick, and that accretion rates in such layers are too small compared to observed accretion rates for the majority of disks.

Perez-Becker, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: perez-becker@berkeley.edu [Departments of Astronomy and Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

Molecular shape and the prediction of high-performance liquid chromatographic retention indexes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

The effects of molecular shape on the retention behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) have been studied. It has been found that the retention on polymeric phases is highly shape dependent in contrast to the monomeric phases where retention is more dependent on the electronic properties of the solute. In addition, retention on the polymeric phases has been studied with respect to substitution and shape. The retention of substituted PAHs shows a strong dependence on shape, whereas the retention of unsubstituted PAHs is more dependent on electronic properties.

Rohrbaugh, R.H.; Jurs, P.C.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Bacterial mutagenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reconstituted mixtures and crude coal tar extracts and fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) are one of the most ubiquitous carcinogens in the environment, little is known regarding their potential mutagenic interactions. Risk assessment of complex PAH mixtures utilizes toxic equivalency factors which assume additive interactions between individual PAHS. The mutagenic interactions of PAH mixtures were investigated using the Salmonellalmicrosome assay. Two groups of samples included PAH mixtures modeling a coal tar and an environmental crude coal tar extract and its fractions. The PAH mixtures were prepared in 2-, 3-, 4-ring and total reconstituted groups in the same percentages as a model coal tar. The environmental coal tar was extracted and separated into PAH fractions. Each sample was tested at 5 consecutive dose levels with and without metabolic activation in the Salmonella/microsome assay using tester strains TA98 and TAIOO. The reconstituted mixture elicited the maximum mutagenic response of 1,089 revertants at a dose of 1.8mg/mL. At the four lower dose levels (0.09mg/mL to 1.8mg/mL), the reconstituted induced a higher response than the 4-ring mixture. At the highest dose level (18mg/mL), the reconstituted showed a lower response that the 4-ring. These results suggest enhanced mutagenic responses at lower dose levels, with inhibition at higher doses. The mutagenicity of the PAH mixtures was evaluated in combinations as 2-:3-, 3-:4-, and 2-:4-ring mixtures. The 2-:4-ring, and 3-:4-ring combinations induced lower mutagenic responses than the 4-ring alone, suggesting inhibition by the 2-and 3-ring PAHS. Inhibition was also observed when benzo[a]pyrene was tested 935 net revertants, while the benzo[a]pyrene:reconstituted mixture induced 349 net revertants. The methylene chloride extract of a coal tar induced 385 net TA98 and 589 net TAIOO revertants with high metabolic activation (30%). Fractions from the coal tar extract and binary mixtures of individual chemicals with a reconstituted coal tar extract induced additive responses. These data indicate that mixtures of PAHs exhibit a variety of mutagenic interactions. The interactive responses appear controlled by concentration and metabolism of the PAHS. Research of this nature may aid in establishing a clearer understanding of risks and interactions which occur from exposure to PAHS.

Onufrock, Amy Mildred

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Hydrocarbon solubility and its migration processes: a look at the present status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study we review the present status of knowledge of solubility of hydrocarbons and its implications on primary migration processes. The intent is to examine the solubility and the transportation mechanisms relevant to geopressured-geothermal reservoirs, although the discussion included here accommodates a wide range of related aspects. Influences of parameters associated with hydrocarbon (especially methane) solubility have been studied. We have sought to evaluate several primary hydrocarbon migration processes and to point out their attractive features as well as their limitations. A brief discussion of hydrocarbon generation processes is also included.

Mamun, C.K.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Spectroscopic investigation of fluorescence quenching agents. Part IV: Selectivity of nitromethane for discriminating between alternant versus nonalternant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solvents of differing polarities  

SciTech Connect

To further assess the applicability of nitromethane as a selective quenching agent for alternant vs. nonalternant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in HPLC analysis, the authors measured the effect that it has non the fluorescence emission behavior of 96 different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons dissolved in a binary ethyl acetate/acetonitrile solvent mixture. Nitromethane quenching results are compared with previously reported acetonitrile, aqueous/acetonitrile, and toluene/acetonitrile solvent mixtures. Results of these measurements revealed that the {open_quotes}selective quenching{close_quotes} rule is obeyed for the vast majority of PAHs in all solvents considered thus far, with the coronene derivatives being the only major exceptions. 31 refs., 1 tab.

Tucker, S.A.; Bates, H.C.; Acree, W.E. Jr. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Fetzer, J.C. [Chevron Research and Technology Center, Richmond, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism by Rhodococcus sp. I24 : computational, biochemical and transcriptional analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rhodococcus sp. 124 is a Gram-positive soil bacterium being developed for the manufacture of (-)cis-(1S,2R)-1-aminoindan-2-ol, a key precursor in the production of the HIV-1 protease inhibitor CrixivanTM, from the aromatic ...

Parker, Jefferson A. (Jefferson Alexander), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

High-pressure binary phase equilibria of aromatic hydrocarbons with CO/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 6/  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe high-pressure vapor-liquid equilibria of several binary systems containing aromatic hydrocarbons as one component and supercritical carbon dioxide or ethane as the other component measured by using a dynamic system in which both vapor and liquid phases were circulated. The aromatic hydrocarbons that were used in this study are anisole, benzaldehyde, tetralin, and 1-methylnaphthalene. The phase equilibria of binary systems containing carbon dioxide were measured at two different temperatures, 343 and 373 K, and pressures up to 22 MPa. For ethane binary systems, equilibrium measurements were made at 373 K and pressures up to 12 MPa. In addition to measuring temperature, pressure, and phase compositions, the vapor- and liquid-phase densities also were determined for both carbon dioxide and ethane binary systems.

Kim, C.H.; Clark, A.B.; Vimalchand, P.; Donohue, M.D. (The Johns Hopkins Univ., Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Baltimore, MD (US))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an urban and a suburban area of Korea from 2002 to 2004  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric bulk samples (wet and dry) were collected monthly during 2002 to 2004 from an urban and a suburban area in Korea for assessment of depositional flux and seasonal variations in the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAH depositional flux ranged from 64.1 to 610 {mu} g/m{sup 2}/y for the urban area and from 65 to 460 {mu} g/m{sup 2}/y for the suburban area. The fluxes of PAHs measured in this study were comparable with those reported for urban and suburban areas in other countries. The fluxes of particulates and PAHs were higher in winter than in summer, consistent with the greater per capita consumption of fossil fuel in winter than in summer. Ambient temperature played a major role in the seasonal variability in PAH fluxes. Photochemical degradation of PAHs appears to occur during the summer months. The relationship of PAH depositional fluxes with major air pollutants, such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and presence of particulate matter up to 10 {mu} m in size (PM10), was also investigated. Dominant PAH compounds in both the urban and the suburban locations were benzo(g,h,i)perylene, pyrene, and indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene. Based on the PAH diagnostic ratios and a factor analysis, the major sources of PAHs in the urban and the suburban regions were found to be similar. Diesel exhaust, coal combustion, and gasoline emissions contributed predominantly to atmospheric PAH contamination.

Moon, H.B.; Kannan, K.; Lee, S.J.; Ok, G. [National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Pusan (Republic of Korea)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Probabilistic ecological risk assessment and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from Yellow Sea  

SciTech Connect

Based on the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 12 surface sediment samples from Yellow Sea, the relative risk of 9 PAHs was investigated using joint risk probability distribution curves and overlapping area, which were generated based on the distributions of exposure and acute toxicity data (LC50), and the sources of PAHs were apportioned using principal component analysis. It was found that joint probability curve and overlapping area indicated the acceptable ecological risk of individual PAHs, only a small fraction of the benthic organisms was affected. Among the nine PAHs studied, the overall risk of pyrene was the highest, with that of naphthalene the lowest. For lower exposure levels at which the percentage of species affected was less than 10%, the risk associated with phenanthrene and fluorene were clearly higher than that of the other seven PAHs. It was indicated that PAHs in surface sediments mainly originated from vehicular emissions, coal combustion sources, coke oven emission and wood combustion, petroleum origin made little influence on sources of PAHs by PCA.

Liu, A.X.; Lang, Y.H.; Xue, L.D.; Liao, S.L.; Zhou, H. [Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China). College for Environmental Science & Engineering

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effectiveness of bioremediation for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments contaminated with highly weathered petroleum was evaluated at a contaminated oil refinery. The sediments were chronically contaminated with crude oil and Bunker C fuel oil for the past 20 years. Two treatments, Inipol EAP-22 (INIPOL) and basic nutrients with indigenous organisms (BNIO), were compared to a control (CONTROL) plot over an 11 week period. In site PAH biodegradation was quantified by plotting the time dependence of PAH to 17?,21?-hopane concentration ratios. 17?,21?-hopane, a nondegradable, C30 triterpane, was used as a natural internal standard. Sediment characterization was performed to determine the effect of geologic conditions on PAH biodegradation rates. Total Ion Chromatograms (TICs) of extracted oil showed high concentrations of an unresolved complex mixture that did not change over the 11 week period. The particle size of the sediments from the plots averaged 51% and 34% for clay and silt content, respectively. Sediment mineralogy was dominated by kaolinite and smectite. [PAH]/[Hopane] ratios indicate no significant PAH degradation in either the INIPOL, BNIO, or CONTROL plots over the 11 week period. This data indicates that bioremediation was unsuccessful at this site due to the extreme weathered state of the oil, the limited bioavailability of the PAH compounds, and the potential toxicity of the petroleum. The use of hopane as a natural internal standard was important in quantifying the effectiveness of bioremediation due to the high spatial variability in initial oil concentrations.

Moffit, Alfred Edward

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Analysis for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from the Thermaikos Gulf, Greece  

SciTech Connect

The Thermaikos Gulf area is suspected of being contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. A total of 57 samples were analyzed as follows: 29 from the western area (industrial) and 28 from the eastern area (agricultural) of the Gulf. All samples examined were found to be contaminated. The levels detected ranged from trace to 13 ng/g (wet weight, drained). Seven of the samples examined contained benzo(a)pyrene at an average level of 1 ng/g. Dibenzo(a,i)pyrene was found at trace levels in a small proportion of samples. Another compound, benzo(a)anthracene, was found in 19 samples at concentrations ranging from 2 ng/g to 42 ng/g. Dibenzo(a,h)pyrene was not found in any of the samples analyzed. On the basis of the above data, the concentration of total PAH in mussels of the Thermaikos Gulf amounted to 91 ng/g (wet weight) and those of the carcinogenic PAH counted to 19 ng/g. (JMT)

Iosifidou, H.G.; Kilikidis, S.D.; Kamarianos, A.P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Advanced research in coal gasification process modification technology: catalytic cracking of aromatic hydrocarbons. Topical report, 1 October 1984-31 June 1985  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to screen inexpensive materials for potential use as disposable aromatic hydrocarbon (AHC) cracking catalysts in the reaction zone of the coal gasifier or in a fixed bed downstream from the gasifier. The approach is based on the conclusions reported in the literature that iron in a reduced state is an effective catalyst for AHC destruction. It therefore follows that chars or minerals with high iron content, high porosity, and high internal surface area will provide the most effective catalysts. We have screened all six of the following iron containing minerals: Siderite, Ankerite, Hematite, Magnetite, Pyrite, and Jarosite. The experimental tests measure the catalytic activity of these minerals for cracking benzene over the parameter range relevant to coal gasifier operation. Simulated coal gas containing 200 to 2000 ppM of model aromatic molecules will be used in all experiments and destruction of benzene will be measured over the temperature range 400 to 1000/sup 0/C. The porosity and surface area of these minerals (partially decomposed in coal gas) will be determined and utilized in a computer model describing pore structure, species transport and surface chemistry to interpret the reactivity data in terms of the intrinsic reactivity of the reduced state of each mineral. These results will provide a basis for catalyst selection, coal selection and economic comparison. 3 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Simons, G.A.; Ham, D.A.; Moniz, G.A.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Copenhaver, Sally C. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Estimation method for the thermochemical properties of polycyclic aromatic molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic molecules, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have attracted considerable attention in the past few decades. They are formed during the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and are ...

Yu, Joanna

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure in northwest Gulf of Mexico marine fish and invertebrates: indicators of offshore petroleum contamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higher molecular weight Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) associated with crude oil induce CYPIAI gene expression, and this response has been utilized as a biomarker of exposure to PAHs in aquatic and marine environments. Several benthic marine fish and invertebrates were collected in the vicinity of offshore petroleum platforms in the northwest Gulf of Mexico and subdivided with respect to distance from the platforms (i.e. "near", 3000 m). Hepatic tissues were analyzed for CYPIAI MRNA levels using a CDNA probe derived from rainbow trout, and ethoxyresorufin-0-deethylase (EROD) activity (a CYPIAI response) was also determined in the fish species. Invertebrate exposure to PAHs was estimated by determining the dose-dependent induction of EROD activity by invertebrate extracts in rat hepatoma H-4-IIE cells. CYPIAI MRNA levels and EROD activity were detected in all species, though the relative response intensities were low, indicating minimal PAH contamination at these sites. Intensities of the MRNA bands did not correlate with EROD activity in the same fish species. The results indicated that there were no consistent differences between the near and far stations as expected for a contaminant gradient. Interestingly, the CYPIAI MRNA data exhibited some inter-and intraspecies differences, suggesting genetic differences in this gene in various fish species. Bioanalysis of invertebrate extracts in rat hepatoma H-4-IIE cells also indicated low PAH contamination at the study sites. All three assays were sensitive indicators of PAH contamination.

Erickson, Cynthia Marie

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Adequacy of benzo(a)pyrene and benzene soluble materials as indicators of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a Sderberg aluminum smelter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Occupational and environmental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) occurs as a complex mixture that is evaluated using specific components, such as benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and benzene soluble materials (BSM). Factors that influence the relationship between BaP, BSM, and other PAHs within an aluminum smelter were investigated. Personal samples collected from 1978 to 2001 were used. Differences in the log-transformed ratios (PAH/BaP, BaP/BSM) due to anode paste composition, pot group, season, and job were examined using linear regression. In linear regression, 27% of the variability in the log-transformed BaP/BSM ratio was explained by coal tar pitch, work area, and job; no seasonal or pot group differences were observed. Within the potrooms, BaP was very strongly correlated with other PAHs (majority 0.9). Depending on the PAH, between 23% and 89% of the variability in the log-transformed PAH/BSM was explained by season, coal tar pitch, pot group, and job. The BaP toxic equivalency factors of the mixture varied more across job (2.1-3.5) than across coal tar pitch source (1.8-2.8) or pot group (2.3-2.5). Seasonal and work area differences in the relationship between BaP and other PAHs have not been reported previously.

Friesen, M.C.; Demers, P.A.; Spinelli, J.J.; Le, N.D. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). School of Occupational & Environmental Hygiene

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission profiles and removal efficiency by electrostatic precipitator and wetfine scrubber in an iron ore sintering plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A monitoring campaign of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl was carried out in an Italian iron ore sintering plant by sampling the combustion gases at the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) outlet, at the Wetfine scrubber (WS) outlet, and by collecting the ESP dust. Few data are available on these micropollutants produced in iron ore sintering plants, particularly from Italian plants. This study investigates the PAH emission profiles and the removal efficiency of ESPs and WS. PAHs were determined at the stack, ESP outlet flue gases, and in ESP dust to characterize the emission profiles and the performance of the ESP and the WS for reducing PAH emission. The 11 PAHs monitored are listed in the Italian legislative decree 152/2006. The mean total PAH sum concentration in the stack flue gases is 3.96 {mu}g/N m{sup 3}, in ESP outlet flue gases is 9.73 {mu}g/N m{sup 3}, and in ESP dust is 0.53 {mu}g/g. Regarding the emission profiles, the most abundant compound is benzo(b)fluoranthene, which has a relative low BaP toxic equivalency factors (TEF) value, followed by dibenzo(a,l)pyrene, which has a very high BaP(TEF) value. The emission profiles in ESP dust and in the flue gases after the ESP show some changes, whereas the fingerprint in ESP and stack flue gases is very similar. The removal efficiency of the ESP and of WS on the total PAH concentration is 5.2 and 59.5%, respectively. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Ettore Guerriero; Antonina Lutri; Rosanna Mabilia; Maria Concetta Tomasi Sciano; Mauro Rotatori [Istituto sull'Inquinamento Atmosferico, Monterotondo Scalo (Italy). Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions data are often lacking or uncertain for many airborne contaminants. Chemicals, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), emitted from combustion sources, fall into this category. Currently available ambient-air emission inventories of PAHs either fail to account for population-based activities (such as residential wood combustion and motor vehicle activity) and/or report ''total PAH'' or particulate organic matter emissions instead of individual compounds. We measure the degree of overlap between predicted concentrations from estimated emissions with measured concentrations. Our analysis is, based on probabilistic analysis of measured outdoor air concentrations with those predicted from mass-balance models. Based on available information, we estimate the relative magnitude of emissions from four major sources of PAHs to outdoor air- (1) on-road motor vehicles, including light-duty gasoline vehicles and diesel-powered buses and medium and heavy duty trucks; (2) residential wood combustion; and (3) power generation from external combustion boilers. We use the CalTOX regional multimedia mass-balance model to evaluate our emissions estimates in rural and urban regions of the state of Minnesota, USA. We compare model estimates of outdoor PAH airborne concentrations with those reported by the Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (MNCPES). With these measured concentrations we probabilistically evaluate our emissions and interpret the reliability of our emissions estimates for specific PAHs. The median estimates of our predicted outdoor air concentrations agree within an order of magnitude of measured concentrations. For four representative PAHs, we were able to obtain a reasonable degree of overlap between empirical and predicted distributions of outdoor air concentrations. Our combination of models, emissions estimates, and empirical concentration data estimate exposure in a manner that is more reliable than any of these tools alone. Thereby, we increase our confidence about our plausible ranges of emissions and predicted concentrations.

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A 700 year sediment record of black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons near the EMEP air monitoring station in Aspvreten, Sweden  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of poor constraints on historical combustion emissions, past environmental loadings of black carbon (BC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) were reconstructed from dated lake sediment cores collected 70 km south of Stockholm, Sweden. Compared to several dramatic variations over the recent 150 years, the preindustrial loadings were steady within {+-}50% through the entire medieval with BC fluxes of 0.071 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} and PAH fluxes of 6 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}. In the wood-burning dominated century leading up to the industrial revolution around 1850, increasing BC fluxes were leading PAH fluxes. BC fluxes reached their millennial-scale maximum around 1920, whereas PAH fluxes increased exponentially to its record maximum around 1960, 50-fold above preindustrial values. For 1920-1950, BC fluxes consistently decreased as PAH fluxes kept increasing. Coal and coke represented >50% of the Swedish energy market in the 1930s. Combined with sharply decreasing (1,7-)/(1,7{+-}2,6-dimethylphenanthrene), indicative of diminishing wood combustion, and decreasing methylphenanthrenes/phenanthrene, indicative of higher-temperature combustion (coal instead of wood), the sediment archive suggests that the relative BC/PAH emission factors thus are lower for coal than for wood combustion. For the first time, both BC and PAH fluxes decreased after 1960. This trend break is a testament to the positive effects of decreasing reliance on petroleum fuels and a number of legislative actions aimed at curbing emissions and by 1990, the loading of BC was back at preindustrial levels, whereas that of PAH were the lowest since the 1910s. However, for the most recent period (1990-2004) the BC and PAH fluxes are no longer decreasing. 55 refs., 3 figs.

Marie Elmquist; Zdenek Zencak; Oerjan Gustafsson [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Applied Environmental Science

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Monitored natural attenuation of manufactured gas plant tar mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ground water: a 14-year field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site 24 was the subject of a 14-year (5110-day) study of a ground water plume created by the disposal of manufactured gas plant (MGP) tar into a shallow sandy aquifer approximately 25 years prior to the study. The ground water plume in 1988 extended from a well-defined source area to a distance of approximately 400 m down gradient. A system of monitoring wells was installed along six transects that ran perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the plume centerline. The MGP tar source was removed from the site in 1991 and a 14-year ground water monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study commenced. The program measured the dissolved mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs) periodically over time, which decreased significantly over the 14-year period. Naphthalene decreased to less than 99% of the original dissolved mass, with mass degradation rates of 0.30 per year (half-life 2.3 years). Bulk attenuation rate constants for plume centerline concentrations over time ranged from 0.33 {+-} 0.09 per year (half-life 2.3 {+-} 0.8 years) for toluene and 0.45 {+-} 0.06 per year (half-life 1.6 {+-} 0.2 years) for naphthalene. The hydrogeologic setting at Site 24, having a sandy aquifer, shallow water table, clay confining layer, and aerobic conditions, was ideal for demonstrating MNA. However, these results demonstrate that MNA is a viable remedial strategy for ground water at sites impacted by MAHs and PAHs after the original source is removed, stabilized, or contained.

Neuhauser, E.F.; Ripp, J.A.; Azzolina, N.A.; Madsen, E.L.; Mauro, D.M.; Taylor, T. [Foth Infrastructure & Environment LLC, Green Bay, WI (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Stable carbon isotope ratio of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment: validation of isolation and stable carbon isotope analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous, toxic contaminants that are released to the environment from various petrogenic and pyrogenic sources. In an effort to more clearly identify and trace sources of PAHs in the environment, purification and compound specific isotope analysis methods were developed to accurately measure the stable carbon isotope ratio of individual PAHs. Development of the method included improving accuracy and precision of the isotopic measurement by producing highly pure extracts using various chromatographic techniques. The method was refined by improving compound separations using purification techniques and high resolution chromatographic columns. The purification method consists of alumina/silica gel column chromatography, gel permeation chromatography and thin layer chromatography. The mean recovery of PAHs after the purification procedure was approximately 80 %. Sample purities after purification were verified by GC/FID and full scan mass spectrometry. To better resolve peaks and provide more accurate stable carbon isotope measurements, various gas chromatographic conditions were evaluated. The precision of the method ranged between 0.08 and 0.43 . The analytical protocols were evaluated to confirm compositional and stable isotopic integrity during purification and stable isotopic analysis. To confirm the utility of the purification and isotope analysis methods, various environmental samples from marine, land and lacustrine environments were analyzed. The isolates were analyzed for the composition and the stable carbon isotope ratios of PAHs. The stable carbon isotope ratio was measured by GC/IRMS and the results, along with quantitative compound compositions, were used to characterize and identify the contaminant sources. The sources of the PAHs in the study areas were differentiated by PAH molecular ratios and confirmed by stable carbon isotope ratios. This study confirms that compound specific isotope analysis of pollutants by GC/IRMS can be used to identify PAH sources in environmental samples. The study also confirms that the purification and stable carbon isotope analysis methods that were developed can be used to accurately measure the stable carbon isotope ratios of PAHs in environmental samples for the purpose of source identification. GC/IRMS measurement of stable isotopic compositions can be an effective fingerprinting method when used in conjunction with traditional molecular composition methods.

Kim, Moon Koo

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Structure Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Naphthalene 4 1,2-(1,8-Naphthalenediyl)benzene 18 Naphthalin 4 ... Structure Name Formula MW L/B CAS# 1 Benzene 78 1.099 1 2 3 4 5 6 CH6 6 ...

54

Catalysts for hydrocarbon conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalyst, particularly useful in catalytic reforming and for producing highly pure aromatic hydrocarbons, comprising an alumina carrier and containing, expressed in proportion of the weight of the alumina carrier: 005 to 1% of platinum 01 to 4% of gallium, indium or thallium 01 to 2% of tungsten, and 1 to 10% of halogen.

Le P. J.; Malmaison, R.; Marcilly, C.; Martino, G.; Miquel, J.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Presentations  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Presentations Presentations Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Seeing Matter Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Presentations Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Provided here are selected presentations given by the Director of BES since 2001 and some other related presentations. These are often large Powerpoint

56

Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| pdf | 11 MB Present and Future Computing Requirements for Daya Bay Doug Toussaint: Lattice QCD and NERSC requirements November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Doug Toussaint, University...

57

Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Craig Tull: Present and Future Computing Requirements for Daya Bay November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Craig Tull (LBNL) | Download File: CraigTull20121127Dayabay.pdf | pdf | 11 MB...

58

PRESENT:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PUBLIC MEETING PUBLIC MEETING + + + + + FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14, 1997 + + + + + WASHINGTON, D.C. The Committee met in the Clark Room of the Capital Holiday Inn, 550 C Street, S.W., at 10:30 a.m., G. Campbell Watkins, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: G. CAMPBELL WATKINS, Chair DANIEL A. RELLES, Vice Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE R. SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE BRENDA G. COX CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD PHILIP HANSEN CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG ROY W. WHITMORE INVITED GUESTS: SEYMOUR SUDMAN RICHARD TABORS EIA STAFF PRESENT: JAY HAKES, EIA Administrator BILL WEINIG LYNDA CARLSON DAVID MOREHOUSE JOHN WOOD ART ANDERSON BOB MANICKE I N D E X Item: Page: World Oil Supply; Evidence from 4 Estimating Supply Functions by Country Questions from the Committee 54 Public Comments 62 Closing Comments by the Chair 67 P-R-O-C-E-E-D-I-N-G-S

59

Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cameron Geddes: Plasma Accelerator Simulation Using Laser and Particle Cameron Geddes: Plasma Accelerator Simulation Using Laser and Particle Beam Drivers Author(s): Cameron Geddes (LBNL) | Download File: Geddes-LPA.pdf | pdf | 7.5 MB Plasma Accelerator Simulation Using Laser and Particle Beam Drivers Liz Sexton---Kennedy: Present and Future Computing Requirements for CMS and ATLAS November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Liz Sexton---Kennedy (Fermilab) | Download File: LHC-Sexton-Kennedy.pdf | pdf | 638 KB Present and Future Computing Requirements for CMS and ATLAS Rob Roser and Tom LeCompte: Detector Simulations using GEANT 4 November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Rob Roser (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) and Tom LeCompte (ANL) | Download File: ROSER-NERSC.pdf | pdf | 2.2 MB Detector Simulations using GEANT 4 Scott Dodelson: The Dark Energy Survey (DES)

60

Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Goals & Process Meeting Goals & Process December 26, 2012 | Author(s): Harvey Wasserman | Download File: LogisticsHarveyWasserman.pdf | pdf | 1.3 MB Meeting Goals & Process Liz Sexton---Kennedy: Present and Future Computing Requirements for CMS and ATLAS November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Liz Sexton---Kennedy (Fermilab) | Download File: LHC-Sexton-Kennedy.pdf | pdf | 638 KB Present and Future Computing Requirements for CMS and ATLAS Rob Roser and Tom LeCompte: Detector Simulations using GEANT 4 November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Rob Roser (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) and Tom LeCompte (ANL) | Download File: ROSER-NERSC.pdf | pdf | 2.2 MB Detector Simulations using GEANT 4 Scott Dodelson: The Dark Energy Survey (DES) November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Scott Dodelson (Fermilab) | Source: The Dark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Role in Biological and Environmental Research NERSC Role in Biological and Environmental Research September 12, 2012 | Author(s): Kathy Yelick | Download File: NERSC-BER-Yelick.ppt | ppt | 35 MB Present and Future Computing Requirements for Computational Prediction of Protein-DNA Binding September 12, 2012 | Author(s): Mohammed AlQuraishi | Download File: AlQuraishi.pdf | pdf | 1 MB KBASE: Data and Modeling for Predictive Biology September 12, 2012 | Author(s): Tom Brettin and Shane Canon | Download File: KBaseBrettin.pdf | pdf | 5.9 MB DOE Joint Genome Institute September 11, 2012 | Download File: JGI.pdf | pdf | 8.4 MB 20th Century Reanalysis September 11, 2012 | Author(s): Gil Compo | Download File: Compo.pdf | pdf | 2.4 MB Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Dynamics and Lignocellulosic Biomass

62

Presented  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

l* l* t , f , q.o Presented at the 20th International Pyrotechnics Seminar Colorado Springs, Colorado July 24-29, 1994 COMMENTS ON TNT EQUIVALENCE Paul W. Cooper Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico U.S.A. 87185-1156 ABSTRACT The term "TNT Equivalence" is used throughout the explosives and related industries to compare the effects of the output of a given explosive to that of TNT. This is done for technical design reasons in scaling calculations such as for the prediction of blast waves, craters, and structural response, and is also used as a basis for government regulations controlling the shipping, handling and storage Of explosive materials, as well as for the siting and design of explosive facilities. TNT equivalence is determined experimentally by several different types of tests, the most common of which include: plate dent, ballistic mortar, trauzl,

63

Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Dynamics and Lignocellulosic Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Dynamics and Lignocellulosic Biomass September 11, 2012 | Download File: PetridisNERSC12.pdf | pdf | 2.8 MB Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport September 11, 2012 | Author(s): Tim Scheibe | Download File: Scheibe.pdf | pdf | 7.5 MB 20th Century Reanalysis September 11, 2012 | Author(s): Gil Compo | Download File: Compo.pdf | pdf | 2.4 MB Present and Future Computing Requirements for Computational Prediction of Protein-DNA Binding September 12, 2012 | Author(s): Mohammed AlQuraishi | Download File: AlQuraishi.pdf | pdf | 1 MB Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future September 11, 2012 | Author(s): David Bader | Download File: CSSEFBader.pdf | pdf | 21 MB KBASE: Data and Modeling for Predictive Biology September 12, 2012 | Author(s): Tom Brettin and Shane Canon |

64

Presenters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 16 October 16 Presenters 7:30 Registration 8:30 Welcome Remarks Pilar Thomas, Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Introductions All 9:00 DOE Tribal Grant Program Overview Lizana Pierce, Department of Energy, Golden Field Office Alaska START Program Overview Alex Dane, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Denali Commission Overview Joel Niemeyer, Denali Commission 9:45 Pathways to Native Village Energy Development Village Energy Planning and Project Development Pilar Thomas, DOE Office of Indian Energy 10:30 -- Break 11:00 Native Village Energy Planning Community Project Development Principles Alex Dane (Moderator), NREL Tribal Energy Planning for the Organized Village of Kasaan Glenn "Stormy" Hamar , Organized Village of Kasaan

65

FUSING PORPHYRINS WITH POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND ...  

... fusion of one or more polycyclic rings or heterocyclic rings to the non-activated porphyrin core in meso,.beta. fashion is achieved, resulting in ...

66

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in urban soils ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

yards, coking plants, power plants, chemical plants, urban parks, university ...... Barrie LA, Gregor DJ, Hargrave B, Lake R, Muir D, Shearer R, Tracy. B, Bidleman ...

67

Chlorinated Aromatic Hydrocarbons Dr. K. Squibb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- cement kilns - iron ore sintering, steel production and scrap metal recovery #12;Polychlorinated banned in 1977 For use in: electrical capacitors and transformers (977 kg/transformer) heat exchangers: Very stable, chemically and thermally Resistant to acids and alkalis Excellent conductor of heat Low

Kane, Andrew S.

68

Extraction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Triethylene Glycol ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

introduced in LG 35-8/300B benzene reforming unit. (Kirishinefteorgsintez Production Association). The sulfolane content in the extractant was gradually brought...

69

Photophysical Properties of Protonated Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a cloud at 10­15 km and HT intermediate size range. Hayashi et al. (1998) showed induced by Kelvin waves. Comstock et al. (2002) analyzed the same data over 7 months, includ- ing instrument. Particles in the ambient air are guided by a pump through the beams of laser diodes transmitting

Blake, Geoffrey

70

Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes  

SciTech Connect

Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for a combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts. 19 figs.

Frei, H.; Blatter, F.; Sun, H.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

75

Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Transition-Metal Systems  

SciTech Connect

Aromaticity is an important concept in chemistry primarily for hydrocarbon compounds, but it has been extended to compounds containing transition-metal atoms. Recent findings of aromaticity and antiaromaticy in all-metal clusters have stimulated further researches in describing the chemical bonding, structures, and stability in transition-metal clusters and compounds on the basis of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, which are reviewed here. The presence of d-orbitals endows much more diverse chemistry, structure, and chemical bonding to transition-metal clusters and compounds. One interesting feature is the existence of a new type of ?-aromaticity, in addition to ?- and ?-aromaticity that are only possible for main group compounds. Another striking characteristic in the chemical bonding of transition-metal systems is the multi-fold nature of aromaticity, antiaromaticity, or even conflicting aromaticity. Separate sets of counting rules have been proposed for cyclic transition-metal systems to account for the three types of ?-, ?-, and ?-aromaticity/antiaromaticity. The diverse transition-metal clusters and compounds reviewed here indicate that multiple aromaticity and antiaromaticity may be much more common in chemistry than one would anticipate. It is hoped that the current review will stimulate interest in further understanding the structure and bonding, on the basis of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, of other known or unknown transition-metal systems, such as the active sites of enzymes or other biomolecules, which contain transition-metal atoms and clusters.

Zubarev, Dmitry Y.; Averkiev, Boris B.; Zhai, Hua Jin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

SciTech Connect

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

78

: Plasma-Hydrocarbon conversion  

crude oil and hydrocarbon gases like natural gas, into lighter hydrocarbon materials (e.g. synthetic light oil).

79

Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

80

Make aromatics from LPG  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) consists mainly of the propane and butane fraction recovered from gas fields, associated petroleum gas and refinery operations. Apart from its use in steam cracking and stream reforming, LPG has few petrochemical applications. The relative abundance of LPG and the strong demand for aromatics - benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) - make it economically attractive to produce aromatics via the aromatization of propane and butanes. This paper describes the Cyclar process, which is based on a catalyst formulation developed by BP and which uses UOP's CCR catalyst regeneration technology, converts propane, butanes or mixtures thereof to petrochemical-quality aromatics in a single step.

Doolan, P.C. (BP Exploration Co. Ltd., London (GB)); Pujado, P.R. (UOP, Des Plaines, IL (US))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Process for converting light alkanes to higher hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the production of aromatic-rich, gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons from the lower alkanes, particularly from methane. The process is carried out in two stages. In the first, alkane is reacted with oxygen and hydrogen chloride over an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst such as copper chloride with minor proportions of potassium chloride and rare earth chloride. This produces an intermediate gaseous mixture containing water and chlorinated alkanes. The chlorinated alkanes are contacted with a crystalline aluminosilicate catalyst in the hydrogen or metal promoted form to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons with a high proportion of aromatics and a small percentage of light hydrocarbons (C.sub.2 -C.sub.4). The light hydrocarbons can be recycled for further processing over the oxyhydrochlorination catalyst.

Noceti, Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Taylor, Charles E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Removing the Hydrocarbon from Hydrocarbon Flow ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gas and petroleum products. Therefore is important to have primary calibration standards with low uncertainty. NIST has several hydrocarbon liquid ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

83

Preignition oxidation characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results obtained from a static reactor are presented for the oxidation of a variety of fuels. Pressure and temperature histories of the reacting fuel/oxidizer mixtures were obtained. Measurements of the stable reaction intermediate and product species were made using gas chromatographic analysis. One aspect of this work involved detailed studies of the oxidation chemistry of relatively low molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons: propane, propene, and n-butane. The oxidation chemistry of these fuels was examined at temperatures in the range 550-750 K, equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 4.0 and at subatmospheric pressures. The main characteristics and features of the oxidation mechanisms were determined for each fuel in each temperature regime. The experimental results from propene and propane were used to develop a low and intermediate temperature kinetic mechanism for these fuels based on a low temperature acetaldehyde mechanism of Kaiser et al. and a high temperature propene/propane mechanism of Westbrook and Pitz. General preignition characteristics of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons and binary mixtures of these fuels were also studied. The low temperature/cool flame ignition characteristics of dodecane were investigated at temperatures in the range 523-623 K, equivalence s ranging from 0.8 to 1.0 and at subatmospheric pressures. The preignition characteristics of binary mixtures of dodecane and the aromatic component tetralin were examined. The addition of the tetralin had the overall effect of decreasing the ignition tendency of the mixture, although this effect was nonlinear with respect to the amount of tetralin added.

Wilk, R.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

FROZEN HYDROCARBONS IN COMETS  

SciTech Connect

Recent investigations of the luminescence of frozen hydrocarbon particles of icy cometary halos have been carried out. The process of luminescence of organic icy particles in a short-wavelength solar radiation field is considered. A comparative analysis of observed and laboratory data leads to 72 luminescent emission lines in the spectrum of the comet 153P/Ikeya-Zhang. The concept of cometary relict matter is presented, and the creation of a database of unidentified cometary emission lines is proposed.

Simonia, Irakli, E-mail: irakli.simonia@jcu.edu.au [School of Graduate Studies, Ilia State University, 3/5 Cholokashvili Street, Tbilisi, 0162 (Georgia); Center for Astronomy, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811 (Australia)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Hydrocarbon adsorption apparatus and process  

SciTech Connect

A method of recovering hydrocarbons from natural gas by the use of solid adsorbents consists of 3 steps. The main flow stream of natural gas is passed through a first and only bed of solid adsorbent so that at least a portion of the hydrocarbons present is adsorbed in the bed. A heated regeneration gas is next passed through a second bed of solid adsorbent so that at least a portion of the hydrocarbons is desorbed from the bed. The main flow of natural gas is passed through the second and only bed when in a heated condition after regeneration and the flow of heated regeneration gas is passed through the first bed. The hydrocarbons desorbed from the first and second beds from the regeneration gas are recovered while the previous 3 steps are repeated. (6 claims)

Humphries, C.L.

1966-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

87

UV Irradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

abundant and widespread class of carbon-car- rying gaseous species is believed to be PAHs (3­5). In dense divided between the hydro

88

Cyclodehydrogenation Reactions to Cyclopentafused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Angela Violi*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to simulate the adsorption process. The adsorption mechanism of metal ammine complexes over silica.D. Gonzalzez, Catal. Today 5 (1989) 395. [56] H.-Y. Lin, Y.-W. Chen, Thermochim. Acta 419 (2004) 283. [57] J

Violi, Angel

89

RESPIRATORY DISEASES Prenatal ambient air exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Charlie Matulka, who lost to Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska the same year, does not trust the results- counting machines, which happen to have been manufactured by a company Mr. Hagel used to run. Mr. Matulka, against Mr. Matulka, he won more than 80 percent of the vote. What gets conspiracy theorists excited

90

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from fossil fuel conversion processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Benzo(a)pyrene continues to be the most widely accepted indicator of PAH content and biological significance. The concentrations of BaP in synfuels related materials are summarized. Petroleum crude is estimated to contain approximately 1 ppM of BaP. Both shale- and coal-derived crudes contain approximately three times as much BaP. Depending on the source (coal, process, process conditions), coal-derived crude oils contain BaP ranging from the same amount as petroleum crudes to ten times as much. High boiling distillates and distillate residues are generally enriched in BaP content as should be expected. While enriched in BaP relative to petroleum crudes, coal-derived crude oils contain two to three times less BaP than do coal tar, coal tar pitch, and petroleum pitch. Mutagenic activity is observed in the PAH fractions containing three-ring PAHs to those containing PAHs greater than five rings in size. The specific activity tends to ''peak'' for the 4-ring and 5-ring fractions, i.e., those containing the most common (benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(c)phenanthrene, 3-methylcholanthrene, etc.) known carcinogens. Of particular interest is the observation that fractions corresponding to PAHs of 4-rings and larger contain constituents which do not require metabolic activation to express histidine reversion. It is also important to note that mutagenicity of the fraction is produced by at most 4-12 wt % (depending on whether enzyme activation is employed) of its constituents.

Guerin, M R; Epler, J L; Griest, W H; Clark, B R; Rao, T K

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Formation mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in methane flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exhausts,7­17 coal-fired, electricity generating power plants,18,19 tobacco smoke,20 residential wood applications including heating systems and gas turbines for electric power generation.62­64 The combustion propane,57,58 butane,59 ethane,31,53,60 and other aliphatic61 flames. Methane is used as fuel in many

Sattler, Klaus

92

Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting lignin into high-quality reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline compositions in high yields is disclosed. The process is a two-stage, catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage, a lignin material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction in the presence of a supercritical alcohol as a reaction medium, to thereby produce a depolymerized lignin product. In the second stage, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to a sequential two-step hydroprocessing reaction to produce a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product. In the first hydroprocessing step, the depolymerized lignin is contacted with a hydrodeoxygenation catalyst to produce a hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product. In the second hydroprocessing step, the hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product is contacted with a hydrocracking/ring hydrogenation catalyst to produce the reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product which includes various desirable naphthenic and paraffinic compounds.

Shabtai, Joseph S. (Salt Lake City, UT); Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W. (Salt Lake City, UT); Chornet, Esteban (Golden, CO)

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

93

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE)

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

1984-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

95

Enhanced solubility of petroleum hydrocarbons using biosurfactants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigation included two similarly-designed experiments. In the first, a biological surfactant produced by Rhodococcus strain H13-A and a commonly-used synthetic surfactant, Tween-80 (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate), were compared for their effectiveness in enhancing the transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a complex organic phase into aqueous solution. In the batch-reactor experiment, each reactor contained a surfactant solution and West Texas Crude oil, while the control reactors contained distilled-deionized water and the crude oil. Using a temporal-monitoring scheme, the reactors were sacrificially sampled to determine the water-accommodated fraction (WAF). The phenanthrenes, fluorenes, pyrenes, and chrysenes showed significant increases in their aqueous-plus-micellar-phase concentrations in the presence of surfactants; the increase was greater for the biosurfactant compared to the synthetic surfactant. The enhancement in "solubility" was also more significant for the highly-substituted aromatics, when compared to their parent compounds. In the second study, the effects of four biosurfactants on the solubility of petroleum saturated hydrocarbons were compared. Rhodococcus species H13-A (glycolipid-producing), Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 (rhamnolipid-producing), Candida bombicola ATCC 22214 (sophorolipid-producing), and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 21332 (surfactin-producing) were compared to a control of distilled-deionized water. The experimental design was similar that of the first study. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa treatment significantly enhanced the solubility of the lower-weight, higher-weight and branched saturated hydrocarbons. The Rhodococcus treatment significantly enhanced the solubility of the low-molecular-weight compounds, but only moderately increased the solubilities of the other saturates. Neither the Candida nor the Bacillus solutions produced any negligible increase in solubility under these laboratory conditions.

Page, Cheryl Ann

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Conversion of methane and acetylene into gasoline range hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of methane and acetylene to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons over zeolite catalyst (HZSM-5) was studied The reaction between methane and acetylene successfully produced high molecular weight hydrocarbons, such as naphthalene, benzene, indene, azulene, fluorene, and biphenyl substituted compounds. Also, lighter hydrocarbons, such as ethylene and isobutene were produced. The reaction was conducted at different operating temperatures and different molar feed composition. The results showed that the conversion of both reactants increased with increasing the operating temperature; for example a conversion of 95.1% was achieved for acetylene at 350C and 98.6% at 412C. In addition, the conversion of both reactants decreased with increasing the molar feed ratio of methane to acetylene. A conversion of 96.4% for acetylene was achieved at a molar feed ratio of 6 to 1 (methane to acetylene) and 80.9% at a molar feed ration of 20 to 1 (methane to acetylene). The reaction of methane and ethane over HZSM-5 catalyst also led to the production of high molecular weight hydrocarbons, mainly aromatics, and some lighter products such as propane, and ethylene. Also methane by itself showed the ability to react over HZSM-5 to produce a small amount of aromatics, and ethylene.

Alkhawaldeh, Ammar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis for the Production of the Hydrocarbon Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising technique for conversion of biomass into hydrocarbons for use as transportation fuels. For over 30 years this process has been studied and it has been demonstrated that oils can be produced with high concentrations of hydrocarbons and low levels of oxygen. However, the yields from this type of conversion are typically low and the catalysts, which are often zeolites, are quickly deactivated through coking. In addition, the hydrocarbons produced are primarily aromatic molecules (benzene, toluene, xylene) that not desirable for petroleum refineries and are not well suited for diesel or jet engines. The goals of our research are to develop new multifunction catalysts for the production of gasoline, diesel and jet fuel range molecules and to improve process conditions for higher yields and low coking rates. We are investigating filtration and the use of hydrogen donor molecules to improve catalyst performance.

Nimlos, M. R.; Robichaud, D. J.; Mukaratate, C.; Donohoe, B. S.; Iisa, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fuel-flexible partial oxidation reforming of hydrocarbons for automotive applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Micro-reactor tests indicate that our partial oxidation catalyst is fuel-flexible and can reform conventional (gasoline and diesel) and alternative (ethanol, methanol, natural gas) fuels to hydrogen rich product gases with high hydrogen selectivity. Alcohols are reformed at lower temperatures (< 600 C) while alkanes and unsaturated hydrocarbons require slightly higher temperatures. Cyclic hydrocarbons and aromatics have also been reformed at relatively low temperatures, however, a different mechanism appears to be responsible for their reforming. Complex fuels like gasoline and diesel, which are mixtures of a broad range of hydrocarbons, require temperatures of > 700 C for maximum hydrogen production.

Ahmed, S.; Carter, J. D.; Kopasz, J. P.; Krumpelt, M.; Wilkenhoener, R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Solubilization of petroleum hydrocarbons using biosurfactants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low solubility of petroleum hydrocarbons in water is the major factor limiting the degradation rates of these compounds (Zhang and Miller, 1994). The fraction that is more soluble in the aqueous phase is degraded at higher rates, while less soluble or insoluble compounds have lower degradation rates due to limited bioavailability to the microbial community. A recent study in our lab found no significant degradation of weathered petroleum at a Texas petrochemical plant site. It was concluded that bioavailability of the crude oil to the microorganisms limited the degradation rates (Mills, 1994). Preliminary experiments at our laboratories have also indicated enhanced solubilities of petroleum hydrocarbons due to the effects of biosurfactants (Kanga et al., 1994). This research focused on biosurfactants because they have been shown to be as effective as chemical surfactants and, most importantly, they enhance biodegradation. Glycolipid biosurfactants are produced by Rhodococcus species HI 3-A to enhance substrate solubility and promote bioavailability for degradation. The work proceeded in two stages. The initial stage involved production and characterization of extracellular biosurfactants by HI 3-A when grown on minimal salts media with hexadecane as the carbon source. The second stage evaluated the performance of the biosurfactants in enhancing the aqueous solubility of weathered West Texas Crude. Initial results indicated production of the biosurfactants by Rhodococcus species H13-A during the stationary growth stage. Biosurfactants lowered the surface tension from 72 to-30 dynes/cm and interfacial tension to below 5 dynes/cm. The two-, three-, and four-ring aromatic compounds showed substantial increase in their aqueous phase concentrations in the presence of biosurfactants. The enhancement was more dramatic with the larger aromatics and also the highly substituted-compounds. Preliminary experiments on toxicity and biodegradation indicated higher levels of toxicity in the surfactant/aqueous mixtures due to increased PAH partitioning (Lambert, 1995), and increased degradation rates for the target PAH compounds.

Kanga, Shahrukh

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hydrocarbon adsorption system  

SciTech Connect

In a solid adsorbent hydrocarbon recovery system for processing natural gas, towers adapted for performing adsorbing, cooling, and regenerating functions are used. It is recommended that a regeneration gas be used of substantially uniform richness in hydrocarbons in the closed-cycle regeneration system. The natural gas stream is flowed through an adsorbent bed to remove liquid hydrocarbons. A portion of the stripped gas stream is flowed through a second adsorbent bed for cooling purposes. A heated, rich, regeneration gas is circulated through a closed-cycle regeneration system that includes a third adsorbent bed. This rich regeneration gas is combined with the stripped gas stream. These steps are repeated in a cyclic operation. (10 claims)

Humphries, C.L.

1966-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

102

The aromatic infrared bands as seen by ISO-SWS: probing the PAH model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the Aromatic Infrared Band (AIB) profiles observed by ISO-SWS towards a number of bright interstellar regions where dense molecular gas is illuminated by stellar radiation. Our sample spans a broad range of excitation conditions (exciting radiation fields with effective temperature, Teff, ranging from 23,000 to 45,000 K). The SWS spectra are decomposed coherently in our sample into Lorentz profiles and a broadband continuum. We find that the individual profiles of the main AIBs at 3.3, 6.2, 8.6 and 11.3 microns are well represented with at most two lorentzians. Furthermore, we show that the positions and widths of these AIBs are remarkably stable (within a few cm-1). We then extract the profiles of individual AIBs from the data and compare them to a model of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) cation emission which includes the temperature dependence of the AIB profiles. The present similarity of the AIB profiles requires that the PAH temperature distribution remains roughly the same whatever the radiation field hardness. Deriving the temperature distribution of interstellar PAHs, we show that its hot tail, which controls the AIB spectrum, sensitively depends on Nmin (the number of C-atoms in the smallest PAH) and Teff. Comparing the observed profiles of the individual AIBs to our model results, we can match most of the AIB profiles if Nmin is increased with Teff. We then discuss our results in the broader context of ISO observations of fainter interstellar regions where PAHs are expected to be in neutral form.

L. Verstraete; C. Pech; Claire Moutou; K. Sellgren; C. M. Wright; M. Giard; A. Leger; R. Timmermann; S. Drapatz

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hydrocarbon/Total Combustibles Sensor  

the invention is an electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor that is more reliable and reproducible than any other hydrocarbon sensor on the market today. The patented method for producing the sensor ensures reproducibility and reduces the need for ...

104

Method for recovery of hydrocarbon material from hydrocarbon material-bearing formations  

SciTech Connect

A method is disclosed for heating a hydrocarbon material contained in a recovery zone in an underground hydrocarbon material-bearing formation to reduce the viscosity thereof for facilitating recovery of the hydrocarbon material. A gaseous penetration medium comprising a gaseous working fluid and a carrier gas, is fed into the formation at a penetration pressure sufficient for penetration of the recovery zone, the working fluid being a water soluble gas which generates heat of solution upon absorption in an aqueous medium, and in which the partial pressure of the working fluid in relation to the penetration pressure and the temperature prevailing in the recovery zone is controlled to inhibit working fluid condensation but to provide for absorption of working fluid by water present in the formation to release heat for heating the hydrocarbon material in the recovery zone.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hydrocarbons in Soil Gas as Pathfinders in Geothermal Resource Surveys in Indonesia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A surface geochemical technique utilizing normal paraffin (C{sub 7+}) and aromatic (C{sub 8}) hydrocarbons in soil gas has been successfully used as pathfinders in surveys for geothermal resources in Indonesia. The Dieng field was used to test the technique. The result shows the paraffin anomalies to be near and over productive wells. Because productive wells usually lie over upflow zones it reinforces our hypothesis that paraffins define the upflow of geothermal systems. The aromatic hydrocarbon alkylbenzene C{sub 8} was found near and around productive wells in the southeast quadrant of the Dieng field (Sikidang-Merdada area) but they are more spread out and more diffuse than the paraffins. The shape of their anomaly seems to suggest a tendency of spreading into the direction of lower elevations. It is thought that the aromatics, which are much more soluble than their corresponding paraffins, express at the surface as anomalies not only of locations of the upflow but also of the outflow of the geothermal system as well. Therefore the combined paraffin and aromatic anomalies, and topography, may be used as an indicator for the direction of the outflow or the flow of the under ground waters. The scarcity of the aromatics in the northwest quadrant of the Dieng field (Sileri area) is unique. A hypothesis has been proposed which could explain this unique feature.

Pudjianto, R.; Suroto, M.; Higashihara, M.; Fukuda, M.; Ong, Akhadiana and Jan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hydrocarbon reclaimer system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a filtering process for filtering sludge from a finished product oil storage tank and thereby separating solids from oil and hydrocarbon. The process requires no added water, solvents or diluents. It comprises: pumping a volume sludge from a finished product oil storage tank to a mixing tank; mixing the sludge; sampling the sludge to determine solid content; adding filter aid comprising diatomaceous earth to the mixing tank; mixing the filter aid with the sludge in the mixing tank; enclosing and sealing a plurality of filter plates inside a horizontal plate filter; pressurizing the horizontal plate filter by operation of pump means; pumping the sludge from the mixing tank through the horizontal plate filter to filter out solids; recirculating the sludge from the horizontal plate filter back through the mixing tank; and pumping a purified hydrocarbon and water filtrate from the horizontal plate filter.

Uremovich, M.J.

1990-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hydrocarbon anomaly in soil gas as near-surface expressions of upflows and outflows in geothermal systems  

SciTech Connect

A variety of hydrocarbons, C1 - C12, have been found in volcanic gases (fumarolic) and in geothermal waters and gases. The hydrocarbons are thought to have come from products of pyrolysis of kerogen in sedimentary rocks or they could be fed into the geothermal system by the recharging waters which may contain dissolved hydrocarbons or hydrocarbons extracted by the waters from the rocks. In the hot geothermal zone, 300+ C, many of these hydrocarbons are in their critical state. It is thought that they move upwards due to buoyancy and flux up with the upflowing geothermal fluids in the upflow zones together with the magmatic gases. Permeability which could be provided by faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures are thought to provide pathways for the upward flux. A sensitive technique (Petrex) utilizing passive integrative adsorption of the hydrocarbons in soil gas on activated charcoal followed by desorption and analysis of the hydrocarbons by direct introduction mass spectrometry allows mapping of the anomalous areas. Surveys for geothermal resources conducted in Japan and in Indonesia show that the hydrocarbon anomaly occur over known fields and over areas strongly suspected of geothermal potential. The hydrocarbons found and identified were n-paraffins (C7-C9) and aromatics (C7-C8). Detection of permeable, i.e. active or open faults, parts of older faults which have been reactivated, e.g. by younger intersecting faults, and the area surrounding these faulted and permeable region is possible. The mechanism leading to the appearance of the hydrocarbon in the soil gas over upflow zones of the geothermal reservoir is proposed. The paraffins seems to be better pathfinders for the location of upflows than the aromatics. However the aromatics may, under certain circumstances, give better indications of the direction of the outflow of the geothermal system. It is thought that an upflow zone can be defined when conditions exist where the recharging waters containing the hydrocarbons feed into the geothermal kitchen. The existence of open and active faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures allow sufficient permeability for the gases to flux up and express themselves at the surface as hydrocarbon anomaly in the soil gas. When any of the requirements is absent, i.e. in the absence of the recharging waters, hydrocarbons, temperature, or permeability, no anomaly can be expected. It assumes a dynamic convective system, i.e. recharging waters, upflow and outflow. The anomalies however can define to a certain extent, regions of geothermal upflow, buoyant transport of gases, and frequently down-gradient of cooling waters.

Ong, H.L.; Higashihara, M.; Klusman, R.W.; Voorhees, K.J.; Pudjianto, R.; Ong, J

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hydrocarbon anomaly in soil gas as near-surface expressions of upflows and outflows in geothermal systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of hydrocarbons, C1 - C12, have been found in volcanic gases (fumarolic) and in geothermal waters and gases. The hydrocarbons are thought to have come from products of pyrolysis of kerogen in sedimentary rocks or they could be fed into the geothermal system by the recharging waters which may contain dissolved hydrocarbons or hydrocarbons extracted by the waters from the rocks. In the hot geothermal zone, 300+ C, many of these hydrocarbons are in their critical state. It is thought that they move upwards due to buoyancy and flux up with the upflowing geothermal fluids in the upflow zones together with the magmatic gases. Permeability which could be provided by faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures are thought to provide pathways for the upward flux. A sensitive technique (Petrex) utilizing passive integrative adsorption of the hydrocarbons in soil gas on activated charcoal followed by desorption and analysis of the hydrocarbons by direct introduction mass spectrometry allows mapping of the anomalous areas. Surveys for geothermal resources conducted in Japan and in Indonesia show that the hydrocarbon anomaly occur over known fields and over areas strongly suspected of geothermal potential. The hydrocarbons found and identified were n-paraffins (C7-C9) and aromatics (C7-C8). Detection of permeable, i.e. active or open faults, parts of older faults which have been reactivated, e.g. by younger intersecting faults, and the area surrounding these faulted and permeable region is possible. The mechanism leading to the appearance of the hydrocarbon in the soil gas over upflow zones of the geothermal reservoir is proposed. The paraffins seems to be better pathfinders for the location of upflows than the aromatics. However the aromatics may, under certain circumstances, give better indications of the direction of the outflow of the geothermal system. It is thought that an upflow zone can be defined when conditions exist where the recharging waters containing the hydrocarbons feed into the geothermal kitchen. The existence of open and active faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures allow sufficient permeability for the gases to flux up and express themselves at the surface as hydrocarbon anomaly in the soil gas. When any of the requirements is absent, i.e. in the absence of the recharging waters, hydrocarbons, temperature, or permeability, no anomaly can be expected. It assumes a dynamic convective system, i.e. recharging waters, upflow and outflow. The anomalies however can define to a certain extent, regions of geothermal upflow, buoyant transport of gases, and frequently down-gradient of cooling waters.

Ong, H.L.; Higashihara, M.; Klusman, R.W.; Voorhees, K.J.; Pudjianto, R.; Ong, J

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

110

THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

113

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

114

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl (18E) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

Ding, Yu-Shin (Central Islip, NY); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

HYDROCARBON LIQUID FLOW CALIBRATION SERVICE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and is the cross correlation coefficient ... a NIST Hydrocarbon Liquid Flow Calibration Facility ... FED2004-56790, 2004 Heat Transfer/Fluids Engineering ...

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

120

Catalytic partial oxidation reforming of hydrocarbon fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is the primary candidate as the power source for light-duty transportation systems. On-board conversion of fuels (reforming) to supply the required hydrogen has the potential to provide the driving range that is typical of today's automobiles. Petroleum-derived fuels, gasoline or some distillate similar to it, are attractive because of their existing production, distribution, and retailing infrastructure. The fuel may be either petroleum-derived or other alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol, natural gas, etc. [1]. The ability to use a variety of fuels is also attractive for stationary distributed power generation [2], such as in buildings, or for portable power in remote locations. Argonne National Laboratory has developed a catalytic reactor based on partial oxidation reforming that is suitable for use in light-duty vehicles powered by fuel cells. The reactor has shown the ability to convert a wide variety of fuels to a hydrogen-rich gas at less than 800 C, temperatures that are several hundreds of degrees lower than alternative noncatalytic processes. The fuel may be methanol, ethanol, natural gas, or petroleum-derived fuels that are blends of various hydrocarbons such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, etc., as in gasoline. This paper will discuss the results obtained from a bench-scale (3-kWe) reactor., where the reforming of gasoline and natural gas generated a product gas that contained 38% and 42% hydrogen on a dry basis at the reformer exit, respectively.

Ahmed, S.

1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Dehydrocyclodimerization, converting LPG to aromatics  

SciTech Connect

British Petroleum (BP) recognized the potential need for ways of exploiting feedstocks with low opportunity cost and commenced a research program at its Sunbury Research Center to discover and develop a catalyst for the conversion of LPG to a liquid product. The successful outcome of this research program is the Cyclar /SUP SM/ process, a joint development of UOP Process Division and British Petroleum. The Cyclar process offers a single-step conversion of LPG to an aromatic product which has a highvalue, is easily transported and useful both to fuel and petrochemical applications. The LPG producer can invest in a single unit, avoiding the need to identify and develop markets for multiple C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ products. This catalytic process, which employs UOP Continuous Catalyst Regeneration (CCR) technology, can also be applied to refinery light ends to produce a high-quality gasoline. Aromatic and hydrogen yields from propane and butane feeds surpass those obtained from catalytic reforming of Light Arabian naphtha. This paper describes the principles of the Cyclar process and illustrates yields and economics for several interesting applications.

Johnson, J.A.; Hilder, G.K.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Study of net soot formation in hydrocarbon reforming for hydrogen fuel cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen fuel cell is expected to be a valuable addition to the electric utility industry; however, the current fuel supply availability requires that conventional heavier hydrocarbon fuels also be considered as primary fuels. Typical heavier fuels would be No. 2 fuel oil with its accompanying sulfur impurities, compared with the currently used light hydrocarbon gases. The potential future use of alternate fuels which are rich in aromatics would exacerbate the problems associated with hydrogen production. Among the more severe of these problems, is the greater tendency of heavier hydrocarbons to form soot. The development of a quasi-global kinetics model to represent the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions which control the autothermal hydrogen reforming process and the accompanying soot formation and gasification was the objective of this study.

Edelman, R. B.; Farmer, R. C.; Wang, T. S.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

Muradov, Nazim Z. (Melbourne, FL)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Review of World Hydrocarbon Resource Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reviews assessments of world oil, natural gas, and oil shale resources made between the end of World War II and the end of 1980. Details are provided on the methods used in developing these assessments, geographic coverage, time horizons, and major assumptions (e.g., about discovery rates and recovery factor). Conclusions on the current state of knowledge concerning each of these hydrocarbon resources are presented.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hydrocarbon content of geopressured brines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design Well data (bottomhole pressure minus wellhead pressure, GWR, and hydrocarbon composition) is presented as a function of producing conditions. These are examined in conjunction with the following models to attempt to deduce the reservoir brine saturation level: (1) reservoir contains gas dispersed in the pores and the gas saturation is greater than critical; (2) reservoir brine is gas-saturated; (3) bubble point below hydrostatic pressure; and (4) bubble point between hydrostatic pressure and reservoir pressure. 24 figs., 10 tabs. (ACR)

Osif, T.L.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

127

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

PHASE BEHAVIOR OF LIGHT GASES IN HYDROCARBON AND AQUEOUS SOLVENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under previous support from the Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present period, the Park-Gasem-Robinson (PGR) equation of state (EOS) has been modified to improve its volumetric and equilibrium predictions. Specifically, the attractive term of the PGR equation was modified to enhance the flexibility of the model, and a new expression was developed for the temperature dependence of the attractive term in this segment-segment interaction model. The predictive capability of the modified PGR EOS for vapor pressure, and saturated liquid and vapor densities was evaluated for selected normal paraffins, normal alkenes, cyclo-paraffins, light aromatics, argon, carbon dioxide and water. The generalized EOS constants and substance-specific characteristic parameters in the modified PGR EOS were obtained from the pure component vapor pressures, and saturated liquid and vapor molar volumes. The calculated phase properties were compared to those of the Peng-Robinson (PR), the simplified-perturbed-hard-chain theory (SPHCT) and the original PGR equations. Generally, the performance of the proposed EOS was better than the PR, SPHCT and original PGR equations in predicting the pure fluid properties (%AAD of 1.3, 2.8 and 3.7 for vapor pressure, saturated liquid and vapor densities, respectively).

KHALED A.M. GASEM; ROBERT L. ROBINSON, JR.

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Conversion of Pentose-Derived Furans into Hydrocarbon Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are interested in the conversion of biomass-derived hemicellulose into hydrocarbon molecules that can be used in the formulation of 'drop-in' fuels such as gasoline (C5-12), diesel (C10-20) and jet fuel (C9-16). Our focus lies on the use of furfuryl alcohol as a starting material since that is already produced commercially from hemicellulose-derived pentoses. The steps required to convert the latter into hydrocarbons are 1) oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol to form dimers (C10) and trimers (C15), and 2) hydrotreatment of the dimers and trimers to produce a mixture of linear hydrocarbons with carbon chain lengths in the range of diesel and jet fuels. However, furfuryl alcohol readily polymerizes to form resins in the presence of an acid catalyst, and the exothermic oligomerization must be carried out under reaction control. This presentation will discuss our progress in the development of this sugar-to-hydrocarbon pathway.

Moens, L.; Johnson, D. K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Method and apparatus for synthesizing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for synthesizing a mixture of hydrocarbons having five carbons or less is disclosed. An equal molar ratio of CO and H/sub 2/ gases is caused to pass through a ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a surface area of about 80 to 125 m/sup 2//g. The catalyst further includes Na present as a substitutional cation in an amount of about 5 to 10 atom %. At a temperature of about 340 to 360/sup 0/C, and at pressures of about 20 to 50 atm, CH/sub 3/OH is produced in an amount of about 90 wt % of the total hydrocarbon mixture, and comprised 1 mole % of the effluent gas.

Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

1983-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

Hydrocarbons in the deep earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

composed of the elements hydrogen and carbon) are the main building block of crude oil and natural gas. Hydrocarbons contribute to the global carbon cycle (one of the most...

132

Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering strategies for biofuels production.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hydrocarbon Fouling of SCR during PCCI combustion  

SciTech Connect

The combination of advanced combustion with advanced selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst formulations was studied in the work presented here to determine the impact of the unique hydrocarbon (HC) emissions from premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion on SCR performance. Catalyst core samples cut from full size commercial Fe- and Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts were exposed to a slipstream of raw engine exhaust from a 1.9-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operating in conventional and PCCI combustion modes. The zeolites which form the basis of these catalysts are different with the Cu-based catalyst made on a chabazite zeolite which las smaller pore structures relative to the Fe-based catalyst. Subsequent to exposure, bench flow reactor characterization of performance and hydrocarbon release and oxidation enabled evaluation of overall impacts from the engine exhaust. The Fe-zeolite NOX conversion efficiency was significantly degraded, especially at low temperatures (<250 C), after the catalyst was exposed to the raw engine exhaust. The degradation of the Fe-zeolite performance was similar for both combustion modes. The Cu-zeolite showed better tolerance to HC fouling at low temperatures compared to the Fe-zeolite but PCCI exhaust had a more significant impact than the exhaust from conventional combustion on the NOX conversion efficiency. Furthermore, chemical analysis of the hydrocarbons trapped on the SCR cores was conducted to better determine chemistry specific effects.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cleanup of hydrocarbon conversion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a substantially contaminant-free second hydrocarbon feed using a second reforming catalyst, in a catalytic-reforming system having equipment contaminated through contact with a contaminant-containing prior feed. It comprises: contacting the first hydrocarbon feed in the catalytic-reforming system at first reforming conditions with a first reforming catalyst until contaminant removal from the conversion system is substantially completed and the system is contaminant-free; thereafter replacing the first reforming catalyst in the contaminant-free catalytic-reforming system with a second reforming catalyst; and thereafter contacting the second hydrocarbon feed in the contaminant-free catalytic-reforming system with the second reforming catalyst at second reforming conditions.

Peer, R.L.; Russ, M.B.

1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

Yang, Dali (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David (Santa Fe, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Colling, Craig W. (Warrenville, IL)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

136

Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

Yang; Dali (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David (Santa Fe, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Colling, Craig W. (Warrenville, IL)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

137

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Robust and Inexpensive Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery for Grid-Scale Energy Storage Lead: University of Southern California, Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute Sub-Awardee: Jet...

138

Awards Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

University of Utah. TMS & AIME Awards Presentation ? February 17, 2009 ? San Francisco, California, USA. ACTA Materialia Materials and Society Award.

139

CFTT Presentations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2009. Date, Venue, Presenation, Presenter. Oct 2009, International Conference on Digital Forensics and Cyber Crime (ICDF2C ...

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

140

Nitration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal combustors and exhaust streams  

SciTech Connect

Our efforts quarter were directed at preparing PAH samples at well-controlled extents of secondary pyrolysis. The same operating conditions used in the past were implemented this quarter to prepare PAH samples at well-controlled extents of secondary pyrolysis from a Pit. [number sign]8 hvA bituminous coal. The new data are in excellent agreement with the old. Both ultimate yield values and soot percentages at particular furnace temperatures from these data sets am within experimental uncertainties. PAH samples have now been prepared to cover extents of conversion of coal tar into soot from 35--80 %. Additional runs during primary devolatilization have yielded PAH samples that cover nearly the full range of this process as well. Hence, all PAH samples from the Pit. [number sign]8 coal sample are in hand. We also began to collect the analogous PAH samples from a subituminous coal. Efforts at sample analysis focused on testing and modification of the gravity-flow column chromatography procedure using actual tar samples. Extra samples collected during combustion experiments using the Pit. [number sign]8 bituminous coal were used to refine the preparation technique. Solvent volumes were adjusted to optimize sample separation, and additional tests were conducted to determine the reproducibility of the fractionation and recovery. Further refinement in the experimental methodology allowed 80% recovery of the coal tar samples to be reproducibly achieved.

Yu, L.; Dadamio, J.; Hildemann, L.; Niska, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

1 Solvent-Extractable Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Biochar: 2 Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature and Feedstock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable gasification­biochar systems? A case-study of rice-husk gasification in Cambodia, Part Biochar Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, Crew Building, King's Buildings, West Mains Road November 2011 Available online 26 November 2011 Keywords: Biochar Rice husk Sustainability a b s t r a c

142

Partitioning and Bioavailability of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons in an Intertidal Marsh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by combustion of organic matter including petroleum and woodcombustion of petroleum-based fuels but also from organic matter including wood.

Maruya, Keith A; Horne, Alex J

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Micellar solubilization of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal tar-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Solubilization of PAHs from a coal tar-contaminated soil obtained from a manufactured gas plant (MGP) site was evaluated using nonionic polyoxyethylene surfactants at dosages greater than cmc. Up to 25% of Soxhlet-extractable PAHs could be solubilized at surfactant loadings of 0.3 g/g of oil in 16 days in completely stirred batch reactors. Longer periods were required to reach equilibrium at higher surfactant dosages. Raoult`s law satisfactorily described the partitioning of constituent PAHs between the weathered coal tar and the micellar solution. An equilibrium model was developed to predict the solubilization of PAHs from coal tar-contaminated soils for given properties of the soil, surfactant, and component PAHs. The model predicted solubilization of constituent PAHs reasonably well at low surfactant dosages. At extremely high surfactant dosages, the model failed to reliably predict solubilization. Presumably, mass transfer mass transfer limitations prevented the attainment of equilibrium during the duration (380h) of solubilization experiments. 25 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Yeom, I.T.; Ghosh, M.M.; Cox, C.D.; Robinson, K.G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEISMO-ACOUSTIC IMAGERY OF A SEISMO-ACOUSTIC IMAGERY OF A CARBONATE/HYDRATE MOUND IN THE GULF OF MEXICO Thomas McGee and Leonardo Macelloni Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology University of Mississippi Presented to the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting San Francisco, California 11-15 December 2006 BACKGROUND INFORMATION In the northern Gulf of Mexico, hydrates outcrop within carbonate mounds precipitated by microbial action at sites of hydrocarbon venting from cold seeps. Such seeps are located along faults that act as pathways for fluids migrating upward from deep reservoirs. Location of MC118 The Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium has begun to install a sea-floor observatory at such a mound in federal lease block Mississippi Canyon 118. Thanks for your attention.

145

Biological enhancement of hydrocarbon extraction  

SciTech Connect

A method of microbial enhanced oil recovery for recovering oil from an oil-bearing rock formation is provided. The methodology uses a consortium of bacteria including a mixture of surfactant producing bacteria and non-surfactant enzyme producing bacteria which may release hydrocarbons from bitumen containing sands. The described bioprocess can work with existing petroleum recovery protocols. The consortium microorganisms are also useful for treatment of above oil sands, ground waste tailings, subsurface oil recovery, and similar materials to enhance remediation and/or recovery of additional hydrocarbons from the materials.

Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

146

Collisional processes of hydrocarbons in hydrogen plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have investigated the reactions of methane and its derivatives with hydrogen plasmas for use in modelling carbon and hydrocarbon transport in hydrogen plasmas. We provide quantitative information over the temperature range from 0.1 eV to 2 keV for the most significant reactions of methane and methane fragments with electrons and protons. We review the properties of each reaction, present graphs of the cross section and reaction rate coefficient, and give analytical fits for sigma and (sigmav). 34 refs.

Ehrhardt, A.B.; Langer, W.D.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

PRESENTATION TITLE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PORTLAND DISTRICT 1 Corps of Engineers Hydro Optimization in the Pacific Northwest Presentation for: Southwestern Federal Hydropower Conference Kansas City, Missouri 16 June 2011...

148

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons ...  

Conventional biomass to hydrocarbon conversion is generally not commercially feasible, due to costs of the conversion process.

149

Evaluation of In Situ Remedial Technologies for Sites Contaminated With Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility managers are faced at times with decision making regarding remediation of sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. This report, which presents the results of a survey of the literature on established and emerging technologies for in situ remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons, is intended to support such decision making.

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

A role of hydrocarbon reaction for NO{sub x} formation and reduction in fuel-rich pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated an index for modeling a NO{sub x} reaction mechanism of pulverized coal combustion. The reaction mechanism of coal nitrogen was examined by drop-tube furnace experiments under various burning conditions. We proposed the gas phase stoichiometric ratio (SRgas) as a key index to evaluate NO{sub x} concentration in fuel-rich flames. The SRgas was defined as: SRgas {identical_to} amount of fuel required for stoichiometry combustion/amount of gasified fuel where, the amount of gasified fuel was defined as the amount of fuel which had been released to the gas phase by pyrolysis, oxidation and gasification reactions. When SRgas estimate the total concentration of hydrocarbons in coal flame. The reaction of heavy hydrocarbons which had plural aromatic rings was very important to analyze the reaction mechanism of hydrocarbons for coal combustion in detail. When burning temperature and SRgas were the same, total hydrocarbon concentration in a coal flame was larger than that of a light gaseous hydrocarbon flame. Total hydrocarbon concentration in oxy-fuel combustion was lower than that in air combustion. We verified the proposed model by experimental results obtained for a drop-tube furnace and a laboratory-scale furnace that had an installed low-NO{sub x} burner. (author)

Taniguchi, Masayuki; Kamikawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Kenji; Orita, Hisayuki [Energy and Environmental Systems Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd. Power Systems Company, 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1292 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Generating Hydrocarbons from Microalgae  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a program of research will be presented that aims to employ unicellular green algae of the genus Botryococcus, elucidate the biochemistry associated with a unique...

152

Hydrocarbons from plants and trees  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The way energy was used in the US in 1980 was examined. A diagram shows the development of energy from its source to its end use. The following are described: the carbon dioxide problem - the greenhouse effect, sugar cane as an energy source, hydrocarbon-producing plants and trees, and isoprenoids from plants and trees. (MHR)

Calvin, M.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Presentation Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview for Newcomers R. Arnold, NV R. Pinney, NJ M. Wangler, DC N. Weber, NM National Transportation Stakeholders Forum 14 May 2013 www.energy.gov/EM 2 Orientation Format * Overview presentation by M. Wangler. * Experiential discussions by R. Arnold, R. Pinney and N. Weber. * Q & A by participants. www.energy.gov/EM 3 Overview Presentation Topics * History of External Coordination * Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) * Background * Some founding principles * Historical issues * Performance goals * Key accomplishments of TEC * National Transportation Stakeholders Forum * Information sharing * Addressing issues and concerns * Working Groups * Continuing focus * 2013 NTSF Meeting * Newsletter www.energy.gov/EM 4 History * Forums existed for addressing issues with communities

155

PRESENTATION TITLE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PORTLAND DISTRICT PORTLAND DISTRICT 1 Corps of Engineers Hydro Optimization in the Pacific Northwest Presentation for: Southwestern Federal Hydropower Conference Kansas City, Missouri 16 June 2011 By Charlie Allen Hydroelectric Design Center US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG ® PORTLAND DISTRICT 2 PRESENTATION OUTLINE  HOT INTRODUCTION AND HISTORY  TYPE I (Unit) OPTIMIZATION ► Cam Curve Verification ► 3-D Cam Controllers ► Inputs and Telemetry ► Gate-Blade Optimizer  TYPE II (Powerhouse) OPTIMIZATION ► Economic Dispatch ► Unit Commitment ► Absolute Flow Measurement ► Benefits Summary  QUESTIONS BUILDING STRONG ® PORTLAND DISTRICT 3 Hydropower Optimization Team (HOT) HOT is joint effort between BPA, COE, and BOR to maximize use of available water for hydropower

156

Presentation Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presentation Schedule Presentation Schedule (30 Min) Dave Wade - Dose Comparisons of once-thru and closed fuel cycles. (30 Min) Ralph Bennett - Roadmap Overview (15 Min) Neil Todreas - GRNS Perspectives and Recommendations (75 Min) Neil Todreas / - NERAC DISCUSSION Sal Levy 2 Generation IV Roadmap NERAC Subcommittee (GRNS) Bobby Abrams* Duke Engineering Douglas Chapin MPR Associates B. John Garrick Independent Consultant Dan Kammen University of California- Berkeley 3 Salomon Levy ** Levy & Associates Ted Marston Electrical Power Research Institute Bill Naughton Exelon Neil Todreas ** Massachusetts Institute of Technology * Resigned, July 2002 ** Co-chair GRNS Recruited Working Group Co-Chairs Jack Devine TWG-1 Water Cooled Phil Hildebrandt TWG-2 Gas Cooled Steve Rosen TWG-3 Metal Cooled Bill Rasin

157

Hydrocarbon processing symposium - 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book presents the papers given at a symposium which investigated the processes and equipment used in the petroleum and natural gas industries. Topics considered at the symposium included recirculation is centrifugal pumps, safety and security audits of LNG/LPG export facilities, flames in prestressed concrete LNG storage tanks, refrigerated liquefied gas storage, hydrogen-assisted failure in petroleum equipment, refinery off-gases, cryogenics, refrigerants, computer-aided plant design, and pipe vibration reducers.

Arnoni, Y.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Presentation title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Transmission Meeting Transmission Challenges in the Rocky Mountain Region Jeff Hein June 21, 2011 Western Renewable Energy Zones Composite photo created by NREL Presentation Outline * WREZ Vision * Chronology * WREZ Initiative Overview * Generation and Transmission Model * Lessons Learned * Future Activities National Renewable Energy Laboratory WREZ Vision * Western Governor's Association and U.S. Department of Energy initiated effort to develop renewable energy resources and reduce GHG emissions * Develop a high level "screening tool" to identify potential projects that allows industry stakeholders to analyze and compare economics of

159

Hydrocarbon Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrocarbon Technologies Hydrocarbon Technologies Place Lawrenceville, New Jersey Zip 8648 Sector Efficiency Product String representation "Technology-base ... onmental risks." is too long. Coordinates 36.761678°, -77.845048° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.761678,"lon":-77.845048,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

160

Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

Song, Chunshan (State College, PA); Ma, Xiaoliang (State College, PA); Sprague, Michael J. (Calgary, CA); Subramani, Velu (State College, PA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geology and hydrocarbon potentials of Arafura Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arafura Sea is a continental-shelf sea located between Irian Jaya (western New Guinea) and the northern part of the Australian continent. On the south it adjoins the stable Australian craton, and on the north it is bordered by the Tertiary collision zone between the Australian craton and the northern Irian Jaya island arc. On the west and northwest it is bounded by the active Banda arc collision zone, whereas on the east it is bordered by the northern extension of the Gulf of Carpentaria that also forms the western limit of the zone of late Paleozoic granites. Shelf sediments, ranging in age from late Paleozoic to Cenozoic, predominate in the Arafura Sea continental shelf, and are underlain by granitic basement. Gas shows have been reported from Jurassic to Cretaceous fine-grained marine limestones and sandstones, and gas and condensate also are present in Cretaceous sediments and Middle Jurassic fine-grained sandstones. At the north, the most prospective area seems to be the hinge zone of the Aru high, where a combination of traps and reservoir rocks presumably exists. On the south, the Money Shoal area is considered a significant prospect. In the Arafura basin, stratigraphic traps seem to be the most promising target for hydrocarbon exploration as tectonics seems not to have played an important role in the area. The sedimentary area occupied by the eastern extension of the Tarera-Aiduna wrench fault should also be investigated in detail for its hydrocarbon potential.

Katili, J.A.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons  

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons Technology Summary A method for catalytically converting an alcohol ...

164

Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

Kulkarni, Sudhir S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Chang, Y. Alice (Westmont, IL); Gatsis, John G. (Des Plaines, IL); Funk, Edward W. (Highland Park, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons  

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons Technology Summary A method for catalytically ...

166

Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

Kulkarni, S.S.; Chang, Y.A.; Gatsis, J.G.; Funk, E.W.

1988-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

168

Method and apparatus for synthesizing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for synthesizing a mixture of aliphatic alcohols having five carbons or less is disclosed. An equal molar ratio of CO and H/sub 2/ gases is caused to pass through a ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a surface area of about 80 to 125 m/sup 2//g. The catalyst further optionally includes Na ions present as substitutional cations in an amount of about 5 to 10 atom %. At a temperature of about 570 to 630/sup 0/K, and at pressures of about 20 to 50 atm, methanol and isobutanol are the predominant products and are produced in amounts of about 90 wt % of the total hydrocarbon mixture. 6 figs.

Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

169

Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames  

SciTech Connect

Work during this contract period has been concerned with the mechanisms through which aromatics are formed and destroyed in flames, and the processes responsible for soot formation. Recent progress has been primarily in two areas: experiments and modeling of the soot nucleation process in low pressure benzene flames and preparation for experiments on the destruction mechanisms of benzene. In addition, we have incorporated weak collision'' formalisms into a fall-off computer code.

Howard, J.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon. 5 Figs.

Greenbaum, E.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

172

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission...

173

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana)...

174

Biogeochemistry of Isoprenoid Production and Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Biodgeradation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation is an exploration of microbial isoprenoid production and destruction by anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation. Isoprenoids are methyl-branched hydrocarbons, and include biomarkers from all three (more)

Dawson, Katherine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hydrocarbon Source Signatures in Houston, Texas: Influence of the Petrochemical Industry  

SciTech Connect

Observations of C1-C10 hydrocarbon mixing ratios measured by in-situ instrumentation at the La Porte super site during the TexAQS 2000 field experiment are reported. The La Porte data were compared to a roadway vehicle exhaust signature obtained from canister samples collected in the Houston Washburn tunnel during the same summer to better understand the impact of petrochemical emissions of hydrocarbons at the site. It is shown that the abundance of ethene, propene, 1-butene, C2-C4 alkanes, hexane, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, isopropylbenzene, and styrene at La Porte were systematically impacted by petrochemical industry emissions. Coherent power law relationships between frequency distribution widths of hydrocarbon mixing ratios and their local lifetimes clearly identify two major source groups, roadway vehicle emissions and industrial emissions. Distributions of most aromatics and long chain alkanes were consistent with roadway vehicle emissions as the dominant source. Airmass reactivity was generally dominated by C1-C3 aldehydes. Propene and ethene sometimes dominated air mass reactivity with HO loss frequencies often greater than 10 s-1. Ozone mixing ratios near 200 ppbv were observed on two separate occasions and these air masses appear to have been impacted by industrial emissions of alkenes from the Houston Ship Channel. The La Porte data provide evidence of the importance of industrial emissions of ethene and propene on air masses reactivity and ozone formation in Houston.

Jobson, B Tom T.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Kuster, W. C.; Goldan, P. D.; Williams, E. J.; Fesenfeld, F.; Apel, Eric; Karl, Thomas G.; Lonneman, William A.; Riemer, D.

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

BIOTIGER, A NATURAL MICROBIAL PRODUCT FOR ENHANCED HYDROCARBON RECOVERY FROM OIL SANDS.  

SciTech Connect

BioTiger{trademark} is a unique microbial consortia that resulted from over 8 years of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from a century-old Polish waste lagoon. BioTiger{trademark} shows rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, produces novel surfactants, is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and shows good activity at temperature and pH extremes. Although originally developed and used by the U.S. Department of Energy for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils, recent efforts have proven that BioTiger{trademark} can also be used to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery process utilizes BioTiger{trademark} to optimize bitumen separation. A floatation test protocol with oil sands from Ft. McMurray, Canada was used for the BioTiger{trademark} evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/floatation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger{trademark} demonstrated a 50% improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis in 4 h and a five-fold increase at 25 hr. Since BioTiger{trademark} performs well at high temperatures and process engineering can enhance and sustain metabolic activity, it can be applied to enhance recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands or other complex recalcitrant matrices.

Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Whitney Jones, W; Charles Milliken, C

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for nitro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound. 4 figures.

Reagen, W.K.; Schulz, A.L.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.; Grey, A.E.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

Environmental Distribution of Petroleum Hydrocarbons at a Utility Service Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a field study at a utility service center located in western New York where a petroleum product had leaked into the subsurface over a number of years. The study was a tailored collaboration effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, aimed at delineating the nature and extent of migration of the dissolved hydrocarbons. The information is of interest to many utilities as they develop and implement management prac...

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

Conversion of ethane and of propane to higher olefin hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has become apparent during the past few months that results obtained in the oxidative coupling of methane cannot be extended to ethane and propane. Good selectivities and yields for the oxydehydrogenation to olefins can be obtained but production of higher hydrocarbons is small. The present report summarizes results of experiments using zeolite based catalysts and compares these with basic oxide catalysts. The oxydehydrogenation of ethane over zeolite based catalysts (H[sup [minus plus

Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Process for recovery of liquid hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Methane is recovered as a gas for discharge to a pipeline from a gas stream containing methane and heavier hydrocarbons, principally ethane and propane. Separation is accomplished by condensing the heavier hydrocarbons and distilling the methane therefrom. A liquid product (LPG) comprising the heavier hydrocarbons is subsequently recovered and transferred to storage. Prior to being discharged to a pipeline, the recovered methane gas is compressed and in undergoing compression the gas is heated. The heat content of the gas is employed to reboil the refrigerant in an absorption refrigeration unit. The refrigeration unit is used to cool the LPG prior to its storage.

Millar, J.F.; Cockshott, J.E.

1978-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Berkeley, CA); Sun, Hai (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. and Calvin, M. J. Amer. Oil Chern. Assoc. Science, 208,of the production of oil and alcohol from hydrocarbon-Figure 1 Cumulative U.S. crude oil discoveries as a function

Calvin, Melvin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Thermodynamic Properties of Acetic Acid + Hydrocarbons ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Properties of Acetic Acid + Hydrocarbons Mixtures L. Negadi1,C,S, N. Ainous2, A. Negadi1, I. Mokbel2, A. Kaci3 and J. Jose2 ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

Process for Photochemical Chlorination of Hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for chlorination of a major portion of the hydrogen atoms of paraffinic hydrocarbons of five or more carbon atoms may be replaced by subjecting the hydrocarbon to the action of chlorine under active light. The initial chlorination is begun at 25 to 30 deg C with the chlorine diluted with HCl. The later stages may be carried out with undiluted chlorine and the temperature gradually raised to about 129 deg C.

Beanblossom, W.S.

1950-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae  

SciTech Connect

A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

Tornabene, T.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Clean, economical, underwater (hydrocarbon) storage  

SciTech Connect

A consortium consisting of Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft A.G., Phoenix Gummiwerke A.G., Strabag Bau-A.G., and Bugsier Reederei und Bergungs-A.G. offers a plausible solution to the large-scale underwater storage of hydrocarbons. Up to 20 storage compartments of 8000 cu m capacity can be assembled for a capacity of 160,000 cu m. Each compartment is divided in half by a nylon-reinforced polyurethane diaphragm which isolates oil or other products on one side from sea-water ballast on the other side. As oil is pumped into storage on one side of the diaphragm, the diaphragm moves and ballast on the other side is displaced to the sea. Ballast re-enters the compartment during unloading. The system can enable small offshore platforms to produce more economically. Cargo tankers load at 8000 cu m/hr. The tanks will be used in 200 m or greater water depths. The loading station is installed in a buoy 30 m below the water surface.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Conversion of Biomass-Derived Furans into Hydrocarbon Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most studied chemical transformations of carbohydrates is their thermocatalytic dehydration to form furans. Cellulose-derived glucose is thereby converted into 5-hydroxymethylfurfuraldehyde (5-HMF), while the hemicellulose-derived pentoses (e.g., xylose, arabinose) form furfuraldehyde. Our objective is to identify new pathways to convert furfuryl alcohol into a mixture of aliphatic hydrocarbons that can be used as drop-in fuels for diesel (C10-20) and jet fuel (C9-16) blends. Furfuryl alcohol is produced commercially through hydrogenation of furfuraldehyde that is derived from hemicellulose-derived pentoses via acid-catalyzed dehydration. The steps that we are currently pursuing to convert furfuryl alcohol into hydrocarbons are 1) oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol to form dimers (C10) and trimers (C15), and 2) hydrotreatment of the dimers and trimers to produce a mixture of linear hydrocarbons with carbon chain lengths in the range of diesel and jet fuels. This presentation will discuss our progress in the development of this pathway.

Moens, L.; Johnson, D. K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [{sup 18}F]fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [{sup 18}F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substituent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is carried out by nucleophilic aromatic substitution with a no-carrier-added (NCA) [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion. The method can be used to synthesize various no-carrier-added aryl [{sup 18}F]fluoride compositions, including 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA, 2-[{sup 18}F]fluorotyrosine, 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine, and 6-[{sup 18}F]fluorodopamine. In those instances when a racemic mixture of enantiomers is produced by the present invention, such as in the synthesis of 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine, a preferred method also includes resolution of the racemic mixture on a chiral HPLC column. This procedure results in a high yield of enantiomerically pure [{sup 18}F] labeled isomers, for example [-]-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine and [+]-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine.

Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Selective Sorbents For Purification Of Hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing thiophene and thiophene compounds from liquid fuel includes contacting the liquid fuel with an adsorbent which preferentially adsorbs the thiophene and thiophene compounds. The adsorption takes place at a selected temperature and pressure, thereby producing a non-adsorbed component and a thiophene/thiophene compound-rich adsorbed component. The adsorbent includes either a metal or a metal ion that is adapted to form p-complexation bonds with the thiophene and/or thiophene compounds, and the preferential adsorption occurs by p-complexation. A further method includes selective removal of aromatic compounds from a mixture of aromatic and aliphatic compounds.

Yang, Ralph T. (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Frances H. (Ann Arbor, MI); Takahashi, Akira (Yoko-Machi, JP); Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

190

Evaluation of biological treatment for the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon can be an effective treatment method applied to control oil pollution in both fresh water and marine environments. Hydrocarbon degraders, both indigenous and exogenous, are responsible for utilizing petroleum hydrocarbon as their substrate for growth and energy, thereby degrading them. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons is often enhanced by bioaugmentation and biostimulation depending on the contaminated environment and the competence of the hydrocarbon degraders present. An evaluation of the performance of the biological treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon by the hydrocarbon degrading microbes at the Brayton Fire School??s 4 million gallon per day (MGD) wastewater treatment plant was the main research objective. Samples were taken for two seasons, winter (Nov 03 ?? Jan 03) and summer (Jun 04 ?? Aug 04), from each of the four treatment units: the inlet tank, equalization tank, aeration tank and the outfall tank. The population of aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders were enumerated and nutrient availability in the system were used to evaluate the effectiveness of on-going bioaugmentation and biostimulation. Monitoring of general effluent parameters was conducted to evaluate the treatment plant??s removal efficiency and to determine if effluent discharge was in compliance with the TCEQ permit. The aeration tank is an activated sludge system with no recycling. Hydrocarbon degraders are supplied at a constant rate with additional nutrient supplement. There was a significant decrease in the population of microbes that was originally fed to the system and the quantity resident in the aeration tank. Nutrient levels in the aeration tank were insufficient for the concentration of hydrocarbon degraders, even after the application of dog food as a biostimulant. The use of dog food is not recommended as a nutrient supplement. Adding dog food increases the nitrogen and phosphorus concentration in the aeration tank but the amount of carbon being added with the dog food increases the total chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). An increase in the concentration of total COD and BOD further increases the nitrogen and phosphorus requirement in the system. The main objective of supplying adequate nutrients to the hydrocarbon degraders would never be achieved as there would be an additional demand of nutrients to degrade the added carbon source. This research study was conducted to identify the drawbacks in the treatment plant which needs further investigation to improve efficiency.

Basu, Pradipta Ranjan

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Coupling of oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization reactions of butane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupling of oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization of butane by using a dual function catalyst has led to a significant enhancement of the yields (from 25 to 40%) and selectivities to aromatics (from 39 to 64%). Butane is converted to aromatics by using either zinc-promoted [Ga]-ZSM-5 or zinc and gallium copromoted [Fe]-ZSM-5 zeolite as a catalyst. However, the formation of aromatics is severely limited by hydrocracking of butane to methane, ethane, and propane due to the hydrogen formed during aromatization reactions. On the other hand, the oxidative dehydrogenation of butane to butene over molybdate catalysts is found to be accompanied by a concurrent undesirable reaction, i.e., total oxidation. When two of these reactions (oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization of butane) are coupled by using a dual function catalyst they have shown to complement each other. It is believed that the rate-limiting step for aromatization (butane to butene) is increased by adding an oxidative dehydrogenation catalyst (Ga-Zn-Mg-Mo-O). The formation of methane, ethane, and propane was suppressed due to the removal of hydrogen initially formed as water. Studies of ammonia TPD show that the acidities of [Fe]-ZSM-5 are greatly affected by the existence of metal oxides such as Ga[sub 2]O[sub 3], MgO, ZnO, and MoO[sub 3]. 40 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Xu, Wen-Qing; Suib, S.L. (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Factors affecting in-situ recovery of hydrocarbons from oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Batch thermal solution of Hell's Hole Canyon oil shale in hydrocarbon solvents has been studied at temperatures of from 274/sup 0/ to 410/sup 0/C. Three solvents were used: cyclohexane; 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene; and creosote oil. In 24-hour, constant-temperature runs under autogenous pressure, each solvent was found to be capable of removing over 90% of the original organic material at extraction temperatures of from 360 to 375/sup 0/C. Cyclohexane extraction resulted in somewhat greater yields than tetralin extraction in runs below 365/sup 0/C but approximately the same yields as tetralin at higher extraction temperatures. With one oil shale sample, virtually identical yields were observed in both cyclohexane and tetralin extractions. This finding suggests that mass-transfer restrictions within some oil shales may restrict the yield regardless of the solvent used. Carbon-13 NMR analyses of the spent shales showed that the aromaticity of the residual organic material in tetralin-extracted shale increased slightly from the raw shale value of 0.27 and remained essentially constant at a value of 0.31 increased. In constant temperature runs of 24-hour duration, the aromaticity of an oil shle sample increased from the raw oil shale value of 0.17 to 0.28 after cyclohexane extraction at 326/sup 0/C, while a tetralin-extracted sample of the same oil shale had an aromaticity of only 0.20 after extraction at 321/sup 0/C. The nitrogen content of the cyclohexane extracts, which ranged from 1.58 to 2.24%, was comparable to that of values reported in the literature for shale oils. The tetralin extracts had somewhat lower nitrogen content, ranging from 0.58 to 1.95%. Extract nitrogen content generally increased with extraction temperature. 55 references, 58 figures, 22 tables.

Tyler, A.L.; Kafesjian, A.S.; Fischer-Calderon, P.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Gas saturated reservoirs change reflection amplitudes significantly. The goal for the final project period was to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration and transfer this knowledge as clearly and effectively as possible.

Michael Batzle

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry Resources with Additional Information · Patents George A. Olah Courtesy Rand Larson, Morningstar Productions George Olah received the 1994 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his contribution to carbocation chemistry" and his 'role in the chemistry of hydrocarbons. In particular, he developed superacids ... that are much stronger than ordinary acids, are non-nucleophilic, and are fluid at low temperatures. In such media ... carbocations are stable and their physical properties ... can be observed, thus allowing details of their structures to be determined. Besides trivalent ions ... Olah demonstrated the existence of higher coordinate carbocations ... . These species do not violate the octet rule, but involve 2-electron 3-center bonding. '1

196

Gulf Hydrocarbon Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrocarbon Inc Hydrocarbon Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Gulf Hydrocarbon Inc Address 2016 Main St Place Houston, Texas Zip 77002 Sector Biofuels Product Wholesale marketing of biodiesel and ethanol to refiners, blenders and petroleum distributors Website http://www.gulfhydrocarbon.com Coordinates 29.749227°, -95.371693° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.749227,"lon":-95.371693,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

Heavy Atom Substitution Effects in Non-Aromatic Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atom Substitution Effects in Non-Aromatic Ionic Liquids: Ultrafast Dynamics and Physical Properties H. Shirota, H. Fukazawa, T. Fujisawa, and J. F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B 114,...

198

Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

Wong, Show-Chu (Riverhead, NY); Shaw, Elliott (Shoreham, NY)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

EVect of aromatic compounds on the production of laccase and ...  

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol (2010) 37:10911096 DOI 10.1007/s10295-010-0757-y 123 ORIGINAL PAPER EVect of aromatic compounds on the production of ...

200

Catalysts for synthesizing various short chain hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Method and apparatus (10), including novel photocatalysts, are disclosed for the synthesis of various short chain hydrocarbons. Light-transparent SiO.sub.2 aerogels doped with photochemically active uranyl ions (18) are fluidized in a fluidized-bed reactor (12) having a transparent window (16), by hydrogen and CO, C.sub.2 H.sub.4 or C.sub.2 H.sub.6 gas mixtures (20), and exposed to radiation (34) from a light source (32) external to the reactor (12), to produce the short chain hydrocarbons (36).

Colmenares, Carlos (Alamo, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Novel metalloporphyrin catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work was done for developing biomimetic oxidation catalysts. Two classes of metalloporphyrin catalysts were studied. The first class of catalysts studied were a novel series of highly substituted metalloporphyrins, the fluorinated iron dodecaphenylporphyrins. These homogeneous metalloporphyrin catalysts were screened for activity as catalysts in the oxidation of hydrocarbons by dioxygen. Results are discussed with respect to catalyst structural features. The second type of catalysts studied were heterogeneous catalysts consisting of metalloporphyrins applied to inorganic supports. Preliminary catalytic testing results with these materials are presented.

Showalter, M.C.; Nenoff, T.M.; Shelnutt, J.A.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Biogenic Hydrocarbons in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonmethane hydrocarbons are ubiquitous trace atmospheric constituents yet they control the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere. Both anthropogenic and biogenic processes contribute to the release of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere. In this ...

J. D. Fuentes; L. Gu; M. Lerdau; R. Atkinson; D. Baldocchi; J. W. Bottenheim; P. Ciccioli; B. Lamb; C. Geron; A. Guenther; T. D. Sharkey; W. Stockwell

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Nitration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal combustors and exhaust streams. Quarterly report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Our efforts quarter were directed at preparing PAH samples at well-controlled extents of secondary pyrolysis. The same operating conditions used in the past were implemented this quarter to prepare PAH samples at well-controlled extents of secondary pyrolysis from a Pit. {number_sign}8 hvA bituminous coal. The new data are in excellent agreement with the old. Both ultimate yield values and soot percentages at particular furnace temperatures from these data sets am within experimental uncertainties. PAH samples have now been prepared to cover extents of conversion of coal tar into soot from 35--80 %. Additional runs during primary devolatilization have yielded PAH samples that cover nearly the full range of this process as well. Hence, all PAH samples from the Pit. {number_sign}8 coal sample are in hand. We also began to collect the analogous PAH samples from a subituminous coal. Efforts at sample analysis focused on testing and modification of the gravity-flow column chromatography procedure using actual tar samples. Extra samples collected during combustion experiments using the Pit. {number_sign}8 bituminous coal were used to refine the preparation technique. Solvent volumes were adjusted to optimize sample separation, and additional tests were conducted to determine the reproducibility of the fractionation and recovery. Further refinement in the experimental methodology allowed 80% recovery of the coal tar samples to be reproducibly achieved.

Yu, L.; Dadamio, J.; Hildemann, L.; Niska, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

STEAM EXTRACTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND LEAD FROM CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT USING SURFACTANT, SALT AND AKALINE CONDITIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Indiana Harbor Canal sediments, containing a number of environmental contaminants, are a source of pollution to Lake Michigan, and will need to be dredged (more)

WEINKAM, GRANT

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Direct determination of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal liquids and shale oil by laser excited Shpol'skii spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article reports that tunable, dye laser excitation of Shpol'skii effect spectra provides a potentially useful means of determining PAH compounds directly in coal liquids and shale oil without prior isolation of the PAH fraction by chromatographic or other techniques. The data reported were obtained by selecting excitation wavelengths within the response curve of a single dye, 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4 oxadiazole (PBD). The characteristic low temperature excitation spectra of PAH compounds in appropriate Shpol'skii matrices are known to be sharp (FWHM approx. 10cm/sup -1/). The luminescence of four individual PAHs is included. The analytical results obtained for a typical solvent refined coal and shale oil sample are summarized. 2 figures, 1 table. (DP)

Yen, Y.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.; Iles, M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Co-cultured Synechococcus and Shewanella Produce Hydrocarbons ...  

... microbes has been developed. These hydrocarbons may be further processed into vehicle fuels using traditional oil refining techniques.

207

Quantitative Changes in Hydrocarbons over Time in Fecal Pellets of Incisitermes minor May Predict Whether Colonies Are Alive or Dead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# The Author(s) 2010. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract Hydrocarbon mixtures extracted from fecal pellets of drywood termites are species-specific and can be characterized to identify the termites responsible for damage, even when termites are no longer present or are unable to be recovered easily. In structures infested by drywood termites, it is common to find fecal pellets, but difficult to sample termites from the wood. When fecal pellets appear after remedial treatment of a structure, it is difficult to determine whether this indicates that termites in the structure are still alive and active or not. We examined the hydrocarbon composition of workers, alates, and soldiers of Incisitermes minor (Hagen) (family Kalotermitidae) and of fecal pellets of workers. Hydrocarbons were qualitatively similar among castes and pellets. Fecal pellets that were aged for periods of 0, 30, 90, and 365 days after collection were qualitatively similar across all time periods, however, the relative quantities of certain individual hydrocarbons changed over time, with 19 of the 73 hydrocarbon peaks relatively increasing or decreasing. When the sums of the positive and negative slopes of these 19 hydrocarbons were indexed, they produced a highly significant linear correlation (R 2 =0.89). Consequently, the quantitative differences of these hydrocarbons peaks can be used to determine the age of worker fecal pellets, and thus help determine whether the colony that produced them is alive or dead.

Vernard R. Lewis; Lori J. Nelson; Michael I. Haverty; James A. Baldwin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Production of hydrocarbons from hydrates. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical and safe method of producing hydrocarbons (or natural gas) from in situ hydrocarbon-containing hydrates is given. Once started, the method will be self-driven and will continue producing hydrocarbons over an extended period of time (i.e., many days).

McGuire, P.L.

1981-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

209

Substantially self-powered method and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Apparatus for recovering gaseous hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Substantially self-powered method and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus, and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, G.R.B.; Barraclough, B.L.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1981-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

212

Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Preliminary design of axial flow hydrocarbon turbine/generator set for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report outlines the design of a 65 MW (e) gross turbine generator set in which a hydrocarbon gas mixture is used as the motive fluid. The turbine generator set is part of a geothermal binary cycle electric power plant proposed for the Heber site in the Imperial Valley, California. Aerodynamic design considerations and estimated unit performance for three hydrocarbon gas mixtures are presented. Real gas properties and equations of state are reviewed as they affect the turbine design and the thermodynamic cycle. The mechanical designs for the casing, rotor dynamics, shaft sealing and unit construction are detailed. Support systems such as the lube and seal supply system, turbine controls, etc., are reviewed. An extensive hydrocarbon turbine general specification is also included.

Barnes, B.; Samurin, N.A.; Shields, J.R.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from IGCC Gas Streams from IGCC Gas Streams Using the AC-ABC Process 2013 NETL CO 2 Capture Technology Meeting July 8-11, 2013 Pittsburgh, PA. SRI- Who We Are A world-leading independent R&D organization 2 * Founded by the Stanford University in 1946 - Non-profit corporation; became independent in 1970 - Name changed to SRI International in 1977 * 2,500 staff members; more than 20 locations worldwide * 2012 revenues: ~$545 million. CO 2 Capture Programs at SRI Advanced Carbon Sorbent Process Field Demonstration at U. Toledo 250 kW Chilled Ammonia Process Mini-pilot System 50 kW High Temperature PBI Membrane Skid. Pilot Unit for Capture of CO2 from Air Project Overview * Project Participants: - SRI International. - Bechtel Hydrocarbon Treatment Solutions, Inc. - EIG, Inc. - National Carbon Capture Center

215

Plasma-assisted conversion of solid hydrocarbon to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing diamond, e.g., diamond fiber, by subjecting a hydrocarbon material, e.g., a hydrocarbon fiber, to a plasma treatment in a gaseous feedstream for a sufficient period of time to form diamond, e.g., a diamond fiber is disclosed. The method generally further involves pretreating the hydrocarbon material prior to treatment with the plasma by heating within an oxygen-containing atmosphere at temperatures sufficient to increase crosslinking within said hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to melt or decompose said hydrocarbon material, followed by heating at temperatures sufficient to promote outgassing of said crosslinked hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to convert said hydrocarbon material to carbon.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Trkula, Mitchell (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Shah, S. Ismat (Wilmington, DE)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

2008 Special Issue: An adaptive method for industrial hydrocarbon flame detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adaptive method for an infrared (IR) hydrocarbon flame detection system is presented. The model makes use of joint time-frequency analysis (JTFA) for feature extraction and the artificial neural networks (ANN) for training and classification. Multiple ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Flame detection, Signal processing

Javid J. Huseynov; Shankar B. Baliga; Alan Widmer; Zvi Boger

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Aromatic nitrogen compounds in fossil fuels: a potential hazard  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To achieve energy independence in the United States, converting coal to oil or extracting oil from shale will be required. Before commercial scale fossil fuel conversion facilities become a reality, chemical and biological studies of currently available synfuel samples derived from coal or shale are urgently needed in order to determine what the potential health problems, such as from occupational exposure, might be. Aromatic nitrogen compounds such as basic aza-arenes, neutral aza-arenes, and aromatic amines are considered environmentally important and several members of these classes of compounds possess biological activity. For example, dibenz(a,h)acridine, 7 H-dibenzo(c,g)carbazole, and 2-naphthylamine, are well known as carcinogens. The methods used to isolate the basic aromatic nitrogen compounds and neutral aza-arenes from one shale oil and one coal-derived oil are discussed. The mutagenic activities of these fractions, based on the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test, are compared.

Ho, C H; Clark, B R; Guerin, M R; Ma, C Y; Rao, T K

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Chemical kinetic modelling of hydrocarbon ignition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon ignition is discussed with reference to a range of experimental configurations, including shock tubes, detonations, pulse combustors, static reactors, stirred reactors and internal combustion engines. Important conditions of temperature, pressure or other factors are examined to determine the main chemical reaction sequences responsible for chain branching and ignition, and kinetic factors which can alter the rate of ignition are identified. Hydrocarbon ignition usually involves complex interactions between physical and chemical factors, and it therefore is a suitable and often productive subject for computer simulations. In most of the studies to be discussed below, the focus of the attention is placed on the chemical features of the system. The other physical parts of each application are generally included in the form of initial or boundary conditions to the chemical kinetic parts of the problem, as appropriate for each type of application being addressed.

Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H.J.; Gaffuri, P.; Marinov, N.M.

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

1988-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT  

SciTech Connect

In this report we detail the synthesis catalytic chemistry of polystyrene supported {eta}{sup 5} ~cyclopentadienyl- dicarbonyl cobalt, CpCo(CO){sub 2}. This material is active in the hydrogenation of CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain its "homogeneous", mononuclear character during the course of its catalysis, During the course of our work 18% and 20% crosslinked analogs of polystyrene supported CpCo(CO){sub 2} were shown to exhibit limited catalytic activity and no CO activation.

Benner, Linda S.; Perkins, Patrick; Vollhardt, K.Peter C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Getter pump for hydrogen and hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gettering device for hydrogen isotopes and gaseous hydrocarbons based on the interaction of a plasma and graphite used as cathodic material. The plasma is maintained at a current density within the range of about 1 to about 1000 mA/cm.sup.2. The graphite may be heated to a temperature greater than 1000.degree. C. The new device offers high capacity, low noise, and gas species selectivity.

Hsu, Wen L. (Danville, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Energy Conservation Opportunities in Hydrocarbon Resin Manufacturing Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The results of a plant-wide assessment of the manufacturing facilities of Neville Chemical Company, a manufacturer of hydrocarbon resins will be presented in this paper. The project was co-funded by US Department of Energy under its Plant-Wide Opportunity Assessment Program. Resin manufacturing is a highly energy intensive process. The process needs extensive heating accomplished through steam boilers and thermal oil heaters, and cooling which is accomplished through refrigeration as well as process cooling water systems. Detailed energy assessment of Neville Chemical plants has shown significant energy conservation opportunities. For the less capital-intensive measures, energy cost savings of 20% to 30% with paybacks of less than two years were identified. The identified measures can be easily replicated in similar facilities. In this paper, details of the processes in hydrocarbon resin production from an energy consumption viewpoint will be discussed, current prevalent practices in the industry will be elaborated, and potential measures for energy use and cost savings will be outlined."

Ganji, A. R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Remedial evaluation of a UST site impacted with chlorinated hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During assessment and remedial planning of an underground storage tank (UST) site, it was discovered that chlorinated hydrocarbons were present. A network of selected wells were sampled for analysis of halogenated volatile organics and volatile organic compounds to determine the extent of constituents not traditionally associated with refined petroleum motor fuel products. The constituents detected included vinyl chloride, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), bromodichloromethane, and 2-chloroethylvinyl ether. These analytical data were evaluated as to what effect the nonpetroleum hydrocarbon constituents may have on the remedial approach utilized the site hydrogeologic properties to its advantage and took into consideration the residential nature of the impacted area. The geometry of the dissolved plume is very flat and broad, emanating from the site and extending downgradient under a residential area situated in a transmissive sand unit. Ground-water pumping was proposed from two areas of the dissolved plume including five wells pumping at a combined rate of 55 gallons per minute (gpm) at a downgradient position, and two wells on-site to remove free product and highly impacted ground water. Also, to assist in remediation of the dissolved plume and to control vapors, a bioventing system was proposed throughout the plume area.

Ilgner, B.; Rainey, E. (Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Ball, M.; Schutt, M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Making your presentation fun: creative presentation techniques  

SciTech Connect

What possesses someone to volunteer and go through hoops and red tape to make a presentation at a conference? For that matter, why does anyone ever present anything to anyone? Actually, presentations are a fact of life and there are many reasons for doing a presentation and doing it well. New and existing staff need training and orientation to the way things are done here. Handing all of them a manual and hoping they read it is pretty much a waste of paper. On the other hand, an effective, entertaining and upbeat presentation on the relevant topics is more likely to stick with those people. They will even have a name and face to remember and seek out when they have an issue on or with that topic. This can be a very effective beginning for networking with new peers. The presenter is seen as knowledgeable, as a source of information on company topics and possibly evaluated as a potential mentor or future manager. Project staff and/or peers benefit from clear, concise, presentations of topical knowledge. This is one way that a group working on various aspects of the same project or program can stay in touch and in step with each other. Most importantly, presentations may be the best or only door into the minds (and budgets) of management and customers. These presentations are a wonderful opportunity to address legal and compliance issues, budget, staffing, and services. Here is a chance, maybe the only one, to demonstrate and explain the wonderfulness of a program and the benefit they get by using the services offered most effectively. An interactive presentation on legal and compliance issues can be an effective tool in helping customers and/or management make good risk management decisions.

KEENEN,MARTHA JANE

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

225

Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis of Lignin Model Compounds: Reaction Pathways of Aromatic Methoxy Groups  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, there is interest in utilizing lignin, a major constituent of biomass, as a renewable source of chemicals and fuels. High yields of liquid products can be obtained from the flash or fast pyrolysis of biomass, but the reaction pathways that lead to product formation are not understood. To provide insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds at 500 C. This presentation will focus on the FVP of {beta}-ether linkages containing aromatic methoxy groups and the reaction pathways of methoxy-substituted phenoxy radicals.

Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C., III; Martineau, D.R.

1999-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov May 2012 Opportunity Research is currently active on the technology "Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview This invention discloses a method to reform hydrocarbon fuels using hexa- aluminate catalysts. In general, the method successfully disrupts the forma- tion of carbon that leads to the deactivation of the catalyst, a key element in the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. When researchers are designing catalysts to reform hydrocarbon fuels, one

227

Method for producing hydrocarbon and alcohol mixtures. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of this invention to provide an efficient process for extracting alcohols and ketones from an aqueous solution containing the same into hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil. Another object of the invention is to provide a mixture consisting of hydrocarbon, alcohols or ketones, polyoxyalkylene polymer and water which can be directly added to fuels or further purified. The above stated objects are achieved in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention by contacting an aqueous fermentation liquor with a hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture containing carbon compounds having 5 to 18 carbon atoms, which may include gasoline, diesel fuel or fuel oil. The hydrocarbon-aqueous alcohol solution is mixed in the presence or one or more of a group of polyoxyalkylene polymers described in detail hereinafter; the fermentation alcohol being extracted into the hydrocarbon fuel-polyoxyalkylene polymer mixture.

Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Griffith, W.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Harvester ants utilize cuticular hydrocarbons in nestmate recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractCuticular hydrocarbons appear to play a role in ant nestmate recognition, but few studies have tested this hypothesis experimentally with purified hydrocarbon extracts. We exposed captive colonies of the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex barbatus to small glass blocks coated with whole cuticular lipid extracts and the purified hydrocarbon portion of extracts from nestmate and nonnestmate workers. As an estimate of agonistic behavior, we measured the proportion of ants in contact with blocks that flared their mandibles. Blocks coated with cuticular extracts from nonnestmates were contacted by more workers in one of two experiments and elicited higher levels of aggression in both experiments than blocks bearing extracts from nestmates. The cuticular hydrocarbon fraction of extracts alone was sufficient to elicit agonistic behavior toward nonnestmates. The results demonstrate that harvester ants can perceive differences in cuticular hydrocarbon composition, and can use those differences in nestmate recognition. Key WordsCuticular hydrocarbons, Formicidae, Nestmate recognition, Pogonomyrmex barbatus.

Diane Wagner; Madeleine Tissot; William Cuevas; Deborah M. Gordon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels ...  

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

230

Novel catalyst for selective NOx reduction using hydrocarbons ...  

This invention discloses a catalyst and process for removing nitrogen oxides from exhaust streams under lean burn conditions using hydrocarbons as the reductant.

231

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. I. MOLECULAR CRITERIA FOR HYDROCARBON GENESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isoprenoid hydrocarbons in crude oils and sediments must beisomers (up to C ) in crude oil and those characterised inarc found ubiqubtously in crude oils and shalt extracts as

McCarthy, Eugene D.; Calvin, Kevin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nelson, Lee O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene ...  

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene purge gas United States Patent. Patent Number: 6,576,043: Issued: June 10, 2003: Official Filing:

234

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

Senum, Gunnar I. (Patchogue, NY); Dietz, Russell N. (Patchogue, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

236

Multi-step catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon fuels ...  

Multi-step catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon fuels from biomass pyrolysis bio-oil (PNNL IPID 16665) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

237

Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

238

Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hydrocarbon synthesis catalyst and method of preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants. The catalyst is preferably used in dilute slurry form, which is desirable from a heat transfer standpoint.

Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Sansone, Michael J. (Summit, NJ); Slegeir, William A. R. (Hampton Bays, NY)

1983-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

240

Correlation between speciated hydrocarbon emissions and flame ionization detector response for gasoline/alcohol blends .  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. renewable fuel standard has made it a requirement to increase the production of ethanol and advanced biofuels to 36 billion by 2022. Ethanol will be capped at 15 billion, which leaves 21 billion to come from other sources such as butanol. Butanol has a higher energy density and lower affinity for water than ethanol. Moreover, alcohol fueled engines in general have been shown to positively affect engine-out emissions of oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide compared with their gasoline fueled counterparts. In light of these developments, the variety and blend levels of oxygenated constituents is likely to increase in the foreseeable future. The effect on engine-out emissions for total hydrocarbons is less clear due to the relative insensitivity of the flame ionization detector (FID) toward alcohols and aldehydes. It is well documented that hydrocarbon (HC) measurement using a conventional FID in the presence of oxygenates in the engine exhaust stream can lead to a misinterpretation of HC emissions trends for alcohol fuel blends. Characterization of the exhaust stream for all expected hydrocarbon constituents is required to accurately determine the actual concentration of unburned fuel components in the exhaust. In addition to a conventional exhaust emissions bench, this characterization requires supplementary instrumentation capable of hydrocarbon speciation and response factor independent quantification. Although required for certification testing, this sort of instrumentation is not yet widely available in engine development facilities. Therefore, an attempt is made to empirically determine FID correction factors for oxygenate fuels. Exhaust emissions of an engine fueled with several blends of gasoline and ethanol, n-butanol and iso-Butanol were characterized using both a conventional FID and a Fourier transform infrared. Based on these results, a response factor predicting the actual hydrocarbon emissions based solely on FID results as a function of alcohol type and content is presented. Finally, the correlation derived from data presented in this study is compared with equations and results found in the literature.

Wallner, T. (Energy Systems)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mobilization of trace elements in aquifers by biodegradation of hydrocarbon contaminants. Master Thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study had two objectives: (1) to determine the extent of metal mobility within petroleum-contaminated aquifers, (2) to determine if biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons can explain metal mobility. The approach reviewed analytical results from 2305 groundwater sampling events, taken from 958 wells, located at 136 sites found at 53 Air Force installations. The study showed that high levels of metals are present at petroleum hydrocarbon sites where metals would not generally be expected. Of the metals with drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs), mercury and silver were detected the least frequently. Barium and copper were detected at the sites, but fewer than 2.5 percent of the samples exceeded their MCLs. All other metals exceeded their MCLs in at least 2.5 percent of the samples, with antimony and lead exceeding their MCLs in 19 percent and 10 percent of samples, respectively. Higher concentrations of barium and manganese were most strongly correlated with petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, and relatively strong correlations also existed for aluminum, arsenic, iron, and lead. Major cations such as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium were least affected by petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations.

Kearney, S.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Presenter Bio - Tasios Melis, Professor, UC Berkeley  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presenter Bio - Tasios Melis, Professor, UC Berkeley Presenter Bio - Tasios Melis, Professor, UC Berkeley A Professor at the University of California Berkeley, Tasios Melis envisioned and pioneered the concept of "Photosynthetic Biofuels", entailing the direct application of photosynthesis for the generation of bioenergy, in a process where a single organism acts both as photocatalyst and processor, synthesizing and secreting ready to use fuels. This has been successfully applied to hydrogen production and specific hydrocarbon products. The Melis lab contributed with a breakthrough in the field, when several years ago they demonstrated, for the first time, how to divert the natural flow of photosynthesis in green microalgae and to sustainably generate hydrogen gas, instead of the normally produced oxygen. This technology is currently employed by

244

Lubricant formulation for lower unburnt hydrocarbon emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engine-out emissions of unburnt hydrocabons from spark ignition engines are attributable to a number of mechanisms, occurring during the engine cycle, by which fuel escapes combustion. These include absorption of fuel components into the bore lubricating oil film during compression, and subsequent desorption into hot combustion gases throughout expansion. A proportion of the hydrocarbons desorbed will then be emitted, either as unburnt or partially oxidised fuel. This mechanism has been studied by a number of workers, and estimates of its importance vary from 10 to 30% of total hydrocarbons being related to the absorption/desorption process. A novel lubricant additive has been formulated for the purpose of reducing the quantity of fuel which is absorbed into the bore lubricant film, and hence the quantity of fuel subsequently desorbed. This paper describes a programme to evaluate the effect that this lubricant additive can have on engine-out emissions from a single cylinder research engine, together with results from current technology, low-emitting US and European vehicles, tested over FTP and ECE drive cycles. 11 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Beckwith, P.; Cooper, J.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

External Coordination Working Group Presented by: Presented by: Tim Runyon, Rail Topic Group Member Tim Runyon, Rail Topic Group Member April 5, 2005, Spring 2005 April...

246

Poster Presentation Purpose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

colleagues. Because poster presentations are usually done in groups, with observers milling around a large room of posters, the presentations are relaxed and more conducive to...

247

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Section 180 Topic Group Topic Group Presented by: Presented by: Anne deLain Clark Western Interstate Energy Board March 15 2006 March 15 2006 Washington, DC Washington,...

248

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot-scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Tan, E.; Tao, L.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Solar Webinar Presentation Slides  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Download presentation slides from the DOE Office of Indian Energy Webinar on solar renewable energy.

251

Presenting and Explaining Mizar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mizar proof language has both many human-friendly presentation features, and also firm semantical level allowing rigorous proof checking. Both the presentation features and the semantics are important for users, and an ideal Mizar presentation should ... Keywords: ATP, MML Query, MPTP, Mizar, proof objects, proof presentation

Josef Urban; Grzegorz Bancerek

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

253

Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Significance of Cytochrome P450 System Responses and Levels of Bile Fluorescent Aromatic Compounds in Marine Wildlife Following Oil Spills  

SciTech Connect

The relationships among cytochrome P450 induction in marine wildlife species, levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC) in their bile, the chemical composition of the inducing compounds, the significance of the exposure pathway, and any resulting injury, as a consequence of exposure to crude oil following a spill, are reviewed. Fish collected after oil spills often show increases in cytochrome P450 system activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and bile fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC), that are correlated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the oil. There is also some evidence for increases in bile FAC and induction of cytochrome P450 in marine birds and mammals after oil spills. However, when observed, increases in these exposure indicators are transitory and generally decrease to background levels within one year after the exposure. Laboratory studies have shown induction of cytochrome P450 systems occurs after exposure of fish to crude oil in water, sediment or food. Most of the PAH found in crude oil (dominantly 2- and 3-ring PAH) are not strong inducers of cytochrome P450. Exposure to the 4-ring chrysenes or the photooxidized products of the PAH may account for the cytochrome P450 responses in fish collected from oil-spill sites. The contribution of non-spill background PAH, particularly combustion-derived (pyrogenic) PAH, to bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses can be confounding and needs to be considered when evaluating oil spill effects. The ubiquity of pyrogenic PAH makes it important to fully characterize all sources of PAH, including PAH from natural resources, e.g. retene, in oil spill studies. In addition, such parameters as species, sex, age, ambient temperature and season need to be taken into account. While increases in fish bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses, can together, be sensitive general indicators of PAH exposure after an oil spill, there is little unequivocal evidence to suggest a linkage to higher order biological effects, e.g. toxicity, lesions, reproductive failure.

Lee, Richard F.; Anderson, Jack W.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Studies on multi-phase equilibrium separation of hydrocarbon/water systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equations of State (EOS) have been used successfully in compositional simulators to describe phase behavior of reservoir crude and gas condensates without water. The three-phase behavior of water/reservoir crude oils both at reservoir and steam flooding temperature has not yet been successfully predicted by an EOS. Recent publications show that incorporation of the association concept into simple cubic equations such as Peng-Robinson EOS significantly improves phase behavior prediction of water/hydrocarbon and nonhydrate systems, but there are still some numerical difficulties in the pre-diction of three phase flash equilibria. In this thesis we presented, an efficient procedure that will help us eliminate common numerical difficulties in predicting three-phase equilibria for systems containing water, and simplify the programming technique. This scheme checks the existence of three-phase flash at given reservoir conditions, and if three-phase flash (vapor-oleic-aqueous) doesn't exist, it automatically switches to check correct type of two-phase flash (vapor-oleic, vapor-aqueous, or oleic-aqueous). This convergence scheme is used in an EOS-simulator (VLLESIM), which uses nine different EOS's and van der Waals mixing rules, to accurately describe multi-phase equilibrium separation of hydrocarbon/water systems. VLLESIM will be validated with literature data and experimental results obtained from two different experimental setups, for different multi-component hydrocarbon/water systems, for hydrocarbon component varying from C6 to C20. PVT-VLLE apparatus can provide on-line compositional analysis and phase volumes of all equilibrium phases for temperatures up to 350 'F and an Isochoric Steam Distillation Cell (ISDC) can provide only vapor phase compositions, but it can be used up to 500 'F. VLLESIM will then be used to study the effect of temperature, pressure and molecular weight of hydrocarbon components on multiphase equilibria of different hydrocarbon/water systems. Detailed analysis is also provided in this thesis, of the effect of increasing concentration of different hydrocarbon components on the size of the three-phase region for ranges of temperature and pressure mostly prevalent under reservoir conditions.

Chawla, Inderjit Singh

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation, the primary source of petroleum hydrocarbons inPetroleum Geologists, Tulsa Clark JF, Washburn L, Hornafius JS, Luyendyk BP (2000) Natural marine hydrocarbon seep source

Leifer, Ira; Kamerling, Marc J.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.; Wilson, Douglas S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Spatial Scales, Distribution, and Intensity of Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps near Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marine hydrocarbon seeps (Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara,marine hydrocarbon seepage near Coal Oil Point, California,associated with offshore oil production", Geology, 27(11),

Washburn, Libe; Clark, Jordan F.; Kyriakidis, Phaedon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Spatial Scales, Distribution, and Intensity of Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps near Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marine hydrocarbon seeps (Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara,marine hydrocarbon seepage near Coal Oil Point, California,source areas such as near Coal Oil Point. Furthermore,

Washburn, Libe; Clark, Jordan F.; Kyriakidis, Phaedon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Conversion of Mixed Oxygenates Generated from Synthesis Gas to Fuel Range Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The growing dependence in the U.S. on foreign crude oil supplies and increased concerns regarding greenhouse gas emission has generated considerable interest in research to develop renewable and environmentally friendly liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels. One of the strategies for achieving this is to produce intermediate compounds such as alcohols and other simple oxygenates from biomass generated synthesis gas (mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and further convert them into liquid hydrocarbons. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of mixed oxygenates intermediate product compositions on the conversion step to produce hydrocarbon liquids. A typical mixed oxygenate stream is expected to contain water (around 50%), alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol (around 35%), and smaller quantities of oxygenates such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and ethyl acetate. However the ratio and the composition of the mixed oxygenate stream generated from synthesis gas vary significantly depending on the catalyst used and the process conditions. Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of methanol accompanied by chain growth is well understood under Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) like reaction conditions using an H-ZSM-5 zeolite as the catalyst6-8. Research has also been conducted to a limited extent in the past with higher alcohols, but not with other oxygenates present9-11. Also there has been little experimental investigation into mixtures containing substantial amounts of water. The latter is of particular interest because water separation from the hydrocarbon product would be less energy intensive than first removing it from the oxygenate intermediate stream prior to hydrocarbon synthesis, potentially reducing overall processing costs.

Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Lilga, Michael A.; Flake, Matthew D.

2012-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

260

AMBIENT HYDROCARBONS IN THE HOUSTON METROPOLITAN AREA DURING TEXAQS 2000: AN IDENTIFICATION OF UNUSUAL FEATURES.  

SciTech Connect

Houston's ozone problem has been linked to the occurrence of very high light olefin concentrations. We have analyzed the DOE G-1 aircraft hydrocarbon data set to provide additional information on the geographic distribution and prevalence of air samples with high olefin concentration as well as an identification of other compounds which contribute to the high hydrocarbon reactivity in Houston. In order to identify high concentrations we need a definition of normal. For that purpose we use aircraft samples collected during a 1999 aircraft based field campaign in Philadelphia relying on the circumstance that the frequency distributions of NO{sub x} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in Philadelphia are nearly the same as in Houston. Comparison is made also with hydrocarbons collected in Phoenix which exhibit nearly the same NO{sub x} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} frequency distribution as the other 2 cities, but in spite of that similarity have a much lower hydrocarbon reactivity. As in other studies we find that there is a subset of Houston hydrocarbon samples with very high OH-reactivity due to elevated concentrations of ethylene, propylene and less often butenes, including 1,3 butadiene. Although these samples stand out as being qualitatively different we present evidence that ethylene and propylene are significantly elevated in at least half of the Houston samples, covering a wide geographic area apart from the Ship Channel region. Frequency distributions for these compounds are log normal suggesting that Houston's atmosphere is a single entity rather than separate industrial and urban areas. The comparison between Houston and Philadelphia also identifies C{sub 2}-C{sub 5} alkanes, n-hexane, and benzene as having elevated concentrations. Emission reductions of these less reactive compounds sufficient to yield the concentrations observed in Philadelphia would have a minor effect on the most reactive samples, but about a 20% effect on samples with more typical (median) reactivity.

KLEINMAN, L.I.; DAUM P.H.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Present your Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learn how to present your research at an AOCS meeting. Present your Research Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo Call for Papers Conferences Congress control dispersions edible exhibit expo fats functions fundam

262

Renewable Energy 101 (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation given at the 2012 Department of Homeland Security Renewable Energy Roundtable as an introduction to renewable technologies and applications.

Walker, A.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

NIST Publications and Presentations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... John Butler presentation at the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) meeting (Krakw, Poland), April 17, 2007, "NIST Human Identity Team ...

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

NIST Publications and Presentations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Margaret Kline presentation at the DARPA Preserved and Stabilized Self-Collected Biospecimens Workshop (San Francisco, CA), February 2, 2012 ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

Deployment Partnerships (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation, Deployment Partnerships, was given by Mike Pacheco at the Industry Growth Forum in Golden, Colorado, November 5, 2009.

Pacheco, M.

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

266

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Inertial confinement fusion: present status and future potential  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power from inertial confinement fusion holds much promise for society. This paper points out many of the benefits relative to combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and fission power. Potential problems are also identified and put in perspective. The progress toward achieving inertial fusion power is described and results of recent work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. Key phenomenological uncertainties are described and experimental goals for the Nova laser system are given. Several ICF reactor designs are discussed.

Hogan, W.J.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Stable isotope investigations of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stable isotope ratio measurements for carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) can be used to elucidate the processes affecting transformation and transportation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) in the environment. Methods recently developed in our laboratory for isotopic analysis of CAHs have been applied to laboratory measurements of the kinetic isotope effects associated with aerobic degradation of dichloromethane (DCM) and with both anaerobic and aerobic cometabolic degradation of trichlomethene (TCE) in batch and column microbial cultures. These experimental determinations of fractionation factors are crucial for understanding the behavior of CAHs in complex natural systems, where the extent of biotransformation can be masked by dispersion and volatilization. We have also performed laboratory investigations of kinetic isotope effects accompanying evaporation of CAHs, as well as field investigations of natural attenuation and in situ remediation of CAHs in a number of contaminated shallow aquifers at sites operated by the federal government and the private sector.

Abrajano, T.; Heraty, L. J.; Holt, B. D.; Huang, L.; Sturchio, N. C.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Microbial hydrocarbons: back to the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The defining challenge of energy research in the 21st century is the development and deployment of technologies for large-scale reconfiguration of global energy infrastructure. Modern society is built upon a concentrated yet finite reservoir of diverse hydrocarbons formed through the photosynthetic transformation of several hundred million years of solar energy. In human history, the fossil energy era will be short lived and never repeated. Although the timing of peak oil is extensively debated, it is an eventuality. It is, therefore, imperative that projections for both when it will occur and the degree to which supply will fall short of demand be taken into serious consideration, especially in the sectors of energy technology development, political and economic decision making, and societal energy usage. The requirement for renewable energy systems is no longer a point for discussion, and swift advances on many fronts are vital to counteract current and impending crises in both energy and the environment.

Work, Victoria H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Posewitz, Matthew C.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Anthropogenic emissions of nonmethane hydrocarbons in the northeastern United States: Measured seasonal variations from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in relative emissions for this series of trace gases. Seasonal changes in n-butane and i-butane emissions may [Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998]. [3] In this study, we present the seasonality of C2-C6 (ethane, propane, n-butane, i-butane, n-pentane, i-pentane and n-hexane) hydrocarbons, NOy and CO as measured at Harvard Forest

Goldstein, Allen

271

Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress made in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser inertial confinement fusion during 1987. The foam materials are polystyrene, resorcinol-formaldehyde, carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde, and cellulose acetate. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationship of their properties to target specifications are presented. Progress in the creation and testing of prototype targets is also described.

Haendler, B.L.; Buckley, S.R.; Chen, C.; Cook, A.R.; Cook, R.C.; Hair, L.M.; Kong, F.M.; Kramer, H.D.; Letts, S.A.; Overturf, G.E. III

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. Concentrations in produced water discharge plume/receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

273

Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. concentrations in produced water discharge plume / receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentration of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

EOS Land Validation Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Land Validation Presentations EOS Land Validation Presentations Meeting: Land Cover Validation Workshop Date: February 2, 2004 Place: Boston, MA Title: Validation Data Support Activities at the ORNL DAAC (Power Point) Presenter: Bob Cook Meeting: Fall 2003 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting Date: December 9, 2003 Place: San Francisco, CA Title: Ground-Based Data Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: MODIS Land Summary (Power Point) Presenter: Chris Justice, University of Maryland Meeting: Spring 2002 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting

275

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working Session Working Session Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Rail Topic Group Transportation External Coordination Rail Topic Group Presented by: Presented by: Chair, Jay Jones Office of National Transportation March 15 2006 March 15 2006 Washington, DC Washington, DC 2 Agenda * Welcome and Introduction * Roll Call * Status/Update on Rail Topic Group at large * Update/Discussion from Individual Subgroups * Summary of CSG/Midwest Routing Project * Update of CSG/NE Routing Project * TRAGIS Update * Wrap Up * Subgroup Breakout

276

Presenting parabolic subgroups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consider a relatively hyperbolic group G. We prove that if G is finitely presented, so are its parabolic subgroups. Moreover, a presentation of the parabolic subgroups can be found algorithmically from a presentation of G, a solution of its word problem, and generating sets of the parabolic subgroups. We also give an algorithm that finds parabolic subgroups in a given recursively enumerable class of groups.

Dahmani, Franois

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update Update Presented to: Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Working Group Transportation External Coordination Working Group Presented by: Presented by: Jay Jones Jay Jones Office of National Transportation Office of National Transportation September 21, 2005 September 21, 2005 Pueblo, CO Pueblo, CO 2 Summary * Summary of Previous Transportation External Coordination (TEC) Rail Topic Group meeting * Summary of meeting with rail industry * Proposed Topic Group activities * Current issues and next steps 3 Summary Previous TEC Rail Topic Group Meeting * Request the Office of National Transportation to wait for SRGs to submit individual routing recommendations * Update from SRGs on their routing process * Topic Group recommendations: - Identified the need for Federal Railroad Administration

278

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanostructured Electrode and Electrolyte Development for Energy Storage Devices Presented by Karen Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM Funded by the Energy Storage...

279

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IOGCCSSEB PTTF REPORT THE PIPELINE PROJECT: Analysis of potential pipeline infrastructure, transportation & storage of CO 2 Presented at DOE's Carbon Storage Program...

280

Renewable Hydrogen (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation about the United State's dependence on oil, how energy solutions are challenging, and why hydrogen should be considered as a long-term alternative for transportation fuel.

Remick, R. J.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Alliance - www.eosalliance.org Slide 1 Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest (CCST Northwest) RCSP Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA November 18, 2009 Presented by Erick...

282

SRNL - Publications & Presentations  

Presented at the American Nuclear Society 2nd International Joint Topical Meeting on Emergency Preparedness and Response and Robotic and Remote ...

283

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

Hand, M.; Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

Hand, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

288

Thermal conversion of oil shale into recoverable hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrocarbons is accomplished by pyrolysis of oil shale with controlled removal of the resulting layer of spent oil-shale residue. A procedure is described for the in situ thermal conversion of oil shale wherein fluidized abrasive particles are employed to foster improved hydrocarbon production, in amount and kind, by a controlled partial removal of the layer of spent oil shale which results from application of flowing fluids to heat exposed surfaces of the oil shale to release hydrocarbons. (5 claims)

Slusser, M.L.; Bramhall, W.E.

1969-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

289

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Topic Group Summary Topic Group Summary Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Working Group Presented by: Presented by: Dan King, Oneida Nation, Tribal Topic Group Member Dan King, Oneida Nation, Tribal Topic Group Member April 5, 2005, Spring 2005 April 5, 2005, Spring 2005 Phoenix, AZ Phoenix, AZ 2 Funding Issues - Considerations * Examination of overlapping jurisdictions * Reconsider half-mile limit * Include all public safety officials in training * Ongoing training - turnover of personnel * Recovery of money spent responding to accidents * Cultural resources cannot be replaced - used to sustain communities 3 Funding Issues - Recommendations * Lessons Learned from Department of Homeland Security * Provide direct funding to Tribes * Create simple application process * Appoint Tribal representatives on application

290

Development of coker feeds from aromatic oil and bituminous coal digests.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kingwood coal has been digested with two coal derived (anthracene oil and carbon black base) and two petroleum derived (slurry oil and Maraflex oil) aromatic (more)

Clendenin, L. Mitchell.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Analysis of the behavior of ternary hydrocarbon mixture as substitutes of the CFC-12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbons are stratospheric ozone friendly and have good heat transfer properties. The use of hydrocarbons (HCs) or their blend as refrigerant is extending in these days. This paper deals with the search of the best ternary hydrocarbons mixture of ... Keywords: CFC-12, LB-12, cub, hydrocarbon, ozone, refrigerant, ternary mixture

Rafael Quintero Ricardo

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Modeling the national chlorinated hydrocarbon supply chain and effects of disruption.  

SciTech Connect

Chlorinated hydrocarbons represent the precursors for products ranging from PVC and refrigerants to pharmaceuticals. Natural or manmade disruptions that affect the availability of these products nationally have the potential to affect a wide range of markets, from healthcare to construction. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) has developed datasets and models that allow the analysis of the interdependencies within the chlorine chemical supply chain and consequences of disruptions. Combining data on plant locations, transportation, utilities, and the chemical supply chain itself, with modeling tools such as N-ABLE, a Sandia-developed agent based modeling system, allows Sandia to model this complex system dynamically. Sandia has used the N-ABLE technology to simulate a disruption to the chlorinated hydrocarbon supply chain caused by a hurricane striking the Louisiana coast. This paper presents results and conclusions from this analysis.

Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Downes, Paula Sue; Blair, Angela S. (United States Department of Homeland Security Science & Technology Directorate); Welk, Margaret Ellen

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Exhaust after-treatment system with in-cylinder addition of unburnt hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Certain exhaust after-treatment devices, at least periodically, require the addition of unburnt hydrocarbons in order to create reductant-rich exhaust conditions. The present disclosure adds unburnt hydrocarbons to exhaust from at least one combustion chamber by positioning, at least partially within a combustion chamber, a mixed-mode fuel injector operable to inject fuel into the combustion chamber in a first spray pattern with a small average angle relative to a centerline of the combustion chamber and a second spray pattern with a large average angle relative to the centerline of the combustion chamber. An amount of fuel is injected in the first spray pattern into a non-combustible environment within the at least one combustion chamber during at least one of an expansion stroke and exhaust stroke. The exhaust with the unburnt amount of fuel is moved into an exhaust passage via an exhaust valve.

Coleman, Gerald N. (Corby, GB); Kesse, Mary L. (Peoria, IL)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

NERSC Science Highlights Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Surveys User Surveys HPC Requirements for Science HPC Workshop Reports NERSC Staff Publications & Presentations Journal Cover Stories Galleries Home » News & Publications » Publications & Reports » Science Highlights Presentations Science Highlights Presentations NERSC collects highlights of recent scientific work carried out by its users. If you are a user and have work that you would like us to highlight please send e-mail to consult@nersc.gov. December 2013 Presentation [PDF] Model Shows Arrangement of Proteins in Photosynthetic Membranes [Geissler] How Many Earths are There? [Petigura] Read more... IceCube is 2013 Physics Breakthrough of the Year [Gerhardt] Read more... Simulation Couples with Experiment to Boost Energy Research [Smith] Simulation Captures the Essence of Carbonate Crystallization [Whitelam]

295

Publications and Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications and Presentations Publications and Presentations News & Publications ESnet in the News ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Publications and Presentations Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2013 Dart E., Rotman L., Tierney B., Hester M., and Zurawski J., "The Science DMZ: A Network Design Pattern for Data-Intensive Science", IEEE/ACM Annual SuperComputing Conference (SC13), Denver CO, USA, November 19, 2013, LBNL LBNL-6366E Download File: sc13sciDMZ-final.pdf (pdf: 952 KB) Ezra Kissel, Martin Swany, Brian Tierney and Eric Pouyoul, "Efficient

296

ARM - 2008 STM Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations 2008 Meeting 2008 Meeting Home Proceedings Sorted by Author Proceedings Sorted by Title Pictures Posters Presentations Meeting Archives ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings Past Science Team Meetings 2008 STM Presentations Monday, March 10 ARM Orientation for New and Current PIs Chief Scientist's Perspective (PDF, 5.7MB) Warren Wiscombe ARM Instruments (PDF, 14.7MB) Jimmy Voyles Infrastructure (PDF, 643KB) Jim Mather How to Get Data (PDF, 2MB) Raymond McCord Working Group Sessions Cloud Modeling Working Group 2008 ARM STM Cloud Modeling Working Group Session Agenda (PDF, 11KB) Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations (PDF, 272KB) Xiaoqing Wu and Qilong Min Interactions of Cumulus Convection and the Boundary Layer at the

297

Roadmap Integration Team Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presentation Presentation NP03-00 Slide 1 Generation IV Technology Roadmap NERAC Meeting: Washington, D.C. September 30, 2002 Roadmap Integration Team Presentation NP03-00 Slide 2 NERAC Meeting September 30, 2002 Generation IV Technology Roadmap * Identifies systems deployable by 2030 or earlier * Specifies six systems that offer significant advances towards: - Sustainability - Economics - Safety and reliability - Proliferation resistance and physical protection * Summarizes R&D activities and priorities for the systems * Lays the foundation for Generation IV R&D program plans Roadmap Integration Team Presentation NP03-00 Slide 3 NERAC Meeting September 30, 2002 The Technical Roadmap Report * Discusses the benefits, goals and challenges, and the importance of the fuel cycle * Describes evaluation and selection process

298

Presentations | MMSNF 2013 Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Privacy and Security Notice Presentations Available Presentations from the Materials Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Fuels (MMSNF) 2013 workshop. Presented on Presentation Title Authors Session Oct. 14, 2013 Welcome and announcements Ewing, Tom (ANL, USA) and Rosner, Robert (UC, USA) Opening Oct. 14, 2013 First-principles DFT+U modeling of paramagnetic UO2 and (U,Pu) mixed oxides [366KB, posted: Oct. 13, 2013 ] Dorado, Boris (CEA, DAM, DIF, France), Garcia, Philippe (CEA, DEN, DEC, France) Atomistic Models and Simulations Oct. 14, 2013 Computational study of energetics and defect-ordering tendencies for rare earth elements in uranium dioxide [1.5MB, posted: Oct. 28, 2013 ] Solomon, Jonathan M. (UC Berkeley, USA), Alexandrov, Vitaly (UC Berkeley, UC Davis, USA), Sadigh, Babak (LLNL, USA), Navrotsky, Alexandra (UC Davis, USA), Asta, Mark (UC Berkeley, UC Davis, USA) Atomistic Models and Simulations

299

Dinner & Awards Presentations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1997 TMS Annual Dinner and Awards Presentations will be held at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, February 11, 1997, at the Omni Rosen Hotel. This highlight of the...

300

Nuclear Physics Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion in the Sun Quark Matter 2004 Teacher Workshop - There are a number of presentations at a high school level which show the field of high energy nuclear physics - the search...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and K.E. Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185-0614 High Voltage Electrochemical Capacitor presented at EESAT 2007 September 23-27, 2007 PEER...

302

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M. M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

PowerPoint Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective Presentations This guide will take you through three important steps 1. Prepare yourself to convey your message clearly 2. Construct slides with impact 3. Put it all together effectively Preparing Yourself

304

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Solar Data Hub (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As power grid integration of renewables becomes ever more important and detailed, the need for a centralized place for solar-related resource data is needed. This presentation describes such a place and website.

Orwig, K.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hydrogen Fuel Quality (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Jim Ohi of NREL's presentation on Hydrogen Fuel Quality at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation on May 15-18, 2007 in Arlington, Virginia.

Ohi, J.

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

Renewable Hydrogen (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation about the United State's dependence on oil, how energy solutions are challenging, and why hydrogen should be considered as a long-term alternative for transportation fuel.

Remick, R. J.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

312

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Catalyst for the production of hydrocarbons from the synthesis gas  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a catalyst for the production of hydrocarbons from the synthesis gas, which comprises the combination of an iron-containing Fisher-Tropsch catalyst, a zeolite and at least one metal selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, platinum, palladium, irridium, cobalt and molybdenum. The metal supported upon the iron-containing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst or supported upon a mixture of the iron-containing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and the zeolite. The iron in terms of iron oxide in the iron-containing Fischer-Tropsch catalyst is present in an amount of 5 to 80% by weight, based on the combined weight of the iron oxide and zeolite. The metal is present in amounts of 0.3 to 5% by weight, based upon the combined weight of the iron oxide and the zeolite. The zeolite is selected from the group consisting of zeolites having a pore size of 5 o 9 A and a silica to alumina mole ratio of at least 12 is described.

Koikeda, M.; Suzuki, T.; Munemura, K.; Nishimoto, Y.; Imai, T.

1986-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

314

Using Ionic Liquids in Selective Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Final Report of the five-year project Using Ionic Liquids in Selective Hydrocarbon Conversion Processes (DE-FC36-04GO14276, July 1, 2004- June 30, 2009), in which we present our major accomplishments with detailed descriptions of our experimental and theoretical efforts. Upon the successful conduction of this project, we have followed our proposed breakdown work structure completing most of the technical tasks. Finally, we have developed and demonstrated several optimized homogenously catalytic methane conversion systems involving applications of novel ionic liquids, which present much more superior performance than the Catalytica system (the best-to-date system) in terms of three times higher reaction rates and longer catalysts lifetime and much stronger resistance to water deactivation. We have developed in-depth mechanistic understandings on the complicated chemistry involved in homogenously catalytic methane oxidation as well as developed the unique yet effective experimental protocols (reactors, analytical tools and screening methodologies) for achieving a highly efficient yet economically feasible and environmentally friendly catalytic methane conversion system. The most important findings have been published, patented as well as reported to DOE in this Final Report and our 20 Quarterly Reports.

Tang, Yongchun; Periana, Roy; Chen, Weiqun; van Duin, Adri; Nielsen, Robert; Shuler, Patrick; Ma, Qisheng; Blanco, Mario; Li, Zaiwei; Oxgaard, Jonas; Cheng, Jihong; Cheung, Sam; Pudar, Sanja

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

315

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality regulates the underground storage of natural gas or liquid hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide. Prior to the use of any underground reservoir for the storage of natural gas and prior to the exercise of eminent domain by any person, firm, or corporation having such right under laws of the state of Louisiana, the commissioner, shall have found all of the following:

316

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mathematical modeling of solid oxide fuel cells using hydrocarbon fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency conversion devices that use hydrogen or light hydrocarbon (HC) fuels in stationary applications to produce quiet and clean power. While successful, HC-fueled SOFCs face ...

Lee, Won Yong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Trend Analysis for Atmospheric Hydrocarbon Partitioning Using Continuous Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The partitioning of atmospheric hydrocarbons into vapor and condensed phases when the species count is large is considered using the formalism of continuous thermodynamics. The vapor saturation pressures and condensate species distribution are ...

K. Harstad

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Assessment of plant-derived hydrocarbons. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of hydrocarbon producing plants are evaluated as possible sources of rubber, liquid fuels, and industrial lubricants. The plants considered are Euphorbia lathyris or gopher plant, milkweeds, guayule, rabbit brush, jojoba, and meadow foam. (ACR)

McFadden, K.; Nelson, S.H.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Computer program for determining the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was written to be used as a subroutine. The program determines the thermodynamics of light hydrocarbons. The following light hydrocarbons can be analyzed: butane, ethane, ethylene, heptane, hexane, isobutane, isopentane, methane, octane, pentane, propane and propylene. The subroutine can evaluate a thermodynamic state for the light hydrocarbons given any of the following pairs of state quantities: pressure and quality, pressure and enthalpy, pressure and entropy, temperature and pressure, temperature and quality and temperature and specific volume. These six pairs of knowns allow the user to analyze any thermodynamic cycle utilizing a light hydrocarbon as the working fluid. The Starling--Benedict--Webb--Rubin equation of state was used. A brief description, flowchart, listing and required equations for each subroutine are included.

Riemer, D.H.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.; Cook, D.S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Computer program for determining the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was written to be used as a subroutine. The program determines the thermodynamics of light hydrocarbons. The following light hydrocarbons can be analyzed: butane, ethane, ethylene, heptane, hexane, isobutane, isopentane, methane, octane, pentane, propane and propylene. The subroutine can evaluate a thermodynamic state for the light hydrocarbons given any of the following pairs of state quantities: pressure and quality, pressure and enthalpy, pressure and entropy, temperature and pressure, temperature and quality and temperature and specific volume. These six pairs of knowns allow the user to analyze any thermodynamic cycle utilizing a light hydrocarbon as the working fluid. The Starling-Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state was used. This report contains a brief description, flowchart, listing and required equations for each subroutine.

Riemer, D.H.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.; Cook, D.S.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Meeting Notes and Presentations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Board Notes and Slides Board Notes and Slides Notes from EM Corporate QA Board Tele-Conference - February 22, 2010 1 of 2 General: Attendance of voting board members was documented. All members were present or had a representative present on the call. Previous 5 Focus Areas: Dave Tuttel presented the proposed closeout of the previous 5 focus areas for the EM Corporate Board. * Focus Area 1 (Requirements Flow Down) - Board voted to close the focus area (unanimous) * Focus Area 2 (Adequate NQA-1 Suppliers) - Board voted to close the focus area (unanimous) * Focus Area 3 (CGI and Services Dedication) - Board voted to close the focus area (unanimous) * Focus Area 4 (Graded Approach to QA) -Discussion noted that the area as a whole may need more work in the future focus areas even though the procurement piece is ready to close out. The discussion also noted

323

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Hydrocarbon-enhanced particulate filter regeneration via microwave ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regeneration method for a particulate filter includes estimating a quantity of particulate matter trapped within the particulate filter, comparing the quantity of particulate matter to a predetermined quantity, heating at least a portion of the particulate filter to a combustion temperature of the particulate matter, and introducing hydrocarbon fuel to the particulate filter. The hydrocarbon fuel facilitates combustion of the particulate matter to regenerate the particulate filter.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Brown, David B. (Brighton, MI)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

325

Cooling and solidification of heavy hydrocarbon liquid streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for cooling and solidifying a stream of heavy hydrocarbon material normally boiling above about 850.degree. F., such as vacuum bottoms material from a coal liquefaction process. The hydrocarbon stream is dropped into a liquid bath, preferably water, which contains a screw conveyor device and the stream is rapidly cooled, solidified and broken therein to form discrete elongated particles. The solid extrudates or prills are then dried separately to remove substantially all surface moisture, and passed to further usage.

Antieri, Salvatore J. (Trenton, NJ); Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Topic Group Transportation External Coordination Rail Topic Group Rail Topic Group Transportation External Coordination Rail Topic Group Presented by: Presented by: Cort Richardson Council of State Governments- Eastern Regional Conference March 15 2006 March 15 2006 Washington, DC Washington, DC 2 Rail Topic Group Summary * Since the last TEC meeting in September, the approach of the Topic Group was to divide into subgroups to address activities important to the Topic Group as a whole * The subgroups are: - Inspections - Tracking and Radiation Monitoring - Planning - Lessons Learned - TRAGIS - Legal Weight Truck Shipments

327

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation External Coordination Working Group Transportation External Coordination Working Group Presented by: Presented by: Jay Jones Jay Jones Office of National Transportation Office of National Transportation September 21, 2005 September 21, 2005 Pueblo, CO Pueblo, CO Tribal Topic Group Update 2 Summary * 2005 Tribal program priorities * Key Transportation External Coordination Tribal (TEC) Topic Group topics * TEC Tribal Topic Group meetings update * TEC Tribal Topic Group recommendations * Next steps -Tribal interaction approaches 3 2005 Tribal Program Priorities * Initiate consultation with Native American Tribes along potential transportation corridors Issue notification letter Contact Tribal leaders regarding notification letter - Begin holding discussions and/or meetings with Tribal

328

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Transportation External Working Group (TEC) EDWARDS MOVING & RIGGING, INC. Heavy Transport Presentation Presented By What kind of projects do we do? Heavy Transport Heavy Rigging Focus today is Heavy Transport Focus today is Heavy Transport Turbine Generator Transformer Boilers Vessel Press Bridge Duct work Railroad Engine Tank Relocation 440T Building Solid Masonry Even a building facade "These guys can move anything" Pressurizer RA Movement of Hazardous Cargo Major Plant Components & Casks Cask Movement Shipment by Road Shipment by Road Shipment by Railroad Shipments by Barge What makes Transport Contactors Suited for these projects? Complete Package *Engineering *Planning *State-of-the-art-equipment

329

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

DeMeo, E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by use of molten metal halide catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating at least a substantial portion of the carbonaceous material associated with the reaction mixture from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the metal halide catalyst, an improvement comprising contacting the spent molten metal halide catalyst after removal of a major portion of the carbonaceous material therefrom with an additional quantity of hydrogen is disclosed.

Gorin, Everett (San Rafael, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

INTERNATIONAL Presented by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation..... MVPP #12; Fuel is burned to drive a gas turbine The gas turbine drives a generator Hot exhaust from the gas turbine is sent to a Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) The steam turbine drives Steam HRSG Air Fuel Gas Turbine & Generator Cooling Water #12;Plant Output MVPP Gas Turbine A Gas

Keller, Arturo A.

333

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Western Utility Energy Efficiency in Western Utility in Western Utility Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and Implications for Regional Assessments and Initiatives Initiatives Charles Goldman Nicole Hopper Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory CREPC Meeting San Diego, CA September 28, 2006 Overview of Presentation Overview of Presentation * LBNL/CREPC Resource Assessment Project - Overview - Data Sources * Treatment of Energy Efficiency (EE) in Resource Plans - Why does it matter? * Energy Efficiency in Recent Resource Plans: - Common Inconsistencies and Data Problems - Levels of EE Proposed in Recent Utility Resource Plans * Recommendations and tools for tracking and reporting EE in future resource plans to support West-wide goals and analysis LBNL/CREPC Resource Assessment Project LBNL/CREPC Resource Assessment Project

334

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Laboratory Mentor-Protégé Program Business Success Stories Presented by Cassandra McGee Stuart ORNL Small Business Programs Office May 23, 2013 2 Presentation name Today, ORNL is DOE's largest science and energy laboratory 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy $1.65B budget World's most intense neutron source 4,400 employees World-class research reactor 3,000 research guests annually $500M modernization investment Nation's largest materials research portfolio Most powerful open scientific computing facility Nation's most diverse energy portfolio Managing billion-dollar U.S. ITER project 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC * A 65-year relationship with DOE

335

Presentations & Testimony  

Office of Science (SC) Website

presentations-and-testimony/ The Office of presentations-and-testimony/ The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {C6485D5D-3C27-4B21-961B-5075074695E9}http://science.energy.gov/~/media/sc-1/pdf/2013/103013_dehmer_csst.pdf Statement of the Acting Director of the Office of Science, Patricia Dehmer to the House Science, Space and Technology Committee Subcommittee on Energy The Office of Science's Role in Providing Tools for Scientific Discovery and Basic Energy Research. Wed, 30 Oct 2013 00:00:00 -0400

336

PowerPoint Presentation  

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Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program: Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program: Geologic Sequestration and Injection of Carbon Dioxide Mark de Figueiredo Climate Change Division U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Presentation for: DOE/NETL Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting November 15, 2011 Outline * Background of Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program * Summary of Subpart UU (Injection of CO 2 ) * Summary of Subpart RR (Geologic Sequestration of CO 2 ) 2 This presentation is provided solely for informational purposes. It does not provide legal advice, have legally binding effect, or expressly or implicitly create, expand, or limit any legal rights, obligations, responsibilities, expectations, or benefits in regard to any person. Background of GHG Reporting Program * In response to the FY2008 Consolidated Appropriations Act, EPA

337

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presentation Presentation * CAES Aquifer Technology * Geological Framework of Iowa * Dallas Center Structure * Results of CAES Feasibility Simulation * ISEP CAES Development Plan How Does CAES Work? CAES Turbo-Machinery Operating Requirements Equipment Manufacturer Plant Size (MW) Min. Inlet Pressure (psi) Min. Flow Rate (lbs/MW/hr) Total Min. Flow Rate (lb/hr) Allison 15 200 9500 142,500 MAN Turbo 50 50 9500 475,000 Dresser Rand 134 830 9500 1,273,000 Alston 300 900 9500 2,850,000 Westinghouse (501D5) 350 750 9500 3,325,000 Westinghouse (501F) 450 750 9500 3,275,000 Earth Storage System Designs All based on the concept of multiple geologic and hydrologic barriers. DESIGN CRITERIA * Capacity: 5 to 10 BCF Total Vessel Volume * Integrity of Vessel: <4% of Volume over a year * Fluid Deliverability - 400#/sec = 464 MMscfd

338

PowerPoint Presentation  

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Projects Projects Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region (RMCCS) RCSP Annual Review Meeting October 5-7, 2010 Pittsburgh, PA Acknowledgements I * Many thanks to the U.S. Department of Energy and NETL for supporting this project * We express our gratitude also to our many industry partners, who have committed a great deal of time, funding and other general support for this project * The work presented today is co-authored by many partners in the RMCCS project * Project Team (Who) * Major Goals (Why) * Work Plan (How) * Progress to Date (What) Presentation Outline Partners The project team consists of the geological surveys in each state of the region, some invaluable industry partners, and of course NETL.

339

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This presentation was given for the This presentation was given for the Navigant Research Webinar on Fast DC Charging for Electric Vehicles * http://www.navigantresearch.com/webinar/fast-dc-charging-for-electric-vehicles * April 9, 2013 1 Lessons Learned on the EV Project and DC Fast Charging Garrett Beauregard Executive Vice President and General Manager, eTec Labs April 9, 2013 ECOtality Company Overview Leading Hardware, Software and R&D for electric transportation Diversified revenue base of 3 complementary business segments Blink * Residential, public & commercial EV charging solutions * Contracted by U.S. Dept. of Energy for The EV Project (~$115M) * Over 11,000 chargers installed as of April 2013 Minit-Charger * Fast charging electric material handling and ground support equipment

340

PowerPoint Presentation  

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FWP-FEW0174 - Task 5 Presenter: Megan Smith PI: Susan Carroll Yue Hao U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2 Presentation Outline  Benefit to Program  Project Overview  Technical Status  Accomplishments  Summary  Appendix Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 3 Benefit to the Program  This research project quantifies relationships between fluid flow, heterogeneity, and reaction rates specific to

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

MDM Tech Day Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mega Project Mega Project Risk Analysis Model Oak Ridge Tennessee November 5, 2009 2 Content - Objectives - Risk Assessment Approach - Nuclear Risk Assessment Model Overview - Lessons Learned 3 Objectives ■ Present a new approach to analyzing risks of large and complex projects that may be directly applied to DOE ■ Discuss an example of how this methodology was recently used in a nuclear project, and how this can fit DOE's unique challenges ■ Present the benefits of using a risk assessment for protecting the government's interests and reduce risk exposure 4 Content - Objectives - Risk Assessment Approach - Nuclear Risk Assessment Model Overview - Lessons Learned 5 Approach to risk assessment follows a logical progression of risk identification, impact, and mitigation analysis Risk

342

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration FAA Air Traffic Organization Presented to: Department of Energy Presented by: Mark DeNicuolo, Manager, Performance & Analyses, FAA ATO Safety and Technical Training Date: September 20, 2012 Safety Management 2 * Approximately 50,000 flights per day * En Route centers handle 40.5 million aircraft per year * FAA/contract towers handle: - 51.2 million airport operations - 39 million instrument operations * 732 million passenger enplanements * Over 5,000 civil, public-use airports * Approximately 33,300 ATO employees - More than 15,000 air traffic controllers - More than 7,000 technicians and engineers * 21 ARTCCs, 513 ATCTs, 17 FSSs, 3 AFSSs National Airspace System (NAS) 3 Discipline Domains En Route Terminal FSS Support NDP Totals

343

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evolution of Risk Management at NASA in Evolution of Risk Management at NASA in the Context of Achieving Adequate Safety Presented at the DOE 2012 Nuclear Safety Workshop Bethesda, Maryland September 20, 2012 Homayoon Dezfuli, Ph.D. NASA Technical Fellow for System Safety Office of Safety and Mission Assurance NASA Headquarters Outline * Historical Perspective on NASA Risk Management (RM) * RM Approach After 2008 * Future Direction of RM at NASA - The Concept of "Adequate Safety" - The Issue of Risk Analysis Completeness (Rationale for Future Trends in RM) * Summary 2 Acknowledgments This presentation is partly derived from the following sources: 3 NASA NPR 8000.4A NASA/SP-2010-576 NASA/SP-2011-3422 NASA/SP-2010-580 Historical Perspective on NASA Risk

344

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LL-WCI-U-2011-522763 Monthly Performance Review Director's Office March 21, 2008 Monthly Performance Weapons and Complex Integration (WCI) High Energy Density Experiments on NIF in FY2011 (A Joint WCI-NIF Success) Presented to SEAB Oct. 12, 2011 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by

345

Evaluation of the total petroleum hydrocarbon standard for cleanup of petroleum contaminated sites. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbon) cleanup standard for petroleum contaminated soils (PCS). A survey of 13 state regulators was performed to characterize current standards and regulatory viewpoints on the use of a TPH versus a BTEX cleanup standard. The regulatory community considers the BTEX constituents the greatest threat to groundwater, yet expressed concern that the use of a compound specific standard, without an accompanying analysis for TPH, might result in residual soil contamination that may present risk. This study also evaluated the ratio of BTEX TPH in soil over time. Based on JP-4 contaminated site soil data, this study demonstrated that the ratio of BTEX to TPH declines with time. The results indicate that the constant ratio of BTEX to TPH assumed by the California LUFT manual and Stokman and Dime's research is not valid for soils contaminated with JP-4. Lastly, this research identifies the cost savings potential that would result if a BTEX based standard, versus a TPH standard, were required at all Air Force sites. The research shows that only 13% of sites which would require cleanup under a TPH standard would require cleanup under a BTEX based standard. Soil cleanup standards, Petroleum hydrocarbons, Total petroleum hydrocarbons, TPH, Bezene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, Ethyl-benzene, Xylene, BTEX, Petroleum contamination, JP-4.

Blaisdell, R.A.; Smallwood, M.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Blowdown of hydrocarbons pressure vessel with partial phase separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a model for the simulation of the blowdown of vessels containing two-phase (gas-liquid) hydrocarbon fluids, considering non equilibrium between phases. Two phases may be present either already at the beginning of the blowdown process (for instance in gas-liquid separators) or as the liquid is formed from flashing of the vapor due to the cooling induced by pressure decrease. There is experimental evidence that the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium is not appropriate, since the two phases show an independent temperature evolution. Thus, due to the greater heat transfer between the liquid phase with the wall, the wall in contact with the liquid experiences a stronger cooling than the wall in contact with the gas, during the blowdown. As a consequence, the vessel should be designed for a lower temperature than if it was supposed to contain vapor only. Our model is based on a compositional approach, and it takes into account internal heat and mass transfer processes, as well as heat transfer with ...

Speranza, Alessandro; 10.1142/9789812701817_0046

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

PowerPoint Presentation  

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INDUSTRY DAY INDUSTRY DAY Emergency Operations Training Academy Support Services James (Jim) Cochran Headquarters Support Section Headquarters Acquisition Branch Business Services Division January 6, 2012 2 Agenda * 0900 - Arrival/Registration * 0915 - Opening Remarks - Jim Cochran, Contracting Officer * 0925 - Emergency Operations Training Academy's (EOTA) Overview - Paul Jenkins, Director, EOTA * 0950 - Review of EOTA Request for Proposals * 1030 -EOTA Server Facility * 1100 - Questions * 1130 - Closing Comments 3 Notice * Presentation is based upon current information and plan of action * Input may be considered * Request for Proposal is the only document that is to be relied upon in determining the Government's needs 4 Overview * Purpose of Industry Day

348

PowerPoint Presentation  

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and Validating Ternary Pd Alloys and Validating Ternary Pd Alloys Designing and Validating Ternary Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance in Hydrogen Separation in Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Capture Membrane Systems and Carbon Capture Membrane Systems Using High Using High - - Throughput Combinatorial Methods Throughput Combinatorial Methods Dan Henkel Rick kleiner November 12, 2009 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 2 Participating Organizations Pall Corporation Pall Cortland Research and Development (PRDC) Cornell University Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR) Georgia Institute of Technology Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Temperature Materials Lab (HTML)

349

TITLE OF PRESENTATION HERE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Claiming Savings from Claiming Savings from Building Codes Activities Presented by Carolyn Sarno April 4, 2012 DOE Code Compliance Meeting FOR TODAY'S DISCUSSION * Background * Claimed Savings Report * Best Practice - Rhode Island 1 RECENT TRENDS 2 Aggressive new goals directing capture of all cost- effective efficiency * CT, MA, NY, RI VT * $2.5 billion committed to efficiency programs in New England, New York and Mid-Atlantic in 2012 * Multiple funding sources: SBC, RGGI, FCM, rate factors * Next generation of efficiency plans going broader & deeper ATTRIBUTING ENERGY CODE SAVINGS ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS * Convene stakeholder advisory group * Identify issues related to PA support for codes (and standards) * Provide procedural guidance for

350

Presentation title goes here  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future of DR Future of DR March 3, 2011 Sila Kiliccote, Mary Ann Piette, Dave Watson, Rish Ghatikar Deputy, DRRC Program Manager, LBNL SKiliccote@lbl.gov 2 Presentation Overview * Trends * Policy * Technology * Implementations * Load As Resource in Ancillary Services Markets * Future directions towards responsive buildings 3 Trends Policy Dynamic Rates - Large C&I, residential, small commercial Codes and Standards -Title 24, US Green Building Council's LEED Credits Smart Grid Standards effort Ancillary Services Technology Integration of Renewables Energy Storage Technologies - Can DR replace storage? PHEVs and EVs Implementation Linking Energy Efficiency and DR Utility Implementations Smart Grid Investment and Demonstration Grants 4 Demand Side Management and Automated DR Future

351

PowerPoint Presentation  

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China China Energy Statistics 2012 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory The LBNL China Energy Group The China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) was established in 1988. Over the years the Group has gained recognition as an authoritative source of China energy statistics through the publication of its China Energy Databook (CED). The Group has published seven editions to date of the CED (http://china.lbl.gov/research/china- energy-databook). This handbook summarizes key statistics from the CED and is expressly modeled on the International Energy Agency's "Key World Energy Statistics" series of publications. The handbook contains timely, clearly-presented

352

PowerPoint Presentation  

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Budget and TYCP Process Budget and TYCP Process Discussion Bob Harris UGP Regional Manager and PM 1 Preliminary 10-Year Capital Budget/Funding Establish Programmatic Asset Management/Capital Funding Process Asset Management Customer Networking Sustainable Funding Discussion Utilize Programmatic Asset Management/Capital Funding AMPIP WESTERN'S ROADMAP ROBUST ASSET MANAGEMENT PROGRAM/WESTERN-WIDE CAPITAL BUDGET 2013 2014 NOV MAY ... ... ... 2 Rates Presentation Jack Murray DSW Rates Manager 3 P-DP Rate Discussion * Transmission rates experiencing long-term upward pressure. * Cost of rebuilding aging infrastructure a key component responsible for potential rate increases. * As additional plant completed and placed in service, annual costs to service debt increase,

353

P9 Summary Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Learned Learned WTP Prototypic Mixing and Sampling System Vijay Jain Manager, Research & Technology (Vitrification) May 18-21, 2009 Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant Project Presented at EM-21 Technical Exchange Denver, CO Jain 04102009 2 Outline Background Test requirements and system design Test status Technical issues during testing Test results Summary Jain 04102009 3 Highlights Testing system is prototypic Major technical and design issues resolved LAW report (3 simulants) - issued HLW & LAW tests - complete Data analyses - 08/09 Reports - 12/09 Jain 04102009 4 Background Compliance to waste specifications is critical to the success of WTP vitrification operations: - Mixing and sampling of waste and melter feed is an integral part

354

Meeting and Presentation Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1) Agenda 2) Presentations: a. Welcome, Agenda and any High Priority Issues b. Issuance of DOE O 414.1D - How it Affects EM Sites c. EM Commercial Grade Dedication Guide d. Integration of QA in Design Guidance Document e. Draft Revision to the Standard QA Contract Language f. Operational Awareness - Basic QA Profile Associated with EM Hazard Category 2 and 3 Nuclear Operations g. EFCOG Current Efforts & Relationship to the EM QA Corporate Board Priorities & Focus Areas 3) Commercial Grade Dedication Guidance Document 4) Integration of QA in Design Guidance Document 5) Draft Revision to Standard QA Contract Language 6) Status of Actions from the February 2011 Board Meeting

355

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fleet Card Program Review Fleet Card Program Review Presented to: U.S. Department of Energy Wright Express Corporation June 25, 2012 2012 Wright Express Corporation. Confidential & Proprietary. 1 2012 Wright Express Corporation. Confidential & Proprietary. 2 Table of Contents I. Wright Express Fleet Card I. Program Statistics II. What's New II. Questions? 2012 Wright Express Corporation. Confidential & Proprietary. 3 Program Statistics 2012 Wright Express Corporation. Confidential & Proprietary. 4 Portfolio Snapshot * 13 Month Overview Month Total Gross Dollars Total Transactions Total Unleaded Gallons Total Unleaded Dollars Total Diesel Gallons Total Diesel Dollars Total Gallons (all Fuel) Total Non-Fuel Transactions Total Non-Fuel Dollars Total Cards

356

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IOGCC/SSEB PTTF REPORT IOGCC/SSEB PTTF REPORT THE PIPELINE PROJECT: Analysis of potential pipeline infrastructure, transportation & storage of CO 2 Presented at DOE's Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting Nov. 15, 2011 Acknowledgement * This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. The Report Four sections: 1. Overview 2. Background 3. Analysis 4. Recommendations PART 1: OVERVIEW * Pipeline Transportation Task Force * Collaborative Work Group Model * Task Force Objectives IOGCC-SSEB CO 2 Pipeline Transportation Task Force (PTTF) * Offshoot of IOGCC's Carbon Capture and Geologic Storage Task Force * Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Focus Area * Collaboration: Task Force Composition

357

FCC Lab Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Introduction to Introduction to Spectrum Engineering Julius Knapp, Chief Office of Engineering and Technology U.S. Federal Communications Commission Department of Energy Seminar on Spectrum Policy for the Utility Sector December 8, 2010 Note: The views expressed in this presentation are those of the author and may not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Communications Commission Why We Are Here: Utility Wireless Applications Use Spectrum Voice Dispatcher to Crews Crew to Crew Emergency Call "Talk Around" Interconnect Trunked Operation Mutual Aid/Interoperability Data: System Monitoring and Control, Reports and Status Messaging Telemetry, Protective Relaying SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) Automated Meter Reading Home Automation

358

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Monitoring Market Monitoring Tools Bernie Lesieutre - LBNL Bob Thomas - Cornell October 18, 2006 Washington, D.C. OE Visualization and Controls Peer Review Market Monitoring Tools: Overview Approach: Use dispatch, profit, revenue/offer price, withholding sensitivities to identify opportunities for local advantage that give some participants market power potential. 2006 Technical Work: Extend prior results to large, RTO-scale systems. Initiate large-scale analysis with RTO (PJM). Evaluate reactive power effects on energy markets. Publication and presentation of results. Market Power: Substitutability Market power boils down to the issue of substitutability Locational Advantage: "Load Pockets" Physical network constraints limit supply to certain loads, so that the incremental demand

359

Wind for Schools (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Schools are key to achieving the goal of producing 20% of the nation's electricity demand. Most significantly, schools are training the scientists, technicians, businesspeople, decisionmakers, and teachers of the future. What students learn and believe about wind energy will impact the United States' ability to create markets and policy, develop and improve technology, finance and implement projects, and create change in all of our public and private institutions. In the nearer term, school districts have large facility costs, electrical loads, and utility costs. They are always in search of ways to reduce costs or obtain revenue to improve educational programs. Schools value teaching about the science and technology of renewable energy. They are important opinion leaders, particularly in rural communities. And their financial structures are quite different from other institutions (funding, incentives, restrictions, etc.). Learning objectives: The presentation will use case studies, project experience, and discussion with the audience to convey the current status of wind energy applications and education in U.S. schools and understanding of the elements that create a successful school wind energy project. The presentation will provide attendees with a background in the current level of knowledge and generate discussion on several themes.

Kelly, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Solar 2012 Utility-Scale Solar 2012 An Empirical Analysis of Project Cost, Performance, and Pricing Trends in the United States Mark Bolinger & Samantha Weaver Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory September 2013 1 This research was supported by funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative. Presentation Outline * Recent market growth has resulted in a critical mass of project-level data ripe for analysis * Key findings from this inaugural edition  Installed Costs/Prices  Operating (O&M) Costs  Performance (Capacity Factors)  Power Purchase Agreement ("PPA") Prices 2 A few background notes about this first edition: * Certain data (e.g., O&M costs) were still rather limited for this first edition, but are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Life Cycle and Structure Cloud Life Cycle and Structure A.M. Vogelmann, E. Luke, M.P. Jensen, P. Kollias, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York and E.R. Boer LUEBEC, San Diego, CA SUMMARY SUMMARY * * Cloud tracking using geostationary satellite data provides a context of the cloud state observed at the ARM Sites, including the cloud's life-cycle stage and its representativeness of the region. * * Examples are presented of the duration and paths of mesoscale convective systems within the Tropical Western Pacific. * * This information will be used to interpret the cloud microphysical retrievals and overlap structure measured at the ARM sites. Reference Reference Boer, E. R., and V. Ramanathan, 1997: Lagrangian approach for deriving cloud characteristics from satellite observations and its implications to cloud

362

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ProActive DNS ProActive DNS Blacklisting Gene Rackow Argonne National Laboratory The Basics of DNS Hostname to IP mapping and back Host aliases Mail server locations Services Security records What is DNS Blacklisting? DNS Blacklist also known as a DNS Blackhole. Local server fakes zones know to contain: Malware Spyware Command/Control Advertising Political Issues What are DNS Blacklist Benefits Preventing hosts from getting to bad stuff. If you are not presented with the malware, Chances are you are not going to be infected. Estimates are that blocking Advertising sites stops 85% of infections. DNS Blacklist Sources of information Bad News about DNS Blacklisting Typically It's ReActive. Entries are added AFTER something happened. Some machines have already been

363

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanostructured Electrode and Electrolyte Nanostructured Electrode and Electrolyte Development for Energy Storage Devices Presented by Karen Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE/ESS) and by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, and managed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. - SNL, GINER, and ADA - Electrochemical Storage Program Reviews - Capacitor Development Activities D. Ingersoll, F.M. Delnick, and K.E. Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185-0614

364

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PUMP CANYON TEST SITE PUMP CANYON TEST SITE Prepared For: 2009 Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting Prepared By: George J. Koperna, Jr. Advanced Resources International, Inc. Pittsburgh, November 16-19, 2009 1 1 2 RCSP SP111709 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Operations * Reservoir Characterization and Modeling * Monitoring, Verification and Accounting * Next Steps 3 RCSP SP111709 Objectives * Field-test the effectiveness of CO 2 sequestration in deep, unmineable coal seams via a small-scale geologic sequestration demonstration * Develop a better understanding of the efficacy of enhanced coalbed methane recovery processes via carbon dioxide injection (CO 2 -ECBM) into a pressure-depleted reservoir * Monitor plume migration to prevent any leakage 4 RCSP SP111709

365

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ingersoll, F.M. Delnick, and K.E. Waldrip Ingersoll, F.M. Delnick, and K.E. Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185-0614 High Voltage Electrochemical Capacitor presented at EESAT 2007 September 23-27, 2007 PEER Review San Francisco, CA Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Objective * New Start - 7/07 * Increasing the energy of the system * Energy = 1/2 CV 2 * Four general means to increasing energy - Increased surface area - most common approach * A - active area of electrode - high surface area materials (carbon - typically > 1000 m 2 /g) - nanomaterials (e.g. carbon multiwalled nanotube) - Employ Faradaic processes -

366

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tolerance and Mechanical Properties of Tolerance and Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Ceramic/Metal Composites Michael Nastasi Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research and Mechanical and Materials Engineering University of Nebraska-Lincoln Collaborators : UNL: Juan Colon Santana MIT: Mike Demkowicz , R. E. Baumer, Kan-Ju Lin TAMU: Lin Shao, Lloyd Price Work supported by DOE, NE, Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies Presented at: Materials-Cross-Cut NEET Webinar August 20 th , 2013 Vacancies Interstitials Atomic defects produced by irradiation Embrittlement Defects that do NOT recombine aggregate into vacancy or interstitial clusters D.L. Porter and F. A. Garner, J. Nuclear Materials, 159, p. 114 (1988) D.J. Bacon and Y.N. Osetsky, Int. Mater. Rev., 47, p. 233 (2002).

367

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup Project _____________________ September 21, 2005 FRR Rail Shipment to Idaho Presentation to the DOE Transportation External coordination Working Group (TEC) Mark R. Arenaz DOE-ID Idaho Cleanup Project U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office 2 DOE - Idaho Operations Office FRR Rail Shipment * Overview of Shipment * Operational Aspects * Emergency Response Preparation * Institutional Program * Route Determination * Lessons Learned * Pictures Idaho Cleanup Project U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office 3 Overview of Shipment * First shipment of Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) * Spent Fuel originated in So. Korea * Transport by dedicated ship to Naval Weapons Station - Concord (NWSCo) * Transport by dedicated rail from NWSCo to Idaho National Laboratory Site

368

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stirling A. Colgate has been a staff physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (1952-1965) Stirling A. Colgate has been a staff physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (1952-1965) and was a staff member at Los Alamos National Laboratory, [LANL] from 1976 to 1991 and from then to present has been an adjunct physicist at LANL. From 1965 through 1974 he was president of New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. He was elected to the National Academy of Science in 1985. In 1990 he received the Rossi prize for work in astrophysics; having predicted in 1963 the emission of neutrinos from supernovae, recently observed from the nearby Supernovae 1987A. He is a Senior fellow at LANL, a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and co-shared the Los Alamos Medal. More important for this proposal is his experience in nuclear weapons, both design and

369

Title of Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Process Approach to Management of Operational Cyber Security Risks Antione Manson, DHS Jim Cebula, CERT DOE Cyber Security Conference Atlanta - May 2010 2 NO WARRANTY THIS MATERIAL OF CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY AND ITS SOFTWARE ENGINEERING INSTITUTE IS FURNISHED ON AN -AS-IS" BASIS. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY MAKES NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, AS TO ANY MATTER INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, WARRANTY OF FITNESS FOR PURPOSE OR MERCHANTABILITY, EXCLUSIVITY, OR RESULTS OBTAINED FROM USE OF THE MATERIAL. CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY DOES NOT MAKE ANY WARRANTY OF ANY KIND WITH RESPECT TO FREEDOM FROM PATENT, TRADEMARK, OR COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT. Use of any trademarks in this presentation is not intended in any way to infringe on the rights of the

370

PowerPoint Presentation  

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1 campaign statistics 1 campaign statistics and plans presented by R. Granetz Alcator C-Mod quarterly review 2011/05/05 C-Mod FY2011 operation * Budgeted for 15 research run weeks (60 run days) * 14.5 research run weeks have been completed to date * 1719 plasma discharges (I p > 0.1 MA and τ pulse > 0.1 s) > 90% plasma initiation success rate * 54 different miniproposals have received run time so far, with emphasis on: * pedestal studies (FY2011 joint facility research topic, J Hughes) * characterization and optimization of I-mode (E. Marmar) * lower hybrid density limit (G. Wallace) * rotation reversal (J. Rice) * 30 full or half run days led by grad students (i.e. session leaders) 2/5 C-Mod FY2011 operation, cont. * 10 PhD students obtained the bulk of their thesis data and/or completed their research

371

Oral Presentation Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Revised 04/01/2011 Page 1 of 2 Revised 04/01/2011 Page 1 of 2 09 ORAL PRESENTATION GUIDANCE The following guidance is not intended to replace or circumvent any existing agency-level guidance or regulation; the guidance is intended to enhance the agency's effectiveness when interviewing potential Energy Service Company (ESCOs). NOTE: Use for down selection of two or more ESCOs INSTRUCTIONS * Preplan your interview(s) * Be prepared o Decide whether to have video conference; webinar, telephonically or face-to-face interview (recommended). o Meet with the Acquisition Team (including your DOE Project Facilitator) at least one hour prior to the first ESCO interview. o Prepare questions and discussion issues based on the Team's comments and concerns. * Be brief o Recommend scheduling a 1 or 1-1/2 hour for each interview.

372

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bipolar Nickel Metal Hydride Battery Bipolar Nickel Metal Hydride Battery Development and Testing DOE ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM ANNUAL PEER REVIEW November 2 - 3, 2006, Washington, D.C. James Landi jlandi@electroenergyinc.com 203-797-2699 Program Objectives and Benefits  The objective of this program is to further develop the bipolar NiMH battery design to be used in high-energy and high-power energy storage applications. - Build and demonstrate large-format batteries - Demonstrate these batteries in present and future applications  The bipolar NiMH battery could provide the following benefits: - Improve efficiencies by reducing transmission peaking losses and shifting peak demands. - Reduce power and voltage sag to users. - Provide an efficient method to distribute backup energy/power

373

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nd nd Energy & Innovation Conference November 28-29, 2012 Partnering for Innovation: Critical Materials Roe-Hoan Yoon, Lead Paul King, Business Development Critical Materials Strategic Growth Area NETL-Regional University Allience 2 o Critical: * Intrinsically rare, low grade, or currently unavailable in the United States. o Energy Critical Elements: * Chemical elements that are essential for the deployment of transformative energy technologies. Critical Materials-Definition 3 Application of Critical Materials 3 4  Short Term (present t - 2015) Criticality Matrix Your Logo  Mid Term (2015 - 2025) 5  Essential for the U.S. leading the 6 th wave of technology innovation o Renewable energy development o High-tech industry o Sustainability

374

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

We'd like to hear from you..." We'd like to hear from you..." "We'd like to hear from you..." * Encourage greater use of ARM data by the modeling community * Create highly polished datasets suitable for modelers * Possible future availability of statistical summaries for all standard ARM products (plots and/or datasets) * Possible future 'on the fly' calculation of statistical quantities, integrated into ARM archive interface The Purpose The Purpose This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. CRL-POST-229191 We present a prototype statistical summary of ARM observations designed for use by climate modelers. LLNL developed this prototype as a way of obtaining

375

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BOEM Lower 48 Assessment BOEM Lower 48 Assessment Matthew Frye BOEM - Herndon, VA 6 June 2013 Update on BOEM Lower 48 Assessment A presentation to the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee Matthew Frye Resource Evaluation Division BOEM - Herndon, VA matt.frye@boem.gov 6 June 2013 BOEM Resource Evaluation Division gas hydrate webpage: http://www.boem.gov/Oil-and-Gas-Energy-Program/Resource- Evaluation/Gas-Hydrates/index.aspx Update on BOEM Lower 48 Assessment Matthew Frye BOEM - Herndon, VA 6 June 2013 Update on BOEM Lower 48 Assessment Matthew Frye BOEM - Herndon, VA 6 June 2013 Oil and Gas Production on the US OCS Reserve Estimation Exploratory & Development Well Drilling Lease / Tract Award ("fair market value determination")

376

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implementation of Implementation of EPA's Class VI Geologic Sequestration Program Bruce Kobelski and Mary Rose Bayer Pittsburgh, PA November 15, 2011 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency UIC Program Background * 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA; reauthorized in 1996) - Federal regulations to ensure protection of Underground Sources of Drinking Water (USDWs) * USDWs are defined as - Any aquifer or portion of an aquifer that contains water that is less than 10,000 ppm total dissolved solids or contains a volume of water such that it is a present, or viable future source for a Public Water Supply System * The UIC Program regulates injection of all fluids - liquid, gas, or slurry - Some natural gas storage, oil and gas production, and hydraulic fracturing fluids are exempted

377

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Requirements for NERSC repository m327: "Parallel Simulation of Electron Cooling Physics and Beam Transport" Work supported by the US DOE Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, including grant No.'s DE-FC02-07ER41499 and DE-SC0000835. Resources of NERSC were used. Workshop: Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics May 26, 2011 Presenter: D.L. Bruhwiler, 1 Contributors: B.T. Schwartz, 1 V.H. Ranjbar, 1 G.I. Bell 1 Other m327 users: J. Qiang, 4 S. White, 2 Y. Luo 2 Collaborators: R. Ryne, 4 V.N. Litvinenko, 2 W. Fischer, 2 G. Wang, 2 Y. Hao, 2 K. Paul, 1 I. Pogorelov 1 1. Tech-X Corporation 2. Brookhaven National Lab 3. Thomas Jefferson National Lab

378

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer Creek State Park, Mt. Sterling, Ohio November 5-7, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Practices Related to Public Input Presented by Greg Simonton Federal Coordinator Portsmouth SSAB EM SSAB NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer Creek State Park, Mt. Sterling, Ohio November 5-7, 2013 DOE Appreciation  The Department recognizes the members of the Site Specific Advisory Boards and Citizens Advisory Boards are volunteers and dedicate a lot of time to this work.  The Department also recognizes that members are asked to weigh in on complex and sometimes controversial issues that can have dramatic impacts on their communities.  The Department acknowledges that careful thought goes into recommendations and other input and that members bring a vital perspective to DOE operations.

379

PowerPoint Presentation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productivity Dispersion Productivity Dispersion Productivity Dispersion Productivity Dispersion and Input Prices: and Input Prices: The Case of Electricity The Case of Electricity Steven J. Davis - University of Chicago and NBER Cheryl Grim - U.S. Census Bureau John Haltiwanger - University of Maryland and NBER April 8, 2008 Disclaimer: This work is unofficial and thus has not undergone the review accorded to official U.S. Census Bureau publications. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Census Bureau. This presentation has been screened to ensure no confidential data are revealed. Background Background * Prior research (Davis and Haltiwanger, 2001) shows that it is important to consider aggregate and allocative effects of oil price shocks - Positive oil shocks have adverse aggregate effect

380

Oral Presentation Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revised 04/01/2011 Page 1 of 2 Revised 04/01/2011 Page 1 of 2 09 ORAL PRESENTATION GUIDANCE The following guidance is not intended to replace or circumvent any existing agency-level guidance or regulation; the guidance is intended to enhance the agency's effectiveness when interviewing potential Energy Service Company (ESCOs). NOTE: Use for down selection of two or more ESCOs INSTRUCTIONS * Preplan your interview(s) * Be prepared o Decide whether to have video conference; webinar, telephonically or face-to-face interview (recommended). o Meet with the Acquisition Team (including your DOE Project Facilitator) at least one hour prior to the first ESCO interview. o Prepare questions and discussion issues based on the Team's comments and concerns. * Be brief o Recommend scheduling a 1 or 1-1/2 hour for each interview.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

PowerPoint Presentation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

William Gausman William Gausman Sr. Vice President Asset Management & Planning DOE Energy Information Administration Washington, DC April 7, 2010 PHI's Smart Grid Vision and Investment Grant Awards 1 Presentation Overview * PHI Company overview * PHI's Smart Grid Vision * SGIG Awards - Scope, Costs, Benefits and Schedules * Distribution Automation * Key Next Steps 2 Combined Service Territory Transmission & Distribution Competitive Energy / Other Who is Pepco Holdings, Inc. PHI Investments 2 Regulated transmission and distribution is PHI's core business. 3 Business Overview Gas Customers ►778,000 ►498,000 ►123,000 ►547,000 GWh ►26,549 ►12,494 ► N/A ►9,659 Mcf (000's) ► N/A ► N/A ►19,044 ► N/A Service Area ►640 ►5,000 ►275 ►2,700 (square miles)

382

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

974 1 974 1 Introducing SAM (Sun and Aureole Measurement), a New, Ground-based Capability for Measuring Cloud Optical Properties Presented to Cloud Properties Working Group IRF Working Group ARM Science Team Meeting John DeVore (devore@visidyne.com) A.T. Stair (ats@visidyne.com) Bob McClatchey 1 (RMcClatchey@msn.com) Visidyne, Inc. 781-273-2820 March 2006 1 Consultant VI-4974 2 Space-Based Sun-Tracking Zenith-Viewing Cirrus (Ice Columns) Solar elevation = 45 deg Sat depression = 45 deg Surface albedo = 0.2 10 +4 10 +2 10 +0 10 -2 550 nm Radiance (W/cm 2 /sr/μm) 0.1 1.0 100. 10. Optical Depth Space-Based Sun-Tracking Zenith-Viewing Cirrus (Ice Columns) Solar elevation = 45 deg Sat depression = 45 deg Surface albedo = 0.2 10 +4 10 +2 10 +0 10 -2 550 nm Radiance (W/cm 2 /sr/μm) 0.1 1.0 100. 10. Optical Depth

383

Review of current research on hydrocarbon production by plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This review assesses the status of research and development in the area of plants that produce hydrocarbons as a possible replacement for traditional fossil fuels. The information is meant to be used as a basis for determining the scope of a possible R and D program by DOE/FFB. Except in the case of guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray), research on hydrocarbon species generally has not advanced beyond preliminary screening, extraction, and growth studies. Virtually no field studies have been initiated; hydrocarbon component extraction, separation, identification, and characterization have been only timidly approached; the biochemistry of hydrocarbon formation remains virtually untouched; and potential market analysis has been based on insufficient data. Research interest is increasing in this area, however. Industrial interest understandably centers about guayule prospects and is supplemented by NSF and DOE research funds. Additional support for other research topics has been supplied by DOE and USDA and by certain university systems. Due to the infant state of technology in this area of energy research, it is not possible to predict or satisfactorily assess at this time the potential contribution that plant hydrocarbons might make toward decreasing the nation's dependence upon petroleum. However, the general impression received from experts interviewed during this review was that the major thrust of research should be directed toward the manufacture of petrochemical substitutes rather than fuel production.

Benedict, H. M.; Inman, B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions  

SciTech Connect

There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; (CIW); (RITS)

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

385

Thermal stabilities of aromatic acids as geothermal tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that thirty-nine aromatic acids were tested for their suitability as geothermal tracers. The parameters of the experiments included temperatures up to 300[degrees]C for periods of up to one month in fluids of various salinities, the presence of absence of rocks, and atmospheric levels of molecular oxygen. Of the compounds tested, at least 24 are suitable as tracers in a moderate-temperature geothermal environment while 5 may be used at temperatures as high as 300[degrees]C. The compounds displayed no adsorption on the rocks used in the tests. Some of the compounds were used successfully in a major tracer test at the Dixie Valley, Nevada geothermal system.

Adams, M.C.; Moore, J.N.; Fabry, L.G.; Ahn, J.H. (Utah Univ. Research Inst., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Carbon-13 magnetic resonance of hydrocarbons. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Several tetralins, tetrahydrophenanthrenes, and dihydroanthracenes were synthesized, /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation measurements were carried out on aromatic and hydroaromatic compounds. /sup 13/C chemical shift studies were also conducted on methylated 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalenes, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydrophenanthrenes, and 9,10-dihydroanthracenes. (DLC)

Grant, D.M.; Pugmire, R.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc.. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Method and apparatus for producing oxygenates from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical reactor for oxygenating hydrocarbons includes: a) a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell, the plasma cell comprising a pair of electrodes having a dielectric material and void therebetween, the plasma cell comprising a hydrocarbon gas inlet feeding to the void; b) a solid oxide electrochemical cell, the electrochemical cell comprising a solid oxide electrolyte positioned between a porous cathode and a porous anode, an oxygen containing gas inlet stream feeding to the porous cathode side of the electrochemical cell; c) a first gas passageway feeding from the void to the anode side of the electrochemical cell; and d) a gas outlet feeding from the anode side of the electrochemical cell to expel reaction products from the chemical reactor. A method of oxygenating hydrocarbons is also disclosed.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P{sub 450} reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates. 1 fig. 2 tab.

Shelnutt, J.A.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

390

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P.sub.450 reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Reclamation and reuse of Freon in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), we have successfully demonstrated the use of a solvent recycling system to reclaim spent Freon solvent in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) analyses of radioactive samples. A wide variety of sample types including ground water, organics, laboratory waste, process control, sludge, soils, and others are received by our lab for total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. This paper demonstrates the successful use of a commercially available carbon bed recycle system which we modified to enable the recovery of 95-98 percent of the radioactive contaminated Freon. This system has been used successfully in our lab for the past three years.

Ekechukwu, A.A.; Young, J.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Method and apparatus for synthesizing various short chain hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus, including novel photocatalysts, are disclosed for the synthesis of various short chain hydrocarbons. Light-transparent SiO{sub 2} aerogels doped with photochemically active uranyl ions are fluidized in a fluidized-bed reactor having a transparent window, by hydrogen and CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} or C{sub 2}H{sub 6} gas mixtures, and exposed to radiation from a light source external to the reactor, to produce the short chain hydrocarbons. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Colmenares, C.

1989-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

393

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

Blandford, J.W.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

Method for recovering light hydrocarbons from coal agglomerates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing light hydrocarbons, such as heptane, from coal agglomerates includes an enclosed chamber having a substantially horizontal perforate surface therein. The coal agglomerates are introduced into a water bath within the chamber. The agglomerates are advanced over the surface while steam is substantially continuously introduced through the surface into the water bath. Steam heats the water and causes volatilization of the light hydrocarbons, which may be collected from the overhead of the chamber. The resulting agglomerates may be collected at the opposite end from the surface and subjected to final draining processes prior to transportation or use.

Huettenhain, Horst (Benicia, CA); Benz, August D. (Hillsborough, CA); Getsoian, John (Ann Arbor, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Preliminary investigation of the nature of hydrocarbon migration and entrapment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations indicate that hydrocarbon migration and entrapment in stacked fault-bounded reservoirs are mainly affected by the following factors: charge time, faults, pressure and geological structures. The charge time for commercial hydrocarbon accumulation is much longer in oil-water systems than in oil-gas-water systems. Faults are classified into charging faults and 'back doors' faults other than charging faults in stacked fault-bounded reservoirs. The lower the displacement pressure of a fault, the higher its updip oil transportation ability. The downdip oil transportation ability of a fault is usually low and cannot cause commercial downdip oil accumulation. Back doors affect both hydrocarbon percent charge and hydrocarbon migration pathways. Updip back doors improve updip oil charge. The lower the displacement pressure of an updip back door, the more efficient the updip oil charge before 3,000 years. Back doors whose displacement pressure is equal to or higher than 28.76 psi are effective in sealing faults in oil-water systems. On the contrary, only sealing faults result in commercial gas accumulations in stacked fault-compartmentalized reservoirs. Otherwise gas is found over oil. Downdip back doors generally have few effects on downdip hydrocarbon charge. Geopressure enhances the updip oil transportation of a fault and improves the positive effects of updip back doors during updip oil charge. Geopressure and updip back doors result in more efficient updip oil charge. A physical barrier is not necessarily a barrier to oil migration with the aid of geopressure and updip back doors. The chance for hydrocarbon charge into reservoirs along growth faults is not equal. Any one of the above controlling factors can change the patterns of hydrocarbon charge and distribution in such complex geological structures. Generally, lower reservoirs and updip reservoirs are favored. Reservoirs along low-permeability charging faults may be bypassed. Gas can only charge the updip reservoirs. Both updip and downdip back doors can facilitate oil penetrating a barrier fault to charge reservoirs offset by the barrier fault. Interreservoir migration among stacked fault-compartmentalized reservoirs is an important mechanism for hydrocarbon accumulation and trap identification. The interreservoir migration is a very slow process, even though the displacement pressures of bounding faults may be very low.

Bai, Jianyong

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Process of producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous thermochemical indirect liquefaction process to convert various biomass materials into diesel-type transportation fuels which fuels are compatible with current engine designs and distribution systems comprising feeding said biomass into a circulating solid fluidized bed gasification system to produce a synthesis gas containing olefins, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and thereafter introducing the synthesis gas into a catalytic liquefaction system to convert the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuel consisting essentially of C.sub.7 -C.sub.17 paraffinic hydrocarbons having cetane indices of 50+.

Kuester, James L. (Scottsdale, AZ)

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

Process of producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous thermochemical indirect liquefaction process is described to convert various biomass materials into diesel-type transportation fuels which fuels are compatible with current engine designs and distribution systems comprising feeding said biomass into a circulating solid fluidized bed gasification system to produce a synthesis gas containing olefins, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and thereafter introducing the synthesis gas into a catalytic liquefaction system to convert the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuel consisting essentially of C[sub 7]-C[sub 17] paraffinic hydrocarbons having cetane indices of 50+. 1 fig.

Kuester, J.L.

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external floatation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the seabed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the seabed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration.

Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Low-Temperature Catalytic Process To Produce Hydrocarbons From Sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of producing hydrogen from oxygenated hydrocarbon reactants, such as methanol, glycerol, sugars (e.g. glucose and xylose), or sugar alcohols (e.g. sorbitol). The method takes place in the condensed liquid phase. The method includes the steps of reacting water and a water-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon in the presence of a metal-containing catalyst. The catalyst contains a metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIIIB transitional metals, alloys thereof, and mixtures thereof. The disclosed method can be run at lower temperatures than those used in the conventional steam reforming of alkanes.

Cortright, Randy D. (Madison, WI); Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

present  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

via e-mail, list serve, and chat. Students will use database software, spreadsheets and scheduling software to plan the design and construction the web site. Students will...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Presentations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... "An Application Footprint Reference Set: Tracking the Lifetime of Software" at USDepartment of Defense Cyber Crime Conference 2012 , January ...

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

402

Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A User Driven Dynamic Circuit Network Implementation A User Driven Dynamic Circuit Network Implementation November 30, 2008 | Author(s): Evangelos Chaniotakis | Download File: oscars-danms2008-v1.ppt | ppt | 1.5 MB DANMS, Nov 30 2008, New Orleans, LA ESnet On-Demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System (OSCARS) 031406 March 14, 2006 | Author(s): Chin Guok | Download File: oscars-uclp-20060316.pdf | pdf | 102 KB UCLPv2 Workshop 2; March 14-16, 2006 ESnet On-Demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System (OSCARS) 051506 May 15, 2006 | Author(s): Chin Guok, David Robertson | Download File: oscars-quilt-20060516.pdf | pdf | 114 KB QUILT; May 15-16, 2006 ESnet On-Demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System (OSCARS) 081805 August 18, 2005 | Download File: oscars-ieee-20050818.pdf | pdf | 152 KB

403

Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update February 3, 2012 | Author(s): Yukiko Sekine, DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research | NERSC Accomplishments and Plans February 3, 2012 | Author(s): Kathy...

404

Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update February 3, 2012 | Author(s): Yukiko Sekine, DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research | Plans for NERSC's New Building February 3, 2012 | Author(s): Howard...

405

Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role in HEP and Research and Emerging Technologies Steven Gottlieb: GPU & MIC for Lattice Field Theory November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Steven Gottlieb | Download File:...

406

Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hightower Hightower Energy Systems Analysis Department Sandia National Laboratories Phone: 505-844-5499 Email: mmhight@sandia.gov Energy Surety Microgrids(tm) for Critical Mission Assurance to Support DOE and DoD Energy Initiatives Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Use Renewable and Distributed Generation to Support DoD Microgrids and the Smart Grid * Small combustion and µ-turbines * Fuel cells * IC engines * Small hydro and wind * Solar electric and solar thermal * Energy storage (batteries, flywheels,...) * Plug in hybrid vehicles * Small nuclear power Gen Bulk supply connection (sub-transmission) Partial Feeder

407

Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and the Smart Grid * Small combustion and -turbines * Fuel cells * IC engines * Small hydro and wind * Solar electric and solar thermal * Energy storage (batteries,...

408

Kinetics simulation for natural gas conversion to unsaturated C? hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas resource is abundant and can be found throughout the world. But most natural gas reserves are at remote sites and considered stranded because of the extremely expensive transportation cost. Therefore advanced gas-to-liquid (GTL) techniques are being studied to convert natural gas to useful hydrocarbon liquids, which can be transported with far less cost. Direct pyrolysis of methane, followed by catalytic reaction, is a promising technology that can be commercialized in industry. In this process, methane is decomposed to ethylene, acetylene and carbon. Ethylene and acetylene are the desired products, while carbon formation should be stopped in the decomposition reaction. Some researchers have studied the dilution effect of various inert gases on carbon suppression. All previous results are based on the isothermal assumption. In this thesis, our simulator can be run under adiabatic conditions. We found there was a crossover temperature for carbon formation in the adiabatic case. Below the crossover temperature, the carbon formation from pure methane feed is higher than the one from a methane/hydrogen feed, while above the crossover temperature, the carbon formation from pure methane feed is lower than the one from a methane/hydrogen feed. In addition to the pure methane and methane/hydrogen feed, we also simulated the rich natural gas feed, rich natural gas with combustion gas, rich natural gas with combustion gas and methane recycle. We found the outlet temperature increases only slightly when we increase the initial feed temperature. Furthermore, the combustion gas or the recycled methane has a dilute effect, which increases the total heat capacity of reactants. The outlet temperature from the cracker will not drop so much when these gases are present, causing the methane conversion to increase correspondingly. Up to now there is no adiabatic simulator for methane pyrolysis. This work has significant meaning in practice, especially for rich natural gases.

Yang, Li

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Variability of Gas Composition and Flux Intensity in Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Development and Technology 008 "Variability of gas composition and flux intensity in natural marine hydrocarbon seeps" Jordan

Clark, J F; Schwager, Katherine; Washburn, Libe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hydrocarbon compositions of high elongational viscosity and process for making the same  

SciTech Connect

A hydrocarbon composition is described consisting essentially of a hydrocarbon liquid and an ionic-association or coordination-complex polymer in an amount sufficient to increase and maintain the elongational viscosity of the composition at a level greater than that of the hydrocarbon alone. The polymer is capable of dissociation upon application of the high shear regime to which the hydrocarbon is subjected, and reassociation upon withdrawal of the high shear.

Hamil, H.F.; Weatherford, W.D. Jr.; Fodor, G.E.

1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

U.S. Product Supplied of Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Product Supplied for Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons ; U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

412

U.S. Exports of Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates (Thousand Barrels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Supply and Disposition; U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

413

Recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from net excess hydrogen in a catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products. An improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from the net excess hydrogen is realized by chilling and contacting said hydrogen with a normally liquid hydrocarbon stream in a plural stage absorption zone at an elevated pressure.

Scheifele, C.A.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

414

Third-Party Evaluation of Petro Tex Hydrocarbons, LLC, ReGen Lubricating Oil Re-refining Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of market, energy impact, and utility of the PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., ReGen process for re-refining used lubricating oil to produce Group I, II, and III base oils, diesel fuel, and asphalt. PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., has performed extensive pilot scale evaluations, computer simulations, and market studies of this process and is presently evaluating construction of a 23 million gallon per year industrial-scale plant. PetroTex has obtained a 30 acre site in the Texas Industries RailPark in Midlothian Texas. The environmental and civil engineering assessments of the site are completed, and the company has been granted a special use permit from the City of Midlothian and air emissions permits for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

Compere, A L [ORNL; Griffith, William {Bill} L [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fundamental and semi-global kinetic mechanisms of hydrocarbon combustion. Progress report, March 1--September 30, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major emphasis in combustion research is being given to the study of oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels to lend insight into the modelling of combustion processes. The introduction of combustion chemistry into the already complex turbulent flow situations which exist in practical devices make modelling exceptionally difficult. Semi-global reaction mechanisms offer the potential of reducing the overall chemical kinetic complexity, thus substantially reducing the computational barriers to appropriate modelling of combustion processes. Reported here are the results of efforts presently underway at Princeton under ERDA support, to provide a general understanding of hydrocarbon oxidation. Specifically the results of studies of the lean oxidation of ethane along with the developed semi-global rates are reported. Initial results for the lean oxidation of propane are discussed and the present status of studies on methanol oxidation is also reported.

Glassman, I.; Dryer, F.L.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

THERMOCATALYTIC CO2-FREE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM HYDROCARBON FUELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, preferential oxidation) and gas separation stages required by conventional technologies (e.g., steam reforming and carbon via sustainable catalytic decomposition of methane or other hydrocarbons using inexpensive-situ generation of catalytically active carbon species produced by co-decomposition of methane and unsaturated and

417

Package of Homojunction of Fully Conjugated Heterocyclic Aromatic Rigid-rod Polymer Light Emitting Diodes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this study is mono-layer polymer light emitting diode (PLED). The emitting layer is poly-p-phenylenebenzobisoxazole (PBO). PBO is a fully conjugated heterocyclic aromatic (more)

Liao, Hung-chi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Use of a Heated Transfer Line-Membrane Interface Probe to Characterize Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at a Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes bench-scale and field pilot tests of a system integrating a heated transfer line (HTL) and a membrane interface probe (MIP) with commercially available analytical instruments and software. Driven into the subsurface by a cone penetrometer, the HTL-MIP thermally extracts organic compounds from saturated and unsaturated soils at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. The integrated system detects compounds using a screening photo-ionization detector (PID) and analyzes them in situ...

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiology 10, 145-58. Xcel Energy, 2003a. Black Dog PlantAccessed December 2003. Xcel Energy, 2003b. Sherburne CountyAccessed December 2003. Xcel Energy, 2003c. Allen S King

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from residential wood combustion. Environmental Science andsuch as residential wood combustion and motor vehicle2) residential wood combustion; and (3) power generation

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Heating: including gas, oil, coal and woodto MVs, domestic heating, in general, and residential woodpopulation using wood as their primary heating fuel (i.e. ,

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood Combustion (RWC) We estimated PAH emissions from RWC from both fireplaces and woodstoves. Emissions from pellet

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Developing indicators for the assessment and proper management of the different levels of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)s generally associated with coke-oven workers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coke ovens may occur in the aluminium, steel, graphite, electrical, and construction industries. In the work area coke-oven workers may be exposed to various chemical (more)

Wang, Tianyuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial sources, such as coke-oven emissions, asphaltindustrial processes such as coke manufacturing and aluminumwood, wood waste, petroleum coke, or wastewater, sludge (

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reclamation and reuse of freon in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses  

SciTech Connect

ADS is using a commercially available solvent reclamation system to recycle 95-97 percent of the Freon used in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses. ADS has further developed the commercially available solvent reclamation system to accommodate radioactive contaminated Freon. This report establishes the following: validity of the method; success of recycling; and effect of radionuclides in recycling radioactive contaminated Freon. The standard analysis method for determining total petroleum hydrocarbons (commonly known as oil and grease determination) involves solvent extraction of the hydrocarbons using Freon followed by quantitation using infrared detection. This has been the method of choice because it is simple, rugged, inexpensive, and applicable to both solid and liquid samples and to radioactive samples. Due to its deleterious effect on the ozone layer, the use of Freon and other chloro-fluorocarbons (CFCs) has been greatly restricted. Freon has become very expensive (800$/liter) and will soon be unavailable entirely. Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon extraction method. These methods include solid-phase extraction, solvent extraction, and supercritical fluid extraction all of which use gravimetric determination or infrared analysis of the extracted hydrocarbons. These methods are not as precise or as sensitive as the Freon extraction method, and a larger amount of sample is therefore required due to the decreased sensitivity. The solid phase extraction method cannot accommodate solid samples. Supercritical fluid extraction requires expensive instrumentation. ADS opted to keep the existing Freon method and recycle the solvent. An inexpensive solvent reclamation system was procured to reclaim the spent Freon. This reclaimer removes hydrocarbons from the Freon solvent by passage through an activated carbon bed.

Ekechukwu, A.A.; Peterson, S.F.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Year/PAD District Alkylates Aromatics Road Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alkylates Alkylates Aromatics Road Oil and Lubricants Petroleum Coke (MMcfd) Hydrogen Sulfur (short tons/day) Production Capacity Asphalt Isomers Marketable Table 7. Operable Production Capacity of Petroleum Refineries, January 1, 1981 to January 1, 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) a JAN 1, 1981 974 299 765 131 234 276 2,054 NA JAN 1, 1982 984 290 740 162 242 267 1,944 NA JAN 1, 1983 960 237 722 212 241 296 2,298 NA JAN 1, 1984 945 218 800 208 241 407 2,444 NA JAN 1, 1985 917 215 767 219 243 424 2,572 NA JAN 1, 1986 941 276 804 258 246 356 2,357 NA JAN 1, 1987 974 287 788 326 250 364 2,569 23,806 JAN 1, 1988 993 289 788 465 232 368 2,418 27,639 JAN 1, 1989 1,015 290 823 469 230 333 2,501 28,369 JAN 1, 1990 1,030 290 844 456 232 341 2,607 24,202

427

Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels and fuel gas from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by the use of molten metal halide catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst in a hydrocracking zone, thereafter separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the spent molten metal halide by incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combustion of carbon and sulfur compounds in the spent molten metal halide in an incineration zone, the improvement comprising: (a) contacting the heavy feedstocks and hydrogen in the presence of the molten metal halide in the hydrocracking zone at reaction conditions effective to convert from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the feedstock to lighter hydrocarbon fuels; (b) separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide; (c) contacting the spent molten metal halide with oxygen in a liquid phase gasification zone at a temperature and pressure sufficient to vaporize from about 25 to about 75 weight percent of the spent metal halide, the oxygen being introduced in an amount sufficient to remove from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the carbon contained in the spent molten metal halide to produce a fuel gas and regenerated metal halide; and (d) incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combusting carbon and sulfur compounds contained therein.

Gorin, Everett (San Rafael, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Mapping Study to Characterize NSCR Performance on a Natural Gas-Fueled Engine Authors: Mohamed Toema (speaker), Sarah Nuss-Warren, and Kirby S. Chapman, Kansas State University National Gas Machinery Laboratory; James McCarthy and Thomas McGrath, Innovative Environmental Solutions Inc. Venue: ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division 2009 Spring Technical Conference, May 3–6, Milwaukee, WI. http://www.asmeconferences.org/ICES09/index.cfm [external site]. Abstract: The researchers are conducting a project to characterize pollutant emissions performance of field gas-fired four-stroke cycle rich burn engines equipped with non-selective catalytic reduction (NSCR) technology. Engine emissions and operating parameters are being monitored on three engines over an extended period. In addition, a mapping study was conducted on one engine. The NSCR was operated at various controlled air-to-fuel (AF) ratios while emission measurements were conducted and engine operating parameters monitored. NOx, CO, and oxygen were measured using both EPA reference method technology and the portable analyzer used in the long-term study. In the mapping study, ammonia, formaldehyde, CO, NOx, and speciated hydrocarbon emissions were recorded in real-time using an extractive FTIR system. This paper focuses on the engine mapping phase. The mapping tests demonstrated a trade-off between NOx emissions and CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbon emissions. Richer engine operation (lower AF) decreases NOx emissions at the expense of higher CO, ammonia, and hydrocarbons. Leaner operation has the opposite effect. The results to date of the semi-continuous monitoring are presented in a separate paper.

429

Direct production of hydrogen and aromatics from methane or natural gas: Review of recent U.S. patents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the year 2000, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted a dozen patents for inventions related to methane dehydroaromatization processes. One of them was granted to UOP LLC (Des Plaines). It relates to a catalyst composition and preparation method. Two patents were granted to Conoco Phillips Company (Houston, TX). One was aimed at securing a process and operating conditions for methane aromatization. The other was aimed at securing a process that may be integrated with separation of wellhead fluids and blending of the aromatics produced from the gas with the crude. Nine patents were granted to ExxonMobil Chemical Patents Inc. (Houston, TX). Most of these were aimed at securing a dehydroaromatization process where methane-containing feedstock moves counter currently to a particulate catalyst. The coked catalyst is heated or regenerated either in the reactor, by cyclic operation, or in annex equipment, and returned to the reactor. The reactor effluent stream may be separated in its main components and used or recycled as needed. A brief summary of those inventions is presented in this review.

Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Survey of Physical and Chemical Properties of Soils Collected From Former Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents technical information and data from a study of the physical and chemical nature of soils at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. Included in the report is a comparison of chemical analysis methods for determination of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). One of the specific objectives of the research was determining relationships between total soil and leachate concentrations of analytes of int...

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

NETL: Gasification Systems - Program Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Presentations Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Program Presentations Research Efforts at the National Energy Technology Laboratory to Improve Gasifier Performance...

432

Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility. Interim final report, 7 November 1986-31 October 1989  

SciTech Connect

Results of material compatibility experiments using hydrocarbon fuels in contact with copper-based combustion chamber liner materials are presented. Mil-Spec RP-1, n- dodecane, propane, and methane fuels were tested in contact with OFHC, NASA-Z, and ZrCu coppers. Two distinct test methods were employed. Static tests, in which copper coupons were exposed to fuel for long durations at constant temperature and pressure, provided compatibility data in a precisely controlled environment. Dynamic tests, using the Aerojet Carbothermal Test Facility, provided fuel and copper compatibility data under realistic booster engine service conditions. Tests were conducted using very pure grades of each fuel and fuels to which a contaminant, e.g., ethylene or methyl mercaptan, was added to define the role played by fuel impurities. Conclusions are reached as to degradation mechanisms and effects, methods for the elimination of these mechanisms, selection of copper alloy combustion chamber liners, and hydrocarbon fuel purchase specifications.

Gage, M.L.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Tan, Eric; Tao, Ling; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Plasma-induced conversion of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results are reported for an electrical device for direct conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. A microchannel plate is excited with electrons from a photoemissive source, and electron impact ionization of methane on the inner surfaces of the microchannels creates an ion feedback process. The resulting low-density plasma creates higher hydrocarbons when charged particles impact the surfaces at grazing incidence. The production Of C{sub 2} to C{sub 8}-containing gases was noted, with a selectivity for C{sub 2} of 39% in one case. The proportions of converted products and the conversion rates depend upon the electrical voltage, the microchannel geometry, and the operating pressure. Conversion rates increase with operating pressure.

Sackinger, W.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Plasma-induced conversion of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results are reported for an electrical device for direct conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. A microchannel plate is excited with electrons from a photoemissive source, and electron impact ionization of methane on the inner surfaces of the microchannels creates an ion feedback process. The resulting low-density plasma creates higher hydrocarbons when charged particles impact the surfaces at grazing incidence. The production Of C{sub 2} to C{sub 8}-containing gases was noted, with a selectivity for C{sub 2} of 39% in one case. The proportions of converted products and the conversion rates depend upon the electrical voltage, the microchannel geometry, and the operating pressure. Conversion rates increase with operating pressure.

Sackinger, W.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700.degree. to 900.degree. C. are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025-0.4 mole and about 0.1-0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800.degree. to 850.degree. C. with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C.sub.2 hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700 to 900{degrees}C are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025--0.4 mole and about 0.1--0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800 to 850{degrees}C with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C{sub 2} hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

Siriwardane, R.V.

1991-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Production of valuable hydrocarbons by flash pyrolysis of oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of gas and liquid hydrocarbons from particulated oil shale by reaction with a pyrolysis gas at a temperature of from about 700/sup 0/C to about 1100/sup 0/C, at a pressure of from about 400 psi to about 600 psi, for a period of about 0.2 second to about 20 seconds. Such a pyrolysis gas includes methane, helium, or hydrogen. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Uwechue, Uzo Philip (Houston, TX)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

Fliermans, C.B.

1988-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

443

Adsorption of binary hydrocarbon mixtures in carbon slit pores: A density functional theory study  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption of binary hydrocarbons mixtures involving methane in carbon slit pores is theoretically studied here from the viewpoints of separation and of the effect of impurities on methane storage. It is seen that even small amounts of ethane, propane, or butane can significantly reduce the methane capacity of carbons. Optimal pore sizes and pressures, depending on impurity concentration, are noted in the present work, suggesting that careful adsorbent and process design can lead to enhanced separation. These results are consistent with earlier literature studies for the infinite dilution limit. For methane storage applications a carbon micropore width of 11.4 {angstrom} (based on distance between centers of carbon atoms on opposing walls) is found to be the most suitable from the point of view of lower impurity uptake during high-pressure adsorption and greater impurity retention during low-pressure delivery. The results also theoretically confirm unusual recently reported observations of enhanced methane adsorption in the presence of a small amount of heavier hydrocarbon impurity.

Bhatia, S.K. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

444

Solid-State Lighting: Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations to someone by Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Presentations on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Presentations on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Presentations on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications Webcasts Videos Tools Presentations This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Solid-State Lighting Workshops, as well as links to reference materials. Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Workshop Presentations, Materials and Reports November 2013: Presentations from DOE SSL Market Introduction Workshop

445

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations to Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings Webinars Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells

446

Challenge for Mesozoic hydrocarbon exploration in the Eastern Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastern part of Indonesia covers approximately 3 million square kilometers, 35 percent being landmass and 65 percent covered by ocean. Only three of 38 sedimentary basins are producing hydrocarbon (Salawati, Bintuni, and Seram Basins). Oil and gas have discovered in the Lariang, Bone, Timor, Banggai, Sula and Biak Basins, however the discoveries have not developed yet. Hydrocarbon systems in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea give the major contributions to the geological idea of Pre-Tertiary section in the less explored area in the Eastern Indonesia. The Triassic-Middle Jurassic marine carbonaceous shale sequences are the main hydrocarbon source rock in the Irian Jaya and surrounding area (Buton, gula and Seram basins). The main Mesozoic reservoir are the Kembelangan Formation in the Bintuni Basin of Irian Jaya and Bobong Formation in the North Sula Region. Exploration play types in the Eastern Indonesia can be divided into five types: 1 - Peri Cratonic, 2 - Marginal Rift Graben, 3 - Thrust Fold Belt Island Arc, 4 - Early Collision and 5 -Microcontinental Block - Advanced Collision. Recent discoveries through Mesozoic section in Eastern Indonesia are: Roabiba-1 (1990) in Bintuni Basin-Irian Jaya (Kambelangan Formation); Loku- 1 (1990) in North Sula region (Pre-Tertiary sediments); Oseil-1 (1993/94) in Bula-Seram Basin (Jurassic Manusela Formation); Elang-1 (1 994); Kakaktua-1 (1994) and Laminaria-1 in North Bonaparte Basin (Upper Jurassic Sands).

Abdullah, S.; Rukmiati, M.G.; Sitompul, N. (Pertamina Exploration and Production, Jakarta (Indonesia))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Method for production of hydrocarbon diluent from heavy crude oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of producing a hydrocarbon diluent from a heavy crude oil extracted from an underground petroleum formation via a production well. It comprises: preheating a quantity of heavy crude oil extracted from the production well to yield a heated crude oil; separating in a separator vessel by flashing the heated crude oil to produce a first vapor fraction and a first liquid fraction; thermally cracking in a cracking unit at least a portion of the first liquid fraction to produce a first liquid effluent; quenching the first liquid effluent; introducing at least a portion of the quenched fist liquid effluent into a separator; condensing the first vapor fraction; separating in a separator vessel the condensed vapor fraction to produce a liquid hydrocarbon diluent middle fraction characterized in having a boiling range between about 400{degrees}-700{degrees}F. and a gas; and, directing the liquid hydrocarbon diluent into the formation via an injection well for enhancing production of petroleum from the formation via the production well.

McCants, M.F.

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

448

Hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material and configuration of the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material comprising a catalyst support impregnated with catalyst is provided for reforming hydrocarbon fuel gases in an electrochemical generator. Elongated electrochemical cells convert the fuel to electrical power in the presence of an oxidant, after which the spent fuel is recirculated and combined with a fresh hydrocarbon feed fuel forming the reformable gas mixture which is fed to a reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst material, where the reforming catalyst material includes discrete passageways integrally formed along the length of the catalyst support in the direction of reformable gas flow. The spent fuel and/or combusted exhaust gases discharged from the generator chamber transfer heat to the catalyst support, which in turn transfers heat to the reformable gas and to the catalyst, preferably via a number of discrete passageways disposed adjacent one another in the reforming catalyst support. The passageways can be slots extending inwardly from an outer surface of the support body, which slots are partly defined by an exterior confining wall. According to a preferred embodiment, the catalyst support is non-rigid, porous, fibrous alumina, wherein the fibers are substantially unsintered and compressible, and the reforming catalyst support is impregnated, at least in the discrete passageways with Ni and MgO, and has a number of internal slot passageways for reformable gas, the slot passageways being partly closed by a containing outer wall. 5 figs.

Singh, P.; Shockling, L.A.; George, R.A.; Basel, R.A.

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

449

Hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material and configuration of the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material comprising a catalyst support impregnated with catalyst is provided for reforming hydrocarbon fuel gases in an electrochemical generator. Elongated electrochemical cells convert the fuel to electrical power in the presence of an oxidant, after which the spent fuel is recirculated and combined with a fresh hydrocarbon feed fuel forming the reformable gas mixture which is fed to a reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst material, where the reforming catalyst material includes discrete passageways integrally formed along the length of the catalyst support in the direction of reformable gas flow. The spent fuel and/or combusted exhaust gases discharged from the generator chamber transfer heat to the catalyst support, which in turn transfers heat to the reformable gas and to the catalyst, preferably via a number of discrete passageways disposed adjacent one another in the reforming catalyst support. The passageways can be slots extending inwardly from an outer surface of the support body, which slots are partly defined by an exterior confining wall. According to a preferred embodiment, the catalyst support is non-rigid, porous, fibrous alumina, wherein the fibers are substantially unsintered and compressible, and the reforming catalyst support is impregnated, at least in the discrete passageways with Ni and MgO, and has a number of internal slot passageways for reformable gas, the slot passageways being partly closed by a containing outer wall.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Plub Borough, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Thermocatalytic CO2-Free Production of Hydrogen from Hydrocarbon Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this project is the development of an economically viable thermocatalytic process for production of hydrogen and carbon from natural gas or other hydrocarbon fuels with minimal environmental impact. The three major technical goals of this project are: (1) to accomplish efficient production of hydrogen and carbon via sustainable catalytic decomposition of methane or other hydrocarbons using inexpensive and durable carbon catalysts, (2) to obviate the concurrent production of CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts and drastically reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the process, and (3) to produce valuable carbon products in order to reduce the cost of hydrogen production The important feature of the process is that the reaction is catalyzed by carbon particulates produced in the process, so no external catalyst is required (except for the start-up operation). This results in the following advantages: (1) no CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts are generated during hydrocarbon decomposition stage, (2) no expensive catalysts are used in the process, (3) several valuable forms of carbon can be produced in the process depending on the process conditions (e.g., turbostratic carbon, pyrolytic graphite, spherical carbon particles, carbon filaments etc.), and (4) CO{sub 2} emissions could be drastically reduced (compared to conventional processes).

University of Central Florida

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

453

Initial results for supercritical cycle experiments using pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research Program, which is being conducted for the Department of Energy, has as its objective the development of the technology for effecting improved utilization of moderate temperature geothermal resources. Testing at the Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) located at the DOE Geothermal Test Facility (GTF), East Mesa, California, is presently being conducted to meet this objective. Current testing involves a supercritical vaporization and countercurrent in-tube condensing system. The paper presents a brief description of the test facility and a discussion of the test program. Preliminary results on the performance of the supercritical heaters, countercurrent in-tube condenser, and turbine are given for both pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Monetization of Nigeria coal by conversion to hydrocarbon fuels through Fischer-Tropsch process  

SciTech Connect

Given the instability of crude oil prices and the disruptions in crude oil supply chains, this article offers a complementing investment proposal through diversification of Nigeria's energy source and dependence. Therefore, the following issues were examined and reported: A comparative survey of coal and hydrocarbon reserve bases in Nigeria was undertaken and presented. An excursion into the economic, environmental, and technological justifications for the proposed diversification and roll-back to coal-based resource was also undertaken and presented. The technology available for coal beneficiation for environmental pollution control was reviewed and reported. The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and its advances into Sasol's slurry phase distillate process were reviewed. Specifically, the adoption of Sasol's advanced synthol process and the slurry phase distillate process were recommended as ways of processing the products of coal gasification. The article concludes by discussing all the above-mentioned issues with regard to value addition as a means of wealth creation and investment.

Oguejiofor, G.C. [Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka (Nigeria). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Presentation for National Governors' Association  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Dr. John S. Cook, Director, Petroleum Division, Office of Oil and GasPresented to: National Governors' AssociationJanuary 26, 2001

Information Center

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

456

Phase Behavior of Light Gases in Hydrocarbon and Aqueous Solvents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under previous support from the Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present reporting period, our solubility apparatus was refurbished and restored to full service. To test the experimental apparatus and procedures used, measurements were obtained for the solubility Of C0{sub 2} in benzene at 160{degrees}F. Having confirmed the accuracy of the newly acquired data in comparison with our previous measurements and data reported in the literature for this test system, we have begun to measure the solubility of hydrogen in hexane. The measurements for this system will cover the temperature range from 160 to 280{degrees}F at pressures to 2,500 psia. As part of our model evaluation efforts, we examined the predictive abilities of an alternative approach we have proposed for calculating the phase behavior properties of highly non-ideal systems. Using this approach, the liquid phase fugacities generated from an equation of state (EOS) are augmented by a fugacity deviation function correction. The correlative abilities of this approach are compared with those of an EOS equipped with the recently introduced Wong-Sandler (MWS) mixing rules. These two approaches are compared with the current methods for vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) calculations, i.e., the EOS (0/0) approach with the van der Waals mixing rules and the split (y/0) approach. The evaluations were conducted on a database comprised of non-ideal low pressure binary systems as well as asymmetric high pressure binary systems. These systems are of interest in the coal liquefaction and utilization processes. The Peng-Robinson EOS was selected for the purposes of this evaluation.

Gasem, K.A.M.; Robinson, R.L., Jr.; Trvedi, N.J., Gao, W.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Multimodal smart interactive presentation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors propose a system that allows presenters to control presentations in a natural way by their body gestures and vocal commands. Thus a presentation no longer follows strictly a rigid sequential structure but can be delivered in various flexible ... Keywords: gesture recognition, natural interaction, presentation system, smart environment, speech recognition

Hoang-An Le, Khoi-Nguyen C. Mac, Truong-An Pham, Vinh-Tiep Nguyen, Minh-Triet Tran

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Wind Integration Study Methods (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of common elements, differences, integration costs, and errors in integration analysis.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Method for direct production of carbon disulfide and hydrogen from hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide feedstock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to carbon disulfide and hydrogen is provided comprising contacting the hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to a bi-functional catalyst residing in a controlled atmosphere for a time and at a temperature sufficient to produce carbon disulfide and hydrogen. Also provided is a catalyst for converting carbon sulfides and hydrogen sulfides to gasoline range hydrocarbons comprising a mixture containing a zeolite catalyst and a hydrogenating catalyst.

Miao, Frank Q.; Erekson, Erek James

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Microsoft PowerPoint - IGFC_Cleanup_SECA_Presentation_072910...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the removal of organic sulfur species from various hydrocarbons * Natural gas, LPG and biogas desulfurization * Warm gas and hot reformate gas desulfurization * Diesel fuel and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aromatic hydrocarbon present" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Advanced Fuel Cell Membranes Based on Heteropolyacids (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Develop the methodology for the fabrication of 3D cross-linked, hydrocarbon-based membranes using immobilized heteropolyacids (HPAs) as the proton conducting moiety.

Turner, J. A.; Pern, F. F. J.; Herring, A. M.; Dec, S. F.

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

462

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The northern GOM is a prolific hydrocarbon province where rapid migration of oil, gases, and brines from deep subsurface petroleum reservoirs occurs through faults...

463

Renewable Resources for Hydrogen (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of renewable resources for hydrogen. It was presented at the National Hydrogen Association Hydrogen Conference & Expo in Long Beach, CA, May 3-6, 2010.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

464

EIA - 2008 Conference Presentation Videos  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Presentations & Conferences > Conferences > EIA 2008 Energy Conference > EIA 2008 Energy Conference Videos. EIA Documentary - produced for 2008 EIA Conference

465

Life Sciences Division 1999 Presentations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (Invited) Chen, C. H., "Gene Probe for Microorganism Monitoring by Novel MS Approach," presented at the DOE Growth Factor and Transforming Growth Factor in the Swine Iliac Artery," presented at the Peripheral Spectrometry Measurement of Targeted Cytokines Under Physiological Conditions," presented at the 47th ASMS

466

Effect of temperature on wave velocities in sands and sandstones with heavy hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory investigation was made of the effects of temperature on wave velocities in well cemented Massillon and Boise sandstones and unconsolidated Ottawa sand saturated with heavy hydrocarbons, as well as the dependence of compressional velocities in the hydrocarbons themselves as a function of temperature. The hydrocarbons selected as pore saturants were a commercial paraffin wax, 1-Eicosene, natural heavy crude, and natural tar. The experimental results show that the compressional wave velocities in the hydrocarbons decrease markedly with increasing temperature. In contrast wave velocities in the Massillon and Boise sandstones and unconsolidated Ottawa sand saturated with air or water decrease only little with increasing temperatures. The main reason for the large decreases in rocks with hydrocarbons is the melting of solid hydrocarbons, and high pore pressure. Thermal expansion of the saturants, and possibly thermal cracking of the heavy fractions and vaporization of the light fractions of the hydrocarbons may also contribute. The large decreases of the compressional and shear wave velocities in the hydrocarbon-saturated rocks and sands with temperature, suggest that seismic measurements such as used in seismology or borehole tomography may be very useful in detecting steam fronts in heavy hydrocarbon reservoirs undergoing steam flooding.

Wang, Z.; Nur, A.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Catalytic conversion of C3+ alcohols to hydrocarbon blend-stock  

Catalytic conversion of C3+ alcohols to hydrocarbon blend-stock Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

468

Rare earth elements (REE) as geochemical clues to reconstruct hydrocarbon generation history.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The REE distribution patterns and total concentrations of the organic matter of the Woodford shale reveal a potential avenue to investigate hydrocarbon maturation processes in (more)

Ramirez-Caro, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Two decades of hydrocarbon exploration activity in Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, hydrocarbon exploration activity within Indonesia has been based on the Indonesian Energy Policy, aims of which include intensifying and expanding hydrocarbon exploration programs. Expansion into the offshore regions of the nation has resulted in the discovery of petroliferous basins. The first offshore oil production came on stream in 1971. Since then, significant achievements have been made in developing these resources. Intensified onshore exploration has resulted in additional oil fields being discovered in these more mature areas. Among the significant gas fields discovered during the past 20 years, Arun and Badak both supply major LNG projects. Oil fields have been found in the onshore areas of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Java, and Irian Jaya, and in the offshore areas around West Java, Madura, Natuna, and East Kalimantan. The exploration drilling success during this time has been approximately 32%. In addition, the ratio of oil field development to these discoveries is about 54%. For technical and economic reasons, not all discoveries can be developed into oil fields. Recently, Pertamina's Research and Development Division organized the study of data contributed by Pertamina exploration, foreign contractors, and science institutes. This study reveals that 60 basins are spread throughout the onshore and offshore areas of the nation. Using PAUS (plan and analysis of uncertainty situation), a Monte Carolo simulation program, the hydrocarbon potential of each basin has been estimated. These estimates will be continually revised as more data are made available to the study, as the geology of Indonesia is better understood in terms of plate tectonic theory, and as computing techniques improve.

Suardy, A.; Taruno, J.; Simbolon, P.H.; Simbolon, B.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a unique rhizobium species that lives within the stems of poplar and we are investigating whether this bacterium contributes nitrogen fixed from the air to the plant and whether this endophyte could be used to introduce genes into poplar. Studies of the production of chloride ion from TCE have shown that our present P-450 constructs did not produce chloride more rapidly than wild type plants. Follow-up studies will determine if there are other rate limiting downstream steps in TCE metabolism in plants. Studies of the metabolism of carbon tetrachloride in poplar cells have provided evidence that the native plant metabolism is due to the activity of oxidative enzymes similar to the mammalian cytochrome P-450 2E1.

Strand, Stuart E.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Road to Net Zero (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A PowerPoint presentation on NREL's Research Support Facility (RSF) and the road to achieving net zero energy for new construction.

Glover, B.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474