Sample records for army ammunition plant

  1. Basewide energy systems plan, Hawthorne Army Ammunition Plant, Hawthorne, Nevada; executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1983-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the Executive Summary of the Basewide Energy Systems Plan for the Hawthorne Army Ammunition Plant (HWAAP) at Hawthorne, Nevada. This project has been executed as a part of the Department of the Army`s Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). The overall objective of the project is to develop a systematic plan of projects that will result in the reduction of energy consumption in compliance with the objectives set forth in the Army Facilities Energy Plan (AFEP), without decreasing the readiness posture of the Army. The Hawthorne Army Ammunition Plant is a Government Owned and Contractor Operator (GOCO) Army facility. Consequently, any reference made in this document to the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) is directly analagous to Energy Conservation and Management (ECAM). The ECAM designation pertains specifically to GOCO Army installations. All Programming Documents for projects developed from this study reference ECAM wherever ECIP is called for.

  2. army ammunitions plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. Engineering Computer Graphics Laboratory 1996 Engineering Computer Graphics Laboratory. 1996. AFastSEEP Automated Se Army...

  3. army ammunition plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. Engineering Computer Graphics Laboratory 1996 Engineering Computer Graphics Laboratory. 1996. AFastSEEP Automated Se Army...

  4. Energy Engineering Analysis (EEA) program for Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant, Texas. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Energy Engineering Analysis (EEA) for LSAAP is threefold: Develop a systematic plan of projects which will result in reducing energy consumption. Consider renewable energy sources with the objective of establishing an orderly procedure for reducing use of non-renewable energy sources. Determine the feasibility of Total Energy (TE), Selective Energy (SE), and Central Heating Plant (CHP) concepts using alternative fuels. In essence, an assessment of the entire energy picture at LSAAP was undertaken. This report is a summary of that effort. LSAAP was originally built during 1941 and 1942 as a shell loading plant for the Army. After World War II, the facility was deactivated until 1951 when it was reactivated as a Government Owned, Contractor Operated (GOCO) facility. Day and Zimmerman was selected as the operator in 1951 and has been the operating contractor ever since. Located just west of Texarkana, Texas, LSAAP encompasses an area of approximately 15,546 acres. The primary mission of LSAAP is to load, assemble and pack ammunition and ammunition components for the Army.

  5. SUMMARY CONCLUSIONS FOR THE PILOT IN-SITU CHROMIUM REDUCTION TEST AT RIVERBANK ARMY AMMUNITIONS PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridley, M

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A treatability study was conducted at Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant's (RBAAP) Site 17, to evaluate the effectiveness of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for the treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup 6+}). The chromium contamination at Site 17 is hydrologically isolated and unsuitable for standard extraction and treatment (pump and treat). The majority of the chromium contamination at Site 17 is trapped within the fine grain sediments of a clay/slit zone (45 to 63). The PRB was established above and adjacent to the contaminated zone at Site 17 to reduce the hexavalent chromium as it leaches out of the contaminated clay/silt zone separating the A zone from the A zone. Site 17 and the monitoring network are described in the In-Situ Chromium Reduction Treatability Study Work Plan (CH2MHILL, January 2004). The PRB was created by reducing naturally occurring Fe{sup 3+} to Fe{sup 2+} with the injection of a buffered sodium dithionite solution into subsurface chromium source area. The Cr{sup 6+} leaching out of the contaminated clay/silt zone and migrating through the PRB is reduced by Fe{sup 2+} to Cr{sup 3+} and immobilized (Amonette, et al., 1994). The sodium dithionite will also reduce accessible Cr{sup 6+}, however the long-term reductant is the Fe{sup 2+}. Bench scale tests (Appendix A) were conducted to assess the quantity and availability of the naturally occurring iron at Site 17, the ability of the sodium dithionite to reduce the hexavalent chromium and Fe within the sediments, and the by-products produced during the treatment. Appendix A, provides a detailed description of the laboratory treatability tests, and provides background information on the technologies considered as possible treatment options for Site 17. Following the sodium dithionite treatment, groundwater/treatment solution was extracted to remove treatment by-products (sulfate, manganese, and iron). The following sections briefly discuss the current treatment status, future recommendations for Site 17, and future recommendations for the application of sodium dithionite at additional sites. At the completion of the treatability test, none of the wells at Site 17 had detectable hexavalent chromium, but the sulfate, iron, and manganese concentrations were detected and exceeded the CA secondary drinking water standards. The extraction done after the injection of the sodium dithionite solution to remove the sulfate, manganese, and iron has to a large extent negated the effectiveness of the iron reduction. Riverbank's local groundwater is naturally high in dissolved oxygen (concentration range at Site 17: 1.8 to 6.0 mg/l) and moving this type of groundwater through the reduced zone caused oxidation of the Fe2+ within the treatment zone, followed by a new release of hexavalent chromium detected in one of the treatment wells. Additional extraction at Site 17 will continue to degrade the PRB, threatening to release additional Cr{sup 6+} into the groundwater. Sulfate and manganese only exceed the CA secondary drinking water standards in the area immediately surrounding the PRB. It is unlikely that these contaminants will threaten any water supply wells in the area. The chromium concentrations are increasing in IW-17. The current concentration is still only a third of the original concentration. It might be worth investigating some of the new zero valent iron treatments, such as nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) to replace the in-situ naturally occurring iron, which may no longer be available for reduction. The NZVI has been successfully tested at NASA in Florida (O'Hara, 2006), and demonstrated no release of metals from the natural sediments. This might also be a viable option for other sites at RBAAP.

  6. alabama army ammunition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: US Army Corps of Engineers ENGINEERING AND DESIGN Inspection, Evaluation, and Repair of Hydraulic No. 1110-2-6054 1 December 2001 Engineering and Design...

  7. ammunition plant radford: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at planting time in 2009. Aboveground biomass production, coarse and fine roots, SOC Norton, Jay B. 233 THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of...

  8. ammunition plant baraboo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at planting time in 2009. Aboveground biomass production, coarse and fine roots, SOC Norton, Jay B. 184 THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of...

  9. ammunition plant joliet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at planting time in 2009. Aboveground biomass production, coarse and fine roots, SOC Norton, Jay B. 184 THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of...

  10. ammunition plant milan: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at planting time in 2009. Aboveground biomass production, coarse and fine roots, SOC Norton, Jay B. 248 THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of...

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Iowa Army Ammunition Plant - IA 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -ElkGuterlHookerInstitute- NYArmy

  12. Excess Titanium from NNSA's Y-12 Plant to be Used by the Army...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Excess Titanium from NNSA's Y-12 Plant to be Used by the Army for New Generation of Protective Body Armor for Combat Troops | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook...

  13. Energy Conservation in Army Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aveta, G. A.; Sliwinski, B. J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -tank ammunition, high explosive filled missile warheads, fuses, demolition blocks and detonators. The plant has four load, assemble, and pack (LAP) production lines, all of which are currently active, and an active ammunition renovation plant. lAAP consumes...

  14. Army Energy Security and Independence

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ARMY ENERGY SECURITY AND INDEPENDENCE Leadership Ownership Partnership 19 NOV 2008 Don Juhasz, PE, CEM CHIEF ARMY ENERGY POLICY Army Energy Security - "The Way Ahead" 2 ARMY ENERGY...

  15. Feasibility of white-rot fungi for biodegradation of PCP-treated ammunition boxes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholze, R.J.; Lamar, R.T.; Bolduc, J.; Dietrich, D.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Millions of pounds of wood ammunition boxes treated with the wood preservative pentachiorophenol (PCP) are being stockpiled at military installations, primarily depots, because cost-effective disposal is not readily available. The Army needs cost-effective and environmentally benign treatment methods for destruction and disposal of PCP-treated wood products. This research investigated the use of white-rot fungi to biodegrade PCP-treated wood. Results showed that white-rot fungi effectively decreased the PCP concentration in contaminated hardwood and softwood chips. Under ideal laboratory conditions the fungi reduced the PCP concentration by 80 percent; a field study showed only a 30 percent decrease in PCP concentration. Despite this disparity, this study demonstrated the feasibility of using white-rot fungi to reduce PCP in treated wood.

  16. Crusader Automated Docking System: Technology support for the Crusader Resupply Team. Interim report, Ammunition Logistics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kring, C.T.; Varma, V.K.; Jatko, W.B.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army and Team Crusader (United Defense, Lockheed Martin Armament Systems, etc.) are developing the next generation howitzer, the Crusader. The development program includes an advanced, self-propelled liquid propellant howitzer and a companion resupply vehicle. The resupply vehicle is intended to rendezvous with the howitzer near the battlefront and replenish ammunition, fuel, and other material. The Army has recommended that Crusader incorporate new and innovative technologies to improve performance and safety. One conceptual design proposes a robotic resupply boom on the resupply vehicle to upload supplies to the howitzer. The resupply boom would normally be retracted inside the resupply vehicle during transit. When the two vehicles are within range of the resupply boom, the boom would be extended to a receiving port on the howitzer. In order to reduce exposure to small arms fire or nuclear, biological, and chemical hazards, the crew would remain inside the resupply vehicle during the resupply operation. The process of extending the boom and linking with the receiving port is called docking. A boom operator would be designated to maneuver the boom into contact with the receiving port using a mechanical joystick. The docking operation depends greatly upon the skill of the boom operator to manipulate the boom into docking position. Computer simulations at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have shown that computer-assisted or autonomous docking can improve the ability of the operator to dock safely and quickly. This document describes the present status of the Crusader Autonomous Docking System (CADS) implemented at Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the CADS project is to determine the feasibility and performance limitations of vision systems to satisfy the autonomous docking requirements for Crusader and conduct a demonstration under controlled conditions.

  17. ammunition plant final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for leading the Entomology and Nematology Jawitz, James W. 124 Methods -Aboveground Harvest -M.E. Kubiske 2009 Field Season Final Harvest Biology and Medicine Websites...

  18. WELDON SPRING FORMER ARMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1959 for the Army Reserve as the Weldon Spring Training Area. Contaminated areas are spread throughoutWELDON SPRING FORMER ARMY ORDNANCE WORKS MISSOURI EPA ID# MO5210021288 EPA Region 7 10/13/2011 City: 35 miles west of St. Louis County: St. Charles County Other Names: Weldon Springs National Guard

  19. ARMY Energy Security Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as much oil as Asia. 2005 Asian consumption exceeded that in North America US oil consumption up: 20.7 mbd-FDF (703) 601-0374 (DSN 329) / don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil 5 April 2007 Army Energy · · · · FOREIGN OIL 2 Situation OIL & GAS LIQUIDS 38% Rise in NTV Fuel Use 35% of DoD utilities 21% of Fed government 11

  20. Army Energy Security Considerations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Juhasz DAIM-FDF (703) 601-0374 (DSN 329) don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil 5 April 2007 World Energy Situation OIL & GAS LIQUIDS 38% Rise in NTV Fuel Use 35% of DoD utilities 21% of Fed...

  1. Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract: Core samples taken from a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Nebraska, were analyzed for physical and chemical...

  2. Army Regulation 690600 Civilian Personnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 690­600 Civilian Personnel Equal Employment Opportunity Discrimination Complaints Civilian Personnel Equal Employment Opportunity Discrimination Complaints *Army Regulation 690­600 Effective 9 March 2004 History. This publication is a major revision. Summary. This regulation establishes

  3. December 2009 ARMY MEDICAL LOGISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 4-02.1 December 2009 ARMY MEDICAL LOGISTICS DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public Medical Logistics Contents Page PREFACE...................................................................................................ix Chapter 1 OVERVIEW OF ARMY MEDICAL LOGISTICS................................................. 1-1 Section

  4. Health Risks from Lead-Based Ammunition in the Environment - A Consensus Statement of Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , and Smith, D.R. 2012. Lead poisoning and the deceptiveV.G. 2006. A review of lead poisoning from ammunitionJ.R. , and Hart, G. 2009. Lead bullet fragments in venison

  5. Letterkenny Army Depot: The Army Teaches Business a Lesson in Lean Six Sigma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Roger K.

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Letterkenny Army Depot: The Army Teaches Business a Lesson in Lean Six Sigma is a case study of Letterkenny Army Depot, one of five Army maintenance depots. Letterkenny recapitalizes missiles, HMMWV's, generators, and other ...

  6. WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    2014 WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL 2014 WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL Army EquipmEnt modErnizAtion plAn #12;The estimated cost .......................................................................................... 75 #12;#12;7 www.g8.army.mil The Army Equipment Modernization Plan 2014 describes the Army Research

  7. Army Regulation 2550 Information Management: Records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 25­50 Information Management: Records Management Preparing and Managing Information Management: Records Management Preparing and Managing Correspondence *Army Regulation 25. This regulation on the prepa- ration and management of Army corre- spondence has been revised. This revision

  8. Army High Performance Computing Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Army High Performance Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science research challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing Research

  9. ARMY SERVICE FORCES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it ! (ARMY SERVICE

  10. Army Regulation 2001 Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 200­1 Environmental Quality Environmental Protection and Enhancement Headquarters Environmental Protection and Enhancement *Army Regulation 200­1 Effective 27 December 2007 History in the summary of change. Summary. This regulation covers envi- ronmental protection and enhancement and provides

  11. Lead Ammunition and Illegal Poisoning: Further International Agreements Are Needed to Preserve Vultures and the Crucial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Lead Ammunition and Illegal Poisoning: Further International Agreements Are Needed to Preserve, free-ranging scavengers, such as vultures, risk ingestion of illegal poison baits intended to kill, a country home to over 95% of all European avian scavengers, more than 4000 vultures were illegally poisoned

  12. Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  13. Salvation Army : the next generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francpourmoi, Salomé

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salvation Army thrift stores are retail entities in the center of neighborhoods which collect and resell used objects. Although historically dear to many, it seems that the physical condition, market visibility, and ...

  14. Army Policy Guidance for UESCs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—provides an overview of the U.S. Army's utility energy service contract (UESC) program and its UESC draft policy guidance.

  15. Process Improvement at Army Installations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northrup, J.; Smith, E. D.; Lin, M.; Baird, J.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Executive Orders require the Army to reduce the use of energy and related environmental impacts by promoting renewable energy technologies. These new energy and environmental directives usually exceed the performance capabilities of DODs currently installed...

  16. Army Regulation 2555 Information Management: Records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 25­55 Information Management: Records Management The Department of the Army Freedom Incorporates the Interim Change No. I01, which expires 30 June 1996 into the baseline regulation dated 10 of Information Act Program *Army Regulation 25­55 Effective 1 December 1997 History. This revision was originally

  17. Sustainability: Preserving Choice for the Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Sustainability: Preserving Choice for the Army Friday, October 19, 2012 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. (lunch will be provided) Wrigley Hall, Room 481 Richard Kidd Deputy Assistant of the Army, Energy and Sustainability infrastructure. The development of Army-wide sustainability principles coupled with investments, training

  18. US Army Corps of Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Projects US Army Corps of Engineers Far East District ® 2012YEAR-in-REVIEW is an autho- rized publication Commander To Our Valued Customers and Stakeholders: - 2 -2012 YEAR-in-REVIEW This annual Year-in-Review over 200 military Families. A few other projects highlighted in this Year-in-Review include the new

  19. ~us Army Corps of Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of aquatic plant management; valuation methods.for aquatic plant control; and field testing and development

  20. This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ­ Joint and Army Operations .......................................................... 1-1 Understanding ......................................................... 1-9 Army Network Operational Environment Operations 1. Change FMI 6-02.45, 5 July 2007, as follows: Remove expiration date. 2. FMI to expire 5 July

  1. Montana State University 1 Military Science -Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    actively seeking this qualification for potential professional employees. Army ROTC provides leadership scholarship covers tuition and fees, a specified amount for textbooks, supplies and equipment, plus

  2. Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard General of the Air Force/Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard O-10 General of the Air Force/Army (Reserved Corps Navy & Coast Guard WarrantOfficers No Warrant Officer Rank Warrant Officer 1 Chief Warrant Officer Warrant Officer 5 Air Force Army Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard E-9 Chief Master Sergeant of the Air

  3. Developing an Army Doctrine Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Judith M.R.

    2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Psychology 59(5): 952-959. Lind, E. Allan, and Tyler, Tom R. 1988. The social psychology of procedural justice. New York, NY: Springer. Luecke, Richard. A., and Patterson, James G. 2008. How to become a better negotiator. 2nd ed. New York, NY: AMACOM... (e.g., “the influence Soldiers exert”) and not applicable to the development of a doctrinal techniques publication. ADP 3-0, Unified Land Operations, outlines how the Army supports and contributes to unified action, defined as “the synchronization...

  4. ARMY SERiWE FORCES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it ! (ARMY

  5. ARMY Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 A Strategic FrameworkRoadmap ANSIthe conveyance ofDepartmentARMY

  6. army future combat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    It also includes links to Army images US Army Corps of Engineers 17 Combating climate change. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ?? Level: Master thesis in Business...

  7. Army Energy Security and Independence | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Army's energy and water strategy for installations; renewable energy projects; net zero energy installations; and the Army's renewable energy program....

  8. army industrial facilities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., or Madigan Van Stryland, Eric 4 ARMY Energy Security Considerations Renewable Energy Websites Summary: . Implement energy security...

  9. Seneca Army Depot EPA ID#: NY0213820830

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and metals. Soils are contaminated with heavy metals, VOCs and SVOCs. Cleanup Approach The site is being. In response to EPA and NYSDEC comments on the Draft Feasibility Study (FS), the Army performed ground water drinking water from private wells within a 3-mile radius of the depot. The Army has stored and disposed

  10. actual hanford tank: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the 1940s to produce plutonium during World War II. The Pantex Plant in the Texas Panhandle was originally used by the U.S. Army for loading conventional ammunition shells and...

  11. ARMY MASS TRANSPORTATION BENEFIT PROGRAM Outside the National Capital Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Civilian/Mil Tech Employee Army National Guard Active Duty Enlisted II. Applicant Certification: Please

  12. Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NREL are developing target energy budgets and design guides to achieve 30% energy savings. This paper focuses the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing.

  13. Study of the treatability of wastewater from a coal-gasification plant. Final report, July 15, 1978-July 14, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iglar, A. F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on the coal gasification facility serving the Holston Army Ammunition Plant in Kingsport, Tennessee. Objectives were to characterize the wastewater produced by the gasification facility, and to evaluate technology for treating the waste in preparation for dischage to the environment. Most wastewater was recycled for scrubbing and cooling the product gas, with the excess requiring disposal found to be an average of only 1170 gallons per day (53 gallons per ton of coal, as received, and 366 gallons per million cubic feet of product gas). Analysis indicated that the waste was warm, high in alkaline material, especially ammonia, high in organic material, especially phenols, and also contaminated with other substances. Sulfides and thiocyanates were especially high in concentration. It was found that pretreatment could be accomplished by stripping (air injection) at high pH, removal of grease and oil (by pH suppression and light aeration) and neutralizatin. Equations were developed to describe the first two steps. Biological treatment through activated sludge was found to be successful, but effected only a moderate degree of treatment, and was troubled with frequent process upset. Attempts to improve treatment efficiency and stability are described. The data indicated the need to study aerated waste stabilization ponds as an alternative to activated sludge. Biological reaction kinetics were studied for activated sludge. Evaluation of the application of granular activated carbon suggested that this could be an effective practical tertiary treatment.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - army research institute Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: army research institute Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Army High Performance Computing Research Center Summary: Army High Performance Computing Research Center...

  15. Army Virtual Housing Experience The Army virtual housing experience provides Soldiers and Families world class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Virtual Housing Experience Fact Sheet OVERVIEW The Army virtual housing experience provides Soldiers and Families world class customer focused housing information which allows them to make informed housing choices regarding off-post, privatized or government housing upon receipt of orders by using

  16. aquatic plants water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    within the metropolitan area of Oklahoma City US Army Corps of Engineers 114 North City Water Reclamation Plant Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary:...

  17. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating with other existing data sources, thus minimizing manually entered data.

  18. army engineer district: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prepared for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: PNNL-22788 Final Prepared for the U.S. Army Corps...

  19. army engineers district: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prepared for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: PNNL-22788 Final Prepared for the U.S. Army Corps...

  20. army health service: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hebert Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP be performed at an Army health care facility near your school, or you could work in one of the Army's world-...

  1. Army Energy Security Considerations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from Tarasa U.S.LLC |AquionMr. Edward RosenbloomArmy EnergyArmy

  2. US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    .D Research Hydraulic Engineer U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center #12;Coastal Modeling System;Coastal Modeling System Basics Webinar 3 1. Overview of CMS-Wave Steady-state (time-independent), half Basics Webinar 2 Outline Overview of CMS-Wave Capability Governing equations Incident wave spectrum

  3. US Army Corps of Engineers PLANNING SMART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    US Army Corps of Engineers PLANNING SMART BUILDING STRONG® SMART Planning Lessons Learned Post Final Feasibility Report Wes Coleman Chief, Office of Water Project Review #12;PLANNING SMART BUILDING STRONG® 3 The Chief's Report Phase #12;PLANNING SMART BUILDING STRONG® 4 Expectations for Final Reports

  4. Raising a Pragmatic Army: Officer Education at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 1946-1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Michael David

    2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    . Pfaff, Army Professionalism, the Military Ethic, and Officership in the 21st Century (Carlisle, PA: US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, 1999), iii, 42. http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usassi/ssipubs/pubs99/ethic/ethic.htm (accessed July 7...

  5. Integrating the Army Geospatial Enterprise: Synchronizing Geospatial-Intelligence to the Dismounted James E. Richards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    1 Integrating the Army Geospatial Enterprise: Synchronizing Geospatial. #12;2 [This Page Intentionally Left Blank] #12;3 Army`s Geospatial Architecture: delivering Geospatial-Intelligence of complex and urban terrain to the dismounted Soldier by James E. Richards ABSTRACT The Army`s Geospatial

  6. An examination of the US Army's Environmental Ethic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danner, Benton Allen

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In its national defense and civil works missions the Army manages more than 20 million acres of land, including many unique natural and cultural resources (US Army Environmental Center). It consumes or utilizes vast quantities of other natural... to limiting environmental damage across the entire spectrum of operational missions, but has made a firm commitment in the areas of preservation, restoration, recycling, wildlife management and a host of other areas. Before we consider the Army's vision...

  7. army military government: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012-01-01 4 Politicized armies, militarized politics : civil-military relations in Turkey and Greece MIT - DSpace Summary: Despite their common Ottoman heritage, Greece and...

  8. army size military: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012-01-01 4 Politicized armies, militarized politics : civil-military relations in Turkey and Greece MIT - DSpace Summary: Despite their common Ottoman heritage, Greece and...

  9. army air defense: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    while avoiding the toxicity of medical and surgical castration. Steven J Hudak; Javier Hernandez; Ian M Thompson; Urology Service; Correspondence Javier Hernandez 50 Army High...

  10. U.S. Army Office of Energy Initiatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    or greater than 10 MW * Will work closely with installations for 1- 10 MW opportunities * Potential for projects that exceed Army requirements * Solar, Wind, Biomass and Geothermal...

  11. Waste-to-Energy Projects at ArmyWaste to Energy Projects at Army Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Now!)p ( gy ) 2009 RDECOM WTE Technology Assessment Selected Army WTE Projects ERDC F l C ll D ERDC natural gas and steam by Oct 2016 [EISA 2007] Electricity use for federal government from renewable, NDAA 2007] Total consumption from renewable sources · At least 50% of required annual renewable energy

  12. ATP 4-91 (FMI 4-93.41) Army Field Support Brigade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Digital Library at (www.train.army.mil). #12;Change 1 Army Techniques Publication No. 4-91 Headquarters-1 Role of the Army Sustainment Command (ASC) ............................................... 1-1 Mission NATIONAL-LEVEL PROVIDER FUNCTIONS .................................................. 3-1 Introduction......................................................................................

  13. Manhattan Project: Enter the Army, 1942

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science, and technology-- Energy, science, andDCP-1Army parade, Los

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - army medical research Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waterways Experiment Station Vicksburg, MS Collection: Engineering 2 Army High Performance Computing Research Center Summary: Army High Performance Computing Research Center...

  15. ERDCTR-14-2 Army Net Zero Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDCTR-14-2 Army Net Zero Program Composting Assessment for Organic Solid Waste at Fort Polk/client/default. #12;Army Net Zero Program ERDC TR-14-2 April 2014 Composting Assessment for Organic Solid Waste for other technical reports published by ERDC, visit the ERDC online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net

  16. army field water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    army field water First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 EPA and the Army Corps' Proposed Rule...

  17. army materials technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    army materials technology First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ERDCELTR-12-10 Army Range...

  18. FM 6-22 (FM 22-100) Army Leadership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 6-22 (FM 22-100) Army Leadership Competent, Confident, and Agile OCTOBER 2006 DISTRIBUTION and complex security environment we face. FM 6-22 is the Army's keystone field manual on leadership. It establishes leadership doctrine and fundamental principles for all officers, noncommissioned officers

  19. army research office: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crawley@usace.army.mil; (601) 634-2142 or 3123; 3242 fax Puerto Rico Republic of Korea US Marshall Islands Virgin Islands 12;2 Alabama Amiri Engineering Corp 35 DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  20. U.S. Army Fort Carson Photovoltaics Project Lease

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NO. DACA45-1-07-6037 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY LEASE FORT CARSON MILITARY INSTALLATION EL PAS0 COUNTY, COLORADO THIS LEASE, made on behalf of the United States, between the SECRETARY...

  1. army special forces: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or by other means. This determination was made on 10 July 2006. Other requests for this document must be referred to Commander, United States Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare...

  2. ARMY, MARINE CORPS, NAVY, AIR FORCE MULTISERVICE TACTICS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ARMY, MARINE CORPS, NAVY, AIR FORCE MULTISERVICE TACTICS, TECHNIQUES, AND PROCEDURES Development and Integration T. L. DAVISON THOMAS J. LOFTUS Captain, US Navy Major General, USAF, MC, CFS Acting Assistant Surgeon General Navy Warfare Development Command Health Care Operations Office

  3. army personnel wu: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology Websites Summary: Sustainability: Preserving Choice for the Army Friday, October 19, 2012 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. (lunch will be provided) Wrigley Hall, Room 481 Richard...

  4. Army Awards 20 Additional Contracts for Renewable Energy Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on February 20 awarded another 20 base contracts to companies for renewable energy-related technologies. The contracts, including two for...

  5. army artillerymen final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by expert nurse educators, instructors, and administrators at Fort Sam Houston Post, San Antonio, Texas Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: The U.S. Army Licensed...

  6. International Weed Science Congress, Vancouver, Canada. 2025 June, 2008. p 53. [Invited] Lisa J. Rew, Hal Balbach, US Army ERDC, Champaign, IL.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    J. Rew, Hal Balbach, US Army ERDC, Champaign, IL. Evaluating the role of vehicles by vehicles, and thereafter, by natural population expansion in the moredisturbed environments along the right of way. Plant propagules (seeds and other reproductive parts) have been observed on vehicles

  7. Renewable Energy Opportunities for the Army

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solana, Amy E.; States, Jennifer C.; Chvala, William D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has a goal of obtaining 25% of its domestic electricity from renewable sources by 2025, and also must meet federal renewable energy mandates and schedules. This report describes the analyses undertaken to study the renewable resource potential at 15 Army sites, focusing on grid-connected generation of electricity. The resources analyzed at each site include solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste-to-energy, and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). For each renewable generation resource, an assessment was completed to determine the level of resource availability, and the price at which that resource would be available for electricity generation. Various design alternatives and available technologies were considered in order to determine the best way to utilize each resource and maximize cost-effective electricity generation. Economic analysis used multiple funding options, including investment by an independent power producer (IPP), Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC), and Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP), and considered tax incentives, renewable energy credits, and other economic factors to reveal the most realistic costs possible. Where resource options proved to be economically viable, implementation approaches were recommended. The intention was to focus each installation’s efforts on realistic projects, moving them from initial assessment through the design and financing to implementation. Many Army sites enjoy very low costs of electricity, limiting the number of cost-effective renewable energy options where resources are available. Waste-to-energy was often a viable option due to the additional revenue gathered from transferred tipping fees. GSHPs were also commonly cost-effective options for replacement in inefficient buildings. Geothermal, wind, and solar resources are found to be more available in certain parts of the country over others, reducing overall potential for use. Wind is variable and often most available in remote areas far from transmission lines, greatly increasing costs. Capital costs for solar energy are high, and the resource is also variable. Table 1 shows which resources are promising for each installation studied. Not all analyses are complete at this point, so some resource potential is still unknown.

  8. UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS: INFORMING A PROGRAM TO STUDY Landing Power Plant (at center). Image from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library. #12; #12;i Acknowledgments The authors would like to thank many people who assisted with locating

  9. FEMP and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Partner to Drive Down Federal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FEMP and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Partner to Drive Down Federal Energy Costs FEMP and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Partner to Drive Down Federal Energy Costs March 26, 2015 -...

  10. The potential of America's Army, the video game as civilian-military public sphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhan, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army developed multiplayer online First Person Shooter video game, America's Army, was examined as the first instance of an entirely state-produced and directed enterprise leveraging video game popular culture. ...

  11. The AEF way of war: the American army and combat in the First World War 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grotelueschen, Mark Ethan

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Many scholars of the First World War have examined the European armies in new ways that have shown not only how those armies actually fought along the Western Front, but how they changed their ideas and methods over time, ...

  12. General Lesley J. McNair: Little-Known Architect of the U.S. Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calhoun, Mark

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    General Lesley J. McNair demonstrated an innovative spirit and exceptional intellectual capacity in his efforts to organize and train the U.S. Army for World War II. The influence he exerted on Army doctrine, training, ...

  13. Integrating the Army Geospatial Enterprise : synchronizing geospatial-intelligence to the dismounted soldier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, James E., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Army's Geospatial Enterprise (AGE) has an emerging identity and value proposition arising from the need to synchronize geospatial information activities across the Army in order to deliver value to military decision ...

  14. US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    in accordance with NRC disposal regulations at the time NRC disposal regulation rescinded in 1981 FUSRAP development. #12;BUILDING STRONG® 2010 Work Plan Gas Pipeline Relocation Site Infrastructure Development Trailers and Parking Area 10 #12;BUILDING STRONG® 11 Water Treatment Plant & Pipeline Work Trailer Site

  15. Volume XIX, No. 1 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Volume XIX, No. 1 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command January -- the New Landscape #12;Public Works Digest · January/February 2007 Public Works Digest is an unofficial publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command, under AR 360-1, The Army Public Affairs Program

  16. Developing Virtuous Soldiers: Mitigating the Problem of Fragmentation in the Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berghaus, Paul T

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Authority in the Army ................................................................. 58 Army Profession Concepts and Construal in the Life of Corporal Sanchez ................................................................... 63 IV HOLISTIC... has on soldiers? lives. Consider the following example from the life of a soldier who served in Iraq. Corporal Sanchez grew up with a strong sense of doing what is right. He entered the Army because he believed his Nation needed soldiers who would...

  17. U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUILDING STRONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Contact: Monique Farmer (402) 995-2420 Monique.l.farmer@usace.army.mil Corps updates reservoir release forecast. More heavy rain storms could cause major revisions." "Due to our vigilant dam safety program, all like this, major revisions in the plan will be necessary." Releases out of Fort Peck, Mont., will start

  18. ERDCTR-12-5 Army Environmental Quality/Installations Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    for the Army and other organizations. Ultimately, populating tactical decision-making tools with critical- mental/operational risk, creating an industry/chemical crosswalk, linking the chemical database to a GIS was christened "TIC-Master," has the capability to enhance urban theater of operations analysis to identify TIC

  19. Award Recipient U.S. Army Armament Research,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) with ARDEC as a partner grew from 99 to more than140--representing79percentofthecash-invaluefor CRADAs signed by the Army's Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) laboratories. The increase in CRADA money that ARDEC could leverage during the three

  20. US Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .dodfuelcell.com Franklin H. Holcomb Project Leader, Fuel Cell Team 27 OCT 08 Distributed Generation H2 Generation & Storage...) · Tactical Facilities (Forward Operating Bases, etc. Powered by Generators) · Fixed Installation Utilities & Marine Diesel 64% Diesel 8% #12;FY06 DoD Energy Consumption The Army represents approximately: · 19

  1. ERDC/ELTR-12-25 Army Range Technology Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/ELTR-12-25 Army Range Technology Program Large-Scale Physical Separation of Depleted Uranium-Scale Physical Separation of Depleted Uranium from Soil Steven Larson, Victor Medina, John Ballard, Chris Griggs) at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) to evaluate this technique for removal of depleted uranium (DU) metal from

  2. Flagging vigilance: the post-Vietnam "Hollow Army"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Robert Matthew

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    " Meyer in his 1980 White Paper. In his assessment, Meyer raised several questions regarding the post-Vietnam army's ability to meet its missions of deterrence and preparedness for war due to several maladies afflicting the force at the time. Ultimately...

  3. US Army Research Office research in progress, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Research Office, under the US Army Materiel Command (AMC), is responsible for coordinating and supporting research in the physical and engineering sciences, in materials science, geosciences, biology, and mathematics. This report describes research directly supported by the Army Research Projects Agency, and several AMC and other Army commands. A separate section is devoted to the research program at the US Army Research, Development and Standardization Group - United Kingdom. The present volume includes the research program in physics, chemistry, biological sciences, mathematics, engineering sciences, metallurgy and materials science, geosciences, electronics, and the European Research Program. It covers the 12-month period from 1 July 1991 through 30 June 1992.

  4. Dose reduction through robotics and automation of nuclear weapons dismantlement and storage procedures at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, David Andrew

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy' s P antex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. Upon disassembly of nuclear weapons, the plutonium and highly enriched uranium pits are placed in specially designed storage containers and temporarily stored in heavily secured ammunition magazines. Pits... in the stockpile; ~ Disassembly of nuclear weapons no longer required in military stockpiles; and ~ Interim storage of plutonium pits from dismantled weapons. ~ Waste management and decontamination and decommissioning activities. ~ Assembling nuclear explosive...

  5. U.S. Army TARDEC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|IndustrialCenterMarchC. BERKELEY: NEGAWATTPhotovoltaics ProjectArmy

  6. Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

  7. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Installation 13307, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolpa, R.; Smith, K.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard property located on Hunter Army Airfield (HAA) near Savannah, Georgia, known as Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) No. 3. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the AASF No. 3 property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the area now occupied by AASF No. 3. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of HAA completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on AASF No. 3 for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of HAA.

  8. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Miller, R.L.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Tolbert, V.R.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Rickert, L.W.; Rogers, G.O.; Staub, W.P.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Phase I report is to examined the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) in light of more detailed and more recent data than those included in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EPEIS). Two principal issues are addressed: (1) whether or not the new data would result in identification of on-site disposal at ANAD as the environmentally preferred alternative (using the same selection method and data analysis tools as in the FPEIS), and (2) whether or not the new data indicate the presence of significant environmental resources that could be affected by on-site disposal at ANAD. In addition, a status report is presented on the maturity of the disposal technology (and now it could affect on-site disposal at ANAD). Inclusion of these more recent data into the FPEIS decision method resulted in confirmation of on-site disposal for ANAD. No unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD have been identified. A review of the technology status identified four principal technology developments that have occurred since publication of the FPEIS and should be of value in the implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD: the disposal of nonlethal agent at Pine Bluff Arsenal, located near Pine Bluff, Arkansas; construction and testing of facilities for disposal of stored lethal agent at Johnston Atoll, located about 1300 km (800 miles) southwest of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean; lethal agent disposal tests at the chemical agent pilot plant operations at Tooele Army Depot, located near Salt Lake City, Utah; and equipment advances. 18 references, 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney Barracks.

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - army aircraft Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sector Summary: of rotary wing DOD aircraft, aircraft crash analysis, and lubricating oil analysis. Tobyhanna Army Depot... Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)....

  11. NREL: News - NREL and Army Validate Energy Savings for Net Zero...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Laboratory (NREL) to increase energy security through improved energy efficiency and optimized renewable energy strategies at nine installations in the Army's...

  12. U.S. Army Energy and Environmental Requirements and Goals: Opportuniti...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Fuel Cells and Hydrogen - Facility Locations and Hydrogen StorageDelivery Logistics U.S. Army Energy and Environmental Requirements and Goals: Opportunities for Fuel...

  13. #~i;:~~.:(' . AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -4 EFFECTS OF WATER CHEMISTRY ON SUBMERSED AQUATIC PLANTS: A SYNTHESIS by R. Michael Smart Environmental. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City. State, and ZIP Code) 3909 Halls Ferry Road IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If applicable) US Army Corps of Engineers Be. ADDRESS (City, Stitte

  14. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  15. Hawthorne Army Depot Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEIHas Been Happening JumpArmy Depot Geothermal

  16. Army Energy Initiatives Task Force | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from Tarasa U.S.LLC |AquionMr. Edward RosenbloomArmy Energy

  17. U S Army Corps of Engineers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas2022WindU S Army Corps of

  18. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas2022WindU S Army Corps

  19. Army Veteran Gains Experience at EM Site | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource Heat 1PowerofSystems | Department ofArlene(ECIP)Army

  20. The 'New Model' Armies of Africa?: The British Military Advisory and Training Team and the Creation of the Zimbabwe National Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitaker, Blake

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    to train armies in newly independent nations. Most notably in Kenya and Zambia, where the transition to independence was fraught with racial and economic difficulties. In 1979, after the conclusion of the Lancaster House Conference the British government...

  1. US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) style guide, Version 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A stated goal of the U.S. Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIS) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of style guides. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide. This document, the U.S. Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide, represents the first version of that style guide. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for RT/NRT Army systems across the weapon systems domains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each domain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their domains.

  2. Volume XVI, No. 5 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Sain 12 Energy audit at Army lab shows opportunities to conserve by David Underwood 13 FY 2004 Annual/October 2004 U.S. Army Installation Management Agency In this issue: Energy Management and Water Conservation .................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 2004 Energy and Water Management awards by David Purcell 5 USMA wins award for energy efficiency 6

  3. Volume XIX, No. 5 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    : A compact fluorescent light saves energy and money. U.S. Army photo September/October 2007 Vol. XIX, No. 5 ................................................................................................... 20 Energy and water campaign plan charts way forward, by Curt Wexel 20-21 Initiative 1 ­ Energy waste/October 2007 U.S. Army Installation Management Command In this issue: Energy and Water Conservation

  4. JSHSENSURING A FUTURE FOR SCIENCE The Junior Science and Humanities Symposium, sponsored by the US Army/Navy/Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, John J.

    Army/Navy/Air Force and Loyola University Chicago is introducing an e-mentoring program for students

  5. Automotive Research Center A U.S. Army RDECOM Center of Excellence for Modeling and Simulation of Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Automotive Research Center A U.S. Army RDECOM Center of Excellence for Modeling and Simulation by the Automotive Research Center Sponsored by U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) National Automotive Center

  6. Automotive Research Center A U.S. Army RDECOM Center of Excellence for Modeling and Simulation of Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Automotive Research Center A U.S. Army RDECOM Center of Excellence for Modeling and Simulation Janet Lyons Organized by the Automotive Research Center Sponsored by U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC

  7. U.S. Army weapon systems human-computer interface style guide. Version 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, L.W.; O`Mara, P.A.; Shepard, A.P.; Donohoo, D.T.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A stated goal of the US Army has been the standardization of the human computer interfaces (HCIs) of its system. Some of the tools being used to accomplish this standardization are HCI design guidelines and style guides. Currently, the Army is employing a number of HCI design guidance documents. While these style guides provide good guidance for the command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) domain, they do not necessarily represent the more unique requirements of the Army`s real time and near-real time (RT/NRT) weapon systems. The Office of the Director of Information for Command, Control, Communications, and Computers (DISC4), in conjunction with the Weapon Systems Technical Architecture Working Group (WSTAWG), recognized this need as part of their activities to revise the Army Technical Architecture (ATA), now termed the Joint Technical Architecture-Army (JTA-A). To address this need, DISC4 tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop an Army weapon systems unique HCI style guide, which resulted in the US Army Weapon Systems Human-Computer Interface (WSHCI) Style Guide Version 1. Based on feedback from the user community, DISC4 further tasked PNNL to revise Version 1 and publish Version 2. The intent was to update some of the research and incorporate some enhancements. This document provides that revision. The purpose of this document is to provide HCI design guidance for the RT/NRT Army system domain across the weapon systems subdomains of ground, aviation, missile, and soldier systems. Each subdomain should customize and extend this guidance by developing their domain-specific style guides, which will be used to guide the development of future systems within their subdomains.

  8. Critical Drivers for Safety Culture: Examining Department of Energy and U.S. Army Operational Experiences - 12382

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowes, Elizabeth A. [The S.M. Stoller Corporation, Broomfield, Colorado (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating operational incidents can provide a window into the drivers most critical to establishing and maintaining a strong safety culture, thereby minimizing the potential project risk associated with safety incidents. By examining U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) versus U.S. Army drivers in terms of regulatory and contract requirements, programs implemented to address the requirements, and example case studies of operational events, a view of the elements most critical to making a positive influence on safety culture is presented. Four case studies are used in this evaluation; two from DOE and two from U.S. Army experiences. Although the standards guiding operations at these facilities are different, there are many similarities in the level of hazards, as well as the causes and the potential consequences of the events presented. Two of the incidents examined, one from a DOE operation and the other from a U.S. Army facility, resulted in workers receiving chemical burns. The remaining two incidents are similar in that significant conduct of operations failures occurred resulting in high-level radioactive waste (in the case of the DOE facility) or chemical agent (in the case of the Army facility) being transferred outside of engineering controls. A review of the investigation reports for all four events indicates the primary causes to be failures in work planning leading to ineffective hazard evaluation and control, lack of procedure adherence, and most importantly, lack of management oversight to effectively reinforce expectations for safe work planning and execution. DOE and Army safety programs are similar, and although there are some differences in contractual requirements, the expectations for safe performance are essentially the same. This analysis concludes that instilling a positive safety culture comes down to management leadership and engagement to (1) cultivate an environment that values a questioning attitude and (2) continually reinforce expectations for the appropriate level of rigor in work planning and procedure adherence. A review of the root causes and key contributing causes to the events indicate: - Three of the four root cause analyses cite lack of management engagement (oversight, involvement, ability to recognize issues, etc.) as a root cause to the events. - Two of the four root cause analyses cite work planning failures as a root cause to the events and all cause analyses reflect work planning failures as contributing factors to the events. - All events with the exception of the Tuba City plant shutdown indicate procedure noncompliance as a key contributor; in the case of Tuba City the procedure issues were primarily related to a lack of procedures, or a lack of sufficiently detailed procedures. - All events included discussion or suggestion of a lack of a questioning attitude, either on the part of management/supervision, work planners, or workers. This analysis suggests that the most critical drivers to safety culture are: - Management engagement, - Effective work planning and procedures, and - Procedure adherence with a questioning attitude to ensure procedural problems are identified and fixed. In high-hazard operational environments the importance of robust work planning processes and procedure adherence cannot be overstated. However, having the processes by themselves is not enough. Management must actively engage in expectation setting and ensure work planning that meets expectations for hazard analysis and control, develop a culture that encourages incident reporting and a questioning attitude, and routinely observe work performance to reinforce expectations for adherence to procedures/work control documents. In conclusion, the most critical driver to achieving a workforce culture that supports safe and effective project performance can be summarized as follows: 'Management engagement to continually reinforce expectations for work planning processes and procedure adherence in an environment that cultivates a questioning attitude'. (authors)

  9. Continuous Commissioning of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill, Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Martinez, J. T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous Commissioning® (CC®) of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital facility was a two phase project. The first phase consisted of a point-to-point verification of a newly upgraded Energy Management Control System (EMCS) and calibration of key...

  10. Army National Guard (ARNG) Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) end-user manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelath, R.P. [National Guard Bureau, Arlington, VA (United States)] [National Guard Bureau, Arlington, VA (United States); Rasch, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign (OSCAR) project is designed to identify and develop programs which automate requirements not included in standard army systems. This includes providing automated interfaces between standard army systems at the National Guard Bureau (NGB) level and at the state/territory level. As part of the OSCAR project, custom software has been installed at NGB to streamline management of major end items. This software allows item managers to provide automated disposition on excess equipment to states operating the Standard Army Retail Supply System Objective (SARSS-O). It also accelerates movement of excess assets to improve the readiness of the Army National Guard (ARNG)--while reducing excess on hand. The purpose of the End-User Manual is to provide direction and guidance to the customer for implementing the ARNG Excess Management Program.

  11. Volume XVI, No. 1 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    . January/February 2004 Vol. XVI, No. 1 Printed on recycled paper. U.S. Army Installation Management Agency of installation services through Common Levels of Support by Karan Foutch 12 Don't be caught by the tire TRAP

  12. Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials and Devices at the Army Research Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Army interests in thermoelectrics include integrated TE-hand-held burners for battery-replacement, waste-heat recovery on vehicles, heat-powered mobile units, and for thermoelectric cooling of high-performance infrared systems for surveillance

  13. Army Net Zero: Energy Roadmap and Program Summary, Fiscal Year 2013 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army (Army) partnered with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through improved energy efficiency and optimized renewable energy strategies at nine installations across the Army's portfolio. Referred to as Net Zero Energy Installations (NZEIs), these projects demonstrate and validate energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies with approaches that can be replicated across DOD and other Federal agencies, setting the stage for broad market adoption. This report summarizes the results of the energy project roadmaps developed by NREL, shows the progress each installation could make in achieving Net Zero Energy by 2020, and presents lessons learned and unique challenges from each installation.

  14. Renewable Energy Assessment Methodology for Japanese OCONUS Army Installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solana, Amy E.; Horner, Jacob A.; Russo, Bryan J.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kora, Angela R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Hand, James R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 2005, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been asked by Installation Management Command (IMCOM) to conduct strategic assessments at selected US Army installations of the potential use of renewable energy resources, including solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste, and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). IMCOM has the same economic, security, and legal drivers to develop alternative, renewable energy resources overseas as it has for installations located in the US. The approach for continental US (CONUS) studies has been to use known, US-based renewable resource characterizations and information sources coupled with local, site-specific sources and interviews. However, the extent to which this sort of data might be available for outside the continental US (OCONUS) sites was unknown. An assessment at Camp Zama, Japan was completed as a trial to test the applicability of the CONUS methodology at OCONUS installations. It was found that, with some help from Camp Zama personnel in translating and locating a few Japanese sources, there was relatively little difficulty in finding sources that should provide a solid basis for conducting an assessment of comparable depth to those conducted for US installations. Project implementation will likely be more of a challenge, but the feasibility analysis will be able to use the same basic steps, with some adjusted inputs, as PNNL’s established renewable resource assessment methodology.

  15. Waste reduction for electroless nickel-plating solutions at U. S. Army depots. Final report, Oct 91-Apr 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.S.

    1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste minimization is one of the most pressing environmental issues currently facing U.S. Army depots. The U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) conducts research and development to support Army depots in implementing technologies to reduce waste generation. The Joint Depot Environmental Panel (JDEP) identified electroless nickel (EN) plating, which is currently used at Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD), Red River Army Depot (RRAD), and Sacramento Army Depot (SAAD) as a target for waste minimization research. This report presents the results of an evaluation conducted by USA regarding minimizing waste from EN-plating operations. The objective of this evaluation was to formulate recommendations for depots regarding implementation of waste minimization technologies. This evaluation was performed through site visits, a literature search, and discussions with vendors of EN processes and decontamination technologies.

  16. *Correspondence to: Kent T. Danielson, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, CEERD-SD-R, Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shaofan

    -mail: danielk@wes.army.mil Contract/grant sponsor: Army High Performance Computing Research Center; contract and Shoafan Li Department of Mechanical Engineering and Army High Performance Computing Research Center

  17. Secretary Chu Visits Advanced Battery Plant in Michigan, Announces New Army

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepository |Complex" at Los|Northof EnergyBestTo

  18. Secretary Chu Visits Advanced Battery Plant in Michigan, Announces New Army

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »Usage »DownloadSolarSequestrationof the AmericasChallenges

  19. Excess Titanium from NNSA's Y-12 Plant to be Used by the Army for New

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russianvolunteer0017 Federal Register09 National3

  20. US Army Corps of Engineers Caribbean Islands Region Version 2.0 WETLAND DETERMINATION DATA FORM Caribbean Islands Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    US Army Corps of Engineers Caribbean Islands Region ­ Version 2.0 WETLAND DETERMINATION DATA FORM ­ Caribbean Islands Region Project/Site: Municipality/Town: Sampling Date: Applicant/Owner: PR or USVI or problematic. Hydrophytic Vegetation Present? Yes No Remarks: #12;US Army Corps of Engineers Caribbean Islands

  1. Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

  2. Baseline Report for the Fort Hood Army Base: Sept. 1, 2001 To Aug. 31, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Sung, Y. H.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    ESL-TR-02/12-02 BASELINE REPORT FOR THE FORT HOOD ARMY BASE: SEPT. 1, 2001 TO AUG. 31, 2002 A Research Project for the U.S. Army C.E.R.L. and the Ft. Hood Energy Office Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Juan...-Carlos Baltazar Cervantes Yong Hoon Sung David E. Claridge, Ph.D., P.E. W. Dan Turner, Ph.D., P.E. December 2002 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System FT. HOOD BASELINE...

  3. Top Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Efficiency Opportunities at DoD/Army Sites - A Guide for O&M/Energy Managers and Practitioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Gregory P.; Dean, Jesse D.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, sponsored the Army's Energy Engineering Analysis Program, provides the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Energy manager and practitioner with useful information about the top O&M opportunities consistently found across the DoD/Army sector. The target is to help the DoD/Army sector develop a well-structured and organized O&M program.

  4. Extremely Low-Energy Design for Army Buildings: Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facility; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langner, R.; Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Liesen, R.; Herron, D.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the integrated energy optimization process for buildings and building clusters and demonstrates this process for new construction projects and building retrofits. An explanation is given of how mission critical building loads affect possible site and source energy use reduction in Army buildings.

  5. Volume XIX, No. 6 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    27 Late-breaking news: facilities regulation is out 28 Water model helps installations address Energy is one of many the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Europe District handed over to the Georgian government Allen 9-12 Huntsville Center projects range from saving energy to designing state-of-the-art facilities

  6. THE U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS AND NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    the emergencies of World War II and the impact of the environmental movement on Army environmental planners, break new ground in tracing the history of environmental work in the context of the military-1987 by James R. Arnold and Roberta Wiener ENGINEERING AND HOUSING SUPPORT CENTER and OFFICE OF HISTORY UNITED

  7. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

  8. French Army Medical Services in the mid-nineteenth century: a medical history of the French Crimean expedition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbison, Burton Earl

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the reign of Louis XIV. During the 1850s the French Military Health Service was still regarded as among the most efficient in Europe. The Crimean War of 1854-1856 brought military success to French Armies, but it also brought a medical catastrophe...'s military predominance, its military medical establishment enjoyed the same prestige that was bestowed on the other arms. First-rate armies rarely have shoddy medical support, and French armies from the time of Louis XIY until the Second Empire were...

  9. Potential sites for joint venture biomass fueled power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army is investigating wood-fired boilers. One application is for wood fuels to fire fixed power plant installations where the technology is well proven. Approximately 170 Army bases were evaluated for their heating and electrical needs versus fuel availability from on-base forests. Approximately 20 bases met the minimum demand and resource criteria. Potential joint venture partner classes were identified as new Contractor Owned/Contractor Operated (COCO) entrepreneurs; existing utilities and industries in the vicinity of the bases; and existing Government Owned/Contractor Operated (GOCO) entrepreneurs.

  10. Doctor of Engineering internship at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, G. C. (George C.)

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    DOCTOR OF ENGINEERING INTERNSHIP AT THE U. S. ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION An Internship Report by GEORGE CHARLES HOFF Submitted to the College of Engineering of Texas A&M University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements... for the Degree of DOCTOR OF ENGINEERING November 1981 Major Subject: Civil Engineering DOCTOR OF ENGINEERING INTERNSHIP AT THE U. S. ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION An Internship Report by GEORGE CHARLES HOFF Approved as to style and content by...

  11. Analysis of heat pumps installed in family housing at Hunter Army Air Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, S.A.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to conduct a postconstruction evaluation of the air-source heat pumps installed in family housing at Hunter Army Air Field (AAF). The objective of this project was to investigate and resolve concerns about an increase in energy costs at Hunter AAF following the installation of heat pumps in November 1992. After completing several analyses and a field inspection of the heat pumps in family housing at Hunter AAF, the following conclusions were made: the installation of air-source heat pumps reduced the annual energy cost in family housing by $46,672 in 1993; the heat pump thermostat controls in Hunter AAF family housing appear to be incorrectly installed; and the Hunter AAF electric utility bill increased 10% during the first 6 months of 1993 compared to the first 6 months of 1992.

  12. Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for US Army Garrison, Japan - Honshu Installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kora, Angela R.; Brown, Daryl R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents an assessment was performed by a team of engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract to the Installation Management Command (IMCOM) Pacific Region Office (PARO). The effort used the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) model to determine how energy is consumed at five U.S. Army Garrison-Japan (USAG-J) installations in the Honshu area, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

  13. ALFRED COFRANC~SCO AQUATIC PLANT CONTROl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    in US Army Corps of Engineer projects and navigable waterways. These herbicides include acrolein, copper

  14. Plants & Animals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plant and animal monitoring is performed to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain. February 2,...

  15. A brief history of the T Plant facility at the Hanford Site. Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    T Plant (221-T) was the first and largest of the early chemical separations plants at the Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) (World War II name for the Hanford Site). Officially designated as a Cell Building by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) of the Army Corps of Engineers (agency responsible for HEW), T Plant served as the headquarters of chemical processing operations at Hanford from its construction until the opening of the REDOX Plant in January 1952. Because it formed a crucial link in the first full-scale plutonium production operations in world history, it meets criteria established in the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 as a National Historic Structure.

  16. Mexican Instability, War Plan Green, and the U.S. Army, 1903 - 1940 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lange, David Michael

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    is located at the College Park facility unless otherwise noted. 3 Mexico was important to the United States during this period for several reasons. The United States and Mexico shared a long border, and there remained lingering resentment... on the Mexican side over the ?gringos? annexing a huge chunk of their country after the war of 1846-1848. The U.S. Army made not infrequent forays across the border in pursuit of bandits and Indian raiders fleeing to the Mexican side. During the reign...

  17. Development and Use of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Eight Army Installations Around the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3/96-Final Report, p. i ESL-TR-96/03-01 DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF BASELINE MONTHLY UTILITY MODELS FOR EIGHT ARMY INSTALLATIONS AROUND THE UNITED STATES Prepared by: T.A. Reddy, N.F. Saman, D.E. Claridge, J.S. Haberl and W.D. Turner Research Sponsored... and Scope 2 2.1 Objectives 2 2.2 Data provided 3 2.3 Scope of study 7 3.0 Mathematical Basis of Regression Models 8 3.1 Pertinent background 8 3.2 Simple regression models using Emodel 9 3.3 Generation of 95% uncertainty bands for individual months 14 3...

  18. Pakistan foreign policy formulation, 1947-65: an analysis of institutional interaction between American policy making bodies and the Pakistan Army 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soherwordi, Syed Hussain Shaheed

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines through the use of archives and oral evidence the role of the Pakistan Army in the context of Pakistan’s domestic politics and foreign policy. Its main purpose is to explore the autonomy of the Pakistan Army in shaping national...

  19. Materiel availability modeling and analysis for a complex army weapon system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunther, David W. (US Army); Anderson, Dennis James; Martin, Jeffrey A. (US Army); Hoffman, Matthew J.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materiel availability (A{sub m}) is a new US Department of Defense Key Performance Parameter (KPP) implemented through a mandatory Sustainment Metric consisting of an Availability KPP and two supporting Key System Attributes (KSAs), materiel reliability and ownership cost. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in conjunction with several US Army organizations, developed the analytical foundation, assumptions, and brigade-level modeling approach to support lifecycle, fleet-wide A{sub m} modeling and analysis of a complex Army weapon system. Like operational availability (A{sub o}), A{sub m} is dependent on reliability, but A{sub m} is also affected by other factors that do not impact A{sub o}. The largest influences on A{sub m} are technology insertion and reset downtimes. A{sub m} is a different metric from A{sub o}. Whereas A{sub o} is an operational measure, A{sub m} is more of a programmatic measure that spans a much larger timeframe, additional sources of downtime, and additional sources of unscheduled maintenance.

  20. Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate, and effects of army smokes in the aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate, and terrestrial ecological effects of hexachloroethane obscurant smokes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Ligotke, M.W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fellows, R.J.; Van Voris, P.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; McFadden, K.M.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of hexachloroethane (HC) smoke were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on exposure scenarios, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of HC smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and two soil types. HC aerosols were generated in a controlled atmosphere wind tunnel by combustion of hexachloroethane mixtures prepared to simulate normal pot burn rates and conditions. The aerosol was characterized and used to expose plant, soil, and other test systems. Particle sizes of airborne HC ranged from 1.3 to 2.1 {mu}m mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD), and particle size was affected by relative humidity over a range of 20% to 85%. Air concentrations employed ranged from 130 to 680 mg/m{sup 3}, depending on exposure scenario. Chlorocarbon concentrations within smokes, deposition rates for plant and soil surfaces, and persistence were determined. The fate of principal inorganic species (Zn, Al, and Cl) in a range of soils was assessed.

  1. UNIT COSTS fot ARMY FACILITIES -MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PAX NEWSLETTER NO. 3.2.2, dated 30 Mar 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ENGLISH UNIT COSTS fot ARMY FACILITIES - MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PAX NEWSLETTER NO. 3.2.2, dated 30 Mar 2006 1. APPENDIX A - FACILITY UNIT COST TABLE (FOR FY08 and later MILCON, BRAC, IGPBS Projects Newsletter No. 3.2.2, 15 March 2005, and updates the Appendix A, Facility Unit Cost Table, Appendix C, Tri

  2. U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS HURRICANE SANDY COASTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION 130 Wainwright Dr. Fort Hamilton, NY 11209

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS ­ HURRICANE SANDY COASTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION 130 Wainwright Dr. Fort,000 miles of coastline within the North Atlantic Division that were affected by Hurricane Sandy. The study response to the devastation in the wake of Hurricane Sandy represents a need to address as a regional

  3. Water balance report for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Y-12 Plant, which occupies approximately 800 acres, was built by the Army Corps of Engineers in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Recently, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, who manages the Y-12 Plant, has been concerned with the effects of water consumption and losses at the plant facility, and the ability of ground water beneath the site to act as a source of water seepage into East Fork Poplar Creek or as a source of water infiltration into subsurface strata. This has prompted the need to perform a water balance study on the facility. Data regarding all uses of municipal water and sources of discharge from the plant were recorded and then water balance calculations were performed using a computer model developed in a multi-dimensional electronic spreadsheet. This report describes the results of this research and includes the flow data collected during the study.

  4. ammunition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    leaning against the square piece of wood behind him. Drouin, who wears brow line eyeglasses, looks down Landweber, Laura First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 Next Page Last Page...

  5. Artificial intelligence technology assessment for the US Army Depot System Command

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennock, K A

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment of artificial intelligence (AI) has been prepared for the US Army's Depot System Command (DESCOM) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The report describes several of the more promising AI technologies, focusing primarily on knowledge-based systems because they have been more successful in commercial applications than any other AI technique. The report also identifies potential Depot applications in the areas of procedural support, scheduling and planning, automated inspection, training, diagnostics, and robotic systems. One of the principal objectives of the report is to help decisionmakers within DESCOM to evaluate AI as a possible tool for solving individual depot problems. The report identifies a number of factors that should be considered in such evaluations. 22 refs.

  6. Building-associated risk of febrile acute respiratory diseases in Army trainees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brundage, J.F.; Scott, R.M.; Lednar, W.M.; Smith, D.W.; Miller, R.N.

    1988-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne transmission of infectious agents and associations of indoor air pollutants with respiratory illnesses are well documented. We hypothesized that energy conservation measures that tighten buildings also increase risks of respiratory infection among building occupants. At four Army training centers during a 47-month period, incidence rates of febrile acute respiratory disease were compared between basic trainees in modern (energy-efficient design and construction) and old barracks. Rates of febrile acute respiratory disease were significantly higher among trainees in modern barracks (adjusted relative risk estimate, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.46 to 1.56), and relative risks were consistent at the four centers. These results support the hypothesis that tight buildings with closed ventilation systems significantly increase risks of respiratory-transmitted infection among congregated, immunologically susceptible occupants.

  7. Remediation application strategies for depleted uranium contaminated soils at the US Army Yuma Proving Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandel, D.S.; Medina, S.M.; Weidner, J.R.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), located in the southwest portion of Arizona conducts firing of projectiles into the Gunpoint (GP-20) firing range. The penetrators are composed of titanium and DU. The purpose of this project was to determine feasible cleanup technologies and disposal alternatives for the cleanup of the depleted uranium (DU) contaminated soils at YPG. The project was split up into several tasks that include (a) collecting and analyzing samples representative of the GP-20 soils, (b) evaluating the data results, (c) conducting a literature search of existing proven technologies for soil remediation, and (0) making final recommendations for implementation of this technology to the site. As a result of this study, several alternatives for the separation, treatment, and disposal procedures are identified that would result in meeting the cleanup levels defined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for unrestricted use of soils and would result in a significant cost savings over the life of the firing range.

  8. Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate and effects of army smokes in an aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate and terrestrial ecological effects of fog oil obscurant smokes: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Van Voris, P.; Ligotke, M.W.; Fellows, R.J.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fredrickson, J.K.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of fog oil (FO) smoke obscurants were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on an exposure scenario, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of fog oil smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters, such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and three soil types. 29 refs., 35 figs., 32 tabs.

  9. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Federal Energy Management Program, Technical Assistance Project 228 - US Army Installation Management Command - Pacific Region, Honolulu, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the activities of a resource efficiency manager that served the US Army Installation Management Command - Pacific Region during the period November 23, 2009 and August 31, 2010.

  10. A new glide path: re-architecting the Flight School XXI Enterprise at the U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enos, James R. (James Robert)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis utilizes eight Enterprise Architecture views to analyze the U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence's Flight School XXI Enterprise and provides recommendations to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of ...

  11. A review of "The Dynastic State and the Army under Louis XIV: Royal Service and Private Interest, 1661-1701." by Guy Rowlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendy F. Kasinec

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    society and agriculture, and economic development in early modern England. Guy Rowlands. The Dynastic State and the Army under Louis XIV: Royal Service and Private Interest, 1661-1701. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. xxv + 404 pp. $70....00. Review by WENDY F. KASINEC, SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. This ambitious and provocative book by Guy Rowlands regarding the army during Louis XIV?s rule situates this vital institution within the context of personal and dynastic concerns held by both the king...

  12. AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    . Michael Smart, John W. Barko Environmental Laboratory DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Waterways Experiment. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) PO Box 631 Vicksburg, MS NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If IIPplicable) US Army Corps of Engineers 8c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code

  13. Technical Assessment for the CPC FD-7x-1500 Wind Turbine located at Tooele Army Base, Tooele Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Turk; Kurt S. Myers; Jason W. Bush

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CPC FD-7x-1500 Wind Turbine was installed with funding from the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP). Since its installation, the turbine has been plagued with multiple operational upsets causing unacceptable down time. In an effort to reduce down time, the Army Corps of Engineers requested the Idaho National Laboratory conduct an assessment of the turbine to determine its viability as an operational turbine.

  14. Coordinating NRC License Closure/Termination and Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP Cleanups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, N. [MACTEC, 511 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04101 (United States); Greene, D. R. [LeBoeuf, Lamb, Greene and MacRae LLP, 225 Asylum Street, Hartford, CT 06103 (United States); Knauerhase, R. K. [Combustion Engineering, 2000 Day Hill Road, CEP 5580-2207, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overlapping regulatory cleanup programs present a significant challenge for business entities seeking to close and redevelop properties in an environmentally-appropriate but cost-effective manner. In the nuclear decontamination context, this challenge has been recognized in Memoranda of Understanding ('MOUs') between regulators with overlapping responsibilities seeking to minimize duplicative efforts/costs while fulfilling their respective regulatory obligations. For instance, an MOU between the Army Corps of Engineers (the 'Corps') and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission ('NRC') for coordinating Corps' cleanups under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program ('FUSRAP') and NRC D and D to close and terminate an NRC license was reached in July 2001. Similarly, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ('EPA') and NRC entered into an MOU in October 2002 addressing the interaction between NRC decontamination and decommissioning ('D and D') oversight and EPA's authority under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act ('CERCLA') at NRC-licensed sites. Yet, despite these MOU agreements, the simultaneous application of different regulatory programs, differing perspectives on their respective objectives and limited experience in addressing such circumstances often can lead to issues that demand creative solutions. This paper examines the interplay of these regulatory programs, the MOU of the agencies seeking to address their responsibilities under them and the coordination of the cleanups and license closure/termination process under the programs. It also offers technical and practical suggestions and insight to cost-effectively manage such efforts based on experiences with these programs and the regulators and stakeholders involved (at the federal, state and local levels). (authors)

  15. Evaluation and characterization of mechanisms controlling fate and effects of Army smokes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Ligotke, M.W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fellows, R.J.; Van Voris, P.; McKinley, J.P.; Mi, Shu-mei W.; McFadden, K.M.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to characterize the fate and response of soil and biotic components of the terrestrial environment to aerosols, deposited brass, and brass in combination with fog oil. Important physical, chemical, and biotic aspects were investigated using an environmental wind tunnel. Air/surface deposition rates were determined for foliar and soil surfaces, both in the absence and presence of fog oil. Deposition velocities for foliage ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 cm/s at wind speeds of 2 to 10 mph, respectively. Foliar contact toxicity was assessed using five different types of terrestrial vegetation representative of Army training sites and surrounding environments. No significant foliar contact toxicity was observed for brass. The weathering and chemistry of brass aerosols deposited and amended to soils was assessed, along with the impacts of acid precipitation and moisture regimes on weathering rates. Rates of brass weathering and the fate of solubilized Cu and Zn are discussed. The influence of soil weathering processes and brass solubilization on seed germination indicated no detectable effects of brass. However, moderate toxicity effects were noted after seed germination indicated no detectable effects of brass. However, moderate toxicity effects were noted after 160 days of soil incubation. The effects were proportional to soil-loading levels. Influence of soil weathering processes and contaminant solubilization on soil microbiological activities indicated that soil dehydrogenase activity was more susceptible to impacts than was phosphatase activity or microbial biomass. Nitrifying bacteria and heterotrophic bacteria were not significantly affected by brass. Invertebrates (earthworms) associated with soil contaminated with brass were only slightly impacted, and only at loading rates >445 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}.

  16. Energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis army installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AH McMakin; RE Lundgren; EL Malone

    2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY1999, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis Army Installation near Tacoma, Washington. Preliminary weather-corrected calculations show energy savings of 10{percent} from FY98 for energy use in family housing. This exceeded the project's goal of 3{percent}. The work was funded by the U.S. DOEs Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The project adapted FEMP's national ``You Have the Power Campaign'' at the local level, tailoring it to the military culture. The applied research project was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of tailored, research-based strategies to promote energy conservation in military family housing. In contrast to many energy efficiency efforts, the campaign focused entirely on actions residents could take in their own homes, as opposed to technology or housing upgrades. Behavioral change was targeted because residents do not pay their own utility bills; thus other motivations must drive personal energy conservation. This campaign augments ongoing energy savings from housing upgrades carried out by Fort Lewis. The campaign ran from September 1998 through August 1999. The campaign strategy was developed based on findings from previous research and on input from residents and officials at Fort Lewis. Energy use, corrected to account for weather differences, was compared with the previous year's use. Survey responses from 377 of Fort Lewis residents of occupied housing showed that the campaign was moderately effective in promoting behavior change. Of those who were aware of the campaign, almost all said they were now doing one or more energy-efficient things that they had not done before. Most people were motivated by the desire to do the right thing and to set a good example for their children. They were less motivated by other factors.

  17. Baseline Report for the Fort Hood Army Base: Sept. 1, 2002 - Aug. 31, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A&M University ABSTRACT This report presents electricity, natural gas and cooling baselines for the thermal plant, buildings located in the 87000 block, III Corp building and other buildings that were determined to be part of the ESPC project...

  18. Army Net Zero: Energy Roadmap and Program Summary, Fiscal Year 2013 (Brochure), Department of Defense (DoD)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational Management »Energy Poneman | DepartmentArleneARMY

  19. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility 2, Installation 25075, Westover Air Force Base, Chicopee, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Army Aviation Support Facility 2 (AASF 2) near Chicopee, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF 2 is a 10-acre site located in the western portion of Massachusetts, in the town of Chicopee, in the county of Hampden. The facilities included in this PA are Building 7400, adjacent paved areas, grassy areas, and the hazardous waste drum storage buildings. The environmentally significant operations (ESOS) associated with the property are (1) the waste drum storage area, (2) abandoned underground storage tanks (USTs), and (3) refueling activities.

  20. Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program.

  1. Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS These are the plants that were present soon after land was colonized, over 400 mil- lion years ago. A few plants living today are closely related to those ancient plants, and we often call them "living fossils". Two major lineages of plants evolved

  2. Physical Plant Power Plant - 32 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ) for producing single-node cuttings. Regardless of reapplication stages, nutrient termination on 1 Oct. caused taller plants with more nodes, more leaves, more flowering nodes, more total flowers, and fewer aborted flowers than those being terminated earlier...

  3. Improving central heating plant performance at the defense construction supply center (DCSC): Advanced operation and maintenance methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savoie, M.J.; Standerfer, J.; Schmidt, C.M.; Gostich, J.; Mignacca, J.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1987 air pollution emissions test done by the U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (USAEHA) identified several problems with the central heating plant (CHP) at the Defense Construction Supply Center (DCSC), Columbus, OH. Though DCSC repaired the specified problems, improved coal specifications, and tried to reduce air infiltration, CHP performance remained at unacceptable levels. Consequently, DCSC contracted the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) to apply advanced operation and maintenance procedures to improve its combustion system. This study employed a system-wide approach to evaluate the CHP 5 fuel storage, combustion, heat distribution, and the control of air emissions. Many short-term improvements to the CHP were identified and tested. Subsequent combustion and air emissions tests revealed that the recommended improvements successfully increased CHP efficiency. Long-term improvements were also recommended to help maintain the short-term improvements.

  4. The Roman General Varus in 9 AD, while watching his army being de-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    ­ the new central heat- ing plant ­ will be fueled primarily by natural gas at a time when natural gas pro in the stock market increase 10% per year, and there are adequate natu- ral resources to support an ever five interrelated economic, social and ecological trends that may dramatically change the world

  5. Evaluation of the utilities energy monitoring and control system installed at the US Army, Europe, Pirmasens and 97th Base Support Battalion, Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broders, M.A.; McConnell, B.W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Authorized under an interagency agreements between the US Department of Energy and the US Army, evaluation of the utilities energy monitoring and control system (UEMCSs) operating at selected US Army installations in Heidelberg, Goeppingen, Pirmasens, and Baumholder, Germany, is nearing completion. This report specifically presents the results of the evaluation of the UEMCS installed at USAREUR, 21st Theater Army Area Command (TAACOM), Pirmasens and 97th Base Support Battalion, which is operated by the Directorate of Engineering and Housing (DEH) Utilities Division. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was selected by Headquarters, USAREUR, Facilities Engineering Division, Utilities and Energy Branch in Heidelberg to evaluated the overall effectiveness and energy efficiency of UEMCSs at four US Army installations in Germany. The third of these systems to be evaluated, which is the scope of this report, is the UEMCS installed at Pirmasens. This evaluation relies upon existing data and information and does not involve introducing metering and instrumentation for the purpose of measuring installation energy use. The primary purpose of this evaluation is to take an in-depth look at the overall performance and effectiveness of the UEMCS installed at Pirmasens to see if it is achieving its operational objectives by resulting in energy and cost savings.

  6. Access to Redstone Arsenal Marshall Space Flight Center is located on the U.S. Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Ala.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Access to Redstone Arsenal Marshall Space Flight Center is located on the U.S. Army's Redstone of the hosting organization. For more information about visiting Marshall, please visit the Visitor Information page: http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/about/visitor.html If you have prior approval for a visit

  7. SERDP 2010 Partners in Environmental Technology Symposium and Technical Workshop December 2010. Rew LJ, Wing A, Pollnac F, Brummer T & Balbach H* (*US Army ERDC, Champaign, IL.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    . Rew LJ, Wing A, Pollnac F, Brummer T & Balbach H* (*US Army ERDC, Champaign, IL.) Vehicle transport by vehicles is an important but relatively unmeasured component of the invasion story. There are few data quantifying the number of propagules accumulating on vehicles under different driving conditions

  8. MULTI-OBJECTIVE MODELING IN RIVERWARE FOR USACE-SWD Allen Avance, Hydraulic Engineer, U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, Fort Worth, TX,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    control points; the system-wide flood control algorithm that computes flood control releases at all algorithms bring together RiverWare's object-oriented modeling features and the power and flexibilityMULTI-OBJECTIVE MODELING IN RIVERWARE FOR USACE-SWD Allen Avance, Hydraulic Engineer, U.S. Army

  9. Baseline Report for the Fort Hood Army Base: September 2003 to October 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    December 2004 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System Ft. Hood Baseline Report, p. 1 December 2004 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University PREFACE This report... building was also initiated in November of 2001 and completed in 2002. The data from Central Thermal Power Plant (87000), III Corp building, Darnall Hospital 1 , Main Substation, West Substation, and North Substation are plotted and reported...

  10. Optimizing Dam Operations for Power and for Fish: an Overview of the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers ADvanced Turbine Development R&D. A Pre-Conference Workshop at HydroVision 2006, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon July 31, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, Dennis D.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet contains abstracts of presentations made at a preconference workshop on the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers hydroturbine programs. The workshop was held in conjunction with Hydrovision 2006 July 31, 2006 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland Oregon. The workshop was organized by the Corps of Engineers, PNNL, and the DOE Wind and Hydropower Program. Presenters gave overviews of the Corps' Turbine Survival Program and the history of the DOE Advanced Turbine Development Program. They also spoke on physical hydraulic models, biocriteria for safe fish passage, pressure investigations using the Sensor Fish Device, blade strike models, optimization of power plant operations, bioindex testing of turbine performance, approaches to measuring fish survival, a systems view of turbine performance, and the Turbine Survival Program design approach.

  11. Energy Savings and Persisitence From an Energy Services Performance Contract at an Army Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.; Lewis, C.; Yazdani, B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. 1 Associate Research Engineer Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. 1 Professor/Associate Director Edwin Frazier2 Electrical Engineer Bobby Lynn2 Chief, Energy Management Branch 1Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University System 2 Fort... Bldg. DO#1 31,470 ? ? 5,887 3 87012 Enlisted UPH Bldg. DO#1 42,306 ? ? 9,719 4 87017 Dining Facility DO#1 15,695 ? ? 41,390 5 87018 Physical Plant DO#1 3,327 ? ? ? 522,971 6 91012 Admin Bldg. DO#1 86,292 ? ? 391,136 1,902,446 7 13 Information...

  12. Environmental effects of dredging. Long-term evaluation of plants and animals colonizing contaminated estuarine dredged material placed in a wetland environment. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.R.; Brandon, D.L.; Engler, R.M.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note summarizes data collected between 1983 and 1989 that relate to plant and animal communities colonizing the wetland creation site of the US Army Corps of Engineers/Environmental Protection Agency Field Verification Program (FVP). The management of contaminated dredged material and the mobility of contaminants from the dredged material into plants and animals are also described and related to the evaluation of test results by Lee and others (1991). This site will be evaluated through September 1995 under the Long-Term Effects of Dredging (LEDO) Program.

  13. Collection of Digital Imagery in Support of Aquatic Invasive Species Program and CERP Sponsor: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, $100,000, 2011-2012. CESU Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Sponsor: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, $100,000, 2011-2012. CESU Agreement W912HZ-10-2-0032. · Development Assessment. Sponsor: Southwest Florida Water Management District. $27,000. 1992. Terminal Interconnected

  14. Environmental investigations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, McCracken County, Kentucky: Volume 1 -- Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the results of four studies into environmental and cultural resources on and near the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) located in Western Kentucky in McCracken County, approximately 10 miles west of Paducah, KY. The area investigated includes the PGDP facility proper, additional area owned by DOE under use permit to the Western Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA), area owned by the Commonwealth of Kentucky that is administered by the WKWMA, area owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Metropolis Lake State Nature preserve and some privately held land. DOE requested the assistance and support of the US Army Engineer District, Nashville (CEORN) in conducting various environmental investigations of the area. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) provided technical support to the CEORN for environmental investigations of (1) wetland resources, (2) threatened or endangered species and habitats, and (3) cultural resources. A floodplain investigation was conducted by CEORN.

  15. The Development of a Method for the Identification and Selection of Preservation Values for the Protection of WWII United States Army Airbases in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunch, Michael A

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND SELECTION OF PRESERVATION VALUES FOR THE PROTECTION OF WWII UNITED STATES ARMY AIRBASES IN TEXAS A Dissertation by MICHAEL ANTHONY BUNCH Submitted to the Office of Graduate... PX Post Exchange/Variety Retail Sales ROIC Resident Officer in Charge SAC Strategic Air Command/Bomber Command SHPO State Historical Preservation Office SRAM Short Range Attack Missile SE South East SV Services TB Training Bomber T...

  16. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance U.S. Army – Project 276 Renewable Resource Development on Department of Defense Bases in Alaska: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warwick, William M.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to increase utilization of renewable energy sources among military facilities in Alaska through coordinated development and operation is the premise of this task. The US Army Pacific Command requested assistance from PNNL to help develop a more complete understanding of the context for wheeling power within Alaska, including legal and regulatory barriers that may prohibit the DOD facilities from wheeling power among various locations to optimize the development and use of renewable resources.

  17. Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear AstrophysicsPayroll,Physics Physics An errorPlant

  18. Quality site seasonal report: Army Air Force Exchange Service Headquarters Building, SFBP 1343, August 1984 through May 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, E.O. Jr.

    1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system at the HQ Army-Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) Building was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Programs (SFBP). This retrofitted system is one of eight of the systems in the SFBP selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort is to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal building applications. The six-story HQ AAFES Building houses a cafeteria, officer's mess and club and office space for 2400 employees. The siphon-return drainback system uses 1147 ft/sup 2/ of Aircraftsman flat-plate collectors to collect solar energy which is used to preheat domestic hot water. Solar energy is stored in a 1329-gallon tank and transferred to the hot water load through a heat exchanger located in the 356-gallon DHW preheat tank. Auxiliary energy is supplied by two gas fired boilers which boost the temperature to 130/sup 0/F before it is distributed to the load. Highlights of the performance of the HQ AAFES Building solar system during the monitoring period from August 1984 through May 1985 are presented in this report.

  19. Fuel-conservation evaluation of US Army helicopters. Part 6. Performance calculator evaluation. Final report for period ending January 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, F.; Lockwood, R.A.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Aviation Engineering Flight Activity conducted an evaluation of Flight Management Calculator for the UH-1H. The calculator was a Hewlett-Packard HP-41CV. The performance calculator was evaluated for flight planning and in-flight use during 14 mission flights simulating operational conditions. The calculator was much easier to use in-flight than the operator's manual data. The calculator program needs improvement in the areas of pre-flight planning and execution speed. The mission flights demonstrated a 19% fuel saving using optimum over normal flight profiles in warm temperatures (15/sup 0/C above standard). Savings would be greater at colder temperatures because of increasing compressibility effects. Acceptable accuracy for individual aircraft under operational conditions may require a regressive analog model in which individual aircraft data are used to update the program. The performance data base for the UH-1H was expanded with level flight and hover data to thrust coefficients and Mach numbers to the practical limits of aircraft operation.

  20. Reproduction of the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) on Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, K A; Berry, W H; Standley, W G; O`Farrell, T P

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reproduction of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) was investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1988 through September 1991. Of 38 vixens radiocollared prior to parturition, 12 (32%) were successful in raising pups from conception to the point where pups were observed above ground. No yearling vixens were known tb be reproductively active. The mean litter size during 1989 - 1991 was 3.0 (n = 21, SE = 0.28) and ranged from one to six pups. Both the proportion of vixens successfully raising pups and the mean litter size observed at Camp Roberts during this study were lower than those reported at other locations. Sex ratios of kit fox pups were male biased two of the three years, but did not differ statistically from 1:1 throughout the study. Whelping was estimated to occur between February 15 and March 5. Results of this study support previous reports that kit foxes are primarily monogamous, although one case of polygamy may have occurred. Both the proportion of dispersing radiocollared juveniles (26%) and the mean dispersal distance (5.9 km) of juveniles at Camp Roberts appeared low compared to other locations.

  1. Site-specific earthquake response analysis for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Davis, J.J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated under contract by Martin Marietta Energy systems, Inc., is located southwest of Paducah, Kentucky. An aerial photograph and an oblique sketch of the plant are shown in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. The fenced portion of the plant consists of 748 acres. This plant was constructed in the 1950`s and is one of only two gaseous diffusion plants in operation in the United States; the other is located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The facilities at PGDP are currently being evaluated for safety in response to natural seismic hazards. Design and evaluation guidelines to evaluate the effects of earthquakes and other natural hazards on DOE facilities follow probabilistic hazard models that have been outlined by Kennedy et al. (1990). Criteria also established by Kennedy et al. (1990) classify diffusion plants as ``moderate hazard`` facilities. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was tasked to calculate the site response using site-specific design earthquake records developed by others and the results of previous geotechnical investigations. In all, six earthquake records at three hazard levels and four individual and one average soil columns were used.

  2. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  3. Innovative Regulatory and Technical Approaches for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers' Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitts, J. T.; Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J.; Boyle, J. D.; Rogers, B. C.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) created the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1974 to identify, investigate, and cleanup or control radiological contamination at sites used by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the 1940s through the 1960s. The USDOE had identified 46 sites in the program and finished remediation at 24 of the smaller ones before the end of 1997. With the passage of the Energy and Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1998 the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) was designated by Congress with responsibility to manage and execute the FUSRAP. The Linde Site located in Tonawanda, New York was operated by the MED from 1942-1946 to extract uranium from several high-grade ores. This natural uranium was subsequently enriched in U-235 elsewhere in the United States and ultimately used to produce energy or weapons. Though in the process of reviewing alternative disposal options by 1995, the USDOE had operated FUSRAP with a strategy requiring virtually all materials remediated be disposed of at only one Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensed facility. The change in management of the FUSRAP in 1997 allowed the disposal policy of low levels of radioactively contaminated materials found at the remaining sites to be reexamined. This paper presents some of the innovative regulatory and technical approaches employed at the Linde Site that are resulting in project cost savings while meeting applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements as well as fulfilling commitments made to the local community.

  4. Proposed plan for remedial action for the Groundwater Operable Unit at the Chemical Plant Area of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Proposed Plan addresses the remediation of groundwater contamination at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The site is located approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis in St. Charles County . Remedial activities at the site will be conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with the U.S. Department of the Army (DA), conducted a joint remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to allow for a comprehensive evaluation of groundwater conditions at the Weldon Spring chemical plant area and the Weldon Spring ordnance works area, which is an Army site adjacent to the chemical plant area. Consistent with DOE policy, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) values have been incorporated into the CERCLA process. That is, the analysis conducted and presented in the RVFS reports included an evaluation of environmental impacts that is comparable to that performed under NEPA. This Proposed Plan summarizes information about chemical plant area groundwater that is presented in the following documents: (1) The Remedial Investigation (RI), which presents information on the nature and extent of contamination; (2) The Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA), which evaluates impacts to human health and the environment that could occur if no cleanup action of the groundwater were taken (DOE and DA 1997a); and (3) The Feasibility Study (FS) and the Supplemental FS, which develop and evaluate remedial action alternatives for groundwater remediation.

  5. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are evaluating conditions in groundwater and springs at the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The 88-ha (217-acre) chemical plant area is chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of uranium-processing activities conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and 1960s and explosives-production activities conducted by the U.S. Army (Army) in the 1940s. The 6,974-ha (17,232-acre) ordnance works area is primarily chemically contaminated as a result of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) manufacturing activities during World War II. This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is being conducted as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RUFS) required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended. The purpose of the BRA is to evaluate potential human health and ecological impacts from contamination associated with the groundwater operable units (GWOUs) of the chemical plant area and ordnance works area. An RI/FS work plan issued jointly in 1995 by the DOE and DA (DOE 1995) analyzed existing conditions at the GWOUs. The work plan included a conceptual hydrogeological model based on data available when the report was prepared; this model indicated that the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. Hence, to optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts, the DOE and DA have decided to conduct a joint RI/BRA. Characterization data obtained from the chemical plant area wells indicate that uranium is present at levels slightly higher than background, with a few concentrations exceeding the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 20 {micro}g/L (EPA 1996c). Concentrations of other radionuclides (e.g., radium and thorium) were measured at back-ground levels and were eliminated from further consideration. Chemical contaminants identified in wells at the chemical plant area and ordnance works area include nitroaromatic compounds, metals, and inorganic anions. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethylene (1,2 -DCE) have been detected recently in a few wells near the raffinate pits at the chemical plant.

  6. Background chemistry for chemical warfare agents and decontamination processes in support of delisting waste streams at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenblatt, D.H.; Small, M.J.; Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The State of Utah, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (DSHW), has declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, cleanup, and testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues have been designated as corrosive, reactive, toxic, and acute hazardous (Hazardous Waste No. F999). The RCRA regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other state hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous but allow generators to petition the regulator to {open_quotes}delist,{close_quotes} if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. The U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) believes that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous and has obtained assistance from Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to make the delisting demonstration. The objective of this project is to delist chemical agent decontaminated residues resulting from materials testing activities and to delist a remediation residue (e.g., contaminated soil). To delist these residues, it must be demonstrated that the residues (1) do not contain hazardous quantities of the listed agents; (2) do not contain hazardous quantities of constituents listed in 40 CFR Part 261, Appendix VIII; (3) do not exhibit other characteristics that could define the residues as hazardous; and (4) do not fail a series of acute toxicity tests. The first phase will focus on a subset of the F999 wastes generated at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), where the Army tests the effects of military chemical agents and agent-decontamination procedures on numerous military items. This effort is identified as Phase I of the Delisting Program. Subsequent phases will address other DPG chemical agent decontaminated residues and remediation wastes and similar residues at other installations.

  7. Polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srienc, Friedrich (Lake Elmo, MN); Somers, David A. (Roseville, MN); Hahn, J. J. (New Brighton, MN); Eschenlauer, Arthur C. (Circle Pines, MN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel transgenic plants and plant cells are capable of biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Heterologous enzymes involved in PHA biosynthesis, particularly PHA polymerase, are targeted to the peroxisome of a transgenic plant. Transgenic plant materials that biosynthesize short chain length monomer PHAs in the absence of heterologous .beta.-ketothiolase and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase are also disclosed.

  8. Ethylene insensitive plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA); Nehring, Ramlah (La Jolla, CA); McGrath, Robert B. (Philadelphia, PA)

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleic acid and polypeptide sequences are described which relate to an EIN6 gene, a gene involved in the plant ethylene response. Plant transformation vectors and transgenic plants are described which display an altered ethylene-dependent phenotype due to altered expression of EIN6 in transformed plants.

  9. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

  10. A resource allocation algorithm for wide area search ammunitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathinam, Sivakumar

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to design a decision algorithm to assign weapons (or vehicles) with the appropriate mode of operation to search, classify and attack as many targets as possible. This work also presents the benefits of cooperation...

  11. automated ammunition logistics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    major industrial accident. The origin times and number of explosions were key 3 Test Automation Test Automation Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

  12. A resource allocation algorithm for wide area search ammunitions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathinam, Sivakumar

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to design a decision algorithm to assign weapons (or vehicles) with the appropriate mode of operation to search, classify and attack as many targets as possible. This work also presents the benefits of cooperation...

  13. ammunition supply point: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying...

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Navy Ammunition Depot - NJ 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36 Supply Depot

  15. Selection guidelines for central heat plant controls. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, S.R.; Lin, M.C.; Schandche, G.W.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operation and control of Central Heating Plants (CHPs) are important factors in maintaining the readiness of U.S. Army installations. Aging CHPs often experience increased interruptions, maintenance difficulties, and inefficient operation. As fuel costs increase, there is a growing need to take advantage of new, emerging control technologies. Microprocessor-based controls can provide opportunities for increased reliability, enhanced safety, better performance monitoring, and cost reduction. However, upgraded control systems cannot compensate for a boiler in poor mechanical condition. Any proposed control systems upgrade must be preceded by a mechanical assessment of the boiler. These CHP control guidelines can help installation personnel develop budgetary-cost proposals to upgrade gas/oil-fired boiler controls for gas/oil-fired steam or high temperature hot water (HTHW) systems. These general guidelines provide basic information to evaluate the feasibility of upgrading boiler control systems, and a methodology for developing budget proposals. Judgement is required to develop designs for specific unit and site characteristics, boiler safety codes, and local regulatory requirements. These guidelines do not eliminate the need for competent professional engineers to finalize assessments of existing conditions, to develop a plant control system design that meets existing and new requirements, and to evaluate alternative contractor proposals.

  16. Evaluation of solidification/stabilization for treatment of a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sludge from Fort Polk Army Installation, Louisiana. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Channell, M.G.; Preston, K.T.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the course of normal operations and training, soldiers and civilian personnel operate many Army vehicles on a day-today basis. These vehicles must be cleaned before they can be returned to the motor pool area of an Army base. The cleaning of these vehicles bas posed a problem with the operation and maintenance of oil/water separators located at vehicle washrack facilities. An oily sludge forms in the oil/water separator and is hard to handle and cannot be disposed of in an ordinary manner. This study used solidification/stabilization to treat the oily sludge found in the vehicle washrack oil/water separators. Solidification/stabilization is usually used to treat soils and sludges that contain heavy metals. Organic compounds, such as petroleum hydrocarbons found in the sludge, interfere with the setting of the solidification binding materials and thus produce a material that is not desirable for a treatment alternative. This study incorporates the use of dicalcium silicate as an additive to the solidification process to increase the strength and reduce the leachability of the petroleum hydrocarbons found in the sludge. This study shows that dicalcium silicate improves the handling characteristics of the sludge and reduces the leachability of the contaminants from the washrack sludge.

  17. Evaluation of the utility and energy monitoring and control system installed at the US Army, Europe, 409th Base Support Battalion, Military Community at Grafenwoehr, Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broders, M.A.; Ruppel, F.R.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the provisions of Interagency Agreement DOE 1938-B090-A1 between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Army Europe (USAREUR), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., is providing technical assistance to USAREUR in the areas of computer science, information engineering, energy studies, and engineering and systems development. One of the initial projects authorized under this interagency agreement is the evaluation of utility and energy monitoring and control systems (UEMCSs) installed at selected US Army installations in Europe. This report is an evaluation of the overall energy-conservation effectiveness and use of the UEMCS at the 409th Base Support Battalion located in Grafenwoehr, Germany. The 409th Base Support Battalion is a large USAREUR military training facility that comprises a large training area, leased housing, the main post area, and the camp areas that include Camps Aachen, Algier, Normandy, Cheb, and Kasserine. All of these facilities are consumers of electrical and thermal energy. However, only buildings and facilities in the main post area and Camps Aachen, Algier, and Normandy are under the control of the UEMCS. The focus of this evaluation report is on these specific areas. Recommendations to further increase energy and cost savings and to improve operation of the UEMCS are proposed.

  18. Korean Army Hat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    lightly. Psy ended up doing his military service twice because he apparently neglected his duties. The Gangnam Style rocker was clearly a little too at ease. #SouthKorea #Hacker #CEAS...

  19. China's Dream Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILLER, Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of Innovation and Technology in China AN IGCC PROJECTleaders/21577070-vision-chinas- new-president-should-serve-In Case You Missed It: China Dream. ” The China Beat, April

  20. Army Regulation 38510 Headquarters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    (para 23-6). o Clarifies policy for decommissioning sites with Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensed sites (para 24-3a). o Adds policy for closure requirements on the radiological decommissioning of areas

  1. Environment US Army Corps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , partners test for Asian carp DNA District site attracts birds, birders Renewable energy push Partnership assignments running the gamut from ones devoted to wind, contract methods, solar thermal energy, converting

  2. China's Dream Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MILLER, Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in China Study of Innovation and Technology in China AN IGCCOffice. SITC Study of Innovation and Technology in ChinaStudy of Innovation and Technology in China AN IGCC PROJECT

  3. Educating the Army's Jedi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Kevin Charles

    2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the decisions taken during the development of the concept for the School of Advanced Military Studies and its subsequent refinement in the first ten years of its history. The other line of inquiry ...

  4. Environment US Army Corps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Asia, Europe and the U. S. An environment once pristine and rich in biological diversity now suffers · Pentagon official lauds services for energy strategies · Corps among winners at `GOVgreen' 16 Sustainability Awards coming soon Corps team earns international recognition Regulators discuss mitigation

  5. GLOSSARY: ARMY RANK, ACRONYMS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    by a relentless insurgency and by a horrific expansion of sectarian violence between Sunni and Shia factions

  6. Idaho_Army

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT | NationalMentoringWind Power -Mtn. Home

  7. US Army Corps

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V4100 DOE/EA-1452D E P A R T M

  8. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  9. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, RongGuan (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  10. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keith, Kevin; Copenhaver, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  11. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  12. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  13. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemethy, E.K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-8596 itr-t C,d.. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS jmethods of isolating the hydrocarbon-like material from I.privatelyownedrights. HYDROCARBONS AND ENERGY FROM PLANTS

  14. NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal, the missiles, and the digital protection systems embed- ded in nuclear power plants. Obviously, safety method SOFTWARE SAFETY ANALYSIS OF DIGITAL PROTECTION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS USING A QUALITATIVE FORMAL

  15. Propagation of Ornamental Plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWerth, A. F.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propagation of Ornamental Plants I A. I?. DEWERTH, Head Department of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture Texas A. & M. College System THE MULTIPLICATION of ornamental plants is After sterilizing, firm the soil to within 1; receiving more...

  16. Poisonous Plant Management. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Toxic plants also contribute to indirect losses such as reduced calving , lambing or kidding percentages and reduced fiber production and weight gain. Direct and indirect losses from poisonous plants in Texas cost livestock producers from $50 million... to $100 million annually. In the United States, more than 400 species of poisonous plants have been identified. These toxic plants are generally not found in greatest abundance on good-to-excellent condition range but are, with few exceptions...

  17. PERSPECTIVES Interpretingphenotypicvariationin plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    PERSPECTIVES Interpretingphenotypicvariationin plants James S. Coleman Kelly D.M. McConnaughay David D. Ackerly Plant ecologists and evolutionary biologists frequently examine patterns of phenotypic phenotypic traits change throughout growth and development of individual plants, and that rates of growth

  18. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  19. Plant evolution The Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Plant evolution The Evolution of Plants by Kathy J. Willis and Jenny C. McElwain. Oxford University Press, 2002. $40.00/£22.99 pbk (378 pages) ISBN 0 19 850065 3 Developmental Genetics and Plant Evolution is observed for treatments of evolution and development. Titles of major monographs on the subject imply

  20. Nutritional status and random blood glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride test among Malaysian Army (MA) personnel in Kuala Lumpur

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadiy, I.; Razalee, S.; Zalifah, M. K. [Nutrition Programme, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia,43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Zulkeffeli, M. J. [Department of Health Service, Ministry of Defense, Level 11, Menara Park, 50450 (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    With the rising trend of obesity among the general population, it is also important to assess the obesity and health status among military population. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Malaysian Army (MA) personnel as well as the relationship between selected socio-demographics factors, antropometric profiles, body composition and random blood test value. A cross sectional study involving 378 male military personnel aged between 20 to 48 years old was conducted at two MA bases in Kuala Lumpur between November and December 2012. Antropometric measurements included height, weight and waist circumference (WC). Body fat percentage was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis method (Tanita TBF-300A). Mean height, weight, BMI, WC, body fat percentage, age, monthly income and duration of service were 1.71 ± 0.6 m, 71.7 ± 12.2 kg, 24.6 ± 4.1 kg/m{sup 2}, 87.0 ± 10.0 cm, 23.4 ± 6.6%, 29.1 ± 5.5 years, RM 2115.12 ± 860.70 and 9.9 ± 5.6 years respectively. According to WHO (1998) classification of BMI, 3.2% of the subjects were underweight, 54.8% normal, 32.8% overweight and 9.3% obese. It was obeserved that 40.2% of the subjects had waist circumference value of 90 cm or more and were considered high risk for diebetes and cardiovascular diseases. This study found that BMI was highly correlated with weight (r=0.925, p<0.05), WC (r=0.852, p<0.05) and body fat percentage. Body fat percentage also show high correlation with weight (r=0.759, p<0.05) and WC (r=0.768, p<0.05. The result from 173 of 378 subjects that were selected for random blood test found that 4.6%, 3.5% and 26.0% had diabetes, high cholesterol and high triglyceride respectively. There was a weak correlation between random blood glucose level with weight (r=0.221, p<0.05), BMI (r=0.243, p<0.05), WC (r=0.298, p<0.05), body fat percentage (r=0.163, p<0.05) and age (r=0.223, p<0.05). Random blood cholesterol level had significant correlation with weight (r=0.284, p<0.05), BMI (r=0.260, p<0.05), WC (r=0.362, p<0.05) and body fat percentage (r=0.313, p<0.05). It was also noted that random blood triglyceride level was significantly correlated with weight (r=0.223, p<0.05), BMI (r=0.312, p<0.05), WC (r=0.288, p<0.05), body fat percentage (r=0.287, p<0.05) and age (r=0.268 p<0.05). These results call for attention to the existence of overweight and obesity as well as the risk of non-communicable diseases among military population. Therefore, future intervention from the aspect of nutritional education and health awareness can benefit thus optimizing the health status of MA military personnel.

  1. 3. PROPONENT OF THIS NEWSLETTER: HQUSACE/CECW-EI, 202-761-5545 or DSN-763-5545, and FAX 202-761-0623 and Internet Address: "amitava.ghosh@usace.army.mil".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of construction date of 1 October 2005 (MCP Index = 2276) for an area cost factor (ACF) of 1.00. These unit costs CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM (MCP) INDEX The base cost index for the unit costs herein in Appendix A is for an assumed-761-0623 and Internet Address: "amitava.ghosh@usace.army.mil". FACILITIES UNIT COSTS - MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PAX

  2. The Flexible Display CenTer aT arizona sTaTe UniversiTy The U.S. Army established the Flexible Display Center at ASU in February 2004 to spearhead the next revolution in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    The Flexible Display CenTer aT arizona sTaTe UniversiTy The U.S. Army established the Flexible development, innovation and integration to create a new generation of innovative displays that will be flexible, lightweight, low power, and rugged. These revolutionary displays will usher in a new era

  3. An examination of electronic file transfer between host and microcomputers for the AMPMODNET/AIMNET (Army Material Plan Modernization Network/Acquisition Information Management Network) classified network environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hake, K.A.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of investigation and testing conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Project Manager -- Acquisition Information Management (PM-AIM), and the United States Army Materiel Command Headquarters (HQ-AMC). It concerns the establishment of file transfer capabilities on the Army Materiel Plan Modernization (AMPMOD) classified computer system. The discussion provides a general context for micro-to-mainframe connectivity and focuses specifically upon two possible solutions for file transfer capabilities. The second section of this report contains a statement of the problem to be examined, a brief description of the institutional setting of the investigation, and a concise declaration of purpose. The third section lays a conceptual foundation for micro-to-mainframe connectivity and provides a more detailed description of the AMPMOD computing environment. It gives emphasis to the generalized International Business Machines, Inc. (IBM) standard of connectivity because of the predominance of this vendor in the AMPMOD computing environment. The fourth section discusses two test cases as possible solutions for file transfer. The first solution used is the IBM 3270 Control Program telecommunications and terminal emulation software. A version of this software was available on all the IBM Tempest Personal Computer 3s. The second solution used is Distributed Office Support System host electronic mail software with Personal Services/Personal Computer microcomputer e-mail software running with IBM 3270 Workstation Program for terminal emulation. Test conditions and results are presented for both test cases. The fifth section provides a summary of findings for the two possible solutions tested for AMPMOD file transfer. The report concludes with observations on current AMPMOD understanding of file transfer and includes recommendations for future consideration by the sponsor.

  4. Insect-Plant Interactions Insects & Plants Evolution of land plants (especially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Christopher A.

    1 Insect-Plant Interactions Insects & Plants Evolution of land plants (especially flowering plants) a major force driving the diversity of insects As diversity of land plants has increased, the diversity of insects has increased Interaction between plants and insects is an example of coevolution Coevolution

  5. Conditional sterility in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

  6. Sampling and Analysis Plan Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouns, Thomas M.

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the Saddle Mountains Basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities. Revision 3 incorporates all interim change notices (ICN) that were issued to Revision 2 prior to completion of sampling and analysis activities for the WTP Seismic Boreholes Project. This revision also incorporates changes to the exact number of samples submitted for dynamic testing as directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Revision 3 represents the final version of the SAP.

  7. Modulating lignin in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  8. Plant pathogen resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  9. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazière

  10. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

  11. PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE TITLE PHYSICAL PLANT HIGH VOLTAGE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE To establish a consistent policy of performing Preventive Maintenance on high voltage by the G.S.A. Preventive Maintenance sections E- 29 (high voltage oil circuit breaker), E-32 (high voltage

  12. Plant Ecology An Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    1 Plant Ecology An Introduction Ecology as a Science Study of the relationships between living and causes of the abundance and distribution of organisms Ecology as a Science We'll use the perspective of terrestrial plants Basic ecology - ecological principles Applied ecology - application of principles

  13. Sandia Energy - Wind Plant Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Plant Optimization Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Wind Plant Optimization Wind Plant OptimizationTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-29T21:33:21+00:00...

  14. Calibration of Cotton Planting Mechanisms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson); Byrom, Mills H. (Mills Herbert)

    1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per foot. To obtain a perfect stand of one plant to Foot, a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 11 plants per foot wonld have to be thinned out. The number for picker wheel- drop planting mechanisms ranged from a minimum of 2 to a maxi- mum of 27 plants... per foot, requiring the removal of from 1 to 26 nlants per foot to leave one plant per foot. CONTENTS Introduction History of cotton planter development ------------.---------------------------------- Cottonseed planting mechanisms Requirements...

  15. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance U.S. Army – Project 214 Analysis of Regulations Associated with Implementation of a Rocky Mountain Secure Smart-Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warwick, William M.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes technical assistance provided by PNNL to further develop a smart grid technologies concept to provide a basis for policies and plans for the US Army. The effort was to analyze the potential to utilize emerging smart grid technologies along with indigenous renewable and other resources to meet the emergency and other power needs of Department of Defense facilities in Colorado and Wyoming.

  16. Nuclear Power Plant Design Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Power Plant Design Project A Response to the Environmental and Economic Challenge Of Global.............................................................................................................. 4 3. Assessment of the Issues and Needs for a New Plant

  17. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  18. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  19. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  20. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  1. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  2. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  3. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  4. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  5. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  6. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  7. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  8. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  9. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  10. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  11. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  12. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  13. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  14. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  15. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  16. Poisonous Plant Management.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are most grass, acid leg paralysis, dribbling urine susceptible to poisoning sorghum, by sorghum sorghum alum Stillingia Trecul Hydrocyanic See prussic acid poisoning Numerous sheep losses to treculiana queensdelight acid this plant have occurred...

  17. Geothermal Demonstration Plant

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a 50 W e binary conversion plant at Heber was initiated and is presented herein. Chevron Oil Company (the field operator) predicts that the reservoir i ill decline from an initial...

  18. Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

    Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4°F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

  19. Network technology for depot modernization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, C.J.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to summarize existing and emerging information system technology and standards applicable to Depot System Command (DESCOM) modernization efforts. The intent of this summarization is to provide the Revitalization of Army Depots for the Year 2000 (READY 2000) team a clear understanding of the enabling information system technologies required to support effective modernization activities. Much of the information contained in this report was acquired during the last year in support of the US Army Armament, Munitions, and Chemical Command (AMCCOM) Facility Integrated Manufacturing Management System (FIMMS) project at PNL, which is targeting the modernization of plant-wide information systems at Army Ammunition Plants. The objective of information system modernization is to improve the effectiveness of an organization in performing its mission. Information system modernization strives to meet this objective by creating an environment where data is electronically captured near the source and readily available to all areas of the organization. Advanced networks, together with related information system technology, are the enabling mechanisms that make modern information system infrastructures possible. The intent of this paper is to present an overview of advanced information system network technology to support depot modernization planners in making technology management decisions. Existing and emerging Open System Interconnection (OSI) and Government Open System Interconnection Profile (GOSIP) standards are explained, as well as a brief assessment of existing products compliant with these standards. Finally, recommendations for achieving plant-wide integration using existing products are presented, and migration strategies for full OSI compliance are introduced. 5 refs., 16 figs. (JF)

  20. AJH November 2012 PLANT QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AJH November 2012 PLANT QUALITY TESTING SERVICE THE SERVICE uses morphological standards for forest to obtain information about the quality of their planting stock before planting. will indicate the likely Potential (RGP) 15 150 FURTHER INFORMATION See the Forest Research, Plant Quality Testing web page: http

  1. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  2. Weed Science Society of America, Chicago, IL. 47 Feb. 2008. p 20. Lisa J. Rew, Hal Balbach, US Army ERDC, Champaign, IL; Joseph Fleming2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Gonzales2 . Evaluating plant propagule spread by vehicles, and the effectiveness of vehicle wash units used to contain them. Few data exist concerning the potential spread of plant propagules by vehicles, particularly differences between vehicle types and the surfaces on which they were driven. Logically, more

  3. Behavior-based rules for fitness-for-duty assessment of nuclear power plant personnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.S.; Turnage, J.J.; Price, H.E.; Lane, N.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants requires that plant personnel not be under the influence of any substance, legal or illegal, or mentally or physically impaired from any cause that in any way adversely affects their ability to safely and competently perform their duties. This goal has been formalized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in their proposed rule for a fitness-for-duty program. The purpose of this paper is to describe a performance-based tool based on surrogate tests and dose equivalency methodologies that is a viable candidate for fitness-for-duty assessment. The automated performance test system (APTS) is a microcomputer-based human performance test battery that has been developed over a decade of research supported variously by the National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, US Department of Energy, and the US Navy and Army. Representing the most psychometrically sound test from evaluations of over 150 well-known tests of basic psychomotor and cognitive skills, the battery provides direct prediction of a worker's fitness for duty. Twenty-four tests are suitable for use, and a dozen have thus far been shown to be sensitive to the effects of legal and illegal drugs, alcohol, fatigue, stress, and other causes of impairment.

  4. Willow plant name 'Preble'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.(Salix sachalinensis.times.Salix miyabeana) named `Preble`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing 29% more woody biomass than the average of three current production cultivars (Salix.times.dasyclados `SV1` (unpatented), Salix sachalinensis `SX61` (unpatented), and Salix miyabeana `SX64` (unpatented)) when grown in the same field for the same length of time (three growing seasons after coppice) in two different trials in Constableville, N.Y. and Middlebury, Vt. `Preble` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested repeatedly after two to four years of growth. `Preble` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  5. THE PLANT SOIL INTERFACE: NICKEL BIOAVAILABILITY AND THE MECHANISMS OF PLANT HYPERACCUMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    THE PLANT SOIL INTERFACE: NICKEL BIOAVAILABILITY AND THE MECHANISMS OF PLANT HYPERACCUMULATION and Learning Company. #12;ii THE PLANT SOIL INTERFACE: NICKEL BIOAVAILABILITY AND THE MECHANISMS OF PLANT

  6. Mechanisms in Plant Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hake, Sarah [USDA ARS Plant Gene Expression Center

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

  7. B Plant hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning Activities for B Plant on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE Order 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific , Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  8. Pinellas Plant facts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pinellas Plant, near St. Petersburg, Florida, is wholly owned by the United States Government. It is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by GE Aerospace, Neutron Devices (GEND). This plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators built at Neutron Devices consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. Production of these devices has necessitated the development of several uniquely specialized areas of competence and supporting facilities. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology; hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials; plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at Neutron Devices has led directly to the assignment of other weapon application products: the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Other product assignments such as active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator evolved from the plant`s materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life.

  9. Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan

    1 Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines Based on Sustainability Goals for the Macquarie Campus #12.................................................................................................................................10 4.2.5 Shale-Sandstone soil transition...................................................................................................................................11 #12;3 1. Purpose This document provides a guideline for specific grounds management procedures

  10. Steam Plant, 6% Irrigation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Pei

    Steam Plant, 6% School of Medicine, 17% Irrigation, 3% Hospital, 22% Athletics, 2% Housing, 5 · Rainwater Cisterns · Reducing the number of once through cooling systems in labs · Expediting the connection for Irrigation ~15 million gallons Percent of Water Used for Irrigation that is Non-Potable ~10-15% Number

  11. Scale Insects on Ornamental Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muegge, Mark A.; Merchant, Michael E.

    2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale insects on o rnamental plants B-6097 8-00 Mark A. Muegge and Michael Merchant* M any species of scale insects damage land- scape plants, shrubs and trees. Scale insects insert their mouthparts into plant tissues and suck out the sap. When... period. Most species never move again in their lives. Scale insects feed by inserting their hairlike mouth- parts into plant tissue and siphoning the plant?s sap. While feeding, many species excrete a sweet, sticky liquid referred to as ?honeydew...

  12. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (USDOE) Operable Unit 5, Paducah, KY, August 10, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Record of Decision (ROD) presents the final remedial action decisions selected for soils and sediments in each of the solid waste management units (SWMUs) of Waste Area Groups (WAGs) 1 and 7 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) near Paducah, Kentucky. Waste Area Group 1 consists of SWMUs 100 and 136. Waste Area Group 7 consists of SWMUs 8 and 130 through 134. By mutual consent among the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection (KDEP), the United States Department of Defense (DOD), the United States Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and the DOE, it was agreed that the evaluation and implementation of any remedial actions required for the Kentucky Ordnance Works (KOW) SWMUs (SWMU 94 (KOW Sewage Treatment Plant), SWMU 95 (KOW Burn Area), and SWMU 157 (KOW Toluene Spill Site)), formerly included in WAGs 1 and 7, would be the responsibility of the DOD and conducted on behalf of the DOD by the COE. Due to the agreements reached among these entities, remedial technologies for the KOW SWMUs are not discussed further in this ROD and will be evaluated as part of the WAG 10 investigation by the COE. Additionally, by written mutual consent, the EPA, the DKEP, and the DOE agreed that an evaluation of remedial alternatives for SWMU 38, the C-615 Sewage Treatment Plant, would be deferred until the unit ceases operation. Consequently, no remedial actions are discussed for these SWMUs in this ROD.

  13. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Environmental Horticulture major Environmental Horticulture Science option Landscape Design option Biotechnology (Environmental Horticultural Science, Landscape Design, Plant Biology, Crop Science, and Biotechnology major Plant Biotechnology option Sustainable Food and Bioenergy Systems major Sustainable Crop

  14. Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foster, G.D. (2012) The top 10 fungal pathogens in molecularBLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteriaC. and Foster, G.D. (2011) Top 10 plant viruses in molecular

  15. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

  16. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Tsai, Fong-Ying (New York, NY)

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  17. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, William G. (Philomath, OR); Lindbo, John A. (Kent, WA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection.

  18. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  19. Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N

  20. Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N S Estabrooke Memorial Gym Stevens

  1. Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby

  2. Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants willows Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery The Laboratory's Corrective Actions Program (CAP) planted nearly 10,000 willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon...

  3. CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing WAS DEEPLY INVOLVED IN ALMOST EVERY ASPECT OF BUILDING THE PLANTS THROUGH · Quality Assurance · Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

  4. Regulating nutrient allocation in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

  5. Jennings Demonstration PLant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russ Heissner

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

  6. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  7. Environmental effects of dredging. Long-term evaluation of plants and animals colonizing contaminated esturaine dredged material placed in an upland environment. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.R.; Brandon, D.L.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminated sediment was dredged from Black Rock Harbor, Connecticut, in October 1983 and placed in aquatic, upland, and wetland environments as part of the US Army Corps of Engineers/Environmental Protection Agency Field Verification Program (FVP), 1981-1986 (Peddicord 1988). Upland tests (plant and earthworm bioassays) were conducted on the sediment before dredging to evaluate potential contaminant mobility under the upland disposal alternative. Laboratory test results were subsequently field verified at the field test site at `Tongue Point,` Bridgeport, Connecticut. The results of the upland disposal portion of the FVP and the changes occurring since the completion of the FVP for the upland disposal environment are summarized herein. This technical note emphasizes the contaminant mobility of heavy metals. Contaminant mobility and the progressive development of the upland ecosystem at this site will be evaluated until September 1995.

  8. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY US Army Corps of Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , statutes, Executive Orders, and court decisions." There are also Presidential Memoranda and Proclamations meaningful and timely input by Tribal officials into any project, program, permit or other undertaking and Procedures, 11 Aug 2008. o. Presidential Memorandum, Tribal Consultation, 9 Nov 2009. p. USACE Tribal Policy

  9. Post-closure permit application for the Kerr Hollow Quarry at the Y-12 plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) is located on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) property at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project. Until 1992, the primary mission of the Y-12 Plant was the production and fabrication of nuclear weapons components. Activities associated with these functions included production of lithium compounds, recovery of enriched uranium from scrap material, and fabrication of uranium and other materials into finished parts for assemblies. The Kerr Hollow Quarry was used for waste disposal of a variety of materials including water-reactive and shock-sensitive chemicals and compressed gas cylinders. These materials were packaged in various containers and sank under the water in the quarry due to their great weight. Disposal activities were terminated in November, 1988 due to a determination by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation that the quarry was subject to regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1993. Methods of closure for the quarry were reviewed, and actions were initiated to close the quarry in accordance with closure requirements for interim status surface impoundments specified in Tennessee Rules 1200-1-11-.05(7) and 1200-1-11-.05(11). As part of these actions, efforts were made to characterize the physical and chemical nature of wastes that had been disposed of in the quarry, and to remove any containers or debris that were put into the quarry during waste disposal activities. Closure certification reports (Fraser et al. 1993 and Dames and Moore 1993) document closure activities in detail. This report contains the post-closure permit application for the Kerr Hollow Quarry site.

  10. Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

  11. Department of the Army Letterhead

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    are unfavorable, the training may be rescheduled. Questions should be directed to 610-xxx-xxxx or 800-xxx-xxxx." 10. CONCLUSIONS. a. The projected operating environments at BRA...

  12. Process Improvement at Army Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northrup, J.; Smith, E. D.; Lin, M.; Baird, J.

    recommendations are for the Fill and Press line where most of the Level I focused LESSONS LEARNED On completion of the project, the researchers assessed the results and some of the 198 ESL-IE-97-04-31 Proceedings from the Nineteenth Industrial Energy.... Finally, the energy issues included initiate an energy team; install energy efficient lighting; and decommission unused steam lines. After the first cost, savings, and simple payback time was calculated for all of the proposed improvements, a...

  13. US Army Corps of Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    : This annual Year-in- Review is provided to you, our partners and stakehold- ers, to show the many sig of Engineers Far East District ® 2013YEAR-in-REVIEW is an autho- rized publication of the Far East District, U in KoreaOne Team Building Strong in Korea #12;2 Far East District 2013 YEAR IN REVIEW From the Far East

  14. Texas Plant Diseases Handbook.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, C. Wendell; Amador, Jose M.; Johnson, Jerral D.; McCoy, Norman L.; Philley, George L.; Lee, Thomas A. Jr.; Kaufman, Harold W.; Jones, Roger K.; Barnes, Larry W.; Black, Mark C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the lesion turns brown. With age, 1 es ions en 1 arge and coa 1 esce. The ent i re 1 eaf fi na 11 y drops. Stem lesions appear as long, reddish colored spots. When the plant begins to set fruit, lesions are formed at the nodes \\'Jhich girdle the stem... gi v i ng the 1 eaf a "shot-ho 1 e" appearance, simi 1 ar to those caused by anthracnose. Spots on fruit are usua lly sma 11 er and circul ar in shape. Bacteria overwinter in crop residue and on seed. Hard rains splash the bacteria to stems...

  15. Plants & Animals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum ReservesThrustBonnevillePlans arePlants &

  16. B Plant - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederalAshleymonthlyAwards SmallStatutesPacificPlant

  17. Gasification Plant Databases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding OpportunityF GGaryPortalPlant

  18. Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

  19. How Plants Grow name______________ Plants can grow from more than just seeds. Let's look at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    How Plants Grow name______________ Plants can grow from more than just seeds. Let's look at some of these ways you can grow plants. CUTTINGS Many plants can be started from cuttings (pieces of a bigger plant). A good place to make a cutting is fromone of the growing points of the plant (stem-tip). Some plants like

  20. Morris Plant Energy Efficiency Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betczynski, M. T.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    installed on several olefins cracking furnaces in order to improve heat recovery from the cracked process gas. As a result of the additional heat recovery, steam imported from the cogeneration facility was reduced by 45,000 lbs/hr. The large turbines... integrated an Aspen-based plant-wide data historian, which is utilized to compile process data from control and measurement points throughout the Morris plant. On-line optimization using this extensive data repository has helped the plant better...

  1. Overview BETTER BUILDINGS, BETTER PLANTS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    are available to Better Plants Partners on a facilitated basis. These resources include free energy audits for qualifying facilities, energy analysis software tools, and...

  2. Power Plant Modeling and Simulation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

  3. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  4. Plant Population Viability and Restoration Potential for Rare Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant Population Viability and Restoration Potential for Rare Plants Near Solar Installations ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental March 2011 with renewable energy by 2020. Largescale solar developments are needed to achieve this goal

  5. Plant Importation Importing "Plant Material" From Outside Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant Importation Importing "Plant Material" From Outside Canada 1) Determine whether) If a permit is required from the CFIA* (a division of Agriculture Canada), please go to the CFIA website Agency Canada (PHAC) or the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). #12;

  6. Managing plant symbiosis: fungal endophyte genotype alters plant community composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudgers, Jennifer

    Managing plant symbiosis: fungal endophyte genotype alters plant community composition Jennifer A hosts the foliar endophytic fungus, Neotypho- dium coenophialum. We quantified vegetation development of the endophyte (KY-31, AR-542) in two tall fescue cultivars (Georgia-5, Jesup). The KY-31 endophyte produces

  7. Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs Selecting healthy plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs Selecting healthy plants Take a step back to examine swollen nodules at the container edge, rather than circling like in a plastic container. The nodules store with soil or mulch ­ ignore these and find the first permanent woody root growing radially out from

  8. Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, James B.; Wolfram, Catherine

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ciency of Electric Generating Plants: A Stochastic Frontierthe existing stock of electricity generating plants. Betweenover 300 electric generating plants in the US, accounting

  9. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

  10. (Photosynthesis in intact plants)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

  11. Do Plants Sweat? Core Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Bruce

    in the bright sun and others are grouped together and are regularly sprinkled with water. You begin to wonder plant distribution where you see this principle in action? -Can you predict the effect of seasons data/graph] Three plants are grown in the same greenhouse with the same air temperature, amount

  12. Graduate Programs in Plant Biology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    not re- biochemistry, cell and molecular biology (B22). pmb.berkeley.edu Plant&Microbial Biology #12;The to the environment will continue to fuel the expansion of plant research well into the future. The plant biology program focuses on contemporary ba- sic plant research, design of biotechnologies, and plant-microbe

  13. Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Three proposed COLs expected in 2007, by Dale E. Klein, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Delivering behaviors that our customers value, by Jack Allen, Westinghouse Electric Company; Facilitating high-level and fuel waste disposal technologies, by Malcolm Gray, IAEA, Austria; Plant life management and long-term operation, by Pal Kovacs, OECD-NEA, France; Measuring control rod position, by R. Taymanov, K. Sapozhnikova, I. Druzhinin, D.I. Mendeleyev, Institue for Metrology, Russia; and, 'Modernization' means higher safety, by Svetlana Genova, Kozluduy NPP plc, Bulgaria.

  14. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; David Mintner; Wendy Moore; Jimmy O. Ong; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Kalapi D. Sheth; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

    2001-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three-phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The accomplishments of Phase I are discussed in detail in this Phase I Concept Report. A RD and T Plan and a preliminary project financing plan have been developed and are submitted separately from this report.

  15. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

  16. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

  17. Early Entrance Coproduction Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

    2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

  18. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

    2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstock. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

  19. Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, A. M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP) is a Management System designed to reduce operating cost in a continuous operating multi product plant by reviewing all cost factors and selecting plant wide production schedules which are most...

  20. Regulatory status of transgrafted plants is unclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haroldsen, Victor M; Paulino, Gabriel; Chi-ham, Cecilia; Bennett, Alan B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    publicatie/new-techniques-in- plant-biotechnology (accessedJuglans regia L. ). ).Plant Sci 163(3):591–7. Gonsalves D.improvement. Frontiers Plant Sci 3:39. Heselmans M. 2011.

  1. Review: Rare Plants of Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ryder W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Guide to the Rare Plants of Washington Pamela Camp andField Guide to the Rare Plants of Washington. Seattle, WA:State’s 3600 vascular plants, 600 mosses, and 1000-1500

  2. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    due to the Fukushima nuclear plant accident. Journal of21 3. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS……………………………………………….. 23 3.1-25 3.2- WASTES FROM NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS………………………… 28 4.

  3. Technology Data for Energy Plants June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................... 35 03 Rebuilding Coal Power Plants to Biomass.......................................................................................................................... 27 01 Advanced Pulverized Fuel Power PlantTechnology Data for Energy Plants June 2010 #12;ISBNwww: 978-87-7844-857-6 #12;2 Table of contents

  4. Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Plants With plants in development. Click...

  5. ASSESSING PLANTING STOCK QUALITY Comprehensive assessments of planting stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    for cold storage, and to evaluate effects of traditional and proposed nursery cultural practices on field and Jenkinson 1970, 1971) just after lifting and after cold storage to spring planting time · Field survival

  6. Demil planning and management system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, C.C.; Bormet, S.M.; Whitfield, R.G.; Bowen, M.; Chun, K.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Golden, R.E. [Army Pacific, Fort Shafter, HI (United States); Fuller, R. [Army Industrial Operations Command, Rock Island, IL (United States). National Maintenance Point Branch

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Maintenance Point (NMP) Branch of the US Army Industrial Operations Command (IOC) serves as the Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition (SMCA) agent for managing the renovation, modification, recycling, and disposal of conventional ammunition, thereby improving readiness. The mission of the NMP includes program management for demilitarization (demil) activities, ammunition maintenance, and ammunition peculiar equipment (APE) projects. Through an Interagency Agreement between the US Army and the US Department of Energy, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing an integrated data management system, called the Demil Planning and Management System (DPMS), for IOC. DPMS is intended to help NMP efficiently manage information on ongoing demil project activities and asset inventories, plan future projects, and allocate budgets. This system, when fully implemented, will also make it possible for the user community to interactively access the DPMS database; perform data entry and queries; and run reports through network, modem, and Internet access to the system. This paper describes the principal components of the DPMS, current capabilities, and planned enhancements.

  7. Automating An Industrial Power Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, D. R.; McCowen, R. R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and electricity requirements of the Component Works as well as all of the heat and a portion of the electricity needed by the adjacent John Deere Foundry. This paper describes the automation of an eXisting industrial power plant and tells how the project...AUTlliATING AN INDUSTRIAL POWER PLANT DAVID R. WILLIAMS, P.E. Energy Coordi?nator John Deere Component Works Waterloo, Iowa ABSTRACT The need for an upgrade of boiler and turbine controls in the 15 MW coal-fired cogeneration plant...

  8. Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles include the following: Application of modeling and simulation to nuclear power plants, by Berry Gibson, IBM, and Rolf Gibbels, Dassault Systems; Steam generators with tight manufacturing procedures, by Ei Kadokami, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries; SG design based on operational experience and R and D, by Jun Tang, Babcock and Wilcox Canada; Confident to deliver reliable performance, by Bruce Bevilacqua, Westinghouse Nuclear; An evolutionary plant design, by Martin Parece, AREVA NP, Inc.; and, Designed for optimum production, by Danny Roderick, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy. Industry Innovation articles include: Controlling alloy 600 degradation, by John Wilson, Exelon Nuclear Corporation; Condensate polishing innovation, by Lewis Crone, Dominion Millstone Power Station; Reducing deposits in steam generators, by the Electric Power Research Institute; and, Minimizing Radiological effluent releases, by the Electric Power Research Institute. The plant profile article is titled 2008 - a year of 'firsts' for AmerenUE's Callaway plant, by Rick Eastman, AmerenUE.

  9. HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Melvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    molecular weights of various hydrocarbon materials for fuelof oil and alcohol from hydrocarbon-producing plants. Into Die Naturwissenschaften HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: METHODS

  10. Natural Gas Processing Plant- Sulfur (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This regulation establishes sulfur emission standards for natural gas processing plants. Standards are stated for both existing and new plants. There are also rules for stack height requirements,...

  11. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  12. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  13. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  14. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  15. Pre-In-Plant Training Webinar (Steam)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This pre-In-Plant training webinar for the Better Plants Program covers how to find energy savings in steam systems.

  16. The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation ? · Fuel Cells ? · Electric Cars ? · Solar Electric Cars · Natural Gas ? · Combo-Cars · Hydrogen Nuclear Plants Operating Very Well · But, Generating Companies not Interested in New Nuclear Plants

  17. Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plant - November 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - November 2013 November 5, 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events...

  18. Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    January 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - January 2013 January 2013 Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control...

  19. Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 August 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth...

  20. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Anderson; William K. Davis; Thomas W. Sloop

    2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Gasification Technologies and Transportation Fuels and Chemicals programs, DOE and Texaco are partners through Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40658 to determine the feasibility of developing, constructing and operating an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). The overall objective of the project is the three-phase development of an EECP that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The specific work requirements of Phase I included: Prepare an EECP Preliminary Concept Report covering Tasks 2-8 specified in the Cooperative Agreement; Develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan as specified in Task 9 of the Cooperative Agreement for implementation in Phase II; and Develop a Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the EECP Project as specified in Task 10 of the Cooperative Agreement. This document is the Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the design, construction, and operation of the EECP at the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery.

  1. Fiberglass plastics in power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, D. [Ashland Performance Materials (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRPs) are replacing metal in FGDs, stacks, tanks, cooling towers, piping and other plant components. The article documents the use of FRP in power plants since the 1970s. The largest volume of FRP in North American power plants is for stack liners and ductwork. Absorber vessel shells and internal components comprise the third largest use. The most common FRP absorber vessels are known as jet bubbling reactors (JBRs). One of the largest JBRs at a plant on the Ohio River removes 99% of sulphur dioxide from high sulphur coal flue gas. FRPs last twice as long as wood structures when used for cooling towers and require less maintenance. 1 tab., 2 photos.

  2. Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutilier, Michael Stephen Ha

    Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees – a readily available, ...

  3. A neighborhood alternative energy plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Douglas James

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A design that proposes the redefinition of the role of a power plant facility within a community by creating a humane environment for recreation, education, community gathering, living, and energy production; rather than ...

  4. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selectionmore »and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.« less

  5. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

  6. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,160","9,556",100.0,"Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,160","9,556",100.0...

  7. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0...

  8. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (percent)","Owner" "Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Unit 1",685,"5,918",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Generation Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",685,"5,918",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal...

  9. Foote Hydroelectric Plant spillway rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowers, D.L. [Consumers Power Co., Jackson, MI (United States); Hasan, N.; Gertler, L.R. [Raytheon Infrastructures Services, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993 the spillway of the 9 MW Foote Hydroelectric Plant located on the AuSable River, near Oscoda, Michigan was rehabilitated. The Foote Plant, built in 1917, is owned and operated by Consumers Power Company. In the 76 years of continuous operation the spillway had deteriorated such that much of the concrete and associated structure needed to be replaced to assure safety of the structure. The hydro station includes an earth embankment with concrete corewall, a concrete spillway with three tainter gates and a log chute, a penstock structure and a steel and masonry powerhouse. The electric generation is by three vertical shaft units of 3,000 KW each. A plan of the plant with spillway and an elevation of the spillway section is shown. This paper describes the evaluation and repair of the plant spillway and associated structure.

  10. North City Water Reclamation Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    -Site Cogeneration Methane Power Plant Methane piped in from: Miramar LandfillMiramar Landfill Metropolitan Biosolids Covered Subgrade basins Malfunction in Point Loma South Bay North City Metro Biosolids Center WW Pumping

  11. AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of these organisms to environmental factors (e .g. , temperature and solar radiation). Actual field data have been compared with simulation output with encouraging results. Starting biomass of the plants and numbers

  12. Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Gym Lot Corbett Lot Greenhouse Patch Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam

  13. A discussion of sanitary engineering problems in army camps in the United States in relation to water supply, sewerage, and garbage problems from the standpoint of the medical department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haskins, Charles Arthur

    1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will consult free­ ly with the engineer officer and the officer in charge of cantonment construction, in connection with the purchases of such equipment as power plants, pumping machinery, refrigerating plants and similar items. .;.. "6. COLSTRUCTION...

  14. Common Aquatic Plants -- Identification, Control.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klussmann, Wallace G. (Wallace Glenn); Lowman, Fred G.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . FLOATING PLANTS WATER STAR GRASS Heteranthera sp. (Mud plantain) Water star grass, a submersed or floating rooted plant, usually is found along muddy shores and in water up to 5 ft. deep. The leaves are approximately 2 inches long and 3/16 inch wide... PONDWEEDS Potamogeton sp. The genus Potamogeton J commonly called pond weeds, includes many species common to Texas waters. Group characteristics include alternate leaves with flowers and fruits in spikes or heads. Many have two kinds...

  15. Computer Control of Unattended Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinson, D. R.; Chatterjee, N.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPUTER CONTROL OF UNATTENDED PLANTS David R. Vinson, Nirma1 Chatterjee ? Ai r Products and Chemi ca 1s, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania Providing a cost-effective and reliable computer monitori ng, control, and optimization package is a greater... the last decade, energy costs in some air separation plants are now more than half the total product cost. Starting in 1975, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. began implementing a program to retrofit existing major energy consuming facili ties...

  16. Valuable Plants Native to Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Harris Braley

    1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and makes a splendid plant for cover along mud flats where the seasona.1 change of water would leave bare places. Commercial. Arundo Donax L. This is the reed grass of southern Texas. It has been used for many years to aid in erosion control...LIBRARY, A b COttECE, CAMPUS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION. BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS -- BULLETIN NO. 551 AUGUST, 1937 -- DIVISION OF APICULTVRE VALUABLE PLANTS NATIVE TO TEXAS i...

  17. COKEMASTER: Coke plant management system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johanning, J.; Reinke, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To keep coke utilization in ironmaking as competitive as possible, the potential to improve the economics of coke production has to be utilized. As one measure to meet this need of its customers, Krupp Koppers has expanded its existing ECOTROL computer system for battery heating control to a comprehensive Coke Plant Management System. Increased capacity utilization, lower energy consumption, stabilization of plant operation and ease of operation are the main targets.

  18. Researching power plant water recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

  19. Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    and Metallurgy Industries Group (AMIG) Ammunition and Metallurgy Industry Group Ammunition Industries Group

  20. Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    Republic of Iran Ammunition and Metallurgy Industries Group (AMIG) Ammunition and Metallurgy Industry Group

  1. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  2. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the manufacture of ethylene and propylene chemicals from F-T naphtha, for the generation of hydrogen from F-T naphtha to power fuel cells, for direct blending of F-T diesels into transportation fuels, for the conversion of F-T heavy product wax to transportation fuels, and the conversion of F-T Heavy product wax to a valuable high melting point food-grade specialty wax product. Product evaluations conducted under Task 2.5 of Phase II successfully mitigated the above technical and economic risks to the EECP with the development of product yields and product qualities for the production of chemicals, transportation fuels, and specialty food-grade waxes from the F-T synthesis products.

  3. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio; Ming He; Lalit Shah; Charles Schrader; Earl Berry; Peter Ricci; Belma Demirel; Charles Benham; Mark Bohn

    2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several important issues were addressed in this phase of the project. They included Rejuvenation/Regeneration of the Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst, online Catalyst Withdrawal and Addition from the synthesis reactor, and the Fischer-Tropsch Design Basis Confirmation. In Phase III the results from these RD&T work will be incorporated in developing the engineering design package. This Topical Report documents the Phase II RD&T work that was completed for this task.

  4. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Anderson; Charles Schrader

    2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1999, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Cooperative Agreement to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. to provide a preliminary engineering design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award, continuous and diligent work has been undertaken to achieve the design of an economical facility that makes strides toward attaining the goal of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to power while coproducing transportation fuels, chemicals, and useful utilities such as steam. This objective is being pursued in a three-phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems, LLC. (TES), the successor to Texaco Energy Systems, Inc. The key subcontractors to TES include General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root. ChevronTexaco provided gasification technology and Rentech Inc.'s Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology that has been developed for non-natural gas sources. GE provided gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair provided air separation technology and KBR provided engineering to integrate the facility. A conceptual design was completed in Phase I and the report was accepted by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of technical success of the EECP. The objective of Phase II was to mitigate the risks by executing research, development, and testing. Results from the Phase II work are the subject of this report. As the work of Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Preliminary Engineering Design. Work in Phase II requires additional technical development work to correctly apply technology at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The decision to proceed with Phase III centers on locating a new site and favorable commercial and economic factors.

  5. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

    2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

  6. Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, J.R.; Staskawicz, B.J.; Bent, A.F.; Innes, R.W.

    1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described. 7 figs.

  7. PHYSICAL PLANT OPERATING POLICY AND PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    in this technology. REVIEW This Physical Plant Operating Policy/Procedure (PP/OP) will be reviewed in March of each Plant. Physical Plant's intention is to provide each employee reasonable access to the technology Plant technology will be a prime consideration. Requests for non-standard products will not be approved

  8. Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap Hutch Neilson Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory International Workshop MFE Roadmapping for the ITER Era Princeton, NJ 10 September 2011 #12;Outline 2 · Pilot plant ­ mission, motivation, and description. · Role of pilot plants on the Roadmap to Demo. Pilot Plant

  9. Exploring the World of Plants and Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Exploring the World of Plants and Soils 4-H Plant , Soils, and Entomology Curriculum 18 U.S.C. 707 Project Book 2 Publication 380-021 2014 #12;Exploring the World of Plants and Soil: Stems and Stamens ................................................................................................................. 3 Activity 1 The Stages of a Plant's Life

  10. Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined cycle power plant utilizing wood waste products as a fuel has been designed. This plant will yield a 50% efficiency improvement compared to conventional wood-fueled steam power plants. The power plant features an externally-fired gas...

  11. Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information about Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant capabilities and resources at NREL.

  12. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdalla H. Ali; Raj Kamarthi; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

    2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified the integration of the water produced in the F-T synthesis section with the gasification section as an area of potential synergy. By utilizing the F-T water in the petroleum coke slurry for the gasifier, the EECP can eliminate a potential waste stream and reduce capital costs. There is a low technical risk for this synergy, however, the economic risk, particularly in regards to the water, can be high. The economic costs include the costs of treating the water to meet the locally applicable environmental standards. This option may require expensive chemicals and treatment facilities. EECP Phase II included tests conducted to confirm the viability of integrating F-T water in the slurry feed for the gasifier. Testing conducted at ChevronTexaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) included preparing slurries made using petroleum coke with F-T water collected at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The work included bench scale tests to determine the slurry ability of the petroleum coke and F-T water. The results of the tests show that F-T water does not adversely affect slurries for the gasifier. There are a few cases where in fact the addition of F-T water caused favorable changes in viscosity of the slurries. This RD&T task was executed in Phase II and results are reported herein.

  13. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Anderson; Mark Anselmo; Earl Berry; Mark Bohn; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit Shah; Donald Todd; Robert Schavey

    2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to its detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC (TES) (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR). The work was under cooperative agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing the gasification technology and the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech Inc., GE is providing the combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing the air separation technology, and KBR is providing overall engineering. Each of the EECP's subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers in Phase I. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified catalyst/wax separation as a potential technical and economic risk. To mitigate risks to the proposed EECP concept, Phase II RD&T included tests for secondary catalyst/wax separation systems as part of Task 2.3--Catalyst/Wax Separation. The LCI Scepter{reg_sign} Microfiltration system was determined to be best suited for producing a filtrate that met the EECP secondary catalyst/wax separation standards of producing F-T wax containing less than10 ppmw solids. As part of task 2.3, micro-filtration removal efficiencies and production rates for two FT feeds, Rentech Inc. bubble column reactor (BCR) product and LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) product, were evaluated. Based on comparisons between the performances of these two materials, the more readily available LaPorte AFDU material was judged an acceptable analog to the BCR material that would be produced in a larger-scale F-T synthesis. The present test was initiated to obtain data in an extended range of concentration for use in the scale-up design of the secondary catalyst/wax separation system that would be operating at the EECP capacity.

  14. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Benham; Mark Bohn; John Anderson; Earl Berry; Fred Brent; Ming He; Randy Roberts; Lalit Shah; Marjan Roos

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1999 U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) award to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. (presently Texaco Energy Systems LLC, a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco) was made to provide a Preliminary Engineering Design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award presentation, work has been undertaken to achieve an economical concept design that makes strides toward the DOE Vision 21 goal. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to electric power plus transportation fuels, chemicals and useful utilities such as steam. The use of petroleum coke was added as a fuel to reduce the cost of feedstock and also to increase the probability of commercial implementation of the EECP concept. This objective has been pursued in a three phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems LLC and subcontractors General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Rentech's Fischer-Tropsch technology that has been developed for non-natural gas feed sources. GE is providing gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering to integrate the facility. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was completed in 2000. The Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was prepared based on making assumptions for the basis of design for various technologies that are part of the EECP concept. The Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was approved by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified technical and economic risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of the technical and economic success of the EECP. The Project Management Plan (Task 1) for Phase II was approved by the DOE in 2001. The results of RD&T efforts for Phase II are expected to improve the quality of assumptions made in Phase I for basis of design for the EECP concept. The RD&T work plan (Task 2 and 3) for Phase II has been completed. As the RD&T work conducted during Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Basic Engineering Design. Also due to the merger of Chevron and Texaco, the proposed refinery site for the EECP was not available. It became apparent that some additional technical development work would be needed to correctly apply the technology at a specific site. The objective of Task 4 of Phase II is to update the concept basis of design produced during Phase I. As part of this task, items that will require design basis changes and are not site dependent have been identified. The team has qualitatively identified the efforts to incorporate the impacts of changes on EECP concept. The design basis has been modified to incorporate those changes. The design basis changes for those components of EECP that are site and feedstock dependent will be done as part of Phase III, once the site has been selected.

  15. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Anderson; Mark Anselmo; Earl Berry; Mark Bohn; Roko Bujas; Ming He; Ken Kwik; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit Shah; Dennis Slater; Donald Todd; Don Wall

    2003-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC (TES), a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco, General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc. GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified catalyst/wax separation as a potential technical and economic risk. To mitigate risks to the proposed EECP, Phase II RD&T included tests of an alternative (to Rentech's Dynamic Settler) primary catalyst/wax separation device and secondary catalyst/wax separation systems. The team evaluated multiple technologies for both primary and secondary catalyst/wax separation. Based on successful testing at Rentech (outside of DOE funding) and difficulties in finalizing a contract to demonstrate alternative primary catalyst/wax separation technology (using magnetic separation technology), ChevronTexaco has selected the Rentech Dynamic Settler for primary catalyst/wax separation. Testing has shown the Dynamic Settler is capable of producing filtrate exceeding the proposed EECP primary catalyst/wax separation goal of less than 0.1 wt%. The LCI Scepter{reg_sign} Microfiltration system appeared to be best suited for producing a filtrate that met the EECP secondary catalyst/wax separation standards of 10 parts per million (weight) [ppmw]. The other technologies, magnetic separation and electrostatic separation, were promising and able to reduce the solids concentrations in the filtrate. Additional RD&T will be needed for magnetic separation and electrostatic separation technologies to obtain 10 ppmw filtrate required for the proposed EECP. The Phase II testing reduces the technical and economic risks and provides the information necessary to proceed with the development of an engineering design for the EECP Fischer-Tropsch catalyst/wax separation system.

  16. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Roberts

    2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using petroleum coke and ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC. (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified F-T reactor scale-up as a potential technical risk. The objective of Task 2.3 was to confirm engineering models that allow scale-up to commercial slurry phase bubble column (SPBC) reactors operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. In developmental work outside the scope of this project, historical data, literature references, and a scale-up from a 1 1/2-in. (3.8 cm) to 6-ft (1.8 m) SPBC reactor have been reviewed. This review formed the background for developing scale-up models for a SPBC reactor operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. The necessary fundamental physical parameters have been measured and incorporated into the mathematical catalyst/kinetic model developed from the SPBC and CSTR work outside the scope of this EECP project. The mathematical catalyst/kinetic model was used to compare to experimental data obtained at Rentech during the EECP Fischer-Tropsch Confirmation Run (Task 2.1; reported separately). The prediction of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion as a function of days on stream compares quite closely to the experimental data.

  17. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Earl R. Berry; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; O.O. Omatete; T.D. Burchell

    2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified several potential methods to reduce or minimize the environmental impact of the proposed EECP. The EECP Project Team identified F-T catalyst disposal, beneficial gasifier slag usage (other than landfill), and carbon dioxide recovery for the gas turbine exhaust for study under this task. Successfully completing the Task 2.10 RD&T provides additional opportunities for the EECP to meet the goals of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The gasification section offers several opportunities to maximize the environmental benefits of an EECP. The spent F-T catalyst can be sent to landfills or to the gasification section. Testing in Phase II shows that the spent F-T catalyst with a small wax coating can safely meet federal landfill requirements. As an alternative to landfilling, it has been proposed to mix the spent F-T catalyst with the petroleum coke and feed this mixture to the gasification unit. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience with gasification and the characteristics of the spent F-T catalyst this appears to be an excellent opportunity to reduce one potential waste stream. The slag from the gasification unit can be commercially marketed for construction or fuel (such as cement kiln fuel) uses. The technical and economic benefits of these options must be reviewed for the final EECP before incorporating a specific alternative into the design basis. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, particularly carbon dioxide, is an important goal of the EECP. The Texaco gasification process provides opportunities to capture high purity streams of carbon dioxide. For Phase II, a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) was tested to determine its potential to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust of a gas turbine. Testing on with a simulated gas turbine exhaust shows that the CFCMS is able to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust. However, more development is required to optimize the system.

  18. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vierstra, Richard D. (Madison, WI); Walker, Joseph M. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  19. The Water Circuit of the Plants - Do Plants have Hearts ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Kundt; Eva Gruber

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a correspondence between the circulation of blood in all higher animals and the circulation of sap in all higher plants - up to heights h of 140 m - through the xylem and phloem vessels. Plants suck in water from the soil, osmotically through the roothair zone, and subsequently lift it osmotically again, and by capillary suction (via their buds, leaves, and fruits) into their crowns. In between happens a reverse osmosis - the endodermis jump - realized by two layers of subcellular mechanical pumps in the endodermis walls which are powered by ATP, or in addition by two analogous layers of such pumps in the exodermis. The thus established root pressure helps forcing the absorbed ground water upward, through the whole plant, and often out again, in the form of guttation, or exudation.

  20. Primary plant performance evaluation and plant signals validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anikanov, S. S. [Westinghouse LLC, 4350 Northern Pike, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States); Stolyetniy, I. V.; Semenovski, Y. P. [Westron, 1, Academic Proskura str., Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses results of the implementation of NPP signal validation and data reconciliation algorithms applied to VVER-1000 reactor as part of the Core Monitoring System (CMS) project at South Ukrainian NPP. The proposed method is compared with the G2TM tool (Gensym) application of neural network algorithms to the same plant data. The proposed algorithms yield practically identical results for situations with a significant amount of erroneous data, even though it runs in on-line mode as oppose to the off-line mode of the G2TM tool. The method described in this paper includes preliminary signal processing, data fusion, and data reconciliation algorithms. All major primary and secondary sides measurements, used for plant thermal power evaluation based on different methods, were undergone the proposed processing algorithm. Some plant life data is presented to illustrate quality of input signals used to obtain calculation results. (authors)

  1. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

    1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 31 figs.

  2. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 67 figs.

  3. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M. (Pasadena, CA); Chang, Caren (Pasadena, CA); Bleecker, Anthony B. (Madison, WI)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  4. Plants having modified response to ethylene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyerowitz, Elliot M. (Pasadena, CA); Chang, Caren (Pasadena, CA); Bleecker, Anthony B. (Madison, WI)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  5. State power plant productivity programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The findings of a working group formed to review the status of efforts by utilities and utility regulators to increase the availability and reliability of generating units are presented. Representatives from nine state regulatory agencies, NRRI, and DOE, participated on the Working Group. The Federal government has been working cooperatively with utilities, utility organizations, and with regulators to encourage and facilitate improvements in power plant productivity. Cooperative projects undertaken with regulatory and energy commissions in California, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Texas, North Carolina and Mighigan are described. Following initiation of these cooperative projects, DOE funded a survey to determine which states were explicitly addressing power plant productivity through the regulatory process. The Working Group was formed following completion of this survey. The Working Group emphasized the need for those power plant productivity improvements which are cost effective. The cost effectiveness of proposed availability improvement projects should be determined within the context of opportunities for operating and capital improvements available to an entire utility. The Working Group also identified the need for: allowing for plant designs that have a higher construction cost, but are also more reliable; allowing for recovery and reducing recovery lags for productivity-related capital expenditures; identifying and reducing disincentives in the regulatory process; ascertaining that utilities have sufficient money available to undertake timely maintenance; and support of EPRI and NERC to develop a relevant and accurate national data base. The DOE views these as extremely important aspects of any regulatory program to improve power plant productivity.

  6. Plant Science Graduates Spring 2011 Bachelor of Science in Plant Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Plant Science Graduates Spring 2011 Bachelor of Science in Plant Sciences Joshua Paul Baker, Old Dale Wallace, Centerville Master of Science Reginald Jason Millwood, Plant Sciences Kara Lee Warwick, Plant Sciences Undergraduate Degrees, Summer Term 2011 Henry Joseph Cope, III, Plant Sciences David

  7. Clemson University Plant Problem Clinic, Nematode Assay Lab and Molecular Plant Pathogen Detection Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Clemson University Plant Problem Clinic, Nematode Assay Lab and Molecular Plant Pathogen Detection Lab Annual Report for 2012 The Plant Problem Clinic serves the people of South Carolina through the Clinic. Plant pathogens, insect pests and weeds can significantly reduce plant growth

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Twin Cities Ammunition - MN 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown SiteTracerlab IncMillTwin

  9. Remedial investigation concept plan for the groundwater operable units at the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are conducting cleanup activities at two properties--the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area (the latter includes the training area)--located in the Weldon Spring area in St. Charles County, Missouri. These areas are on the National Priorities List (NPL), and cleanup activities at both areas are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE and DA are conducting a joint remedial investigation (RI) and baseline risk assessment (BRA) as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the groundwater operable units for the two areas. This joint effort will optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts and facilitate overall remedial decision making since the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. A Work Plan issued jointly in 1995 by DOE and the DA discusses the results of investigations completed at the time of preparation of the report. The investigations were necessary to provide an understanding of the groundwater system beneath the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area. The Work Plan also identifies additional data requirements for verification of the evaluation presented.

  10. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdalla H. Ali; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

    2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified petroleum coke characteristics as a potential technical risk. The composition of petroleum coke varies from one refinery to another. Petroleum coke characteristics are a function of the crude oil slate available at the refinery and the coker operating parameters. The specific petroleum coke characteristics at a refinery affect the design of the Gasification and Acid Gas Removal (AGR) subsystems. Knowing the petroleum coke composition provides the necessary data to proceed to the EECP Phase III engineering design of the gasification process. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience, the EECP team ranked the technical, economic, and overall risks of the petroleum coke composition related to the gasification subsystem as low. In Phase I of the EECP Project, the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery had been identified as the potential EECP site. As a result of the merger between Texaco and Chevron in October 2001, Texaco was required to sell its interest in the Motiva Enterprises LLC joint venture to Shell Oil Company and Saudi Refining Inc. To assess the possible impact of moving the proposed EECP host site to a ChevronTexaco refinery, samples of petroleum coke from two ChevronTexaco refineries were sent to MTC for bench-scale testing. The results of the analysis of these samples were compared to the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis developed for Motiva's Port Arthur Refinery. The analysis confirms that if the proposed EECP is moved to a new refinery site, the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis would have to be updated. The lower sulfur content of the two samples from the ChevronTexaco refineries indicates that if one of these sites were selected, the Sulfur Recovery Unit (SRU) might be sized smaller than the current EECP design. This would reduce the capital expense of the SRU. Additionally, both ChevronTexaco samples have a higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio than the Motiva Port Arthur petroleum coke. The higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio could give a slightly higher F-T products yield from the F-T Synthesis Reactor. However, the EECP Gasification Design Basis can not be updated until the site for the proposed EECP site is finalized. Until the site is finalized, the feedstock (petroleum coke) characteristics are a low risk to the EECP project.

  11. Condensate polishing at Plant Bowen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, K.A.; Siegwarth, D.P.; Sawochka, S.G.; McNea, D.A.; Suhonen, C.H.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensate polisher system design and operation were evaluated at the fosssil-fueled Plant Bowen of Georgia Power Company relative to the ability of the polishers to achieve an effluent chemical quality consistent with PWR Steam Generator Owners Group Chemistry Guidelines. Polishers regenerated employing the Seprex and Ammonex processes were evaluated during normal plant operation and during periods of simulated condenser inleakage. Although polisher effluent quality was acceptable relative to boiler corrosion control at Plant Bowen, it was inconsistent with that required for recirculating PWR steam generators. Polisher effluent quality was reasonably consistent with requirements for PWR once-through steam generator systems. High polisher cation to anion resin equivalence ratios (3.4 to 1), and insufficiently rapid anion resin kinetics were the major reasons for the observed non-optimum polisher performance.

  12. Automating An Industrial Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, D. R.; McCowen, R. R.

    AUTlliATING AN INDUSTRIAL POWER PLANT DAVID R. WILLIAMS, P.E. Energy Coordi?nator John Deere Component Works Waterloo, Iowa ABSTRACT The need for an upgrade of boiler and turbine controls in the 15 MW coal-fired cogeneration plant... for the project was estimated at $860,OOO/year. The upgrading process began with a search for a design/ build contractor that could provide complete turn key capability, beginning with a site survey and ending with operator acceptanoe. The contractor...

  13. The Propagation of Ornamental Plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWerth, A. F.

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Germinntior- to 10 days. I Cercis canadensis ( Redbud) Soak in full strength commercial sulphuric acid for When seed is removed from acid, 1ca4 - 20 minutes. Stratify in moist peat at 35" to 40" F. running water for 10 minutes. Soak in !rr for 60 days... to 30 days. ture, until ready for planting. Diospyros virginana Stratify freshly cleaned seed in moist peat 36" to These seed will not germinate at thc~ !c (Common Persimmon) 41" F. Seeds will be ready for planting in 30 days. peratures and can...

  14. Annual Report 2001 -Plant Research Departme Plant Research Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    post-genomic tools to improve our understanding of plants. The aim is to develop crops with improved activities in the area of Functional Genomics integrate the department. Each programme contains special expertise in the fields of genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome analyses, which are delivered

  15. Balance of Plant Requirements for a Nuclear Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley Ward

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the requirements for the components and systems that support the hydrogen production portion of a 600 megawatt thermal (MWt) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These systems, defined as the "balance-of-plant" (BOP), are essential to operate an effective hydrogen production plant. Examples of BOP items are: heat recovery and heat rejection equipment, process material transport systems (pumps, valves, piping, etc.), control systems, safety systems, waste collection and disposal systems, maintenance and repair equipment, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical supply and distribution, and others. The requirements in this document are applicable to the two hydrogen production processes currently under consideration in the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. These processes are the sulfur iodide (S-I) process and the high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process. At present, the other two hydrogen production process - the hybrid sulfur-iodide electrolytic process (SE) and the calcium-bromide process (Ca-Br) -are under flow sheet development and not included in this report. While some features of the balance-of-plant requirements are common to all hydrogen production processes, some details will apply only to the specific needs of individual processes.

  16. Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G1 Plants of Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    leaves San Juan NF revising Management Plan ­ make sure it is included, although it occurs on the Rio (Tamara Naumann) has no resources to survey for this species, focus is on weed management. CNE population. Can survey for this species almost any time of year. In Arches NP, sand blowing over the plants

  17. Sixth Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium Overview of G2 Plants of Northern Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium Overview of G2 Plants of Northern Colorado 9:00 am - 4 Anticlea (Zigadenus) vaginatus 3:15 Rare Plant Conservation Initiative ­ CNHP/TNC 4:00 Adjourn #12;

  18. Integrated Toxic Plant Management Handbook: Livestock Poisoning Plants of the Trans-Pecos Region of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Photographs, plant descriptions, and symptoms of poisoning help ranchers identify toxic plants that may be harmful to their livestock in West Texas. There is also information on grazing, livestock management, and toxic plant control....

  19. Integrated Toxic Plant Management Handbook: Livestock Poisoning Plants of the Trans-Pecos Region of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Photographs, plant descriptions, and symptoms of poisoning help ranchers identify toxic plants that may be harmful to their livestock in West Texas. There is also information on grazing, livestock management, and toxic plant control....

  20. Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester M. Waganer

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

  1. Magnetic Fusion Pilot Plant Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FNSF = Fusion Nuclear Science Facility CTF = Component Test Facility · Powerplantlike maintenance. · Targeted ultimate capabilities: ­ Fusion nuclear S&T development, component testing · Steady applicable to power plant · Demonstrate methods for fast replacement of in-vessel components ­ Net

  2. Systemic Signalling in Plant Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, David

    develop continuously throughout their life cycle, constantly initiating new or- gans. They doSystemic Signalling in Plant Development David Jackson, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring to the production of systemic signals that control the development of distant organs and tissues. Introduction

  3. Ram Village South Chiller Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Winston Ram Village South Chiller Plant Dental Craige Campus Alumni Swain Stacy Thermal Student Planetarium Ackland Art Museum Research Chiller D 114 Chase Ave. APCF- Grounds Medical Morehead Stalling- Evans Sports Medicine Center Cobb Hall Ernie School Old Hospital Chiller Hanes Art Coker Wilson Battle

  4. Advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  5. Successful restoration of plant communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fant, Jeremie

    of restoration failure if seed source is incorrect #12;Unexpected results... Penstemon deustus (hot rock miles NEVADA UTAH IDAHOOREGON #12;Plant-focused restoration efforts Disturbed Site Cheatgrass (49%) Rock/Bare Ground (50%) Shrub (0.8%) Native Grass (0.7%) Cattle Dung (0.2%) Undisturbed Site Cheatgrass (0.7%) Rock

  6. Glutathione-S-conjugate transport in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rea, Philip A. (Ardmore, PA); Lu, Yu-Ping (Havertown, PA); Li, Ze-Sheng (Prospect Park, PA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes an isolated DNA encoding a plant GS-X pump polypeptide and an isolated preparation of a plant GS-X pump polypeptide. Also included is an isolated preparation of a nucleic acid which is antisense in orientation to a portion or all of a plant GS-X pump gene. The invention also includes a cells, vectors and transgenic plants having an isolated DNA encoding a plant GS-X pump and methods of use thereof. In addition, the invention relates to plant GS-X pump promoter sequences and the uses thereof.

  7. Plant Physiology: Manipulating Plant Growth with Solar Radiation Dennis Decoteau, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    Plant Physiology: Manipulating Plant Growth with Solar Radiation Dennis Decoteau, Ph.D. Department. Greenhouse Glazing & Solar Radiation Transmission Workshop, October 1998 © CCEA, Center for Controlled

  8. Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

  9. Chemicals for Plant Disease Control at Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ong, Kevin

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    common chemical names and the corresponding chemical name for each active ingredient. Kevin Ong* ?Assistant Professor and Extension Plant Pathologist, The Texas A&M University System Table 1. Plant disease control chemicals. Common name Chemical name 1...

  10. Steam Conservation and Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D. P.

    This paper examines several cost-effective steam conservation and boiler plant efficiency advancements that were implemented during a recently completed central steam boiler plant replacement project at a very large semiconductor manufacturing...

  11. Power Plant Research and Siting Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Power Plant Research and Siting Act of 1971 established the Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) to evaluate electric generation issues in the state and recommend responsible, long-term...

  12. Minnesota Power Plant Siting Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act regulates the siting of large electric power generating plants, which are defined as plants designed for or capable of operating with a capacity of 50,000 kW or more. The policy of the...

  13. Florida Electrical Power Plant Siting Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Power Plant Siting Act (PPSA) is the state’s centralized process for licensing large power plants. One license—a certification— replaces local and state permits. Local governments and state...

  14. Plant Breeding Program COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradford, Kent

    Plant Breeding Program COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Office of the Dean Cereal Breeding Program 51 Acknowlegements 51 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Office in production agriculture, which included plant breeding, was necessary for California farmers to thrive

  15. Waste Management Trends in Texas Industrial Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, C. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    have become familiar with several plant waste management practices. This paper discusses waste management practices in industrial plants in Texas with particular attention to the requirements of the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission...

  16. Method to improve drought tolerance in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Kwak, June Myoung

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to increase drought resistance in plants is provided. The method comprises inhibiting or disabling inward-rectifying K.sup.+ (K.sup.+.sub.in) channels in the stomatal guard cells of the plant.

  17. Descriptions of Range and Pasture Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, Bobby; Welch, Tommy G.

    2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of common range and pasture plants are listed in this publication. The common and scientific name of each species are given, along with the species' value as a grazing plant for wildlife and livestock....

  18. Plant Diagnostic Clinic Services Offered & Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant Diagnostic Clinic Services Offered & Fees Make the Most of a Beneficial Facility Visual without notice. Location Jefferson County Plant Diagnostic Clinic 15200 West 6th Avenue, Unit C Golden, CO

  19. Modeling water use at thermoelectric power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutberg, Michael J. (Michael Jacob)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The withdrawal and consumption of water at thermoelectric power plants affects regional ecology and supply security of both water and electricity. The existing field data on US power plant water use, however, is of limited ...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Plant Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy and ClimateRenewable SystemsRenewable EnergyWind EnergyWind Plant Optimization Wind Plant Optimization swift21 swift20 swift19 swift18 swift17 swift16 swift15 swift14...

  1. BORON MOBILITY IN CASTOR BEAN PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Denis Herisson da; Boaretto, Antonio Enedi; Muraoka, Takashi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil extracted from castor bean (Ricinus communis L. ) seedsthe B distribution in castor bean, as a tropical plant, ismobility of the B in castor bean plant were evaluated in the

  2. Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R. L.; Thoms, R. B.; Johnson, R. O.; Nurmi, J. T.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core samples taken from a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Nebraska, were analyzed for physical and chemical characteristics. Precipitates containing iron and sulfide were present at much higher concentrations in native aquifer materials just upgradient of the PRB than in the PRB itself. Sulfur mass balance on core solids coupled with trends in ground water sulfate concentrations indicates that the average ground water flow after 20 months of PRB operation was approximately twenty fold less than the regional ground water velocity. Transport and reaction modeling of the aquifer PRB interface suggests that, at the calculated velocity, both iron and hydrogen could diffuse upgradient against ground water flow and thereby contribute to precipitation in the native aquifer materials. The initial hydraulic conductivity (K) of the native materials is less than that of the PRB and, given the observed precipitation in the upgradient native materials, it is likely that K reduction occurred upgradient to rather than within the PRB. Although not directly implicated, guar gum used during installation of the PRB is believed to have played a role in the precipitation and flow reduction processes by enhancing microbial activity.

  3. alters plant development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which plant communities Minnesota, University of 8 Signal compounds involved with plant perception and response to microbes alter plant physiological activities and growth of...

  4. Feeding on Phytoestrogens: Implications of Estrogenic Plants for Primate Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasserman, Michael David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Johnson. 2009. The effects of plant defensive chemistry onT. Yokota. 2007. Progesterone: Its occurrence in plants andinvolvement in plant growth. Phytochemistry 68: 1664-1673.

  5. Treated wastewater discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Treated wastewater discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contains plants radically improve the overall quality of the treated wastewa- ter compared to secondary plants

  6. Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolk, C.P.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on plants continued. Topics include: Molecular basis of symbiotic plant-microbe interations; enzymatic mechanisms and regulation of plant cell wall biosynthesis; molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of genes in plants; resistance of plants to environmental stress; studies on hormone biosynthesis and action; plant cell wall proteins; interaction of nuclear and organelle genomes; sensor transduction in plants; molecular mechanisms of trafficking in the plant cell; regulation of lipid metabolism; molecular bases of plant disease resistance mechanisms; biochemical and molecular aspects of plant pathogenesis; developmental biology of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria; environmental control of plant development and its relation to plant hormones.

  7. A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc, Wesley Wai

    be utilized in a steam power plant to produce electricitytemperature reactor. A steam power plant is a large scaleworking fluid. A simple steam power plant is illustrated in

  8. abortion plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at planting time in 2009. Aboveground biomass production, coarse and fine roots, SOC Norton, Jay B. 247 THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of...

  9. aposematic spiny plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at planting time in 2009. Aboveground biomass production, coarse and fine roots, SOC Norton, Jay B. 239 THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of...

  10. antidiabetic plants bauhinia: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at planting time in 2009. Aboveground biomass production, coarse and fine roots, SOC Norton, Jay B. 188 THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of...

  11. aube plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at planting time in 2009. Aboveground biomass production, coarse and fine roots, SOC Norton, Jay B. 262 THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of...

  12. antifungal plant defensins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at planting time in 2009. Aboveground biomass production, coarse and fine roots, SOC Norton, Jay B. 220 THE PLANT BIOLOGY SEMINAR Molecular Plant Biology, Department of...

  13. Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, J.G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Investments to Power Plants J. Koorney, A.H.Efficiency Investments to Power Plants Jonathan Koorney,Pollution, and Avoid Power Plant Construction. Testimony

  14. Goodyear Tire Plant Gains Traction on Energy Savings After Completing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tire Plant saved approximately 93,000 MMBtu and 875,000 annually after increasing steam system energy efficiency in their Union City, Tennessee, plant. Goodyear Tire Plant...

  15. Dirty kilowatts: America's most polluting power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, the US EPA tracked more than 1,400 fossil-fired power plants of varying sizes through its Acid Rain Program. This report ranks each of the 378 largest plants (generating at least 2 million megawatt-hours in 2006) for which both the most recent EPA emissions data and Energy Information Administration (EIA) electric generation data are available. The report ranks each plant based on emission rates, or pounds of pollutant for each megawatt-hour (or million megawatt-hours, in the case of mercury) the plant produced. It ranks the top fifty power plants polluters for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, and mercury. A complete listing of all 378 plants is included as Appendix A. Appendix B contains overheads of an NETL presentation: Tracking new coal-fired power plants - coal's resurgence in electric power generation, 24 January 2007. The 12 states with the heaviest concentrations of the dirtiest power plants, in terms of total tons of carbon dioxide emitted, are: Texas (five, including two of the top 10 dirtiest plants); Pennsylvania (four); Indiana (four, including two of the top 10 dirtiest plants); Alabama (three); Georgia (three, including two of the top three dirtiest plants); North Carolina (three); Ohio (three); West Virginia (three); Wyoming (two); Florida (two); Kentucky (two); and New Mexico (two). Carbon dioxide emissions from power plants are now at roughly 2.5 billion tons per year. Power plants are responsible for about 30%-40% of all man-made CO{sub 2} emissions in the USA. Power plants, especially those that burn coal, are by far the largest single contributor of SO{sub 2} pollution in the United States. Power plant mercury emissions remain steady as compared to previous years. A searchable database ranking 378 U.S. power plants on carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and mercury pollution is available online at http://www.dirtykilowatts.org. 22 refs., 8 tabs., 2 apps.

  16. What You Should Know About Plant Diseases.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, C. Wendell; Smith, Harlan E.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . From 1845 to 1860, plant disease caused a disaster in Irelantl. Late blight struck the potato- yrowing region and turned the fields into a black- ened, rotting mass. A million people diet1 because I the potato crop failed; numerous families.... OTHER CONDITIONS WHICH MAY CAUSE PLANT IN JURY 1. Drying winds 2. Excessive light 3. Excessive lime in the soil 4. Over-use of commercial fertilizer 5. Gas injury PARASITIC OR SAPROPHYTIC PLANTS MISTLETOE-Mistletoe is a parasitic flowering plant...

  17. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Laboratory - January 2014 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2013 Independent Activity Report, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant - July...

  18. ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM ENTRAINMENT IMPACTS Prepared For: California be obvious that large studies like these require the coordinated work of many people. We would first like from the Duke Energy South Bay and Morro Bay power plants and the PG&E Diablo Canyon Power Plant

  19. Steam Plant Conversion Eliminating Campus Coal Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Steam Plant Conversion Eliminating Campus Coal Use at the Steam Plant #12;· Flagship campus region produce 14% of US coal (TN only 0.2%) Knoxville and the TN Valley #12;· UT is one of about 70 U.S. colleges and universities w/ steam plant that burns coal · Constructed in 1964, provides steam for

  20. Maintenance implementation plan for B Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tritt, S.E.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The B Plant facility, is located in the 200 East Area at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. It consists of two major operating areas: the B Plant Canyon Building, and the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The B Plant was originally designed to chemically process spent nuclear fuels. After this initial mission was completed, the plant was modified to provide for the separation of strontium and cesium, individually, from the fission productwaste stream following plutonium and uranium recovery from irradiated reactor fuels in the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX). The recovered, purified, and concentrated strontium and cesium solutions were then transferred to the WESF for conversion to solid compounds, encapsulation, and interim storage. After strontium and cesium removal, the remaining waste was transferred from B Plant to tank farms. B Plantis an operating facility that is required to ensure safe storage And management of the WESF cesium and strontium capsules, as well as a substantial radiological inventory remaining in the plant from previous campaigns. There are currently no production activities at B Plant, but several operating systems are required to accomplish the current B Plant mission.B Plant receives and stores various chemicals from commercial suppliers for treatment of low-level waste generated at WESF and B Plant, generation of demineralized water, and conditioning of water used in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning units. This report describes the maintenance of B Plant, including personnel training and schedules.

  1. Transgenic plants with altered senescence characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amasino, Richard M. (Madison, WI); Gan, Susheng (Lexington, KY); Noh, Yoo-Sun (Madison, WI)

    2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of senescence-specific promoters from plants is described. Using information from the first senescence-specific promoter, SAG12 from Arabidopsis, other homologous promoters from another plant have been identified. Such promoters may be used to delay senescence in commercially important plants.

  2. Author Proof Plants on red alert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Martin

    Author Proof A Plants on red alert: do insects pay attention? H. Martin Schaefer* and Gregor Rolshausen Summary Two recent hypotheses have proposed that non-green plant colouration evolved as a defence against herbi- vores, either as protective colouration promoting handi- cap signals indicating plant

  3. Exploration of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Exploration of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants: Initial Results from ARIES-CS Study Farrokh, see: http://aries.ucsd.edu/ #12;Exploration and Optimization of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants in the context of power plant studies, e.g., particle loss Divertor (location, particle and energy distribution

  4. Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants: Advanced Characterization and Thermodynamic Introduction to Municipal Solid Waste Incineration 2 Chapter 2 Plants Considered and Samples Collected 5 Chapter 3 Mapping of Ash Chemistry in MSWI Plants 8 Chapter 4 Advanced Characterization Methods 12 4

  5. FUSION POWER PLANTS GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    FUSION POWER PLANTS ­ GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES Farrokh Najmabadi Dept. of Electrical for fusion power plants is given and their economic, safety, and environmental features are explored. Concep- tual design studies predict that fusion power plants will be capital intensive and will be used

  6. Plant nuclear bodies Peter J Shaw1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Peter

    Plant nuclear bodies Peter J Shaw1 and John WS Brown2 Knowledge of the organization bodies have been examined in plants, and recently, various other sub-nuclear domains that are involved. Until recently, the only plant nuclear bodies to be in any way characterized were the nucleolus [11

  7. Solar thermionic power plant (II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou-Elfotouh, F.; Almassary, M.; Fatmi, H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that the geometric configuration of a central receiver solar electric power plant (SEPP) can be optimized for the high power density and concentration required for the operation of a thermionic converter. The working period of a Thermionic Diode Converter constructed on the top of a SEPP in Riyadh area is found to be 5 to 6 hours per day in winter and 6 to 8 hours in summer. 17 refs.

  8. Energy Efficiency in Chilling Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Energy Efficiency in Chilling Plants Xin Wang????PhD. CandidateBuilding Energy Research Centre, Tsinghua University2006.10.11 2 Index ? Improve COP of chillers ? Increase load ratio? Decrease cooling water temperature? Increase chilled water... temperature ? Reduce energy use of pumps ? Avoid unexpected bypass flow? Keep Working on higher efficiency point? Optimized VFD control Report of On-site Survey, 2005, 20063 1.1 Improve load ratio ? Characteristic of the centrifugal chillers Decrease...

  9. Nuclear plant irradiated steel handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldfield, W.; Oldfield, F.M.; Lombrozo, P.M.; McConnell, P.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This reference handbook presents selected information extracted from the EPRI reactor surveillance program database, which contains the results from surveillance program reports on 57 plants and 116 capsules. Tabulated data includes radiation induced temperature shifts, capsule irradiation conditions and statistical features of the Charpy V-notch curves. General information on the surveillance materials is provided and the Charpy V-notch energy results are presented graphically.

  10. Plant Level Energy Performance Benchmarking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, T. W.

    then be used to construct models that may act as the basis for assessing individual plant performance relative to a peer group. Database Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey The Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), administered by the EIA....S. economy as defined by the Office of Management and Budget. With a sample size of 22,173 establishments, the MECS was undertaken to represent approximately 250,000 of the largest manufacturing establishments which translates to roughly 98 percent...

  11. Canaigre, The New Tanning Plant.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, H. H.; Adriance, Duncan

    1896-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................ Winkler County... 40 miles west of Houston. Florida.................... 12.0 70 71 Ten months old; grown on black, heavy soil........ Seven^months old; cultivated-................................... 16.5 22.5 72 Twelve months old; cultivated... important con? sideration; the first car load of the root having been shipped in 188? from Tucson, Arizona, by Mr. E. J. Kerr, who has, since that time; be? come largely interested in the commercial development of the cultivated plant. But the Mexicans...

  12. Morris Plant Energy Efficiency Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betczynski, M. T.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . These valves affected the steam balance by leaking steam to lower pressure systems or to the atmosphere. Repairs to these valves enabled improved control of the medium pressure steam systems facility-wide. Since the Morris plant is energy integrated across..., the steam demand of each turbine has decreased, while minimizing deposit formation in the turbines. A facility-wide steam trap testing program was established in 2001. Numerous steam traps were found to be leaking or plugged. Replacement of these traps...

  13. B PLANT DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DODD, E.N.; KERR, N.R.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the documented safety analysis (DSA) and Central Plateau Remediation Project (CP) requirements that apply to surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities at the 221-B Canyon Building and ancillary support structures (B Plant). The document replaces BHI-010582, Documented Safety Analysis for the B-Plant Facility. The B Plant is non-operational, deactivated and undergoing long term S&M prior to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This DSA is compliant with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements.'' The DSA was developed in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) standard DOE-STD-1120-98, Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities (DOE 1998) per Table 2 of 10 CFR 830 Appendix A, DOE Richland Operation Office (RL) direction (02-ABD-0053, Fluor Hanford Nuclear Safety Basis Strategy and Criteria) for facilities in long term S&M, and RL Direction (02-ABD-0091, ''FHI Nuclear Safety Expectations for Nuclear Facilities in Surveillance and Maintenance''). A crosswalk was prepared to identify potential inconsistencies between the previous B Plant safety analysis and DOE-STD-1120-98 guidance. In general, the safety analysis met the criteria of DOE-STD-1120-98. Some format and content changes have been made, including incorporating recent facility modifications and updating the evaluation guidelines and control selection criteria in accordance with RL direction (02-ABD-0053). The facility fire hazard analysis (FHA) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) are appended to this DSA as an aid to the users, to minimize editorial redundancy, and to provide an efficient basis for update.

  14. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (MillionperYear Jan FebSamenuclear power plants,

  15. The 6th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G2 Plants of Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The 6th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G2 Plants of Colorado September 11, 2009 8 am - 4 pm, endangered, candidate, and petitioned plant species. The second symposium, held in Pagosa Springs in 2005, covered the globally critically imperiled (G1) plant species of Colorado that are not federally listed

  16. Plant Characteristics Associated with Natural Enemy Abundance at Michigan Native Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    BEHAVIOR Plant Characteristics Associated with Natural Enemy Abundance at Michigan Native Plants A. K. FIEDLER1 AND D. A. LANDIS Department of Entomology, 204 Center for Integrated Plant Systems populations by providing them with plant resources such as pollen and nectar. Insects are known to respond

  17. Engineered plant biomass feedstock particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H. (Federal Way, WA); Lanning, David N. (Federal Way, WA); Broderick, Thomas F. (Lake Forest Park, WA)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of plant biomass feedstock particles characterized by consistent piece size and shape uniformity, high skeletal surface area, and good flow properties. The particles of plant biomass material having fibers aligned in a grain are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain and defining a substantially uniform distance along the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L. In particular, the L.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers, the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces characterized by crosscut fibers and end checking between fibers, and the L.times.W dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces. The L.times.W surfaces of particles with L/H dimension ratios of 4:1 or less are further elaborated by surface checking between longitudinally arrayed fibers. The length dimension L is preferably aligned within 30.degree. parallel to the grain, and more preferably within 10.degree. parallel to the grain. The plant biomass material is preferably selected from among wood, agricultural crop residues, plantation grasses, hemp, bagasse, and bamboo.

  18. Methods of saccharification of polysaccharides in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, John; Fake, Gina

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Saccharification of polysaccharides of plants is provided, where release of fermentable sugars from cellulose is obtained by adding plant tissue composition. Production of glucose is obtained without the need to add additional .beta.-glucosidase. Adding plant tissue composition to a process using a cellulose degrading composition to degrade cellulose results in an increase in the production of fermentable sugars compared to a process in which plant tissue composition is not added. Using plant tissue composition in a process using a cellulose degrading enzyme composition to degrade cellulose results in decrease in the amount of cellulose degrading enzyme composition or exogenously applied cellulase required to produce fermentable sugars.

  19. Kansas City Plant Celebrates Safety Milestone

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gang of motorcycle riders arrived at the NNSA's Kansas City Plant on July 1 to help celebrate a significant safety achievement - working nearly five million hours, covering a one-year period without a lost-time injury. The bikers -- some of whom are plant employees -- represent Bikers Against Child Abuse, the local nonprofit selected to receive a $5,000 donation as part of the plant's safety achievement celebration. The organization was selected because it aligns with the plant's community outreach focus on Family Safety & Security and partnership with the plant's union members.

  20. Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1986-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

  1. PET Plants: Imaging Natural Processes for Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    PET Plants: Imaging Natural Processes for Renewable Energy from Plants Benjamin A. Babst Goldhaber Postdoctoral Fellow Medical Department Plant Imaging #12;PET imaging for medicine Tumor Diagnosis Biomedical research and plants #12;Brookhaven's Unique Capabilities Movement, distribution, and metabolism

  2. A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc, Wesley Wai

    Plant Production 5000 kg/day Solar Plant Module Cost (with2, which was a solar thermal plant built by the Departmentfor a continuous solar thermochemical plant was modeled and

  3. Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

  4. Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT COMMISSIONDECISION ENERGY COMMISSION Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT GAS TURBINE PLANT SMALL POWER PLANT EXEMPTION DOCKET NO. 06-SPPE-1 The California Energy Commission

  5. Scale Insects on Ornamental Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muegge, Mark A.; Merchant, Michael E.

    2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    of all insect groups. Scale insects are generally small ( 1 /4 inch long or less) and often mimic various plant parts, such as bark and buds. Other species appear as small, white, waxy blotches or small bits of cotton on leaves and stems. The one... crawlers are pre- sent, they will fall onto the paper, where you can eas- ily see them moving about. Using natural enemies to control scales Many natural enemies?small parasitic wasps, lady- bird beetles and some fungi?can significantly reduce scale insect...

  6. PEATGAS pilot plant operating results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biljetina, R.; Punwani, D.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Gas Technology has been developing the PEATGAS process for the conversion of peat to synthetic fuels. A program has recently been completed for the pilot-plant-scale testing of the process. In this scheme, peat is gasified in a two-stage reactor system, which operates at temperatures up to 1750/sup 0/F and pressures up to 500 psig. The process can be controlled to maximize the production of either substitute natural gas (SNG) or liquid hydrocarbons. The technical feasibility of the process was demonstrated in a series of five gasification tests. Highlights of this operating program are presented in this paper.

  7. PEATGAS pilot plant operating results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biljetina, R.; Punwani, D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Gas Technology has been developing the PEATGAS process for the conversion of peat to synthetic fuels. A program has recently been completed for the pilot-plant-scale testing of the process. In this scheme, peat is gasified in a two-stage reactor system, which operates at temperatures up to 1750/sup 0/F and pressures up to 500 psig. The process can be controlled to maximize the production of either substitute natural gas (SNG) or liquid hydrocarbons. The technical feasibility of the process was demonstrated in a series of five gasification tests. Highlights of this operating program are presented in this paper.

  8. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 UFeet)nuclear power plants,

  9. ARM - Lesson Plans: Planting Trees

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMakingPast Sea LevelPlanting

  10. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  11. Dose reduction at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collective dose equivalent at nuclear power plants increased from 1250 rem in 1969 to nearly 54,000 rem in 1980. This rise is attributable primarily to an increase in nuclear generated power from 1289 MW-y to 29,155 MW-y; and secondly, to increased average plant age. However, considerable variation in exposure occurs from plant to plant depending on plant type, refueling, maintenance, etc. In order to understand the factors influencing these differences, an investigation was initiated to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at light water plants. Objectives are to: identify high-dose maintenance tasks and related dose-reduction techniques; investigate utilization of high-reliability, low-maintenance equipment; recommend improved radioactive waste handling equipment and procedures; examine incentives for dose reduction; and compile an ALARA handbook.

  12. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Fort Ord Army Base Site in Marina, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoltenberg, B.; Konz, C.; Mosey, G.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Fort Ord Army Base (FOAB) site in Marina, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  13. Bryan Rubber Plant - International Shoe Company, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, W. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BRYAN RUBBER PLANT - INTERNATIONAL SHOE COhIPANY, INC. \\\\'illis hl. Ponder, P. E. President ACR Energy Engineering, Inc. Austin, Texas ABSTRACT This paper is an energy case study of a failing American manufacturing process suffering from... plant was envisioned alongside the main production building between the original production building and the administration building. The physical plant consists of: MANUFACTURING BUILDING . single story . concrcte floor on one level . walls...

  14. Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII genes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Lam, Hon-Ming (Hong Kong, HK); Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun (Woodside, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the

  15. Reducing Livestock Losses To Toxic Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Machen, Richard V.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    TexasAgriculturalExtensionService The Texas A&M University System Reducing Livestock Losses to Toxic Plants B-1499 Sand Shinnery L Perennial Broomweed Texas Agricultural Extension Service a71 Zerle L. Carpenter, Director a71 The Texas A&M University... ................... ...... ... 6 BehaviorModification.................................. 7 Management Techniques forReducingToxic Plant Losses... 8 LiteratureCited........................................ 9 Poisonous Plants ofTexas...............................10 Editor: Judy Winn...

  16. Reducing Livestock Losses To Toxic Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Machen, Richard V.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    TexasAgriculturalExtensionService The Texas A&M University System Reducing Livestock Losses to Toxic Plants B-1499 Sand Shinnery L Perennial Broomweed Texas Agricultural Extension Service a71 Zerle L. Carpenter, Director a71 The Texas A&M University... ................... ...... ... 6 BehaviorModification.................................. 7 Management Techniques forReducingToxic Plant Losses... 8 LiteratureCited........................................ 9 Poisonous Plants ofTexas...............................10 Editor: Judy Winn...

  17. Molybdenum nutrition of the cotton plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, Jagdish V.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that plants receiving molybdenum exhibited a greater capacity to c?nvert accumulated inorganic phosphorus into ?rgani? phosphorus than those lacking the element. Spencer (?0) pointed out that malybdate is a powerful competitive inhibitor of the acid..., Molybdenum cycle in the soil..................... Representative 30-day-?ld c?tt?n plants ?f the plus and minus molybdenum series* Plants in the right hand beaker are in minus molybdenum s?luti?n. . . . Figure 3* Alcohol s?luble amino acids in leaves...

  18. Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    December, 2014 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Conduct of Maintenance Recovery Plan The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments, within the U.S. Department...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: manufacturing plant factory logic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plant factory logic model Sandia Participated in AMII to Support American-Made Wind-Turbine Blades On December 3, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Materials...

  20. Molecular biology of signal transduction in plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of the 1991 Cold Springs Harbor Meeting entitled Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction in Plants.