National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for arizona portland cement

  1. Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment at the Arizona Portland Cement Plant in Rillito, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen J. Coppinger, P.E.; Bruce Colburn, Ph.D., P.E., CEM

    2007-05-17

    A Department of Energy Plant-wide Assessment was undertaken by Arizona Portland Cement (APC) beginning in May 2005. The assessment was performed at APC’s cement production facility in Rillito, Arizona. The assessment included a compressed air evaluation along with a detailed process audit of plant operations and equipment. The purpose of this Energy Survey was to identify a series of energy cost savings opportunities at the Plant, and provide preliminary cost and savings estimates for the work. The assessment was successful in identifying projects that could provide annual savings of over $2.7 million at an estimated capital cost of $4.3 million. If implemented, these projects could amount to a savings of over 4.9 million kWh/yr and 384,420 MMBtu/year.

  2. Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with portland cement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Meyer; Krishna, Coimbatore R.

    1986-01-01

    Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described.

  3. Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with Portland cement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, M.; Krishna, C.R.

    1984-10-17

    Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of Portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described. 1 tab.

  4. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted

  5. Odor investigation of a Portland cement plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pleus, R.C. [Intertox, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The main concern expressed by Smithville residents is whether the odors they were smelling during odor events were due to chemicals that could cause adverse health effects. Odors were allegedly emanating from the town`s Portland cement plant. The purpose of the study was to measure the ambient air for 20 reduced sulfur, 50 volatile organic compounds, and air samples for olfactometric analysis. Carbonyl sulfide was found to be at a concentration that could create a sense of odor and irritation. This sense of irritation may be due to a physiological response by the central nervous system, and is not associated with any known adverse effects. This physiological response could account for some or all of the irritation experienced by residents during odor events. Comparing chemical concentrations that were detected in air samples to standard and recognized guidelines for acceptable exposure, all measured concentrations were found to be well below the acceptable criteria. From these data the authors conclude that no acute or chronic adverse health effects are expected at the concentrations of the chemicals detected downwind of the cement plant, either routinely or during odor events.

  6. Transcending Portland Cement with 100 percent fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, D.; Akin, M.; Stephens, J.; Cuelh, E.

    2009-07-01

    The use of concrete, made with 100% fly ash and no Portland cement, in buildings at the Transportation Institute in Bozeman, MT, USA, is described. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Arizona

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona

  8. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Saout, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara; Hori, Akihiro; Higuchi, Takayuki; Winnefeld, Frank

    2013-01-15

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C-S-H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA-OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  9. Chromium stabilization chemistry of paint removal wastes in Portland cement and blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boy, J.H.; Race, T.D.; Reinbold, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    The use of cement based systems for solidification and stabilization of hazardous wastes has been proposed. The stabilization of Cr contaminated paint removal wastes in ordinary Portland cement and in a Portland cement and blast furnace slag matrix was investigated. A loading by volume of 75% waste and 25% cement (or cement + slag) was used. The expression of pore solution was utilized to determine the chemical environment encountered by the waste species in the cement matrix. The highly alkaline conditions of ordinary Portland cement determined the stability of the metal species, with Cr being highly soluble. The replacement of 25% of the Portland cement by blast furnace slag was found to decrease the [OH-] of the pore solution resulting in a decrease of the Cr concentration. For cement wastes forms hydrated for 28 days, the Cr concentration decreased in the expressed pore solution. During the TCLP tests the cement waste form and extraction solution were found to react, changing the chemistry of the extraction solution. The expression of pore solution was found to give a direct measure of the chemistry of the waste species in the cement matrix. This avoids the reaction of the TCLP extraction solution with the cement matrix which changes the solubility of the hazardous metals. 15 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Portland cement for SO.sub.2 control in coal-fired power plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Meyer

    1985-01-01

    There is described a method of removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. There is also described the cement products that result from this method.

  11. Portland cement for SO/sub 2/ control in coal-fired power plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, M.

    1984-10-17

    A method is described for removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. The cement products that result from this method is also described. 1 tab.

  12. Permeability of consolidated incinerator facility wastes stabilized with portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.W.

    2000-04-19

    The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as a method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and offgas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as wastewater. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete, and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solutions that do not meet the ETF Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The disposal plan for Ashcrete and special case blowcrete is to bury these containerized waste forms in shallow unlined trenches in E-Area. The WAC for intimately mixed, cement-based wasteforms intended for direct disposal specifies limits on compressive strength and permeability. Simulated waste and actual CIF ash and scrubber solution were mixed in the laboratory and cast into wasteforms for testing. Test results and related waste disposal consequences are given in this report.

  13. Pore size distribution, strength, and microstructure of portland cement paste containing metal hydroxide waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majid, Z.A.; Mahmud, H.; Shaaban, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    Stabilization/solidification of hazardous wastes is used to convert hazardous metal hydroxide waste sludge into a solid mass with better handling properties. This study investigated the pore size development of ordinary portland cement pastes containing metal hydroxide waste sludge and rice husk ash using mercury intrusion porosimetry. The effects of acre and the addition of rice husk ash on pore size development and strength were studied. It was found that the pore structures of mixes changed significantly with curing acre. The pore size shifted from 1,204 to 324 {angstrom} for 3-day old cement paste, and from 956 to 263 {angstrom} for a 7-day old sample. A reduction in pore size distribution for different curing ages was also observed in the other mixtures. From this limited study, no conclusion could be made as to any correlation between strength development and porosity. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Individual and combined effects of chloride, sulfate, and magnesium ions on hydrated Portland-cement paste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poole, T.S.; Wakeley, L.D.; Young, C.L.

    1994-03-01

    Ground water with a high concentration of magnesium ion is known to cause deterioration to portland cement concretes. A proposed mechanism for this deterioration process published previously involves an approximate 1:1 replacement of Ca ions by Mg ions in the crystalline phases of hydrated cement. The current study was undertaken to determine which ions, among magnesium, chloride, and sulfate, cause deterioration; whether their deleterious action is individual or interdependent; and to relate this mechanism of deterioration to the outlook for a 100-yr service life of concretes used in mass placements at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Loss of Ca ion by cement pastes was found to be strongly related to the concentration of Mg ion in simulated ground-water solutions in which the paste samples were aged. This was true of both salt- containing and conventional cement pastes. No other ion in the solutions exerted a strong effect on Ca loss. Ca ion left first from calcium hydroxide in the pastes, depleting all calcium hydroxide by 60 days. Some calcium silicate hydrate remained even after 90 days in the solutions with the highest concentration of Mg ion, while the paste samples deteriorated noticeably. The results indicated a mechanism that involves dissolution of Ca phases and transport of Ca ions to the surface of the sample, followed by formation of Mg-bearing phases at this reaction surface rather than directly by substitution within the microstructure of hydrated cement. Given that calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate are the principal strength-giving phases of hydrated cement, this mechanism indicates the likelihood of significant loss of integrity of a concrete exposed to Mg-bearing ground water at the WIPP. The rate of deterioration ultimately will depend on Mg-ion concentration, the microstructure materials of the concrete exposed to that groundwater, and the availability of brine.

  15. Time-variability of NO{sub x} emissions from Portland cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, L.J. Jr.; May, M.S. III [PSM International, Dallas, TX (United States)] [PSM International, Dallas, TX (United States); Johnson, D.E. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Statistics] [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Statistics; MacMann, R.S. [Penta Engineering, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Penta Engineering, St. Louis, MO (United States); Woodward, W.A. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Statistics] [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Statistics

    1999-03-01

    Due to the presence of autocorrelation between sequentially measured nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) concentrations in stack gas from portland cement kilns, the determination of the average emission rates and the uncertainty of the average has been improperly calculated by the industry and regulatory agencies. Documentation of permit compliance, establishment of permit levels, and the development and testing of control techniques for reducing NO{sub x} emissions at specific cement plants requires accurate and precise statistical estimates of parameters such as means, standard deviations, and variances. Usual statistical formulas such as for the variance of the sample mean only apply if sequential measurements of NO{sub x} emissions are independent. Significant autocorrelation of NO{sub x} emission measurements revealed that NO{sub x} concentration values measured by continuous emission monitors are not independent but can be represented by an autoregressive, moving average time series. Three orders of time-variability of NO{sub x} emission rates were determined from examination of continuous emission measurements from several cement kilns.

  16. Phased-Resolved Strain Measuremetns in Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement Using Synchrotron x-Rays (Prop. 2003-033)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BIernacki, Joseph J.; Watkins, Thomas R; Parnham, C. J.; Hubbard, Camden R; Bai, J.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray diffraction methods developed for the determination of residual stress states in crystalline materials have been applied to study residual strains and strains because of mechanical loading of ordinary portland cement paste. Synchrotron X-rays were used to make in situ measurements of interplanar spacings in the calcium hydroxide (CH) phase of hydrated neat portland cement under uniaxial compression. The results indicate that strains on the order of 1/100 000 can be resolved providing an essentially new technique by which to measure the phase-resolved meso-scale mechanical behavior of cement under different loading conditions. Evaluation of these strain data in view of published elastic parameters for CH suggests that the CH carries a large fraction of the applied stress and that plastic interactions with the matrix are notable.

  17. Incorporation of trace elements in Portland cement clinker: Thresholds limits for Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gineys, N.; Aouad, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Damidot, D.

    2011-11-15

    This paper aims at defining precisely, the threshold limits for several trace elements (Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn) which correspond to the maximum amount that could be incorporated into a standard clinker whilst reaching the limit of solid solution of its four major phases (C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A and C{sub 4}AF). These threshold limits were investigated through laboratory synthesised clinkers that were mainly studied by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The reference clinker was close to a typical Portland clinker (65% C{sub 3}S, 18% C{sub 2}S, 8% C{sub 3}A and 8% C{sub 4}AF). The threshold limits for Cu, Ni, Zn and Sn are quite high with respect to the current contents in clinker and were respectively equal to 0.35, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 wt.%. It appeared that beyond the defined threshold limits, trace elements had different behaviours. Ni was associated with Mg as a magnesium nickel oxide (MgNiO{sub 2}) and Sn reacted with lime to form a calcium stannate (Ca{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}). Cu changed the crystallisation process and affected therefore the formation of C{sub 3}S. Indeed a high content of Cu in clinker led to the decomposition of C{sub 3}S into C{sub 2}S and of free lime. Zn, in turn, affected the formation of C{sub 3}A. Ca{sub 6}Zn{sub 3}Al{sub 4}O{sub 15} was formed whilst a tremendous reduction of C{sub 3}A content was identified. The reactivity of cements made with the clinkers at the threshold limits was followed by calorimetry and compressive strength measurements on cement paste. The results revealed that the doped cements were at least as reactive as the reference cement.

  18. Zinc electrode with cement additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charkey, Allen

    1982-06-01

    A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

  19. Suppression of phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary Portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng-Peng Ye; Fan-Zhong Chen; Yan-Qing Sheng; Guo-Ying Sheng; Jia-Mo Fu

    2006-08-15

    In this study, the effect of suppression on phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated by small scale experiment. A system including sediment, lake water, and several kinds of capping materials was designed to clarify the suppression of phosphate liberation from sediment under the anaerobic condition. The suppression efficiencies of fly ash, OPC and glass bead used as control material were also determined, and these effects were discussed. The suppression efficiency of glass bead was 44.4%, and those of fly ash and OPC were 84.4%, 94.9%, respectively. The suppression by fly ash and OPC was mainly carried out by the adsorption effect, in addition to the covering effect. The suppression efficiency depended on the amounts of the material used, and about 90% of liberated phosphate was suppressed by fly ash of 10.0 Kg m{sup -2}, and OPC of 6.0 Kg m{sup -2}. The concentrations of heavy metals, such as mercury, cadmium, lead, copper, zinc, chromium, silver, arsenic and nickel, in fly ash and OPC were lower than those in the environmental materials. And it was considered that the concentrations of heavy metals in fly ash and OPC were too low to influence the ecosystem in natural water region.

  20. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschner, Florian; Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank; Neubauer, Jrgen

    2013-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the CSH and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the CSH. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the CSH and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: The reaction of quartz powder at 80 C strongly enhances the compressive strength. Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 C was found after 2 days. Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 C correlates with sulphate content of CSH.

  1. Resistance of fly ash-Portland cement blends to thermal shock

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pyatina, Tatiana; Sugama, Toshifumi

    2015-09-11

    Thermal-shock resistance of high-content fly ash-Portland cement blends was tested in the following ways. Activated and non-activated blends with 80-90 % fly ash F (FAF) were left to set at room temperature, then hydrated for 24 hours at 85°C and 24-more hours at 300°C and tested in five thermal-shock cycles (600°C heat - 25°C water quenching). XRD, and thermal gravimetric analyses, along with calorimetric measurements and SEM-EDX tests demonstrated that the activated blends form more hydrates after 24 hours at 300°C, and achieve a higher short-term compressive strength than do non-activated ones. Sodium meta-silicate and sodaash engendered the concomitant hydrationmore » of OPC and FAF, with the formation of mixed crystalline FAF-OPC hydrates and FAF hydrates, such as garranite, analcime, and wairakite, along with the amorphous FAF hydration products. In SS-activated and non-activated blends separate OPC (tobermorite) and FAF (amorphous gel) hydrates with no mixed crystalline products formed. The compressive strength of all tested blends decreased by nearly 50% after 5 thermal-shock test cycles. These changes in the compressive strength were accompanied by a marked decrease in the intensities of XRD patterns of the crystalline hydrates after the thermalshock. As a result, there was no significant difference in the performance of the blends with different activators« less

  2. Resistance of fly ash-Portland cement blends to thermal shock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyatina, Tatiana; Sugama, Toshifumi

    2015-09-11

    Thermal-shock resistance of high-content fly ash-Portland cement blends was tested in the following ways. Activated and non-activated blends with 80-90 % fly ash F (FAF) were left to set at room temperature, then hydrated for 24 hours at 85°C and 24-more hours at 300°C and tested in five thermal-shock cycles (600°C heat - 25°C water quenching). XRD, and thermal gravimetric analyses, along with calorimetric measurements and SEM-EDX tests demonstrated that the activated blends form more hydrates after 24 hours at 300°C, and achieve a higher short-term compressive strength than do non-activated ones. Sodium meta-silicate and sodaash engendered the concomitant hydration of OPC and FAF, with the formation of mixed crystalline FAF-OPC hydrates and FAF hydrates, such as garranite, analcime, and wairakite, along with the amorphous FAF hydration products. In SS-activated and non-activated blends separate OPC (tobermorite) and FAF (amorphous gel) hydrates with no mixed crystalline products formed. The compressive strength of all tested blends decreased by nearly 50% after 5 thermal-shock test cycles. These changes in the compressive strength were accompanied by a marked decrease in the intensities of XRD patterns of the crystalline hydrates after the thermalshock. As a result, there was no significant difference in the performance of the blends with different activators

  3. The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E.; Daniel, J.

    1991-12-31

    The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

  4. The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. ); Daniel, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

  5. Examples of cooler reflective streets for urban heat-island mitigation : Portland cement concrete and chip seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chang, S.-C.; Levinson, R.; Pon, B.

    2003-04-30

    Part of the urban heat island effect can be attributed to dark pavements that are commonly used on streets and parking lots. In this paper we consider two light colored, hence cooler, alternative paving materials that are in actual use in cities today. These are Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and chip seals. We report measurements of the albedos of some PCC and chip sealed pavements in the San Francisco Bay Area. The albedos of the PCC pavements ranged from about 0.18 to 0.35. The temperatures of some PCC pavements are also measured and calculated. We then consider how the albedos of the constituent materials of the PCC (stone, sand and cement) contribute to the albedos of the resulting finished concrete. The albedos of a set of chip sealed pavements in San Jose, CA, were measured and correlated with the times of their placement. It is found that the albedos decrease with age (and use) but remain higher than that of standard asphalt concrete (AC) for about five years. After t hat, the albedos of the chip seals are about 0.12, similar to aged AC. The fact that many PCC pavements have albedos at least twice as high as aged AC suggests that it is possible to have pavement albedos that remain high for many years.

  6. Hydration mechanisms of ternary Portland cements containing limestone powder and fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Weerdt, K.; Haha, M. Ben; Le Saout, G.; Kjellsen, K.O.; Justnes, H.; Lothenbach, B.

    2011-03-15

    The effect of minor additions of limestone powder on the properties of fly ash blended cements was investigated in this study using isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetry (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, and pore solution analysis. The presence of limestone powder led to the formation of hemi- and monocarbonate and to a stabilisation of ettringite compared to the limestone-free cements, where a part of the ettringite converted to monosulphate. Thus, the presence of 5% of limestone led to an increase of the volume of the hydrates, as visible in the increase in chemical shrinkage, and an increase in compressive strength. This effect was amplified for the fly ash/limestone blended cements due to the additional alumina provided by the fly ash reaction.

  7. Normal and refractory concretes for LMFBR applications. Volume 1. Review of literature on high-temperature behavior of portland cement and refractory concretes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazant, Z.P.; Chern, J.C.; Abrams, M.S.; Gillen, M.P.

    1982-06-01

    The extensive literature on the properties and behavior at elevated temperature of portland cement concrete and various refractory concretes was reviewed to collect in concise form the physical and chemical properties of castable refractory concretes and of conventional portland cement concretes at elevated temperature. This survey, together with an extensive bibliography of source documents, is presented in Volume 1. A comparison was made of these properties, the relative advantages of the various concretes was evaluated for possible liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications, and a selection was made of several materials of interest for such applications. Volume 2 concludes with a summary of additional knowledge needed to support such uses of these materials together with recommendations on research to provide that knowledge.

  8. Effects of setting regulators on the efficiency of an inorganic acid based alkali-free accelerator reacting with a Portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maltese, C. . E-mail: Building.lab@mapei.it; Pistolesi, C.; Bravo, A.; Cella, F.; Cerulli, T.; Salvioni, D.

    2007-04-15

    Today, in the field of underground constructions, alkali-free accelerators are commonly employed, during tunnel excavation, to allow flash concrete setting. In this way, the cementitious sprayed material can firmly bond to the tunnel walls, controlling the convergence (the tendency of the section to squeeze). Their efficiency may be related to many parameters like: cement type, setting regulator, concrete composition, working temperature. Nevertheless, the influence of such factors on the accelerator performance has not been clarified yet. The accelerator efficacy is evaluated by real spraying test in job site or, when only laboratory equipment are available, by measuring the final setting times of cement systems admixed with the accelerator. Several alkali-free flash setting admixtures are available on the market. They can be divided into two main categories both containing aluminium sulphate complexes stabilized either by inorganic acids or by organic acids. In this paper, the influence of different setting regulators on the performances of an inorganic acid based alkali-free accelerator was analysed. Portland cement samples were obtained by mixing clinker with gypsum, {alpha}-hemihydrate, {beta}-hemihydrate or anhydrite. The setting regulator instantaneous dissolution rates were evaluated through conductivity measurements. The setting time of cement pastes with and without the accelerator was measured. It was found that the shorter the final setting time (therefore the more efficient is the accelerator) the lower the setting regulator instantaneous dissolution rate. In order to understand this phenomenon, a comparison was performed between accelerated cement paste samples containing the setting regulator with the highest ({beta}-hemihydrate) and the lowest instantaneous dissolution rate (anhydrite). The analytical work included morphological (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy-Field Emission Gun - ESEM-FEG), crystal-chemical (X-Ray Powder Diffraction

  9. Map of Cement Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cement

  10. The use of electrical impedance spectroscopy for monitoring the hydration products of Portland cement mortars with high percentage of pozzolans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, J.M.; Fita, I.C.; Soriano, L.; Pay, J.; Borrachero, M.V.

    2013-08-15

    In this paper, mortars and pastes containing large replacement of pozzolan were studied by mechanical strength, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of metakaolin (35%) and fly ash (60%) was evaluated and compared with an inert mineral addition (andalusite). The portlandite content was measured, finding that the pozzolanic reaction produced cementing systems with all portlandite fixed. The EIS measurements were analyzed by the equivalent electrical circuit (EEC) method. An EEC with three branches in parallel was applied. The dc resistance was related to the degree of hydration and allowed us to characterize plain and blended mortars. A constant phase element (CPE) quantified the electrical properties of the hydration products located in the solidsolution interface and was useful to distinguish the role of inert and pozzolanic admixtures present in the cement matrix.

  11. Arizona - Compare - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Arizona

  12. Arizona - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Arizona

  13. Arizona - Search - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Arizona

  14. Change in pore structure and composition of hardened cement paste...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    To investigate the alteration associated with dissolution, dissolution tests of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydrates were performed. Through observation of the samples after ...

  15. Solar Policy Environment: Portland | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland Solar Policy Environment: Portland This document outlines the policies in place affecting solar deployment. City of Portland's Solar Now Program will pursue solar market ...

  16. Portland Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Data Dashboard Portland Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Portland, Oregon, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Portland Data Dashboard (301.34 KB) More ...

  17. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  18. EA-97-C Portland General Electric | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C Portland General Electric EA-97-C Portland General Electric Order authorizing Portland General Electric to export electic energy to Canada PDF icon EA-97-C Portland General ...

  19. Gila County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Day, Arizona Central Heights-Midland City, Arizona Claypool, Arizona Gisela, Arizona Globe, Arizona Hayden, Arizona Miami, Arizona Payson, Arizona Peridot, Arizona Pine, Arizona...

  20. Pinal County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chuichu, Arizona Coolidge, Arizona Dudleyville, Arizona Eloy, Arizona Florence, Arizona Gold Camp, Arizona Hayden, Arizona Kearny, Arizona Mammoth, Arizona Maricopa, Arizona...

  1. Category:Portland, OR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    72 KB SVSecondarySchool Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVSecondarySchool Port... 70 KB SVSmallHotel Portland OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVSmallHotel Portland ... 69...

  2. Portland, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Portland, Maine: Energy Resources (Redirected from Portland, ME) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.661471, -70.2553259 Show Map Loading map......

  3. Pima County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona Flowing Wells, Arizona Green Valley, Arizona Littletown, Arizona Marana, Arizona Oro Valley, Arizona Picture Rocks, Arizona Pisinemo, Arizona Sahuarita, Arizona Santa Rosa,...

  4. Navajo County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mesa, Arizona Shongopovi, Arizona Shonto, Arizona Show Low, Arizona Snowflake, Arizona Taylor, Arizona Whiteriver, Arizona Winslow West, Arizona Winslow, Arizona Retrieved from...

  5. Apache County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Houck, Arizona Lukachukai, Arizona Many Farms, Arizona McNary, Arizona Nazlini, Arizona Red Mesa, Arizona Rock Point, Arizona Rough Rock, Arizona Round Rock, Arizona Sawmill,...

  6. Investing in Their Future: Portlands Purchase and Conversion...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    round out the inventory. In all, there were more than 60 combinations of fixtures and poles installed around the city prior to the lighting conversion. The Portland Bureau of...

  7. Portland State University Shattuck Hall

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Portland, OR Portland State's Shattuck hall was originally constructed as an elementary school in 1915. In 2007 the university undertook extensive renovations of the building to bring it up to current seismic requirements. In addition to structural improvements, the design team was able to upgraded the building's aging mechanical and electrical systems, upgrade plumbing, and restore the large light wells that bring daylight into the U-shaped building. The resulting building houses Portland State's Architecture department, where students are able to learn from the exposed building systems.

  8. Climate Action Champions: Portland, OR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 1993, Portland became the first local government in the U.S. to adopt a plan for reducing carbon emissions. The current Portland Climate Action Plan was adopted by Portland City Council in 2009. Portland’s overarching climate objective is to reduce emissions to 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050, with an interim goal of a 40 percent reduction by 2030. Portland has reduced emissions by 14 percent as of 2013, through a combination of improved efficiency in buildings, appliances, and vehicles; a shift to lower-carbon energy sources; a focus on a compact urban development pattern; and a rise in walking, biking and transit made possible by shifts in infrastructure investment.

  9. Portland Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summary of Reported Data Portland Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Portland, Oregon. Portland Summary of Reported ...

  10. Spokane Seattle Portland Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spokane Seattle Portland Y a k i m a R i d g e Um tan um Rid ge R a t t l e s n a k e M o u n t a i n G a b l e M o u n t a i n G a b l e B u t t e Sa dd le M ou nt a in s H w y . 2 4 0 Hwy. 24 Hw y. 243 H w y . 2 4 4 0 0 4 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 6 0 0 6 0 0 1106.1 m 4 0 0 4 0 0 6 0 0 6 0 0 821.7 m 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 W h i t e B l u f f s 2 0 0 2 0 0 400 400 200 200 600 600 6 0 0 6 0 0 W h i t e B l u f f s WB10 Ponds S a d d le M o u n ta in L a k e C o l u m b i a R i v e

  11. [Task 1.] Biodenitrification of low nitrate solar pond waters using sequencing batch reactors. [Task 2.] Solidification/stabilization of high strength and biodenitrified heavy metal sludges with a Portland cement/flyash system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, L.; Cook, N.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Mosher, J.; Terry, S.; Canonico, S.

    1995-09-22

    Process wastewater and sludges were accumulated on site in solar evaporation ponds during operations at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant (DOE/RF). Because of the extensive use of nitric acid in the processing of actinide metals, the process wastewater has high concentrations of nitrate. Solar pond waters at DOE/RF contain 300-60,000 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L. Additionally, the pond waters contain varying concentrations of many other aqueous constituents, including heavy metals, alkali salts, carbonates, and low level radioactivity. Solids, both from chemical precipitation and soil material deposition, are also present. Options for ultimate disposal of the pond waters are currently being evaluated and include stabilization and solidification (S/S) by cementation. Removal of nitrates can enhance a wastes amenability to S/S, or can be a unit operation in another treatment scheme. Nitrate removal is also a concern for other sources of pollution at DOE/RF, including contaminated groundwater collected by interceptor trench systems. Finally, nitrate pollution is a problem at many other DOE facilities where actinide metals were processed. The primary objective of this investigation was to optimize biological denitrification of solar pond waters with nitrate concentrations of 300--2,100 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L to below the drinking water standard of 45 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L (10 mg N/L). The effect of pH upon process stability and denitrification rate was determined. In addition, the effect Cr(VI) on denitrification and fate of Cr(VI) in the presence of denitrifying bacteria was evaluated.

  12. Yuma County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Project Places in Yuma County, Arizona Fortuna Foothills, Arizona Gadsden, Arizona San Luis, Arizona Somerton, Arizona Tacna, Arizona Wellton, Arizona Yuma, Arizona...

  13. Cochise County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Douglas, Arizona Huachuca City, Arizona Naco, Arizona Pirtleville, Arizona Sierra Vista Southeast, Arizona Sierra Vista, Arizona St. David, Arizona Tombstone, Arizona...

  14. SSL Demonstration: NE Cully Boulevard, Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-11-01

    GATEWAY program report brief summarizing an SSL street lighting demonstration in a residential area of Portland, OR

  15. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Portland Workshop |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Portland Workshop National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Portland Workshop On December 13, 2011, DOE hosted a regional pre-study workshop in Portland, OR to receive input and suggestions concerning the National Electric Transmission Congestion Study. The workshop flyer, agenda, presentations, and full transcript are available below. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Western Workshops (85.19 KB) 12-13-11 CONGESTION WORKSHOP AGENDA - PORTLAND

  16. Coconino County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sedona, Arizona Supai, Arizona Tonalea, Arizona Tuba City, Arizona Tusayan, Arizona Williams, Arizona Winslow West, Arizona Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  17. Permeability of Consolidated Incinerator Facility Wastes Stabilized with Portland Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.W.

    1999-08-23

    The Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) burns low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes as method of treatment and volume reduction. The CIF generates secondary waste, which consists of ash and off-gas scrubber solution. Currently the ash is stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process. The scrubber solution (blowdown) is sent to the SRS Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for treatment as waste water. In the past, the scrubber solution was also stabilized/solidified in the Ashcrete process as blowcrete and will continue to be treated this way for listed waste burns and scrubber solution that do not meet the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC).

  18. The effect of cure conditions on the stability of cement waste forms after immersion in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siskind, B.; Adams, J.W.; Clinton, J.H.; Piciulo, P.L.; McDaniel, K.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the effects of curing conditions on the stability of cement-solidified ion-exchange resins after immersion in water. The test specimens consisted of partially depleted mixed-bed bead resins solidified in one of three vendor-supplied Portland I cement formulations, in a reference cement formulation, or in a gypsum-based binder formulation. We cured samples prepared using each formulation in sealed containers for periods of 7, 14, or 28 days as well as in air or with an accelerated heat cure prior to 90-day immersion in water. Two cement formulations exhibited apparent Portland-cement-like behavior, i.e., compressive strength increased or stabilized with increasing cure time. Two cement formulations exhibited behavior apparently unlike that of Portland cement, i.e., compressive strength decreased with increasing cure time. Such non-Portland-cement-like behavior is correlated with higher waste loadings. The gypsum-based formulation exhibited approximately constant compressive strength with cure time. Accelerated heat cures may not give compressive strengths representative of real-time cures. Some physical deterioration (cracking, spalling) of the waste form occurs during immersion.

  19. Portland Diversifying Weatherization Workforce | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland Diversifying Weatherization Workforce Portland Diversifying Weatherization Workforce May 6, 2010 - 4:45pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE As Recovery Act funds started flowing towards businesses in Oregon last year, stakeholders in Portland wanted to make sure some of the money landed in the hands of women, minorities and other underrepresented groups. A diverse group in itself, the stakeholders-made up of city officials, labor unions, civil

  20. Portland Company Weatherizes, Preserves Historic Home

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Roy and Kim Fox, owners of a stunning Victorian home in Portland, Oregon, show local residents how to achieve energy efficiency in historic homes without sacrificing vintage character.

  1. Portland, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Portland, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.661471, -70.2553259 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  2. Portland, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titlePortland,Connecticut&oldid...

  3. 2015 Arizona Housing Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 12th annual Arizona Housing Forum provides a platform for affordable housing professionals to network and share ideas to improve and create housing choices for Arizona. Registration is $350.

  4. Global warming impact on the cement and aggregates industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, J. . Geopolymer Inst.)

    1994-06-01

    CO[sub 2] related energy taxes are focusing essentially on fuel consumption, not on actual CO[sub 2] emission measured at the chimneys. Ordinary Portland cement, used in the aggregates and industries, results from the calcination of limestone and silica. The production of 1 ton of cement directly generates 0.55 tons of chemical-CO[sub 2] and requires the combustion of carbon-fuel to yield an additional 0.40 tons of CO[sub 2]. The 1987 1 billion metric tons world production of cement accounted for 1 billion metric tons of CO[sub 2], i.e., 5% of the 1987 world CO[sub 2] emission. A world-wide freeze of CO[sub 2] emission at the 1990 level as recommended by international institutions, is incompatible with the extremely high cement development needs of less industrialized countries. Present cement production growth ranges from 5% to 16% and suggests that in 25 years from now, world cement CO[sub 2] emissions could equal 3,500 million tons. Eco-taxes when applied would have a spectacular impact on traditional Portland cement based aggregates industries. Taxation based only on fuel consumption would lead to a cement price increase of 20%, whereas taxation based on actual CO[sub 2] emission would multiply cement price by 1.5 to 2. A 25--30% minor reduction of CO[sub 2] emissions may be achieved through the blending of Portland cement with replacement materials such as coal-fly ash and iron blast furnace slag.

  5. Re-use of drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) sludge: Characterization and technological behaviour of cement mortars with atomized sludge additions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Husillos Rodriguez, N.; Martinez Ramirez, S.; Blanco Varela, M.T.; Guillem, M.; Puig, J.; Larrotcha, E.; Flores, J.

    2010-05-15

    This paper aims to characterize spray-dried DWTP sludge and evaluate its possible use as an addition for the cement industry. It describes the physical, chemical and micro-structural characterization of the sludge as well as the effect of its addition to Portland cements on the hydration, water demand, setting and mechanical strength of standardized mortars. Spray drying DWTP sludge generates a readily handled powdery material whose particle size is similar to those of Portland cement. The atomized sludge contains 12-14% organic matter (mainly fatty acids), while its main mineral constituents are muscovite, quartz, calcite, dolomite and seraphinite (or clinoclor). Its amorphous material content is 35%. The mortars were made with type CEM I Portland cement mixed with 10 to 30% atomized sludge exhibited lower mechanical strength than the control cement and a decline in slump. Setting was also altered in the blended cements with respect to the control.

  6. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, ...

  7. Portland Street Lighting Report (August 2015) | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Portland Street Lighting Report (August 2015) Portland Street Lighting Report (August 2015) 2015gateway-msslcportland.pdf (840.03 KB) More Documents & Publications OCTOBER 2015 ...

  8. Solar Array on Portland Water Bureau Meter Shop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this photograph, the 12-kilowatt photovoltaic (PV) array is the largest system entirely owned by the City of Portland. Portland is a Solar America City.

  9. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for ...

  10. City of Portland- Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed a streamlined permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. The City of Portland has staff at the...

  11. EA-97-B Portland General Electric Company | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    icon EA-97-B Portland General Electric Company More Documents & Publications EA-380 Freeport Commodities EA-97-D Portland General Electric Company EA-196-A Minnesota Power, Sales

  12. Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2011-11-01

    Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron

  13. Effect of large additions of Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn, to cement raw meal on the composition and the properties of the clinker and the cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murat, M.; Sorrentino, F.

    1996-03-01

    The utilization of hydraulic binders to solidify and to stabilize industrial wastes and municipal garbage is presently recognized as one of the solutions to the problem of environment protection. Te addition of important quantities of Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn to raw meals of Portland and calcium aluminate cement modifies the mineralogical composition and the properties of the final cement. Portland cement can absorb a large amount of Cd and Zn. This absorption leads to an increase of setting time and a decrease of strengths of the cement. It also can trap chromium with a short setting time and high strengths. Calcium aluminate cements easily trap Cd and Cr with a delayed setting and good strength but also Pb with normal setting time and strengths. Large quantities of zinc oxide have a deleterious effect on calcium aluminate strengths.

  14. Graham County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    B. Places in Graham County, Arizona Peridot, Arizona Pima, Arizona Safford, Arizona Swift Trail Junction, Arizona Thatcher, Arizona Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  15. Mohave County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Creek, Arizona Mohave Valley, Arizona Mojave Ranch Estates, Arizona New Kingman-Butler, Arizona Peach Springs, Arizona Willow Valley, Arizona Retrieved from "http:...

  16. Portland, Oregon Climate-Friendly Infrastructure:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland, Oregon Climate-Friendly Infrastructure: Tilikum Crossing, Bridge of the People A White House Climate Action Champions Case Study INDEX Executive Summary...............................2 Climate Action Champion.....................2 Project Spotlight.................................3-5 Co-benefits.............................................6 Challenges and lessons learned...........6 Resources & Contacts............................7 2 Executive Summary The City of Portland's 2015

  17. Portland Public School Children Move with Propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    This 2-page Clean Cities fact sheet describes the use of propane as a fuel source for Portland Public Schools' fleet of buses. It includes information on the history of the program, along with contact information for the local Clean Cities Coordinator and Portland Public Schools.

  18. Study on modification of the high-strength slag cement material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Fusheng . E-mail: fusheng429@163.com; Sun Ruilian; Cui Yingjing

    2005-07-01

    The influence of the slag powder's fineness, the amounts of activator, type and contents of modification addition on the dry-shrinkage and strength of the high-strength slag cement material was investigated. The experimental data showed that adding 9% Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} activator and 10% Portland cement (PC) made the ratios of drying-shrinkage of high-strength slag cement material similar to the ratios of Portland cement and the compressive strengths as higher. The main hydration products are calcium alumina-silicate gels and a little CH; the gel ratio of CaO/SiO{sub 2} is close to 1 and includes a little Na{sub 2}O and MgO for high-strength slag cement material, as shown by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDXA)

  19. Clean Energy Works Portland: A Model For Retrofit Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    How a new weatherization organization in Portland, Oregon has already managed to weatherize 250 homes.

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Arizona

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Arizona Arizona az_map Monument Valley Processing Site Tuba City Disposal

  1. Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trabits, George

    2015-04-20

    After an oil, gas, or geothermal production well has been drilled, the well must be stabilized with a casing (sections of steel pipe that are joined together) in order to prevent the walls of the well from collapsing. The gap between the casing and the walls of the well is filled with cement, which locks the casing into place. The casing and cementing of geothermal wells is complicated by the harsh conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and a chemical environment (brines with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid) that degrades conventional Portland cement. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provided support for the development of fly-ash-modified calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) cement, which offers improved resistance to degradation compared with conventional cement. However, the use of CaP cements involves some operational constraints that can increase the cost and complexity of well cementing. In some cases, CaP cements are incompatible with chemical additives that are commonly used to adjust cement setting time. Care must also be taken to ensure that CaP cements do not become contaminated with leftover conventional cement in pumping equipment used in conventional well cementing. With assistance from GTO, Trabits Group, LLC has developed a zeolite-containing cement that performs well in harsh geothermal conditions (thermal stability at temperatures of up to 300°C and resistance to carbonation) and is easy to use (can be easily adjusted with additives and eliminates the need to “sterilize” pumping equipment as with CaP cements). This combination of properties reduces the complexity/cost of well cementing, which will help enable the widespread development of geothermal energy in the United States.

  2. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Work for Contractors | Department of Energy Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors. Spotlight on Portland (536.02 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives

  3. University of Portland Google Vernier Software + Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sponsors for their support of the bpa science bowl University of Portland Google Vernier Software + Technology Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories B O N N E V I L L E P O W E...

  4. Portland General Electric- Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Portland General Electric's (PGE) Heat Pump Rebate Program offers residential customers a $200 rebate for an energy-efficient heat pump installed to PGE’s standards by a PGE-approved contractor....

  5. Benson, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Act Smart Grid Projects in Benson, Arizona Southwest Transmission Cooperative, Inc. Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Benson, Arizona Arizona Electric Power...

  6. Arizona Electric Power Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona Electric Power Cooperative Jump to: navigation, search Name: Arizona Electric Power Cooperative Place: Benson, Arizona Zip: 85602 Product: AEPCO was originally founded in...

  7. Arizona Solar Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Arizona Solar Center Name: Arizona Solar Center Place: Mesa, Arizona Number of Employees: 1-10 Year Founded: 1999 Website:...

  8. 20th Annual Green Chemistry & Engineering Conference (Portland...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    th Annual Green Chemistry & Engineering Conference (Portland, OR) 20th Annual Green Chemistry & Engineering Conference (Portland, OR) Tue, Jun 14, 2016 2:30pm 14:30 Thu, Jun 16, ...

  9. EA-97-D Portland General Electric Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D Portland General Electric Company EA-97-D Portland General Electric Company Order authorizing PGE to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-97-D PGE (CN).pdf More ...

  10. Promoting High-Performance Homes to Portland Real Estate Pros

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two Portland, Oregon-based Better Buildings Residential Network members—the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability and Clean Energy Works (CEW)—are supporting Earth Advantage’s...

  11. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group: Welcome to Portland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers welcoming attendees to Portland at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  12. Portland Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary of Reported Data Portland Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Portland, Oregon. Portland Summary of Reported Data (873.83 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Summary of Reported Data From July 1, 2010 - September 30, 2013 Energize New York Summary of Reported Data Maryland Summary of Reported Data

  13. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Portland, OR, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  14. Portland Advancing Green Image With Solar Installs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A quick Internet search reveals that many sources consider Portland, Ore., to be one of the most green-minded cities in the United States. But large upfront costs have been a barrier for citizens looking to install solar power systems in the past. Now, a neighborhood solar initiative is helping communities organize to get solar discounts, meaning the city could become even greener.

  15. QER- Comment of Portland General Electric

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks, Karen. As per our email exchange earlier this week, we're attaching prepared comments from PGE to support the statement Jim Piro offered at the QER public meeting in Portland this past summer. We appreciate your flexibility on the submission deadline! Please let me know if you need anything else from us.

  16. Corrosion of aluminium metal in OPC- and CAC-based cement matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, Hajime; Swift, Paul; Utton, Claire; Carro-Mateo, Beatriz; Collier, Nick; Milestone, Neil

    2013-08-15

    Corrosion of aluminium metal in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based pastes produces hydrogen gas and expansive reaction products causing problems for the encapsulation of aluminium containing nuclear wastes. Although corrosion of aluminium in cements has been long known, the extent of aluminium corrosion in the cement matrices and effects of such reaction on the cement phases are not well established. The present study investigates the corrosion reaction of aluminium in OPC, OPC-blast furnace slag (BFS) and calcium aluminate cement (CAC) based systems. The total amount of aluminium able to corrode in an OPC and 4:1 BFS:OPC system was determined, and the correlation between the amount of calcium hydroxide in the system and the reaction of aluminium obtained. It was also shown that a CAC-based system could offer a potential matrix to incorporate aluminium metal with a further reduction of pH by introduction of phosphate, producing a calcium phosphate cement.

  17. Use of X-ray diffraction to quantify amorphous supplementary cementitious materials in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snellings, R.; Salze, A.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-10-15

    The content of individual amorphous supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements was quantified by the PONKCS [1] X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The analytical precision and accuracy of the method were assessed through comparison to a series of mixes of known phase composition and of increasing complexity. A 2σ precision smaller than 2–3 wt.% and an accuracy better than 2 wt.% were achieved for SCMs in mixes with quartz, anhydrous Portland cement, and hydrated Portland cement. The extent of reaction of SCMs in hydrating binders measured by XRD was 1) internally consistent as confirmed through the standard addition method and 2) showed a linear correlation to the cumulative heat release as measured independently by isothermal conduction calorimetry. The advantages, limitations and applicability of the method are discussed with reference to existing methods that measure the degree of reaction of SCMs in blended cements.

  18. Arizona/Transmission/Agency Links | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Fish Department Arizona State Historic Preservation Office Arizona Department of Transportation Arizona Department of Agriculture Arizona Department of Water Resources Central...

  19. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) | Department of Energy Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Portland, OR, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case

  20. Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings | Department of Energy - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incentives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings. Spotlight

  1. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  2. Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage ...

  3. South Portland, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    South Portland, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.6414716, -70.2408811 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  4. City of Portland - Green Building Policy and LEED Certification...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Website http:www.portlandonline.combpsindex.cfm?c41701 State Oregon Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Summary In 2001, the City of Portland adopted a...

  5. Arizona City, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.7558935, -111.6709584 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  6. Waste tires as auxiliary fuel for cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodds, J.

    1987-01-01

    The subject I have been asked to speak about is the utilization of scrap tires as an auxiliary fuel for cement kilns. My experience with scrap tires began five years ago when we performed a technical and economic evaluation for tire pyrolysis. I work for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory which is supported by the Department of Energy. My interest in scrap tires continued; in 1984 the Department of Energy and the Portland Cement Association jointly sponsored a conference on the utilization of scrap tires in cement kilns. Most of my remarks today are based upon that conference along with some current information in the US. Mr. Sladek requested that I speak on the combustion process, the progress to date, and the factors that impede or encourage implementation of using scrap tires in cement kilns. For discussion purposes it would help if we had a common understanding of the cement manufacturing process. Cement is made by heating a mixture of finely ground limestone and silica from clay or sand to about 1450/degree/C in a large rotating kiln. The heat causes the limestone to decarbonate and subsequently react with the silica to form calcium silicates. 5 figs.

  7. History and some potentials of oil shale cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knutson, C.F.; Smith, R.P.; Russell, B.F. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The utilization of oil shale as a cement component is discussed. It was investigated in America and Europe during World War I. Additional development occurred in Western Europe, Russia, and China during the 1920s and 1930s. World War II provided further development incentives and a relatively mature technology was in place in Germany, Russia, and China prior to 1980. The utilization of oil shale in cement has taken a number of different paths. One approach has been to utilize the energy in the oil shale as the principal source for the cement plant and to use the combusted shale as a minor constituent of the plant's cement product. A second approach has been to use the combusted shale as a class C or cementitious fly-ash component in portland cement concrete. Other approaches utilizing eastern oil shale have been to use the combusted oil shale with additives as a specialty cement, or to cocombust the oil shale with coal and utilize the sulfur-rich combustion product.

  8. Wellbore cement fracture evolution at the cement–basalt caprock interface during geologic carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Um, Wooyong; Martin, Paul F.; Dahl, Michael E.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Varga, Tamas; Stephens, Sean A.; Arey, Bruce W.; Carroll, KC; Bonneville, Alain; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2014-08-01

    Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock cores with fractures, as well as neat Portland cement columns, were prepared to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores with defects during geologic carbon sequestration. The samples were reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50 ºC and 10 MPa for 3 months under static conditions, while one cement-basalt core was subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. Micro-XRD and SEM-EDS data collected along the cement-basalt interface after 3-month reaction with CO2-saturated groundwater indicate that carbonation of cement matrix was extensive with the precipitation of calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, whereas the alteration of basalt caprock was minor. X-ray microtomography (XMT) provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnection of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling further revealed that this stress led to the increase in fluid flow and hence permeability. After the CO2-reaction, XMT images displayed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along the fracture located at the cement-basalt interface. The 3-D visualization and CFD modeling also showed that the precipitation of calcium carbonate within the cement fractures after the CO2-reaction resulted in the disconnection of cement fractures and permeability decrease. The permeability calculated based on CFD modeling was in agreement with the experimentally determined permeability. This study demonstrates that XMT imaging coupled with CFD modeling represent a powerful tool to visualize and quantify fracture evolution and permeability change in geologic materials and to predict their behavior during geologic carbon sequestration or hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production and enhanced geothermal systems.

  9. Energy Exchange 2015: Phoenix, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentations from Energy Exchange, a two-and-a-half day training scheduled for August 11-13, 2015, at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona.

  10. Grecycle Arizona LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Grecycle Arizona LLC Place: Tucson, Arizona Product: Biodiesel producer out of cooking oil that operates a 1.2m liter plant in Tucson, Arizona....

  11. Phoenix, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Phoenix is a city in Maricopa County, Arizona. It falls under Arizona's 2nd congressional district and Arizona's 3rd congressional...

  12. Arizona State Land Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Department Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Arizona State Land Department Name: Arizona State Land Department Abbreviation: ASLD Address: 1616 W. Adams St. Place: Phoenix, AZ Zip:...

  13. Arizona State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Arizona State University Place: Tempe, Arizona Zip: 85287 Website: asu.edu Coordinates: 33.4183159, -111.9311939 Show Map Loading...

  14. Energy Department, Arizona Utilities Announce Transmission Infrastruct...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    County, Arizona, and runs southeast to the ED5 Substation in Pinal County, Arizona. ... Area Power Administration Transmission Substation Federal Agencies to Assist with Clean ...

  15. Geothermal energy in Arizona. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, C.; Witcher, J.C.

    1982-09-01

    Current knowledge and basic data on geothermal resources in Arizona are compiled. The following are covered: specific area investigations, thermal aspects of Arizona, and exploration methods. (MHR)

  16. Phoenix, Arizona Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Data Dashboard Phoenix, Arizona Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Phoenix, Arizona, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Phoenix Data Dashboard (300.58 KB) ...

  17. Arizona/Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Incentive Incentive Type Active APS - Energy Efficiency Solutions for Business (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Yes APS - GEOSmart Financing Program (Arizona) Utility Loan Program...

  18. Arizona Corporation Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commission Jump to: navigation, search Name: Arizona Corporation Commission Abbreviation: ACC Service Territory: Arizona Website: www.azcc.gov EIA Form 861 Data This article is a...

  19. Arizona Solar Tech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tech Jump to: navigation, search Name: Arizona Solar Tech Place: Phoenix, Arizona Zip: 85040 Sector: Solar, Vehicles Product: Designs and installs solar PV systems for vehicles,...

  20. Arizona Administrative Code | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona Administrative Code Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Arizona Administrative CodeLegal Abstract This...

  1. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  2. MECS 2006- Cement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Cement (NAICS 327310) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  3. Experimental study of potential wellbore cement carbonation by various phases of carbon dioxide during geologic carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

    2013-08-16

    Hydrated Portland cement was reacted with carbon dioxide (CO2) in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases to understand the potential cement alteration processes along the length of a wellbore, extending from deep CO2 storage reservoir to the shallow subsurface during geologic carbon sequestration. The 3-D X-ray microtomography (XMT) images displayed that the cement alteration was significantly more extensive by CO2-saturated synthetic groundwater than dry or wet supercritical CO2 at high P (10 MPa)-T (50C) conditions. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis also exhibited a systematic Ca depletion and C enrichment in cement matrix exposed to CO2-saturated groundwater. Integrated XMT, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses identified the formation of extensive carbonated zone filled with CaCO3(s), as well as the porous degradation front and the outermost silica-rich zone in cement after exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater. The cement alteration by CO2-saturated groundwater for 2-8 months overall decreased the porosity from 31% to 22% and the permeability by an order of magnitude. Cement alteration by dry or wet supercritical CO2 was slow and minor compared to CO2-saturated groundwater. A thin single carbonation zone was formed in cement after exposure to wet supercritical CO2 for 8 months or dry supercritical CO2 for 15 months. Extensive calcite coating was formed on the outside surface of a cement sample after exposure to wet gaseous CO2 for 1-3 months. The chemical-physical characterization of hydrated Portland cement after exposure to various phases of carbon dioxide indicates that the extent of cement carbonation can be significantly heterogeneous depending on CO2 phase present in the wellbore environment. Both experimental and geochemical modeling results suggest that wellbore cement exposure to supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases of CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration is unlikely to damage the wellbore

  4. The use of scrap tires in rotary cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, M.

    1996-12-31

    The use of scrap tires as a supplemental fuel in the United States Portland cement industry has increased significantly in the past six years. In 1990, there were two kilns using tire-derived fuel (TDF), today 30 kilns use TDF. The outlook for continued and expanded use of TDF in the U.S. cement industry should be considered favorable, with 15 kilns conducting tests to determine TDF`s applicability or in the permitting process. The Council`s estimates are that by the end of 1996, the cement industry could be consuming some 75-100 million of the 253 million annually generated scrap tires in the United States. This level of TDF usage will make the cement industry the largest market segments for scrap tires in the United States. While the long-term outlook is at present positive, there are a series of factors that have, and will likely continue to adversely impact the near-term usage of TDF. These issues, as well as the factors that are likely to positively impact the cement kiln TDF market are the subject of this presentation.

  5. The role of calcium ions and lignosulphonate plasticiser in the hydration of cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grierson, L.H.; Knight, J.C.; Maharaj, R

    2005-04-01

    Experiments involving equilibrium dialysis, conductivity, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) have been carried out to investigate the role of calcium ions and polymeric plasticisers in cement/admixture hydration. Results from a study of lignosulphonic acid, sodium salt, acetate as a plasticiser shows that a plasticiser has dual role; one mainly as a kinetic inhibitor (poison) in cement hydration mechanism and the other as a dispersant. Evidence of a weak Ca{sup 2+} binding to lignosulphonate sulphonic moieties was found at low ionic strengths of 0.1 M using ITC. No evidence of formal Ca{sup 2+} binding to lignosulphonate sulphonic acid moieties was found using equilibrium dialysis at higher ionic strength of 1 M (ionic strengths of 0.4 M are typically found in Portland cement pore solution), as is often suggested in cement/admixture literature.

  6. Determination of Diffusion Profiles in Altered Wellbore Cement Using X-ray Computed Tomography Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Harris E.; Walsh, Stuart D. C.; DuFrane, Wyatt L.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-06-17

    The development of accurate, predictive models for use in determining wellbore integrity requires detailed information about the chemical and mechanical changes occurring in hardened Portland cements. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) provides a method that can nondestructively probe these changes in three dimensions. Here, we describe a method for extracting subvoxel mineralogical and chemical information from synchrotron XRCT images by combining advanced image segmentation with geochemical models of cement alteration. The method relies on determining effective linear activity coefficients (ELAC) for the white light source to generate calibration curves that relate the image grayscales to material composition. The resulting data set supports the modeling of cement alteration by CO2-rich brine with discrete increases in calcium concentration at reaction boundaries. The results of these XRCT analyses can be used to further improve coupled geochemical and mechanical models of cement alteration in the wellbore environment.

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  8. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  9. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  10. Arizona Oil and Gas Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commission Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Arizona Oil and Gas Commission Name: Arizona Oil and Gas Commission Address: 416 W. Congress Street, Suite 100 Place: Arizona Zip:...

  11. EA-108 Arizona Public Service Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-108 Arizona Public Service Company Order authorizing Arizona Public Service to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-108 Arizona Public Service.pdf More Documents & ...

  12. Arizona Solar Energy Industries Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona Solar Energy Industries Association Name: Arizona Solar Energy Industries Association Place: Arizona Website: www.arizonasolarindustry.org Coordinates: 34.0489281,...

  13. Arizona's 7th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Arizona's 7th congressional district Agenera, LLC Amereco Biofuels Corp Arizona Public Service Company APS Arizona Solar Tech EDGE Energy LLC EGreenIdeas Ecotality North...

  14. Arizona's 4th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Arizona's 4th congressional district Agenera, LLC Amereco Biofuels Corp Arizona Public Service Company APS Arizona Solar Tech EDGE Energy LLC EGreenIdeas Ecotality North...

  15. Arizona's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Arizona's 2nd congressional district Agenera, LLC Amereco Biofuels Corp Arizona Public Service Company APS Arizona Solar Tech EDGE Energy LLC EGreenIdeas Ecotality North...

  16. Yavapai County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EV Solar Products Energy Generation Facilities in Yavapai County, Arizona Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Places in Yavapai County, Arizona Ash Fork, Arizona...

  17. Sunshine Arizona Wind Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sunshine Arizona Wind Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sunshine Arizona Wind Energy LLC Place: Flagstaff, Arizona Zip: 86001 Sector: Wind energy Product: Formed to...

  18. Arizona Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district. For more information, please visit the High School Coach page. Arizona Region High School Regional Arizona Arizona...

  19. Arizona Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    for your school's state, county, city, or district. For more information, please visit the Middle School Coach page. Arizona Region Middle School Regional Arizona Arizona...

  20. Arizona Department of Environmental Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Name: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Abbreviation: ADEQ Address: 1110 West Washington Street Phoenix, Arizona 85007 Place:...

  1. Northern Arizona University Wind Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Arizona University Wind Projects (Redirected from Northern Arizona University Wind Project) Jump to: navigation, search Northern Arizona University ARD Wind Project...

  2. Phoenix, Arizona Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary of Reported Data Phoenix, Arizona Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Phoenix, Arizona. Phoenix, Arizona ...

  3. DOE Publishes GATEWAY Report on Portland's LED Streetlight Conversion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    matters, and the Portland Bureau of Transportation was an early investigator of LED street lighting and one of the first public agencies to join DOE's Municipal Solid-State Street ...

  4. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Palo Verde Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","3,937","31,200",100.0,"Arizona Public Service Co" "1 Plant 3 ...

  5. NREL: Technology Deployment - Portland, Oregon Grassroots Solarize Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drives Down Solar Prices 30% Portland, Oregon Grassroots Solarize Campaign Drives Down Solar Prices 30% News Watch a video on the Solarize movement Pallets of PV: Communities Purchase Solar and Drive Down Costs Together Solarize Portland Solarize New York Solarize Connecticut Solarize Massachusetts Solarize Washington Publications The Solarize Guidebook: A Community Guide to Collective Purchasing of Residential PV Systems Powering Your Community With Solar: Overcoming Market and

  6. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweigh cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary surface pipe and intermediate casing cementing conditions historically encountered in the US and establishment of average design conditions for ULHS cements. Russian literature concerning development and use of ultra-lightweight cements employing either nitrogen or ULHS was reviewed, and a summary is presented. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was conducted to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS. This protocol is presented and discussed. finally, results of initial testing of ULHS cements is presented along with analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project.

  7. Geochemical and Geomechanical Effects on Wellbore Cement Fractures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Experimental studies were conducted using batch reactors, X-ray microtomograpy (XMT), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to determine changes in cement fracture surfaces, fluid flow pathways, and permeability with geochemical and geomechanical processes. Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock core with artificial fractures was prepared and reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50°C and 10 MPa for 3 to 3.5 months under static conditions to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores containing defects. Cement-basalt interface samples were subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. XMT provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnectionmore » of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. After the CO2 reaction, XMT images revealed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along fractures located at the cement-basalt interface. The permeability calculated based on CFD simulation was in agreement with the experimentally measured permeability. The experimental results imply that the wellbore cement with fractures is likely to be healed during exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater under static conditions, whereas fractures along the cement-caprock interface are still likely to remain vulnerable to the leakage of CO2. CFD simulation for the flow of different fluids (CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2) using a pressure difference of 20 kPa and 200 kPa along ~2 cm-long cement fractures showed that a pressure gradient increase resulted in an increase of CO2 fluids flux by a factor of only ~3-9 because the friction of CO2 fluids on cement fracture surfaces increased with higher flow rate as well. At the same pressure gradient, the simulated flow rate was higher for supercritical CO2 than CO2-saturated brine by a factor of only ~2-3, because the viscosity of supercritical CO2 is

  8. Geochemical and Geomechanical Effects on Wellbore Cement Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Experimental studies were conducted using batch reactors, X-ray microtomograpy (XMT), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to determine changes in cement fracture surfaces, fluid flow pathways, and permeability with geochemical and geomechanical processes. Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock core with artificial fractures was prepared and reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50°C and 10 MPa for 3 to 3.5 months under static conditions to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores containing defects. Cement-basalt interface samples were subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. XMT provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnection of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. After the CO2 reaction, XMT images revealed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along fractures located at the cement-basalt interface. The permeability calculated based on CFD simulation was in agreement with the experimentally measured permeability. The experimental results imply that the wellbore cement with fractures is likely to be healed during exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater under static conditions, whereas fractures along the cement-caprock interface are still likely to remain vulnerable to the leakage of CO2. CFD simulation for the flow of different fluids (CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2) using a pressure difference of 20 kPa and 200 kPa along ~2 cm-long cement fractures showed that a pressure gradient increase resulted in an increase of CO2 fluids flux by a factor of only ~3-9 because the friction of CO2 fluids on cement fracture surfaces increased with higher flow rate as well. At the same pressure gradient, the simulated flow rate was higher for supercritical CO2 than CO2-saturated brine by a factor of only ~2-3, because the viscosity of supercritical CO2 is much

  9. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  10. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.I.; Mishulovich, A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. Currently only about 30% of the 5 million tons of these coal combustion residues generated in Illinois each year are utilized, mainly as aggregate. These residues are composed largely Of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. The process being developed in this program will use the residues directly in the manufacture of cement products. Therefore, a much larger amount of residues can be utilized. To achieve the above objective, in the first phase (current year) samples of coal combustion residues will be blended and mixed, as needed, with a lime or cement kiln dust (CKD) to adjust the CaO composition. Six mixtures will be melted in a laboratory-scale furnace at CTL. The resulting products will then be tested for cementitious properties. Two preliminary blends have been tested. One blend used fly ash with limestone, while the other used fly ash with CKD. Each blend was melted and then quenched, and the resulting product samples were ground to a specific surface area similar to portland cement. Cementitious properties of these product samples were evaluated by compression testing of 1-inch cube specimens. The specimens were formed out of cement paste where a certain percentage of the cement paste is displaced by one of the sample products. The specimens were cured for 24 hours at 55{degrees}C and 100% relative humidity. The specimens made with the product samples obtained 84 and 89% of the strength of a pure portland cement control cube. For comparison, similar (pozzolanic) materials in standard concrete practice are required to have a compressive strength of at least 75% of that of the control.

  11. Active mines in Arizona and Arizona exploration offices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book is a directory that lists 91 mining operations and 107 sand and gravel operations. It lists the company name, address, key personnel, mine, mill, or smelter location, and a description of the operation. A map plotting the locations of all the active mines is also available ($2). Arizona Exploration Offices is a directory that lists 68 exploration companies in Arizona, 80% of whom list gold or silver as their principal exploration target. Other exploration companies are searching for industrial minerals, uranium, beryllium, rare earths, ferroalloys, and sulfur.

  12. Flagstaff, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Flagstaff is a city in Coconino County, Arizona. It falls under Arizona's 1st congressional district.12 Contents 1 Registered...

  13. Arizona Power Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona Power Authority Place: Arizona Phone Number: 602-368-4265 Website: www.powerauthority.org Outage Hotline: 602-368-4265 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

  14. Chemical Reactions of Portland Cement with Aqueous CO2 and their...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Li, Q. ; Lim, Yun Mook ; Flores, Kathy ; Kranjc, Kelly ; Jun, Young-Shin Publication Date: 2015-05-19 OSTI Identifier: 1210712 DOE Contract Number: AC02-05CH11231 Resource ...

  15. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  16. Energy Incentive Programs, Arizona | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arizona Energy Incentive Programs, Arizona Updated February 2015 What public-purpose-funded energy efficiency programs are available in my state? Arizona's restructuring law provides for a systems benefits charge (SBC) to fund energy efficiency programs. The SBC is collected through a non-bypassable surcharge on electricity bills. Although some of these funds have been devoted to renewable energy programs, in 2013 Arizona utilities budgeted over $160 million to promote energy efficiency and load

  17. Arizona: Building Smart from the Start

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-06-01

    A fact sheet that describes Arizona's Housing Tax Credit Program, to make sure houses were built more efficiently.

  18. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  19. Portland Company to Receive $1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland Company to Receive 1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Technologies Portland Company to Receive 1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Technologies September 15, 2009 -...

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  1. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland, Oregon Includes case studies on: * Increasing Market Demand: The Solar Now! Campaign * Streamlining City Regulations * Integrating Solar into City Planning and Facilities October 2011 Solar in Action Portland was designated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on June 20, 2007, as a Solar America City. Portland has worked toward, and in many ways, achieved, a reputation as one of the country's leading cities in sustainability. This is due in part to Portland being the first U.S. city

  2. Characterization using thermomechanical and differential thermal analysis of the sinterization of Portland clinker doped with CaF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, O.; Torres-Castillo, A.; Flores-Velez, L.M.; Torres, R.

    2010-04-15

    In this work, the sintering process of Portland cement was studied by combining thermomechanical analysis (TMA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), together with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal analysis results employing both techniques indicted that phase transformations appeared at lower temperatures when CaF{sub 2} was incorporated in the raw materials. Besides, it was observed at high temperature that in some phase transformations TMA conducts to better resolution compared with the DTA measurements. Furthermore, mechanical properties and X-ray diffraction patterns corroborate the TMA and DTA results, corroborating that the final amount of alite (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}) is higher when a certain amount of CaF{sub 2} was present during the clinkerization process.

  3. Tribal Water in Arizona Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Law Seminars International is hosting the Tribal Water in Arizona: New Development for Indian Water Rights, Regulations, and Settlement Processes. The two-day conference will present an overview of the law governing tribal water rights and impacting the development of tribal water projects.

  4. Clean Energy Works Portland Pilot Process Evaluation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This is a document from Research Into Action Inc., posted to the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Clean Energy Works Portland Pilot Process Evaluation (2.22 MB) More Documents & Publications Data Collection and Analysis Oregon Recovery Act State Memo Primer on Clean Energy Lending: The Major Components and Options

  5. Recovery Act State Memos Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Arizona For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION

  6. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Arizona | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arizona Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Arizona Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Arizona. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 20, 2016 CX-100662 Categorical Exclusion Determination Thermally Conductive Backsheets (TCB) for Reduced Operating Temperatures Award Number: DE-EE0007138 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Building Technologies Office Date: 7/12/2016 Location(s): AZ Office(s): Golden Field Office July 20, 2016 CX-100660 Categorical Exclusion Determination

  7. Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Monument Valley, Arizona. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Description and History The Monument Valley processing site is located on the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona, approximately 15 miles south of Mexican Hat, Utah, on the west side of Cane Valley. A uranium-ore

  8. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  9. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-06-16

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the tenth quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in test specimen erosion that was unacceptable. A different expansion procedure is being evaluated. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The testing program initiated in November produced questionable initial results so the procedure was modified slightly and the testing was reinitiated. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but questionable data were obtained from several of the compositions. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement are being implemented and testing is ongoing.

  10. Arizona Teachers Prepare Students for Green Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Students led by their building trades teacher , are wiring parts of the Raymond S. Kellis High School in Glendale, Arizona for solar power.

  11. Flagstaff, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona Wind Energy LLC References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) US Census Bureau...

  12. Arizona/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic SearchQuerying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Arizona...

  13. Tucson, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Tucson, Arizona Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG Ethanol Capital Management Expert Solar Systems General Plasma Inc Genesis Solar LLC GeoInnovation Global...

  14. Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's AZPDES Website...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AZPDES Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's AZPDES Website Abstract This website...

  15. Williams, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Williams, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2494566, -112.1910031 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  16. Prescott, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    district.12 Energy Generation Facilities in Prescott, Arizona Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and...

  17. Arizona Indian Gaming Association (AIGA) Expo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This year’s EXPO will take place November 5-7, 2014 at the Radisson Fort McDowell Resort & Casino located in Scottsdale, Arizona.

  18. ARIZONA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Arizona has substantial natural resources, including coal, solar, and hydroelectric resources. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment ...

  19. Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Individual Permits...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Individual Permits Website Abstract This website contains information...

  20. Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's General Permits...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's General Permits Website Abstract This website provides information...

  1. Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Application Forms...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Application Forms and Guidance Website Abstract This site contains forms...

  2. Burnside, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Burnside, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.7511228, -109.6245514 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  3. Summit, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Summit, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.0670238, -110.9514796 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  4. Cameron, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.8758285, -111.4129207 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  5. Ganado, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ganado, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.7114022, -109.5420492 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  6. Avondale, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Avondale, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.4355977, -112.3496021 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  7. Jerome, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.7489107, -112.1137716 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  8. Northern Arizona University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northern Arizona University Place: Flagstaff, AZ Zip: 86011 Phone Number: 928-523-0715 Website: nau.edu Coordinates: 35.1905403,...

  9. Littletown, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Littletown, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.1303561, -110.8728658 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  10. Peoria, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Peoria, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.5805955, -112.2373779 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  11. Springerville, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springerville, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.1333799, -109.2859196 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  12. Surprise, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surprise, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.6305938, -112.333216 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  13. Cottonwood, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.7391876, -112.0098791 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  14. Maricopa, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.0581063, -112.0476423 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  15. Kaibab, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kaibab, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.896652, -112.7407596 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  16. Coolidge, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coolidge, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.977839, -111.517624 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  17. Gadsden, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gadsden, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.5544974, -114.7849577 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  18. Whetstone, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Whetstone, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.701705, -110.340746 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  19. Chinle, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chinle, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.1544483, -109.5526072 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  20. Blackwater, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blackwater, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.0311702, -111.582627 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  1. Vail, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.0478583, -110.7120272 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  2. Cornville, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cornville, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.7177989, -111.9215438 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  3. Tsaile, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tsaile, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.303712, -109.214705 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  4. Wilhoit, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wilhoit, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.4258586, -112.5868398 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  5. Mountainaire, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountainaire, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0852924, -111.6659925 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  6. Kingman, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.189443, -114.0530065 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goog...

  7. Oracle, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oracle, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.6109054, -110.7709348 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  8. Fredonia, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.945542, -112.5265889 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goog...

  9. Chuichu, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chuichu, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.752002, -111.7831837 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  10. Sahuarita, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sahuarita, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.9575818, -110.955646 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  11. Tortolita, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tortolita, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.4005302, -111.0400795 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  12. Sacaton, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sacaton, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.0767225, -111.7392993 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  13. Moenkopi, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Moenkopi, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.1111043, -111.2223624 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  14. Paulden, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Paulden, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.8855756, -112.4682271 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  15. Parks, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Parks, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2605664, -111.9487743 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  16. Arizona Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    12312015 Next Release Date: 01292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Used for Repressuring Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Used for Repressuring...

  17. Tacna, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tacna, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.6975472, -113.9535427 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  18. Houck, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Houck, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2830803, -109.2070391 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  19. Tucson, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tucson, Arizona: Energy Resources (Redirected from Tucson, AZ) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.2217429, -110.926479 Show Map Loading map......

  20. Congress, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Congress, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.162526, -112.8507374 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  1. Supai, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Supai, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.2369265, -112.6890791 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  2. Superior, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Superior, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.293945, -111.0962305 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  3. Wellton, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wellton, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.6728256, -114.1468821 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  4. Carefree, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carefree, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.8222611, -111.918203 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  5. Willcox, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Willcox, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.2528519, -109.8320124 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  6. Chandler, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chandler, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.3061605, -111.8412502 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  7. Pirtleville, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pirtleville, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.3570467, -109.561734 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  8. Dudleyville, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dudleyville, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.914267, -110.733779 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  9. Tonalea, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tonalea, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.3224923, -110.9634781 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  10. Mayer, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mayer, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.3978054, -112.2362734 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  11. Ajo, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ajo, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.3717248, -112.8607099 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  12. Wickenburg, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wickenburg, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9686412, -112.729622 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  13. Glendale, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.5386523, -112.1859866 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  14. Bisbee, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bisbee, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.4481547, -109.9284084 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  15. Eloy, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eloy, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.7558962, -111.554844 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  16. Tolleson, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tolleson, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.4500425, -112.259321 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  17. Nazlini, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nazlini, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.8963986, -109.4487147 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  18. Tombstone, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tombstone, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.7128683, -110.0675764 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  19. Sedona, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sedona, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.8697395, -111.7609896 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  20. Sawmill, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sawmill, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.6181083, -110.3964911 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  1. Pisinemo, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pisinemo, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.0378487, -112.3209689 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  2. Sells, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sells, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.9120215, -111.881234 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  3. Hayden, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hayden, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.0047878, -110.7853836 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  4. Kearny, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.0570085, -110.9106656 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  5. Eagar, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eagar, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.1111581, -109.291475 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  6. Stanfield, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stanfield, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.8825531, -111.9620805 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  7. Mammoth, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mammoth, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.722568, -110.6406547 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  8. Lukachukai, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lukachukai, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.416946, -109.2287125 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  9. Florence, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.0314508, -111.3873431 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  10. Lechee, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lechee, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0322421, -110.7529145 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...