National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for arizona portland cement

  1. Plant-Wide Energy Efficiency Assessment at the Arizona Portland Cement Plant in Rillito, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen J. Coppinger, P.E.; Bruce Colburn, Ph.D., P.E., CEM

    2007-05-17

    A Department of Energy Plant-wide Assessment was undertaken by Arizona Portland Cement (APC) beginning in May 2005. The assessment was performed at APC’s cement production facility in Rillito, Arizona. The assessment included a compressed air evaluation along with a detailed process audit of plant operations and equipment. The purpose of this Energy Survey was to identify a series of energy cost savings opportunities at the Plant, and provide preliminary cost and savings estimates for the work. The assessment was successful in identifying projects that could provide annual savings of over $2.7 million at an estimated capital cost of $4.3 million. If implemented, these projects could amount to a savings of over 4.9 million kWh/yr and 384,420 MMBtu/year.

  2. Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT may be substituted for part of the required Portland cement. Substitution of mineral admixtures shall Cement shall not exceed the percentages shown in the following table: MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE SUBSTITUTION

  3. MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE Feng Lin Submitted in partial and Sciences COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 2006 #12;MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE;ABSTRACT MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE Feng Lin A mathematical

  4. Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with portland cement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Krishna, Coimbatore R. (Mount Sinai, NY)

    1986-01-01

    Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described.

  5. Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with Portland cement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, M.; Krishna, C.R.

    1984-10-17

    Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of Portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described. 1 tab.

  6. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facilityâ??s production process.

  7. Transcending Portland Cement with 100 percent fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, D.; Akin, M.; Stephens, J.; Cuelh, E.

    2009-07-01

    The use of concrete, made with 100% fly ash and no Portland cement, in buildings at the Transportation Institute in Bozeman, MT, USA, is described. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  8. In What Form is Lime Present in Portland Cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Claude W.

    1910-01-01

    ScholarWorks | The University of Kansas Pre-1923 Dissertations and Theses Collection In What Form is Lime Present in Portland Cement 1910 by Claude W. Wright This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program staff in the KU Libraries...’ Center for Digital Scholarship. http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Submitted to the School of Engineering of the University of Kansas for completion of Masters of Cheimcal Engineering. IN WHAT FORM IS LIME PRESENT IN PORTLAND CEMENT. A Dissertation...

  9. Odor investigation of a Portland cement plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pleus, R.C. [Intertox, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The main concern expressed by Smithville residents is whether the odors they were smelling during odor events were due to chemicals that could cause adverse health effects. Odors were allegedly emanating from the town`s Portland cement plant. The purpose of the study was to measure the ambient air for 20 reduced sulfur, 50 volatile organic compounds, and air samples for olfactometric analysis. Carbonyl sulfide was found to be at a concentration that could create a sense of odor and irritation. This sense of irritation may be due to a physiological response by the central nervous system, and is not associated with any known adverse effects. This physiological response could account for some or all of the irritation experienced by residents during odor events. Comparing chemical concentrations that were detected in air samples to standard and recognized guidelines for acceptable exposure, all measured concentrations were found to be well below the acceptable criteria. From these data the authors conclude that no acute or chronic adverse health effects are expected at the concentrations of the chemicals detected downwind of the cement plant, either routinely or during odor events.

  10. Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    pressure. However, elevated temperatures and high pressures are frequently encountered in oil wells whereHydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature 2006 Accepted 28 January 2009 Keywords: Hydration Kinetics Portland cement Modeling Thermodynamics

  11. Influence of Nucleation Seeding on the Compressive Strength of Ordinary Portland Cement and Alkali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland Cement and Alkali Activated Blast-Furnace Slag M. Hubler, H. Jennings OF NUCLEATION SEEDING ON THE COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF ORDINARY PORTLAND CEMENT AND ALKALI ACTIVATED BLAST on the early hydration kinetics and compressive strength by seeding of Portland cement and alkali

  12. Revised 08-2014 TASK FORCE ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT FOR PORTLAND CEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised 08-2014 TASK FORCE ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT FOR PORTLAND CEMENT AND BLENDED CEMENTS CEMENT OF CEMENT COMPANY: FACILITY LOCATED AT CEMENT TYPE & ASSOCIATED PRODUCT NAME 1. The host state agency that performs testing for acceptance of hydraulic cement plants within its boundaries shall have a laboratory

  13. Nondestructive Monitoring of Setting and Hardening of Portland Cement Mortar with Sonic Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nondestructive Monitoring of Setting and Hardening of Portland Cement Mortar with Sonic Methods of Portland cement mortar, represented by setting time, dynamic elastic moduli, compressive strength analysis and adiabatic heat release. The water/cement ratio was varied for the tested mixture composition

  14. PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT FOR FLEXIBLE OVER RIGID COMPOSITE PAVEMENTS (Tollway)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT FOR FLEXIBLE OVER RIGID COMPOSITE PAVEMENTS (Tollway) Effective portland cement concrete for special applications to composite pavements as shown and described. Constructing the Jointed Plain Ternary Cement Concrete Pavement layer of the composite pavement on a prepared

  15. A Comparison Study of Portland Cement Hydration Kinetics as Measured by Chemical Shrinkage and Isothermal Calorimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    1 A Comparison Study of Portland Cement Hydration Kinetics as Measured by Chemical Shrinkage methods of evaluating cement hydration kinetics, namely chemical shrinkage and isothermal calorimetry tests, are used to investigate the early stage hydration of different classes of oilwell cement

  16. Chromium stabilization chemistry of paint removal wastes in Portland cement and blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boy, J.H.; Race, T.D.; Reinbold, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    The use of cement based systems for solidification and stabilization of hazardous wastes has been proposed. The stabilization of Cr contaminated paint removal wastes in ordinary Portland cement and in a Portland cement and blast furnace slag matrix was investigated. A loading by volume of 75% waste and 25% cement (or cement + slag) was used. The expression of pore solution was utilized to determine the chemical environment encountered by the waste species in the cement matrix. The highly alkaline conditions of ordinary Portland cement determined the stability of the metal species, with Cr being highly soluble. The replacement of 25% of the Portland cement by blast furnace slag was found to decrease the [OH-] of the pore solution resulting in a decrease of the Cr concentration. For cement wastes forms hydrated for 28 days, the Cr concentration decreased in the expressed pore solution. During the TCLP tests the cement waste form and extraction solution were found to react, changing the chemistry of the extraction solution. The expression of pore solution was found to give a direct measure of the chemistry of the waste species in the cement matrix. This avoids the reaction of the TCLP extraction solution with the cement matrix which changes the solubility of the hazardous metals. 15 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Portland cement for SO.sub.2 control in coal-fired power plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

    1985-01-01

    There is described a method of removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. There is also described the cement products that result from this method.

  18. Portland cement for SO/sub 2/ control in coal-fired power plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, M.

    1984-10-17

    A method is described for removing oxides of sulfur from the emissions of fossil fuel combustion by injecting portland cement into the boiler with the fuel, the combustion air, or downstream with the combustion gases. The cement products that result from this method is also described. 1 tab.

  19. Identification and characterization of agent for reductive dechlorination in mixtures of ferrous iron and Portland cement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Sae Bom

    2001-01-01

    were conducted to identify a potential active agent in a mixture of Fe(II) and Portland cement extract (PCX). Results of XRD analysis indicated that a potential active agent is likely to be green rust chloride, which is a layered Fe(II)/Fe(III...

  20. Examples of cooler reflective streets for urban heat-island mitigation : Portland cement concrete and chip seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chang, S.-C.; Levinson, R.; Pon, B.

    2003-01-01

    1995). “Mitigation of Urban Heat Islands: Materials, UtilityStreets for Urban Heat-Island Mitigation: Portland CementR. Levinson and B. Pon Heat Island Group Energy Analysis

  1. Zinc electrode with cement additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charkey, Allen (Brookfield, CT)

    1982-06-01

    A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

  2. A Coupled Nanoindentation/SEM-EDS Study on Low Water/Cement Ratio Portland Cement Paste: Evidence for C-S-H/Ca(OH)[subscript 2] Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jeffrey J.

    A low water/cement ratio (w/c=0.20) hydrated Portland cement paste was analyzed by grid-indentation coupled with ex situ scanning electron microscope-energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (SEM-EDS) analysis at each indentation ...

  3. Contact Mechanics Based Mechanical Characterization of Portland Cement Paste 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Christopher

    2012-02-14

    Current research interest in multi-scale modeling of cement paste requires accurate characterization of the time-dependent mechanical properties of the material, particularly the C-S-H phase. Nanoindentation is evaluated as a tool for measuring...

  4. Time-variability of NO{sub x} emissions from Portland cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, L.J. Jr.; May, M.S. III [PSM International, Dallas, TX (United States)] [PSM International, Dallas, TX (United States); Johnson, D.E. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Statistics] [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Statistics; MacMann, R.S. [Penta Engineering, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Penta Engineering, St. Louis, MO (United States); Woodward, W.A. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Statistics] [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Statistics

    1999-03-01

    Due to the presence of autocorrelation between sequentially measured nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) concentrations in stack gas from portland cement kilns, the determination of the average emission rates and the uncertainty of the average has been improperly calculated by the industry and regulatory agencies. Documentation of permit compliance, establishment of permit levels, and the development and testing of control techniques for reducing NO{sub x} emissions at specific cement plants requires accurate and precise statistical estimates of parameters such as means, standard deviations, and variances. Usual statistical formulas such as for the variance of the sample mean only apply if sequential measurements of NO{sub x} emissions are independent. Significant autocorrelation of NO{sub x} emission measurements revealed that NO{sub x} concentration values measured by continuous emission monitors are not independent but can be represented by an autoregressive, moving average time series. Three orders of time-variability of NO{sub x} emission rates were determined from examination of continuous emission measurements from several cement kilns.

  5. Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Petroleum Products Institute, Canadian Portland Cement Association, Canadian Pulp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Canadian Pulp and Paper Association, Canadian Steel Producers Association, Canadian Textiles InstituteSponsors of CIEEDAC: Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Petroleum Products Institute, Canadian Portland Cement Association

  6. Incorporation of trace elements in Portland cement clinker: Thresholds limits for Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gineys, N.; Aouad, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Damidot, D.

    2011-11-15

    This paper aims at defining precisely, the threshold limits for several trace elements (Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn) which correspond to the maximum amount that could be incorporated into a standard clinker whilst reaching the limit of solid solution of its four major phases (C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A and C{sub 4}AF). These threshold limits were investigated through laboratory synthesised clinkers that were mainly studied by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The reference clinker was close to a typical Portland clinker (65% C{sub 3}S, 18% C{sub 2}S, 8% C{sub 3}A and 8% C{sub 4}AF). The threshold limits for Cu, Ni, Zn and Sn are quite high with respect to the current contents in clinker and were respectively equal to 0.35, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 wt.%. It appeared that beyond the defined threshold limits, trace elements had different behaviours. Ni was associated with Mg as a magnesium nickel oxide (MgNiO{sub 2}) and Sn reacted with lime to form a calcium stannate (Ca{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}). Cu changed the crystallisation process and affected therefore the formation of C{sub 3}S. Indeed a high content of Cu in clinker led to the decomposition of C{sub 3}S into C{sub 2}S and of free lime. Zn, in turn, affected the formation of C{sub 3}A. Ca{sub 6}Zn{sub 3}Al{sub 4}O{sub 15} was formed whilst a tremendous reduction of C{sub 3}A content was identified. The reactivity of cements made with the clinkers at the threshold limits was followed by calorimetry and compressive strength measurements on cement paste. The results revealed that the doped cements were at least as reactive as the reference cement.

  7. CEMENT RELATED RESEARCH HYDROGEOCHEMISTRY GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    CEMENT RELATED RESEARCH HYDROGEOCHEMISTRY GROUP Josep M. Soler Jordi Cama Carles Ayora Ana Trapote.soler@idaea.csic.es #12;NOMECLATURE cement + water = hardened cement paste cement + water + sand = mortar cement + waterC) clinker + gypsum portland cement PORTLAND CEMENT #12;GTS-HPF Core Infiltration Experiment Experimental

  8. Resistance of fly ash-Portland cement blends to thermal shock

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pyatina, Tatiana; Sugama, Toshifumi

    2015-09-11

    Thermal-shock resistance of high-content fly ash-Portland cement blends was tested in the following ways. Activated and non-activated blends with 80-90 % fly ash F (FAF) were left to set at room temperature, then hydrated for 24 hours at 85°C and 24-more hours at 300°C and tested in five thermal-shock cycles (600°C heat - 25°C water quenching). XRD, and thermal gravimetric analyses, along with calorimetric measurements and SEM-EDX tests demonstrated that the activated blends form more hydrates after 24 hours at 300°C, and achieve a higher short-term compressive strength than do non-activated ones. Sodium meta-silicate and sodaash engendered the concomitant hydrationmore »of OPC and FAF, with the formation of mixed crystalline FAF-OPC hydrates and FAF hydrates, such as garranite, analcime, and wairakite, along with the amorphous FAF hydration products. In SS-activated and non-activated blends separate OPC (tobermorite) and FAF (amorphous gel) hydrates with no mixed crystalline products formed. The compressive strength of all tested blends decreased by nearly 50% after 5 thermal-shock test cycles. These changes in the compressive strength were accompanied by a marked decrease in the intensities of XRD patterns of the crystalline hydrates after the thermalshock. As a result, there was no significant difference in the performance of the blends with different activators« less

  9. Suppression of phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary Portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng-Peng Ye; Fan-Zhong Chen; Yan-Qing Sheng; Guo-Ying Sheng; Jia-Mo Fu

    2006-08-15

    In this study, the effect of suppression on phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated by small scale experiment. A system including sediment, lake water, and several kinds of capping materials was designed to clarify the suppression of phosphate liberation from sediment under the anaerobic condition. The suppression efficiencies of fly ash, OPC and glass bead used as control material were also determined, and these effects were discussed. The suppression efficiency of glass bead was 44.4%, and those of fly ash and OPC were 84.4%, 94.9%, respectively. The suppression by fly ash and OPC was mainly carried out by the adsorption effect, in addition to the covering effect. The suppression efficiency depended on the amounts of the material used, and about 90% of liberated phosphate was suppressed by fly ash of 10.0 Kg m{sup -2}, and OPC of 6.0 Kg m{sup -2}. The concentrations of heavy metals, such as mercury, cadmium, lead, copper, zinc, chromium, silver, arsenic and nickel, in fly ash and OPC were lower than those in the environmental materials. And it was considered that the concentrations of heavy metals in fly ash and OPC were too low to influence the ecosystem in natural water region.

  10. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschner, Florian; Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank; Neubauer, Jürgen

    2013-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

  11. Methodological and Practical Considerations for Developing Multiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion, Kristel

    2008-01-01

    in: Innovations in Portland Cement Manufacturing, Skokie,IL, Portland Cement Association. Worrell, E. , Price, L. ,emissions from the global cement industry’, Ann. Rev. Energy

  12. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2009-01-01

    eds. ) 2004. Innovations in Portland Cement Manufacturing.Portland Cement Association. Venkateswaran, S.R. and H.E.Lowitt. 1988. The U.S. Cement Industry, An Energy

  13. Concrete international /january 2010 35 Portland limestone cement (PLC) is produced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) such as slag cement or fly ash. PLCs can, therefore, significantly PLCs are combined with slag cement or fly ash. This article presents results from a recent part fly ash, by mass. The PLC was produced by intergrinding limestone with calcium sulfate

  14. Examples of cooler reflective streets for urban heat-island mitigation : Portland cement concrete and chip seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chang, S.-C.; Levinson, R.; Pon, B.

    2003-04-30

    Part of the urban heat island effect can be attributed to dark pavements that are commonly used on streets and parking lots. In this paper we consider two light colored, hence cooler, alternative paving materials that are in actual use in cities today. These are Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and chip seals. We report measurements of the albedos of some PCC and chip sealed pavements in the San Francisco Bay Area. The albedos of the PCC pavements ranged from about 0.18 to 0.35. The temperatures of some PCC pavements are also measured and calculated. We then consider how the albedos of the constituent materials of the PCC (stone, sand and cement) contribute to the albedos of the resulting finished concrete. The albedos of a set of chip sealed pavements in San Jose, CA, were measured and correlated with the times of their placement. It is found that the albedos decrease with age (and use) but remain higher than that of standard asphalt concrete (AC) for about five years. After t hat, the albedos of the chip seals are about 0.12, similar to aged AC. The fact that many PCC pavements have albedos at least twice as high as aged AC suggests that it is possible to have pavement albedos that remain high for many years.

  15. Normal and refractory concretes for LMFBR applications. Volume 1. Review of literature on high-temperature behavior of portland cement and refractory concretes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazant, Z.P.; Chern, J.C.; Abrams, M.S.; Gillen, M.P.

    1982-06-01

    The extensive literature on the properties and behavior at elevated temperature of portland cement concrete and various refractory concretes was reviewed to collect in concise form the physical and chemical properties of castable refractory concretes and of conventional portland cement concretes at elevated temperature. This survey, together with an extensive bibliography of source documents, is presented in Volume 1. A comparison was made of these properties, the relative advantages of the various concretes was evaluated for possible liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications, and a selection was made of several materials of interest for such applications. Volume 2 concludes with a summary of additional knowledge needed to support such uses of these materials together with recommendations on research to provide that knowledge.

  16. The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Daniel, J. [Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    Emissions from the Global Cement Industry, Annual Review ofThe Use of Limestone in Portland Cement: a State- of-the-Review, Skokie, IL: Portland Cement Association. Dolores, R.

  18. Hydration mechanisms of ternary Portland cements containing limestone powder and fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Weerdt, K.; Haha, M. Ben; Le Saout, G.; Kjellsen, K.O.; Justnes, H.; Lothenbach, B.

    2011-03-15

    The effect of minor additions of limestone powder on the properties of fly ash blended cements was investigated in this study using isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetry (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, and pore solution analysis. The presence of limestone powder led to the formation of hemi- and monocarbonate and to a stabilisation of ettringite compared to the limestone-free cements, where a part of the ettringite converted to monosulphate. Thus, the presence of 5% of limestone led to an increase of the volume of the hydrates, as visible in the increase in chemical shrinkage, and an increase in compressive strength. This effect was amplified for the fly ash/limestone blended cements due to the additional alumina provided by the fly ash reaction.

  19. The physical and chemical aspects of the leaching behavior of metals from portland cement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ricardo Corye

    1990-01-01

    intrusion pozosimetzy (NIP) is another method applied to correlate structural changes to the effects of addition of metal nitrates and subsequent leaching of waste forms. The changes in the void, capillary and gel pores (diameters greater than 0. 15 )(m..., between 0. 15 and 0. 01 pm and less than 0. 01 )lm, respectively) are related to the following: mixing enhancement, precipitation of complex metal compounds and retardation of clinker hydration on addition of metal nitrates to cement, and dissolution...

  20. Comparison of reactive magnesia-, carbide slag-activated ground granulated blastfurnace slag and Portland cement for stabilisation of a natural soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Yaolin; Zheng, Xu; Liu, Songyu; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2015-04-11

    -Tabbaa, 2013). Compared to PC, less energy is required for manufacturing reactive MgO (~2400 MJ/t MgO) due to its lower calcination temperature, and renewable energy sources can be used (Liska, 2009). Manufacturing 1t reactive MgO consumes 2.08 t MgCO3... ; Kitazume and Terash, 2013; Terashi, 2003; Terashi and Kitazume, 2011); however, there are significant environmental impacts associated with Portland cement (PC) production, such as high CO2 emissions (0.95t CO2/t PC), energy consumption (5000 MJ/t PC...

  1. Solidification/Stabilization of High Nitrate and Biodenitrified Heavy Metal Sludges with a Portland Cement/Flyash System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canonico, J.S.

    1995-07-26

    Pond 207C at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) contains process wastewaters characterized by high levels of nitrates and other salts, heavy metal contamination, and low level alpha activity. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of treating a high-nitrate waste, contaminated with heavy metals, with a coupled dewateriug and S/S process, as well as to investigate the effects of biodenitrification pretreatment on the S/S process. Pond 207C residuals served as the target waste. A bench-scale treatability study was conducted to demonstrate an S/S process that would minimize final product volume without a significant decrease in contaminant stabilization or loss of desirable physical characteristics. The process formulation recommended as a result a previous S/S treatability study conducted on Pond 207C residuals was used as the baseline formulation for this research. Because the actual waste was unavailable due to difficulties associated with radioactive waste handling and storage, a surrogate waste, of known composition and representative of Pond 207C residuals, was used throughout this research. The contaminants of regulatory concern added to the surrogate were cadmium, chromium, nickel, and silver. Product volume reduction was achieved by dewatering the waste prior to S/S treatment. The surrogate was dewatered by evaporation at 60 to 80 C to total solids contents from 43% to 78% by weight, and treated with Portland cement and fly ash. Two cement to flyash ratios were tested, 2:1 and 1:2, by weight. Contaminant leachability testing was conducted with a 0.5 water to pozzolan (the cement/flyash mixture) ratio and both cement to flyash ratios. Each product was tested for unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and for contaminant leachability by the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP). At the highest solids content achieved by dewatering, 78% solids by weight, the predicted final waste form volume f or Pond 207C residuals after S/S processing was reduced by over 60 A when compared to the baseline process. All tested process formulations produced final waste forms with an average UCS of 100 psi or greater. Percent fixation of Chrome (VI) increased at higher solids contents. Fixation of nickel varied from over 87% to 69%, and cadmium fixation was greater than 99% at every solids content tested. Silver TCLP extract concentrations were below detection limits in all cases except for one anomalous measurement. Final product volume reduction was not achieved with coupled dewatering and S/S processing after biodenitrification pretreatment. The waste slurry became too viscous to mix with reagents after dewatering to approximately 55% solids. Fixation of contaminant constituents and final product UCSs were similar to the results of S/S processing without biodenitrification. Due to the lack of volume reduction, biodenitrification was not successful as a pretreatment for S/S processing under the test conditions of this research.

  2. Performance of Concrete Made With Slag Cement and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Performance of Concrete Made With Slag Cement and Portland-Limestone Blended Cement Philadelphia;Today's Discussion ! The materials ! Slag cement ! Portland-limestone cement ! Use in concrete is slag cement? #12;! Non-metallic product of an iron blast furnace ! Granulated ! Ground ! Cementitious

  3. Performance of Typical Concrete Mixtures for Transportation Structures as Influenced by Portland-Limestone Cements from Five Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including 0% SCM, 25% Class C fly ash, 25% Class F fly ash, and 40% slag cement mixtures. All mixtures used

  4. Carbon nanotube and nanofiber reinforcement for improving the flexural strength and fracture toughness of portland cement paste 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyson, Bryan Michael

    2012-07-16

    ................................................................................................... 14 2.1.1 Noncovalent Functionalization ....................................................... 17 2.1.2 Covalent Functionalization ............................................................. 19 2.1.3 Defect Site Functionalization... ......................................................................................................... 48 4.1.1 Nano-filament Preparation ............................................................. 48 4.1.2 Incorporation of Cement and Nano-filaments ................................ 49 4.1.3 Molding...

  5. The use of electrical impedance spectroscopy for monitoring the hydration products of Portland cement mortars with high percentage of pozzolans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, J.M.; Fita, I.C.; Soriano, L.; Payá, J.; Borrachero, M.V.

    2013-08-15

    In this paper, mortars and pastes containing large replacement of pozzolan were studied by mechanical strength, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of metakaolin (35%) and fly ash (60%) was evaluated and compared with an inert mineral addition (andalusite). The portlandite content was measured, finding that the pozzolanic reaction produced cementing systems with all portlandite fixed. The EIS measurements were analyzed by the equivalent electrical circuit (EEC) method. An EEC with three branches in parallel was applied. The dc resistance was related to the degree of hydration and allowed us to characterize plain and blended mortars. A constant phase element (CPE) quantified the electrical properties of the hydration products located in the solid–solution interface and was useful to distinguish the role of inert and pozzolanic admixtures present in the cement matrix.

  6. Materials of Cement Science Primer Principal Investigators: Professors Hamlin Jennings and Jeffery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials of Cement Science Primer Principal Investigators: Professors Hamlin Jennings and Jeffery Chapter 3. The Concrete Construction Process 19 Chapter 4. Manufacture and composition of Portland cement 24 Chapter 5. Hydration and microstructure of Portland cement paste 45 Chapter 6. The pore structure

  7. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  8. Influence of Curing Conditions on Water Loss and Hydration in Cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Influence of Curing Conditions on Water Loss and Hydration in Cement Pastes with and without Fly Loss and Hydration in Cement Pastes with and without Fly Ash Substitution Dale P. Bentz Building at different rates from portland cement, blended cements may require that special attention be paid

  9. Quantum Mechanical Metric for Internal Cohesion in Cement Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharmawardhana, C. C.; Misra, Anil; Ching, Wai-Yim

    2014-12-05

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the main binding phase of Portland cement, the single most important structural material in use worldwide. Due to the complex structure and chemistry of CSH at various length scales, the focus has progressively...

  10. A geotechnical description of fresh cement groutfiltration and consolidation behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    . For stress levels above the filtration pressure the calculated permeability values are similar to those from ratio eg grout void ratio Gs specific gravity of a solid kc filter cake permeability Lc filter cake to cement grouting or concrete placement in the ground. 1 Mixtures of Portland cement and water have a wide

  11. Speciation of heavy metals in cement-stabilized waste forms: A micro-spectroscopic study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    structures of nuclear power plants. Previous experi- ments of Ni uptake by blended cement (Atkins et al. Vespa). Journal of Geochemical Exploration 88 (2006) 77­80 www.elsevier.com/locate/jgeoexp #12;studied.1. Sample preparation The cement samples were prepared from a com- mercial sulfate-resisting Portland cement

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    Hydraulic Institute/Europump/ United States Department of Energy.Hydraulic Institute standards and motor performance data from the MotorMaster+ database to calculate potential energy andhydraulic cements, including portland, natural, masonry, and pozzolana cements. The production of cement is an energy-

  13. Solar Policy Environment: Portland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Portland’s Solar Now! Program will pursue solar market transformation for Portland residents, businesses, and city operations. The program will work with other City bureaus to ease the regulatory process by streamlining city-level regulations for contractors, homeowners and businesses. The City will use its influence as a regulator, educator and motivator to reach the larger regional community.

  14. Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    , and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

  15. Comparative Analysis of Cement and Lateralite on the Engineering Properties of Niger Delta Soils for Pavement Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alayaki, F. M.; Al-Tabbaa, A.; Meshida, E. A.; Ayotamuno, M. J.

    2015-05-13

    not have the cementing capability of Portland cement, it however compared well to cement in affecting the engineering properties of the soils that will make them applicable as sub-base and base soils for pavement construction. Lateralite also... of test for Soils for Civil Engineering Purpose. British Standards Institution, London; 1990. 15. AASHTO T 131-06: Standard Method of Test for Time of Setting of Hydraulic Cement by Vicat Needle. American Association of State Highway...

  16. Wellbore cement fracture evolution at the cement–basalt caprock interface during geologic carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Um, Wooyong; Martin, Paul F.; Dahl, Michael E.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Varga, Tamas; Stephens, Sean A.; Arey, Bruce W.; Carroll, KC; Bonneville, Alain; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2014-08-01

    Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock cores with fractures, as well as neat Portland cement columns, were prepared to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores with defects during geologic carbon sequestration. The samples were reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50 ºC and 10 MPa for 3 months under static conditions, while one cement-basalt core was subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. Micro-XRD and SEM-EDS data collected along the cement-basalt interface after 3-month reaction with CO2-saturated groundwater indicate that carbonation of cement matrix was extensive with the precipitation of calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, whereas the alteration of basalt caprock was minor. X-ray microtomography (XMT) provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnection of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling further revealed that this stress led to the increase in fluid flow and hence permeability. After the CO2-reaction, XMT images displayed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along the fracture located at the cement-basalt interface. The 3-D visualization and CFD modeling also showed that the precipitation of calcium carbonate within the cement fractures after the CO2-reaction resulted in the disconnection of cement fractures and permeability decrease. The permeability calculated based on CFD modeling was in agreement with the experimentally determined permeability. This study demonstrates that XMT imaging coupled with CFD modeling represent a powerful tool to visualize and quantify fracture evolution and permeability change in geologic materials and to predict their behavior during geologic carbon sequestration or hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production and enhanced geothermal systems.

  17. Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2011-11-01

    Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

  18. [Task 1.] Biodenitrification of low nitrate solar pond waters using sequencing batch reactors. [Task 2.] Solidification/stabilization of high strength and biodenitrified heavy metal sludges with a Portland cement/flyash system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, L.; Cook, N.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Mosher, J.; Terry, S.; Canonico, S.

    1995-09-22

    Process wastewater and sludges were accumulated on site in solar evaporation ponds during operations at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant (DOE/RF). Because of the extensive use of nitric acid in the processing of actinide metals, the process wastewater has high concentrations of nitrate. Solar pond waters at DOE/RF contain 300-60,000 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L. Additionally, the pond waters contain varying concentrations of many other aqueous constituents, including heavy metals, alkali salts, carbonates, and low level radioactivity. Solids, both from chemical precipitation and soil material deposition, are also present. Options for ultimate disposal of the pond waters are currently being evaluated and include stabilization and solidification (S/S) by cementation. Removal of nitrates can enhance a wastes amenability to S/S, or can be a unit operation in another treatment scheme. Nitrate removal is also a concern for other sources of pollution at DOE/RF, including contaminated groundwater collected by interceptor trench systems. Finally, nitrate pollution is a problem at many other DOE facilities where actinide metals were processed. The primary objective of this investigation was to optimize biological denitrification of solar pond waters with nitrate concentrations of 300--2,100 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L to below the drinking water standard of 45 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L (10 mg N/L). The effect of pH upon process stability and denitrification rate was determined. In addition, the effect Cr(VI) on denitrification and fate of Cr(VI) in the presence of denitrifying bacteria was evaluated.

  19. Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System Portland Community College Celebrates Commissioning of Combined Heat and Power Fuel...

  20. Portland State UNIVERSITY HOUSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzanowski, Marek

    Portland State UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE Release From Liability and Consent to Check Criminal History University Housing and Residence Life requires all prospective residents with a felony evidence satisfactory to the UHRL Student Services Office in Broadway 210 or housing@pdx.edu. Your contract

  1. EA-97-C Portland General Electric | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Order authorizing Portland General Electric to export electic energy to Canada EA-97-C Portland General Electric More Documents & Publications EA-97-D Portland...

  2. 2015 Arizona Housing Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arizona Housing Forum 2015 Arizona Housing Forum August 26, 2015 8:00AM MDT to August 28, 2015 5:00PM MDT Scottsdale, Arizona The 12th annual Arizona Housing Forum provides a...

  3. Waste tires as auxiliary fuel for cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodds, J.

    1987-01-01

    The subject I have been asked to speak about is the utilization of scrap tires as an auxiliary fuel for cement kilns. My experience with scrap tires began five years ago when we performed a technical and economic evaluation for tire pyrolysis. I work for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory which is supported by the Department of Energy. My interest in scrap tires continued; in 1984 the Department of Energy and the Portland Cement Association jointly sponsored a conference on the utilization of scrap tires in cement kilns. Most of my remarks today are based upon that conference along with some current information in the US. Mr. Sladek requested that I speak on the combustion process, the progress to date, and the factors that impede or encourage implementation of using scrap tires in cement kilns. For discussion purposes it would help if we had a common understanding of the cement manufacturing process. Cement is made by heating a mixture of finely ground limestone and silica from clay or sand to about 1450/degree/C in a large rotating kiln. The heat causes the limestone to decarbonate and subsequently react with the silica to form calcium silicates. 5 figs.

  4. History and some potentials of oil shale cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knutson, C.F.; Smith, R.P.; Russell, B.F. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The utilization of oil shale as a cement component is discussed. It was investigated in America and Europe during World War I. Additional development occurred in Western Europe, Russia, and China during the 1920s and 1930s. World War II provided further development incentives and a relatively mature technology was in place in Germany, Russia, and China prior to 1980. The utilization of oil shale in cement has taken a number of different paths. One approach has been to utilize the energy in the oil shale as the principal source for the cement plant and to use the combusted shale as a minor constituent of the plant's cement product. A second approach has been to use the combusted shale as a class C or cementitious fly-ash component in portland cement concrete. Other approaches utilizing eastern oil shale have been to use the combusted oil shale with additives as a specialty cement, or to cocombust the oil shale with coal and utilize the sulfur-rich combustion product.

  5. COMPOSITE PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENTS (Tollway) Effective: January 30, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Transportation (IDOT) #12;· Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction, Adopted with Section 1020 of the Standard Specifications as an IDOT approved Class PV mix using coarse aggregate aggregate sources that are certified by IDOT as 30 year life aggregates. An IDOT approved Class PV mix shall

  6. CO2 Alteration Rates for Class H Portland Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, W.K.; Verba, C.A.; Ideker, J

    2011-05-10

    CuPd alloys are among the most promising candidate materials for hydrogen separation membranes and membrane reactor applications due to their high hydrogen permeability. In order to reduce the Pd content and, therefore, the cost of the membrane materials, efforts have been initiated to develop CuPdM ternary alloys having a bcc structure. Searching for alloying elements is done using first principles electronic density functional theory calculations. Potential ternary alloys are synthesized via arc melting, followed by a homogenization heat treatment and equilibrium annealing. The phase stability and bcc phase boundary in Cu-Pd-M systems are investigated by microstructural observation (Optical microscopy and SEM), thermal analysis, and XRD. Finally, the hydrogen permeability of promising alloys is determined.

  7. Hydration and leaching characteristics of cement pastes made from electroplating sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ying-Liang [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Ko, Ming-Sheng [Institute of Mineral Resources Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chunghsiao E. Rd., Taipei City 10608, Taiwan (China); Lai, Yi-Chieh [Department of Bioenvironmental Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, No. 200, Chung-Pei Rd., Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Chang, Juu-En, E-mail: juuen@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Rd., Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydration and leaching characteristics of the pastes of belite-rich cements made from electroplating sludge. The compressive strength of the pastes cured for 1, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days was determined, and the condensation of silicate anions in hydrates was examined with the {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology. The leachabilities of the electroplating sludge and the hardened pastes were studied with the multiple toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (MTCLP) and the tank leaching test (NEN 7345), respectively. The results showed that the electroplating sludge continued to leach heavy metals, including nickel, copper, and zinc, and posed a serious threat to the environment. The belite-rich cement made from the electroplating sludge was abundant in hydraulic {beta}-dicalcium silicate, and it performed well with regard to compressive-strength development when properly blended with ordinary Portland cements. The blended cement containing up to 40% the belite-rich cement can still satisfy the compressive-strength requirements of ASTM standards, and the pastes cured for 90 days had comparable compressive strength to an ordinary Portland cement paste. It was also found that the later hydration reaction of the blended cements was relatively more active, and high fractions of belite-rich cement increased the chain length of silicate hydrates. In addition, by converting the sludge into belite-rich cements, the heavy metals became stable in the hardened cement pastes. This study thus indicates a viable alternative approach to dealing with heavy metal bearing wastes, and the resulting products show good compressive strength and heavy-metal stability.

  8. Portland State University Shattuck Hall

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Portland, OR Portland State's Shattuck hall was originally constructed as an elementary school in 1915. In 2007 the university undertook extensive renovations of the building to bring it up to current seismic requirements. In addition to structural improvements, the design team was able to upgraded the building's aging mechanical and electrical systems, upgrade plumbing, and restore the large light wells that bring daylight into the U-shaped building. The resulting building houses Portland State's Architecture department, where students are able to learn from the exposed building systems.

  9. Investing in Their Future: Portlands Purchase and Conversion...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    round out the inventory. In all, there were more than 60 combinations of fixtures and poles installed around the city prior to the lighting conversion. The Portland Bureau of...

  10. Arizona/Transmission/Agency Links | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Fish Department Arizona State Historic Preservation Office Arizona Department of Transportation Arizona Department of Agriculture Arizona Department of Water Resources Central...

  11. Experimental study of potential wellbore cement carbonation by various phases of carbon dioxide during geologic carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

    2013-08-16

    Hydrated Portland cement was reacted with carbon dioxide (CO2) in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases to understand the potential cement alteration processes along the length of a wellbore, extending from deep CO2 storage reservoir to the shallow subsurface during geologic carbon sequestration. The 3-D X-ray microtomography (XMT) images displayed that the cement alteration was significantly more extensive by CO2-saturated synthetic groundwater than dry or wet supercritical CO2 at high P (10 MPa)-T (50°C) conditions. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis also exhibited a systematic Ca depletion and C enrichment in cement matrix exposed to CO2-saturated groundwater. Integrated XMT, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses identified the formation of extensive carbonated zone filled with CaCO3(s), as well as the porous degradation front and the outermost silica-rich zone in cement after exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater. The cement alteration by CO2-saturated groundwater for 2-8 months overall decreased the porosity from 31% to 22% and the permeability by an order of magnitude. Cement alteration by dry or wet supercritical CO2 was slow and minor compared to CO2-saturated groundwater. A thin single carbonation zone was formed in cement after exposure to wet supercritical CO2 for 8 months or dry supercritical CO2 for 15 months. Extensive calcite coating was formed on the outside surface of a cement sample after exposure to wet gaseous CO2 for 1-3 months. The chemical-physical characterization of hydrated Portland cement after exposure to various phases of carbon dioxide indicates that the extent of cement carbonation can be significantly heterogeneous depending on CO2 phase present in the wellbore environment. Both experimental and geochemical modeling results suggest that wellbore cement exposure to supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases of CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration is unlikely to damage the wellbore integrity because cement alteration by all phases of CO2 is dominated by carbonation reaction. This is consistent with previous field studies of wellbore cement with extensive carbonation after exposure to CO2 for 3 decades. However, XMT imaging indicates that preferential cement alteration by supercritical CO2 or CO2-saturated groundwater can occur along the cement-steel or cement-rock interfaces. This highlights the importance of further investigation of cement degradation along the interfaces of wellbore materials to ensure permanent geologic carbon storage.

  12. The use of scrap tires in rotary cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, M.

    1996-12-31

    The use of scrap tires as a supplemental fuel in the United States Portland cement industry has increased significantly in the past six years. In 1990, there were two kilns using tire-derived fuel (TDF), today 30 kilns use TDF. The outlook for continued and expanded use of TDF in the U.S. cement industry should be considered favorable, with 15 kilns conducting tests to determine TDF`s applicability or in the permitting process. The Council`s estimates are that by the end of 1996, the cement industry could be consuming some 75-100 million of the 253 million annually generated scrap tires in the United States. This level of TDF usage will make the cement industry the largest market segments for scrap tires in the United States. While the long-term outlook is at present positive, there are a series of factors that have, and will likely continue to adversely impact the near-term usage of TDF. These issues, as well as the factors that are likely to positively impact the cement kiln TDF market are the subject of this presentation.

  13. Portland Bike History Weather Prophet Pague,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Portland Bike History Weather Prophet Pague, Governor Geer, & Portland's First Bicycle Paths Eric, as a trooper is bred to his horse. From dawn till dark she lives in the saddle. Whatever be her errand, she, and bowls home again, serene tranquil, content. Since bicycles came to Portland, not to play with

  14. Performance Cements Focus on Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with low associated CO2 emissions Blended cements versus separate components Limestone in cement #12;3 High the beneficial re-use of byproducts Maximize use of materials with low associated CO2 emissions Blended cements versus separate components Limestone in cement #12;4 High Limestone Cements 5/21/08 Cost Holcim (US) Inc

  15. Determination of Diffusion Profiles in Altered Wellbore Cement Using X-ray Computed Tomography Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Harris E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walsh, Stuart D. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DuFrane, Wyatt L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carroll, Susan A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-17

    The development of accurate, predictive models for use in determining wellbore integrity requires detailed information about the chemical and mechanical changes occurring in hardened Portland cements. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) provides a method that can nondestructively probe these changes in three dimensions. Here, we describe a method for extracting subvoxel mineralogical and chemical information from synchrotron XRCT images by combining advanced image segmentation with geochemical models of cement alteration. The method relies on determining “effective linear activity coefficients” (ELAC) for the white light source to generate calibration curves that relate the image grayscales to material composition. The resulting data set supports the modeling of cement alteration by CO2-rich brine with discrete increases in calcium concentration at reaction boundaries. The results of these XRCT analyses can be used to further improve coupled geochemical and mechanical models of cement alteration in the wellbore environment.

  16. Geochemical and Geomechanical Effects on Wellbore Cement Fractures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Experimental studies were conducted using batch reactors, X-ray microtomograpy (XMT), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to determine changes in cement fracture surfaces, fluid flow pathways, and permeability with geochemical and geomechanical processes. Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock core with artificial fractures was prepared and reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50°C and 10 MPa for 3 to 3.5 months under static conditions to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores containing defects. Cement-basalt interface samples were subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. XMT provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnectionmore »of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. After the CO2 reaction, XMT images revealed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along fractures located at the cement-basalt interface. The permeability calculated based on CFD simulation was in agreement with the experimentally measured permeability. The experimental results imply that the wellbore cement with fractures is likely to be healed during exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater under static conditions, whereas fractures along the cement-caprock interface are still likely to remain vulnerable to the leakage of CO2. CFD simulation for the flow of different fluids (CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2) using a pressure difference of 20 kPa and 200 kPa along ~2 cm-long cement fractures showed that a pressure gradient increase resulted in an increase of CO2 fluids flux by a factor of only ~3-9 because the friction of CO2 fluids on cement fracture surfaces increased with higher flow rate as well. At the same pressure gradient, the simulated flow rate was higher for supercritical CO2 than CO2-saturated brine by a factor of only ~2-3, because the viscosity of supercritical CO2 is much lower than that of CO2-saturated brine. The study suggests that in deep geological reservoirs the geochemical and geomechanical processes have coupled effects on the wellbore cement fracture evolution and fluid flow along the fracture surfaces.« less

  17. Geothermal energy in Arizona. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, C.; Witcher, J.C.

    1982-09-01

    Current knowledge and basic data on geothermal resources in Arizona are compiled. The following are covered: specific area investigations, thermal aspects of Arizona, and exploration methods. (MHR)

  18. Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Application Forms...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Application Forms and Guidance Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Arizona Department...

  19. City of Portland- Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed a streamlined permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. The City of Portland has staff at the...

  20. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  1. QER Public Meeting in Portland, OR: Electricity Transmission...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Portland, OR: Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution - West QER Public Meeting in Portland, OR: Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution - West Meeting Date...

  2. Arizona Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun19

  3. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Investigations on hydraulic cement from spent oil shale,"April 16-18, 1980 HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGIpressi ve b strength, MPa this cement in moist environments.

  4. Cement (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cement (2010 MECS) Cement (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Cement Sector (NAICS 327310) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint...

  5. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    P. , "Investigations on hydraulic cement from spent oilCO, April 16-18, 1980 HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROMUniversity of California. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM

  6. Phoenix, Arizona Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Phoenix, Arizona Summary of Reported Data Phoenix, Arizona Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Phoenix, Arizona....

  7. Portland Public School Children Move with Propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    This 2-page Clean Cities fact sheet describes the use of propane as a fuel source for Portland Public Schools' fleet of buses. It includes information on the history of the program, along with contact information for the local Clean Cities Coordinator and Portland Public Schools.

  8. Communication Cement-based thermocouples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Communication Cement-based thermocouples Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Received 31 May 2000; accepted 4 August 2000 Abstract A cement-based thermocouple in the form of a junction between dissimilar cement pastes and exhibiting thermocouple sensitivity 70 7 mV/°C is provided

  9. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  10. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  11. Alex Benson Cement Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    with steel balls which grind mix into a fine powder -> Final Cement Product Associated Air Pollution: o From.4 million dollars for violating the Clean Air Act and 2 million dollars for pollution controls #12; Pollution Controls: o Electrostatic Precipitator: ionizes contaminated air so that the charge particles

  12. of Mining & www.mge.arizona.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Vance T.

    .621.8330 mgedept@email.arizona.edu ONLINE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 15 UNITS YOUR CAREER GEOMECHANICS #12;GEOMECHANICS Department of Mining & Geological Engineering www.mge.arizona.edu Contact: John Kemeny Kemeny@email.arizona.edu REQUIRED COURSES (12 units) MNE 527 Geomechanics (3 units) MNE 580 Rock Fracture Mechanics (3 units) MNE

  13. Brownfield reuse of dredged New York Harbor sediment by cement-based solidification/stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loest, K. [ECDC Environmental L.C., Pembroke, MA (United States). Eastern Operations; Wilk, C.M. [Portland Cement Association, Skokie, IL (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Newly effective federal regulations restrict the ocean disposal of sediments dredged from the harbors of New York and Newark. The New York Port Authority is faced with a critical situation: find land-based disposal/uses for 10`s of millions cubic yards of sediments or lose standing as a commercial port for ocean-going ships. One of the technologies now being employed to manage the sediments is portland cement-based solidification/stabilization (S/S) treatment. At least 4 million cubic yards of the sediments will undergo cement-based S/S treatment. This treatment will immobilize heavy metals, dioxin, PCBs and other organic contaminants in the sediment. The treatment changes the sediment from a environmental liability into a valuable structural fill. This structural fill is being used at two properties. The first property is an old municipal landfill in Port Newark, New Jersey. The treated sediments are being used as structural fill to cover about 20 acres of the landfill. This will allow planned redevelopment of the landfill property into a shopping mall. The second property called the Seaboard site, was the location of a coal gasification facility and later a wood preservation facility. This 160-acre property has been designated for brownfield redevelopment. Over 4 million cubic yards of treated sediments will eventually cover this site. Portland cement is the selected S/S binding reagent. Nearly 500,000 tons of cement will eventually be used to treat the sediments. Cement was selected for its ability to (a) change the peanut butter-like consistency of the sediments into a structural material and (b) to physically and chemically immobilize hazardous constituents in the sediment.

  14. University of Portland Google Vernier Software + Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sponsors for their support of the bpa science bowl University of Portland Google Vernier Software + Technology Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A...

  15. Portland General Electric- Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portland General Electric's (PGE) Heat Pump Rebate Program offers residential customers a $200 rebate for an energy-efficient heat pump installed to PGE’s standards by a PGE-approved contractor....

  16. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  17. Elliott Cheu University of Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    of Direct CP Violation in KS,L Decays", A. Alavi-Harati et al., Physical Review Letters 83, 22-32 (1999-921 (1999). 7. A. Alavi-Harati et al. "Measurements of Direct CP Violation, CPT Symmetry, and Other, 2008-present. P-20 Education Council of Southern Arizona, 2008-present. TRIF Workforce Development

  18. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

  19. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group: Welcome to Portland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers welcoming attendees to Portland at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  20. Evaluation of cement production using a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLallo, M.; Eshbach, R.

    1994-01-01

    There are several primary conclusions which can be reached and used to define research required in establishing the feasibility of using PFBC-derived materials as cement feedstock. 1. With appropriate blending almost any material containing the required cement-making materials can be utilized to manufacture cement. However, extensive blending with multiple materials or the use of ash in relatively small quantities would compromise the worth of this concept. 2. The composition of a potential feedstock must be considered not only with respect to the presence of required materials, but just as significantly, with respect to the presence and concentration of known deleterious materials. 3. The processing costs for rendering the feedstock into an acceptable composition and the energy costs associated with both processing and burning must be considered. It should be noted that the cost of energy to produce cement, expressed as a percentage of the price of the product is higher than for any other major industrial product. Energy consumption is, therefore, a major issue. 4. The need for conformance to environmental regulations has a profound effect on the cement industry since waste materials can neither be discharged to the atmosphere or be shipped to a landfill. 5. Fifth, the need for achieving uniformity in the composition of the cement is critical to controlling its quality. Unfortunately, certain materials in very small concentrations have the capability to affect the rate and extent to which the cementitious compound in portland cement are able to form. Particularly critical are variations in the ash, the sulfur content of the coal or the amount and composition of the stack dust returned to the kiln.

  1. Cementation and solidification of miscellaneous mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.A.; Semones, G.B.

    1995-02-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site produces a variety of wastes which are amenable to micro-encapsulation in cement Portland cement is an inexpensive and readily available material for this application. The Waste Projects (WP) group at Rocky Flats evaluated cementation to determine its effectiveness in encapsulating several wastes. These included waste analytical laboratory solutions, incinerator ash, hydroxide precipitation sludge, and an acidic solution from the Delphi process (a chemical oxidation technology being evaluated as an alternative to incineration). WP prepared surrogate wastes and conducted designed experiments to optimize the cement formulation for the waste streams. These experiments used a Taguchi or factorial experimental design, interactions between the variables were also considered in the testing. Surrogate waste samples were spiked with various levels of each of six Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed metals (Cd, Cr, Ba, Pb, Ni, and Ag), cemented using the optimized formulation, and analyzed for leach resistance using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The metal spike levels chosen were based on characterization data, and also based on an estimate of the highest levels of contaminants suspected in the waste. This paper includes laboratory test results for each waste studied. These include qualitative observations as well as quantitative data from TCLP analyses and environmental cycling studies. The results from these experiments show that cement stabilization of the different wastes can produce final waste forms which meet the current RCRA Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) requirements. Formulations that resulted in LDR compliant waste forms are provided. The volume increases associated with cementation are also lower than anticipated. Future work will include verification studies with actual mixed radioactive waste as well as additional formulation development studies on other waste streams.

  2. A review of Title V operating permit application requirements caused by the use of waste-derived fuel at cement plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarmac, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 required the USEPA to establish a comprehensive operating permit program which is being administered by the states. Most major air pollution sources will be required to submit operating permit applications by November 15, 1995 or earlier. Portland cement plants that burn waste-derived fuel face some special permitting problems that need to be addressed during the permit application process. This paper presents a brief summary of the Title V application with special emphasis on the permitting requirements incurred by the utilization of waste fuel at cement plants.

  3. Unum Life Insurance Company of America Portland, Maine 04122

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cina, Jeff

    Unum Life Insurance Company of America Portland, Maine 04122 Election for Continuation of Coverage - A Long Term Care Mail to: Unum LTC Customer Services 2211 Congress Street Portland, Maine 04122 Services 2211 Congress Street Portland, Maine 04122-1760 How Long Will Unum Continue To Pay For Long Term

  4. Arizona Indian Gaming Association (AIGA) Expo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This year’s EXPO will take place November 5-7, 2014 at the Radisson Fort McDowell Resort & Casino located in Scottsdale, Arizona.

  5. Arizona Teachers Prepare Students for Green Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Students led by their building trades teacher , are wiring parts of the Raymond S. Kellis High School in Glendale, Arizona for solar power.

  6. Arizona/Transmission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEPA Database The electrical grid in Arizona is part of the Western Interconnection power grid and the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) is the Regional Entity...

  7. Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Kansas Louisiana Montana New Mexico North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Texas Utah West Virginia Wyoming Other States Total Alabama Arizona...

  8. Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet Percent

  9. Arizona Geological Society Digest 22

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. Geographic Available for sale to2 |Arizona

  10. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2009-01-01

    1993. Present and Future Energy Use of Energy in the Cement1993. Present and Future Energy Use of Energy in the Cement1993. Present and Future Energy Use of Energy in the Cement

  11. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyDiagram or Photo: Waste heat recovery at cement plant, image

  12. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyConcepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energy

  13. QER- Comment of Portland General Electric

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks, Karen. As per our email exchange earlier this week, we're attaching prepared comments from PGE to support the statement Jim Piro offered at the QER public meeting in Portland this past summer. We appreciate your flexibility on the submission deadline! Please let me know if you need anything else from us.

  14. rom urban downtown Portland to rural north-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decision-making Puget Sound Energy's Latest 4 Wind Project Adds to the Region's Renewables Federal Judge Portland used informa- tion in the Willamette plan to facilitate a cost share with the Corps of Engineers here matters. The plan helps us make the transformation as a city from a simple provider of utilities

  15. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Portland, OR, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  16. The Swelling of Clays Within Portland Brownstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    the stone comes into contact with water. Water enters between the clay layers and surrounds the positive and buckling Ex.: rain #12;Example of Damage: Victoria Mansion in Portland, Maine oh my #12;2. Equipment: How 2. Water is poured on top, causes differential swelling 3. Sample warps due to the stress from

  17. Portland State University Robert Noyce Scholarship Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholarship US Citizen US Citizen Admitted to PSU Seeking BA/BS in a science field, math or ElementaryPortland State University Robert Noyce Scholarship Program A Partnership for Science Teacher Preparation from the Graduate School of Education, the Center for Science Education and the Beaverton School

  18. Portland State University June 8, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    -Threatening Crisis Water is one of the most widely distributed substances on earth, and is a basic human need careless and water has for the most part gone untreated and unprotected. Worldwide, we are challengedJoe Parker Portland State University June 8, 2006 Forestalling Water Wars: Returning to Our (Grass

  19. INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Research INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OILCalifornia. INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENTA process for making hydraulic cements from spent oil shale

  20. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants EnergyM. 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energyleading to increased heat recovery efficiency and reduced

  1. transmission Michael P. McGarry, Arizona State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    Tecnologic de Telecomunicacions de Catalunya Martin Reisslein ,Arizona State University ABSTRACT Optical

  2. Arizona

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing AnnualFoot)EnergyAnnual

  3. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Portland Summary of Reported Data Voluntary Initiative: Designing Incentives...

  4. EA-97-D Portland General Electric Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland General Electric Company Order authorizing PGE to export electric energy to Canada. EA-97-D PGE (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric...

  5. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2009-01-01

    have requirements similar to fly ash. These data are used tocommon Portland, slag, fly ash, Pozzolana, and/or blendedone or more additives (fly ash, pozzolans, blast furnace

  6. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    http://www.wbcsd.ch/web/projects/cement/pop-report.pdfShui Ni 1 and Shui Ni 2 cement plants in Shangdong ProvinceReferences Ash Grove Cement, n.d. , “Cement Manufacturing

  7. ARIZONA COOPERATIVE Climate Change and Wildfire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crimmins, Michael A.

    in precipitation acrossArizona and New Mexico associated with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) modulate wildfire events. El Nino events typically bring above-average winter precipitatio

  8. Opportunity and Competitiveness for the Region: Portland State University Strategic Plan 2011-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzanowski, Marek

    erected on the northern border of Portland to house wartime shipyard workers. Today that tiny extension

  9. Energy Incentive Programs, Arizona | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeCommunication3-EDepartment ofArizona Energy Incentive Programs, Arizona Updated

  10. Transport in Cement:Transport in Cement: Relating Permeability and PoreRelating Permeability and Pore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    #12;Background:Background: CementitiousCementitious MaterialsMaterials Raw Materials:Raw MaterialsProduces Cement Clinker (basic cementClinker (basic cement material)material) #12;THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING PROCESS preheating clinker 2. BURNING 1. RAW GRINDING : The raw materials are very finely ground in order to produce

  11. Cement waste-form development for ion-exchange resins at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veazey, G.W.; Ames, R.L.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the development of a cement waste form to stabilize ion-exchange resins at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). These resins have an elevated potential for ignition due to inadequate wetness and contact with nitrates. The work focused on the preparation and performance evaluation of several Portland cement/resin formulations. The performance standards were chosen to address Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, compatibility with Rocky Flats equipment, and throughput efficiency. The work was performed with surrogate gel-type Dowex cation- and anion-exchange resins chosen to be representative of the resin inventory at RFETS. Work was initiated with nonactinide resins to establish formulation ranges that would meet performance standards. Results were then verified and refined with actinide-containing resins. The final recommended formulation that passed all performance standards was determined to be a cement/water/resin (C/W/R) wt % ratio of 63/27/10 at a pH of 9 to 12. The recommendations include the acceptable compositional ranges for each component of the C/W/R ratio. Also included in this report are a recommended procedure, an equipment list, and observations/suggestions for implementation at RFETS. In addition, information is included that explains why denitration of the resin is unnecessary for stabilizing its ignitability potential.

  12. Palomar Community College District Portland State University Transfer Worksheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Palomar Community College District Portland State University Transfer Worksheet If you are taking classes that are part of the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) at a Palomar. Degree Requirements (BA, BS) #12;Palomar Community College District Portland State University 2. DEGREE

  13. Undesired drying of concrete and cement paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Undesired drying of concrete and cement paste is a nightmare for any construction engineer of the concrete or cement paste surface. Inspired by the art of molecular cooking a team of TU Delft scientists for instance sodium alginates. When sprayed on the surface of concrete or cement paste, a rapid chemical

  14. Portland cement mortar modified with latex and fiber glass for thin shell construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond, Jewell Duane

    1963-01-01

    owners. Thin shell construction began first in Italy and Spain, later spreading to the western hemisphere, notably Mexico. In the United States widespread application of thin shell roof construction has been hampered by the high cost of labor...

  15. Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Sae Bom

    2006-08-16

    the the important elements that affect degradation activity. Elemental compositions of the mixtures and the conditions affecting solid formation might be the important factors in determining how active solids are formed. Second, instrumental analyses (XRD, SEM, SEM...

  16. A study of immobilization of four heavy metals by solidification/stabilization with portland cement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trussell, Susan A

    1994-01-01

    Two sites were established in Harris County, Texas, to relate seasonal saturation to soil morphology, micromorphology, soil reduction potential (Eh), and iron phases; and to test a,a'-dipyridyl dye for field identification of iron...

  17. COARSE AGGREGATE FOR COMPOSITE PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT Effective: January 30, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Specifications: "(g) Recycled Coarse Aggregate (RCA). If recycled coarse aggregate is specified for use in a concrete mix design, the recycled coarse aggregate will be generated from a Tollway approved source of existing concrete or asphalt pavement. The recycled coarse aggregate may be processed from a non

  18. USE ON SPECIFIED PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PROJECTS REQUIRING IRI SURFACE TOLERANCE REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the following. 601.11 SURFACE TOLERANCE REQUIRMENTS (a) General: This subsection outlines the method. Longitudinal surface profile is measured in inches per mile (mm per km) and reported as the International verification and profiler system parameter settings. These settings shall be verified by the inspector before

  19. Assessment of durability performance of "Early-Opening-to-Traffic" Portland Cement Concrete pavement and patches 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Pradhumna Babu

    1999-01-01

    -thaw, shrinkage, chemical attack, abrasion resistance, fatigue life, volumetric expansion, practicality, and concrete costs. The assessment discusses material combinations, mixture designs, and construction practices on performance. A computer program using...

  20. Preliminary non-destructive assessment of moisture content, hydration and dielectric properties of Portland cement concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avelar Lezama, Ivan

    2007-04-25

    ) where ? is graphically the angle between the two vectorial components (dielectric constant and loss) of the complex permittivity. The dielectric constant can be thought of as a measure of the ability of a material to store charge or electrical...

  1. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    CO 2 emissions from China’s cement production: methodologiesfossil fuel consumption and cement production. Geophys. Res.NTNU, 2006). 27. China Cement Association. China Cement

  2. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

    1985-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  3. SOURCE PHENOMENOLOGY EXPERIMENTS IN ARIZONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessie L. Bonner; Brian Stump; Mark Leidig; Heather Hooper; Xiaoning (David) Yang; Rongmao Zhou; Tae Sung Kim; William R. Walter; Aaron Velasco; Chris Hayward; Diane Baker; C. L. Edwards; Steven Harder; Travis Glenn; Cleat Zeiler; James Britton; James F. Lewkowicz

    2005-09-30

    The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments (SPE) have resulted in an important dataset for the nuclear monitoring community. The 19 dedicated single-fired explosions and multiple delay-fired mining explosions were recorded by one of the most densely instrumented accelerometer and seismometer arrays ever fielded, and the data have already proven useful in quantifying confinement and excitation effects for the sources. It is very interesting to note that we have observed differences in the phenomenology of these two series of explosions resulting from the differences between the relatively slow (limestone) and fast (granodiorite) media. We observed differences at the two SPE sites in the way the rock failed during the explosions, how the S-waves were generated, and the amplitude behavior as a function of confinement. Our consortium's goal is to use the synergy of the multiple datasets collected during this experiment to unravel the phenomenological differences between the two emplacement media. The data suggest that the main difference between single-fired chemical and delay-fired mining explosion seismograms at regional distances is the increased surface wave energy for the latter source type. The effect of the delay-firing is to decrease the high-frequency P-wave amplitudes while increasing the surface wave energy because of the longer source duration and spall components. The results suggest that the single-fired explosions are surrogates for nuclear explosions in higher frequency bands (e.g., 6-8 Hz Pg/Lg discriminants). We have shown that the SPE shots, together with the mining explosions, are efficient sources of S-wave energy, and our next research stage is to postulate the possible sources contributing to the shear-wave energy.

  4. MHK Projects/Portland | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHKKembla < MHK Projects Jump to:Portland

  5. Portland, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) |Texas: EnergyOklahoma:Ewen,Risk Modeling Jump to:Portland,

  6. CAMBRIAN STRATIGRAPHY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF NORTHERN ARIZONA AND SOUTHERN NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Northern Arizona and Southern Nevada ARTICLE 7 TRILOBITE BIOSTRATIGRAPHY AND SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY#12;CAMBRIAN STRATIGRAPHY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF NORTHERN ARIZONA AND SOUTHERN NEVADA THE 16TH FIELD STRATIGRAPHY FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA, AND SOUTHERN NEVADA, UNITED STATES Edited by J. Stewart Hollingsworth

  7. Angora Goats for Conversion of Arizona Chaparral: Early Results1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angora Goats for Conversion of Arizona Chaparral: Early Results1 O. D. Knipe2 1 Presented located at the Station's Research Work Unit at Tempe, in cooperation with Arizona State Univer- sity quarter century has shown that conversion of Arizona chaparral to grass significantly increases water

  8. CAMBRIAN STRATIGRAPHY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF NORTHERN ARIZONA AND SOUTHERN NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;CAMBRIAN STRATIGRAPHY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF NORTHERN ARIZONA AND SOUTHERN NEVADA THE 16TH FIELD STRATIGRAPHY FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA, AND SOUTHERN NEVADA, UNITED STATES Edited by J. Stewart Hollingsworth. A., and Foster, J. R., (editors), 2011, Cambrian Stratigraphy and Paleontology of Northern Arizona

  9. TECHNICAL NOTE Geotechnical properties of fresh cement groutpressure ltration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    TECHNICAL NOTE Geotechnical properties of fresh cement groutÐpressure ®ltration and consolidation relations; grouting; laboratory tests; permeability. INTRODUCTION Cement is a basic construction material, and in geotechnics the hydraulic cements known as Port- land cements are particularly important. Hydraulic cements

  10. CONSTRUCTION-GRADE CEMENT PRODUCTION FROM CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    1 CONSTRUCTION-GRADE CEMENT PRODUCTION FROM CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS USING CEMENT-LOCKTM TECHNOLOGY A manufacturing technology for producing construction-grade cements from a wide variety of contaminated waste cementitious properties that allow it to be transformed into construction-grade cement. The Cement

  11. Characterization of cement minerals, cements and their reaction products at the atomic and nano scale 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skibsted, Joergen; Hall, Christopher

    Recent advances and highlights in characterization methods are reviewed for cement minerals, cements and their reaction products. The emphasis is on X-ray and neutron diffraction, and on nuclear magnetic resonance methods, ...

  12. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2009-01-01

    S. , 1990. Energy Outlook in West Germany’s Cement Industry.imported from Germany and/or Japan. 1 Energy/Environment/® Energy Converter at the Lengfurt Cement, Germany, image

  13. Primary cementing across massive lost circulation zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turki, W.H.; Mackay, A.S.

    1983-03-01

    As a result of severe lost circulation problems in some wells in the Ghawar and Abqaiq Fields, Aramco has been unable to cover the Umm Er-Radhuma (Paleocene) and Wasia (Cretaceous) aquifers with cement. This has necessitated setting an extended liner opposite the Wasia aquifer, to ensure that there are two casing strings and a cement sheath across the aquifer, resulting in increased casing cost and reduced well productivity. This paper describes the results of field trial tests performed, along with conclusions and recommendations aimed at solving this problem. Field methods employed include light weight extended cements, ultra-light cement slurries weighing as little as 55 lbm/ft/sup 3/ (pcf), using ceramic hollow spheres, glass bubbles and foam, plus hydrostatic cementing, and mechanical devices. Finally, methods of job evaluation are discussed. These include temperature surveys, bond logs, radioactive tracers, and a new cement volume log.

  14. THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC April 11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    of growing economic importance, and it will become more important still. As alternative forms of energy are explored, Arizona's geography will make it a focal point for solar- energy initiatives, and its expertise that opportunity is the best way to ensure that our state will rebound from the bursting of the housing bubble

  15. University of Arizona Code of Academic Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    University of Arizona Code of Academic Integrity Sanctions for Multiple Violations Instructions at 621-7057. 2. Determine if additional sanctions are to be imposed within 20 academic days of receipt of notice from the Dean of Students Office of multiple violations. 2. Indicate on this form the sanctions

  16. Master's in Development The Arizona MDP offers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in international development Curriculum that integrates training in global health, natural sciences, social, Arizona, in the picturesque Sonoran Desert with close proximity to the US/Mexico border An affordable MDP students and faculty who have dedicated themselves to reducing the grinding impacts of global poverty

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    Emissions from the Global Cement Industry, Annual Review ofBösche, A. , 1993. “Variable Speed Drives in Cement Plants,”World Cement 6 24 pp.2- Buzzi, S. 1997. Die Horomill® - Eine

  18. INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Cement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff Aprilhydraulic cements from spent oil shale is described in this

  19. INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P. Persoff AprilCement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P, K, Mehta Civil Engineering

  20. Squeeze cement method using coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underdown, D.R.; Ashford, J.D.; Harrison, T.W.; Eastlack, J.K.; Blount, C.G.; Herring, G.D.

    1986-12-09

    A method is described of squeeze cementing a well wherein the well has a casing throughout the wellbore, casing cement between the casing and the wellbore of the well, perforations through the casing and the casing cement to establish fluid communication between the interior of the casing and a formation adjacent the perforations, channels in the casing cement in fluid communication with at least some of the perforations, a well tubing string in the casing extending from the surface to the proximity of the perforations, and a packer means for sealing between the tubing and the casing above the perforations. The method consists of: isolating the casing adjacent the perforations; lowering a coiled tubing down the well tubing string to a point adjacent the perforations; flowing uncontaminated squeeze cement through the coiled tubing and through the perforations into the channels; flowing a cement contaminating liquid down the coiled tubing to mix with the squeeze cement remaining in the casing; allowing the uncontaminated squeeze cement in the channels to harden; and removing the contaminated squeeze cement from the casing through the coiled tubing.

  1. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01

    Cement Portland Cement Fly Ash Cement Blast Furnace SlagCement Portland Cement Fly Ash Cement Blast Furnace SlagCEM II), up to 35% can be fly ash and 65% clinker; for blast

  2. Portland Company to Receive $1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland Company to Receive 1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Technologies Portland Company to Receive 1.3 Million to Improve Hydro Power Technologies September 15, 2009 -...

  3. Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well...

  4. Wellbore Integrity Assurance with NETL's Safe Cementing Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects Contact Us Wellbore cement integrity is paramount to safe, successful oil and natural gas drilling. Cement acts as the primary barrier between the wellbore and...

  5. Fredonia, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistar LLCNorth Carolina:Arizona: Energy Resources Jump

  6. Sawmill, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage ResourcesFlorida:Satcon JumpSawmill, Arizona: Energy

  7. Lukachukai, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon:Lowell Point, Alaska:Vermont: Energy Resources Jump

  8. Mayer, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois:Martin,OpenMatthews,MaverickMayer, Arizona: Energy

  9. Lechee, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: EnergyLebanon County, Pennsylvania: Energy

  10. Leupp, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: EnergyLebanonTexas: Energy ResourcesLetcher

  11. Littletown, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: Energy ResourcesGrove,LittleNew Hampshire:

  12. University of Arizona Compressed Air Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Joseph; Muralidharan, Krishna

    2012-12-31

    Boiled down to its essentials, the grant’s purpose was to develop and demonstrate the viability of compressed air energy storage (CAES) for use in renewable energy development. While everyone agrees that energy storage is the key component to enable widespread adoption of renewable energy sources, the development of a viable scalable technology has been missing. The Department of Energy has focused on expanded battery research and improved forecasting, and the utilities have deployed renewable energy resources only to the extent of satisfying Renewable Portfolio Standards. The lack of dispatchability of solar and wind-based electricity generation has drastically increased the cost of operation with these components. It is now clear that energy storage coupled with accurate solar and wind forecasting make up the only combination that can succeed in dispatchable renewable energy resources. Conventional batteries scale linearly in size, so the price becomes a barrier for large systems. Flow batteries scale sub-linearly and promise to be useful if their performance can be shown to provide sufficient support for solar and wind-base electricity generation resources. Compressed air energy storage provides the most desirable answer in terms of scalability and performance in all areas except efficiency. With the support of the DOE, Tucson Electric Power and Science Foundation Arizona, the Arizona Research Institute for Solar Energy (AzRISE) at the University of Arizona has had the opportunity to investigate CAES as a potential energy storage resource.

  13. Guide to Cement-Based Integrated Pavement Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide to Cement-Based Integrated Pavement Solutions August 2011 #12;Cement-Based Integrated Commercial Residential Recreation LAND USE CEMENT-BASED INTEGRATED PAVEMENT SOLUTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Conventional Overlays CRCP VIBRATORY COMPACTION Pervious Concrete Full-Depth Reclamation Cement- Treat- ed Base

  14. Arizona: Solar Panels Replace Inefficient Fossil Fuel-Powered...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Program project results in annual estimated cost savings of 313,000 for reduced consumption of gasoline, diesel, propane, and electricity. Location Arizona Partners State...

  15. EIS-0474: Southline Transmission Line Project; Arizona and New...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    consist of a new 225-mile transmission line between existing substations at Afton, New Mexico, and Apache, Arizona, and improvements to approximately 130 miles of existing...

  16. ,"Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release...

  17. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120.degree. C. to about 300.degree. C. to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate.

  18. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.

    1993-09-21

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

  19. Tobacco Control in Transition: Public Support and Governmental Disarray in Arizona 1997-2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendlin M.Sc., Yogi H.; Barnes, Richard L JD; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

    2008-01-01

    2002. Morris D. "East & West Valley Voters Support Smokefreebecame the first city in the West Valley of the metropolitanTGen) Arizona Heart Institute West Valley Hospital Arizona

  20. Second International Workshop on Social Computing, Behavioral Modeling, and Prediction Phoenix, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Huan

    Second International Workshop on Social Computing, Behavioral Modeling, and Prediction Phoenix, Arizona March 31 - April 1, 2009 Phoenix, Arizona Proceedings published by Springer Social computing

  1. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2009-01-01

    the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tooland domestic best practice energy use. Comparing the barson the next sheet) best practice energy use. Comparing the

  2. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2009-01-01

    waste heat recovery on dioxin emissions from cement kilns (low-temperature, catalytic dioxin formation reactions. Heattime for the flue gas at the dioxin formation temperature

  3. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    D.  Tamás.  “Burnability of Cement Raw Materials at Rapid Calcination Conditions. ” Cement and Concrete Research and Herman H.  Tseng.  Cement Plant Operations Handbook: 

  4. Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2013-01-01

    House, Beijing. CCA (China Cement Association), 2009.China Cement Almanac 2008. Jiangsu People'sHouse, Nanjing. CCA (China Cement Association), 2010. China

  5. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Burnability of Cement Raw Materials at Rapid  Calcination of Alternative Fuels and Raw  Materials in the Cement cement shipping and raw materials receiving system  Union 

  6. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p. 54S,Colorado's primary oil shale resource for vertical modifiedSimulated effects of oil-shale development on the hydrology

  7. A nanochemomechanical investigation of carbonated cement paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanzo, James (James F.)

    2009-01-01

    Concrete, and in particular its principal component, cement paste, has an interesting relation with carbon dioxide. Concrete is a carbon dioxide generator-- it is estimated that 5-10% of atmospheric CO? comes from this ...

  8. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    hydraulic cement from spent oil shale," Vol. 10, No. 4, p.J. W. , "Colorado's primary oil shale resource for verticalSimulated effects of oil-shale development on the hydrology

  9. Supply chain management in the cement industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agudelo, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally supply chain management has played an operational role within cement and mineral extraction commodity companies. Recently, cost reduction projects have brought supply chain management into the limelight. In ...

  10. Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom Advisor: Dr. Scott Whiteford Center resources. Often excluded from the typical water- related concerns associated with biofuels as algae as the best location in the world to grow algae, the state of Arizona is now home to several premier algae

  11. Williams, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:MeadowWikiSysop'sOhio: EnergyWilliams, Arizona:

  12. Tombstone, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open EnergyTinoxOpenStatutes JumpTombstone, Arizona: Energy

  13. Storage opportunities in Arizona bedded evaporites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.; Rauzi, S.L.

    1996-10-01

    Arizona is endowed with incredibly diverse natural beauty, and has also been blessed with at least seven discrete deposits of bedded salt. These deposits are dispersed around the state and cover some 2, 500 square miles; they currently contain 14 LPG storage caverns, with preliminary plans for more in the future. The areal extent and thickness of the deposits creates the opportunity for greatly expanded storage of LPG, natural gas, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). The location of salt deposits near Tucson and Phoenix may make CAES an attractive prospect in the future. The diversity of both locations and evaporate characteristics allows for much tailoring of individual operations to meet specific requirements.

  14. Florence, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to:Flanders, New York:EnergyFlixArizona: Energy

  15. Dennehotso, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:Delta ElectricDenair,Dennehotso, Arizona:

  16. Eagar, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: ETEC GmbHUnitedOpen|Eagar, Arizona:

  17. Eloy, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville, New York: Energy ResourcesEloy, Arizona: Energy

  18. Stanfield, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:SpillDavid,Energyby Europe JumpStanfield, Arizona:

  19. Maricopa, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChangeMarc M SiahMaribel,Arizona:

  20. Kearny, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills,New York:JustKandiyohiCounty,Kawar(CTI PFAN)Arizona:

  1. Kaibito, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills,New York:Just HotKahaluu, Hawaii:Kaibito, Arizona:

  2. Pisinemo, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975) | OpenBethlehem Biomass FacilityPinto HotPisinemo, Arizona:

  3. Parks, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program |View NewParatek Microwave IncParkeParks, Arizona: Energy

  4. Arizona Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014ResidentialRepressuring

  5. Arizona Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas

  6. Prescott, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC JumpPhonoSolar and WindPrayagMonitoring,Arizona:

  7. Somerton, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSolo Energy Jump to:Somerton, Arizona: Energy

  8. Surprise, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEuropeEnergy InformationSunrainSamplingSurprise, Arizona:

  9. Wickenburg, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,What Is a Small CommunityWickenburg, Arizona: Energy

  10. Cameron, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas:Information(RedirectedEnterpriseCounty, Texas:toArizona:

  11. Cottonwood, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)|Alabama: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchArizona:

  12. Chuichu, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR JumpMaine:WestTexas:Chittenango,Christine,Chuichu, Arizona:

  13. Arizona Department of Transportation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump| OpenExplorationArgentina: EnergyTexas:Arizona

  14. Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump|Line Siting CommitteeInformationArizona:

  15. Computational fluid dynamics improves liner cementing operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, N.A.; Archer, G.L. ); Seymour, D.A. )

    1994-09-26

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), an analytical tool for studying fluid mechanics, helped plan the successful cementing of a critical liner in a North Sea extended reach well. The results from CFD analysis increased the confidence in the primary cementing of the liner. CFD modeling was used to quantify the effects of increasing the displacement rate and of rotating the liner on the mud flow distribution in the annulus around the liner.

  16. Investigation of Possible Wellbore Cement Failures During Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George

    2014-11-01

    We model and assess the possibility of shear failure, using the Mohr-Coulomb model ? along the vertical well by employing a rigorous coupled flow-geomechanic analysis. To this end, we vary the values of cohesion between the well casing and the surrounding cement to representing different quality levels of the cementing operation (low cohesion corresponds to low-quality cement and/or incomplete cementing). The simulation results show that there is very little fracturing when the cement is of high quality.. Conversely, incomplete cementing and/or weak cement can causes significant shear failure and the evolution of long fractures/cracks along the vertical well. Specifically, low cohesion between the well and cemented areas can cause significant shear failure along the well, but the same cohesion as the cemented zone does not cause shear failure. When the hydraulic fracturing pressure is high, low cohesion of the cement can causes fast propagation of shear failure and of the resulting fracture/crack, but a high-quality cement with no weak zones exhibits limited shear failure that is concentrated near the bottom of the vertical part of the well. Thus, high-quality cement and complete cementing along the vertical well appears to be the strongest protection against shear failure of the wellbore cement and, consequently, against contamination hazards to drinking water aquifers during hydraulic fracturing operations.

  17. ArizonaArizona''s Electricity Future:s Electricity Future: The Demand for WaterThe Demand for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    ArizonaArizona''s Electricity Future:s Electricity Future: The Demand for WaterThe Demand for Water'' projected energy demandprojected energy demand 317 1,281 257 511 5,506 1,989 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5

  18. Analysis of CCRL proficiency cements 151 and 152 using the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullard, Jeffrey W. . E-mail: jeffrey.bullard@nist.gov; Stutzman, Paul E.

    2006-08-15

    To test the ability of the Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing Laboratory (VCCTL) software to predict cement hydration properties, characterization of mineralogy and phase distribution is necessary. Compositional and textural characteristics of Cement and Concrete Reference Laboratory (CCRL) cements 151 and 152 were determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis followed by computer modeling of hydration properties. The general procedure to evaluate a cement is as follows: (1) two-dimensional SEM backscattered electron and X-ray microanalysis images of the cement are obtained, along with a measured particle size distribution (PSD); (2) based on analysis of these images and the measured PSD, three-dimensional microstructures of various water-to-cement ratios are created and hydrated using VCCTL, and (3) the model predictions for degree of hydration under saturated conditions, heat of hydration (ASTM C186), setting time (ASTM C191), and strength development of mortar cubes (ASTM C109) are compared to experimental measurements either performed at NIST or at the participating CCRL proficiency sample evaluation laboratories. For both cements, generally good agreement is observed between the model predictions and the experimental data.

  19. Low fluid leakoff cementing compositions and filtration control additive for cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrest, G.T.

    1993-07-20

    A cementing composition is described, for cementing oil or gas wells penetrating subterranean formations, capable of forming a fluid slurry when mixed with water comprising: dry hydraulic cement; and a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh. In a process for cementing a casing in an oil or gas well penetrating a subterranean formation wherein a cement slurry, formed by mixing water and hydraulic cement, is pumped down the well to flow upwardly between the casing and the subterranean formation, the improvement is described comprising: utilizing as a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, and utilizing finely ground peanut hulls wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh.

  20. Revised 5/7/10 Portland State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    323, 324 Analysis of Environmental Systems I, II Lab 4 ESM 322 Environmental Risk Assessment 4 ESM 325 Environmental Risk Assessment Lab 2 ESM 335 Intro to Environmental Management 4 ESM 407Revised 5/7/10 Portland State University Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science in Environmental

  1. Use of Finite-element Analysis to Improve Well Cementing in HTHP Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arias, Henry

    2013-07-30

    ........................................................................... 50 3.4 Shrinkage and Cement Expansion ................................................................... 52 3.5 Flexible Cements ............................................................................................. 57 3.6 Self...

  2. In situ grouting of low-level burial trenches with a cement-based grout at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, C.W.; Spence, R.D.; Tamura, T.; Spalding, B.P.

    1993-01-01

    A technology being evaluated for use in the closure of one of the low-level radwaste burial grounds at ORNL is trench stabilization using a cement-based grout. To demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of this technology, two interconnecting trenches in SWSA 6 were selected as candidates for in situ grouting with a particulate grout. The primary objective was to demonstrate the increased trench stability (characterized by trench penetration tests) and the decreased potential for leachate migration (characterized by hydraulic conductivity tests) following in situ injection of a particulate grout into the waste trenches. Stability against trench subsidence is a critical issue. For example, construction of impermeable covers to seal the trenches will be ineffectual unless subsequent trench subsidence is permanently suspended. A grout composed of 39% Type 1 Portland cement, 55.5% Class F fly ash, and 5.5% bentonite mixed at 12.5 lb/gal of water was selected. Before the trenches were grouted, the primary characteristics relating to physical stability, hydraulic conductivity, and void volume of the trenches were determined. Their physical stability was evaluated using soil-penetration tests.

  3. Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop a novel, zeolite-containing lightweight, high temperature, high pressure geothermal cement, which will provide operators with an easy to use, flexible cementing system that saves time and simplifies logistics.

  4. Identification of Concrete Incompatibilities Using Cement Paste Rheology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Se Hoon

    2010-07-14

    The complex interaction between cement and chemical/mineral admixtures in concrete mixtures sometimes leads to unpredictable concrete performance in the field which is generally defined as concrete incompatibilities. Cement paste rheology...

  5. INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE P.K. Mehta and P.Cement Manufacture from Oil Shale, U.S. Patent 2,904,445,203 (1974), E. D. York, Amoco Oil Co. , letter to J, P. Fox,

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energyalso installed waste heat recovery equipment on its 2400 tpdM. 1990. Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants Energy

  7. Portland State University Graduate School of Education Research unit Early Childhood Outcomes Measurement Project (ECOMP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland State University Graduate School of Education Research unit Early Childhood Outcomes Measurement Project (ECOMP) US Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative

  8. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Blvd., Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, M. P.; Poplawski, M. E.; Tuenge, J. R.

    2012-08-01

    GATEWAY program report on a demonstration of LED roadway lighting on NE Cully Boulevard in Portland, OR, a residential collector road.

  9. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-97-D Portland...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Company: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 103 - May 29, 2014 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-97-D Portland General Electric Company: Federal Register...

  10. High temperature expanding cement composition and use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Erik B. (Tulsa County, OK); Eilers, Louis H. (Rogers County, OK)

    1982-01-01

    A hydratable cement composition useful for preparing a pectolite-containing expanding cement at temperatures above about 150.degree. C. comprising a water soluble sodium salt of a weak acid, a 0.1 molar aqueous solution of which salt has a pH of between about 7.5 and about 11.5, a calcium source, and a silicon source, where the atomic ratio of sodium to calcium to silicon ranges from about 0.3:0.6:1 to about 0.03:1:1; aqueous slurries prepared therefrom and the use of such slurries for plugging subterranean cavities at a temperature of at least about 150.degree. C. The invention composition is useful for preparing a pectolite-containing expansive cement having about 0.2 to about 2 percent expansion, by volume, when cured at at least 150.degree. C.

  11. ASCE Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering, 20 (7), 502-508, 2008. Early-Age Properties of Cement-Based Materials: I. Influence of Cement Fineness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    of Cement-Based Materials: I. Influence of Cement Fineness Dale P. Bentz1* , Gaurav Sant1 , and Jason Weiss1 Abstract The influence of cement fineness on early-age properties of cement-based materials is investigated deformation. Measurements of these properties for two cements of widely different fineness are supplemented

  12. Communication Effect of stress on the electric polarization in cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Communication Effect of stress on the electric polarization in cement Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung the extent of electric polarization in the transverse direction in cement pastes with and without carbon smaller when carbon fibers were present. It was smaller for carbon fiber cement paste containing silica

  13. Microcapsule-Induced Toughening of Bone Cement Gina M. Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    27 Microcapsule-Induced Toughening of Bone Cement Gina M. Miller Senior in Aerospace Engineering R. White, and TAM Prof. Nancy R. Sottos Acrylic bone cement is the primary material used cement, it may be possible to extend the lifetime of the implant, thus reducing the occurrence

  14. Communication Seebeck effect in steel fiber reinforced cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Communication Seebeck effect in steel fiber reinforced cement Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Abstract Cement pastes containing short steel fibers, which contribute to electron conduction, exhibit.0% by mass of cement gives a higher value of the absolute thermoelectric power than a content of 0.5% by mass

  15. Communication Electric polarization in carbon fiber-reinforced cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Communication Electric polarization in carbon fiber-reinforced cement Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung-reinforced cement paste during resistivity measurement. The effect was diminished by increasing the conductivity of the cement paste through the use of carbon fibers that were more crystalline, the increase of the fiber

  16. A NONLINEAR LEARNING CONTROL APPROACH FOR A CEMENT MILLING PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efe, Mehmet Önder

    A NONLINEAR LEARNING CONTROL APPROACH FOR A CEMENT MILLING PROCESS 1 OGUZ H. DAGCI, 2 M. ÖNDER EFE, control of a cement milling circuit is studied with time-varying set values, time-varying plant parameters popularity since the field of nonlinear control still does not offer systematized procedures. Cement mill

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Percutaneous Cement Injection into a Created Cavity for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casto, Joseph M.

    on these assumptions by finding minimal pressure increases (9.4 6 8.5 mm Hg) during direct injection of cement into exORIGINAL ARTICLE Percutaneous Cement Injection into a Created Cavity for the Treatment of Vertebral, CA). PV involves the injection of polymethylmethacrylate cement into an injured vertebral body via

  18. Water infrastructure : hybridized architecture along the Arizona canal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwood, Alex (Wayne Alex)

    2012-01-01

    Due to budget issues, the Central Arizona Project (CAP) canal has been left exposed to the arid desert environment since its construction in the 1970s. As a result, 5% of the amount of water diverted from the Colorado River ...

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Arizona Southwest...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of the University of Arizona under FUSRAP; October 13, 1987 AZ.01-4 - DOE Letter; Bauer to Liverman; Past Operations and a Survey by Messrs, Jascewsky, and Smith; February 7, 1978...

  20. Better Buildings- Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incentives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings.

  1. EIS-0427: Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposed wind energy generation project in Coconino County, Arizona, on privately owned ranch lands and trust lands administered by the Arizona State Land Department. The proposed project includes a new transmission tie-line that would cross lands administered by Coconino National Forest and interconnect with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration’s existing Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak transmission lines.

  2. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials Dale P. Bentz* Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute-Jochen Haecker* Wilhelm Dyckerhoff Institut, 65203 Wiesbaden, Germany The influence of cement particle

  3. PORTLAND SHOWS HOW CLEAN ENERGY WORKS | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codes have a moreINCREASES | Department ofPORTLAND

  4. The variability of fly ash and its effects on selected properties of fresh Portland cement/fly ash mortars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKerall, William Carlton

    1980-01-01

    for air content testing for 15 cubic feet of mortar per cubic yard of concrete 44 13 Summary of samples failing to meet ASTM C-618 uniformity specifications for specific gravity and fineness Average and relative rankings of flow, set, and air... of Energy (2). C Faber and Styron (9). Figure 2. Photomicrograph of' f'l y ash from sub-bituminous coal exposed to moisture ior seven days. 14 ~Sit'i ti ASTM recommends speci f1cat1ons for both class F and class C fly ashes (8). Tables 3 and 4 list...

  5. Cementation and solidification of Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.A.; Semones, G.B.

    1994-04-01

    Cementation studies on various aqueous waste streams at Rocky Flats have shown this technology to be effective for immobilizing the RCRA constituents in the waste. Cementation is also being evaluated for encapsulation of incinerator ash. Experiments will initially evaluate a surrogate ash waste using a Taguchi experimental design to optimize the cement formulation and waste loading levels for this application. Variables of waste loading, fly ash additions, water/cement ratio, and cement type will be tested at three levels each during the course of this work. Tests will finally be conducted on actual waste using the optimized cement formulation developed from this testing. This progression of tests will evaluate the effectiveness of cement encapsulation for this waste stream without generating any additional wastes.

  6. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Economic Output in Chinese Cement Kilns,” Proceedings of thereduction of China’s cement industry. Energy Policy 45 (751. Kong, Xiangzhong (China Cement Association, CCA), 2009.

  7. Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

    2012-12-01

    The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS surfaces; 2) inhibiting the cathodic reactions at the corrosion site of CS; 3) extending the coverage of cement over CS surfaces; and, 4) improving the adherence of the cement to CS surfaces. Thus, the CS’s corrosion rate of 176 milli inch/per year (mpy) for 1 wt% FA-foamed cement without AP was considerably reduced to 69 mpy by adding only 2 wt% AP. Addition of AP at 10 wt% further reduced this rate to less than 10 mpy.

  8. Portland State University School of the Environment Winter Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Director, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University Influence of data scale on studying urban water demand January 28 No talk this week February 4 Hunter Shobe Associate Maps of the Western U.S: Understanding Geothermal Energy Potential February 25 Janine Castro

  9. Latest News Browse Topics Encyclopedia Science Shop Green-winged macaws. (Photo courtesy of Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    Latest News Browse Topics Encyclopedia Science Shop Green-winged macaws. (Photo courtesy of Arizona & Energy > Computers & Math > Fossils & Ruins Science Topics > Agriculture > Astronomy > Biology > more topics Encyclopedia > Agriculture > Anthropology Source: Arizona State University Date: 2005

  10. Integrated solid waste management of Scottsdale, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the city of Scottsdale, Arizona, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. The document reports actual data from records kept by participants. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may per-form manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for municipal solid waste (MSW) management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption, for a 1-year period, of an operating IMSWM system. The report is organized into two main parts. The first part is the executive summary and case study portion of the report. The executive summary provides a basic description of the study area and selected economic and energy information. Within the case study are detailed descriptions of each component operating during the study period; the quantities of solid waste collected, processed, and marketed within the study boundaries; the cost of MSW in Scottsdale; an energy usage analysis; a review of federal, state, and local environmental requirement compliance; a reference section; and a glossary of terms. The second part of the report focuses on a more detailed discourse on the above topics. In addition, the methodology used to determine the economic costs and energy consumption of the system components is found in the second portion of this report. The methodology created for this project will be helpful for those professionals who wish to break out the costs of their own integrated systems.

  11. Arizona – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Institute Employment Discrimination Report The City ofprotect city employees from discrimination based on sexualsexual orientation discrimination In 1965, Arizona passed

  12. Pressures on Arizona Water and Energy Policy: Case Study of the Navajo Generating Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    , the Navajo Generating Station (NGS), that is among the dirtiest coal power plants in the country1 Pressures on Arizona Water and Energy Policy: Case Study of the Navajo Generating Station Sonya largest user of energy in the state of Arizona. It is powered by a coal plant in Northern Arizona

  13. Frequency Modes of Monsoon Precipitation in Arizona and New Mexico ANNE W. NOLIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Frequency Modes of Monsoon Precipitation in Arizona and New Mexico ANNE W. NOLIN Department proportion of the annual precipitation for Arizona and New Mexico arrives during the summer monsoon. Forty-one years of daily monsoon season precipitation data for Arizona and New Mexico were studied using wavelet

  14. GEOGRAPHY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA: A HISTORY1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 GEOGRAPHY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA: A HISTORY1 Leland R. Pederson, Professor Emeritus of Geography and Regional Development, The University of Arizona pederson@geog.arizona.edu January 2002 (edited September 2007) CONTENTS I INTRODUCTION II PREPARATORY GEOGRAPHY III THE NATURAL

  15. St. Michaels, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:SpillDavid, Arizona:LandryMartinMichaels, Arizona:

  16. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2011-01-01

    10 References Anonymous. 1994. Cement Plant Modernization inCentral Europe, World Cement (November): 35-38 Bösche, A.Variable Speed Drives in Cement Plants, World Cement 6 24

  17. Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Azure. Alternative Fuel Use in the Cement Sector in ShandongSector Analysis Report: Cement Testing Sectoral ProposalTemplates In China’s Cement Sector. 2009. Bao , Xianfa.

  18. Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    2009. CO 2 Capture in the Cement Industry. Energy Procedia2 Capture Technologies for Cement Industry. Energy Procedia,J.M. Makar, T. Sato. 2010. Cement and concrete nanoscience

  19. Promoting Energy Efficiency in Cement Making: The ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

    2007-01-01

    information Energy Guide for Cement Making, please contact:Saving Opportunities for the Cement Industry: An ENERGY STARindex.cfm? c=in_focus.bus_cement_manuf_focus Based on data

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    Lime Institute. 2001. Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide inIndustry, Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resourcesof a Cement Kiln, Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme,

  1. NIST Special Publication 1173 Virtual Cement and Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    made with port- land cement clinker, calcium sulfate, fly ash, slag, limestone, and other ma- terials.2 Slags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 6.3 Fly Ashes

  2. The carbon leakage effect on the cement sector under different ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-08

    Electricity consumption per tons of clinker produced with technology w ? W ...... An application to the cement, steel and oil refining industries in Spain. Climate ...

  3. South Portland, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSiliciumEnergyHouston, Texas:588958°, -80.0386522°Portland,

  4. EA-97-B Portland General Electric Company | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to exportEndure Energy,VitolSaracenPortland General

  5. EA-97-C Portland General Electric | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to exportEndure Energy,VitolSaracenPortland

  6. EA-97-D Portland General Electric Company | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to exportEndure Energy,VitolSaracenPortlandPGE to

  7. Portland Street Lighting Report (August 2015) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1,anEnergy Company Weatherizes, PreservesPortland

  8. FUPWG Meeting Agenda - Portland, Oregon | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111, 2015EnergyEnergy 3,4 AgendaPortland,

  9. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Cement Production Source: IEA 2011a, GOI 2012b Appendix 3.International Energy Agency (IEA), 2009, Cement TechnologyInternational Energy Agency (IEA), 2011a. Energy Transition

  10. Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Specific cement energy consumption: conversion of power into2006. Cement industry energy consumption status and energyZhou, H. , 2007a. Energy consumption and environment

  11. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    design code for energy saving, energy consumption auditingEnergy Consumption and Energy Saving Potential,” ProceedingsCement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement

  12. February 3 Kimberly Ogden "Cultivation Strategies for Microalgae to Produce 1:15 pm University of Arizona Biofuels"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    of Arizona Biofuels" SCOB 228 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering February 17 Daven Henze

  13. Water, Electric Power and Growth in Southern Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    . #12;Growth City of Tucson: Department of Urban Planning and Design. 2008. Pima County Population and Regional Development University of Arizona #12;The Water-Energy Nexus Goldstein, Robert. 2006. Electric Power/Water Sustainability. Western Region Energy-Water Needs Assessment Workshop, Salt Lake City. #12

  14. EIS-0441: Mohave County Wind Farm Project, Mohave County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, prepared by the Bureau of Land Management with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, evaluated the environmental impacts of a proposed wind energy project on public lands in Mohave County, Arizona. Power generated by this project would tie to the electrical power grid through an interconnection to one of Western’s transmission lines.

  15. EIS-0417: South Mountain Freeway (Loop 202); Phoenix, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Highway Administration and Arizona Department of Transportation, with Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, prepared an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed South Mountain Freeway (Loop 202) project in the Greater Metropolitan Phoenix Area.

  16. MS in Water, Society, and Policy University of Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    MS in Water, Society, and Policy University of Arizona Biological Sciences East, Room 325 Phone of scholarship. The Water, Society and Policy Program draws on the expertise of scientists, social scientists and the Environment School of Geography and Development Water Resources Research Center Institute

  17. EA-1989: Cliffrose Solar Energy Interconnection Project, Mohave County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA that will assess the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed Cliffrose Solar Energy Project in Mohave County, Arizona, to Western’s transmission system at the existing Griffith Substation. Additional information is available at http://www.wapa.gov/dsw/environment/CliffroseSolarEnergyProject.html.

  18. Salt River (Rio Salado Oeste), Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Salt River (Rio Salado Oeste), Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona 18 October 2006 Abstract: The Rio of Phoenix encompassing eight miles of the Salt River from 19th to 83rd Avenues on the southwest side is $164,950,000. The project cost will be shared between the Federal government and the city of Phoenix

  19. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30

    The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5) the amount of production of cement by type and grade (in tonnes per year); (6) the electricity generated onsite; and, (7) the energy used by fuel type; and, the amount (in RMB per year) spent on energy. The tool offers the user the opportunity to do a quick assessment or a more detailed assessment--this choice will determine the level of detail of the energy input. The detailed assessment will require energy data for each stage of production while the quick assessment will require only total energy used at the entire facility (see Section 6 for more details on quick versus detailed assessments). The benchmarking tool provides two benchmarks--one for Chinese best practices and one for international best practices. Section 2 describes the differences between these two and how each benchmark was calculated. The tool also asks for a target input by the user for the user to set goals for the facility.

  20. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-97-D Portland...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Company Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-97-D Portland General Electric Company Application from PGE to export electric energy to Canada. EA-97-D PGE (CN).pdf...

  1. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director www progress report on various activities that are underway. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503

  2. Communication Damage monitoring of cement paste by electrical resistance measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    on the use of electrical resistance measurement to sense strain in cement reinforced with short carbon fibers of curing [2±5]. How- ever, this paper is not concerned with carbon fiber-rein- forced cement. 2 in the elastic deformation regime. However, damage in the plastic deformation regime is much more significant

  3. TRANSIENT EFFECTS IN OILFIELD CEMENTING FLOWS MIGUEL ANGEL MOYERS GONZALEZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    cementing of an oil well. This process involves displacement of a sequence of non-Newtonian fluids alongTRANSIENT EFFECTS IN OILFIELD CEMENTING FLOWS by MIGUEL ANGEL MOYERS GONZ´ALEZ B.Sc., Instituto is in fact well-posed. In chapter 4 we study stability of multi-layer parallel flows, i.e. long fingers

  4. Making a Cement Tray for Compression Molding of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Making a Cement Tray for Compression Molding of Shape&Roll Prosthetic Foot Cores Andrew Hansen, Ph, MS and Andrew Hansen, PhD. #12;A lever compression molding device for fabrication of Shape entitled "Making a Cement Upper Molding Surface for Compression Molding of Shape&Roll Prosthetic Foot Cores

  5. Communication Improving silica fume cement by using silane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    for enhancing the bond between a ceramic filler and a polymer matrix [57] because the epoxy structure at the end for enhancing the bond between a ceramic filler and a cement matrix [51]. In spite of the difference in chemicalCommunication Improving silica fume cement by using silane Yunsheng Xu, D.D.L. Chung* Composite

  6. Primary Cementing of a Highly Deviated Oil Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    in the construction of a well. The objective is to provide zonal isolation, i.e., a hydraulic seal between the wellPrimary Cementing of a Highly Deviated Oil Well by Mariana Carrasco-Teja B.Sc., Instituto Tecnol. The study comes from the primary cementing of highly deviated oil and gas wells. Highly deviated wells

  7. High Temperature Cements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey, Pennsylvania:HiddenTemperature Cements Jump to:

  8. Cement Bond Log | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPIDCavallo Energy JumpCeiling Fan JumpCement Bond Log

  9. Magnesium-phosphate-glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1982-09-23

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate, exhibits rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  10. Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY)

    1984-03-13

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  11. Use of hazardous waste in cement kilns backed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krieger, J.

    1993-07-19

    Cement kiln operators who are making use of hazardous waste as a partial substitute for fossil fuel now have a better engineering foundation for determining what is going on in the kilns and how to optimize their operations. A just-released study by a scientific advisory board of experts commissioned by the Cement Kiln Recycling Coalition (CKRC) in Washington, DC, has provided an in-depth look, at such operations and finds the practice to be a fundamentally sound' technology. Long residence times and high temperatures in cement kilns maximize the combustion efficiency for waste-derived fuels, according to the study report. The scientific advisory board notes that all organic compounds can be destroyed in a kiln at 99.9999% efficiency. Also, the behavior of metals in cement kilns can be readily measured, predicted, and controlled. Cement kilns are extremely efficient in reducing metals emissions.

  12. Ghabezloo et al.: Poromechanical behaviour of hardened cement paste under isotropic loading Poromechanical behaviour of hardened cement paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of this cement in oil-wells conditions, i.e. under high stress and elevated temperature, is essential of the well when CO2 storage and sequestration is planned. Whether the mechanical behaviour of hardened cement and drained bulk modulus are discussed. A phenomenon of degradation of elastic properties is observed

  13. The effects of the mechanical–chemical stabilization process for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash on the chemical reactions in cement paste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Cheng-Gang; Sun, Chang-Jung; Gau, Sue-Huai; Wu, Ching-Wei; Chen, Yu-Lun

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? Milling extracted MSWI fly ash. ? Increasing specific surface area, destruction of the crystalline texture, and increasing the amount of amorphous materials. ? Increasing heavy metal stability. ? Inducing pozzolanic reactions and increasing the early and later strength of the cement paste. - Abstract: A water extraction process can remove the soluble salts present in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash, which will help to increase the stability of the synthetic materials produced from the MSWI fly ash. A milling process can be used to stabilize the heavy metals found in the extracted MSWI fly ash (EA) leading to the formation of a non-hazardous material. This milled extracted MSWI fly ash (MEA) was added to an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste to induce pozzolanic reactions. The experimental parameters included the milling time (96 h), water to binder ratios (0.38, 0.45, and 0.55), and curing time (1, 3, 7 and 28 days). The analysis procedures included inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES), BET, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The results of the analyses indicate that the milling process helped to stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA, with an increase in the specific surface area of about 50 times over that of OPC. The addition of the MEA to the OPC paste decreased the amount of Ca(OH){sub 2} and led to the generation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) which in turned increased the amount of gel pores and middle sized pores in the cement. Furthermore, a comparison shows an increase in the early and later strength over that of OPC paste without the addition of the milled extracted ash. In other words, the milling process could stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA and had an activating effect on the MEA, allowing it to partly substitute OPC in OPC paste.

  14. Do cement nanoparticles exist in space ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilalbegovic, G; Mohacek-Grosev, V

    2014-01-01

    The calcium-silicate-hydrate is used to model properties of cement on Earth. We study cementitious nanoparticles and propose these structures as components of cosmic dust grains. Quantum density functional theory methods are applied for the calculation of infrared spectra of Ca4Si4O14H4, Ca6Si3O13H2, and Ca12Si6O26H4 clusters. We find bands distributed over the near, mid and far-infrared region. A specific calcium-silicate-hydrate spectral feature at 14 microns, together with the bands at 10 and 18 microns which exist for other silicates as well, could be used for a detection of cosmic cement. We compare calculated bands with the 14 microns features in the spectra of HD 45677, HD 44179, and IRC+10420 which were observed by Infrared Space Observatory and classified as remaining. High abundance of oxygen atoms in cementitious nanoparticles could partially explain observed depletion of this element from the interstellar medium into dust grains.

  15. Incinerators and cement kilns face off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, I.

    1994-04-01

    For the past few years, US incinerators have been at odds with thermal waste processors such as cement kilns. Originally, there was enough room in the industrial waste treatment market for both types of treatment. As waste generators turned to pollution prevention and onsite treatment, however, the volume of waste decreased and its composition changed. Now, each sees the other crowding it out of a tightening market, and the fight between them is growing increasingly bitter. At the center of this battle are the products of alternative thermal processes--for cement kilns, the dust formed after processing, and for other processes, a variety of materials, many of which can be used for construction. Currently, these materials are exempted from regulation under the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). In addition, the alternative processes offer generators a significant cost advantage over incineration. The question that US regulators are now grappling with is whether these materials are safe enough to justify this preferential treatment. So far, the answer seems to be a qualified yes. The paper discusses these issues.

  16. Product List Substructure -Foundations -Slab on Grade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % Fly Ash Cement Generic 20% Fly Ash Cement Generic 20% Slag Cement Generic 35% Slag Cement Generic 50Cem Slag Cement (35%) Lafarge NewCem Slag Cement (50%) Generic 35% Fly Ash Cement Lafarge Portland Type I Ash Cement Generic 20% Fly Ash Cement Generic 20% Slag Cement Generic 35% Slag Cement #12;Generic 50

  17. Double percolation in the electrical conduction in carbon fiber reinforced cement-based materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Double percolation in the electrical conduction in carbon fiber reinforced cement-based materials Available online 9 November 2006 Abstract Electrically conductive cement-based materials are important conduction in carbon fiber cement-based materials. It involves fiber percolation and cement paste percolation

  18. USE OF VATERITE AND CALCITE IN FORMING CALCIUM PHOSPHATE CEMENT A. Cuneyt Tas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    USE OF VATERITE AND CALCITE IN FORMING CALCIUM PHOSPHATE CEMENT SCAFFOLDS A. Cuneyt Tas Department calcium phosphate (CaP+CaCO3) cements have been developed. The common point in these cements in the end-product of these cements was carbonated, Ca-deficient, apatitic calcium phosphate, together

  19. Abstract The concurrent goals of cement hydration are to percolate (bridge) the original

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Abstract The concurrent goals of cement hydration are to percolate (bridge) the original cement. The initial volume, particle size distribution, and flocculation/dispersion state of the cement particles have and the alkali content of the cement pastes. Finally, it is proposed that future efforts in this field

  20. Guang Ye, Characterization of cement paste at early age, 1 of 11 Fax: +31 15 2785895

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guang Ye, Characterization of cement paste at early age, 1 of 11 Fax: +31 15 2785895 E-mail: ye.guang@ct.tudelft.nl A MICROMECHANIC MODEL FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF CEMENT PASTE AT EARLY AGE VALIDATED WITH EXPERIMENTS Guang Ye Delft of a cement-based material, i.e. the stiffness of cement paste, is the result of the continuous change

  1. Functionally-graded fiber-reinforced cement composite: Processing, microstructure, and properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Functionally-graded fiber-reinforced cement composite: Processing, microstructure, and properties-graded fiber-reinforced cement composite (FGFRCC). Fiber volume fractions were increased linearly from 0: Fiber-reinforced cement composite (FRCC); Functionally-graded fiber-reinforced cement composite (FGFRCC

  2. Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement to an increase of AF use from 8.7% to 20.9% of the total energy consumption. 2. One of the alternative fuels used cement industry produces about 3.3 billion tonnes of cement annually. Cement production is energy

  3. Formation of slot-shaped borehole breakout within weakly cemented sandstones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakagawa, Seiji; Tomutsa, Liviu; Myer, Larry R.

    2008-01-01

    within weakly cemented sandstones Seiji Nakagawa, Liviusynthetic high-porosity sandstone with controlled porosity

  4. The effects of indoor pollution on Arizona children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, R.

    1982-05-01

    The respiratory health of a large group of Arizona school children who have been exposed to indoor pollutants-tobacco smoke and home cooking fumes-is reported. A significant relationship was found between parental smoking and symptoms of cough, wheeze, and sputum production. Also, children in homes where gas cooking fuel was used had higher rates of cough than children in homes where electricity was used. No differences in pulmonary function or yearly lung growth rates occurred among subjects grouped by exposure to tobacco smoke or cooking fuel. Thus, parental smoking and home cooking fuel affected cross-sectional respiratory symptom rates in a large group of Arizona school children. Study of pulmonary function, however, revealed no lung function or lung growth effects during 4 yr of study.

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

    2008-01-31

    This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in this report is based on publicly-available reports, journal articles, and case studies from applications of technologies around the world.

  6. EA-2023: Crossman Peak Communications Facility; Mohave County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a proposed new microwave communication facility to be located adjacent to a privately-owned one near Crossman Peak, east of Lake Havasu City in Mohave County, Arizona. The proposal would consist of a microwave communication facility, an access road, and an approximately 8-mile electrical service distribution line across private land and land administered by the Bureau of Land Management.

  7. Gold Camp, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia: Energy Resources Jump to:GodfreyCamp, Arizona:

  8. Rock Point, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: Energy Resources Jump to:RockPoint, Arizona: Energy

  9. St. David, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:SpillDavid, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to:

  10. St. Johns, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:SpillDavid, Arizona: EnergyMissouri:Johns

  11. Mohave County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett, 2004) | OpenMohave County, Arizona: Energy

  12. Lake Montezuma, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI

  13. Queen Valley, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic Utility DistrictQuailValley, Arizona: Energy

  14. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Arizona | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic UtilityQuintasNEPARAPID/BulkTransmission/Arizona

  15. Red Mesa, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpenRecycledMesa, Arizona: Energy

  16. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Asia Pacific Partnership Cement Task Force (APP). 2010.07(3) Utilizing Biosolids in Cement Kilns. (November). Asia-Utilising Biosolids in Cement Kilns. Final Report. Available

  17. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    2007. “Alternative Fuels & Raw Materials in Halyps cement. ”Fuels & Alternative Raw Materials in the Cement Industry.Alternative Fuels and Raw Materials in the European Cement

  18. From Barbies to Boycotts: How Immigration Raids in Arizona Created a Ten-Year Old Activist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez Vega, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Policy Perspective. O'Leary, A. O. (2014). UndocumentedArizona on a daily basis (O'Leary, 2014). The state is also

  19. Could Gila Bend, Arizona, Become the Solar Capital of the World?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Serving approximately 9,000 homes with clean renewable energy, the Paloma and Cotton Center solar plants highlight the rapidly rising solar corridor in Gila Bend, Arizona.

  20. 49 A.R.S. 255 et seq.: Arizona Pollutant Discharge Elimination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System Program (2014). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?title49A.R.S.255etseq.:ArizonaPollutantDischargeEliminationSystemProgram&oldid793854" ...

  1. From Barbies to Boycotts: How Immigration Raids in Arizona Created a Ten-Year Old Activist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez Vega, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    2009). Puente Arizona, Phoenix. Dreby, J . (2012). TheFigueroa Quinceañera, Phoenix. Personal photograph by2009. Feet In Two Worlds, Phoenix. Retrieved from (http://

  2. INVESTIGATIONS ON HYDRAULIC CEMENTS FROM SPENT OIL SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    saving in heat energy is pbssible if the hydraulic cement ofEnergy Requirement and Cost It is demonstrated above that a hydraulicEnergy and Environment Division Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT A process for making hydraulic

  3. Development of an OCS Cementing Operational Guidelines Database 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Matthew G.

    2014-08-20

    the goals of the database, identifying its users, and selecting an appropriate database management system. The main goal of the database is to present specific design, testing, and operational procedures to ensure optimized cement seal effectiveness...

  4. Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    , the industry has reduced the fuel requirement per ton of cement from about 7 million Btu per ton in old plants to less than 3 million Btu per ton in the most modern plants....

  5. User's Guide to the NIST Virtual Cement and Concrete Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    , a user may create starting microstructures of cement (gypsum, fly ash, etc.) particles in water, hydrate . 20 2.12 Menu Selection 11) Distribute fly ash phases amongst fly ash particles

  6. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    S. , 1990. Energy Outlook in West Germany’s Cement Industry.Energy, Emissions, Savings Potential and Policy Actions, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems Technology and Innovation, Karlsruhe, Germany.Wiesbaden, Germany: 296-304. Caffal, C. 1995. Energy

  7. Wellbore Cement: Research That Begins Where the Sidewalk Ends...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is needed to determine how adeptly cement is placed in a well to ensure that hydrocarbons or other fluids do not leak into surrounding rock, even after years or decades of...

  8. Determination of age in forensic dentistry from cemental incremental lines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa, Eliane Marques Duarte de

    1987-01-01

    ) John E. Martin (Member) H. Del Var Petersen (Member) Gerald R. Bratton (Head of Department) December lg87 ABSTNACT Determination of Age in Forensic Dentistry from Cemental Incremental Lines. (December 1987) Eliane Marques Duarte de Sousa, D. D...DETERMINATION OF AGE IN FORENSIC DENTISTRY FROM CEMENTAL INCREMENTAL LINES Thes' s by ELIANE MARJUES DLARTE DF SOUSA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A?M Univer ity ' n r. srt' al f"lf' llment of the requirements for the degree...

  9. Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett-Price, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

  10. Arizona Geological Society Digest 22 e-mail: Dorsey: rdorsey@uoregon.edu; LaMaskin: tlamaski@uoregon.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorsey, Becky

    Arizona Geological Society Digest 22 2008 325 e-mail: Dorsey: rdorsey@uoregon.edu; La evolution, and ore deposits: Arizona Geological Society Digest 22, p. 325-332. Mesozoic collision

  11. Reverse osmosis (RO) treatment of Tucson's share of Central Arizona Project (CAP) water is being con-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Reverse osmosis (RO) treatment of Tucson's share of Central Arizona Project (CAP) water is being for RO Treatment of CAP Water PROJECT TEAM This Arizona Water Institute PROJECT FACT SHEET is part to treat CAP water and to minimize the amount of concentrate produced. More research and significant

  12. Fellowships in Comparative Genomics Graduate education at the University of Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Fellowships in Comparative Genomics Graduate education at the University of Arizona Supported Traineeships (IGERT) The NSF-IGERT Program in Comparative Genomics is an interdisciplinary program designed genomics More information, application instructions, and deadlines at: www.genomics.arizona.edu Biosciences

  13. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Trial Demonstration of Area Lighting Retrofit, Yuma Border Patrol, Yuma, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkerson, A. M.; McCullough, J. J.

    2014-12-31

    Along the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona, the GATEWAY program conducted a trial demonstration in which the incumbent quartz metal halide area lighting was replaced with LED at three pole locations at the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona. The retrofit was documented to better understand LED technology performance in high-temperature environments.

  14. Estimating the Price Elasticity of Residential Water Demand: The Case of Phoenix, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Article Estimating the Price Elasticity of Residential Water Demand: The Case of Phoenix, Arizona elasticity of residential water demand in Phoenix, Arizona, which is likely to be strongly impacted to such changes requires understanding the responsiveness of water demand to price changes. We estimate the price

  15. The University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences12 Trace Minerals for Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerriero, Vince

    The University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences12 Trace Minerals for Cattle that Arizona cattle held in feedlots seem to contract more diseases. Some scientists linked the increases extension agent, led the research team that learned not only how cattle health is affected when their diet

  16. Applying Remote Sensing to Paleontology Studies in the State of Arizona, USA. Alberto Jimnez1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Applying Remote Sensing to Paleontology Studies in the State of Arizona, USA. Alberto Jiménez1 1 of remote sensing in the last decade have proven to be quite essential in its widespread use in geology: Remote sensing, paleontology, prospecting, Arizona, Landsat, ETM+ INTRODUCTION Improvements

  17. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona Abstract Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at $105 times

  18. THE CONTRIBUTION OF ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY TO THE CITY OF PHOENIX ECONOMY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    THE CONTRIBUTION OF ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY TO THE CITY OF PHOENIX ECONOMY, FISCAL YEAR 2013 of Arizona State University (ASU) to the city of Phoenix. Estimates are presented for the jobs and incomes that are supported in the Phoenix economy by the spending of the university and its employees and students

  19. Debris flows from small catchments of the Ma Ha Tuak Range, metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Debris flows from small catchments of the Ma Ha Tuak Range, metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona Ronald I from tiny but steep mountain catchments throughout metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Urban growth downtown Phoenix, was selected to determine the feasibility of using the varnish microlaminations (VML

  20. Effects of Ambient Fine and Coarse Particles On Mortality in Phoenix, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effects of Ambient Fine and Coarse Particles On Mortality in Phoenix, Arizona Merlise A. Clyde AND COARSE PARTICLES ON MORTALITY IN PHOENIX, ARIZONA1 Merlise A. Clyde Institute of Statistics and Decision of Washington Running Title: Particulate Pollution and Mortality in Phoenix, AZ Key Words: Bayesian Model

  1. Do Debris Flows Pose a Hazard to Mountain-Front Property in Metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Do Debris Flows Pose a Hazard to Mountain-Front Property in Metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona? Ronald I by growing suburbs of metropoli- tan Phoenix, Arizona, including on steep slopes above large single hazard in Phoenix and perhaps other grow- ing cities in the desert Southwest. Key Words: debris flow

  2. Valencia West, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York:PowerNewPumatyUvalde County,VadeWest, Arizona: Energy

  3. Tucson Estates, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergyTrailTrosky,Energy InformationEstates, Arizona:

  4. Sunshine Arizona Wind Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model for theSunLan SolarKorea JumpSunselexSunshine Arizona

  5. East Sahuarita, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to:Providence, Rhode Island: Energy ResourcesSahuarita, Arizona:

  6. Spring Valley, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:Spill Prevention andWell LogMount,Arizona: Energy

  7. EA-106 Arizona Public Service Company | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratoryofNotices | DepartmentDepartmentWesternAvista toArizona

  8. EA-134-APS Arizona Public Service Company | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratoryofNotices |Dynegy Power Marketing, IncArizona Public

  9. Arizona Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. Feet

  10. Arizona Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu. FeetYear Jan

  11. Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu.% of Total

  12. Arizona Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu.% ofFeet)

  13. Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu.%

  14. Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 Million Cu.%Feet)

  15. Arizona Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 MillionYear JanYear

  16. Arizona Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 MillionYear JanYearYear

  17. Arizona Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 MillionYear

  18. Arizona Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 MillionYearDecade Year-0

  19. Arizona Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014 MillionYearDecade

  20. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014Residential Consumers

  1. Arizona Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

  2. Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May

  3. Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayVented

  4. Arizona Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr

  5. Arizona Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYear Jan Feb Mar AprDecade

  6. Arizona Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYear Jan Feb Mar AprDecadeYear

  7. Arizona Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYear Jan Feb Mar

  8. Avra Valley, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustria Geothermal RegionAvra Valley, Arizona: Energy

  9. Camp Verde, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village, Arkansas: Energy Resources JumpVerde, Arizona: Energy

  10. Casas Adobes, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village, Arkansas:FundMichigan:NorthCasas Adobes, Arizona: Energy

  11. Big Park, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBentMichigan:Greece)Daddy s Biodiesel IncPark, Arizona:

  12. Yuma County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan) Jump to:Sanming LianfaYoungstown,Yuma County, Arizona:

  13. City of Fredonia, Arizona (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,ThermalCuba City, Wisconsin (UtilityCity of Fredonia, Arizona

  14. City of Williams - AZ, Arizona (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,ThermalCubaParker,Georgia (UtilityWilliams - AZ, Arizona

  15. Paradise Valley, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina: EnergyIncPanEnergyValley, Arizona:

  16. Pima County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue Mountain GeothermalPilgerPima County, Arizona:

  17. Arizona Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4OfficeArizona Regions National Science Bowl®

  18. Arizona Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4OfficeArizona Regions National Science

  19. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    2012. Potential energy savings and CO 2 emissions reductiondesign code for energy saving, energy consumption auditingCement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement

  20. 'The Overriding Demand for Energy Conservation in the Cement Industry' An Update 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spellman, L. U.

    1981-01-01

    Incentives and constraints to upgrade the U. S. cement industry and its energy efficiency are discussed. Emphasis is given to those measures most accessible to the industry, such as increased use of blended cements and waste fuels....

  1. Nano-ChemoMechanical assessment of Rice Husk Ash cement by wavelength dispersive spectroscopy and nanoindentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abuhaikal, Muhannad (Muhannad A. R.)

    2011-01-01

    Cement global production stands at 3 Giga tons making concrete the most consumed structural mateial worldwide. This massively produced material comes with a heavy environmental footprint rendering the cement industry ...

  2. Unprocessed rice husk ash as a partial replacement of cement for low-cost concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Dorothy Kamilah

    2012-01-01

    Cement is a very valuable commodity as it can be used to construct structurally sound buildings and infrastructure. However, in many developing countries cement is expensive due to the unavailability of local resources to ...

  3. Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    CEM II), up to 35% can be fly ash and 65% clinker; for blastvalue of 70 kgce/tonne (fly ash cement with clinker-to=Blended cement (additives: fly ash, pozzolans, and blast

  4. CO2 on the Integrity of Well Cement | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CO2 on the Integrity of Well Cement Effect of CO2 on the Integrity of Well Cement under Geologic Storage Conditions Geologic carbon storage is the separation and capture of carbon...

  5. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Development waste heat recovery World Wide Fund for NatureTaishan Cement Works Waste Heat Recovery and Utilisation forCement Plant 9100KW Waste Heat Recovery and Utilisation for

  6. Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    oil shale. Emerging technologies enable the use of these alternative raw materials as well as production of cement

  7. Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO2 Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    continuous kiln operation (Perkins 2000). For example, Texas Industries has licensed its patented CemStar cement production process

  8. Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2013-01-01

    is coal-fired power generation. power generation. China Cement (10), 18-heat recovery (WHR) power generation technologies have been

  9. A comparison of normal and worst case cement plant emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodford, J.; Gossman, D.; Johnson, N.

    1996-12-31

    Lone Star Industries, Inc. in Cape Girardeau, Missouri conducted a trial burn in October, 1995. Two metals emissions test days were conducted. One of the test days was a worst case metals spiking day and one of the test days was a normal emissions day. This paper examines and compares the emissions from these two test days. Much has been made of metals emissions from hazardous waste burning cement kilns, but for the most part, this has been due to the worst case metals emissions data that became available from the 1992 BIF compliance testing performed and reported by 24 cement plants. By comparison, very little data exists on normal cement kiln emissions. This paper provides one comparison.

  10. Pacific Northwest Generating Cooperative 711 NE Halsey Portland, OR 97232-1268

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Northwest Generating Cooperative 711 NE Halsey Portland, OR 97232-1268 (503) 288-1234 Fax and Wildlife Program, guided by principles of cost effectiveness. Because our members continue to contribute significantly to the fish and wildlife program through their electric rates, PNGC is deeply interested in seeing

  11. The 2014 Clean Tech Challenge New Building Materials May Reduce Waste At Portland Grocers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    The 2014 Clean Tech Challenge #12;New Building Materials May Reduce Waste At Portland Grocers. According to Teak Wall, Sustainability Program Manager for New Seasons Markets, waxed cardboard boxes represent roughly 80 percent of the organization's compostable materials. "We estimated New Seasons com

  12. Marquam Hill Campus OHSU's central campus, Marquam Hill, is Portland's largest medical destination.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    . The intersection of SW Moody Ave & SW Gibbs St alone is host to an aerial tram, pedestrian bridge, streetcar, bike for Students OHSU Transportation & Parking Mail code: PP22A 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road Portland, OR 97239 Waterfront (SW Moody Ave & Gibbs St) to Marquam Hill (OHSU Kohler Pavilion) in 5 minutes. The tram operates

  13. Communication Uniaxial compression in carbon fiber-reinforced cement, sensed by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Communication Uniaxial compression in carbon fiber-reinforced cement, sensed by electrical 2000; accepted 23 September 2000 Abstract Uniaxial compression of carbon fiber-reinforced cement pastes. The fractional change in resistivity per unit strain is higher in magnitude for carbon fiber silica fume cement

  14. Communication Origin of the thermoelectric behavior of steel fiber cement paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Communication Origin of the thermoelectric behavior of steel fiber cement paste Sihai Wen, D fiber cement. The scattering sites include the fiber­matrix interface, which is like a pn junction, since the fiber and cement paste have opposite signs of the absolute thermoelectric power

  15. The application of an ultrasonic shear wave reflection method for nondestructive testing of cement-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The application of an ultrasonic shear wave reflection method for nondestructive testing of cement for Nondestructive Testing of Cement-Based Materials at Early Ages An Experimental and Numerical Analysis by Dr associate under the supervision of Professor Surendra P. Shah at the Center for Advanced Cement

  16. MULTIVARIABLE NONLINEAR MODEL REFERENCE CONTROL OF CEMENT MILLS Mehmet nder Efe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efe, Mehmet Önder

    MULTIVARIABLE NONLINEAR MODEL REFERENCE CONTROL OF CEMENT MILLS Mehmet Önder Efe1 and Okyay Kaynak2 reference control of a cement-milling circuit that has been studied previously. The approach presented studies focusing on cement mills have appeared. Clarke (1988) discusses the predictive control technique

  17. Sr radionuclide in cement: An atomistic modeling study Mostafa Youssef a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    Docking 90 Sr radionuclide in cement: An atomistic modeling study Mostafa Youssef a , Roland J: Available online xxxx Keywords: Molecular simulation Cement Nuclear waste storage Mechanical properties a b crystalline analog, the 9 Å-tobermorite. C­S­H is the major binding phase of cement. Strontium was shown

  18. Probing Water Phases in Cement Blends using 1 Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Probing Water Phases in Cement Blends using 1 H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry Jean)114 222 5973 Fax: +44 (0)114 222 5943 E-Mail: j.gorce@sheffield.ac.uk Extended Abstract: Cement and Concrete Science, Warwick, 16th + 17th September 2004 Introduction The nuclear industry uses blended cement

  19. Communication Role of moisture in the Seebeck effect in cement-based materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Communication Role of moisture in the Seebeck effect in cement-based materials Jingyao Cao, D of liquid water contributes little, if any, to the Seebeck effect in cement-based materials. Moisture loss Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Fiber reinforcement; Cement paste; Electrical properties

  20. Monitoring the hydration of cement using highly nonlinear solitary waves Xianglei Ni a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    Monitoring the hydration of cement using highly nonlinear solitary waves Xianglei Ni Available online 22 May 2012 Keywords: Highly nonlinear solitary waves Cement Hydration Nondestructive on the propagation of highly nonlinear solitary waves (HNSWs) to monitor the hydration of cement. HNSWs

  1. Fabrication of Functionally Graded-cellular Structures of Cement-based Materials by Co-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Fabrication of Functionally Graded-cellular Structures of Cement-based Materials by Co- extrusion Y-extrusion of layered cement-based materials. The paste flow in the barrel and the die land in a ram extruder should. The functionally graded cellular structures of cement-based materials were successfully fabricated by co

  2. Piezoresistive Cement-based Materials for Strain Sensing D. D. L. CHUNG*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Piezoresistive Cement-based Materials for Strain Sensing D. D. L. CHUNG* Composite Materials ABSTRACT: Cement-based materials that exhibit piezoresistivity with sufficient magnitude and reversibility. The piezoresistive behavior, mechanism and materials are reviewed, including cement-based materials with continuous

  3. Pyroelectric behavior of cement-based materials Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Pyroelectric behavior of cement-based materials Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials for temperature sensing, was observed in cement-based materials. The use of short steel fibers (8 mm diameter dielectric constant, the pyroelectric voltage is lower than those of plain cement paste or carbon fiber (15

  4. DELETERIOUS EXPANSION OF CEMENT PASTE SUBJECTED TO WET-DRY CYCLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ·I CEMENT PASTE SUBJECTED TO WET-DRY CYCLES John A. Wells*, Emmanuel K with five cements produced in different regions of Canada. Test specimens with nominal diameters of 25 mm program show that cement paste specimens exhibit significant differences in the magnitude of expansion

  5. Electric polarization and depolarization in cement-based materials, studied by apparent electrical resistance measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Electric polarization and depolarization in cement-based materials, studied by apparent electrical September 2003 Abstract Electric polarization in cement-based materials (without conductive admixture) under in carbon fiber cement, due to the fast hole response. Sand addition slowed down polarization saturation

  6. A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates Roland J.-M. Pellenqa,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates Roland J.-M. Pellenqa,b , Akihiro Kushimac , Rouzbeh-S-H. The latter results illustrate the prospect of treating cement on equal footing with metals and ceramics and cracking. atomistic simulation mechanical properties structural properties By mixing water and cement

  7. Quartz cementation inhibited by crestal oil charge: Miller deep water sandstone,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    Quartz cementation inhibited by crestal oil charge: Miller deep water sandstone, UK North Sea A. M cement continued to precipitate in the water zone of the reservoir up to the present day. KEYWORDS: quartz cementation, Miller deep water sandstone, North Sea, diagenetic quartz. The Miller Field

  8. Sandstone cementation and fluids in hydrocarbon basins R.S. Haszeldinea,*, C.I. Macaulaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    Sandstone cementation and fluids in hydrocarbon basins R.S. Haszeldinea,*, C.I. Macaulaya , A there is an intermediate view. Processes governing sandstone cementation in the deep sub-surface are elusive, case have driven studies of sandstone cementation in the past ten years: Firstly, the economic motive

  9. Lehigh Southwest Cement Company: Compressed Air System Improvement Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-10-01

    In 2001, Lehigh Southwest Cement Company improved the compressed air system at its cement plant in Tehachapi, California. Consequently, the system was able to operate more efficiently with less compressor capacity and at a lower system pressure. The project yielded total annual savings of 895,000 kWh and $199,000. The initial project cost was $417,000, but Southern California Edison provided a $90,000 incentive payment to reduce the cost to $327,000. Simple payback was about 20 months.

  10. The effect of additives on effective diffusivities in solidified/stabilized wastes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyi, Aye Aye

    1992-01-01

    Cement ? Fly Ash (PCFA) Portland Cement-Bentonite (PCB) Portland Cement-Silica Fume (PCSF) Portland Cement-Sodium Silicate (PCSS) COMPARISON BETWEEN SCC AND SSCC TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON (TOC) ANALYSIS COST ANALYSIS SUMMARY OF RESULTS CONCLUSIONS... Solutions PORTLAND CEMENT BASED SOLIDIFICATION Soft Water 18 18 19 20 vii SIMPLE LEACH MODEL THE ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY METHOD CORRELATIONS BETWEEN POROSITY AND EFFECTIVE DIFFUSIVITY ADDITIVES Pozzolans Fly Ash . Microsilica Sodium Silicate...

  11. Modeling of diffusive mass transport in micropores in cement based materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, Tetsuji, E-mail: yamaguchi.tetsuji@jaea.go.j [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Negishi, Kumi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Taiheiyo Consultant Company Limited, 2-4-2, Osaku, Sakura, Chiba 285-8655 (Japan); Hoshino, Seiichi; Tanaka, Tadao [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    In order to predict long-term leaching behavior of cement constituents for safety assessments of radioactive waste disposal, we modeled diffusive mass transport in micropores in cement based materials. Based on available knowledge on the pore structure, we developed a transport porosity model that enables us to estimate effective porosity available for diffusion (transport porosity) in cement based materials. We microscopically examined the pore structure of hardened cement pastes to partially verify the model. Effective diffusivities of tritiated water in hardened cement pastes were also obtained experimentally, and were shown to be proportional to the estimated transport porosity.

  12. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas. Attached you policies and strategies that support the Energy Security and Climate Stewardship Platform

  13. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feb (Portland) · Issues for 6th Plan: comments proposed changes · Briefing on carbon sequestration · Demand and conservation interface May (Walla Walla) · Sequestration project report (PNL Peter Mc

  14. More durable roof coverings such as steel and fiber cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - heating equipment saves money. Tankless water heaters provide hot water on demand at a preset temperature. Lighter colors absorb less heat, reducing cooling costs in warm climates. Now, solar roofing products- cement siding is termite- and water-resistant and warrantied to last 50 years. Increasing the amount

  15. Surface effects of cement-based solidified waste forms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlonnis, George

    1998-01-01

    This study was performed in order to determine-nine if the surface characteristics of cement-based waste forms were different than those of the bulk material. This was done as a prelude to the potential development of an accelerated leach test...

  16. Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulidowski, Irek

    Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using Anteroposterior, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK Abstract Polyethylene wear in the acetabular components of hip to the polyethylene acetabular component of a prosthesis so that both it and the metal femoral head component can

  17. Characterizing Curing-Cement Slurries by Permeability, Tensile Strength,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backe, Knut

    the permeability on the other hand is low, and entry pressure is, in general, inversely proportional is still low. The pressure difference between the formation gas and the hydro- static pressure of cement slurries in oil wells is very com- plex. Many parameters contribute to the final result

  18. Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

  19. Westinghouse Cementation Facility of Solid Waste Treatment System - 13503

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Torsten; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    During NPP operation, several waste streams are generated, caused by different technical and physical processes. Besides others, liquid waste represents one of the major types of waste. Depending on national regulation for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, solidification can be one specific requirement. To accommodate the global request for waste treatment systems Westinghouse developed several specific treatment processes for the different types of waste. In the period of 2006 to 2008 Westinghouse awarded several contracts for the design and delivery of waste treatment systems related to the latest CPR-1000 nuclear power plants. One of these contracts contains the delivery of four Cementation Facilities for waste treatment, s.c. 'Follow on Cementations' dedicated to three locations, HongYanHe, NingDe and YangJiang, of new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in the People's Republic of China. Previously, Westinghouse delivered a similar cementation facility to the CPR-1000 plant LingAo II, in Daya Bay, PR China. This plant already passed the hot functioning tests successfully in June 2012 and is now ready and released for regular operation. The 'Follow on plants' are designed to package three 'typical' kind of radioactive waste: evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the Westinghouse experience to design and execution of cementation facilities. (authors)

  20. Making a Cement Upper Molding Surface for Compression Molding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    . Pipe 4. Glue or barge cement 5. Threaded rods or long bolts with washers and nuts 1 2 3 4 5 #12 clay between the stacked materials and the mandrel support plastic pieces as shown. #12;20 Cut a piece support plastic pieces. #12;21 Put clay along the seams of these three pieces of plastic. #12;22 Scrape

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    S. , 1990. Energy Outlook in West Germany’s Cement Industry.Energy, Emissions, Savings Potential and Policy Actions, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems Technology and Innovation, Karlsruhe, Germany.Germany) and Mitsui Mining (Japan). Several companies in China also provide optimized information technology for energy

  2. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight: Yavapai College, Chino Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-22

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Yavapai College of Chino Valley, Arizona. These college students built a Building America Builders Challenge house that achieved the remarkably low HERS score of -3 and achieved a tight building envelope.

  3. FIA-12-0059- In the Matter of California Arizona Nevada District Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 31, 2012, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) denied a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Appeal filed by the California Arizona Nevada District...

  4. FIA-12-0054- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 14, 2012, California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) filed an appeal from a final determination issued by the Loan Guarantee Program Office (LGPO) of...

  5. FIA-12-0053- In the Matter of Arizona Nevada District Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 11, 2012, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) denied a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Appeal filed by the California Arizona Nevada District...

  6. Structural fabric of the Palisades Monocline: a study of positive inversion, Grand Canyon, Arizona 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orofino, James Cory

    2005-08-29

    A field study of positive inversion is conducted to describe associated structural fabrics and to infer kinematic development of the Palisades Monocline, Grand Canyon, Arizona. These features are then compared to sand, clay and solid rock models...

  7. Experimental study of the relationship between formation factor, porosity, and cementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harig, M.D.; Chaney, R.C.

    1999-07-01

    Cemented granular soils are classified based on the size and distribution of the individual grains and qualitatively on the basis of cementation. To uniquely classify these types of soils, information about the fabric (pore geometry and/or level of cementation) of the specimen needs to be quantified. Electrical resistivity, or its reciprocal, conductivity, methods have been extensively used both in situ and in the laboratory to provide a means for determining a variety of soil index, structural, erosional, and cyclic properties. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between formation factor (F), porosity (n), and cementation factor (m) of remolded sand-cement specimens. This relationship is shown to provide a mechanism for estimating the level of cementation in undisturbed specimens. The formation factor is the ratio of the electrical resistivity of the sand-water-cement mixture to that of the interstitial water.

  8. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-11

    This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, the Energy Trust of Oregon, and Lighting Sciences Group (LSG) Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. PNNL manages GATEWAY demonstrations for DOE and represents their perspective in the conduct of the work. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light and electrical power were taken at the site for both HPS and LED light sources. Economic costs were estimated and garage users’ responses to the new light sources were gauged with a survey. Six LED luminaires were installed in the below-ground parking level A, replacing six existing 150W HPS lamps spread out over two rows of parking spaces. Illuminance measurements were taken at floor level approximately every 4 ft on a 60-ft x 40-ft grid to measure light output of these LED luminaires which were termed the “Version 1” luminaires. PNNL conducted power measurements of the circuit in the garage to which the 6 luminaires were connected and determined that they drew an average of 82 W per lamp. An improved LED luminaire, Version 2, was installed in Level B of the parking garage. Illuminance measurements were not made of this second luminaire on site due to higher traffic conditions, but photometric measurements of this lamp and Version 1 were made in an independent testing laboratory and power usage for Version 2 was also measured. Version 1 was found to produce 3600 lumens and Version 2 was found to produce 4700 lumens of light and to consume 78 Watts. Maximum and minimum light levels were measured for the HPS and LED Version 1 luminaires and projected for the Version 2 luminaires. Maximum light levels were 23.51 foot candles, 20.54 fc, and 26.7 fc respectively and minimum light levels were 1.49 fc, 1.45 fc, and 1.88 fc. These results indicate very similar or even slightly higher light levels produced by the LED lamps, despite the higher lumen output of the HPS lamp. The LED lamps provide higher luminaire efficacy because all of the light is directed down and out. None of it is “lost” in the fixture. Also the HPS luminaire had poorly designed optics and a plastic covering that tended to get dirty and cracked, further decreasing the realized light output.[is this an accurate way to say this?] Consumer perceptions of the Version 2 LED were collected via a written survey form given to maintenance and security personnel. More than half felt the LED luminaires provided more light than the HPS lamps and a majority expressed a preference for the new lamps when viewing the relamped area through a security camera. Respondents commented that the LED luminaires were less glary, created less shadows, had a positive impact on visibility, and improved the overall appearance of the area. PNNL conducted an economic analysis and found that the Version 1 lamp produced annual energy savings of 955 kWh and energy cost savings of $76.39 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $105.03 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL found that the Version 2 lamp produced annual energy savings of 991 kWh and energy cost savings of $79.26 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $108.98 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL also calculated simple payback and found that Version 1 showed paybacks of 5.4 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 4.1 yrs at 11c/kWh while Version 2 showed paybacks of 5.2 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 3.9 yrs at 11c/kWh.

  9. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

    2010-12-22

    This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

  10. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Deep Energy Retrofit of 1910 House, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-12-01

    This case study lists project information, cost and energy efficiency performance data, energy efficiency measures and lessons learned for a 100-year-old home in Portland, Oregon, audited by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for a deep energy retrofit. New HVAC and extensive insulation upgrades including rigid XPS and new siding over the old lead painted siding, and EPS on the basement walls and in cathedral ceiling helped bring HERS down to 68.

  11. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1,anEnergy Company Weatherizes,Portland,

  12. Electrical conductivity is a parameter that can be used to monitor the entire hardening process of oilwell cement slurries. The theo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backe, Knut

    process of oilwell cement slurries. The theo- retical relationship among conductivity, porosity, cement and that rapid hydration will reduce the risk of gas migration. Introduction The main purposes of oilwell cements hardening process of oilwell cement slurries is important for successful cementing operations. Several

  13. Cement and Concrete Research, Vol. 42 (2), 404-409, 2012. Influence of Particle Size Distributions on Yield Stress and Viscosity of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    on Yield Stress and Viscosity of Cement-Fly Ash Pastes Dale P. Bentz Chiara F. Ferraris Michael A. Galler of three variables (cement particle size distribution (PSD), fly ash PSD, and ratio of fly ash to cement of either total (cement + fly ash) particle surface area or total particle density. Keywords: Cement; fly

  14. Socioeconomic impact of photovoltaic power at Schuchulik, Arizona. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahr, D.; Garrett, B.G.; Chrisman, C.

    1980-10-01

    Schuchuli, a small remote village on the Papago Indian Reservation in southwest Arizona, is 27 kilometers (17 miles) from the nearest available utility power. In some respects, Schuchuli resembles many of the rural villages in other parts of the world. For example, it's relatively small in size (about 60 residents), composed of a number of extended family groupings, and remotely situated relative to major population centers (190 km, or 120 miles, from Tucson). Its lack of conventional power is due to the prohibitive cost of supplying a small electrical load with a long-distance distribution line. Furthermore, alternate energy sources are expensive and place a burden on the resources of the villagers. On December 16, 1978, as part of a federally funded project, a solar cell power system was put into operation at Schuchuli. The system powers the village water pump, lighting for homes ad other village buildings, family refrigerators and a communal washing machine and sewing machine. The project, managed for the US Department of Energy by the NASA Lewis Research Center, provided for a one-year socio-economic study to assess the impact of a relatively small amount of electricity on the basic living environment of the villagers. The results of that study are presented, including village history, group life, energy use in general and the use of the photovoltaic-powered appliances. No significant impacts due to the photovoltaic power system were observed.

  15. Weatherization Assistance Program: Final monitoring report for: Arizona, California, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    Stroud, Inc., was awarded a contract by the Department of Energy San Francisco Operations Office (DOE-SAN) to evaluate the weatherization programs for selected grantees and subgrantees in Arizona, California, and Nevada. The provisions of the contract specified an initial year and renewable optional periods of two (2) additional years. The first year of the contract began on October 1, 1985, and expired on September 30, 1986. The final report for that first year was submitted to DOE-SAN in August, 1986. The second year of the contract began on October 1, 1986, and expired on September 30, 1987. The final report for that second year was submitted to DOE-SAN in August, 1987. This report covers the monitoring of grantees and subgrantees for the second option year, or what is the third year of the contract. The first two (2) weeks of the third year's activities were devoted to scheduling the agencies to be monitored. The actual field monitoring began on November 16, 1987, and was completed on August 19, 1988. During this nine-month period, twenty-nine (29) agencies, both grantees and subgrantees, were visited and evaluated under this contract.

  16. Evaluation of geothermal energy in Arizona. Arizona geothermal planning/commercialization team. Quarterly topical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.H.; Mancini, F.; Goldstone, L.A.; Malysa, L.

    1980-01-01

    Progress is reviewed on the following: area development plans, evaluation of geothermal applications, continued evaluation of geothermal resources, engineering and economic analyses, technical assistance in the state of Arizona, the impact of various growth patterns upon geothermal energy development, and the outreach program. (MHR)

  17. Rheology of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Cement-Based Mortar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banfill, Phillip F. G.; Starrs, Gerry; McCarter, W. John [School of the Built Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-07

    Carbon fibre reinforced cement based materials (CFRCs) offer the possibility of fabricating 'smart' electrically conductive materials. Rheology of the fresh mix is crucial to satisfactory moulding and fresh CFRC conforms to the Bingham model with slight structural breakdown. Both yield stress and plastic viscosity increase with increasing fibre length and volume concentration. Using a modified Viskomat NT, the concentration dependence of CFRC rheology up to 1.5% fibre volume is reported.

  18. Hard x-ray nanotomography of amorphous aluminosilicate cements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provis, J. L.; Rose, V.; Winarski, R. P.; van Deventer, J. S. J.

    2011-08-01

    Nanotomographic reconstruction of a sample of low-CO{sub 2} 'geopolymer' cement provides the first three-dimensional view of the pore structure of the aluminosilicate geopolymer gel, as well as evidence for direct binding of geopolymer gel onto unreacted fly ash precursor particles. This is central to understanding and optimizing the durability of concretes made using this new class of binder, and demonstrates the value of nanotomography in providing a three-dimensional view of nanoporous inorganic materials.

  19. Modelling and simulation of acrylic bone cement injection and curing within the framework of vertebroplasty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landgraf, Ralf; Kolmeder, Sebastian; Lion, Alexander; Lebsack, Helena; Kober, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    The minimal invasive procedure of vertebroplasty is a surgical technique to treat compression fractures of vertebral bodies. During the treatment liquid bone cement gets injected into the affected vertebral body and therein cures to a solid. In order to investigate the treatment and the impact of injected bone cement on the vertebra, an integrated modelling and simulation framework has been developed. The framework includes (i) the generation of computer models based on microCT images of human cancellous bone, (ii) CFD simulations of bone cement injection into the trabecular structure of a vertebral body as well as (iii) non-linear FEM simulations of the bone cement curing. Thereby, microstructural models of trabecular bone structures are employed. Furthermore, a detailed description of the material behaviour of acrylic bone cements is provided. More precisely, a non-linear fluid flow model is chosen for the representation of the bone cement behaviour during injection and a non-linear viscoelastic material mo...

  20. Liquid-Solid Phase Transition Alloy as Reversible and Rapid Molding Bone Cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Liting; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Bone cement has been demonstrated as an essential restorative material in the orthopedic surgery. However current materials often imply unavoidable drawbacks, such as tissue-cement reaction induced thermal injuries and troublesome revision procedure. Here we proposed an injectable alloy cement to address such problems through its liquid-solid phase transition mechanism. The cement is made of a unique alloy BiInSnZn with a specifically designed low melting point 57.5{\\deg}C. This property enables its rapid molding into various shapes with high plasticity. Some fundamental characteristics including mechanical strength behaviors and phase transition-induced thermal features have been measured to demonstrate the competence of alloy as unconventional cement with favorable merits. Further biocompatible tests showed that this material could be safely employed in vivo. In addition, experiments also found the alloy cement capability as an excellent contrast agent for radiation imaging. Particularly, the proposed alloy...

  1. Cactus, Pixies, 04 Sept 09 Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Cactus, Pixies, 04 Sept 09 Em Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor G Em just wishin' that I had that dress when you di-yi-yi-yi-yine Em Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor G Em just wishin' that I had it to me Em Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor G Em just wishin' that I had something you wore #12;

  2. Proceedings of the TOUGH Symposium 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finsterle, S.

    2014-01-01

    and performance of oil well cement with 30 years of CO2Portland cement cores of a 55-year-old oil well exposed to

  3. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow III, William R.

    2014-01-01

    L. 2000. “Potentials for Energy Efficiency Improvement inthe U.S. Cement Industry,” Energy, 25, 1189-1214. Worrell,Benefits of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures,” Energy

  4. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Toolbut that used best practice energy-efficiency technologiesof the plant compared to best practice energy use, which is

  5. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Toolfor product i = best practice energy intensity for product ibut that used best practice energy-efficiency technologies

  6. Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2014-01-01

    emissions from electricity consumption. This paper examinesmainly from electricity consumption for cement production,CO 2 emissions from electricity consumption are usually

  7. Cementing operations on Fenton Hill during FY1987, 1 October 1986-September 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cocks, G.G.; Dreesen, D.S.; Gill, P.J.; Root, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    As part of repairing and sidetracking EE-2 geothermal well, a number of cementing operations were successfully carried out. These included; plugging back of EE-2 below the proposed side track site, cement behind casing at 10220-24 ft, cement behind casing at 9800-04 ft, whipstock plug, and the cementing through perforations of the 9-5/8 in. casing from 6500 ft to the surface. Specific data on each of these operations is given, and the results discussed. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  8. Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2014-01-01

    statistics and energy intensity analysis of the NSP process and VSK cement production (CCA, 2011; QEASCBM, 2011; Zhou, 2007), we separately estimated the energy consumption

  9. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.for Improving Energy Efficiency, Reducing Pollution and

  10. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems,” Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures,” Proceedings of

  11. Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    experience reviewing energy consumption data reported bybe noted that energy consumption data are not directlythe cement sector energy consumption data published by the

  12. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Blended cement (Additives: fly ash, pozzolans, and blastcan include such materials as fly ash from electric poweradditives (GGBS, pozzolana, fly ash, or limestone), made up

  13. Alteration of Sediments by Hyperalkaline KRich Cement Leachate: Implications for Strontium Adsorption and Incorporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    Alteration of Sediments by Hyperalkaline KRich Cement Leachate: Implications for Strontium pH cementitious leachate, there is significantly enhanced Sr retention in sediments due to changes

  14. Proceedings of 2004 NSF DMII Grantees Conference, Scottsdale, Arizona Grant: #DMI-01-15486 Flow Dynamics and Inclusion Transport in Continuous Casting of Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    Proceedings of 2004 NSF DMII Grantees Conference, Scottsdale, Arizona Grant: #DMI- 01-15486 Flow;Proceedings of 2004 NSF DMII Grantees Conference, Scottsdale, Arizona Grant: #DMI- 01-15486 inclusion removal

  15. Proceedings of ASME 2010 4th International Conference on Energy Sustainability May 17-22, 2010 Phoenix, Arizona, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    1 Proceedings of ASME 2010 4th International Conference on Energy Sustainability ES2010 May 17 International Conference on Energy Sustainability ES2010 May 17-22, 2010, Phoenix, Arizona, USA ES2010- 0 #12-22, 2010 Phoenix, Arizona, USA ES2010-90190 CO-DESIGN OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT HOUSING WITH THE PINOLEVILLE

  16. Intraseasonal Variability of Summer Storms over Central Arizona during 1997 and 1999 PAMELA L. HEINSELMAN* AND DAVID M. SCHULTZ*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, David

    , downed power lines from high winds can result in loss of profits to power companies, disruption to lifeIntraseasonal Variability of Summer Storms over Central Arizona during 1997 and 1999 PAMELA L previous climatologies over central Arizona show a summer diurnal precipitation cycle, on any given day

  17. Urban Effects on Summer Monsoon Convection in Phoenix, Arizona (USA): A Model Case Study of Aug. 2-3, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Christopher L.

    Urban Effects on Summer Monsoon Convection in Phoenix, Arizona (USA): A Model Case Study of Aug. 2 American Monsoon thunderstorm event on 2-3 August 2005 in Phoenix, Arizona (USA). Using a factor effects led to a reduction of simulated rainfall over Phoenix and enhanced precipitation on the northern

  18. CP Tech Center I Iowa State University I 2711 S. Loop Dr. Suite 4700,Ames, IA 50010-8664 I 515-294-5798 FOR MORE INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --the project mixture design calls for 423 lb of portland cement and 141 lb of fly ash. Total cementitious materials = 564 lb Portland cement = 423 lb (75%) Fly ash = 141 lb (25%) Materials required for the test + water Portland cement = 375 g (500 g · 75%) Fly ash = 125 g (500 g · 25%) Water = 200g Total materials

  19. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2011-01-01

    M. , 1990. “Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” EnergyAdvanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants”process Optimize heat recovery of Wet Increased product

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    M. , 1990. “Waste Gas Heat Recovery in Cement Plants” EnergyAdvanced Concepts of Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants”grate cooler Refractories Heat recovery for power generation

  1. Housing and Residence Life 1977 SW 6th Ave Suite 210 Portland, OR, 97201 Phone: (503) 725-4375 Fax: (503) 725-4394 E-mail: Housing@pdx.edu www.pdx.edu/Housing PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY HOUSING PROPOSED CONTRACT TERMS & CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzanowski, Marek

    Housing and Residence Life 1977 SW 6th Ave Suite 210 Portland, OR, 97201 Phone: (503) 725-4375 Fax: (503) 725-4394 E-mail: Housing@pdx.edu www.pdx.edu/Housing 2015-2016 PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY HOUSING PROPOSED CONTRACT TERMS & CONDITIONS 1) Term of Contract: This Contract is binding upon signature

  2. Hanson's Cement Plant 0.02 0 Lower Guadalupe River 0.03 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson's Cement Plant 0.02 0 Lower Guadalupe River 0.03 0 Mills Creek 0.06 0 Lower Coyote Creek 0PabloCk SanFelipeCk LowerWalkerCk MuddyHollow LagunitasCk MillsCk SimasCk LowerCoyoteCk LowerGuadalupeR Hanson'sCement

  3. Relationship Between Engineering Properties, Mineralogy, and Microstructure in Cement-Based Hydroceramic Materials Cured at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    . I. Introduction CEMENT is universally used in the construction of oil and geothermal wells. Cement-based materials used to seal geothermal or deep oil wells are exposed to severe conditions. Optimizing engineering for geothermal and deep, hot oil wells. These formulations contain minerals that occur in nature and hence have

  4. Flow of Fiber-Reinforced Cement Slurries at Elevated Temperatures Y. Wang and C. Meyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    . Keywords: Non-Newtonian fluids; Fiber suspensions; Oil well cement slurries; Rheology 1. Problem Statement are used for the construction of oil wells as deep as 30,000 ft (9,000 m). The severe performanceFlow of Fiber-Reinforced Cement Slurries at Elevated Temperatures Y. Wang and C. Meyer Dept

  5. Rigless multizone recompletion using a cement packer placed with coiled tubing: A case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, T.W.; Patout, T.S.

    1997-12-01

    Cement packers have been used for some time when reserve estimates have not justified the cost of major rig remedial work. They typically provide a means of zonal isolation of the last reserves in an existing wellbore. The success of these operations has historically been low. This is predominantly because of poor cement bonding in the annulus between the tubing and production casing. Because of the minimal amount of equipment on location and lack of upfront design work involved, most cement packers are doomed to failure before they are even placed. Cement packers have been placed using a large number of methods. In the Ship Shoal 181 field, Well B-4 would not economically justify a major rig workover, even though there were several uphole gas sands capable of producing in this well. With proper upfront planning and design, it would be economical; however, all these reserves could be produced in a through-tubing process using a cement packer. This case history presents a refined look at existing technology involving placement of a cement packer and reviews problems common to cement-packer completions, including a case history. Solutions are also discussed for successfully completing and recovering reserves from not one but several remaining gas intervals. This paper reviews the design considerations and precautions, along with the production results and economics, for placing what is believed to be the largest cement packer placed through coiled tubing.

  6. Improved cement quality and grinding efficiency by means of closed mill circuit modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejeoumov, Gleb Gennadievich

    2009-05-15

    Grinding of clinker is the last and most energy-consuming stage of the cement manufacturing process, drawing on average 40% of the total energy required to produce one ton of cement. During this stage, the clinker particles are substantially reduced...

  7. Measurement of Water Transport from Saturated Pumice Aggregates to Hardening Cement Paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    ) to hydrating cement paste [water/cement (w/c) ratio 0.3] took place in the first days after casting and covered-age self-desiccation shrinkage. INTRODUCTlON High strength cementitious materials are characterized~tigated the effects on the reduction of autogenous shrinkage of the replacement level of normal weight coarse

  8. Non-Linear Drying Diffusion and Viscoelastic Drying Shrinkage Modeling in Hardened Cement Pastes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Chin K.

    2010-07-14

    The present research seeks to study the decrease in diffusivity rate as relative humidity (RH) decreases and modeling drying shrinkage of hardened cement paste as a poroviscoelastic respose. Thin cement paste strips of 0.4 and 0.5 w/c at age 3 and 7...

  9. The Effect of Cement Mechanical Properties and Reservoir Compaction on HPHT Well Integrity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Zhaoguang

    2012-11-15

    the principal parameters for mechanical structural calculations. The experiment was also set up to simulate conditions under which cement low-cycle fatigue failure could occur. Zero-based cyclic pressure was applied to the casing in the cement low-cycle fatigue...

  10. Impact of Hydrated Cement Paste Quality and Entrained Air-Void

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of Hydrated Cement Paste Quality and Entrained Air-Void System on the Durability of Concrete the characteristics of the entrained air-void system #12;Objectives · Review the current accepted relationship between is affected by the quality of the hydrated cement paste (HCP) and the presence of a properly entrained air

  11. Auxiliary Information for "Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    Auxiliary Information for "Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale. Sharp exhibit features consistent with eolian sandstones that may be cemented by sulfates. As described to features observed in terrestrial eolian sandstones such as the Navajo sandstone in the southwestern U

  12. New subsea wiper plugs hold down deepwater cementing costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringer, R.; Sonnefeld, A.; Minge, J.

    1997-02-01

    British Petroleum Exploration (BPX) achieved top-quality cementing performance at significantly lower costs in a deepwater area 45 miles offshore Louisiana by using a new method of launching subsea wiper plugs. The method is based on a newly designed subsea casing wiper plug release system, which uses up to three solid wiper plugs loaded in a basket and released by individual darts launched from a surface tool. This design has eliminated the problems sometimes associated with the latching, unlatching and sealing of conventional subsea casing wiper plugs.

  13. BEST-Cement for China | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustria Geothermal RegionAvraPáginasSolarBB HobbsBEST-Cement

  14. DOE and Northwest Partners Host Three-Day Market Introduction Workshop in Portland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than 270 attendees gathered in Portland, OR to participate in the "Voices for SSL Efficiency" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on July 9-11, 2008. The workshop, hosted by DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Energy Trust of Oregon, Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, and Puget Sound Energy, was the third DOE meeting to explore how Federal, State, and private-sector organizations can work together to guide market introduction of high-performance SSL products. The workshop brought together a diverse gathering of participants – energy efficiency organizations, utilities, government, and industry – to share insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

  15. Portland, Oregon Summary of Reported Data From July 1, 2010 - September 30, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1,anEnergy Company Weatherizes,Portland, Oregon,

  16. 502 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 7, NO. 4, JULY 1999 Multivariable Nonlinear Predictive Control of Cement Mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    Nonlinear Predictive Control of Cement Mills Lalo Magni, Georges Bastin, and Vincent Wertz Abstract--A new multivariable controller for cement milling circuits is presented, which is based on a nonlinear model: a change of hardness of the raw material. Index Terms--Cement industry, multivariable control systems

  17. Cement-based materials for stress sensing by dielectric measurement Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Cement-based materials for stress sensing by dielectric measurement Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung-sensing of stress by measurement of the relative dielectric constant (k) has been shown in cement pastes containing. Inferior sensing performance was observed in cement paste with carbon fibers of 15 mm diameter, although

  18. SENSITIVITY OF THE BOND STRENGTH TO THE STRUCTURE OF THE INTERFACE BETWEEN REINFORCEMENT AND CEMENT, AND THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    SENSITIVITY OF THE BOND STRENGTH TO THE STRUCTURE OF THE INTERFACE BETWEEN REINFORCEMENT AND CEMENT strength to this variation were studied for each of the interfaces between carbon fiber and cement paste, between stainless steel fiber and cement paste, and between steel rebar and concrete. The interfacial

  19. 618 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 46, NO. 4, APRIL 2001 Robust Stabilization of a Nonlinear Cement Mill Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    of a Nonlinear Cement Mill Model F. Grognard, F. Jadot, L. Magni, G. Bastin, R. Sepulchre, and V. Wertz Abstract--Plugging is well known to be a major cause of instability in in- dustrial cement mills. A simple nonlinear model- troller can be designed in order to fully prevent the mill from plugging. Index Terms--Cement mill

  20. Apparatus and method for measuring the expansion properties of a cement composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spangle, Lloyd B. (Claremore, OK)

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed which is useful for measuring the expansion properties of semi-solid materials which expand to a solid phase, upon curing, such as cement compositions. The apparatus includes a sleeve, preferably cylindrical, which has a vertical slit on one side, to allow the sleeve to expand. Mounted on the outside of the sleeve are several sets of pins, consisting of two pins each. The two pins in each set are located on opposite sides of the slit. In the test procedure, the sleeve is filled with wet cement, which is then cured to a solid. As the cement cures it causes the sleeve to expand. The actual expansion of the sleeve represents an expansion factor for the cement. This factor is calculated by measuring the distance across the pins of each set, when the sleeve is empty, and again after the cured cement expands the sleeve.

  1. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Pyatina, T.

    2014-11-14

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  2. Inorganic Corrosion-Inhibitive Pigments for High-Temperature Alkali-activated Well Casing Foam Cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Pyatina, T.

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluates inorganic pigments for improving carbon steel (CS) brine-corrosion protection by the sodium metasilicate-activated calcium aluminate cement/Fly Ash blend at 300°C. Calcium borosilicate (CBS) and zinc phosphate, significantly improved CS corrosion-protection by decreasing cement’s permeability for corrosive ions and inhibiting anodic corrosion. An amorphous Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O phase tightly attached to CS surface formed at 300oC in CBS-modified cement pore solution. The corrosion rate of the CS covered with this phase was nearly 4-fold lower than in the case of nonmodified cement pore solution where the major phase formed on the surface of CS was crystalline analcime.

  3. Dynamic Evolution of Cement Composition and Transport Properties under Conditions Relevant to Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunet, Jean-Patrick Leopold; Li, Li; Karpyn, Zuleima T.; Strazisar, Brian; Bromhal Grant

    2013-08-01

    Assessing the possibility of CO{sub 2} leakage is one of the major challenges for geological carbon sequestration. Injected CO{sub 2} can react with wellbore cement, which can potentially change cement composition and transport properties. In this work, we develop a reactive transport model based on experimental observations to understand and predict the property evolution of cement in direct contact with CO{sub 2}-saturated brine under diffusion-controlled conditions. The model reproduced the observed zones of portlandite depletion and calcite formation. Cement alteration is initially fast and slows down at later times. This work also quantified the role of initial cement properties, in particular the ratio of the initial portlandite content to porosity (defined here as ?), in determining the evolution of cement properties. Portlandite-rich cement with large ? values results in a localized “sharp” reactive diffusive front characterized by calcite precipitation, leading to significant porosity reduction, which eventually clogs the pore space and prevents further acid penetration. Severe degradation occurs at the cement–brine interface with large ? values. This alteration increases effective permeability by orders of magnitude for fluids that preferentially flow through the degraded zone. The significant porosity decrease in the calcite zone also leads to orders of magnitude decrease in effective permeability, where fluids flow through the low-permeability calcite zone. The developed reactive transport model provides a valuable tool to link cement–CO{sub 2} reactions with the evolution of porosity and permeability. It can be used to quantify and predict long-term wellbore cement behavior and can facilitate the risk assessment associated with geological CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  4. Strategies for Developing Water-Conscious Communities: An Analysis of Water Conservation in Tucson, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    conservation. Water conservation practices, such as rainwater harvesting, recycling gray-water and installation1 Strategies for Developing Water-Conscious Communities: An Analysis of Water Conservation was made possible by the University of Arizona, Technology and Research Initiative Fund 2009/2010, Water

  5. Gene Duplication and Adaptive Evolution of Digestive Proteases in Drosophila arizonae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markow, Therese

    Gene Duplication and Adaptive Evolution of Digestive Proteases in Drosophila arizonae Female with the male ejaculate. Strikingly, we also discovered 12 unique digestive proteases whose expression digestive function by the female reproductive tract points to a novel coevolutionary mechanism of ejaculate

  6. FIA-12-0004- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Hearings and Appeals issued one Decision relating to two appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) from two determination letters issued by the Loan Guarantee Program Office (LGPO) of the Department of Energy (DOE) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

  7. FIA-12-0005- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Hearings and Appeals issued one Decision relating to two appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) from two determination letters issued by the Loan Guarantee Program Office (LGPO) of the Department of Energy (DOE) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

  8. FIA-12-0020- In the Matter of California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Hearings and Appeals granted a Motion for Reconsideration of part of a Decision we issued on March 23, 2012, relating to appeals filed by California-Arizona-Nevada District Organization Contract Compliance (CANDO) under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

  9. Forward: Final Version 2007 January 31 Forward to the University of Arizona Kuiper Belt Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewitt, David C.

    Forward: Final Version 2007 January 31 Forward to the University of Arizona Kuiper Belt Book Only belt since 1992. Those of us whose research has "helped the tree grow", a group which includes most a privilege and what a thrill it is to be able to do science this way. The Kuiper belt is amazing in its

  10. 4.5 Rock Coatings RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    4.5 Rock Coatings RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA r 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 4.5.1 Introduction to Rock Coatings 70 4.5.2 Interpreting Rock Coatings through a Landscape: Subaerial Exposure of Subsurface Coatings 73 4.5.2.3 Third-Order Control: Competition from Lithobionts 78 4

  11. 4.4 Nanoscale: Mineral Weathering Boundary RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    4.4 Nanoscale: Mineral Weathering Boundary RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA SJ-scattered detector. Biotic weathering Mineral weathering caused by life, including bacteria, fungi, algae, plants of elements such as silica or iron. Etching of minerals Mineral dissolution is not an even produce; areas

  12. The Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center's toll-free line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    The Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center's toll-free line is always open. Call us if: · You think someone has been poisoned. · You have questions about any type of poison. · You want information about poison prevention. Storing Safely · Lock up poisonous products and medicines out of reach and out

  13. The Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center's toll free line is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    The Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center's toll free line is always open. Call us if: · You think someone has been poisoned. · You have questions about any type of poison. · You want information about poison prevention. Storing Safely · Lock up poisonous products and medicines out of reach and out

  14. University of Arizona Geography and Regional Development 696O Adaptation and Resilience in Water Resources Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Arizona Geography and Regional Development 696O 1 Adaptation and Resilience in Water-4393) Office hours: by appointment Seminar summary [from course catalog] Climate change, urban growth, energy demand, and global food trade alter water in coupled human-natural systems. This seminar addresses

  15. EA-1987: Parker-Headgate Rock and Parker-Bouse Rebuild Project, Arizona and California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that will assess the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild the existing Parker Dam-Headgate Rock and Parker Dam-Bouse 161-kilovolt transmission lines along the Colorado River in western Arizona and eastern California.

  16. Ground Covers for northern ArizonA Above 6,000 foot elevAtions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanderson, Mike

    or the use of fabric or plastic mulch may be required. Most Northern Arizona soils are limited in the amount to turf, bare ground, and rock mulches. Ground covers fill a number of important design needs. They can or even highway embankments. They can soften and add a touch of greenery to the large rock-mulched areas

  17. Peak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in channel geometry, dam height, and hydraulic characteristics, ranged from 2.3 to 5.3 × 105 m3 s-1 Canyon; Colorado river; Pleistocene floods; Lava dams; Hydraulic modeling; Paleoflood indicators; DamPeak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA Cassandra R

  18. University of Arizona Geography and Regional Development 696J Adaptive Water Management in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Agriculture GEOG 696J (Water Resources Geography) Seminar, Fall Semester 2008 Thursdays, 2:00 ­ 4:30 pUniversity of Arizona Geography and Regional Development 696J 1 Adaptive Water Management implications. This Geography & Regional Development seminar addresses rapidly evolving agricultural water use

  19. Evaluation of cement kiln laboratories testing hazardous waste derived fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    Cement kiln operators wishing to burn hazardous waste derived fuels in their kilns must submit applications for Resource Conservation Recovery Act permits. One component of each permit application is a site-specific Waste Analysis Plan. These Plans describe the facilities` sampling and analysis procedures for hazardous waste derived fuels prior to receipt and burn. The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted on-site evaluations of several cement kiln facilities that were under consideration for Resource Conservation Recovery Act permits. The purpose of these evaluations was to determine if the on-site sampling and laboratory operations at each facility complied with their site-specific Waste Analysis Plans. These evaluations covered sampling, laboratory, and recordkeeping procedures. Although all the evaluated facilities were generally competent, the results of those evaluations revealed opportunities for improvement at each facility. Many findings were noted for more than one facility. This paper will discuss these findings, particularly those shared by several facilities (specific facilities will not be identified). Among the findings to be discussed are the ways that oxygen bombs were scrubbed and rinsed, the analytical quality control used, Burn Tank sampling, and the analysis of pH in hazardous waste derived fuels.

  20. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G.; León-Reina, L.; Aranda, M.A.G.; CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona ; Santacruz, I.

    2013-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.