National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for arid lands ecology

  1. Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1993-02-01

    The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

  2. Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Survey of Revegetated Areas on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve: Status and Initial Monitoring Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Link, Steven O.; Rozeboom, Latricia L.; Durham, Robin E.; Cruz, Rico O.; Mckee, Sadie A.

    2011-09-01

    During 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office removed a number of facilities and debris from the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument (HRNM). Revegetation of disturbed sites is necessary to stabilize the soil, reduce invasion of these areas by exotic weeds, and to accelerate re-establishment of native plant communities. Seven revegetation units were identified on ALE based on soils and potential native plant communities at the site. Native seed mixes and plant material were identified for each area based on the desired plant community. Revegetation of locations affected by decommissioning of buildings and debris removal was undertaken during the winter and early spring of 2010 and 2011, respectively. This report describes both the details of planting and seeding for each of the units, describes the sampling design for monitoring, and summarizes the data collected during the first year of monitoring. In general, the revegetation efforts were successful in establishing native bunchgrasses and shrubs on most of the sites within the 7 revegetation units. Invasion of the revegetation areas by exotic annual species was minimal for most sites, but was above initial criteria in 3 areas: the Hodges Well subunit of Unit 2, and Units 6 and 7.

  4. Plant Succession at the Edges of Two Abandoned Cultivated Fields on the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Sally A. (OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIP PROG); Rickard, William H. (OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIP PROG)

    2002-12-01

    How vegetation recovers from disturbances is an important question for land managers. We examined 500 m2 plots to determine the progress made by native herbaceous plant species in colonizing the edges of abandoned cultivated fields at different elevations and microclimates, but with similar soils in a big sagebrush/bluebunch wheatgrass steppe. Alien species, especially cheatgrass and cereal rye, were the major competitors to the natives. The native species with best potential for restoring steppe habitats were sulphur lupine, hawksbeard, bottlebrush squirreltail, needle-and-thread grass, Sandberg's bluegrass, and several lomatiums.

  5. Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities and specific methods for seeding and planting at each area. evegetation work is scheduled to commence during the first quarter of FY 2011 to minimize the amount of time that sites are unvegetated and more susceptible to invasion by non-native weedy annual species.

  6. New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

  7. Ecological consequences of dead wood extraction in an arid Diego P. Vzquez,a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazquez, Diego

    -nesting bees Introduction Extraction activities such as mining, fisheries, logging and harvesting are amongEcological consequences of dead wood extraction in an arid ecosystem1 Diego P. Vázquez,a,b * Juan A development, storing nutrients and water, providing a major source of energy and nutrients, serving

  8. Land Snail Ecology and Biogeography of Eastern Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nekola, Jeffrey C.

    Land Snail Ecology and Biogeography of Eastern Maine Vertigo bollesiana Vertigo nylanderi Vertigo & Invertebrate Group Maine Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife and the Aroostook Hills and Lowlands ......................................................................................................... 75 Appendix I: Taxonomic Key for Maine Land Snails ............................................... 78

  9. What can ecological science tell us about opportunities for carbon sequestration on arid rangelands in the United States?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayre, Nathan

    What can ecological science tell us about opportunities for carbon sequestration on arid rangelands). It is now commonplace to use the rationale of increasing carbon sequestration to argue for changes interest in carbon sequestration on rangelands is largely driven by their extent, while the interest

  10. Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay. The consequences for both the hydrology and 41 #12;42 HYDRO-ECOLOGIC RESPONSES TO LAND USE IN SMALL URBANIZING

  11. Information Analysis of a Spatial Database for Ecological Land classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Information Analysis of a Spatial Database for Ecological Land classification Frank W. Davis:An ecologicalland classification was developed for a complex region in southern California using geographic. The analysis was weakened by map errors, especially errors in the digital elevation data. Nevertheless

  12. CHAPTER ELEVEN The microbial ecology of land and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    CHAPTER ELEVEN The microbial ecology of land and water contaminated with radioactive waste: towards the development of bioremediation options for the nuclear industry A N D R E A G E I S S L E R , S O N J A S E L E via a number of mechanisms which are potentially useful for scalable, cost-effective bioremediation

  13. Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 LCTA Relational Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 LCTA Relational Database Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands No. 5 - 1997 The LCTA data is stored in a relational database, currently SQLBase from Gupta Technologies Inc. To the inexperienced user the LCTA database can seem very complex with 45

  14. Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 Loading Handheld Data Files

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 Loading Handheld Data Files Understanding the Process Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands No. 10 - 1998 The purpose of this document Data File Requirements Three criteria are checked by the loading program before the import process

  15. Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 Loading Data from Mixed Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands 1 Loading Data from Mixed Data Collection Techniques Center for Ecological Management of Military Lands No. 7 - 1997 Currently the LCTA data logger has, for example, plot 1 will have an additional file marked as 301. Follow the procedures below to load the data

  16. Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G.; Tharp, M Lynn; Fogel, Jonah

    2009-02-01

    Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

  17. Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-8200, USA Abstract: In this work, we used the Regional Hydro

  18. Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Assess the ecological sustainability of deploying energy cane on land previously used for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Objective Assess the ecological to the ecological sustainability of the wide-scale deployment of biofuel feedstocks. Key among these issues are how replacing current land use with biofuel feedstocks will affect the fluxes of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N20

  19. An ecological perceptual aid for precision vertical landings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Cristin Anne

    2006-01-01

    Pilots of vertical landing vehicles face numerous control challenges which often involve the loss of outside visual perceptual cues or the control of flight parameters within tight constraints. These challenges are often ...

  20. Modeling the per capita ecological footprint for Dallas County, Texas: Examining demographic, environmental value, land-use, and spatial influences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Hyung Cheal

    2005-08-29

    This study addresses factors driving the variation in the per capita Ecological Footprint (EF) in Dallas County, Texas. A main hypothesis was that scientifically estimated demography, environmental values, spatial attributes, and land-use patterns...

  1. Living on Scorched Earth: the Political Ecology of Land Ownership in Guatemala's Northern Lowlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ybarra, Megan

    2010-01-01

    T. , and M. Melville. 1971. Guatemala: the politics of landBajas del Norte de Guatemala: Petén y la Franja Transversaldel Norte. Ciudad de Guatemala: FLACSO, MINUGUA, CONTIERRA.

  2. Nesting ecology of dickcissels on reclaimed surface-mined lands in Freestone County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Thomas Pingul

    2005-02-17

    aspects of dickcissel nesting ecology (i.e., nest-site selection, nest success, and nest parasitism, and identification of nest predators) on 2 spatial scales on TXU Energy?s Big Brown Mine, near Fairfield, Texas, and to subsequently provide TXU Energy...

  3. An Ecological Data Specialist (Research Associate I Special) position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML). This position is located at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POSITION An Ecological Data Specialist (Research Associate I Special) position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML). This position is located at Pohakuloa. RESPONSIBILITIES This position will provide support for Geographic Information Systems (GIS), data management

  4. Meta-analysis of high-latitude nitrogen-addition and warming studies imply ecological mechanisms overlooked by land models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bouskill, N. J.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.

    2014-08-18

    Accurate representation of ecosystem processes in land models is crucial for reducing predictive uncertainty in energy and greenhouse gas feedbacks with the atmosphere. Here we describe an observational and modeling meta-analysis approach to benchmark land models, and apply the method to the land model CLM4.5 with two versions of belowground biogeochemistry. We focused our analysis on the above and belowground high-latitude ecosystem responses to warming and nitrogen addition, and identified mechanisms absent, or poorly parameterized in CLM4.5. While the two model versions predicted similar trajectories for soil carbon stocks following both types of perturbation, other variables (e.g., belowground respiration) differedmore »from the observations in both magnitude and direction, indicating the underlying mechanisms are inadequate for representing high-latitude ecosystems. The observational synthesis attribute these differences to missing representations of microbial dynamics, characterization of above and belowground functional processes, and nutrient competition. We use the observational meta-analyses to discuss potential approaches to improving the current models (e.g., the inclusion of dynamic vegetation or different microbial functional guilds), however, we also raise a cautionary note on the selection of data sets and experiments to be included in a meta-analysis. For example, the concentrations of nitrogen applied in the synthesized field experiments (average =72 kg ha-1 yr-1) are many times higher than projected soil nitrogen concentrations (from nitrogen deposition and release during mineralization), which preclude a rigorous evaluation of the model responses to nitrogen perturbation. Overall, we demonstrate here that elucidating ecological mechanisms via meta-analysis can identify deficiencies in both ecosystem models and empirical experiments.« less

  5. Meta-analysis of high-latitude nitrogen-addition and warming studies implies ecological mechanisms overlooked by land models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bouskill, N. J.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J. Y.

    2014-12-11

    Accurate representation of ecosystem processes in land models is crucial for reducing predictive uncertainty in energy and greenhouse gas feedbacks with the climate. Here we describe an observational and modeling meta-analysis approach to benchmark land models, and apply the method to the land model CLM4.5 with two versions of belowground biogeochemistry. We focused our analysis on the aboveground and belowground responses to warming and nitrogen addition in high-latitude ecosystems, and identified absent or poorly parameterized mechanisms in CLM4.5. While the two model versions predicted similar soil carbon stock trajectories following both warming and nitrogen addition, other predicted variables (e.g., belowgroundmore »respiration) differed from observations in both magnitude and direction, indicating that CLM4.5 has inadequate underlying mechanisms for representing high-latitude ecosystems. On the basis of observational synthesis, we attribute the model–observation differences to missing representations of microbial dynamics, aboveground and belowground coupling, and nutrient cycling, and we use the observational meta-analysis to discuss potential approaches to improving the current models. However, we also urge caution concerning the selection of data sets and experiments for meta-analysis. For example, the concentrations of nitrogen applied in the synthesized field experiments (average = 72 kg ha-1 yr-1) are many times higher than projected soil nitrogen concentrations (from nitrogen deposition and release during mineralization), which precludes a rigorous evaluation of the model responses to likely nitrogen perturbations. Overall, we demonstrate that elucidating ecological mechanisms via meta-analysis can identify deficiencies in ecosystem models and empirical experiments.« less

  6. Bestelmeyer, BT, GS Okin, MC Duniway, SR Archer, NF Sayre, JC Williamson, JE Herrick. 2014. Desertification, land use and the transformation of global drylands. Frontiers in Ecology and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    . Desertification, land use and the transformation of global drylands. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment : In Press Desertification is an escalating concern in global drylands, yet assessments to guide are involved. In order to provide greater clarity, we propose that assessments of desertification and land

  7. An Ecological Analysis of the Impact of Weather, Land Cover and Politics on Childhood Pneumonia in Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mgendi, Mlenge 1971-

    2012-12-03

    .................................................................................................... 91 Table 13: Linking air-pollutants and Land use / Land cover (LULC) in the recent studies (2007 ? 2011) inquiries indexed in MEDLINE database....................... 103 xvi Table 14: Disbursement to the local government authorities (LGA... the link between land cover and disease is of increasing interest to researchers across academic disciplines. Different land cover types have been associated with either being sources or sinks of particulate air pollution, and by extension, the spatial...

  8. Green Infrastructure for Arid Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On March 24, 2015, from 1:00pm – 2:30pm EDT, EPA's Green Infrastructure Program will launch our 2015 Webcast Series with the webinar Green Infrastructure for Arid Communities. This webinar aims to...

  9. Land-Use History and Contemporary Management Inform an Ecological Reference Model for Longleaf Pine Woodland Understory Plant Communities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brudvig, Lars A.; Orrock, John L.; Damschen, Ellen I.; et al, et al

    2014-01-23

    Ecological restoration is frequently guided by reference conditions describing a successfully restored ecosystem; however, the causes and magnitude of ecosystem degradation vary, making simple knowledge of reference conditions insufficient for prioritizing and guiding restoration. Ecological reference models provide further guidance by quantifying reference conditions, as well as conditions at degraded states that deviate from reference conditions. Many reference models remain qualitative, however, limiting their utility. We quantified and evaluated a reference model for southeastern U.S. longleaf pine woodland understory plant communities. We used regression trees to classify 232 longleaf pine woodland sites at three locations along the Atlantic coastal plain based on relationships between understory plant community composition, soils lol(which broadly structure these communities), and factors associated with understory degradation, including fire frequency, agricultural history, and tree basal area. To understand the spatial generality of this model, we classified all sites together. and for each of three study locations separately. Both the regional and location-specific models produced quantifiable degradation gradients–i.e., progressive deviation from conditions at 38 reference sites, based on understory species composition, diversity and total cover, litter depth, and other attributes. Regionally, fire suppression was the most important degrading factor, followed by agricultural history, but at individual locations, agricultural history or tree basal area was most important. At one location, the influence of a degrading factor depended on soil attributes. We suggest that our regional model can help prioritize longleaf pine woodland restoration across our study region; however, due to substantial landscape-to-landscape variation, local management decisions should take into account additional factors (e.g., soil attributes). Our study demonstrates the utility of quantifying degraded states and provides a series of hypotheses for future experimental restoration work. More broadly, our work provides a framework for developing and evaluating reference models that incorporate multiple, interactive anthropogenic drivers of ecosystem degradation.

  10. Biosphere-atmosphere interactions over semi-arid regions : modeling the role of mineral aerosols and irrigation in the regional climate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc Pace

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation describes the role of land surface processes in shaping semi-arid climates, namely those of Southwest Asia and Northwest Africa. The interactions between dust emissions, irrigation, and climate processes ...

  11. The Ecological Impact of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The Ecological Impact of Biofuels Joseph E. Fargione,1 Richard J. Plevin,2 and Jason D. Hill3 1 land-use change Abstract The ecological impact of biofuels is mediated through their effects on land, air, and water. In 2008, about 33.3 million ha were used to produce food- based biofuels

  12. Evaluating the complementary relationship for estimating evapotranspiration from arid shrublands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Evaluating the complementary relationship for estimating evapotranspiration from arid shrublands J supplies, accurate estimates of evapotranspiration (LE) from arid shrublands of the Southwestern United for estimating regional LE in arid shrubland environments. Our observational evidence supports the idea

  13. DEPARTMENT OF LAND RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    of invasive plant species, soil nutrient management, bioremediation, land reclamation ecology of natural systems, chemical fate and transport, water quality, crop

  14. The Impact of Observed Vegetation Changes on LandAtmosphere Feedbacks During Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Laboratory of Land Surface Process and Climate Change in Cold and Arid Regions, Cold and Arid Regions conditions of the advanced research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model to assess the influence show that modeled air temperature was improved when MODIS data were incorporated, while precipitation

  15. EA-1660: Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2. Ecological sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novich, C.M.

    1985-02-01

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) the terrestrial ecology of semi-arid sites; (2) marine sciences; (3) radionuclide fate and effects; (4) waste mobilization, fate and effects; and (5) theoretical research on environmental sampling. (ACR)

  17. Natural sources of mercury in arid and semiarid landscapes of western North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustin, M.S.; Taylor, G.E. Jr. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Environmental and Resource Sciences

    1994-12-31

    Mercury is enriched naturally in three global belts associated with areas in which Tertiary and Quaternary volcanism occurred. one belt, which occurs along the western margin of North America, contains concentrated and disseminated mercury occurrences in semiarid and arid biomes. Mercury enters the atmosphere from these landscapes through three processes: volatilization from enriched substrate, venting of geothermal systems, and resuspension. It is expected that the component of Hg deposited to arid landscapes through wet and dry deposition is negligible. Mercury fluxes to the atmosphere from arid and semiarid landscapes will be greater than that in more mesic environments because of the aridity and the daily amplitude in air temperatures. Resuspension may contribute significantly to the atmospheric burden of Hg due to eolian dispersal and subsequent evasion. To calculate the Hg flux from naturally enriched areas, the concentration, chemical form, and distribution of the Hg must be known. An understanding of the magnitude of natural Hg enrichment in global mercuriferous belts is important because the baseline for addressing human health and ecological risk is likely to be higher in these landscapes.

  18. Sustainability, arid grasslands and grazing: New applications for technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Parmenter, R.; Passell, H.D.; Budge, T.; Vande Caste, J.

    1999-12-08

    The study of ecology is taking on increasing global importance as the value of well-functioning ecosystems to human well-being becomes better understood. However, the use of technological systems for the study of ecology lags behind the use of technologies in the study of other disciplines important to human well-being, such as medicine, chemistry and physics. The authors outline four different kinds of large-scale data needs required by land managers for the development of sustainable land use strategies, and which can be obtained with current or future technological systems. They then outline a hypothetical resource management scenario in which data on all those needs are collected using remote and in situ technologies, transmitted to a central location, analyzed, and then disseminated for regional use in maintaining sustainable grazing systems. They conclude by highlighting various data-collection systems and data-sharing networks already in operation.

  19. The Public Lands Commission of 1879 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odom, Danna Evelyn

    1971-01-01

    primary sources for a study of' the Public Lands Commission of i879 are the 2 1 ' rl ~Rt (46 Cong. , 2 . , Ron Rxee tt Document 06), and Thomas Donaldson's The Public Domain. Important background material for the formation of the commission... is provided. by A Letter from the ~Actin Presi- 6* t 8 th Nt' 1~Ad. f S ' ~7?'tt' sess. , House Miscellaneous Document 5), and by the ~Re ort on the Lands of the Arid ~Re ion of the United. States with a Kore Detailecl Account of the Lands of Utah, by John...

  20. Modified Advection-Aridity Model of Evapotranspiration Jozsef Szilagyi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Modified Advection-Aridity Model of Evapotranspiration Jozsef Szilagyi1 ; Michael T. Hobbins2 1979 proposed the advection-aridity AA model of regional evapotranspiration based on Bouchet's 1963 ; and Janos Jozsa3 Abstract: The original and modified versions of the advection-aridity AA model of regional

  1. Sources and transport of nitrogen in arid urban watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, Rebecca L.; Turnbull, Laura; Earl, Stevan; Grimm, Nancy B.; Riha, Krystin M.; Michalski, Greg; Lohse, Kathleen; Childers, Daniel L.

    2014-06-03

    Urban watersheds are often sources of nitrogen (N) to downstream systems, contributing to poor water quality. However, it is unknown which components (e.g., land cover and stormwater infrastructure type) of urban watersheds contribute to N export and which may be sites of retention. In this study we investigated which watershed characteristics control N sourcing, biogeochemical processing of nitrate (NO3–) during storms, and the amount of rainfall N that is retained within urban watersheds. We used triple isotopes of NO3– (?15N, ?18O, and ?17O) to identify sources and transformations of NO3– during storms from 10 nested arid urban watersheds that varied in stormwater infrastructure type and drainage area. Stormwater infrastructure and land cover—retention basins, pipes, and grass cover—dictated the sourcing of NO3– in runoff. Urban watersheds can be strong sinks or sources of N to stormwater depending on the proportion of rainfall that leaves the watershed as runoff, but we found no evidence that denitrification occurred during storms. Our results suggest that watershed characteristics control the sources and transport of inorganic N in urban stormwater but that retention of inorganic N at the timescale of individual runoff events is controlled by hydrologic, rather than biogeochemical, mechanisms.

  2. Predicting Flows in Semi-Arid Watersheds Using GIS Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Semi-Arid Watersheds Using GIS Technologies Richard Wrightgeographic information system (GIS) technologies to developongoing project to create a GIS-database for the San Diego–

  3. Mining the Agave Microbiome for adaptions to arid environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman-Derr, Devin; Wojke, Tanja; North, Gretchen; Partida-Martinez, Laila; DeAngeli, Kristen; Clingenpeel, Scott; Gross, Stephen; Tringe, Susannah; Visel, Axel

    2013-03-25

    A major challenge facing the biofuels industry is the identification of high-yield plant feedstocks that can be cultivated with minimal resource inputs without competing for land and water supplies with existing food crops. Recent research has demonstrated that the Agave plant, cultivated in Mexico and Southwestern United States for the production of fiber and alcohol, meets these criteria1. Agaves grow on non-arable rocky soils in regions characterized by prolonged drought and extreme temperatures, due in part to physiological adaptions that prevent excess water-loss in arid environments2. Plant-microbial symbioses can play a role in helping plants adapt to heat and drought stress, increasing the accessibility of soil nutrients, or compete with plant pathogens3. Whether agaves have similar beneficial microbe interactions in their native environment is unknown. We aim to provide a comprehensive characterization of the Agave microbiome, with the goal of identifying specific community members that may contribute to Agave biotic and abiotic stress tolerance

  4. Montana State University 1 M.S. in Land Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 M.S. in Land Rehabilitation Course work in land rehabilitation is designed to serve students new to the rehabilitation field, as well as to experienced individuals or those already working in land rehabilitation or restoration ecology and who desire further education

  5. Uses of tree legumes in semi-arid regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, P.

    1980-01-01

    Uses of tree legumes in semi-arid and arid regions are reviewed. This review is divided into sections according to the following general use categories: fuels; human food; livestock food; to increase yields of crops grown beneath their canopies;and control of desertification. (MHR)

  6. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and HydrologyHydrology Steven Fassnacht Watershed Science Colorado State University The Importance of Climate · Climate affects the environment and us ­ Ecology: vegetation and animals ­ Water Systems ­ People

  7. The United States Regional Association of the International Association for Landscape Ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Abstracts are presented from a meeting on landscape ecology. Topics include: conservation, climatic change, forest management, aquatic, wetland, rural and urban landscapes, land use, and biodiversity.

  8. The United States Regional Association of the International Association for Landscape Ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Abstracts are presented from a meeting on landscape ecology. Topics include: conservation, climatic change, forest management, aquatic, wetland, rural and urban landscapes, land use, and biodiversity.

  9. Urban heat island mitigation strategies and lizard thermal ecology: landscaping can quadruple potential activity time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Urban heat island mitigation strategies and lizard thermal ecology: landscaping can quadruple potential activity time in an arid city Jeffrey W. Ackley1 & Michael J. Angilletta Jr.1 & Dale DeNardo1 of 3 °C warmer than the surrounding desert. With continuing urbanization and climate change, thermal

  10. Environments Journal of Arid Environments 67 (2006) 142156

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    2006-01-01

    ; Desertification 1. Introduction Low and highly variable precipitation inputs constrain plant productivity in arid organic carbon, increase of bare soil and eventually desertification (Golluscio et al., 1998; Lal, 2002

  11. Aridity changes in the Tibetan Plateau in a warming climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Yanhong; Li, Xia; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Chen, Deliang; Xu, Jianwei

    2015-03-10

    Desertification in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) has drawn increasing attention in the recent decades. It has been postulated as a consequence of climate aridity due to the observed warming. This study quantifies the aridity changes in the TP and attributes the changes to different climatic factors. Using the ratio of P/PET (precipitation to potential evapotranspiration) as an aridity index to indicate changes in dryness and wetness in a given area, P/PET was calculated using observed records at 83 stations in the TP, with PET calculated using the Penman–Monteith (PM) algorithm. Spatial and temporal changes of P/PET in 1979-2011 are analyzed.more »Results show that stations located in the arid and semi-arid northwestern TP are becoming significantly wetter and stations in the semi-humid southeastern TP are becoming drier, though not significantly, in the recent three decades. The aridity change patterns are significantly correlated with precipitation, sunshine duration and diurnal temperature range changes at confidence level of 99.9% from two-tail t-test. Temporal correlations also confirm the significant correlation between aridity changes with the three variables, with precipitation being the most dominant driver of P/PET changes at interannual time scale. PET changes are insignificant but negatively correlated with P/PET in the cold season. In the warm season, however, correlation between PET changes and P/PET changes are significant at confidence level of 99.9% when the cryosphere melts near the surface. Significant correlation between wind speed changes and aridity changes occurs in limited locations and months. Consistency in the climatology pattern and linear trends in surface air temperature and precipitation calculated using station data, gridded data, and nearest grid-to-stations for the TP average and across sub-basins indicate the robustness of the trends despite the large spatial heterogeneity in the TP that challenge climate monitoring.« less

  12. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  13. Designing for ecology : the ecological park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power, Andres M

    2006-01-01

    This thesis aims to define a) what an ecological park is, and b) whether it is a new model in park design. Reference to the literature on landscape ecology is used to analyze the natural ecological merit of these parks, ...

  14. Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest A Scientific Workshop Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-92 #12;#12;Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Service; Justin Klure, Oregon Wave Energy Trust; Greg McMurray, Oregon Department of Land Conservation

  15. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  16. Ecology, Microbial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-05-15

    Microbial ecology is a relatively young discipline within the field of microbiology. Its modern history spans just the past 60 years, and the field is defined by its emphasis on understanding the interactions of microbes with their environment, rather than their behavior under artificial laboratory conditions. Because microbes are ubiquitous, microbial ecologists study a broad diversity of habitats that range from aquatic to terrestrial to plant- or animal-associated. This has made it a challenge to identify unifying principles within the field. One approach is to recognize that although the activity of microbes in nature have effects at the macroscale, they interact with their physical, chemical and biological milieu at a scale of micrometers. At this scale, several different microbial ecosystems can be defined, based upon association with particles, the presence of environmental gradients and the continuous availability of water. Principles applicable to microbial ecology reflect not only their population ecology and physiological ecology, but also their broad versatility and quantitative importance in the biosphere as biogeochemical catalysts and capacity for rapid physiological and evolutionary responses.

  17. Ecology, Microbial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-03-19

    Microbial ecology is a relatively young discipline within the field of microbiology. Its modern history spans just the past 60 years, and the field is defined by its emphasis on understanding the interactions of microbes with their environment, rather than their behavior under artificial laboratory conditions. Because microbes are ubiquitous, microbial ecologists study a broad diversity of habitats that range from aquatic to terrestrial to plant- or animal-associated. This has made it a challenge to identify unifying principles within the field. One approach is to recognize that although the activity of microbes in nature have effects at the macroscale, they interact with their physical, chemical and biological milieu at a scale of micrometers. At this scale, several different microbial ecosystems can be defined, based upon association with particles, the presence of environmental gradients and the continuous availability of water. Principles applicable to microbial ecology reflect not only their population ecology and physiological ecology, but also their broad versatility and quantitative importance in the biosphere as biogeochemical catalysts and capacity for rapid physiological and evolutionary responses.

  18. Book Reviews Ecology, 86(12), 2005, pp. 34203421

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    with their landscapes to achieve an ecolog- ically, economically, and socially sustainable world? More specifically, these are some of the questions that have motivated DeFries et al. to organize this book on impacts of land on ``Ecosystems interactions with land-use change,'' held in Santa Fe, New Mexico during June 14­18, 2003

  19. Terrestrial aridity and its response to greenhouse warming1 across CMIP5 climate models2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frierson, Dargan

    Terrestrial aridity and its response to greenhouse warming1 across CMIP5 climate models2 Jacob climatic aridity, it makes sense to consider P relative to potential37 evapotranspiration PET (e using v4.3.2 of the AMS LATEX template 1 #12;ABSTRACT 2 #12;The aridity of a terrestrial climate

  20. Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bronstert, Axel

    Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil A: Bronstert 1 Integrated modelling of water availability and water use in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil A con- straint for development in the semi-arid Northeast of Brazil. Quanti cation of natural water

  1. Ecological footprint of an organization: can it really be Gondran Natacha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    land, built-up land and carbon uptake land. For each component, the ecological footprint is obtained Footprint Network (for example, FAO for harvested products). Concerning the carbon emission factors in order to make the Carbon footprint be consistent with the results of the more official "Bilan Carbone

  2. Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom Advisor: Dr. Scott Whiteford Center resources. Often excluded from the typical water- related concerns associated with biofuels as algae as the best location in the world to grow algae, the state of Arizona is now home to several premier algae

  3. Environments Journal of Arid Environments 68 (2007) 652667

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    2007-01-01

    desertification in a semi-arid area of Ordos Plateau, northwestern China, to explore the spatial relationships degraded community C2. With increasing desertification effects from C3 to C5, the AGB, N, and P decreased nutrients; Disturbed prairie; Geostatistics 1. Introduction Desertification associated with human activities

  4. Mechanical environmental transport of actinides and ¹³?Cs from an arid radioactive waste disposal site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Mathew S.; Clark, Sue B.; Morrison, Samuel S.; Watrous, Matthew G.; Olson, John E.; Snyder, Darin C.

    2015-10-01

    Particulate transport represents an important mechanism for actinides and fission products at the Earth's surface; soil samples taken in the early 1970's near the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) provide a case study for examining the mechanisms and characteristics of actinide transport under arid conditions. Transuranic waste was disposed via shallow land burial at the SDA until shortly after a flooding event that occurred in 1969. In this study we analyze soils collected in the early 1970's for ¹³?Cs, ²?¹Am, and Pu using a combination of radiometric and mass spectrometric techniques. Two distinct ²??Pu/²³?Pu isotopic ratios are observed for contamination from the SDA, with values ranging from at least 0.059 to 0.069. ²?¹Am concentrations are observed to increase only slightly in 0-4 cm soils over the ~40 year period since soil sampling, contrary to Markham's previous hypothesis that ²?¹Pu is principally associated with the 0-4 cm soil fractions (Markham 1978). The lack of statistical difference in ²?¹Am/²³??²??Pu ratios with depth suggests mechanical transport and mixing discrete contaminated particles under arid conditions. Occasional samples beyond the northeastern corner are observed to contain anomalously high Pu concentrations with corresponding low ²??Pu/²³?Pu atoms ratios, suggesting the occurrence of "hot particles;" application of a background Pu subtraction results in calculated Pu atom ratios for the "hot particles" which are statistically similar to those observed in the northeastern corner. Taken together, our data suggests that flooding resulted in mechanical transport of contaminated particles into the area between the SDA and the flood containment dike in the northeastern corner, following which subsequent contamination spreading resulted from wind transport of discrete particles.

  5. Mechanical environmental transport of actinides and ¹³?Cs from an arid radioactive waste disposal site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Snow, Mathew S.; Clark, Sue B.; Morrison, Samuel S.; Watrous, Matthew G.; Olson, John E.; Snyder, Darin C.

    2015-10-01

    Particulate transport represents an important mechanism for actinides and fission products at the Earth's surface; soil samples taken in the early 1970's near the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) provide a case study for examining the mechanisms and characteristics of actinide transport under arid conditions. Transuranic waste was disposed via shallow land burial at the SDA until shortly after a flooding event that occurred in 1969. In this study we analyze soils collected in the early 1970's for ¹³?Cs, ²?¹Am, and Pu using a combination of radiometric and mass spectrometric techniques. Two distinct ²??Pu/²³?Pu isotopic ratiosmore »are observed for contamination from the SDA, with values ranging from at least 0.059 to 0.069. ²?¹Am concentrations are observed to increase only slightly in 0-4 cm soils over the ~40 year period since soil sampling, contrary to Markham's previous hypothesis that ²?¹Pu is principally associated with the 0-4 cm soil fractions (Markham 1978). The lack of statistical difference in ²?¹Am/²³??²??Pu ratios with depth suggests mechanical transport and mixing discrete contaminated particles under arid conditions. Occasional samples beyond the northeastern corner are observed to contain anomalously high Pu concentrations with corresponding low ²??Pu/²³?Pu atoms ratios, suggesting the occurrence of "hot particles;" application of a background Pu subtraction results in calculated Pu atom ratios for the "hot particles" which are statistically similar to those observed in the northeastern corner. Taken together, our data suggests that flooding resulted in mechanical transport of contaminated particles into the area between the SDA and the flood containment dike in the northeastern corner, following which subsequent contamination spreading resulted from wind transport of discrete particles.« less

  6. The Hole as a Whole: Geological and Microbiological Features of Rock Weathering in Arid and Hyper-Arid Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    weathering only when exposed to the atmosphere regardless of their physico-chemical properties. We have and hyper arid environments where weathering may be the result of salt, mobilized by dew and crystallized within rock pores exposed to atmospheric conditions. We hypothesize that this process is mitigated

  7. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceRisk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane, Senior

  8. Terry Land

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel: Name: Rm. Tel: Location:TerrachanicsTerry Land

  9. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  10. Oak Ridge reservation land-use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibb, W. R.; Hardin, T. H.; Hawkins, C. C.; Johnson, W. A.; Peitzsch, F. C.; Scott, T. H.; Theisen, M. R.; Tuck, S. C.

    1980-03-01

    This study establishes a basis for long-range land-use planning to accommodate both present and projected DOE program requirements in Oak Ridge. In addition to technological requirements, this land-use plan incorporates in-depth ecological concepts that recognize multiple uses of land as a viable option. Neither environmental research nor technological operations need to be mutually exclusive in all instances. Unique biological areas, as well as rare and endangered species, need to be protected, and human and environmental health and safety must be maintained. The plan is based on the concept that the primary use of DOE land resources must be to implement the overall DOE mission in Oak Ridge. This document, along with the base map and overlay maps, provides a reasonably detailed description of the DOE Oak Ridge land resources and of the current and potential uses of the land. A description of the land characteristics, including geomorphology, agricultural productivity and soils, water courses, vegetation, and terrestrial and aquatic animal habitats, is presented to serve as a resource document. Essentially all DOE land in the Oak Ridge area is being fully used for ongoing DOE programs or has been set aside as protected areas.

  11. Arid Land Research and Management, 15:359 370, 2001 Copyright # 2001 Taylor & Francis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    -4982/01 $12.00 .00 Optimizing Solution P Concentration in a Peat-Based Medium for Producing Mycorrhizal of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources University of Hawaii Honolulu, Hawaii, USA An investigation was undertaken to test the hypothesis that amending peat to increase its P bu er capacity and optimizing the P

  12. The structure of conservation : experiments in representing design knowledge for arid lands design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Andrew M. (Andrew Michael)

    1987-01-01

    This thesis proposes, through a multi-layered exploration, the development of a system of computer tools for architects. The research consists of a series of "design sessions" in the context of a desert design problem. The ...

  13. Quantifying land cover in a semi-arid region of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peschel, Joshua Michael

    2005-02-17

    millimeters of H2O) for the STATSGO (STAT) and SSURGO (SSUR) models of the Upper Sabinal River watershed.............................................. 153 42 Sub-basin daily average evapotranspiration results by month (in millimeters of H2O...) and SSURGO (SSUR) models of the Upper Sabinal River watershed ................................ 159 46 Percentage of impervious surface area in the Edwards Aquifer watershed contributing zones from 1986 through 2000...

  14. Arid Lands Newsletter | ISSN: 02779455 | EISSN: 10925481 4 ALN No. 60, June 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papuga, Shirley A.

    Desertification and local resilience Extreme makeovers: Crossing critical thresholds into desertification by Shirley Kurc1 Introduction:kurc@ag.arizona.edu #12;ALN No. 60, June 2008 Desertification and local resilience Kurc: Extreme Makeovers: Crossing

  15. Ecological Restoration for Community Benefit: People and Landscapes in Northern California, 1840-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Lucy Ontario

    2011-01-01

    ecological degradation is land management primarily focused on economic extraction (practitioner interview #1020, 10/12/08; Houseecological conditions are seen as essential for and manifestations of a healthy human community (Baker 2005; House

  16. wwwwww..ffrroonnttiieerrssiinneeccoollooggyy..oorrgg The Ecological Society of America Carbon trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10 wwwwww..ffrroonnttiieerrssiinneeccoollooggyy..oorrgg ©© The Ecological Society of America Carbon to land or resources, are now responsible for sequestering carbon emitted by a coal-fired energy plant

  17. Arid site water balance: evapotranspiration modeling and measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    In order to evaluate the magnitude of radionuclide transport at an aird site, a field and modeling study was conducted to measure and predict water movement under vegetated and bare soil conditions. Significant quantities of water were found to move below the roo of a shallow-rooted grass-covered area during wet years at the Hanford site. The unsaturated water flow model, UNSAT-1D, was resonably successful in simulating the transient behavior of the water balance at this site. The effects of layered soils on water balance were demonstrated using the model. Models used to evaluate water balance in arid regions should not rely on annual averages and assume that all precipitation is removed by evapotranspiration. The potential for drainage at arid sites exists under conditions where shallow rooted plants grow on coarse textured soils. This condition was observed at our study site at Hanford. Neutron probe data collected on a cheatgrass community at the Hanford site during a wet year indicated that over 5 cm of water drained below the 3.5-m depth. The unsaturated water flow model, UNSAT-1D, predicted water drainage of about 5 cm (single layer, 10 months) and 3.5 cm (two layers, 12 months) for the same time period. Additional field measurements of hydraulic conductivity will likely improve the drainage estimate made by UNSAT-1D. Additional information describing cheatgrass growth and water use at the grass site could improve model predictions of sink terms and subsequent calculations of water storage within the rooting zone. In arid areas where the major part of the annual precipitation occurs during months with low average potential evapotranspiration and where soils are vegetated but are coarse textured and well drained, significant drainage can occur. 31 references, 18 figures, 1 table.

  18. HYDROLOGIC ISSUES IN ARID, UNSATURATED SYSTEMS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    being proposed for low-level and high-level radioactive waste disposal [Montazer and Wilson, 1984HYDROLOGIC ISSUES IN ARID, UNSATURATED SYSTEMS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT Bridget R Science University of Arizona, Tucson Abstract. Analysis of unsaturated flow and transport in arid regions

  19. POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D EA-1 ,Page 1 of 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polissar, Pratigya J.

    POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D EA-1 ,Page 1 of 21 Polissar & Freeman (2010) Effects of Aridity and Vegetation on Plant-wax D in Modern Lake Sediments Electronic annex. References 6. Supplemental Figures #12;POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D

  20. An Evaluation of Unsaturated Flow Models in an Arid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, J.

    1999-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two unsaturated flow models in arid regions. The area selected for the study was the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. The two models selected for this evaluation were HYDRUS-1D [Simunek et al., 1998] and the SHAW model [Flerchinger and Saxton, 1989]. Approximately 5 years of soil-water and atmospheric data collected from an instrumented weighing lysimeter site near the RWMS were used for building the models with actual initial and boundary conditions representative of the site. Physical processes affecting the site and model performance were explored. Model performance was based on a detailed sensitivity analysis and ultimately on storage comparisons. During the process of developing descriptive model input, procedures for converting hydraulic parameters for each model were explored. In addition, the compilation of atmospheric data collected at the site became a useful tool for developing predictive functions for future studies. The final model results were used to evaluate the capacities of the HYDRUS and SHAW models for predicting soil-moisture movement and variable surface phenomena for bare soil conditions in the arid vadose zone. The development of calibrated models along with the atmospheric and soil data collected at the site provide useful information for predicting future site performance at the RWMS.

  1. The Un-Quantifiable Values of Conservation Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    The Un-Quantifiable Values of Conservation Lands Win Everham Marine and Ecological Sciences Florida there are no values that are not economic (i.e it's the economy stupid!) #12;An economist "knows the price inappropriate #12;An economist "knows the price of everything and the value of nothing" "there is more

  2. Bishop's University Minutes Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop's University Minutes Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting held called: Sustainable development residence challenge to compete to reduce the Residence's ecological foot the momentum gained by the committee up to now. The SD&LU is a student driven committee and sustainability

  3. Jonathan K. London, Ph.D. Department of Human Ecology &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    + Jonathan K. London, Ph.D. Department of Human Ecology & Eyes on the Prize: Sustainable and Jobs" (EEJ) alternative Sacramento: Formal integration into SCS Selection of TPAs Transportation just communities Focus on actual transportation and housing investments not only modeled land use

  4. Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    appeared at this time. Both of these groups of plants had life cycles, involving two generations. One of the year these mosses will produce tiny sporophytes. Prior to this generation, the tiny plants producedPrimitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS These are the plants that were present soon after

  5. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore »plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N addition rates indicate that arid ecosystems are sensitive to modest increments in anthropogenic N deposition.« less

  6. Development of a Decision Support Geographic Information System for land restoration programs in the Leon, Lampasas, and Bosque River Watersheds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Jason Samuel

    2006-10-30

    Ashe Juniper encroachment onto privately owned rangelands in Central Texas has resulted in significant degradation of the ecological condition of these lands, and a subsequent public concern for the hydrologic function, ...

  7. Journal of Animal Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2004 73, 342­352 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, reproductive value, sex allocation, sex-dependent mortality, varia- ble environment. Journal of Animal Ecology manipulation in kestrels © 2004 British Ecological Society, Journal of Animal Ecology, 73, 342­352 van

  8. Journal of Applied Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2004 41, 922­933 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing-scale, Sacramento River, succession, vegetation Journal of Applied Ecology (2004) 41, 922­933 Introduction More than@ucsc.edu). #12;923 Riparian forest restoration © 2004 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology, 41

  9. Journal of Applied Ecology 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2002 39, 960­970 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science- tion, succession. Journal of Applied Ecology (2002) 39, 960­970 Introduction Efforts to reclaim@ucsc.edu). #12;961 Vegetation on reclaimed mines © 2002 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology

  10. Journal of Animal Ecology 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trexler, Joel C.

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2005 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd Everglades, Moran effect, spatial synchrony. Journal of Animal Ecology (2005) doi: 10.1111/j.1365-mail: cruetz@sigmaxi.org #12;2 C. R. Ruetz et al. © 2005 British Ecological Society, Journal of Animal Ecology

  11. Master programme in Ecology & Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    of Ecology and Evolution, Baltzerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern save form print form #12;Master programme in Ecology of Ecology and Evolution, Baltzerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern #12;Master programme in Ecology & Evolution Jointly, Baltzerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern #12;Master programme in Ecology & Evolution Jointly organized by the Institute

  12. Small lysimeters for documenting arid site water balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J. (Chem-Nuclear Geotech, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (USA)); Thiede, M.E.; Cadwell, L.L.; Gee, G.W.; Freeman, H.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Sackschewsky, M.R.; Relyea, J.F. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA))

    1991-07-01

    Small weighing lysimeters consisting of plastic pipes with lifting and drainage fittings were installed at the arid US DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to conduct factorial experiments comparing the influences of various waste site cover designs on soil water balance. Results of a comparison of erosion control designs indicate that gravel can be mixed into the soil surface to control soil loss without influencing the water balance. In contrast, an equivalent amount of gravel applied as a surface mulch suppressed evapotranspiration resulting in increased storage and drainage. Only slight differences were observed in a comparison of storage changes in the small-tube lysimeters and adjacent large weighing lysimeters. Soil temperature curves for small-tube lysimeters and nearby soil profiles converged after insulation collars were installed. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Development of a Species Distribution Model for the East Pacific Green Sea Turtle using Ecological Geoprocessing Tools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Roxanne

    2012-10-19

    East Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, play ecologically important roles in marine habitats which range from grazing (and thus regularly "mowing") algae and seagrass beds to cycling nutrients between the ocean and land. However...

  14. Quantifying landscape pattern in the Ouachita National Forest: an ecological application of GIS-based spatial analysis and modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Delayne Marie

    1998-01-01

    Human induced land use changes are contributing to raphics. serious ecological impacts in National Forests. Although these types of human activities are being looked upon with great concern, the contribution of human development and disturbance...

  15. Intermediate depth burial of classified transuranic wastes in arid alluvium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Risk and Decision Analysis Dept.; Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Geologic Integration Group; Di Sanza, F. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Nevada Operations Office

    1999-04-01

    Intermediate depth disposal operations were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the DOE`s Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1984 through 1989. These operations emplaced high-specific activity low-level wastes (LLW) and limited quantities of classified transuranic (TRU) wastes in 37 m (120-ft) deep, Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes. The GCD boreholes are 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and founded in a thick sequence of arid alluvium. The bottom 15 m (50 ft) of each borehole was used for waste emplacement and the upper 21 m (70 ft) was backfilled with native alluvium. The bottom of each GCD borehole is almost 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in one of the most arid portions of the US, with an average precipitation of 13 cm (5 inches) per year. The limited precipitation, coupled with generally warm temperatures and low humidities results in a hydrologic system dominated by evapotranspiration. The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) 40 CFR 191 defines the requirements for protection of human health from disposed TRU wastes. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU wastes emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA`s 40 CFR 191 requirements. This paper describes DOE`s actions undertaken to evaluate whether the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes will, or will not, endanger human health. Based on preliminary modeling, the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes meet the EPA`s requirements, and are, therefore, protective of human health.

  16. Baseline ecological footprint of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coplen, Amy K.; Mizner, Jack Harry,; Ubechel, Norion M.

    2009-01-01

    The Ecological Footprint Model is a mechanism for measuring the environmental effects of operations at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). This analysis quantifies environmental impact associated with energy use, transportation, waste, land use, and water consumption at SNL/NM for fiscal year 2005 (FY05). Since SNL/NM's total ecological footprint (96,434 gha) is greater than the waste absorption capacity of its landholdings (338 gha), it created an ecological deficit of 96,096 gha. This deficit is equal to 886,470lha, or about 3,423 square miles of Pinyon-Juniper woodlands and desert grassland. 89% of the ecological footprint can be attributed to energy use, indicating that in order to mitigate environmental impact, efforts should be focused on energy efficiency, energy reduction, and the incorporation of additional renewable energy alternatives at SNL/NM.

  17. 245Copyright ECOLOGICAL BULLETINS, 2013 Ecological Bulletins 54: 245250, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    245Copyright © ECOLOGICAL BULLETINS, 2013 Ecological Bulletins 54: 245­250, 2013 Background, An- drewartha and Birch 1954, Odum 1959). Indeed, the relation between environmental gradients

  18. Marine Ecological Processes Online section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Marine Ecological Processes Online section FAS 6272 (3 credits) Fall 2014 Course Description, behavior, population dynamics, and community structure in marine and estuarine ecosystems. Prerequisite will have: · Examined how ecological processes operate in the marine environment · Compared how ecological

  19. Remote sensing estimates of supplementary water consumption by arid ecosystems of central Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Remote sensing estimates of supplementary water consumption by arid ecosystems of central Argentina Nacional de San Luis & CONICET, San Luis, Argentina b Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School Ambiental, Centro Regional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas, CONICET, Mendoza, Argentina d

  20. Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Aggregate Stability in an Arid Mountain Range, White Mountains, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frisbie, Juanita Aapris

    2014-01-01

    D.L. 1989. Responses of Mountain Big Sagebrush to inducedgradient in the Gongga Mountain on the Tibetan plateau. J.relationships in an arid mountain range, Mojave Desert,

  1. The role of rooting strategies on the eco-hydrology of semi-arid regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivandran, Gajan

    2012-01-01

    Arid regions are characterized by high variability in the arrival of rainfall, and species found in these areas have adapted mechanisms to ensure the capture of this scarce resource. In particular, the rooting strategies ...

  2. Environments Journal of Arid Environments 72 (2008) 314325

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Ecology and Management, Texas A&M University, 2126 TAMU, College Station, TX 77840-2126, USA b Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, P.O. Box 1658, Vernon, TX 76384, USA Received 3 January 2007; received lift (Ludwig et al., 2003); (4) competition between trees and understory plants for light, soil

  3. LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for development; In order to integrate the region to the rest of the country, a series of highways were and landless workers; The landless workers are the agents with less opportunity cost; The loggers need.g. Hydropower) Transport (e.g. roads) Agricultural Expansion Cultivation (e.g Smallholders) Cattle Ranching

  4. LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    attempts for development; In order to integrate the region to the rest of the country, a series of highways and landless workers; The landless workers are the agents with less opportunity cost; The loggers need.g. Hydropower) Transport (e.g. roads) Agricultural Expansion Cultivation (e.g Smallholders) Cattle Ranching

  5. LAND USE AND ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the Marcellus region. Some of those species, such as the green salamander and the snow trillium, have all or most of their populations in areas with a high probability of...

  6. Ecology 2003 91, 240252

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chave, Jérôme

    Journal of Ecology 2003 91, 240­252 © 2003 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Center for Tropical Forest Science, Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute-words: above-ground biomass change, carbon cycle, dry living above-ground bio- mass, tropical rain forest

  7. Ecology 2004 18, 212222

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehleringer, Jim

    Functional Ecology 2004 18, 212­222 © 2004 British Ecological Society 212 Blackwell Publishing, Ltd of California, Berkeley 94720-3140, CA, and Stable Isotope Ratio Facility for Environmental Research (SIRFER) examine if cultural conditions have an effect on instantaneous gas exchange and time-integrated carbon

  8. Ecology 2005 93, 10851093

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehring, Catherine "Kitty"

    Journal of Ecology 2005 93, 1085­1093 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd G. WHITHAM Department of Biological Sciences and Merriam Powell Center for Environmental Research on ecosystems and ecosystem processes. Projected changes include increased levels of carbon dioxide, elevated

  9. Ecology 2006 20, 678688

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Carotenoid accumulation strategies for becoming a colourful HouseFunctional Ecology 2006 20, 678­688 678 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British. CRINO School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287­4501, USA Summary 1. Male House

  10. Ecology 2006 20, 491499

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    Functional Ecology 2006 20, 491­499 491 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Physiological and behavioural correlates of life-history variation: a comparison between tropical and temperate zone House Wrens B. I. TIELEMAN,* T. H. DIJKSTRA,§ J

  11. Baltimore Harbor's Ecological and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    1 State of Baltimore Harbor's Ecological and Human Health 2010 E. Caroline Wicks, R. Heath Kelsey of Baltimore Harbor's ecological and human health, 2011. IAN Press, Cambridge, Maryland. Science communication to thank all the data providers: Baltimore City, Baltimore County, Maryland Department of Natural Resources

  12. Ecology 2004 92, 168173

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvertown, Jonathan

    in these islands. Key-words: Canary Islands, colonization, endemism, interspecific competition, Macaronesia, niche et al. 1994) and the Canary Islands (e.g. Francisco-Ortega et al. 1996), and these show that most.Oxford, UKJECJournal of Ecology0022-04772004 British Ecological SocietyFebruary 2004921ForumPhylogeny of island

  13. Journal of Animal Ecology 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2002 71, 23­31 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science Ltd, cyclic variation in food abundance, differential mortality, reproductive effort, senescence. Journal@utu.fi #12;© 2002 British Ecological Society, Journal of Animal Ecology, 71, 23­31 24 T. Laaksonen, E

  14. Journal of Animal Ecology 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2003 72, 1015­1026 © 2003 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, positive interactions, rarefaction. Journal of Animal Ecology (2003) 72, 1015­1026 Introduction After Society, Journal of Animal Ecology, 72, 1015­1026 available to other colonizing species (Gallagher et al

  15. Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No name listed on publication

    2011-08-01

    Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

  16. VOCs in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (ID) was initiated in 1989. Objectives for the ID were to test the integrated demonstration concept, demonstrate and evaluate innovative technologies/systems for the remediation of VOC contamination in soils and groundwater, and to transfer technologies and systems to internal and external customers for use in fullscale remediation programs. The demonstration brought together technologies from DOE laboratories, other government agencies, and industry for demonstration at a single test bed. The Savannah River Site was chosen as the location for this ID as the result of having soil and groundwater contaminated with VOCS. The primary contaminants, trichlorethylene and tetrachloroethylene, originated from an underground process sewer line servicing a metal fabrication facility at the M-Area. Some of the major technical accomplishments for the ID include the successful demonstration of the following: In situ air stripping coupled with horizontal wells to remediate sites through air injection and vacuum extraction; Crosshole geophysical tomography for mapping moisture content and lithologic properties of the contaminated media; In situ radio frequency and ohmic heating to increase mobility, of the contaminants, thereby speeding recovery and the remedial process; High-energy corona destruction of VOCs in the off-gas of vapor recovery wells; Application of a Brayton cycle heat pump to regenerate carbon adsorption media used to trap VOCs from the offgas of recovery wells; In situ permeable flow sensors and the colloidal borescope to determine groundwater flow; Chemical sensors to rapidly quantify chlorinated solvent contamination in the subsurface; In situ bioremediation through methane/nutrient injection to enhance degradation of contaminants by methanotrophic bateria.

  17. A comparison of automated land cover/use classification methods for a Texas bottomland hardwood system using lidar, spot-5, and ancillary data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernon, Zachary Isaac

    2009-05-15

    Bottomland hardwood forests are highly productive ecosystems which perform many important ecological services. Unfortunately, many bottomland hardwood forests have been degraded or lost. Accurate land cover mapping is crucial for management...

  18. Karst characterization in a semi-arid region using gravity, seismic, and resistivity geophysical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnhart, Kevin Scott

    2013-10-01

    We proposed to customize emerging in situ geophysical monitoring technology to generate time-series data during sporadic rain events in a semi-arid region. Electrodes were to be connected to wireless %5Cnodes%22 which can be left in the eld for many months. Embedded software would then increase sampling frequency during periods of rainfall. We hypothesized that this contrast between no-volume ow in karst passageways dur- ing dry periods and partial- or saturated-volume ow during a rain event is detectable by these Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) geophysical nodes, we call this a Wireless Resistivity Network (WRN). The development of new methodologies to characterize semi-arid karst hydrology is intended to augment Sandia National Laboratorys mission to lead e orts in energy technologies, waste disposal and climate security by helping to identify safe and secure regions and those that are at risk. Development and initial eld testing identi ed technological barriers to using WRNs for identifying semi-arid karst, exposing R&D which can be targeted in the future. Gravity, seismic, and resis- tivity surveys elucidated how each technique might e ectively be used to characterize semi-arid karst. This research brings to light the importance and challenges with char- acterizing semi-arid karst through a multi-method geophysical study. As there have been very few studies with this emphasis, this study has expanded the body of practical experience needed to protect the nations water and energy security interests.

  19. Ecology, 82(4), 2001, pp. 10231039 2001 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    , CHRISTER BRO¨ NMARK, AND WILHELM GRANE´ LI Department of Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, S-223

  20. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Practicing Urban Agriculture Right Here: Integrating the LFS Garden with the Faculty of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Practicing Urban Urban Agriculture Right Here: Integrating the LFS Garden with the Faculty of Land and Food Systems Orchard Garden Committee..................................................24 LFS Orchard Garden

  1. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan Keywords (Subject): Land Use, Soils, Agriculture

  2. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan #12;Keywords (Subject): Land Use, Soils, Vegetation

  3. Loss of phosphorus from soil in semi-arid northern Tanzania as a result of cropping: evidence from sequential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Loss of phosphorus from soil in semi-arid northern Tanzania as a result of cropping: evidence from-arid northern Tanzania, the native woodland is being rapidly cleared and replaced by low input agriculture Tanzania, the indigenous tropical woodland is rapidly being replaced by low input agriculture. In addition

  4. Organic Phosphorus Composition and Potential Bioavailability in Semi-Arid Arable Soils of the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Organic Phosphorus Composition and Potential Bioavailability in Semi-Arid Arable Soils to understand the nature of organic P in these soils.The organic P composition of semi-arid arable soils is largely un- Soil organic P determination has traditionally beenknown, but such information is fundamental

  5. Vadose zone lag time and potential 21st century climate change effects on spatially distributed groundwater recharge in the semi-arid Nebraska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    to centuries in semi-arid and arid environments. Yet, studies of future climate change impacts to GR have groundwater recharge in the semi-arid Nebraska Sand Hills N.R. Rossman a, , V.A. Zlotnik a , C.M. Rowe a , J Keywords: Groundwater recharge Climate change Vadose zone Lag time Groundwater modeling Nebraska Sand Hills

  6. 44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 4453.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 44­53. Accepted 13 May 2009 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 agricultural landscape on local bird communities. ­ Web Ecol. 9: 44­53. This study assesses whether Alcalá de Henares, Spain. #12;45WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 multifunctional systems are common in southern Europe

  7. 74 WEB ECOLOGY 8, 2008 Web Ecology 8: 7483.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    74 WEB ECOLOGY 8, 2008 Web Ecology 8: 74­83. Accepted 2 June 2008 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 experimental environments. ­ Web Ecol. 8: 74­83. Living organisms respond both to current and previous;75WEB ECOLOGY 8, 2008 previous environments on the future performance. This type of experiments

  8. 120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120131.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120­131. Accepted 27 December 2007 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 improves early performance of planted seedlings of the Mediterranean shrub Quer- cus coccifera. ­ Web, Spain. #12;121WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 have important economic consequences because large amounts of public

  9. Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide 2014-2015 #12;2 #12;Student Responsibilities in Ecological Engineering as administered by Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering (BEE carefully review the College of Engineering and the BEE Department policies for admission, student

  10. Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide 2013-2014 #12;2 #12;Student Responsibilities in Ecological Engineering as administered by Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering (BEE carefully review the College of Engineering and the BEE Department policies for admission, student

  11. Journal of Applied Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2007 44, 748­759 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British, distribution, edge, marbled murrelets, model transferability, old-growth Journal of Applied Ecology (2007) 44-nesting Alcid © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied

  12. Marine Ecological Processes Online section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Marine Ecological Processes Online section FAS 4270 (3 credits) Fall 2012 Course Description The course covers the ecology of marine organisms and habitats with focus on how general ecological principles and those unique to the marine environment drive patterns and processes. Prerequisite: Two

  13. Future land use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  14. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  15. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  16. GEOLOGY, January 2010 83 Many semiarid and arid regions of the world are almost entirely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    that decreased recharge in responses to the global warming trend in the arid and semiarid regions will impose additional stresses on these groundwater systems (Seager et al., 2007). To adapt to the global warming trend truthing, for example, in the late Pleistocene and Holocene (e.g., ca. 40 ka to the present). However

  17. Effects of aridity and vegetation on plant-wax dD in modern lake sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polissar, Pratigya J.

    Effects of aridity and vegetation on plant-wax dD in modern lake sediments Pratigya J. Polissar Abstract We analyzed the deuterium composition of individual plant-waxes in lake sediments from 28 fractionation (ea) between plant-wax n-alkanes and precipitation differs with watershed ecosystem type

  18. COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Considerable amount of radioactive waste has been released to vadose zone sediments at the Hanford siteCOLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE By ZIRU LIU support, and endless love. iv #12;COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI

  19. Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California; revised 29 March 2011; accepted 1 April 2011; published 7 May 2011. [1] Beryllium7 is a potentially potential as a sediment tracer in desert environments. Beryllium7 in vegetation and the upper few cm of soil

  20. Submitted for Publication to SOLAR ENERGY PRODUCING SATELLITE-DERIVED IRRADIANCES IN COMPLEX ARID TERRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    & Ray George NREL 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 drenne / ray_george@nrel.nrel.gov ABSTRACT This paper range management. Ground specular reflectance had been identified as the main source of model inaccuracy in the arid western US and was found to perform adequately (Perez et al., 2002). However, these stations

  1. Prediction of sediment-bound nutrient delivery from semi-arid California watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabet, Emmanuel "Manny"

    Prediction of sediment-bound nutrient delivery from semi-arid California watersheds Emmanuel J, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA Received 4 March 2005; revised 16 June 2005 in soil to account explicitly for hillslope sediment transport processes that yield sediment

  2. Ecology 2006 94, 276284

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehring, Catherine "Kitty"

    Journal of Ecology 2006 94, 276­284 © 2006 The Authors Journal compilation © 2006 British of Biological Sciences and Merriam Powell Center for Environmental Research, Northern Arizona University and Cupressaceae that are dependent on the host plant for water and mineral nutrients and a portion of their carbon

  3. Ecology 2007 95, 13941403

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    EvolutionResearchGroup(CSIC-IPNA),C/AstrofísicoFranciscoSánchez3,38206LaLaguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain, Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation (Canary Islands). 2. Seeds from all three plant species studied (Lycium intricatum, Rubia fruticosa probably in the colonization of other subtropical islands. Key-words: Badlands, Canary Islands, diplochory

  4. Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three Major Floods, Gila RiverKelvey, Director Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Burkham, D. E. 1927 Hydraulic effects 19.16:655-J 1. Gila River-Floods. 2. Hydraulics. 3. Botany-Ecology-Gila River. 1. Title: Hydraulic

  5. Access to Land and Global Development Wendy Wolford, Polson Professor of Development Sociology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    for agricultural goods and alternative energy crops. Although the extent of the land deals are not known (see, particularly hunger; climate change and the search for sustainable energy alternatives; ecological degradation ongoing research in these areas; or initiating a research project in the local area (the state of New York

  6. Modeling soil depth from topographic and land cover attributes Teklu K. Tesfa,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Modeling soil depth from topographic and land cover attributes Teklu K. Tesfa,1 David G. Tarboton,1 June 2009; published 29 October 2009. [1] Soil depth is an important input parameter in hydrological and ecological modeling. Presently, the soil depth data available in national soil databases (STATSGO and SSURGO

  7. Valuation of ecological resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.; Ricci, P.F.; Seely, H.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Westerdahl, H.E.

    1995-04-01

    Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.

  8. Exploring the effects of local development regulations on ecological landscape structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin Ki

    2005-08-29

    An ecological approach to land-use planning is essential to maintain the long-term sustainability of ecosystem benefits, services, and resources. Concern about environmental quality and the long-term livability of urban areas is now a driving force...

  9. UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The UBC Food System Project: Summary 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Services (UBCFS), AMS Food and Beverage Department (AMSFBD), UBC Waste Management (UBCWM), CentreUBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The UBC Food System.Sc. Candidate for Dietetics in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems and has served as Teaching Assistant in AGSC

  10. Finding GIS data: Land cover and land use in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Rhonda

    2006-12-08

    classes with no key to indicate class descriptions. The student understands how human actions modify the physical environment. The student helps create both a hard copy and digital pie chart that shows relative land cover class areas. The student... helps create a digital pie chart that shows relative land cover class areas. The student helps create a pie chart by hand that shows relative land cover class areas. The student creates e a pie chart by hand that shows relative land cover class...

  11. Stumped by Detroit's Vacant Land Process?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Lucia; Kiani, Naria; O'Brien-Kovari, Lilly; Ordower, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Stumped by Detroit's Vacant Land Process?Illustrating the Role of the Detroit Land Bank AuthorityLos Angeles STUMPED BY DETROIT’S VACANT LAND PROCESS?

  12. Sandia Energy - Bureau of Land Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Land Management Home Climate & Earth Systems Sustainable Subsurface Energy Development Program Leadership Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Land ManagementMaelyn...

  13. Chennai Urban Land Market Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowall, David E; Monkkonen, Paavo

    2007-01-01

    for 2003 and 2004 land price data (Tables 13 and 14), adding25 Table 12: Price Gradient Regression Results for35 Table 15: Average Price of Land in Residential Plots and

  14. Ethnic differences in ecological concerns: Spanish-speaking Hispanics are more concerned than others

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8082 (United States) and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)]. E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu; Greenberg, Michael [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University, 33 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901-1958 (United States)

    2006-09-15

    We postulated that environmental concern encompasses a wide range of different issues, often lumping pollution with habitat loss (or land use) and ecological resources (fish and wildlife). In this paper, we compare perceptions about a range of environmental and ecological resource issues, and explore ethnic/racial differences. We surveyed 1513 residents of New Jersey about 'environmental concerns', using both general environmental questions (two questions: How serious are environmental problems in New Jersey? Are you concerned about the loss of open space?) and ecological resource questions (12 questions: e.g., how important is planting trees in your neighborhood, how concerned are you about loss of breeding and feeding habitat for fish and birds?) in New Jersey. Not all concerns were rated equally. For the ecological questions, there were no ethnic differences in concerns over preserving areas around water supplies, loss of places to hunt and fish, and loss of places for quiet walks and cycling, but there were for the other 9 ecological concerns. For eight of these nine concerns, Spanish-speaking Hispanics were more concerned than others (including English-speaking Hispanics). We divided the ecological resources into three categories: ecological services (clean water and safety), ecological resources (fish and wildlife), and recreational services. The strongest correlates of people's association with enlarging and enhancing recreational services were Spanish-speaking Hispanics, who are supportive of regulations and believe local government is not doing enough for environmental problems. People concerned about the loss of ecological resources and open space believe the federal government and the state are not doing enough for the environment, were non-Hispanic White, want continued environmental regulations, were longer-term residents, were high school graduates, and were older (45-54 years). People interested in ecological services were college-educated, non-White, not rich, females that did not trust DEP's environmental actions, and thought the state was not doing enough environmentally. There was a high correlation between general environmental concern and the ecological resource variables for the population overall, and for each ethnic group. Overall, only 39% of the subjects were very concerned about the seriousness of environmental problems in New Jersey, yet from 36% to 81% of the people were very concerned about 11 of 12 ecological issues. This indicates that people respond different to the term 'environmental problems' compared to specific 'ecological resource' issues. The greatest concern (81%) was for preserving areas around water supplies and cleaning up garbage in the parks, and the least concern was for the loss of places to hunt and fish (26%). Our results indicate that people distinguish between general environmental concern and ecological concerns, as well as distinguishing ecological services from ecological resources.

  15. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  16. Aggressive landing maneuvers for unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, Selcuk

    2006-01-01

    VTOL (Vertical Take Off and Landing) vehicle landing is considered to be a critically difficult task for both land, marine, and urban operations. This thesis describes one possible control approach to enable landing of ...

  17. Prospects for Photovoltaics in Sunny and Arid Regions: A Solar Grand Plan for Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Chile) #12;Chile: The Atacama Solar Resource Capacity: 4.6 GW Load: 15.4 TWh 50 MW 99 MW Station Horizontal,000-40,000 2,000-14,000 2,000-21,000 302 323 442 Installed capacity of renewable energies 1236 [MW] PotentialProspects for Photovoltaics in Sunny and Arid Regions: A Solar Grand Plan for Chile Part I

  18. The ecology of mutualism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucher, D. H.; James, Samuel W.; Keeler, K. H.

    1982-11-01

    , Quebec, Canada H3C 3P8 Sam James Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA 48109 Kathleen H. Keeler School of Life Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA 68588 INTRODUCTION....annualreviews.org/aronline Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 1982.13:315-347. Downloaded from arjournals.annualreviews.org by University of Kanas-Lawrence & Edwards on 09/26/05. For personal use only. 316 BOUCHER, JAMES & KEELER species" without evoking group selection. Two definitions have...

  19. Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguero, Tania

    2003-01-01

    changes in the Rocky Mountains, global warming, and severalReview: Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological Perspective ByJill S. Baron (Ed. ). Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological

  20. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT -1997 UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, N.V.; Wike, L.D.; Patterson, K.K.; Bowers, J.A.; Bryan, A.L.; Chen, K.F.; Cummins, C.L.; deCarmen, B.R.; Dixon, K.L.; Dunn, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of the SRS Ecology: Environmental Information Document is to provide a source of information on the ecology of the Savannah River Site.

  1. Big data and the future of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Bonter DN. 2010. Citizen science as an ecological researchand ecology Panel 2. Citizen science – crowd-sourcing bigspecies (NABCI 2011). Citizen science is a form of data

  2. Journal of Applied Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Len

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2006 43, 377­384 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd METHODOLOGICAL INSIGHTS Point transect sampling with traps, Etive House, Beechwood Park, Inverness IV2 3BW, UK Summary 1. The ability to monitor abundance of animal

  3. ISSUES IN ECOLOGY TECHNICAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    ISSUES IN ECOLOGY TECHNICAL REPORT Ecological Applications, 21(6), 2011, pp. 1902­1924 Ó 2011 for carbon benefits, environmental and monetary costs, risks and trade-offs for a variety of activities co-benefits such as biodiversity, water, and economic opportunities. Each strategy also has trade

  4. Journal of Animal Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2007 76, 1045­1052 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British-words: density effect, Ficedula hypoleuca, long-term trend, Parus major, timing of breeding. Journal of Animal@utu.fi #12;1046 M. P. Ahola et al. © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society

  5. SRS ecology: Environmental information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

  6. Journal of Animal Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2006 75, 456­465 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British-words: correlated random walk, first-passage time, search paths, spatial scale. Journal of Animal Ecology (2006) 75-mail: h.bailey@abdn.ac.uk #12;457 Movementpatterns and foraging © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation

  7. ORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a way that preserves the greatest possible knowledge base, while making the most efficient and effectiveORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES Society for Range Management Annual Meeting Ecological effectively for planning, restoration, and management. Arranging the various elements within the ecosystem

  8. Rich land Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100Nationalquestionnaires 0serialIndustrial ConsumptionRibbon The|Rich land

  9. Land Management - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratory program Labs and Field SiteLand

  10. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and...

  11. A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crowe, Braden [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Attalah, Said [University of Arizona; Agrawal, Shweta [University of Arizona; Waller, Peter [University of Arizona; Ryan, Randy [University of Arizona.edu; Van Wagenen, Jon [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Chavis, Aaron [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Kyndt, John [University of Arizona; Kacira, Murat [University of Arizona; Ogden, Kim L. [University of Arizona; Huesemann, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management

  12. New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and associated facilities to house its new Department of Global Ecology. The buildings, located on the campus1 New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology Carnegie Institution of Washington Stanford Ecology will conduct basic research and training on large-scale interactions between ecological systems

  13. HIC1 interacts with a specific subunit of SWI/SNF complexes, ARID1A/BAF250A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Leprince, Dominique

    2009-08-07

    HIC1, a tumor suppressor gene epigenetically silenced in many human cancers encodes a transcriptional repressor involved in regulatory loops modulating p53-dependent and E2F1-dependent cell survival and stress responses. HIC1 is also implicated in growth control since it recruits BRG1, one of the two alternative ATPases (BRM or BRG1) of SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes to repress transcription of E2F1 in quiescent fibroblasts. Here, through yeast two-hybrid screening, we identify ARID1A/BAF250A, as a new HIC1 partner. ARID1A/BAF250A is one of the two mutually exclusive ARID1-containing subunits of SWI/SNF complexes which define subsets of complexes endowed with anti-proliferative properties. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in WI38 fibroblasts and in BRG1-/- SW13 cells showed that endogenous HIC1 and ARID1A proteins interact in a BRG1-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HIC1 does not interact with BRM. Finally, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-reChIP) experiments demonstrated that HIC1 represses E2F1 through the recruitment of anti-proliferative SWI/SNF complexes containing ARID1A.

  14. Journal of Animal Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willson. J.D.

    energy reserves during the drought, S. pygaea reproduced with the same frequency and fecundity during to rebound rapidly from the stresses of prolonged drought is due in part to their reproductive ecology

  15. Journal of Animal Ecology 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    * *Evolutionary Ecology Group, Zoological Institute, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland; Behavioural, Zoological Institute, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland; Tel: +41 31 631 30 21, Fax: +41 31 631 30

  16. ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Programs of Study The graduate program in Ecology & Environmental Science capitalizes on University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Science capitalizes on University strengths in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy programs in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy. The EES Graduate Program includes studying a wide range of challenging problems in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy

  17. Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

    2008-11-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

  18. National Land Cover Data National Land Cover Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _Data_Presentation_Form: raster digital data Other_Citation_Details: Classification and processing of the orginal remote sensing (NLCD). The NLCD is a 21-class land cover classification of the entire United States. It is derived from

  19. The evolution of ecology in Mexico: facing challenges and preparing for the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martí nez, ML; Manson, RH; Balvanera, P.; Dirzo, R.; Soberó n, Jorge; Garcí a-Barrios, L.; Martí nez-Ramos, M.; Moreno-Casasola, P.; Rosenzweig, L.; Sarukhá n, J.

    2006-06-01

    exacerbated by uncertain land tenure, the collapse of traditional peasant institutions, perverse government subsidies (promoting large-scale deforestation), agricultural industrialization, and an acute lack of coordination between ministries (Stedman... Ministry and a pharmaceutical industry that used yam (Dioscorea composita) to synthesize the first cortisone and all corticosteroids (including the birth-control pill) in Mexico. The Commission was charged with carrying out ecological studies on this plant...

  20. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.H.

    1995-07-01

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. Major additions to SREL Facilities were completed that will enhance the Laboratory`s work in the future. Following several years of planning, opening ceremonies were held for the 5000 ft{sup 2} multi-purpose conference center that was funded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF). The center is located on 68 acres of land that was provided by the US Department of Energy. This joint effort between DOE and UGARF supports DOE`s new initiative to develop partnerships with the private sector and universities. The facility is being used for scientific meetings and environmental education programs for students, teachers and the general public. A 6000 ft{sup 2} office and library addition to S@s main building officially opened this year, and construction plans are underway on a new animal care facility, laboratory addition, and receiving building.

  1. Land and Facility Use Planning

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-07-09

    The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. Incidence of Oestrus ovis infestation in Borno-White Sahel goats in the semi-arid zone of Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of Nigeria Abdullahi A. Biu Chukwunyere O. Nwosu Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maiduguri, P.M.B. 1069, Maiduguri, Nigeria (Received 10 chez les chèvres blanches du Sahel dans la zone semi-aride du Nigeria. Les recherches menées sur l

  3. Insect visitation rates to wild flowers increase in the presence of arid agriculture in South Sinai, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nottingham, University of

    , Egypt Olivia Norfolk* , Francis Gilbert School of Biology, University Park, University of Nottingham, UK Accepted 15 May 2014 Available online Keywords: Agriculture Arid Egypt Insect Plant Pollinator Seed set agricultural gardens in South Sinai, Egypt. The mean number of flower visitors per plant during a 30 min focal

  4. ANALYSIS OF OFF-GRID, OFF-PIPE HOUSING FOR HOT-HUMID AND HOT-ARID CLIMATES 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of off-grid, off-pipe housing in hot-humid and hot-arid climates in the U.S. The study aims to eliminate the need for non-renewable sources of energy and municipal water in residences by using off-grid, off...

  5. Competition and compensation among cattle, zebras, and elephants in a semi-arid savanna in Laikipia, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Todd M.

    Competition and compensation among cattle, zebras, and elephants in a semi-arid savanna in Laikipia mammalian herbivores have been independently manip- ulated since 1995. In plots from which cattle were). Vegetation data indicate that cattle fully compensate for the absence of wildlife; all plots accessible

  6. Precipitation variability and fire influence the temporal dynamics of soil CO2 efflux in an arid grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Precipitation variability and fire influence the temporal dynamics of soil CO2 efflux in an arid primary production, precipitation vari- ability, soil respiration, wavelet analysis Received 8 November of precipitation affect ecosystem processes (Gerten et al., 2008; Luo et al., 2008). This research is especially

  7. NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment Overview and Preliminary Results NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment Overview and Preliminary Results NASA Cold Land ProcessesNASA Cold Land Processes Field properties using active and passive microwave remote sensing. NASA DC-8 Airborne Laboratory with AIRSAR

  8. Journal of Animal Ecology 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillingham, Michael

    and Environmental Studies, University of Northern British Columbia, 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, Canada, V2N 4Z9; and British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks, 1011 4th Avenue, Prince

  9. Ecologic and geographic distribution of filovirus disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Bauer, John T.; Mills, James N.

    2004-01-01

    We used ecologic niche modeling of outbreaks and sporadic cases of filovirus-associated hemorrhagic fever (HF) to provide a large-scale perspective on the geographic and ecologic distributions of Ebola and Marburg viruses. We predicted...

  10. Opportunistic, collaborative and synchronized, proximal device ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledano, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    CoSync is an on-device software framework for coordinating proximal consumer electronic devices in order to create a synchronized, opportunistic and collaborative device ecology. The CoSync device ecology combines multiple ...

  11. 2578 Ecology, Vol. 79, No. 7BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, 79(7), 1998, p. 2578

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    2578 Ecology, Vol. 79, No. 7BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, 79(7), 1998, p. 2578 1998 by the Ecological and challenging ecological issues associated with human expansion and global change. This issue has led, muskrat, house finch, gypsy moth, cheatgrass, rinderpest, etc. But this book does not pinpoint specific

  12. Big data and the future of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Ecological Archives, iPlant, NatureServe, Dryad, the National Oceanographic Data Center). Some of these repositories house

  13. SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Mike

    SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and genome function in the natural environment MC Ungerer, LC Johnson and MA Herman Division of Biology, Ecological Genomics Institute, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA The field of ecological genomics seeks to understand the genetic mechanisms

  14. Journal of Animal Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Fangliang

    and Macroecology Group, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK between species of different colonization status. Indeed, virtually all variation about the bivariate distribution, spatial variance, Taylor's power law. Journal of Animal Ecology (2006) 75, 646­656 doi: 10.1111/j

  15. Zoology 4413 TROPICA L ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fincke, Ola M.

    2/22/2013 1 Zoology 4413 TROPICA L ECOLOGY FIELD COURSE In Veracruz and Chiapas, Mexico At Los rainforest left in Mexico Mahogany tree The forest provided a sense of history . . . Casa de Cortez, La to Chajul Solar panels power Chajul Clinics provide free family planning but also saw some solutions #12

  16. Journal of Animal Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, John D.

    of distribution due to thermal stratification during the summer. However, plaice from the northern North Sea did, spatial dynamics, thermal stratification. Journal of Animal Ecology (2004) 73, 377­385 Introduction Long non-breeding season. Two clusters were in warm, thermally mixed water in the eastern and western North

  17. Journal of Animal Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engen, Steinar

    on the dynamics of central European great and blue tit popula- tions. This generates synchronous fluctuations Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd The extended Moran effect and large-scale synchronous, Bauernstrasse 14, D-38162 Cremlingen, Germany Summary 1. Synchronous fluctuations of geographically separated

  18. Cheatgrass Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Cheatgrass Biology, Ecology, and Management Fabián Menalled menalled@montana.edu 406-994-4783 Montana State #12;http://ipm.montana.edu/cropweeds #12;#12;· Biology and identification of brome species secalinus Not found in MT #12;Cheatgrass Japanese brome #12;Pictures from Interactive Encyclopedia of North

  19. Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of populations include the mallard ducks in the Central flyway of the United States, the Daphnia laevis(t) - e(t), (2) where b(t), d(t), i(t), and e(t) are the instantaneous rates of birth, death, immigrationPopulation Ecology Philip M. Dixon Department of Statistics Iowa State University 20 December 2001

  20. Industrial Ecology Master of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Cycles · Resource Scarcity · Agent Based Modelling of Complex Adaptive Systems · Renewable energy systems. An interdisciplinary approach, integrating technical, environmental and social frames of reference, is essential and profit Industrial Ecology is inspired by nature. The analogy between natural and technical systems

  1. Ecoiogicnl A/~pilEcolog~calSoctet) of Amertca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    With, Kimberly A.

    of the biocontrol agent, H. nxyridis, tracked this threshold in aphid distribution, but the native coccinellid. C (below the threshold in land- scape structure), which is a requisite for successful biocontrol. If native on the introduction of exotic species for biocontrol, which is not without economic cost and potential ecological

  2. The Effect of War and Its Aftermath on Land Use and Land Cover in Jinotega, Nicaragua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeledon, Esther Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Lughod, D. 2000. Failed Buyout: Land Rights for the ContraLughod, D. 2000. Failed Buyout: Land Rights for the Contra

  3. 7th International Conference on Fluvial Sedimentology, Lincoln, USA 2001 Semi-arid paleoflood and modern flood facies in central Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourke, Mary C.

    7th International Conference on Fluvial Sedimentology, Lincoln, USA 2001 Semi-arid paleoflood, University of Oxford, OX13TB Mary.bourke@geog.ox.ac.uk The stratigraphy of desert fluvial systems is poorly

  4. Civil Engineering & Land Surveying Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    Civil Engineering & Land Surveying Services May 6, 2014 COMPANY NAME DATE CONTACT PERSON MAILING ADDRESS PHONE / CELL # 1 Bedrock Engineering 5/6/14 David O. Hartley PO Box 25783 Fresno, CA 93729 559 North Star Engineering Group, Inc. 5/6/14 John Mensonides 620 12th St. Modesto, CA 95354 209-524-3525 4

  5. 2011LandesBioscience. Donotdistribute.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hay, Bruce A.

    fever, malaria, medea, merea, mosquitoes, pink bollworms, population replacement, population sup such as malaria and dengue fever. Advances in insect transgenesis are mak- ing it increasingly feasible Bugs 2:5, 1-6; September/October 2011; © 2011 Landes Bioscience COMMENTARY COMMENTARY Key words: dengue

  6. 2011LandesBioscience. Donotdistribute.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasalde Dominicc, Jose A. - Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico

    -12; July/August 2011; © 2011 Landes Bioscience ReseARCh pApeR ReseARCh pApeR Introduction- and open-channel states can be explained by the structural effects caused by the presence of a bending scanning mutagenesis identifies a bending point on the lipid-exposed M3 transmembrane domain of the Torpedo

  7. A Comparison of Nannochloropsis salina Growth Performance in Two Outdoor Pond Designs: Conventional Raceways versus the ARID Pond with Superior Temperature Management

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crowe, Braden; Attalah, Said; Agrawal, Shweta; Waller, Peter; Ryan, Randy; Van Wagenen, Jon; Chavis, Aaron; Kyndt, John; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kim L.; et al

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines how climatic conditions and pond design affect the growth performance of microalgae. From January to April of 2011, outdoor batch cultures of Nannochloropsis salina were grown in three replicate 780 L conventional raceways, as well as in an experimental 7500 L algae raceway integrated design (ARID) pond. The ARID culture system utilizes a series of 8-20 cm deep basins and a 1.5 m deep canal to enhance light exposure and mitigate temperature variations and extremes. The ARID culture reached the stationary phase 27 days earlier than the conventional raceways, which can be attributed to its superiormore »temperature management and shallower basins. On a night when the air temperature dropped to -9°C, the water temperature was 18°C higher in the ARID pond than in the conventional raceways. Lipid and fatty acid content ranged from 16 to 25% and from 5 to15%, respectively, as a percentage of AFDW. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosapentaenoic acids comprised the majority of fatty acids. While the ARID culture system achieved nearly double the volumetric productivity relative to the conventional raceways (0.023 versus 0.013 g L-1day-1), areal biomass productivities were of similar magnitude in both pond systems (3.47 versus 3.34 g m-2day-1), suggesting that the ARID pond design has to be further optimized, most likely by increasing the culture depth or operating at higher cell densities while maintaining adequate mixing.« less

  8. A comparison of two models for simulating the water balance of soil covers under semi-arid conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chammas, G.A.; Geddis, M.; McCaulou, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    Numerical water-balance modeling of store-and-release soil covers for hypothetical mine tailings was conducted using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) and SoilCover models. The objective of the modeling was to compare the utility of both models in a semi-arid environment. Although values for input parameters were chosen to make simulations as identical as possible between models, differences in model solution methods and discretization led to different water-balance predictions. Specifically, SoilCover predicted less percolation than HELP, because HELP uses simplified water-routing algorithms which may over predict infiltration and under predict subsequent evapotranspiration. Since SoilCover explicitly solves physically based governing equations for heat and water flow, its predictions more accurately represent the water balance in semi-arid regions where evapotranspiration dominates, HELP can only conservatively predict percolation in dry environments.

  9. Comment on "Evaluation of evapotranspirative covers for waste containment in arid and semiarid regions in the southwestern USA"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Benson, C H.; Albright, William H.

    2006-05-26

    Landfill covers relying on a balance between soil water storage and evapotranspiration (ET) as the primary means to control drainage have been described in the recent paper by Scanlon et al. (2005) in the Vadose Zone Journal. These so-called "ET Covers" have been receiving considerable interest in the past few years as economically viable cover systems for landfills in arid and semi-arid environments (Hauser et al. 2001, Madalinksi et al. 2003) Scanlon et al. (2005) have provided a summary of their studies in Texas and New Mexico, demonstrating an acceptable performance of ET covers in minimizing drainage under their test conditions. Further, they illustrate with both measurement and modeling that capillary barriers (fine soils over coarse soils) similar in concept to those previously built and tested at Los Alamos, NM and Hanford, WA over the past 20 years, store more water than surface barriers that have uniform profiles.

  10. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands From...

  11. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Topic Landing Pages | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Landing Pages Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Topic Landing Pages From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archives for the topic landing pages by...

  12. Pollution on the Federal Lands II: Water Pollution Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    text. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION nonpoint sources. 19at 622. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION The third requirement,n.25. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION form a nondiscretionary

  13. Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Department - Forest...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Protectio Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Department - Forest Land Protectio...

  14. Land-ocean contrasts under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Observations and climate models show a pronounced land-ocean contrast in the responses of surface temperature and the hydrological cycle to global warming: Land temperatures increase more than ocean temperatures, low-level ...

  15. Addressing land-based discrimination in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    , feudalism was based on ownership of land, the dominant mode of production. Political power was dominated by absolute kings and feudal overlords. Wealth and position in society was derived from the land ownership

  16. Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 20142015 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate Program in Land and Atmospheric Science at the University of Minnesota. It is a sciencebased interdisciplinary program focused on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related

  17. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

    2006-03-01

    The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

  18. Presented by LandScan Population Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Bhaduri_LandScan_SC10 Kosovo Refugee Crisis 1998 May 25 of Energy Bhaduri_LandScan_SC10 What is LandScan? Population distribution model, database, and tool people are located #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Bhaduri_LandScan_SC10

  19. Marine One Landing Exercise at Argonne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-20

    Marine One and its support helicopters conduct a landing exercise at Argonne prior to the President's visit.

  20. Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Department - Forest Land

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | Open Energy Information Oregon Department of Land

  1. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL LANDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1957 Marine Biological Laboratory;#12;ABSTRACT This report presents data on the species composition of the industrial trawl fish catch landed OF TABLES Page Table 1. 1957 landings and number of trips of industrial trawl fish vessels at Pt. Judith

  2. Land-Use Change and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-07-01

    This publication describes the Biomass Program’s efforts to examine the intersection of land-use change and bioenergy production. It describes legislation requiring land-use change assessments, key data and modeling challenges, and the research needs to better assess and understand the impact of bioenergy policy on land-use decisions.

  3. Land Information Systems in Developing Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Land Information Systems in Developing Countries: Bibliography Compiled by: Harlan Onsrud Jeff Acknowledgments Articles on land information systems and cadastral systems in developing countries are spread SES 88-10917. #12;1 References Abdul, Majid Bin Mohamed (1984). Proposed Land Information System

  4. FIT-FOR-PURPOSE LAND ADMINISTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIT-FOR-PURPOSE LAND ADMINISTRATION AND THE POST-2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA ANNUAL WORLD BANK the coalescence the yardstick 3 #12;Methodology fit-for-purpose land administration urban and rural; it will influence land administration design 2. Fit-for-purpose is happening; but, needs purpose, stages, and future

  5. Top-down vs. bottom-up regulation of herbaceous primary production and composition in an arid, urbanizing ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's land area and are expanding rapidly from desertification (Gruner et al., 2008; Hillebrand et al., 2007

  6. Monitoring urban land cover change: An expert system approach to land cover classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael

    such as land use data, spatial texture, and digital elevation models (DEMs) to obtain greater classificationMonitoring urban land cover change: An expert system approach to land cover classification with Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data to derive a land cover classification for the semiarid Phoenix

  7. Ecological Applications, 10(5), 2000, pp. 14001413 2000 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with appendages that resulted in exposure of a large surface area to the wind did exhibit significant to the site or placed on the site during restoration. Because wind is a dominant feature of the environment E-mail: chambers@equinox.unr.edu arid ecosystems, significant horizontal and vertical movement

  8. Dust resuspension from soil in a semi-arid environment at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckart, R.; Chen, H. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The resuspension and transport of contaminated dust at an and or semi-arid site create a major source of exposure to people who use the site and to off-site populations. At the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a preliminary base-line risk assessment conducted by the University of Cincinnati indicated that [approximately]90% of the annual effective dose equivalent is derived from inhalation of contaminated dust. Despite the importance of this pathway, very few models exist to predict the resuspension of the soil from the desert pavement. There are no good models to predict the resuspension of soil after soil cleaning or site restoration. There are three types of resuspension processes: 1. wind-related resuspension/suspension; (2) mechanical resuspension/suspension; and (3) local resuspension or suspension. Mechanical and local resuspension originate from mechanical disturbance of the soil. This paper discusses the analysis of wind-related resuspension based on physical principles and examines revegetation or mulching of the cleansed soil.

  9. Alternative Landfill Cover and Monitoring Systems for Landfills in Arid Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. E. Rawlinson

    2002-09-01

    In December 2000, a performance monitoring facility was constructed adjacent to the mixed waste disposal unit U-3ax/bl at the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site. This facility consists of eight drainage lysimeters measuring 10 feet in diameter, 8 feet deep, and backfilled with native soil. The lysimeters have three different surface treatments: two were left bare, two were revegetated with native species, and two were allowed to revegetate with invader species (two are reserved for future studies). The lysimeters are instrumented with an array of soil water content and soil water potential sensors and have sealed bottoms so that any drainage can be measured. All sensors are working properly and indicate that the bare lysimeters are the wettest, as expected. The vegetated lysimeters, both seeded and those allowed to revegetate with invader species, are significantly drier than the bare cover treatments. No drainage has occurred in any of the lysimeters. The Accelerated Site Technology Deployment program under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and Technology provided the funding for this project with the objective of reducing the uncertainty associated with the performance of monolayer-evapotranspiration waste covers in arid regions such as the one deployed at U-3ax/bl.

  10. Land capability classification of minesoils in East Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Amy Kristen

    2002-01-01

    for the post-mine land. A land capability classification specific to minesoils will facilitate the design of appropriate land uses or alternative uses for reclaimed mine areas based on observed limitations. The proposed system is similar to the Land...

  11. Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology New Opportunities Making the world incorporate a broad range of biological systems as components, and emphasize mutual improvement of both human

  12. EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

  13. Globalisation and sustainable development: a political ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    ...................................................................................64 Free trade versus fair trade ........................................................................63 Globalisation and trade ecological justice into practice: guidelines for policy.............................68 A role for "fair trade

  14. ADVANCING A POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF GLOBAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    environmental issues: deforestation, desertification, biodiversity use and climate change. These discourses ecology, global environmental change, deforestation, desertification, biodiversity, climate change #12;1 1

  15. Impact of vegetation removal and soil aridation on diurnal temperature range in a semiarid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    surface emissivity longwave radiation sensitivity test surface energy balance The global mean land surface). Changes in DTR can result from a number of mechanisms, all connected to the surface energy balance with more rainfall and better human management. Other mechanisms with similar effects on surface energy

  16. Survey of ecological resources at selected US Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAllister, C.; Beckert, H.; Abrams, C.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages a wide range of ecological resources. During the next 30 years, DOE Headquarters and Field Offices will make land-use planning decisions and conduct environmental remediation and restoration activities in response to federal and state statutes. This document fulfills, in part, DOE`s need to know what types of ecological resources it currently owns and manages by synthesizing information on the types and locations of ecological resources at 10 DOE sites: Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, savannah River Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Fernald Environmental Management Project. This report summarizes information on ecosystems, habitats, and federally listed threatened, endangered, and candidate species that could be stressed by contaminants or physical activity during the restoration process, or by the natural or anthropogenic transport of contaminants from presently contaminated areas into presently uncontaminated areas. This report also provides summary information on the ecosystems, habitats, and threatened and endangered species that exist on each of the 10 sites. Each site chapter contains a general description of the site, including information on size, location, history, geology, hydrology, and climate. Descriptions of the major vegetation and animal communities and of aquatic resources are also provided, with discussions of the treatened or endangered plant or animal species present. Site-specific ecological issues are also discussed in each site chapter. 106 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Ecology of Owens Valley vole 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Fletcher Chris

    2005-08-29

    of vegetative cover types (sites 1 and 5 consisted of Rabbitbrush Meadow, sites 2 and 4 consisted of Riparian Forest, sites 3 and 7 consisted of Rush/Sedge Meadow, site 6 consisted of Irrigated Pasture [ungrazed], site 8 consisted of Riparian Scrub.... These mesic areas, including riparian corridors, meadows, and agricultural lands, are subject to more intensive and concentrated use (i.e., livestock grazing, recreation) than drier areas. Mesic environments are likely to support small mammal...

  18. Ecologic Analytics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to:Providence, RhodeEchols County,EU (SmartEcofysEcoleEcologic

  19. Metapopulation Ecology Saskya van Nouhuys, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Nouhuys, Saskya

    of natural and experimental systems. Metapopulation ecology is used in conservation biology and in population Nouhuys, Saskya (December 2009) Metapopulation Ecology. In: Encyclopedia of

  20. Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Friday, G. P. 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; SURFACE WATERS; SEDIMENTS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL...

  1. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #18 Pedro Quintana 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #16 Covering

  2. MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound Tension Leg Platform for Deep Water Wind Farms MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound...

  3. Living on Scorched Earth: the Political Ecology of Land Ownership in Guatemala's Northern Lowlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ybarra, Megan

    2010-01-01

    perspectivas de desarrollo sostenible en Petén. Guatemala:perspectivas de desarrollo sostenible en Petén. Guatemala:

  4. Change in the Land Use System in Bhutan: Ecology, History, Culture, and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wangchuk, Tashi

    2000-01-01

    minority to the free peasants. Others were zasen or slaves as explained above. Ura distinguishes them from the drap: 'zab [zasen] were in a worse situation: they worked entirely for the master who gave them only food and clothes.' Thus, a mixture... , impinge, dominate, yield, and disappear in this kaleidoscope. The vast majority of the inhabitants we never see, because they are too small and obscure: creepy-crawlies, immense in diversity, from insects to fungi and bacteria. All together...

  5. UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

  6. Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, Anne

    Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

  7. Integrating Soil Ecological Knowledge into Restoration Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell

    Integrating Soil Ecological Knowledge into Restoration Management Liam Heneghan,1,2 Susan P. Miller that lead to restoration success. The discipline of soil ecology, which emphasizes both soil organisms the outcomes of restoration despite this variability. Here, we propose that the usefulness of this soil

  8. FrontiersinEcology and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    , Diorhabda elongata (Chrysomelidae; Dudley 2005), as a biocontrol agent for tamarisk. Beetle releasesFrontiersinEcology and the Environment Tamarisk biocontrol in the western United States: ecological are reported to result in up to REVIEWS REVIEWS REVIEWS Tamarisk biocontrol in the western United States

  9. Nordic Society Oikos Phylogenetic Approaches in Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nylin, Sören

    Nordic Society Oikos Phylogenetic Approaches in Ecology Author(s): Hans-Erik Wanntorp, Daniel R. Brooks, Thomas Nilsson, Soren Nylin, Fredrik Ronquist, Stephen C. Stearns, Nina Wedell Source: Oikos, Vol cited.A summaryis required. Phylogeneticapproachesin ecology Hans-Erik Wanntorp, Daniel R. Brooks

  10. Landfill cover revegetation using organic amendments and cobble mulch in the arid southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AGUILAR,RICHARD; DWYER,STEPHEN F.; REAVIS,BRUCE A.; NEWMAN,GRETCHEN CARR; LOFTIN,SAMUEL R.

    2000-02-01

    Cobble mulch and composted biosolids, greenwaste, and dairy manure were added to arid soil in an attempt to improve plant establishment and production, minimize erosion, increase evapotranspiration, and reduce leaching. Twenty-four plots (10 x 10 m) were established in a completely randomized block design (8 treatments, 3 plots per treatment). Treatments included (1) non-irrigated control, (2) irrigated control, (3) non-irrigated greenwaste compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (4) irrigated greenwaste compost (5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (5) non-irrigated biosolids compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (6) irrigated biosolids compost (5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (7) cobble-mulch, and (8) non-irrigated dairy manure compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot). Soil samples were collected from each plot for laboratory analyses to assess organic matter contents, macro-nutrient levels and trace metal contents, and nitrogen mineralization potential. All plots were seeded similarly with approximately equal portions of cool and warm season native grasses. The organic composts (greenwaste, biosolids, dairy manure) added to the soils substantially increased soil organic matter and plant nutrients including total nitrogen and phosphorus. However, the results of a laboratory study of the soils' nitrogen mineralization potential after the application of the various composts showed that the soil nitrogen-supplying capability decreased to non-amended soil levels by the start of the second growing season. Thus, from the standpoint of nitrogen fertilizer value, the benefits of the organic compost amendments appear to have been relatively short-lived. The addition of biosolids compost, however, did not produce significant changes in the soils' copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc concentrations and thus did not induce adverse environmental conditions due to excessive heavy metal concentrations. Supplemental irrigation water during the first and second growing seasons did not appear to increase plant biomass production in the irrigated control plots over that produced in the non-irrigated control plots. This surprising result was probably due to the cumulative effects of other factors that influenced the initial establishment and production of plants in the plots (e.g., plant species competition, seed germination delay times, differences in nutrient release and availability). Variation within individual plots, and among the three replicate plots associated with each treatment, rendered many of the recorded differences in vegetation establishment and production statistically insignificant. However, after two complete growing seasons the highest total plant foliar cover and the greatest biomass production and plant species diversity occurred in the cobble-mulched plots. These results suggest that cobble-mulch may be the desired amendment in re-vegetated arid landfill covers if the principal objectives are to quickly establish vegetation cover, stabilize the site from erosion, and increase water usage by plants, thereby reducing the potential for leaching and contaminant movement from the landfill's waste-bearing zone.

  11. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  12. A multilevel analysis of effects of land use policy on land-cover change and local land use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    2014 Available online Keywords: Desertification Household Multi-scale drivers Multilevel statistical (Reynolds et al., 2007). Land degradation, which is often referred to as desertification in drylands (Dregne

  13. Ecological

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N S I551 - g 7 sEZrZ, -

  14. Soil bacterial and fungal community responses to nitrogen addition across soil depth and microhabitat in an arid shrubland

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mueller, Rebecca C.; Belnap, Jayne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-09-04

    Arid shrublands are stressful environments, typified by alkaline soils low in organic matter, with biologically-limiting extremes in water availability, temperature, and UV radiation. The widely-spaced plants and interspace biological soil crusts in these regions provide soil nutrients in a localized fashion, creating a mosaic pattern of plant- or crust-associated microhabitats with distinct nutrient composition. With sporadic and limited rainfall, nutrients are primarily retained in the shallow surface soil, patterning biological activity. We examined soil bacterial and fungal community responses to simulated nitrogen (N) deposition in an arid Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa field experiment in southern Nevada, USA, using high-throughput sequencing ofmore »ribosomal RNA genes. To examine potential interactions among the N application, microhabitat and soil depth, we sampled soils associated with shrub canopies and interspace biological crusts at two soil depths (0–0.5 or 0–10 cm) across the N-amendment gradient (0, 7, and 15 kg ha–1 yr–1). We hypothesized that localized compositional differences in soil microbiota would constrain the impacts of N addition to a microhabitat distribution that would reflect highly localized geochemical conditions and microbial community composition. The richness and community composition of both bacterial and fungal communities differed significantly by microhabitat and with soil depth in each microhabitat. Only bacterial communities exhibited significant responses to the N addition. Community composition correlated with microhabitat and depth differences in soil geochemical features. Provided the distinct roles of soil bacteria and fungi in major nutrient cycles, the resilience of fungi and sensitivity of bacteria to N amendments suggests that increased N input predicted for many arid ecosystems could shift nutrient cycling toward pathways driven primarily by fungal communities.« less

  15. A framework for benchmarking land models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    processes (exchanges of water and energy) and biogeochemicalsimulation of the water and energy balance (Pitman, 2003).models. Exchange of water and energy between land sur- face

  16. Bureau of Land Management - Final Programmatic Environmental...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management - Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Geothermal Leasing in the Western United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  17. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  18. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  19. A Comparison of Nannochloropsis salina Growth Performance in Two Outdoor Pond Designs: Conventional Raceways versus the ARID Pond with Superior Temperature Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, Braden [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Attalah, Said [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering; Agrawal, Shweta [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering; Waller, Peter [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering; Ryan, Randy [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) College of Agriculture; Van Wagenen, Jon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chavis, Aaron [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kyndt, John [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Chemitstry and Biochemistry; Kacira, Murat [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering; Ogden, Kim L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States) Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering; Huesemann, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines how climatic conditions and pond design affect the growth performance of microalgae. From January to April of 2011, outdoor batch cultures of Nannochloropsis salina were grown in three replicate 780 L conventional raceways, as well as in an experimental 7500 L algae raceway integrated design (ARID) pond. The ARID culture system utilizes a series of 8-20 cm deep basins and a 1.5 m deep canal to enhance light exposure and mitigate temperature variations and extremes. The ARID culture reached the stationary phase 27 days earlier than the conventional raceways, which can be attributed to its superior temperature management and shallower basins. On a night when the air temperature dropped to -9°C, the water temperature was 18°C higher in the ARID pond than in the conventional raceways. Lipid and fatty acid content ranged from 16 to 25% and from 5 to15%, respectively, as a percentage of AFDW. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosapentaenoic acids comprised the majority of fatty acids. While the ARID culture system achieved nearly double the volumetric productivity relative to the conventional raceways (0.023 versus 0.013 g L-1day-1), areal biomass productivities were of similar magnitude in both pond systems (3.47 versus 3.34 g m-2day-1), suggesting that the ARID pond design has to be further optimized, most likely by increasing the culture depth or operating at higher cell densities while maintaining adequate mixing.

  20. What is microbial community ecology?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-11-11

    The activities of complex communities of microbes affect biogeochemical transformations in natural, managed and engineered ecosystems. Meaningfully defining what constitutes a community of interacting microbial populations is not trivial, but is important for rigorous progress in the field. Important elements of research in microbial community ecology include the analysis of functional pathways for nutrient resource and energy flows, mechanistic understanding of interactions between microbial populations and their environment, and the emergent properties of the complex community. Some emergent properties mirror those analyzed by community ecologists who study plants and animals: biological diversity, functional redundancy and system stability. However, because microbes possess mechanisms for the horizontal transfer of genetic information, the metagenome may also be considered a community property.

  1. Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO): Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO)- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), together with its partners, will conduct a feasibility study (FS) of a program to develop renewable energy on the Paragon-Bisti ranch lands in northwestern New Mexico, which were set aside under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act for the benefit of relocatees (defined as Navajo families living on Hopi Partitioned Lands as of December 22, 1974).

  2. Multimodel inference in ecology and evolution: challenges and solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Ian

    landscape ecol- ogy, behavioural ecology, life history evolution, phylog- enetics and population genetics

  3. Land Tenure and Land Administration Issues in Guatemala Danielle Kelly Donovan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onsrud, Harlan J.

    Land Tenure and Land Administration Issues in Guatemala Danielle Kelly Donovan danielle.donovan@spatial.maine.edu May 2002 1. Abstract The evolution of land tenure in Guatemala is a mix of the native Mayan implementation stage, when the CIA began "Operation Success". The operation sent mercenaries into Guatemala

  4. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

  5. ECOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF THE SOLAR ALTERNATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, M.

    2010-01-01

    energy intensive materials production moderate high moderate (navigation aids, ship lanes) high (land disposal) high moderate WIND (MULTIMEGAWATT SCALE) environmental impact

  6. TS 10 Developing Land Administration Systems Paul van der Molen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TS 10 ­ Developing Land Administration Systems Paul van der Molen TS10.5 Some Microeconomic Aspects Microeconomic Aspects of Land Ownership Paul VAN DER MOLEN, The Netherlands Key words: land administration, microeconomics, institutions, property rights, transaction costs, land markets SUMMARY Land administration ('the

  7. Land Use Planning (3cr.) Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Gregory G.

    , as well as the use of geographic information systems. The environmental approach to land use planning, ENV 2011. Students should also have taken ENV 2010, Geographic Information Systems, or alternatively information system · The ability to do a land suitability analysis Class expectations: This class is designed

  8. LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRIDGE CREEK BASIN Prepared for: Water Quality Branch Environmental Protection Dept. BC Environment Victoria, B.C. and Fraser Pollution Abatement Office ..................................................... WATER QUALITY OF UNDISTURBED AREAS ....................... LAND USE EFFECTS ON WATER QUALITY

  9. Ungulate Carcasses Perforate Ecological Filters and Create

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007). Forest biodiversity, energy flow, nutrient cycling, and regeneration are significantly affectedUngulate Carcasses Perforate Ecological Filters and Create Biogeochemical Hotspots in Forest. Vucetich, Rolf O. Peterson, Joshua M. Shields, and Matthew D. Powers School of Forest Resources

  10. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 30: 19­36, 2002 Published November 27 INTRODUCTION consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 30: 19­36, 2002 Hodson 1977, Azam et al. 1983). Net DOC

  11. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 38: 295­307, 2005 Published March 18 INTRODUCTION Resale or republication not permitted without written consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 38

  12. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morel, François M. M.

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 51: 183­193, 2008 doi: 10.3354/ame01192 Published Microb Ecol 51: 183­193, 2008 ous study, we found that cdca-like genes are com- mon in diatoms

  13. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 31: 33­47, 2003 Published February 13 INTRODUCTION@princeton.edu #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 31: 33­47, 2003 tions. There is evidence that the geologic history of the East

  14. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 54: 35­44, 2009 doi: 10.3354/ame01253 Published be taken up. It also applies to some phagotrophic particle feeders, such as radiolari- ans

  15. Microfluidics Expanding the Frontiers of Microbial Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusconi, Roberto

    Microfluidics has significantly contributed to the expansion of the frontiers of microbial ecology over the past decade by allowing researchers to observe the behaviors of microbes in highly controlled microenvironments, ...

  16. The Resurgence of Land Reform Policy and Agrarian Movements in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachman, Noer Fauzi

    2011-01-01

    2006. Tafsir(an) Land Reform dalam Alur Sejarah Indonesia:Bibingka Strategy in Land Reform Implementation: Autonomous2006a. “Redistributive Land Reform in ‘Public (Forest) Land?

  17. Industrial ecology Prosperity Game{trademark}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.; Boyack, K.; Berman, M.

    1998-03-01

    Industrial ecology (IE) is an emerging scientific field that views industrial activities and the environment as an interactive whole. The IE approach simultaneously optimizes activities with respect to cost, performance, and environmental impact. Industrial Ecology provides a dynamic systems-based framework that enables management of human activity on a sustainable basis by: minimizing energy and materials usage; insuring acceptable quality of life for people; minimizing the ecological impact of human activity to levels that natural systems can sustain; and maintaining the economic viability of systems for industry, trade and commerce. Industrial ecology applies systems science to industrial systems, defining the system boundary to incorporate the natural world. Its overall goal is to optimize industrial activities within the constraints imposed by ecological viability, globally and locally. In this context, Industrial systems applies not just to private sector manufacturing and services but also to government operations, including provision of infrastructure. Sandia conducted its seventeenth Prosperity Game{trademark} on May 23--25, 1997, at the Hyatt Dulles Hotel in Herndon, Virginia. The primary sponsors of the event were Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory, who were interested in using the format of a Prosperity Game to address some of the issues surrounding Industrial Ecology. Honorary game sponsors were: The National Science Foundation; the Committee on Environmental Improvement, American Chemical Society; the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division, American Chemical Society; the US EPA--The Smart Growth Network, Office of Policy Development; and the US DOE-Center of Excellence for Sustainable Development.

  18. NUMERICAL MODEL FOR LAND SUBSIDENCE IN SHALLOW GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2010-01-01

    and R. L. Klausing, 1969, Land subsidence due to groundwater7612-10874 Fig. S. Land subsidence at Pixley, California:Symposium on Land Subsidence, Anaheim, CA, December 10-

  19. Aridity and vegetation composition are important determinants of leaf-wax dD values in southeastern Mexico and Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aridity and vegetation composition are important determinants of leaf-wax dD values in southeastern September 2012 Abstract Leaf-wax hydrogen isotope composition (dDwax) is increasingly applied as a proxy remain poorly understood. We measured dDwax and the stable carbon isotope composition of leaf-waxes (d13

  20. Water-use efficiency for alternative cooling technologies in arid climates Energy and Buildings, Volume 43, Issues 23, FebruaryMarch 2011, Pages 631-638

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Water-use efficiency for alternative cooling technologies in arid climates Energy and Buildings, Volume 43, Issues 2­3, February­March 2011, Pages 631-638 Theresa Pistochini, Mark Modera 1 Water-site water use and the impact of poor water quality on their performance. While compressor-based systems do

  1. A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1 subsequent management for beneficial use. GIS-based modeling and evaluation is another tool to evaluate-basin of the Rio Puerco basin to the Rio Grande. Objective The objective of this work is to utilize a GIS platform

  2. A MODELING APPROACH TO ESTIMATING SNOW COVER DEPLETION AND SOIL MOISTURE RECHARGE IN A SEMI-ARID CLIMATE AT TWO NASA CLPX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    THESIS A MODELING APPROACH TO ESTIMATING SNOW COVER DEPLETION AND SOIL MOISTURE RECHARGE IN A SEMI A MODELING APPROACH TO ESTIMATING SNOW COVER DEPLETION AND SOIL MOISTURE RECHARGE IN A SEMI-ARID CLIMATE ________________________________________ Department Head #12;iii ABSTRACT A MODELING APPROACH TO ESTIMATING SNOW COVER DEPLETION AND SOIL MOISTURE

  3. Desalination is here. In the arid southwest, from Texas to California, as well as in Florida and a few other states, the demand for freshwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Desalination is here. In the arid southwest, from Texas to California, as well as in Florida of sustainability, desalination presents particular problems, not only in the energy used to accomplish the desalination itself (where great progress has been made in the past 20 years), but in all of the ancillary

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

  5. Ecology, 89(6), 2008, pp. 17231732 2008 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarnelle, Orlando

    on Daphnia clearance rate at low food levels, i.e., evidence of an overall Type III functional responseEcology, 89(6), 2008, pp. 1723­1732 Ó 2008 by the Ecological Society of America TYPE III FUNCTIONAL Aquacultures, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 USA Abstract. The functional response of Daphnia

  6. Water in a Changing World IssuesinEcologyPublishedbytheEcologicalSocietyofAmericaNumber9,Spring2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    , recreation, and waste disposal. In many regions of the world, the amount and quality of water available-based ecosystems that influence water quality. · At least 90 percent of river flows in the United StatesWater in a Changing World IssuesinEcologyPublishedbytheEcologicalSocietyofAmericaNumber9,Spring2001

  7. Ecology, 92(5), 2011, pp. 11151125 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    Ecology, 92(5), 2011, pp. 1115­1125 Ó 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Terrestrial understanding of basal resource use by consumers is limited, because describing trophic pathways in complex food evident. Zooplankton relied on terrestrial and pelagic primary production, while zoobenthos and fishes

  8. Ecology, 92(11), 2011, pp. 21082116 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    succession with climax communities being relatively uncommon. The effects of disturbance frequency mayEcology, 92(11), 2011, pp. 2108­2116 Ó 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Wave disturbance pressure (top-down), and storm waves (disturbance) in determining the standing biomass and net primary

  9. EA-2000: Proposed Land Transfer to Develop a General Aviation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2000: Proposed Land Transfer to Develop a General Aviation Airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-2000: Proposed Land Transfer to...

  10. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Historic Preservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Historic Preservation Division Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Historic...

  11. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of...

  12. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission...

  13. Clean Cities: Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) The Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community...

  14. Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services May 2004 Introduction Land economy. This may also require that existing agricultural producers need to travel farther

  15. Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An...

  16. Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity Development: Case studies from Ethiopia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Land...

  17. Perspective Does the Shoe Fit? Real versus Imagined Ecological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Erle C.

    across six mutually exclusive land-use types: cropland, grazing land, forest, fishing ground, built-up wastes. The amount of biological productivity available within the six land-use types is termed

  18. Making land fly : the institutionalization of China's land quota markets and its implications for urbanization, property rights, and intergovernmental politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yuan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation investigates China's land quota markets, a recent land policy innovation that virtually transfers urbanization permission from the countryside to cities. To circumvent national government's quota restrictions ...

  19. Land system architecture: Using land systems to adapt and mitigate global environmental change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, B.L.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Verbug, Peter H.; Murray, Alan T.

    2013-04-01

    Land systems (mosaics of land use and cover) are human environment systems, the changes in which drive and respond to local to global environmental changes, climate to macro-economy (Foley et al., 2005). Changes in land systems have been the principal proximate cause in the loss of habitats and biota globally, long contributed to atmospheric greenhouse gases, and hypothesized to have triggered climate changes in the early Holocene (Ruddiman, 2003). Land use, foremost agriculture, is the largest source of biologically active nitrogen to the atmosphere, critical to sources and sinks of carbon, and a major component in the hydrologic cycle (e.g., Bouwman et al., 2011). Changes in land systems also affect regional climate (Feddema et al., 2005; Pielke, 2005), ecosystem functions, and the array of ecosystem services they provide. Land systems, therefore, are a central feature of how humankind manages its relationship with nature-intended or not, or whether this relationship proceeds sustainably or not.

  20. 2015 Tribal Lands and Environment Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) are hosting the annual Tribal Lands and Environment Forum. The four-day forum will feature special trainings, field trips, and breakout sessions focused on tribal water programs.

  1. 2015 Tribal Lands and Environment Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) are hosting the annual Tribal Lands and Environment Forum. The four-day forum will feature special trainings, field trips, and breakout...

  2. A framework for benchmarking land models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    their inclu- sion in Earth system models (ESMs). State-of-land models cou- pled to Earth system models should simulateland models within Earth system models, however, can help

  3. Modeling Land Biogeochemistry Term Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    :30 pm or by appointment Course Description Dynamic land models are widely used as part of Earth system models and serve to represent exchange of energy (heat radiation momentum), water, carbon, and nutrients

  4. Northeast Regional Land Cover Change Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . To learn more about the C-CAP data products used in this report and to access the data sets, please visit% of the total land area. The region has significant coastal-dependent industries, including tourism

  5. Biomass Energy and Competition for Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John

    We describe an approach for incorporating biomass energy production and competition for land into the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy, ...

  6. Integrating Empirical-Modeling Approaches to Improve Understanding of Terrestrial Ecology Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Heather [University of Oklahoma; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Recent decades have seen tremendous increases in the quantity of empirical ecological data collected by individual investigators, as well as through research networks such as FLUXNET (Baldocchi et al., 2001). At the same time, advances in computer technology have facilitated the development and implementation of large and complex land surface and ecological process models. Separately, each of these information streams provides useful, but imperfect information about ecosystems. To develop the best scientific understanding of ecological processes, and most accurately predict how ecosystems may cope with global change, integration of empirical and modeling approaches is necessary. However, true integration - in which models inform empirical research, which in turn informs models (Fig. 1) - is not yet common in ecological research (Luo et al., 2011). The goal of this workshop, sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program, was to bring together members of the empirical and modeling communities to exchange ideas and discuss scientific practices for increasing empirical - model integration, and to explore infrastructure and/or virtual network needs for institutionalizing empirical - model integration (Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA). The workshop included presentations and small group discussions that covered topics ranging from model-assisted experimental design to data driven modeling (e.g. benchmarking and data assimilation) to infrastructure needs for empirical - model integration. Ultimately, three central questions emerged. How can models be used to inform experiments and observations? How can experimental and observational results be used to inform models? What are effective strategies to promote empirical - model integration?

  7. Influence of Disturbance, Soils, and Socio-Economic Constraints on Restoration in Brush Encroached, Semi-Arid Texas Rangelands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wonkka, Carissa Lyn

    2014-12-15

    effective interventions, I analyzed the effect of prescribed burning regulations and liability standards on prescribed fire use on private lands. Limited liability standards coupled with strict regulatory requirements increased the use of prescribed fire...

  8. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  9. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  10. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  11. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  12. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  13. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  14. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  15. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  16. FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program algae, including evolution, classification, structure, photosynthesis, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral

  17. Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes Christopher K. Wikle Department of Statistics, University of Missouri To appear: Ecology June 10, 2002 Key Words: Bayesian, Diffusion, Forecast, Hierarchical, House Finch, Invasive, Malthu- sian, State Space, Uncertainty Abstract

  18. DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules June 14, 2005 - 4:53pm Addthis...

  19. Ecological Engineering and Sustainability: A New Opportunity for Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stouffer, Daniel B.

    Ecological Engineering and Sustainability: A New Opportunity for Chemical Engineering Daniel B Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, and Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). Keywords: ecological engineering, food webs, contaminant

  20. Ecologic niche modeling and spatial patterns of disease transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    2006-12-01

    Ecologic niche modeling (ENM) is a growing field with many potential applications to questions regarding the geography and ecology of disease transmission. Specifically, ENM has the potential to inform investigations concerned ...

  1. START HERE 2013 Annual Ecology Report DVD 1.htm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Ecology DVD 1 Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2013 Annual Report Sections...

  2. START HERE 2014 Annual Ecology Report DVD 1.htm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Ecology DVD 1 Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2014 Annual Report Sections...

  3. Applicability of 10 CFR 851 to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Letter from Bruce Diamond, Assistant General Counsel for Environment, DOE, dated November 24, 2007 to Mr. Bertsch, Director and Professor, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, regarding Savannah Riber Ecology Laboratory's Request for Interpretive Ruling under 10 CFR 851.

  4. Amigo Bob Cantisano: Organic Farming Advisor, Founder, Ecological Farming Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    the Ecological Farming Conference at that point? Cantisano:the speakers at that conference? Cantisano: Miguel Altieri.it the Ecological Farming Conference. I can’t remember if it

  5. Behavioral Ecology doi:10.1093/beheco/arn084

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendry, Andrew

    stud- ies of ecologically based divergence in mating signals have focused on nonbehavioral traits own size'' rule (Wood and Foote 1996; McKinnon et al. 2004). Another possibility is that ecologically

  6. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #14 A willow island 19 April 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #14

  7. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #6 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 July 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  8. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #2 Drs. Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 March 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  9. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #11 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 January 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  10. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #15 Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 26 May 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status

  11. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #12 Willow sapling 15 February 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #9

  12. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #17 Pedro Quintana;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #16 Covering the time period from

  13. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #5 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 June 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  14. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #19 Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 September 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  15. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #4 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 May 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  16. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #9 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 11 November 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  17. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #3 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 April 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  18. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #10 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 December 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  19. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #16 Pedro Quintana, Florida 32816 15 June 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report

  20. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #1 Drs. Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 14 February 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  1. Ecology and Geography of Plague Transmission Areas in Northeastern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, John R.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ameida, Alzira

    2011-01-04

    Plague in Brazil is poorly known and now rarely seen, so studies of its ecology are difficult. We used ecological niche models of historical (1966-present) records of human plague cases across northeastern Brazil to assess hypotheses regarding...

  2. Paul van der Molen Good Administration of Land in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul van der Molen Good Administration of Land in Europe UN, FIG, PC IDEA Inter-regional Special 2004 1/14 Good Administration of Land in Europe Paul van der MOLEN, The Netherlands Keywords: land administration, spatial data infrastructures, land policy, Europe ABSTRACT Europe's history resulted in a variety

  3. FAS6176 ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FAS6176 ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips 7922 NW 71st Street the biology and ecology of aquatic algae, including evolution, classification, structure, photosynthesis, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e

  4. FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program-mail: phlips@ufl.edu Office Hours: Mondays 4pm-5pm Course Description: The biology and ecology of aquatic algae on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral reefs, rocky

  5. Bird diversity indicates ecological value in urban home prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    have been proven to benefit housing values with little need for nuanced ecological assessmentBird diversity indicates ecological value in urban home prices Michael C. Farmer & Mark C. Wallace are equally valuable. Also some ecologically valuable space appears on private residences, not only public

  6. Advanced Mathematical Ecology -Fall 2013 Math/EEB 681

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics Dr. Chris Remien, NIMBioS Postdoctoral Fellow Meeting Methods for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology by Marc Mangel, Cambridge University Press 2006 We the mathematical aspects of the text, and by a few essays from the recent Encyclopedia of Theoretical Ecology (Alan

  7. CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giron, David - Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Université François Rabelais

    545 CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY Ecology, 86 could be achieved in that model by assuming that the large amounts of ingested proteins and car to all organisms with implications ranging from energy metabolism, behav- ioral ecology, senescence

  8. Marine Chemical Ecology: A Science Born of Scuba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlik, Joseph

    Marine Chemical Ecology: A Science Born of Scuba Joseph R. Pawlik, Charles D.Amsler, Raphael Ritson chemists have been interested in the novel chemical structures and biological activities of marine natural by diverse marine organisms. Chemi- cal ecology, the study of the natural ecological functions

  9. Carbon Density and Anthropogenic Land Use Influences on Net Land-Use Change Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Rothwell, Andrew J.

    2013-10-08

    We examine historical and future land-use emissions using a simple mechanistic carbon-cycle model with regional and ecosystem specific parameterizations. Our central estimate of net terrestrial land-use change emissions, exclusive of climate feedbacks, is 250 GtC over the last three hundred years. This estimate is most sensitive to assumptions for preindustrial forest and soil carbon densities. We also find that estimates are sensitive to the treatment of crop and pasture lands. These sensitivities also translate into differences in future terrestrial uptake in the RCP4.5 land-use scenario. This estimate of future uptake is lower than the native values from the GCAM integrated assessment model result due to lower net reforestation in the RCP4.5 gridded land-use data product

  10. Master of Science in Ecology (Plan A) Graduate Degree Interdisciplinary Program in Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    section of the catalog or http://catalog.colostate.edu/front/courses-of-instruction.aspx to see the course Advanced Physiological Ecology of Fishes 4 FW662 Wildlife Population Dynamics 3 HORT571 Soil Plant Water

  11. PhD in Ecology Graduate Degree Interdisciplinary Program in Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    of the catalog or http://catalog.colostate.edu/front/courses-of-instruction.aspx to see the course prerequisites Physiological Ecology of Fishes 4 FW662 Wildlife Population Dynamics 3 #12;HORT571 Soil Plant Water Relations 3

  12. Ecology, 83(8), 2002, pp. 20912096 2002 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCabe, Declan

    1989), species nestedness (Patterson and At- mar 1986), and trait­environment associations (Keddy colonization and were competition-free. These ex- changes touched off a debate in community ecology that has

  13. Ecology, 91(11), 2010, pp. 31893200 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    of a grassland ecosystem to an experimental manipulation of a keystone rodent and domestic livestock ANA D (Cynomys spp.), a keystone burrowing rodent. Understanding the ecological relationships between cattle; grasshoppers; grassland; grazing; herbivores; keystone species; prairie dogs; vegetation. INTRODUCTION

  14. Montana State University 1 Department of Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    leading to Master of Science degrees in biological sciences. The Master's degree generally requires the Master's and Doctoral level the following areas of study are available: terrestrial and aquatic ecologyBT is required for admission. All qualified students must secure an agreement from a faculty member who

  15. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 22: 301­313, 2000 Published October 26 of the phytoplankton community. This community was dominated by cells, which averaged 77% (range 41 to 98, and might contribute to fueling planktonic communities with the limiting nutrient through regeneration. KEY

  16. Restoring Ecological Function with Invasive Species Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Cause

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Ecology 22:55-63. Beggs, J. R. , J. S. Rees, R.and Systematics 38:567-593. Beggs, J. R. , R. J. Toft, J. P.Control 44:399-407. Beggs, J. R. , E. G. Brockerhoff, J. C.

  17. Predicting species invasions using ecological niche modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Vieglais, David A.

    2001-05-01

    ) and commission (including niche space not ,lctually occupied by the 'pecies). Each algorithm for modeling specIes' ecological niches involves a specific com binatiol1 of errors of omission ,md commission. A rel.ltively new approach, called the (;enetic...

  18. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochem, Frank J.

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 51: 117­128, 2008 doi: 10.3354/ame01180 Published and mortality rates of microbes in Lake Erie during thermal stratification and determined how they varied consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 51: 117­128, 2008 1999, DeBruyn et al. 2004), autotrophic

  19. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 51: 195­208, 2008 doi: 10.3354/ame01190 Published May 19 INTRODUCTION Over the last 20 yr, extensive studies have revealed the crucial roles of microbes of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 51: 195­208, 2008 phylogenetic diversity of microbes (Breitbart et al. 2002

  20. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Laura

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 64: 51­67, 2011 doi: 10.3354/ame01509 Published to the historic view that microbes are not dispersal-limited (reviewed in Finlay 2002, Foissner 2006). Molecular closely related microbes and such studies do indicate that dispersal of microbial forms can be global (e

  1. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Laura

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 41: 55­65, 2005 Published November 11 INTRODUCTION on the phylogeography of eukaryotic microbes (protists). The first maintains that all microbes, including ciliates, have or republication not permitted without written consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 41: 55­65, 2005 ing

  2. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 41: 49­54, 2005 Published November 11 INTRODUCTION Microbial species appear to have cosmopolitan distribution. With respect to eukaryotic microbes of the Earth provided that particular habitat requirements are met. The distribution of microbes does

  3. Ecology & Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Ecosystem Science Reserve; East Bethel, MN (approx. 35 miles north of the Twin Cities). For more information ecology and environmental issues. Topics include a survey of general ecosystem and community level Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve located approximately 35 miles north of the Twin Cities in East Bethel

  4. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yahel, Gitai

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 45: 181­194, 2006 Published November 24.g. by maximizing their energy gain or avoiding harmful food. It is well documented that selective predation in pelagic habi- tats structures the microbial community (Pernthaler 2005). Less is known of interactions

  5. Introduction to Theme "Genomics in Ecology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    Introduction to Theme "Genomics in Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics" H. Bradley Shaffer1, Los Angeles, California 90095; email: brad.shaffer@ucla.edu 2 Center for Genomics and Systems Biology.1146/annurev-ecolsys-081913-123118 Copyright c 2013 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved Keywords genome

  6. INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology: old and new challenges Andrea Belgrano Looking up ``aquatic food web'' on Google provides a dizzying array of eclectic sites and information (and disinformation!) to choose from. However, even within this morass it is clear that aquatic food-web research has

  7. NRES 725 PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    1 NRES 725 ­ PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY Spring 2006 Reading List ­ Water Balance of Plants I) Water Balance of Plants A) Water potential B) Soil, plant, air continuum C) Physiological control 1 Kramer & Boyer (95) pp 16-41 & 42-83 Kramer & Boyer (95) pp 201-256 *Steudle (01) Ann Rev Plant Phy Mol

  8. Five Differences Between Ecological and Economic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald D. Smith

    2011-08-29

    Ecological and economic networks have many similarities and are often compared. However, the comparison is often more apt as metaphor than a direct equivalence. In this paper, five key differences are explained which should inform any analysis which compares the two.

  9. Elsevier Oceanography Series, 52 GLOBAL ECOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    Elsevier Oceanography Series, 52 GLOBAL ECOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE 1982-83 EL NINO 30602 ABSTRACT Duffy, D.C., 1989. Seabirds and the 1982-1984 El Nino-Southern Oscillation The 1982-1984 El Nino and associated events affected seabirds in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Effects ranged

  10. Environmental science and ecology involve studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Dan

    Environmental science and ecology involve studies of the biosphere, hydro- sphere, and lithosphere in environmental science is conducted on spatial scales varying from a single algal cell to the Earth as a whole's environmental scientists require investigation by an interdisciplinary team, including members from several

  11. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Dennis; Anderson, David; Derek, Hall; Greger, Paul; Ostler, W. Kent

    2008-03-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

  12. Marine Bird Ecology & Conservation: The Farallon Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    11/19/2014 1 Marine Bird Ecology & Conservation: The Farallon Islands Example Some Historical;11/19/2014 2 Charadriformes: gulls, terns Anseriformes: marine ducks, geese and swans Other birds Location of island Distant photo of island #12;11/19/2014 3 Western Gull The gull colony on the marine terrace

  13. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  14. Results from KamLAND-Zen

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Asakura, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hachiya, T.; Hayashida, S.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishio, S.; et al

    2015-07-15

    KamLAND-Zen reports on a preliminary search for neutrinoless double-beta decay with 136Xe based on 114.8 live-days after the purification of the xenon loaded liquid scintillator. In this data, the problematic 110mAg background peak identified in previous searches is reduced by more than a factor of 10. By combining the KamLAND-Zen pre- and post-purification data, we obtain a preliminary lower limit on the 0??? decay half-life of T0?1/2 > 2.6×1025 yr at 90% C.L. The search sensitivity will be enhanced with additional low background data after the purification. As a result, prospects for further improvements with future KamLAND-Zen upgrades are alsomore »presented.« less

  15. Ecological Applications, 22(8), 2012, pp. 20352048 2012 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    -TEIXEIRA,1,2,3 BENJAMIN D. DUVAL,1,2,3 STEPHEN P. LONG,1,2,3,4 AND EVAN H. DELUCIA 1,2,3,4,5 1 Energy production will also draw from cellulosic sources such as perennial grasses. In selecting optimal bioenergy are competing with uncultivated land, our model calculates land requirements to meet a given bioenergy demand

  16. A framework for benchmarking land models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

    2012-10-09

    Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models to improve their prediction performance skills.

  17. Remediation and management of degraded lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, M.H.; Wong, J.W.C.; Baker, A.J.M. [eds.

    1999-11-01

    This book presents the program of the first International Conference on the Remediation and Management of Degraded lands. The book has three sections: mine management and rehabilitation, the management of derelict lands, and soil contamination and reclamation. The 34 chapters present a proactive, solution based approach to the rehabilitation of natural resources. Topics of discussions include the following: the multidisciplinary approach practiced by the Australian Center for Minesite Rehabilitation Research; the relationship between biofuel harvesting and Hong Kong`s continuing upland degradation; and experiments with the effectiveness of EDTA/HCI to remove contaminants from soil.

  18. Recent Trends in Land Tenure in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motheral, Joe

    1944-01-01

    IN TEXAS JOE MOTHERAL Division of Farm and Ranch Economics [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Public interest in the subject of land tenure has been height- ened by the swift changes, in the tenure pattern of the Southwest during the last decade.... In Texas, Common methods of renting farm land such as the "third-and-fourth" system, which is adapted to the growing of annual cash crops, proved to be inadequate in numerous instances where cotton acreage was reduced and a live- stock program...

  19. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  20. THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH. Paterson's Land.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    . Page 9. Internal Access. Page 13. Reception. Page 14. Lift. Page 14. Platform Lifts. Page 15. Stairs staff, students, visitors and contractors. The main Holyrood Campus car park is located off St John Street, to the rear of Paterson's Land (see location map). This is a one way car park which is accessed

  1. State Agency Land Leases Prepared for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Energy Reliability Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-06NT42847 Hawai`i Distributed Energy Resource: This material is based upon work supported by the United States Department of Energy under Cooperative AgreementState Agency Land Leases Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery

  2. Accuracy Requirements for Rural Land Parcel Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Accuracy Requirements for Rural Land Parcel Boundaries Kristin M. Stock School of Planning accuracy of about +/-0.2m. Utilities companies and local authorities in rural areas have more relaxed of Planning, Landscape Architecture and Surveying at Queensland University of Technology, and the Geodetic

  3. Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development Unconventional Fuels Conference University of Utah May 17, 2011 #12;#12;Domestic Oil Shale Resources Primary oil shale resources in the U.S. are in the Green River Formation in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. 72 % of this oil shale resource is on Federal

  4. INTERAGENCY REPORT APOLLO 17 LANDING SITE GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    INTERAGENCY REPORT APOLLO 17 LANDING SITE GEOLOGY UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ASTROGEOLOGY #73 JUNE 1975 Prepared under NASA Contract T-5874A and W13,130 NATIONAL STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY INTERAGENCY REPORT: ASTROGEOLOGY 73 Part I

  5. Influenza A Virus Infections in Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    Influenza A Virus Infections in Land Birds, People's Republic of China A. Townsend Peterson, Sarah for avian in- fluenza viruses. We examined this assumption by sampling and real-time reverse transcription migratory species. Surveillance programs for monitoring spread of these viruses need to be redesigned. Avian

  6. Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noah, J.C.

    1995-06-29

    This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

  7. Modification ofregional groundwater regimes by land reclamation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Modification ofregional groundwater regimes by land reclamation Jiu Jimmy Jiao Department of groundwater regime, in tum causing similar problems. This paper represents the first attempt to address the impact ofreclamation on groundwater regimes. It will be demonstrated that large-scale of reclamation

  8. Land Condition -Trend Analysis Data Dictionary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and wildlife resources to characterize an installation's natural resources in a cost- and time-effective manner (USACERL) developed the Land Condition Trend Analysis (LCTA) program to meet the need for natural resources of natural resources data collection, analysis, and reporting designed to meet multiple goals and objectives

  9. Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

  10. Soil erosion and conservation as affcted by land use and land tenure, El Pital Watershed, Nicaragua 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somarriba-Chang, Matilde de los Angeles

    1997-01-01

    . This trend is associated with increased fragmentation of farms associated with the agrarian reform activities of the 1980's, during which many of the large land-holdings were confiscated and redistributed to many peasant families. Also the increasing...

  11. November 2009 Land-Use/Land Cover Transitions in Delaware, 2002-2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    of Agriculture & Natural Resources University of Delaware Newark, DE 19717 Abstract: This report quantifies land are distributed as GIS shapefiles from the Office of Statewide Planning Coordination website at http://stateplanning.delaware.gov/info

  12. Land Use and Wildfire: A Review of Local Interactions and Teleconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2015-01-01

    to coordinate land change and fire management across largeof land use change and fire management—Such as land useland use change through fire management. Often, increased

  13. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  14. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Julie Maupin- Furlow

    2009-07-26

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  15. Science and technology for industrial ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmartin, T.J.; Allenby, B.R.

    1996-07-10

    Scientific and technological communities have a significant role to play and responsibility for the evolution of global sustainability (continuously improving quality of life into the indefinite future). Sustainability is not possible without a substantially improved science and technology basis for industrial ecology. Society needs data and understanding of complex ecological issues to govern itself in a sustainable manner. We should: support and develop multi-disciplinary programs which create the scientific basis for understanding natural and anthropogenic complex systems and for developing environmentally and economically efficient technology; demonstrate a systems-based approach to science and technology issues which is life-cycle comprehensive, integrates environmental considerations, and promotes conservation of natural resources; and encourage development of responsible, technically and scientifically valid, cost-effective environmental laws and practices.

  16. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  17. Aspects of Key Largo woodrat ecology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCleery, Robert Alan; Lopez, Roel R.

    2004-09-30

    population has declined even within protected areas (Frank et al. 1997, USFWS 1999). Still, little is known about KLWR ecology and what may be causing its decline. Feral cats (Felix domestica, Humphrey 1992, Frank et al. 1997, USFWS 1999 ), fire ants... of 26, 42, and 30 also suggest the original estimate of 106 was likely an overestimation of the population. MANAGEMENT IMPLICATIONS No clear evidence has been found to explain the decline of the KLWR. Feral cats (Felix domestica, Humphrey 1992...

  18. Symposium Essay: The Energy-Land Use Nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2012-01-01

    This Symposium Essay explores the contours of the 'energy-land use nexus' – the rich set of interrelationships between land use and energy production and consumption. This underexplored nexus encapsulates barriers and opportunities as the trajectory...

  19. Energy Department Releases New Land-Based/Offshore Wind Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Releases New Land-BasedOffshore Wind Resource Map Energy Department Releases New Land-BasedOffshore Wind Resource Map May 1, 2012 - 2:23pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the...

  20. Spectral behavior of the coupled land-atmosphere system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to understand the daily cycle of the energy coupling between the land and the atmosphere in response to a forcing of incoming radiation at their common boundary, the land surface. This ...

  1. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  2. Relative efficiency of land surface energy balance components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateni, S. M.

    [1] The partitioning of available energy into dissipative fluxes over land surfaces is dependent on the state variable of the surface energy balance (land surface temperature) and the state variable of the surface water ...

  3. Title 16 USC 818 Public Lands Included in Project - Reservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Lands From Entry Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 16 USC 818 Public Lands Included in Project...

  4. Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar June 24, 2015 11:00AM to 12:30PM...

  5. Grout treatment facility land disposal restriction management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1991-04-04

    This document establishes management plans directed to result in the land disposal of grouted wastes at the Hanford Grout Facilities in compliance with Federal, State of Washington, and Department of Energy land disposal restrictions. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Bureau of Land Management - Techniques for Documenting a No Action...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management - Techniques for Documenting a No Action Alternative in an EA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land...

  7. Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

  8. Precipitation, Recycling, and Land Memory: An Integrated Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.

    A synthesis of several approaches to quantifying land–atmosphere interactions is presented. These approaches use data from observations or atmospheric reanalyses applied to atmospheric tracer models and stand-alone land ...

  9. The Gut Microbiota: Ecology and Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willing, B.P.; Jansson, J.K.

    2010-06-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is teeming with an extremely abundant and diverse microbial community. The members of this community have coevolved along with their hosts over millennia. Until recently, the gut ecosystem was viewed as black box with little knowledge of who or what was there or their specific functions. Over the past decade, however, this ecosystem has become one of fastest growing research areas of focus in microbial ecology and human and animal physiology. This increased interest is largely in response to studies tying microbes in the gut to important diseases afflicting modern society, including obesity, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. Although the importance of a resident community of microorganisms in health was first hypothesized by Pasteur over a century ago (Sears, 2005), the multiplicity of physiological changes induced by commensal bacteria has only recently been recognized (Hooper et al., 2001). The term 'ecological development' was recently coined to support the idea that development of the GI tract is a product of the genetics of the host and the host's interactions with resident microbes (Hooper, 2004). The search for new therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers has escalated the need to understand the identities and functions of the microorganisms inhabiting the gut. Recent studies have revealed new insights into the membership of the gut microbial community, interactions within that community, as well as mechanisms of interaction with the host. This chapter focuses on the microbial ecology of the gut, with an emphasis on information gleaned from recent molecular studies.

  10. Ecological Risk Assessment Framework for Low-Altitude Overflights by Fixed-Wing and Rotary-Wing Military Aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2001-01-12

    This is a companion report to the risk assessment framework proposed by Suter et al. (1998): ''A Framework for Assessment of Risks of Military Training and Testing to Natural Resources,'' hereafter referred to as the ''generic framework.'' The generic framework is an ecological risk assessment methodology for use in environmental assessments on Department of Defense (DoD) installations. In the generic framework, the ecological risk assessment framework of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1998) is modified for use in the context of (1) multiple and diverse stressors and activities at a military installation and (2) risks resulting from causal chains, e.g., effects on habitat that indirectly impact wildlife. Both modifications are important if the EPA framework is to be used on military installations. In order for the generic risk assessment framework to be useful to DoD environmental staff and contractors, the framework must be applied to specific training and testing activities. Three activity-specific ecological risk assessment frameworks have been written (1) to aid environmental staff in conducting risk assessments that involve these activities and (2) to guide staff in the development of analogous frameworks for other DoD activities. The three activities are: (1) low-altitude overflights by fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft (this volume), (2) firing at targets on land, and (3) ocean explosions. The activities were selected as priority training and testing activities by the advisory committee for this project.

  11. Aircraft Landing Gear Thermo-Tribomechanical Model and Sensitivity Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aircraft Landing Gear Thermo-Tribomechanical Model and Sensitivity Study Laurent Heirendt and Hugh-tribomechanical response of an aircraft landing gear shock absorber is presented. Structural damage has been reported sources and sinks in the landing gear shock absorber is developed. The thermo-tribomechanical model

  12. Towards vision-based safe landing for an autonomous helicopter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukhatme, Gaurav S.

    Towards vision-based safe landing for an autonomous helicopter Pedro J. Garcia-Pardoa;, Gaurav S from real test ights on a helicopter testbed demonstrate the robustness of the approach under widely di-performance embedded com- puters. Key words: autonomous helicopter, vision-based landing, safe landing, contrast

  13. PETROLEUM LAND MANAGEMENT (PLMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    PETROLEUM LAND MANAGEMENT (PLMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree The Haskayne School of Business offers a Bachelor of commerce degree with a concentration in Petroleum Land Management that prepares graduates average, and other documentation. Two third-year courses, PLMA 475 (Introduction to Petroleum Land

  14. Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Christian Azar Department of Physical of Brazil on "good" versus "bad" lands is investigated. It is shown that the value of the higher yields) lands. The focus of the analysis is on the Northeast of Brazil (NE), where the prospects for dedicated

  15. AUTOMATED LANDING SITE EVALUATION FOR SEMI-AUTONOMOUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kochersberger, Kevin

    AUTOMATED LANDING SITE EVALUATION FOR SEMI-AUTONOMOUS UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES Dylan Klomparens for a vertical-takeoff-and- landing (VTOL) semi-autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) from point cloud data Evaluation © 2008, Dylan Klomparens #12;AUTOMATED LANDING SITE EVALUATION FOR SEMI-AUTONOMOUS UNMANNED AERIAL

  16. Tuesday, March 14, 2006 POSTER SESSION I: PHOENIX LANDING SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Tuesday, March 14, 2006 POSTER SESSION I: PHOENIX LANDING SITE 7:00 p.m. Fitness Center Guinn J. The Engineering Behind Mars Exploration Program 2007 Phoenix Mission Landing Site Selection [#2051] This abstract Characterization of the 2007 Phoenix Mission Landing Sites in the Northern Plains of Mars [#2166] Geomorphology

  17. Tuesday, March 14, 2006 SPECIAL SESSION: PHOENIX LANDING SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Tuesday, March 14, 2006 SPECIAL SESSION: PHOENIX LANDING SITE 5:30 p.m. Marina Plaza Ballroom of the Phoenix Mission Landing Site [#1910] The Phoenix mission will study the subsurface ice discovered in 2002 L. Tyler D. Overview of Mars Exploration Program 2007 Phoenix Mission Landing Site Selection [#1328

  18. Ecological Applications, 15(5), 2005, pp. 15351549 2005 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutto, Richard

    species, but logistics, unpredictability of weather, and inherent danger make it nearly impossible a need to manage public lands for the maintenance of all kinds of fires, not just the low

  19. Ecological Applications, 12(6), 2002, pp. 18401860 2002 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillingham, Michael

    and Environmental Studies, University of Northern British Columbia, 3333 University Way, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada V2N 4Z9 2British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks, 1011 4th Ave., Prince

  20. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

  1. Giving Back: Collaborations with Others in Ecological Studies on the Nevada National Security Site - 13058

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, Scott A.; Knapp, Kathryn S. [U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Agency, Nevada Site Office, P.O. Box 98518, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8518 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Agency, Nevada Site Office, P.O. Box 98518, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8518 (United States); Wills, Cathy A. [National Nuclear Security Technologies, LLC, P.O. Box 98521, M/S 260, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8521 (United States)] [National Nuclear Security Technologies, LLC, P.O. Box 98521, M/S 260, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8521 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Formerly named the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) was the historical site for nuclear weapons testing from the 1950's to the early 1990's. The site was renamed in 2010 to reflect the diversity of nuclear, energy, and homeland security activities now conducted at the site. Biological and ecological programs and research have been conducted on the site for decades to address the impacts of radiation and to take advantage of the relatively undisturbed and isolated lands for gathering basic information on the occurrence and distribution of native plants and animals. Currently, the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) oversees the radiological biota monitoring and ecological compliance programs on the NNSS. The top priority of these programs are compliance with federal and state regulations. They focus on performing radiological dose assessments for the public who reside near the NNSS and for populations of plants and animals on the NNSS and in protecting important species and habitat from direct impacts of mission activities. The NNSS serves as an invaluable outdoor laboratory. The geographic and ecological diversity of the site offers researchers many opportunities to study human influences on ecosystems. NNSA/NSO has pursued collaborations with outside agencies and organizations to be able to conduct programs and studies that enhance radiological biota monitoring and ecosystem preservation when budgets are restrictive, as well as to provide valuable scientific information to the human health and natural resource communities at large. NNSA/NSO is using one current collaborative study to better assess the potential dose to the off-site public from the ingestion of game animals, the most realistic pathway for off-site public exposure at this time from radionuclide contamination on the NNSS. A second collaborative study is furthering desert tortoise conservation measures onsite. It is the goal of NNSA/NSO to continue to develop such collaborations in the sharing of resources, such as personnel, equipment, expertise, and NNSS land access, with outside entities to meet mutually beneficial goals cost effectively. (authors)

  2. Giving Back: Collaborations with Others in Ecological Studies on the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott A. Wade; Kathryn S. Knapp; Cathy A. Wills

    2013-02-24

    Formerly named the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) was the historical site for nuclear weapons testing from the 1950s to the early 1990s. The site was renamed in 2010 to reflect the diversity of nuclear, energy, and homeland security activities now conducted at the site. Biological and ecological programs and research have been conducted on the site for decades to address the impacts of radiation and to take advantage of the relatively undisturbed and isolated lands for gathering basic information on the occurrence and distribution of native plants and animals. Currently, the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) oversees the radiological biota monitoring and ecological compliance programs on the NNSS. The top priority of these programs are compliance with federal and state regulations. They focus on performing radiological dose assessments for the public who reside near the NNSS and for populations of plants and animals on the NNSS and in protecting important species and habitat from direct impacts of mission activities. The NNSS serves as an invaluable outdoor laboratory. The geographic and ecological diversity of the site offers researchers many opportunities to study human influences on ecosystems. NNSA/NSO has pursued collaborations with outside agencies and organizations to be able to conduct programs and studies that enhance radiological biota monitoring and ecosystem preservation when budgets are restrictive, as well as to provide valuable scientific information to the human health and natural resource communities at large. NNSA/NSO is using one current collaborative study to better assess the potential dose to the off-site public from the ingestion of game animals, the most realistic pathway for off-site public exposure at this time from radionuclide contamination on the NNSS. A second collaborative study is furthering desert tortoise conservation measures onsite. It is the goal of NNSA/NSO to continue to develop such collaborations in the sharing of resources, such as personnel, equipment, expertise, and NNSS land access, with outside entities to meet mutually beneficial goals cost effectively.

  3. Project Reports for Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO): Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO)- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), together with its partners, will conduct a feasibility study (FS) of a program to develop renewable energy on the Paragon-Bisti ranch lands in northwestern New Mexico, which were set aside under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act for the benefit of relocatees (defined as Navajo families living on Hopi Partitioned Lands as of December 22, 1974).

  4. Spatial Scaling of Land Cover Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Spatial networks of land cover are well-described by power law rank-size distributions. Continuous field proxies for human settlements, agriculture and forest cover have similar spatial scaling properties spanning 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Progressive segmentation of these continuous fields yields spatial networks with rank-size distributions having slopes near -1 for a wide range of thresholds. We consider a general explanation for this scaling that does not require different processes for each type of land cover. The same conditions that give rise to scale-free networks in general can produce power law distributions of component sizes for bounded spatial networks confined to a plane or surface. Progressive segmentation of a continuous field naturally results in growth of the network while the increasing perimeters of the growing components result in preferential attachment to the larger components with the longer perimeters. Progressive segmentation of two types of random continuous field results in progr...

  5. ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    English Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ECOLOGY; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; CONTAMINATION Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View...

  6. 2006 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2006 Annual Report Sections Diffuse Knapweed...

  7. Functional Ecological Gene Networks to Reveal the Changes Among...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    network structure among different microbial speciespopulations. Here, a novel random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional ecological gene...

  8. Ecology-basics and applications Planned activities 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Ecological Ideas January 2013 Jan.Bengtsson@slu.se Statistical programming in R 22-26th April 2013 Matt

  9. Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

  10. NEEC RESEARCH: GPS-DENIED LANDING OF UAVS ON SHIPS 1 NEEC Research: Toward GPS-denied Landing of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    . The UAV estimates its relative-pose to the landing platform through observations of fiducial markers detections, estimated poses of the UAV and landing platform, and an embedded stream of the UAV's onboard-build-test project focused on the development of a fully autonomous system for landing Navy unmanned aerial vehicles

  11. State Land Commission FAQ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jumpand Maintenance Geothermal Project | OpenStateLand

  12. Rehabilitation of semi-arid coal mine spoil bank soils with mine residues and farm organic by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, M.; Bosch-Serra, A.; Estudillos, G.; Poch, R.M. [University of Lleida, Lleida (Spain). Dept. of Environmental & Soil Science

    2009-07-01

    A method of rehabilitating coal mine soils was studied under the conditions of a semi-arid climate, lack of topsoil but availability of farm by-products in NE Spain. The objectives of the research were to assess a new method in order to achieve a suitable substrate for the establishment of native vegetation, to evaluate environmental impacts associated with the reclamation process, and to determine the time necessary to integrate the treated area into the surrounding environment. Eight plots (10 x 35 m{sup 2}) were established in September 1997. Substrate combinations of two types of mine spoil (coal dust and coarse-sized material), two levels of pig slurry (39 and 94 Mg ha{sup -1}dry-wt), and cereal straw (0 and 15 Mg ha{sup -1}) were applied. Monitoring of select physical and chemical soil properties and vegetation characteristics was performed from 1997 until 2005. The bulk density and the saturated hydraulic conductivity measured did not limit plant development and water availability. Initial substrate salinity (1.37 S m{sup -1}) decreased with time and in the long term did not limit plant colonization to salinity-adapted species. Initial nitrate concentration was 298 mg kg{sup -1}, but was reduced significantly to acceptable values in 3 years (55 mg kg{sup -1}) and the measured pH (7.6) was maintained at the level of initial spoil values. Vegetation cover reached up to 90%. In the treated area, spontaneous vegetation cover (15 to 70%) colonized the nonsown areas widely. In the medium term, vegetation cover tended to be higher in plots with a thicker layer of coal dust material and the higher slurry rate. Soil rehabilitation and environmental reintegration, taking into account soil and vegetation indicators, was possible in the studied area with low cost inputs using residual materials from mining activities and animal husbandry by-products.

  13. Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) program overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) enacted in 1984 required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate all listed and characteristic hazardous wastes according to a strict schedule and to develop requirements by which disposal of these wastes would be protective of human health and the environment. The implementing regulations for accomplishing this statutory requirement are established within the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) program. The LDR regulations (40 CFR Part 268) impose significant requirements on waste management operations and environmental restoration activities at DOE sites. For hazardous wastes restricted by statute from land disposal, EPA is required to set levels or methods of treatment that substantially reduce the waste`s toxicity or the likelihood that the waste`s hazardous constituents will migrate. Upon the specified LDR effective dates, restricted wastes that do not meet treatment standards are prohibited from land disposal unless they qualify for certain variances or exemptions. This document provides an overview of the LDR Program.

  14. Hazard/Risk Assessment A REFINED AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR A PYRETHROID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    Hazard/Risk Assessment A REFINED AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR A PYRETHROID INSECTICIDE risk assessments, the authors performed a probabilistic aquatic ecological risk assessment. The present study is the first ecological risk assessment for pyrethroids to quantitatively integrate

  15. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R. [eds.; Johnson, G.

    1993-11-01

    This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

  16. Ecology, 89(2), 2008, pp. 306312 2008 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; ecosystem-based management; eggs; fisheries; food web; foraging; functional extinction; grayling; marine in subsidies to stream food webs. Thus, the ecological consequences of population declines of keystone species et al. 2004), there is concern that nonlinearities may lead to functional extinction prior to species

  17. Ecology, 93(8), 2012, pp. 18671879 2012 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    of soil bacteria and fungi along a soil moisture gradient. On average, soil microorganisms had relatively with metabolism restricted to less-negative water potentials. These contrasting ecological strategies had microorganisms is highly conserved. In addition, variation in microbial responses along the moisture gradient

  18. Ecology, 91(2), 2010, pp. 422430 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    (Barrowclough and Rockwell 1993, Dodd and Silvertown 2000); and (3) from an ecological viewpoint, it may, demographic structure, and persis- tence of populations (Harper 1977, Clutton-Brock 1988, Newton 1989). Our groups and life styles (Clutton-Brock 1988, Newton 1989), similar information is scarce for natural plant

  19. Ecological Applications, 23(4), 2013, pp. 726741 2013 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leslie, Heather

    the Pacific red snapper (Lutjanus peru) fishery around La Paz, Mexico, where medium or ``plate-sized'' fish words: coupled natural and human systems model; coupled social-ecological systems; ecosystem services et al. 2010, Buckley 2011). Nonetheless, investigations of human impacts in marine systems, and even

  20. Ecological Monographs, 74(3), 2004, pp. 513532 2004 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    QUANTIFYING SCALE IN ECOLOGY: LESSONS FROM A WAVE-SWEPT SHORE MARK W. DENNY,1,4 BRIAN HELMUTH,1,2 GEORGE H physical and biological processes in the wave-swept intertidal zone at Mussel Point, near Hopkins Marine Station in California. We analyze temporal variability in wave height, ocean temperature, upwelling

  1. Ecology, 93(6), 2012, pp. 14391450 2012 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    feedback mediates effects of invasive grasses on coastal dune shape PHOEBE L. ZARNETSKE,1,6 SALLY D. HACKER-specific ecological mechanisms influencing the geomorphology of U.S. Pacific Northwest coastal dunes. Over the last century, this system changed from open, shifting sand dunes with sparse vegetation (including native beach

  2. Traditional ecological knowledge: the third alternative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierotti, Raymond; Wildcat, Daniel R.

    2000-10-01

    , Lakota (Marshall 1995, McIntyre 1995), and Northwest coastal tribes (Anderson 1996). This was wolf, Canis lupus, who was found throughout North America, lived in family groups, and was not strong or swift enough to kill large prey alone. Wolves working... with the exact time when events happened, since they happened so long ago that they exist ‘‘on the other side of memory’’ (Marshall 1995:207). The worldviews and cultures of Native American peoples evolved in 1336 INVITED FEATURE Ecological ApplicationsVol. 10...

  3. Ecological effects of an invasive social wasp on Hawaiian arthropod communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Erin Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    M (eds) Food exploitation by social insects: ecological,M (eds) Food exploitation by social insects: ecological,insect species represent an important and underappreciated food

  4. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology-748-1331. mdeact@shaw.ca #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  5. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Rd., Black Creek, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology

  6. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  7. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Airphotos to Interpret

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture March 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

  8. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  9. Close-Ups and the Scale of Ecology: Land Uses and the Geography of Social Context and Crime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boessen, A; Hipp, JR

    2015-01-01

    680. ———. 2007. Income Inequality, Race, and Place: Does theethnic heterogeneity, inequality, and other distributional6 We capture economic inequality (a distributional measure)

  10. Ecosystem management aligns different uses of the land with ecological parameters and goals of environmental quality. An important USDA Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    -aged timber harvest on old-growth forests and their associated wildlife, such as the California spotted owl" for special needs, will sustain all key resources (soil, water, vegetation, and wildlife) and functions, promoting forest health, allowing sustainable levels of commodity extraction, and supporting recreational

  11. To concentrate or ventilate? Carbon acquisition, isotope discrimination and physiological ecology of early land plant life forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Moritz; Seibt, Ulli; Griffiths, Howard

    2008-05-16

    , by recourse to a resurrection strategy (Proctor & Pence 2002; Proctor et al. 2007; Wood 2007). Overall, none of the three groups have developed a significant degree of cuticularization, stomata and water transport tissues, and then only in specialized tissues... cultures were refreshed every two months on average. Algal cells were collected by centrifugation (4000g for 5 min) and the pellet was evenly spread on a filter paper tomimic the chlorophyllous layer of a thallus prior to measurements. (c) General protocol...

  12. SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(8), 2005, pp. 19671974

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    , see footnote 1, p. 1965. 1 E-mail: turnermg@wisc.edu dresses landscape and urban planning (e and fluxes of organisms, material, and energy; and potential applications of landscape ecology in natural.g., Nassauer 1997). Landscape ecology has been defined variously (Ris- ser et al. 1984, Urban et al. 1987

  13. Vol. 59: 195-201. 1990 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morel, François M. M.

    Vol. 59: 195-201. 1990 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. Published January 11, lithium dodecyl sulfate. INTRODUCTION nitrogen. To begin to understand the ecological signifi- cance of L Biological Supply House (USA) and main- tained according to accompanying instructions. Present address: Dept

  14. Evaluating biodiversity in fragmented landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Evaluating biodiversity in fragmented landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools Kevin landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools" will soon be published. It will expand on the basic Networks (FHNs) are an important tool for directing the improvement of woodland landscapes using a series

  15. TOOLS AND METHODS FOR STUDIES IN COASTAL ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

    TOOLS AND METHODS FOR STUDIES IN COASTAL ECOLOGY OF THE BAHAMAS Version 1.2. April 2006 #12;TOOLS Sealey, K, K. Semon, N. Cushion, E.Wright, C. Kaplan, and B. Carpenter. 2006. Tools and Methods for Coastal Ecological Studies of The Bahamas. University of Miami, Coral Gables, Fl. 33124. 111 pp. #12;TOOLS

  16. Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern? G. Allen Burton Jr; Fracking; Water-quality stressor; Ecological risk assessment Introduction The world's energy marketplace industrial processes, the higher the risk of that ecosystem being impacted by the operation. The associated

  17. Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Ecological Informatics Manuscript Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    : Special Issue: Ecol. Data Management Keywords: Analytic web; Little-JIL; metadata; process; sensor network. Nowhere is this change more evident than in the advent of sensor networks able to collect and process (in and synthesis, including a new standard for descriptive metadata for ecological datasets (Ecological Metadata

  18. MEETING REVIEW Ecological genomics--changing perspectives on Darwin's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renn, Susan C.P.

    MEETING REVIEW Ecological genomics--changing perspectives on Darwin's basic concerns SUZY C. P Genomics Program, Department of Biology, Black Hills State University, Spearfish, SD 57799, USA Abstract Ecological Genomics is an interdisciplinary field that seeks to understand the genetic and physiological

  19. Industrial ecology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory summary statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmartin, T.J.

    1996-06-04

    At Livermore our hope and our intention is to make important contributions to global sustainability by basing both our scientific and technological research and our business practices on the principles of industrial ecology. Current efforts in the following fields are documented: global security, global ecology, energy for transportation, fusion energy, materials sciences, environmental technology, and bioscience.

  20. Communications Ecological Applications, 23(3), 2013, pp. 515522

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Communications Ecological Applications, 23(3), 2013, pp. 515­522 Ó 2013 by the Ecological Society to develop statistical models to quantify three different aspects of aggregate regional forest harvest agents of tree mortality. Disturbance theory provides a useful framework for integrating the impacts

  1. Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    ......................................................................................................7 The Technology: Wave Energy Development on the West Coast Mirko Previsic, re vision consultingEcological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest A Scientific Workshop Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-92 #12;#12;Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific

  2. CULTURE, ECONOMIC STRUCTURE, AND THE DYNAMICS OF ECOLOGICAL ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    CULTURE, ECONOMIC STRUCTURE, AND THE DYNAMICS OF ECOLOGICAL ECONOMIC SYSTEMS By John M. Anderies B are developed and analyzed in an attempt to better un- derstand the interaction of culture, economic structure, and the dynamics of human ecological economic systems. Speci cally, how does the ability of humans to change

  3. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 253: 25­38, 2003 Published May 15 INTRODUCTION Marine protected areas are riding the wave of ocean governance reform (Kelleher 1997, Allison et component for the ecologically sustainable use of marine resources. Where such reform processes are grounded

  4. An ecological and range vegetation analysis of the upland sites of the southern extension of the oak-hickory forest region in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaleb, John Earl

    1954-01-01

    a c r e s p er animal unit y e a r ................... 99 Table Page 1 AN ECOLOGICAL AND RANGE VEGETATION ANALYSIS OF THE UPLAND SITES OF THE SOUTHERN EXTENSION OF THE OAK- HICKORY FOREST REGION IN TEXAS INTRODUCTION The oak -h ick o ry fo... the nature o f the vegetational changes which are o c cu rr in g is n e c e s sa ry fo r p roper management o f these a reas as range lands. 4 OBJECTIVES The ob je c t iv es set forth in this study are th ree - fo ld : 1. To make an e co lo g...

  5. Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

  6. Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference will be held from November 19–20, 2014, at the Richland Community College in Decatur, Illinois. The event will focus on bioenergy and sustainable agriculture and explore topics ranging from logistics, energy conversion technologies, and markets for grass biomass. BETO Sustainability Program Technology Manager Kristen Johnson will be speaking about the Energy Department’s perspective on sustainable bioenergy landscapes and will focus on BETO’s recent work with landscape design. The conference will be November 19–20 only. On November 18, participants may choose to participate in a pre-conference field tour.

  7. Ewing Land Development Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,PowerEvaporative Coolers Jumpin theVillages,Ewing Land

  8. AG Land 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo NewYanbu,Information onAD HydroCompanyAG Land 1

  9. LDK Uni Land JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectric Cooperative(Redirected fromUni Land JV Jump

  10. Montana State Land Board | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsource History ViewMoe WindJump to:VistaLand Board

  11. pv land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data book Homefuelleasingoutages Homeplanningpowerpv land

  12. solar land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult formats Home Jweers'ssmartsolar land use

  13. California State Lands Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County, California: EnergyNatural Resources Agency Jump to:Assembly JumpLands

  14. HOLARCTIC ECOLOGY 12: 137-143. Copenhagen 1989 Thermal ecology and spatio-temporal distribution of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    at 24.5"C (air temperature) and 31.4"C (body temperature). The spatial distribution pattern of Pvariationsof air (Ta) and ground (Ts: areas exposed to sun; Tsh: areas in the shade) temperatures (bottomHOLARCTIC ECOLOGY 12: 137-143. Copenhagen 1989 Thermal ecology and spatio-temporal distribution

  15. FOR 4934/6934 Longleaf Pine: Ecology, Management and Restoration Course Title: Forestry 6934/4934 Longleaf Pine: Ecology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and ecology. Methods of Instruction: 1) Lectures Major source of theory and technical information Discussion assigned papers #12;2 2) Laboratory Major source of practical and applied information; 3) Textbook). Univ. Georgia Press. 211 p. Purpose and Objectives: 1) Knowledge of fundamental ecological

  16. 173Bailey: Design ofEcologicalNetworksfor Monitoring Global Change Designof Ecological Networks for Monitoring Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) of the United Nations Environment Programme, and the US Global Change173Bailey: Design ofEcologicalNetworksfor Monitoring Global Change Designof Ecological Networks for Monitoring Global Change World-wide monitoring of agricultural and other natural-resource ecosystems

  17. Wave Energy Ecological Effects Workshop page 1 of 4 Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Wave Energy Ecological Effects Workshop page 1 of 4 Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development the capacity to harvest wave energy off its coast as a clean, renewable resource. An important part of moving this agenda forward must include understanding the potential effects of wave energy technology

  18. Quantifying the effect of land use and land cover changes on green water and blue water in northern part of China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X.; Ren, L.; Yuan, F.; Singh, V. P.; Fang, X.; Yu, Z.; Zhang, W.

    2009-06-12

    ) and runoff. The LULC data showed that from 1980 to 1996 grass land and water body had decreased and forest land and crop land had increased. This change caused the evaporation from vegetation interception and vegetation transpiration to increase, whereas...

  19. Wood energy and preservation of woodlands in semi-arid developing countries. The case of Dodoma region, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    At present little land and labour resources are expended on energy production, but the woodlands in Dodoma are disappearing, causing villagers to save time by switching from fuelwood collected on foot to charcoal shipped in by truck. Results of a linear program show that if the costs of growing the wood for charcoal are counted the switch to charcoal saves time only in areas where population is relatively dense and natural woodland remote. Woodland preservation in Dodoma will require more plantations, increased plantation productivity, improved efficiency of charcoal kilns or stoves and ultimately a switch to some other fuel than wood.

  20. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY OF REPORTS ON BIOFUELS, LAND RIGHTS IN AFRICA & GLOBAL LAND GRABBING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    functional at todays date. The majority of the reports are by FAO, GRAIN, SCI-DEV NET, Pambazuka News, IIED, 13 December 2009 http://farmlandgrab.org/9723/print/ Feeding the world in 2050, World Summit on Food investment ­ win-win or land grab?, World Summit on Food Security, Rome, 16-18 November 2009 ftp

  1. Characterizing the Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Change on Freshwater Inflows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferijal, Teuku

    2009-05-15

    . This study proposed to characterize the impact of land use/cover change in the Guadalupe River Watershed on freshwater inflows to the Guadalupe Estuary. Pre-whitening, Mann-Kendall and bootstrap techniques were used to test for significant trends...

  2. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Access/Washington | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado < RAPID‎ |RAPID/Geothermal/LandRAPID/Geothermal/LandRAPID/Geothermal/Land

  3. Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture....

  4. Energy Corridors on Federal Lands | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    lands throughout the United States. Energy corridors would help address growing energy demand by facilitating future siting of oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines and electricity...

  5. Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    federal agencies, states and tribes involved in the siting and permitting process for electric transmission facilities on Federal land. The MOU will improve uniformity,...

  6. Land use regulation and intraregional population-employment interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, JH; Hewings, GJD

    2013-01-01

    Levine J (2006) Zoned out: Regulation, markets, and choicesprices, externalities, and regulation in U.S. metropolitanCT (2000) Land use regulation and new construction. Regional

  7. Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development - Farmland...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development - Farmland Protection...

  8. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

  9. Bureau of Land Management, Colorado collaborate to advance efficient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management, Colorado collaborate to advance efficient geothermal development Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Bureau of...

  10. Bureau of Land Management - Notice of Intent to Conduct Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management - Notice of Intent to Conduct Geothermal Resource Exploration Operations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Bureau...

  11. Texas General Land Office Construction Certificate and Dune Protection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Checklist: Texas General Land Office Construction Certificate and Dune Protection Permit Requirements...

  12. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use Suzanne Tegen WINDExchange Webinar June 17, 2015 2 Overview * Current NREL Research *...

  13. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Dennis J.; Anderson, David C.; Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2009-04-30

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  14. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2013 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-06-05

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2013. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2013, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  15. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D. J.; Anderson, D. C.; Hall, D. B.; Greger, P. D.; Ostler, W. K.

    2012-06-13

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  16. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

    2013-07-03

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  17. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, J. Dennis; Anderson, David C.; Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2010-07-13

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  18. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

    2011-07-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  19. Ecological Applications, 18(1), 2008, pp. 159171 2008 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rank, Nathan Egan

    , the positive effects of woodland size and negative effects of understory temperature explained significant Death. We assessed effects of land-cover change, forest structure, and understory microclimate effects on inoculum load. We conclude that enlargement of woodlands and closure of canopy gaps, likely due

  20. Discordance between living and death assemblages as evidence for anthropogenic ecological change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . ecological baseline eutrophication marine communities paleoecology Human activities affect living systems