Sample records for arid atmospheric conditions

  1. Economic analysis of a simulated alley cropping system for semi-arid conditions, using micro computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, D.A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Returns were simulated for the semi-arid areas in Mackakos District, Kenya (bimodal rainfall distribution, 600 mm/yr) comparing the present system (maize and beans intercropped twice a year) with a Leucaena leucocephala hedgerow system. Although some of the assumptions contain a large element of uncertainty, the results were promising enough for the system to be considered further. 4 references.

  2. HYPERsensarium : an archive of atmospheric conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Kelly E. (Kelly Evelyn)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYPERsensarium proposes a tangible interface of atmospheres for public experience through an archive of historical and projected weathers. While architecture's purpose has long been to act as the technical boundary between ...

  3. Environments Journal of Arid Environments 67 (2006) 142156

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    , as a tool to promote carbon sequestration and offset the increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrationJournal of Arid Environments Journal of Arid Environments 67 (2006) 142­156 Carbon sequestration-arid regions together with their widespread degradation give these areas a high potential to sequester carbon

  4. atmospheric conditions influenced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  5. atmospheric conditions controlling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  6. Description of Atmospheric Conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahlers, M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Almela, A.; /Natl. Tech. U., San Nicolas /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN /Santiago de Compostela U.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malargue and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

  7. Sulfur capture by oil shale ashes under atmospheric and pressurized FBC conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yrjas, K.P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Kuelaots, I.; Ots, A. [Tallinn Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Dept.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    When oil shale contains large quantities of limestone, a significant auto-absorption of sulfur is possible under suitable conditions. The sulfur capture by oil shale ashes has been studied using a pressurized thermogravimetric apparatus. The chosen experimental conditions were typical for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustion. The Ca/S molar ratios in the two oil shales studied were 8 (Estonian) and 10 (Israeli). The samples were first burned in a gas atmosphere containing O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} (and CO{sub 2} if pressurized). After the combustion step, SO{sub 2} was added and sulfation started. The results with the oil shales were compared to those obtained with an oil shale cyclone ash from the Narva power plant in Estonia. In general, the results from the sulfur capture experiments under both atmospheric and pressurized conditions showed that the oil shale cannot only capture its own sulfur but also significant amounts of additional sulfur of another fuel if the fuels are mixed together. For example from the runs at atmospheric pressure, the conversion of CaO to CaSO{sub 4} was about 70% for Israeli oil shale and about 55% for Estonian oil shale (850 C). For the cyclone ash the corresponding conversion was about 20%. In comparison it could be mentioned that under the same conditions the conversions of natural limestones are about 30%. The reason the cyclone ash was a poor sulfur absorbent was probably due to its temperature history. In Narva the oil shale was burned at a significantly higher temperature (1,400 C) than was used in the experiments (750 C and 850 C). This caused the ash to sinter and the reactive surface area of the cyclone ash was therefore decreased.

  8. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. III. BREAKDOWN CONDITIONS FOR MINERAL CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helling, Ch.; Jardine, M.; Stark, C. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Diver, D., E-mail: ch@leap2010.eu [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric discharges were detected directly in the cloudy atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, are debatable for Venus, and indirectly inferred for Neptune and Uranus in our solar system. Sprites (and other types of transient luminous events) have been detected only on Earth, and are theoretically predicted for Jupiter, Saturn, and Venus. Cloud formation is a common phenomenon in ultra-cool atmospheres such as in brown dwarf and extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Cloud particles can be expected to carry considerable charges which may trigger discharge events via small-scale processes between individual cloud particles (intra-cloud discharges) or large-scale processes between clouds (inter-cloud discharges). We investigate electrostatic breakdown characteristics, like critical field strengths and critical charge densities per surface, to demonstrate under which conditions mineral clouds undergo electric discharge events which may trigger or be responsible for sporadic X-ray emission. We apply results from our kinetic dust cloud formation model that is part of the DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmosphere simulations. We present a first investigation of the dependence of the breakdown conditions in brown dwarf and giant gas exoplanets on the local gas-phase chemistry, the effective temperature, and primordial gas-phase metallicity. Our results suggest that different intra-cloud discharge processes dominate at different heights inside mineral clouds: local coronal (point discharges) and small-scale sparks at the bottom region of the cloud where the gas density is high, and flow discharges and large-scale sparks near, and maybe above, the cloud top. The comparison of the thermal degree of ionization and the number density of cloud particles allows us to suggest the efficiency with which discharges will occur in planetary atmospheres.

  9. Monitoring and ANN modeling of coal stockpile behavior under different atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozdeniz, A.H.; Ozbay, Y.; Yilmaz, N.; Sensogut, C. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Engineering & Architecture Faculty

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, an industrial-sized stockpile of 5 m width, 4 m height, and 10 m length was built in a coal stock area to investigate coal stockpile behavior under different atmospheric conditions. The effective parameters on the coal stockpile that were time, weather temperature, atmospheric pressure, air humidity, velocity, and direction of wind values were automatically measured by means of a computer-aided measurement system to obtain Artificial Neural Network (ANN) input data. The coal stockpiles, which should be continuously observed, are capable of spontaneous combustion and then causing serious economical losses due to the mentioned parameters. Afterwards, these measurement values were used for training and testing of the ANN model. Comparison of the experimental and ANN results, accuracy rates of training, and testing were found as 98.6% and 98.7%, respectively. It is shown that possible coal stockpile behavior with this ANN model is powerfully estimated.

  10. Investigation of coal stockpiles of Tuncbilek thermal power plant with respect to time under atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozdeniz, A.H. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal power plants have delayed the coal that they will use at stockpiles mandatorily. If these coal stockpiles remain at the stockyards over a certain period of time, a spontaneous combustion can be started itself. Coal stocks under combustion threat can cost too much economically to coal companies. Therefore, it is important to take some precautions for saving the stockpiles from the spontaneous combustion. In this research a coal stockpile at Tuncbilek Thermal Power Plant which was formed in 5 m wide, 10 m long, and 3 m height with a weight of 120 tons to observe internal temperature changes with respect to time under normal atmospheric conditions. Later, internal temperature measurements were obtained at 20 points distributed all over two layers in the stockpile. The parameters, such as air temperature, humidity, atmosphere pressure, wind speed and direction, which are effective on the stockpiles, were measured and used to obtain the graphs of stockpiles' internal temperature.

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric stability conditions Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind park model considering atmospheric stability. Wind... : A simple analytical wind park model considering atmospheric stability. Wind Energy, 13, 459-469. 12... : A...

  12. Remote Raman - laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) geochemical investigation under Venus atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, Sanuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphries, Seth D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vaniman, D. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sharma, S. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Misra, A. K. [UNIV OF HAWAII; Dyar, M. D. [MT. HOLYOKE COLLEGE; Smrekar, S. E. [JET PROPULSION LAB.

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The extreme Venus surface temperatures ({approx}740 K) and atmospheric pressures ({approx}93 atm) create a challenging environment for surface missions. Scientific investigations capable of Venus geochemical observations must be completed within hours of landing before the lander will be overcome by the harsh atmosphere. A combined remote Raman - LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instrument is capable of accomplishing the geochemical science goals without the risks associated with collecting samples and bringing them into the lander. Wiens et al. and Sharma et al. demonstrated that both analytical techniques can be integrated into a single instrument capable of planetary missions. The focus of this paper is to explore the capability to probe geologic samples with Raman - LIBS and demonstrate quantitative analysis under Venus surface conditions. Raman and LIBS are highly complementary analytical techniques capable of detecting both the mineralogical and geochemical composition of Venus surface materials. These techniques have the potential to profoundly increase our knowledge of the Venus surface composition, which is currently limited to geochemical data from Soviet Venera and VEGA landers that collectively suggest a surface composition that is primarily tholeiitic basaltic with some potentially more evolved compositions and, in some locations, K-rich trachyandesite. These landers were not equipped to probe the surface mineralogy as can be accomplished with Raman spectroscopy. Based on the observed compositional differences and recognizing the imprecise nature of the existing data, 15 samples were chosen to constitute a Venus-analog suite for this study, including five basalts, two each of andesites, dacites, and sulfates, and single samples of a foidite, trachyandesite, rhyolite, and basaltic trachyandesite under Venus conditions. LIBS data reduction involved generating a partial least squares (PLS) model with a subset of the rock powder standards to quantitatively determine the major elemental abundance of the remaining samples. PLS analysis suggests that the major element compositions can be determined with root mean square errors ca. 5% (absolute) for SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(total), MgO, and CaO, and ca. 2% or less for TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO, K{sub 2}O, and Na{sub 2}O. Finally, the Raman experiments have been conducted under supercritical CO{sub 2} involving single-mineral and mixed-mineral samples containing talc, olivine, pyroxenes, feldspars, anhydrite, barite, and siderite. The Raman data have shown that the individual minerals can easily be identified individually or in mixtures.

  13. Comparison of optical emission from nanosecond and femtosecond laser produced plasma in atmosphere and vacuum conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    for Materials Under eXtreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 500 Central Drive in an ambient atmosphere environment, the impact of low-pressure envi- ronments is also important for certain and atmosphere environments using identical laser fluences in order to better understand the differ- ences

  14. Microwave plasma based single step method for free standing graphene synthesis at atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatarova, E.; Henriques, J.; Dias, A.; Ferreira, C. M. [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Instituto Superior Tťcnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal)] [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Instituto Superior Tťcnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Luhrs, C. C.; Phillips, J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California 93943 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California 93943 (United States); Abrashev, M. V. [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)] [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave atmospheric pressure plasmas driven by surface waves were used to synthesize graphene sheets from vaporized ethanol molecules carried through argon plasma. In the plasma, ethanol decomposes creating carbon atoms that form nanostructures in the outlet plasma stream, where external cooling/heating was applied. It was found that the outlet gas stream temperature plays an important role in the nucleation processes and the structural quality of the produced nanostructures. The synthesis of few layers (from one to five) graphene has been confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectral studies were conducted to determine the ratio of the 2D to G peaks (>2). Disorder D-peak to G-peak intensity ratio decreases when outlet gas stream temperature decreases.

  15. Fluidized bed pyrolysis of bitumen-impregnated sandstone at sub-atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, J.V.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 15.2 cm diameter fluidized bed reactor was designed, built, and operated to study the pyrolysis of oil sands at pressures slightly less than atmospheric. Fluidizing gas flow through the reactor was caused by reducing the pressure above the bed with a gas pump operating in the vacuum mode. Pyrolysis energy was supplied by a propane burner, and the hot propane combustion gases were used for fluidization. The fluidized bed pyrolysis at reduced pressure using combustion gases allowed the reactor to be operated at significantly lower temperatures than previously reported. At 450{degree}, over 80% of the bitumen fed was recovered as a liquid product, and the spent sand contained less than 1% coke. The liquid product recovery system, by design, yielded three liquid streams with distinctly different properties.

  16. Fluidized bed pyrolysis of bitumen-impregnated sandstone at sub-atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, J.V.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 15.2 cm diameter fluidized bed reactor was designed, built, and operated to study the pyrolysis of oil sands at pressures slightly less than atmospheric. Fluidizing gas flow through the reactor was caused by reducing the pressure above the bed with a gas pump operating in the vacuum mode. Pyrolysis energy was supplied by a propane burner, and the hot propane combustion gases were used for fluidization. The fluidized bed pyrolysis at reduced pressure using combustion gases allowed the reactor to be operated at significantly lower temperatures than previously reported. At 450[degree], over 80% of the bitumen fed was recovered as a liquid product, and the spent sand contained less than 1% coke. The liquid product recovery system, by design, yielded three liquid streams with distinctly different properties.

  17. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant elevated Legionella concentrations when the dew point temperature was high--a summertime occurrence. However, analysis of the three years of Legionella monitoring data of the 14 different SRS Cooling Towers demonstrated that elevated concentrations are observed at all temperatures and seasons. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ecology of L. pneumophila including serogroups and population densities, chemical, and atmospheric data, on cooling towers at SRS to determine whether relationships exist among water chemistry, and atmospheric conditions. The goal is to more fully understand the conditions which inhibit or encourage L. pneumophila growth and supply this data and associated recommendations to SRS Cooling Tower personnel for improved management of operation. Hopefully this information could then be used to help control L. pneumophila growth more effectively in SRS cooling tower water.

  18. Estimation of the aerodynamic roughness length in arid and semi-arid regions over the globe with the ERS scatterometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aires, Filipe

    Estimation of the aerodynamic roughness length in arid and semi-arid regions over the globe 2005. [1] Estimates of the aerodynamic roughness lengths z0 in arid and semi-arid regions: Prigent, C., I. Tegen, F. Aires, B. Marticorena, and M. Zribi (2005), Estimation of the aerodynamic

  19. Observations of Secondary Organic Aerosol Production and Soot Aging under Atmospheric Conditions Using a Novel Environmental Aerosol Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glen, Crystal

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of the processes leading to SOA production under ambient gaseous and particulate concentrations as well as the impact these aerosol types have on climate is poorly understood. Although the majority of atmospheric aerosols scatter radiation either directly...

  20. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

  1. New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

  2. Enclosed and open spaces in the arid region-Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talib, K.; Al-Zamil, A.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of the enclosed (sheltered) and open (unsheltered) spaces in two tradiational and three-contemporary settlements in Saudi Arabia - comparative analysis of micro climatic conditions - solar exposure - analysis of the differences in the design approaches of the old and new ''modern'' developments - recommendations for the appropriate approach to the design of enclosed and open spaces in the arid regions of Saudi Arabia.

  3. 10, 87818787, 2013 Advection-Aridity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    . Szilagyi 2,3 1 Department of Infrastructure Engineering, University of Melbourne, Australia 2 Department)), the Szilagyi­Jozsa Advection­Aridity model (Szilagyi, 2007; Szilagyi and Jozsa, 2008), which is a modification as intended by au-5 thor J. Szilagyi. This Commentary seeks to clarify the issue and provide the correct

  4. Fabrication of ZnO/Cu2O heterojunctions in atmospheric conditions: improved interface quality and solar cell performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ievskaya, Y.; Hoye, R. L. Z.; Sadhanala, A.; Musselman, K.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tail (Early view), Adv. Energy Mater. (2014). [8] A.J. Kronemeijer, V. Pecunia, D. Venkateshvaran, M. Nikolka, A. Sadhanala, J. Moriarty, M. Szumilo, H. Sirringhaus, Two-dimensional carrier distribution in top-gate polymer field-effect transistors... conditions and (b) optimized conditions of ZnO AALD deposition. Multiple whisker-, rod- and flower-like formations are present in the standard device. 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 ?8 ?7 ?6 ?5 ?4 ?3 ?2 ?1 0 Voltage V / V C ur re nt d en si ty J / m A cm ?2...

  5. Using Mesoscale Weather Model Output as Boundary Conditions for Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulations and Wind-Plant Aerodynamic Simulations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Michalakes, J.; Vanderwende, B.; Lee, S.; Sprague, M. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind plant aerodynamics are directly affected by the microscale weather, which is directly influenced by the mesoscale weather. Microscale weather refers to processes that occur within the atmospheric boundary layer with the largest scales being a few hundred meters to a few kilometers depending on the atmospheric stability of the boundary layer. Mesoscale weather refers to large weather patterns, such as weather fronts, with the largest scales being hundreds of kilometers wide. Sometimes microscale simulations that capture mesoscale-driven variations (changes in wind speed and direction over time or across the spatial extent of a wind plant) are important in wind plant analysis. In this paper, we present our preliminary work in coupling a mesoscale weather model with a microscale atmospheric large-eddy simulation model. The coupling is one-way beginning with the weather model and ending with a computational fluid dynamics solver using the weather model in coarse large-eddy simulation mode as an intermediary. We simulate one hour of daytime moderately convective microscale development driven by the mesoscale data, which are applied as initial and boundary conditions to the microscale domain, at a site in Iowa. We analyze the time and distance necessary for the smallest resolvable microscales to develop.

  6. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Lee, E-mail: leeli@mail.hust.edu.cn; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, HuaZhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  7. arid climate conditions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are fully analyzed. The survey on solar energy resources, and the feasibility of solar energy heating on a large scale... Li, A.; Liu, Y. 2006-01-01 56 Climate change...

  8. Scientific uncertainties in atmospheric mercury models III: Boundary and initial conditions, model grid resolution, and Hg(II) reduction mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Che-Jen [ORNL; Pongprueksa, Pruek [Lamar University; Lindberg, Steven Eric [ORNL; Jang, Carey [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Braverman, Thomas [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Raleigh, North Carolina; Bullock, Russell O [NOAA; Ho, Thomas [ORNL; Chu, Hsing-Wei [Lamar University

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary condition (BC), initial condition (IC), model grid resolution (12 km versus 36 km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms, was investigated. The model response to the change of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentration from 0 to 2 ngm3 in IC/BC is found to be very linear (r240.99) based on the results of sensitivity simulations in July 2001. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in BC resulted in an increase of 0.81 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 1270 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. IC has similar but weaker effects compared to those of BC. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in IC resulted in an increase of 0.14 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 250 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. Varying reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) or particulate mercury (PHg) in BC/IC has much less significant impact. Simulation results at different grid resolutions show good agreement (slope 0.950 1.026, r 0.816 0.973) in mercury concentration, dry deposition, and total deposition. The agreement in wet deposition is somewhat weaker (slope 0.770 0.794, r 0.685 0.892) due to the difference in emission dilution and simulated precipitation that subsequently change reaction rates in the aqueous phase. Replacing the aqueous Hg(II)-HO2 reduction by either RGM reduction by CO (51018cm3 molecule1 s1) or photoreduction of RGM (1105 s1) gives significantly better model agreement with the wet deposition measured by Mercury Deposition Network (MDN). Possible ranges of the reduction rates are estimated based on model sensitivity results. The kinetic estimate requires further verification by laboratory studies.

  9. ASSESSMENT OF 90SR AND 137CS PENETRATION INTO REINFORCED CONCRETE (EXTENT OF 'DEEPENING') UNDER NATURAL ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When assessing the feasibility of remediation following the detonation of a radiological dispersion device or improvised nuclear device in a large city, several issues should be considered including the levels and characteristics of the radioactive contamination, the availability of resources required for decontamination, and the planned future use of the city's structures and buildings. Currently, little is known about radionuclide penetration into construction materials in an urban environment. Knowledge in this area would be useful when considering costs of a thorough decontamination of buildings, artificial structures, and roads in an affected urban environment. Pripyat, a city substantially contaminated by the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in April 1986, may provide some answers. The main objective of this study was to assess the depth of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs penetration into reinforced concrete structures in a highly contaminated urban environment under natural weather conditions. Thirteen reinforced concrete core samples were obtained from external surfaces of a contaminated building in Pripyat. The concrete cores were drilled to obtain sample layers of 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-20, 20-30, 30-40, and 40-50 mm. Both {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were detected in the entire 0-50 mm profile of the reinforced cores sampled. In most of the cores, over 90% of the total {sup 137}Cs inventory and 70% of the total {sup 90}Sr inventory was found in the first 0-5 mm layer of the reinforced concrete. {sup 90}Sr had penetrated markedly deeper into the reinforced concrete structures than {sup 137}Cs.

  10. Use of composts in revegetating arid lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Hendrickson, P.L.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compost has been suggested as a soil amendment for arid lands at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The operating contractor of the site, Westinghouse Hanford Company, requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conduct a literature review to compile additional information on the use of compost amendments and their benefits. This report provides background information on the factors needed for plant growth and the consequences of severe soil disturbance. This report also discussed the characteristics of composts relative to other amendments and how they each affect plant growth. Finally,regulatory requirements that could affect land application of sludge-based compost on the Hanford Site are reviewed.

  11. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  12. Modified Advection-Aridity Model of Evapotranspiration Jozsef Szilagyi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Modified Advection-Aridity Model of Evapotranspiration Jozsef Szilagyi1 ; Michael T. Hobbins2=empirically derived constant correction factor. Szilagyi 2007 suggested a temperature-dependent expression for b

  13. arid southwestern united: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    moisture is investigated so that feasibility of using optical remote sensing Texas at San Antonio, University of 259 Estimating basin-wide hydraulic parameters of a semi-arid...

  14. Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

  15. Jennifer Learned, Dana Nakase, Enrique Vivoni, and Sharon J . Hall. Arizona State University, PO Box 874501, Tempe AZ 85287-4501. Background: Plant growth in arid ecosystems is water limited. Soil water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Box 874501, Tempe AZ 85287-4501. Background: Plant growth in arid ecosystems is water limited. Soil and temperature sensors were installed at 7 cm. · Atmospheric temperature & humidity sensors were deployed in the soil box via sensors. · Simulations in Hydrus 2D were run to match soil box experiments. · Model output

  16. OBSERVATIONS SUR LA POLLINISATION DE LA LUZERNE PAR LES ABEILLES (APIS MELLIFICA L.) EN ZONE ARIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .R.A., 86-Lusignan SUMMARY LUCERNE POLLINATION BY HONEY-BEES (Apas mellifica L.) IN IRRIGATED ARID LANDS in an irrigated lucerne field sown for seed (Medicago sativa L.) in the arid district of Beni Mellal (Morocco). 86

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - affect semi-arid grassland Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nutrient delivery from semi-arid California watersheds Summary: grasslands; steep rolling hills, semi-arid numerical model 13.8 1.1 1.5 1.5 0.9 0.07 Likens et al... effect...

  18. Interannual memory effects for spring NDVI in semi-arid South Africa Yves Richard,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Interannual memory effects for spring NDVI in semi-arid South Africa Yves Richard,1 Nade`ge Martiny vegetation dynamics of semi-arid South Africa may preferably be driven by biological rather than hydrological (2008), Interannual memory effects for spring NDVI in semi-arid South Africa, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L

  19. Environments Journal of Arid Environments 65 (2006) 6282

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of grazing in Patagonia selected for graminoids of lower forage quality, resulting in a plant community more contributed to a longer growing season in Patagonia, as measured by a satellite index of vegetation activity the larger arid zone within Patagonia might still favor the evolution of xerophytic traits. On the other hand

  20. arid patagonia argentina: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arid patagonia argentina First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Fibrous-clay mineral formation...

  1. Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Aridity and Algae: Biodiesel Production in Arizona Jenna Bloxom Advisor: Dr. Scott Whiteford Center and biodiesel industry in Arizona on the state's water supply and policies. Analyzing potential political extensive literature review of current publications and studies concerning algae biomass and biodiesel

  2. Herbivore dynamics in an arid environment†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hempson, Gareth Peter

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the effects of a seasonally variable forage resource on herbivore population dynamics. This involved estimating the relative importance of environmental conditions, and the accessible and used ...

  3. Agave: a biofuel feedstock for arid and semi-arid environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, Stephen; Martin, Jeffrey; Simpson, June; Wang, Zhong; Visel, Axel

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient production of plant-based, lignocellulosic biofuels relies upon continued improvement of existing biofuel feedstock species, as well as the introduction of newfeedstocks capable of growing on marginal lands to avoid conflicts with existing food production and minimize use of water and nitrogen resources. To this end, specieswithin the plant genus Agave have recently been proposed as new biofuel feedstocks. Many Agave species are adapted to hot and arid environments generally unsuitable forfood production, yet have biomass productivity rates comparable to other second-generation biofuel feedstocks such as switchgrass and Miscanthus. Agavesachieve remarkable heat tolerance and water use efficiency in part through a Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) mode of photosynthesis, but the genes andregulatory pathways enabling CAM and thermotolerance in agaves remain poorly understood. We seek to accelerate the development of agave as a new biofuelfeedstock through genomic approaches using massively-parallel sequencing technologies. First, we plan to sequence the transcriptome of A. tequilana to provide adatabase of protein-coding genes to the agave research community. Second, we will compare transcriptome-wide gene expression of agaves under different environmentalconditions in order to understand genetic pathways controlling CAM, water use efficiency, and thermotolerance. Finally, we aim to compare the transcriptome of A.tequilana with that of other Agave species to gain further insight into molecular mechanisms underlying traits desirable for biofuel feedstocks. These genomicapproaches will provide sequence and gene expression information critical to the breeding and domestication of Agave species suitable for biofuel production.

  4. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

  5. Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

  6. Development of technology for the design of shallow land burial facilities at arid sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Abeele, W.V.; Drennon, B.J.; Herrera, W.J.; Lopez, E.A.; Langhorst, G.J.; Stallings, E.A.; Walker, R.D.; Martinez, J.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos field research program involving technology development for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Field data are presented for an integrated field experiment, which was designed to test individual SLB component experiments related to erosion control, biobarriers, and subsurface capillary and migration barriers. Field tests of biointrusion barriers at waste disposal sites and in experimental plots are reported. The results of a joint DOE/NRC experiment to evaluate leaching and transport of sorbing (Cs, Sr, Li) and nonsorbing (I, Br) solutes in sandy silt backfill are presented for steady-state and unsteady-state flow conditions. A capillary barrier experiment performed in a large caisson (3-m diameter, 6.1 m deep) is described and a year's worth of field data is presented.

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - arid lands Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arid lands are located in the sub- tropical hot deserts of the Southwest... -based global ranking of the Earth's most biologically outstanding habitats. ... Source: Archer, Steven...

  8. The complementary relationship in estimation of regional evapotranspiration: An enhanced Advection-Aridity model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramírez, Jorge A.

    Collins, Colorado Abstract. Long-term monthly evapotranspiration estimates from Brutsaert and Stricker and Stricker's [1979] Advection- Aridity (AA) model, exhibit two very different approaches to parameterizing

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - arid terrains tanami Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: the lowlands even in arid climates. The low requirement of forcing and...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - arid land ecology Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rapidly across the land- scape, leaving glacial till in their wake. As with arid coppice dunes, management... ecological sites are located in the land- scape figure using...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - arid lands ecology Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rapidly across the land- scape, leaving glacial till in their wake. As with arid coppice dunes, management... ecological sites are located in the land- scape figure using...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - arid zone radioactive Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    date pore water in arid unsaturated ... Source: Scanlon, Bridget R. - Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin Collection:...

  13. Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions Appendix II The unique geology, hydrology and instream habitat. This chapter examines how environmental conditions in the Deschutes watershed affect, the discussion characterizes the environmental conditions within three watershed areas: the Lower Deschutes

  14. Climate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    : burning; arid ecosystems; livestock; climate; broad-scale climate; Southern Russia; socio-economic change by decreasing livestock numbers, vegetation changes, climate change, or interactions of these factors. OurClimate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid Ecosystems of Southern

  15. COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE By ZIRU LIU Hanford project. Unfortunately, he just passed away this January and could not see the completion-ARID HANFORD SITE Abstract by Ziru Liu, Ph.D. Washington State University May 2013 Chair: Markus Flury

  16. Atmosphere Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4 Medicare5Dust

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - arid western doe Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Summary: , AN UPDATE April 200854 Changes in Aridity in the Western United States Hidalgo H.G.1, Dettinger M.D.2... basin. The water budget of the Lower Colorado is...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - applications affect semi-arid Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth and Environmental Engineering, Center for Life Cycle Analysis Collection: Renewable Energy 2 Different responses of MODIS-derived NDVI to root-zone soil moisture in semi-arid...

  19. Low energy cooling in multi-storey buildings for hot, arid climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostafa, Amira M

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses passive and low energy cooling strategies and systems in hot arid climates. The choice of a certain strategy, as well as determining the appropriate cooling schemes for such a context becomes of prime ...

  20. Decision Analysis on Water Resources Planning and Management for an Arid Metropolitan Center in West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, C. S.; Dean, J. H.

    TR- 54 1973 Decision Analysis on Water Recourses Planning and Management for an Arid Metropolitan Center in West Texas C.S. Shih J.H. Dean Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

  1. The role of rooting strategies on the eco-hydrology of semi-arid regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivandran, Gajan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arid regions are characterized by high variability in the arrival of rainfall, and species found in these areas have adapted mechanisms to ensure the capture of this scarce resource. In particular, the rooting strategies ...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - arid northwest china Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    China, northwest, and Tibet... resources total 5,555 Gt. Over 90 percent of identified coal reserves in China are in less-developed, arid... - Executive Summary Coal has ......

  3. Atmospheric Aerosol Systems | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Themes Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems...

  4. Karst characterization in a semi-arid region using gravity, seismic, and resistivity geophysical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnhart, Kevin Scott

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We proposed to customize emerging in situ geophysical monitoring technology to generate time-series data during sporadic rain events in a semi-arid region. Electrodes were to be connected to wireless %5Cnodes%22 which can be left in the eld for many months. Embedded software would then increase sampling frequency during periods of rainfall. We hypothesized that this contrast between no-volume ow in karst passageways dur- ing dry periods and partial- or saturated-volume ow during a rain event is detectable by these Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) geophysical nodes, we call this a Wireless Resistivity Network (WRN). The development of new methodologies to characterize semi-arid karst hydrology is intended to augment Sandia National Laboratorys mission to lead e orts in energy technologies, waste disposal and climate security by helping to identify safe and secure regions and those that are at risk. Development and initial eld testing identi ed technological barriers to using WRNs for identifying semi-arid karst, exposing R&D which can be targeted in the future. Gravity, seismic, and resis- tivity surveys elucidated how each technique might e ectively be used to characterize semi-arid karst. This research brings to light the importance and challenges with char- acterizing semi-arid karst through a multi-method geophysical study. As there have been very few studies with this emphasis, this study has expanded the body of practical experience needed to protect the nations water and energy security interests.

  5. Reconstructing long time series of burned areas in arid grasslands of southern Russia by satellite remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    Reconstructing long time series of burned areas in arid grasslands of southern Russia by satellite of Sciences, 33 Leninskiy prospect, Moscow, 119071 Russia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: AVHRR MODIS RESURS Landsat Burned area mapping Southern Russia Arid grasslands Grazing Fire

  6. atmospheric pressure plasmas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric conditions. Our module is capable of measuring temperature, pressure, wind speed, and particle concentration. The module will take measurements every minute and the...

  7. atmospheric pressure radio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric conditions. Our module is capable of measuring temperature, pressure, wind speed, and particle concentration. The module will take measurements every minute and the...

  8. atmospheric pressure plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric conditions. Our module is capable of measuring temperature, pressure, wind speed, and particle concentration. The module will take measurements every minute and the...

  9. Submitted for Publication to SOLAR ENERGY PRODUCING SATELLITE-DERIVED IRRADIANCES IN COMPLEX ARID TERRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    Submitted for Publication to SOLAR ENERGY PRODUCING SATELLITE-DERIVED IRRADIANCES IN COMPLEX ARID spectrum. #12;Submitted for Publication to SOLAR ENERGY In its simplest description the model amounts wavelengths in the visible spectral range (0.55-0.75 ¬Ķm) corresponding to the peak of the solar radiation

  10. Soil texture estimation over a semi-arid area using TERRASAR-X radar data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Soil texture estimation over a semi-arid area using TERRASAR-X radar data M. Zribi1 , F. Kotti1 , Z Abstract In this paper, it is proposed to use TERRASAR-X data for analysis and estimation of soil surface. Simultaneously to TERRASAR-X radar acquisitions, ground measurements (texture, soil moisture and roughness) were

  11. Strontium isotopes and nutrient sourcing in a semi-arid woodland Amanda C. Reynolds a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strontium isotopes and nutrient sourcing in a semi-arid woodland Amanda C. Reynolds a , Jay Quade b in revised form 7 June 2012 Accepted 21 June 2012 Available online xxxx Keywords: Strontium isotopes Nutrient Malpais National Monument (EMNM), New Mexico provide an ideal set- ting to examine strontium, and hence

  12. Understanding arid environments using fossil rodent Stuart Pearson*w & Julio L. Betancourtz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on an offshore island and in captivity. This is the only species, of 23 species of extirpated mammals in arid et al., 1990; Thompson et al., 1993). This record, based primarily on species identification of plant-preserved plant and animal remains in the world. These archives are available for remining in geochemical (Engel

  13. Managing site remediation using pathway analysis, application to a semi-arid site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutz, E.E.; Ijaz, T.; Wood, R.P.; Eckart, R.E. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Industrial and Nuclear Engineering

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the application of pathway analysis methodology to evaluate alternatives associated with remediation of a semi-arid site. Significant aspects of remediation include potential land uses, soil cleaning techniques and restoration alternatives. Important environmental transport pathways and dominant radionuclides are identified using pathway analysis. The remediation strategy is optimized based on results of the analysis.

  14. Atmospheric aerosol light scattering and surface wetness influence the diurnal pattern of net ecosystem exchange in a semi-arid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    and can enhance terrestrial carbon sequestration (Gu et al., 1999, 2002, 2003; Roderick et al., 2001 observational evidence of a link between routine aerosol variability, diffuse radiation and carbon sequestration.g. Baldocchi, 1997). Relation- ships using these variables have been used to model carbon exchange between

  15. Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    1 Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http://aerosol.ucsd.edu/courses.html Text: Curry & Webster Atmospheric Thermodynamics Ch1 Composition Ch2 Laws Ch3 Transfers Ch12 Energy Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http

  16. 5, 60416076, 2005 Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    opportunity to examine atmospheric oxidation in a megacity that has more pollution than typical USACPD 5, 6041­6076, 2005 Atmospheric oxidation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area T. R. Shirley et.atmos-chem-phys.org/acpd/5/6041/ SRef-ID: 1680-7375/acpd/2005-5-6041 European Geosciences Union Atmospheric Chemistry

  17. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  18. Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume Ė primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (ďbrownfieldĒ) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

  19. AtmosphericAtmospheric Composition Introduction The division investigates the atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    development on observation side was the installation of an ozone observation station in Surinam in close co-operation with the Surinam Meteorological Service. Processes in the tropical regions are important for the global climate and the global atmospheric composition. The participation in Indoex (Indian Ocean Experiment) and this Surinam

  20. Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

  1. A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crowe, Braden [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Attalah, Said [University of Arizona; Agrawal, Shweta [University of Arizona; Waller, Peter [University of Arizona; Ryan, Randy [University of Arizona.edu; Van Wagenen, Jon [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Chavis, Aaron [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Kyndt, John [University of Arizona; Kacira, Murat [University of Arizona; Ogden, Kim L. [University of Arizona; Huesemann, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management

  2. Atmospheric Thermodynamics Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    1 Atmospheric Thermodynamics Ch1 Composition Ch2 Laws Ch3 Transfers Ch12 EnergyBalance Ch4 Water Ch Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http #12;2 Review from Ch. 1 ∑ Thermodynamic quantities ∑ Composition ∑ Pressure ∑ Density ∑ Temperature

  3. Atmospheric Dynamics II Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AT602 Atmospheric Dynamics II 2 credits Instructor: David W. J. Thompson davet: An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, 5th Edition, Academic Press (recommended) · Marshall, J., and Plumb, R. A., 2008: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: An Introductory Text, Academic Press. · Vallis, G. K

  4. Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research www in modeling of the associated multiphase processes. Iron redox species are important pollutants. The oxidative capacity of the atmospheric cloud water decreases when dissolution is included

  5. Status of corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeele, W.V.; Nyhan, J.W.; Drennon, B.J.; Lopez, E.A.; Herrera, W.J.; Langhorst, G.J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field research program involving corrective measure technologies for arid shallow land burial sites is described. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments was measured and compared with similar data from agricultural systems across the United States. Report of field testing of biointrusion barriers continues at a closed-out waste disposal site at Los Alamos. Final results of an experiment designed to determine the effects of subsidence on the performance of a cobble-gravel biobarrier system are reported, as well as the results of hydrologic modeling activities involving biobarrier systems. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  6. S H O R T C O M M U N I C A T I O N Carbon sequestration in arid-land forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakir, Dan

    S H O R T C O M M U N I C A T I O N Carbon sequestration in arid-land forest J . M . G R U√? N Z W E with most northern hemispheric forest activity. This seasonal offset offers low latitude forests $10 ppm to regions predicted to undergo increasing aridity. Keywords: carbon inventory, micrometeorological flux

  7. Causality Analysis of Groundwater dynamics based on a Vector Autoregressive model in the semi-arid basin of Gundal (South India)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Causality Analysis of Groundwater dynamics based on a Vector Autoregressive model in the semi, time space analysis, causality, VAR model, semi-arid region 1. Introduction Large amounts of water. Abstract: Causal relationships existing between observed levels of groundwater in a semi-arid sub

  8. Effects of Changing Atmospheric Conditions on Wind Turbine Performance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, A.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-megawatt, utility-scale wind turbines operate in turbulent and dynamic winds that impact turbine performance in ways that are gradually becoming better understood. This poster presents a study made using a turbulent flow field simulator (TurbSim) and a Turbine aeroelastic simulator (FAST) of the response of a generic 1.5 MW wind turbine to changing inflow. The turbine power output is found to be most sensitive to wind speed and turbulence intensity, but the relationship depends on the wind speed with respect to the turbine's rated wind speed. Shear is found to be poorly correlated to power. A machine learning method called 'regression trees' is used to create a simple model of turbine performance that could be used as part of the wind resource assessment process. This study has used simple flow fields and should be extended to more complex flows, and validated with field observations.

  9. Security Conditions

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice ensures that DOE uniformly meets the requirements of the Homeland Security Advisory System outlined in Homeland Security Presidential Directive-3, Threat Conditions and Associated Protective Measures, dated 3-11-02, and provides responses specified in Presidential Decision Directive 39, U.S. Policy on Counterterrorism (U), dated 6-21-95. It cancels DOE N 473.8, Security Conditions, dated 8-7-02. Extended until 7-7-06 by DOE N 251.64, dated 7-7-05 Cancels DOE N 473.8

  10. atmospheric aerosol limb: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coefficient is 0.5 and then 1.0 2. For the same conditions calculate the H Weber, Rodney 5 Secondary organic aerosol 1. Atmospheric chemical mechanism for production...

  11. atmospheric aerosols recorded: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coefficient is 0.5 and then 1.0 2. For the same conditions calculate the H Weber, Rodney 4 Secondary organic aerosol 1. Atmospheric chemical mechanism for production...

  12. atmospheric aerosols relation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coefficient is 0.5 and then 1.0 2. For the same conditions calculate the H Weber, Rodney 4 Secondary organic aerosol 1. Atmospheric chemical mechanism for production...

  13. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface movement were stronger than during the receding movement. Theory indicates that, for hydrophilic colloids, the advancing interface movement generally exerts a stronger detachment force than the receding, except when the hysteresis of the colloid-air-water contact angle is small. These results of our study are particularly relevant for colloid mobilization and transport related to three process in the vadose zone at Hanford: (1) water infiltration into sediments during rainfall or snowmelt events, (2) groundwater fluctuations as caused by river stage fluctuations, and (3) steady-state, low-flow recharge in deep vadose zone sediments. Transient water flow, like during infiltration or groundwater level fluctuations, are most conducive for colloid mobilization, but even during steady-state, low-flow recharge, colloids can be mobile, although to a much lesser extent. The results of this project have led to a comprehensive and fundamental understanding of colloid transport and mobilization under unsaturated flow conditions at the Hanford site.

  14. Development of passive dry cooling system for power plants in arid land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabbagh, J.A.; Khalifa, A.M.A.; Olwi, I.A. (King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Availability of large amounts of cooling water is essential for steam power plants. In inland arid areas, gas turbines are usually used for electric power generation at low efficiency and high operation costs. Dry cooling towers are another option but they are not effective with high ambient temperature. This work explores the use of radiative cooling for power plants and large refrigeration plants in inland arid areas. The work done consists of small scale experiments, mathematical models, a survey of the suitable materials, and a prototype experiment. This article presents the prototype experiment. The mathematical modeling was presented by the authors in Solar Energy 48(5), 279-286 (1992). A prototype experimental pond, 10m x 25m x 1m, covered with a painted white aluminum sheet was designed, constructed, and tested. The pond was divided into two layers. The experiment was carried out from January to June. Temperatures in the pond at different sections and depths, net radiation, and weather data were measured. At night the results showed an average heat rejection by radiation of 50 W/m[sup 2]. These results were comparable with the results of the mathematical model. The net result of the experiment was positive. It demonstrated the suitability of the covered pond as a heat rejection system in place where a sufficient amount of cooling water was not available.

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric moisture budget Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -deficient atmospheric column under dry surface conditions. By contrast, under high soil moisture (or energy... , and horizontal and vertical ... Source: Sobel, Adam -...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric moisture content Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    York Collection: Geosciences 53 Direct and indirect effects of atmospheric conditions and soil moisture on surface energy partitioning revealed by a prolonged drought at a Summary:...

  17. Estimating basin-wide hydraulic parameters of a semi-arid mountainous watershed by recession-flow analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Estimating basin-wide hydraulic parameters of a semi-arid mountainous watershed by recession 2002; accepted 23 April 2003 Abstract Insufficient sub-surface hydraulic data from watersheds often and in watersheds with low population densities because well-drilling to obtain the hydraulic data is expensive

  18. Recent summer droughts in Texas have made dust control in feedyards in the semi-arid High Plains far

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    and appearance. The Total Quality Manure Management Manual published by the Texas Cattle Feeders AssociationRecent summer droughts in Texas have made dust control in feedyards in the semi-arid High Plains of a drought-management scheme to con- serve water and control dust. Background "Scraping pens" is not a new

  19. Do landscape heterogeneity and water distribution explain aspects of elephant home range in southern Africa's arid savannas?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pretoria, University of

    , Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa a r t i c l e i n f). However, to maximise their energy intake there should be a trade-off between selection for scarce, high in southern Africa's arid savannas? Y. de Beer, R.J. van Aarde √? Conservation Ecology Research Unit

  20. What can ecological science tell us about opportunities for carbon sequestration on arid rangelands in the United States?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayre, Nathan

    What can ecological science tell us about opportunities for carbon sequestration on arid rangelands). It is now commonplace to use the rationale of increasing carbon sequestration to argue for changes interest in carbon sequestration on rangelands is largely driven by their extent, while the interest

  1. Dynamics of Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Peter L.

    transfer ­ Solar heating of surface, and atmosphere via dust absorption ­ Infrared CO2 band cooling (especially around 667 cm-1) ­ nonLTE near-infrared heating of CO2 and nonLTE cooling effects above ~60-80 km. Baroclinic waves, scales, heat and momentum transport, seasonal occurrence. Qualitative treatment

  2. Dynamics of Planetary Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Peter L.

    pressure (bars) N2 82%; Ar 12%; CH4 6%CO2 96.5%; N2 3.5%Atmospheric composition 26177Orbital inclination (1992) orbiter ­ Winds from cloud-tracking and probe drifts ­ IR temperatures, solar-fixed tides, polar-Huygens mission (from 2005) ­ Doppler wind descent profile ­ IR temperature and composition maps ­ Visible, IR

  3. Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

  4. Differential atmospheric tritium sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

    1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

  5. Differential atmospheric tritium sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

  6. The changing atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graedel, T.E.; Crutzen, P.J.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemistry of the atmosphere is changing, in large measure because of gases emitted by such human activities as farming, manufacturing, and the combustion of fossil fuels. The deleterious effects are increasingly evident; they may well become worse in the years ahead. This paper discusses the pollutants and the environmental perturbations with which they are associated. The authors believe the solution to the earth's environmental problems lies in a truly global effort.

  7. Atmospheric model intercomparison project: Monsoon simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperber, K.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison; Palmer, T.N. [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading (United Kingdom)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The simulation of monsoons, in particular the Indian summer monsoon, has proven to be a critical test of a general circulation model`s ability to simulate tropical climate and variability. The Monsoon Numerical Experimentation Group has begun to address questions regarding the predictability of monsoon extremes, in particular conditions associated with El Nino and La Nina conditions that tend to be associated with drought and flood conditions over the Indian subcontinent, through a series of seasonal integrations using analyzed initial conditions from successive days in 1987 and 1988. In this paper the authors present an analysis of simulations associated with the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP), a coordinated effort to simulate the 1979--1988 decade using standardized boundary conditions with approximately 30 atmospheric general circulation models. The 13 models analyzed to date are listed. Using monthly mean data from these simulations they have calculated indices of precipitation and wind shear in an effort to access the performance of the models over the course of the AMIP decade.

  8. Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Theodore

    Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate ChangeSYLLABUS FOR Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry) FCH 511 Fall 2013 Theodore S

  9. Pluto's Atmosphere Does Not Collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olkin, C B; Borncamp, D; Pickles, A; Sicardy, B; Assafin, M; Bianco, F B; Buie, M W; de Oliveira, A Dias; Gillon, M; French, R G; Gomes, A Ramos; Jehin, E; Morales, N; Opitom, C; Ortiz, J L; Maury, A; Norbury, M; Ribas, F B; Smith, R; Wasserman, L H; Young, E F; Zacharias, M; Zacharias, N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining stellar occultation observations probing Pluto's atmosphere from 1988 to 2013 and models of energy balance between Pluto's surface and atmosphere, we conclude that Pluto's atmosphere does not collapse at any point in its 248-year orbit. The occultation results show an increasing atmospheric pressure with time in the current epoch, a trend present only in models with a high thermal inertia and a permanent N2 ice cap at Pluto's north rotational pole.

  10. ON THE STABILITY OF SUPER-EARTH ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Astronomy, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093, Zuerich (Switzerland); Kopparla, Pushkar [ETH Zuerich, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, Universitaetstrasse 16, CH-8092, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the stability of super-Earth atmospheres around M stars using a seven-parameter, analytical framework. We construct stability diagrams in the parameter space of exoplanetary radius versus semimajor axis and elucidate the regions in which the atmospheres are stable against the condensation of their major constituents, out of the gas phase, on their permanent nightside hemispheres. We find that super-Earth atmospheres that are nitrogen-dominated (Earth-like) occupy a smaller region of allowed parameter space, compared to hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, because of the dual effects of diminished advection and enhanced radiative cooling. Furthermore, some super-Earths which reside within the habitable zones of M stars may not possess stable atmospheres, depending on the mean molecular weight and infrared photospheric pressure of their atmospheres. We apply our stability diagrams to GJ 436b and GJ 1214b, and demonstrate that atmospheric compositions with high mean molecular weights are disfavored if these exoplanets possess solid surfaces and shallow atmospheres. Finally, we construct stability diagrams tailored to the Kepler data set, for G and K stars, and predict that about half of the exoplanet candidates are expected to harbor stable atmospheres if Earth-like conditions are assumed. We include 55 Cancri e and CoRoT-7b in our stability diagram for G stars.

  11. Atmospheric Aerosol Systems | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsTools PrintableCARIBU ProposalBeamAtmospheric

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August 1999 ARM

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August 1999

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August 1999July

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3 ARM 2003

  17. Atmospheric Particulates | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik -GrownAn overheadAtmospheric

  18. Methane present in an extrasolar planet atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark R. Swain; Gautam Vasisht; Giovanna Tinetti

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecules present in exoplanetary atmospheres are expected to strongly influence the atmospheric radiation balance, trace dynamical and chemical processes, and indicate the presence of disequilibrium effects. Since molecules have the potential to reveal the exoplanet atmospheric conditions and chemistry, searching for them is a high priority. The rotational-vibrational transition bands of water, carbon monoxide, and methane are anticipated to be the primary sources of non-continuum opacity in hot-Jovian planets. Since these bands overlap in wavelength, and the corresponding signatures from them are weak, decisive identification requires precision infrared spectroscopy. Here we report on a near-infrared transmission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b showing the presence of methane. Additionally, a resolved water-vapour band at 1.9 microns confirms the recent claim of water in this object. On thermochemical grounds, carbon-monoxide is expected to be abundant in the upper atmosphere of hot-Jovian exoplanets; thus the detection of methane rather than carbon-monoxide in such a hot planet could signal the presence of a horizontal chemical gradient away from the permanent dayside, or it may imply an ill-understood photochemical mechanisms that leads to an enhancement of methane.

  19. Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals in an Arid Vadose Zone Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler Flitton, Mariana Kay; Mizia, Ronald Eugene; Bishop, Carolyn Wagoner

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subsurface radioactive disposal site located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains neutron-activated metals from nonfuel nuclear-reactor- core components. A long-term corrosion test is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The tests use nonradioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, Type 304L stainless steel, Type 315L stainless steel, nickel-chromium alloy (UNS NO7718), beryllium, aluminum 6061-T6, and a zirconium alloy, (UNS R60804). In addition, carbon steel (the material presently used in the cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and a duplex stainless steel (UNS S32550) (the proposed material for the high- integrity disposal containers) are also included in the test program. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the early corrosion rate results after 1 year and 3 years of underground exposure.

  1. Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals in an Arid Vadose Zone Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler Flitton, M.K; Mizia, R.E.; Bishop, C.W.

    2001-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The subsurface radioactive disposal site located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains neutron-activated metals from nonfuel nuclear-reactor- core components. A long-term corrosion test is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The tests use nonradioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, Type 304L stainless steel, Type 315L stainless steel, nickel-chromium alloy (UNS NO7718), beryllium, aluminum 6061-T6, and a zirconium alloy, (UNS R60804). In addition, carbon steel (the material presently used in the cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and a duplex stainless steel (UNS S32550) (the proposed material for the high- integrity disposal containers) are also included in the test program. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the early corrosion rate results after 1 year and 3 years of underground exposure.

  2. Geomorphic controls on hydrology and vegetation in an arid basin: Turkana district, northern Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppinger, K.D.; Doehring, D.O.; Schimel, D.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a broad ecological study of Kenyan pastoralist adaptation to periodic drought, a study was done to determine how arid region geomorphology affects hydrology and subsequently vegetative patterns. In this study area, 100 kilometers south of Lake Turkana, it appears that irregular precipitation is stored in bajada sediments and is available to deeply rooted vegetation over long periods of time. This vegetation provides a relatively constant food source for people's herds of browsers, the camels and goats, whereas cattle, which graze mainly on grasses, are significant producers only during wet seasons. Field observations suggest that the mountain and abutting pediment soils are too shallow to store appreciable water. However, greater quantities of water are stored in the deeper bajada sediments adjacent to the pediment where pastoralists dig temporary wells in ephemeral channels during wet seasons. Density of tree growth is greater along channels, and highest canopy cover values are found about the pediment-bajada interface. Geohydrologic processes in this area provide the basis for continuous occupation by the desert people, in contrast to recurring famines in adjacent areas, by enhancing the growth of woody vegetation.

  3. Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

  4. ATMOSPHERIC ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 44 (1997) 231-241

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 44 (1997) 231-241 Error analysis of backscatter;accepted 14 February 1997 Abstract Ice sphere backscatter has been calculated using both Mie theory as a reasonable approximation for rv 1997 Elsevier Science B.V. 1. Introduction Cirrus clouds play

  5. ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 38 (1995) 207-235 ATMOSPHERIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 38 (1995) 207-235 ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH On the parameterization of ice and water substance mixing ratio fields were only strongly altered by turning off the ice phase of these schemes includes ice processes. But in mid- latitudes and also in tropics the ice phase is an important

  6. Polyport atmospheric gas sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guggenheim, S. Frederic (Teaneck, NJ)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric gas sampler with a multi-port valve which allows for multi, sequential sampling of air through a plurality of gas sampling tubes mounted in corresponding gas inlet ports. The gas sampler comprises a flow-through housing which defines a sampling chamber and includes a gas outlet port to accommodate a flow of gases through the housing. An apertured sample support plate defining the inlet ports extends across and encloses the sampling chamber and supports gas sampling tubes which depend into the sampling chamber and are secured across each of the inlet ports of the sample support plate in a flow-through relation to the flow of gases through the housing during sampling operations. A normally closed stopper means mounted on the sample support plate and operatively associated with each of the inlet ports blocks the flow of gases through the respective gas sampling tubes. A camming mechanism mounted on the sample support plate is adapted to rotate under and selectively lift open the stopper spring to accommodate a predetermined flow of gas through the respective gas sampling tubes when air is drawn from the housing through the outlet port.

  7. DOE research on atmospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

  8. Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate at the carbon cycle #12;However, #12;Greenhouse Effect is Complex #12;PLANETARY ENERGY BALANCE G+W fig 3-5

  9. Oddelek za ziko Normal modes in the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¬?umer, Slobodan

    weather prediction. In section 3 I concentrate on the normal modes of a very simple model, shallow water #12;Numerical weather prediction is an initial condition problem. That means we need ini- tial-gravity waves just play their role, but in numerical models of the atmosphere, they can cause huge problems. 1

  10. Atmospheric science and power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randerson, D. (ed.)

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  11. Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

  12. Removal of Pollutants by Atmospheric Non Thermal Plasmas Ahmed Khacef 1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Removal of Pollutants by Atmospheric Non Thermal Plasmas Ahmed Khacef 1* , Jean Marie Cormier1]. The electron beam technique which is very efficient for removal of pollutants such NOx and VOCs has been first operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and room temperature), and relatively low maintenance

  13. Overturning and wind driven circulation in a low-order ocean-atmosphere model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Veen, Lennaert

    july 2002 Abstract A low-order ocean-atmosphere model is presented which combines coupling through heat exchange at the interface and wind stress forcing. The coupling terms are derived from the boundary conditions and the forcing terms of the constituents. Both the ocean and the atmosphere model are based

  14. Fragmentation Energetics of Clusters Relevant to Atmospheric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Clusters Relevant to Atmospheric New Particle Formation. Fragmentation Energetics of Clusters Relevant to Atmospheric New Particle Formation. Abstract: The exact mechanisms by...

  15. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression for the non-decaying tracer. If the power-law equation for the median dilution factor, Df, based on a non-decaying tracer has the general form Df=a?◊t?^(-b) for time t after the release event, then the equation has the form Df=e^(-?t)◊a◊t^(-b) for a radioactive isotope, where ? is the decay constant for the isotope.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, T

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

  17. Retrieval of cloud-cleared atmospheric temperature profiles from hyperspectral infrared and microwave observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, William Joseph, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the problem of retrieving the temperature profile of the Earth's atmosphere from overhead infrared and microwave observations of spectral radiance in cloudy conditions. The contributions of the thesis ...

  18. atmospheric aerosol source-receptor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coefficient is 0.5 and then 1.0 2. For the same conditions calculate the H Weber, Rodney 6 Secondary organic aerosol 1. Atmospheric chemical mechanism for production...

  19. A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1 and Environmental Engineering, New Mexico Tech 801 Leroy Place Socorro, NM, 87801, h2odoc@nmt.edu 2 Jose B. Gallegos.gallegos@arcadis-us.com 3 Jaime Ealey, Graduate Research Assistant, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, New Mexico

  20. Foreseeing critical phosphorus cycle transitions in constructed wetlands: applied to the new Tres Rios arid-land constructed wetlands with the city of Phoenix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Foreseeing critical phosphorus cycle transitions in constructed wetlands: applied to the new Tres Rios arid-land constructed wetlands with the city of Phoenix E.Chapman1 and B.Warner2 1 School of Life Sciences, 2 School of Sustainability, Arizona State University,Tempe, AZ Abstract Constructed wetland

  1. Comments of the Independent Peer-Review Team for the Arid West Regional Supplement to the 1987 Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual, and Responses by the Corps of Engineers and Arid West are still very active in professional wetland delineation work which would have clarified original intent. "Further, the Working Group and contributors" included NO private sector wetland scientists much less ones

  2. SIO 217a Atmospheric and Climate Sciences I: Atmospheric Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    . Radiant Energy. Radiative Transfer. Transport.) 10-Oct W 3 More Transfer Processes 15-Oct M 4 4 Gas. Equation of State. Hydrostatic Equilibrium.) 3-Oct W 2 2.11 First and Second Laws and Characteristics. Precipitation Processes. Radiative Transfer in a Cloudy Atmosphere. Fogs, Stratus

  3. Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery Linked Environments for Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unidata Program Center #12;Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery The Team: 9 institutions and 105 MethodologyTraditional NWP Methodology STATIC OBSERVATIONS Radar Data Mobile Mesonets Surface Observations Satellites The Process is Entirely Prescheduled and Serial; It Does NOT Respond to the Weather! The Process

  4. NETL SOFC: Atmospheric Pressure Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifA Comparison95519LocalizedWaterTerryAtmospheric

  5. HEATING THE ATMOSPHERE ABOVE SUNSPOTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rucklidge, Alastair

    become fragmented and twisted, and where they generate the necessary energy to heat the solar coronaHEATING THE ATMOSPHERE ABOVE SUNSPOTS David Alexander and Neal E. Hurlburt Lockheed Martin Solar, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 9EW, UK Abstract We present our results of a hybrid model of sunspots

  6. 13, 90179049, 2013 Stable atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 13, 9017­9049, 2013 Stable atmospheric methane in the 2000s I. Pison et al. Title Page Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands 3 SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands 4 Vrije Universiteit, Department of Systems Ecology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 5

  7. Space Science: Atmosphere Thermal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Space Science: Atmosphere Part -2 Thermal Structure Review tropospheres Absorption of Radiation Adiabatic Lapse Rate ~ 9 K/km Slightly smaller than our estimate Pressure ~3000ft under ocean surface thickness (positive up) is the solar zenith angle Fs is the solar energy flux at frequency (when

  8. ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust Documentation DataProductswsicloudwsicloudsummarygifAOS Processing

  9. Millimeter-wave Radiometer for High Sensitivity Water Vapor Profiling in Arid Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazmany, Andrew

    2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz) water Vapor Radiometer (GVR) for long-term, unattended measurements of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. Precipitable water vapor and liquid water path are estimated from zenith brightness temperatures measured from four double-sideband receiver channels, centered at 183.31 1, 3 and 7, and 14 GHz. A prototype ground-based version of the instrument was deployed at the DOE ARM program?s North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow AK in April 2005, where it collected data continuously for one year. A compact, airborne version of this instrument, packaged to operate from a standard 2-D PMS probe canister, has been tested on the ground and is scheduled for test flights in the summer of 2006. This paper presents design details, laboratory test results and examples of retrieved precipitable water vapor and liquid water path from measured brightness temperature data.

  10. AtmoHEAD 2013 workshop / Atmospheric Monitoring for High-Energy Astroparticle Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. BernlŲhr; G. Bellassai; O. Blanch; M. Bourgeat; P. Bruno; M. Buscemi; C. Cassardo; P. M. Chadwick; R. Chalme-Calvet; F. Chouza; M. Cilmo; M. Coco; J. Colombi; M. Compin; M. K. Daniel; R. De Los Reyes; J. Ebr; R. D'Elia; C. Deil; A. Etchegoyen; M. Doro; S. Ferrarese; M. Fiorini; LL. Font; D. Garrido; H. Gast; M. Gaug; F. Gonzales; A. Grillo; F. Guarino; J. Hahn; M. Hrabovsky; K. Kosack; P. KrŁger; G. La Rosa; G. Leto; Y. T. E. Lo; A. Lůpez-Oramas; K. Louedec; M. C. Maccarone; D. Mandat; V. Marandon; E. Martinetti; M. Martinez; M. de Naurois; A. Neronov; S. J. Nolan; L. Otero; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; M. Pech; G. Puhlhofer; M. Prouza; E. Quel; D. Raul; P. Ristori; M. D. Rodriguez Frias; S. Rivoire; C. B. Rulten; P. Schovanek; A. Segreto; G. Sottile; L. Stringhetti; J. -P. Tavernet; A. S. Tonachini; S. Toscano; P. Travnicek; L. Valore; G. Vasileiadis; S. Vincent; S. Wada; L. Wiencke; M. Will

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A 3-day international workshop on atmospheric monitoring and calibration for high-energy astroparticle detectors, with a view towards next-generation facilities. The atmosphere is an integral component of many high-energy astroparticle detectors. Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and cosmic-ray extensive air shower detectors are the two instruments driving the rapidly evolving fields of very-high- and ultra-high-energy astrophysics. In these instruments, the atmosphere is used as a giant calorimeter where cosmic rays and gamma rays deposit their energy and initiate EASs; it is also the medium through which the resulting Cherenkov light propagates. Uncertainties in real-time atmospheric conditions and in the fixed atmospheric models typically dominate all other systematic errors. With the improved sensitivity of upgraded IACTs such as H.E.S.S.-II and MAGIC-II and future facilities like the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and JEM-EUSO, statistical uncertainties are expected to be significantly reduced, leaving the atmosphere as the limiting factor in the determination of astroparticle spectra. Varying weather conditions necessitate the development of suitable atmospheric monitoring to be integrated in the overall instrument calibration, including Monte Carlo simulations. With expertise distributed across multiple collaborations and scientific domains, an interdisciplinary workshop is being convened to advance progress on this critical and timely topic.

  11. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  12. Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muhle, J.

    The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

  13. Refined conceptual model for the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration and 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rohay, V.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a refined geohydrologic and geochemical conceptual model of the host site (Hanford Reservation) for the Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) and 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) Expedited Response Action (ERA), based on the results from fiscal year 1992 site characterization activities. The ERA was initiated in December 1990 to minimize or stabilize CCl{sub 4} migration within the unsaturated (vadose) zone in the vicinity of three CCl{sub 4} disposal sites in the 200 West Area (216-Z-1A tile field, 216-Z-9 trench, and 216-Z-18 crib). Implementation of this ERA was based on concerns that CCl{sub 4} residing in the soils was continuing to spread to the groundwater and, if left unchecked, would significantly increase the area of groundwater contamination. A soil-vapor-extraction system began operating at the site in February 1992.

  14. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  15. Quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Springston, Stephen R. (Upton, NY); Lloyd, Judith (Westbury, NY); Zheng, Jun (Stony Brook, NY)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the quantitative determination of atmospheric hydroperoxyl radical comprising: (a) contacting a liquid phase atmospheric sample with a chemiluminescent compound which luminesces on contact with hydroperoxyl radical; (b) determining luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample; and (c) comparing said luminescence intensity from the liquid phase atmospheric sample to a standard luminescence intensity for hydroperoxyl radical. An apparatus for automating the method is also included.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using ARM Mobile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4August3Radiative

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDear Friend,Arthur J. Nozik -GrownAnAtmospheric Radiation

  18. Atmospheric Lifetime of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherer, Norbert F.

    Atmospheric Lifetime of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide David Archer,1 Michael Eby,2 Victor Brovkin,3 released from combustion of fossil fuels equilibrates among the various carbon reservoirs of the atmosphere literature on the atmospheric lifetime of fossil fuel CO2 and its impact on climate, and we present initial

  19. Impacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    anthropogenic carbon dioxide may result from this atmospheric nitrogen fertilization, leading to a decreaseImpacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the Open Ocean R. A. Duce,1 * J. LaRoche,2 K quantities of atmospheric anthropogenic fixed nitrogen entering the open ocean could account for up to about

  20. Ch4. Atmosphere and Surface Energy Balances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    than red light. #12;The Electromagnetic Spectrum 8% 47% 45% 100% solar radiation #12;Blue Sky, Red;Energy Pathways #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Atmosphere or performing any work. #12;Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere Solar radiation Reflection Transmission

  1. Proof of the Atmospheric Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Arthur P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently advanced argument against the atmospheric greenhouse effect is refuted. A planet without an infrared absorbing atmosphere is mathematically constrained to have an average temperature less than or equal to the effective radiating temperature. Observed parameters for Earth prove that without infrared absorption by the atmosphere, the average temperature of Earth's surface would be at least 33 K lower than what is observed.

  2. ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS621, Fall 2013 Atmospheric Chemistry Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 ­ 10:50, 212B ACRC) 491-8587 Teaching Assistant: Lauren Potter Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 11 Lepotter, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical composition; 2) Explain the chemical

  3. ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    ATS621, Fall 2014 Atmospheric Chemistry Monday and Wednesday, 9 ­ 9:50, 212B ACRC Instructor: Prof) Understand quantitatively how emissions, transport, chemistry and deposition impact atmospheric chemical to Atmospheric Chemistry, D.J. Jacob Princeton University Press, 1999 PDF versions of the chapters can

  4. Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    4 5- (DRAFT) Evaluation of Health Risks of Atmospheric Pollutants Guy Landrieu INERIS Institut, Stuttgart : Germany (1995)" #12;INERIS: Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants (DRAFT may 1995) Evaluation of health risks of atmospheric pollutants Summary 1 Introduction 2 Background 3 Harmfulness

  5. Ionisation in atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets VI: Properties of large-scale discharge events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, R L; Hodos, G; Bilger, C; Stark, C R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral clouds in substellar atmospheres play a special role as a catalyst for a variety of charge processes. If clouds are charged, the surrounding environment becomes electrically activated, and ensembles of charged grains are electrically discharging (e.g. by lightning), which significantly infuences the local chemistry creating conditions similar to those thought responsible for life in early planetary atmospheres. We note that such lightning discharges contribute also to the ionisation state of the atmosphere. We apply scaling laws for electrical discharge processes from laboratory measurements and numerical experiments to Drift-Phoenix model atmosphere results to model the discharge's propagation downwards (as lightning) and upwards (as sprites) through the atmospheric clouds. We evaluate the spatial extent and energetics of lightning discharges. The atmospheric volume affected (e.g. by increase of temperature or electron number) is larger in a brown dwarf atmosphere ($10^8 -~10^{10}$m$^3$) than in a gi...

  6. Terms and Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

  7. Atmospheric Sciences Program Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Matthew D. Brown

    atmospheric chemistry/air quality, boundary layer and air pollution meteorology, regional/global climatology MODELING OF MULTIPLE AIR POLLUTANTS AT URBAN AND REGIONAL SCALES Our atmosphere is a complex systemAtmospheric Sciences Program Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (MEAS) (http

  8. atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Greenhouse Effect and Atmospheric Warming Atmosphere absorbs heat energy A real greenhouse traps heatCh4. Atmosphere and Surface Energy Balances...

  9. atmospheric pressure surface: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K. 27 Ch4. Atmosphere and Surface Energy Balances Geosciences Websites Summary: Greenhouse Effect and Atmospheric Warming Atmosphere absorbs heat energy A real greenhouse traps...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: atmospheric chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NREL Release Wavearc-fault circuit interrupterchemistry

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: atmospheric research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NREL Release Wavearc-fault circuit interrupterchemistryresearch

  12. Atmosphere to Electrons Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope Change #1Impacts |Services SubcommitteeAtmosphere to

  13. Special waste-form lysimeters - arid: 1984--1992 data summary and preliminary interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, T.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Serne, R.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lysimeter facility constructed at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State has been used since 1984 to monitor the leaching of buried waste forms under natural conditions. The facility is generating data that are useful in evaluating source-term models used in radioactive waste transport analyses. The facility includes ten bare-soil lysimeters (183 cm diameter by 305 cm depth) containing buried waste forms generated at nuclear reactors in the United States and solidified with Portland M cement, masonry cement, bitumen, and vinyl-ester styrene. The waste forms contained in the lysimeters have been leached under natural, semiarid conditions. In spite of the semiarid conditions, from 1984 through 1992, an average of 45 cm of water leached through the lysimeters, representing 27% of area precipitation. Leachate samples have been routinely collected and analyzed for radionuclide and chemical content. To date, tritium, cobalt-60, and cesium-137 have been identified in the lysimeter leachate samples. From 1984 through 1992, over 4000 {mu}Ci of tritium, representing 76 and 71 % of inventory (not decay corrected), have been leached from the two waste forms containing tritium. Cobalt-60 has been found in the leachate from all six of the waste forms that originally contained > 1 mCi of inventory. The leached amounts of cobalt-60 represent < 0.1 % of original cobalt inventories. Mobile cobalt is believed to be chelated with organic compounds, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), that are present in the waste. Trace amounts of cesium-137 have occasionally been identified in leachate from two waste forms since 1991. Qualitatively, the field leaching results confirm laboratory studies suggesting that tritium is readily leached from cement, and that cobalt-60 is generally leached more easily from cement than from vinyl-ester styrene.

  14. When Does Aid Conditionality Work?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montinola, Gabriella R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    institutions may tailor conditions for success because theytailor their conditions for success, and they are especially

  15. Survey of Revegetated Areas on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve: Status and Initial Monitoring Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Link, Steven O.; Rozeboom, Latricia L.; Durham, Robin E.; Cruz, Rico O.; Mckee, Sadie A.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office removed a number of facilities and debris from the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument (HRNM). Revegetation of disturbed sites is necessary to stabilize the soil, reduce invasion of these areas by exotic weeds, and to accelerate re-establishment of native plant communities. Seven revegetation units were identified on ALE based on soils and potential native plant communities at the site. Native seed mixes and plant material were identified for each area based on the desired plant community. Revegetation of locations affected by decommissioning of buildings and debris removal was undertaken during the winter and early spring of 2010 and 2011, respectively. This report describes both the details of planting and seeding for each of the units, describes the sampling design for monitoring, and summarizes the data collected during the first year of monitoring. In general, the revegetation efforts were successful in establishing native bunchgrasses and shrubs on most of the sites within the 7 revegetation units. Invasion of the revegetation areas by exotic annual species was minimal for most sites, but was above initial criteria in 3 areas: the Hodges Well subunit of Unit 2, and Units 6 and 7.

  16. Carbon tetrachloride contamination, 200 West Area, Hanford Site: Arid Site Integrated Demonstration for remediation of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Rohay, V.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arid State Integrated Demonstration is a US Department of Energy (DOE) program targeted at the acquisition, development, demonstration, and deployment of technologies for evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic and associated contaminants in soils and ground waters. Several DOE laboratories, universities, and industry will participate in the program. Candidate technologies will be demonstrated in the areas of site characterization; performance prediction, monitoring, and evaluations; contaminant extraction and ex situ treatment; in situ remediations; and site closure and monitoring. The performance of these demonstrated technologies will be compared to baseline technologies and documented to promote the transfer of new technologies to industry for use at DOE facilities. The initial host site is the Hanford Site's 200 West Area. The location of the demonstration contains primarily carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), chloroform, and a variety of associated mixed waste contaminants. Chemical processes used to recover and purify plutonium at Hanford's plutonium finishing plant (Z Plant) resulted in the production of actinide-bearing waste liquid. Both aqueous and organic liquid wastes were generated, and were routinely discharged to subsurface disposal facilities. The primary radionuclide in the waste streams was plutonium, and the primary organic was CCl{sub 4}. This paper contains brief descriptions of the principal CCl{sub 4} waste disposal facilities in Hanford's 200 West Area, associated hydrogeology, existing information on the extent of soil and ground-water contamination, and a conceptual outline of suspected subsurface CCl{sub 4} distributions.

  17. Carbon tetrachloride contamination, 200 West Area, Hanford Site: Arid Site Integrated Demonstration for remediation of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rohay, V.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arid State Integrated Demonstration is a US Department of Energy (DOE) program targeted at the acquisition, development, demonstration, and deployment of technologies for evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic and associated contaminants in soils and ground waters. Several DOE laboratories, universities, and industry will participate in the program. Candidate technologies will be demonstrated in the areas of site characterization; performance prediction, monitoring, and evaluations; contaminant extraction and ex situ treatment; in situ remediations; and site closure and monitoring. The performance of these demonstrated technologies will be compared to baseline technologies and documented to promote the transfer of new technologies to industry for use at DOE facilities. The initial host site is the Hanford Site`s 200 West Area. The location of the demonstration contains primarily carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), chloroform, and a variety of associated mixed waste contaminants. Chemical processes used to recover and purify plutonium at Hanford`s plutonium finishing plant (Z Plant) resulted in the production of actinide-bearing waste liquid. Both aqueous and organic liquid wastes were generated, and were routinely discharged to subsurface disposal facilities. The primary radionuclide in the waste streams was plutonium, and the primary organic was CCl{sub 4}. This paper contains brief descriptions of the principal CCl{sub 4} waste disposal facilities in Hanford`s 200 West Area, associated hydrogeology, existing information on the extent of soil and ground-water contamination, and a conceptual outline of suspected subsurface CCl{sub 4} distributions.

  18. MSW effect with flavor changing interactions and the atmospheric neutrino problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Montero; V. Pleitez

    2000-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider flavor changing effective neutrino interactions in the context of massive neutrinos in the issue of atmospheric neutrinos. Assuming as usual that this is an indication of the oscillation of muon neutrinos into tau neutrinos we show that there is a set of parameters which is consistent with the MSW resonance condition for the typical Earth density and atmospheric neutrino energies. In particular we show that even if the vacuum mixing angle vanishes it is still possible to have a resonance which is compatible with the atmospheric neutrino data. We also briefly consider the case of the solar neutrino problem.

  19. Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

    1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

  20. CONDITIONS OF PURCHASE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO 1 of 8 GE Global Research

  1. CONDITIONS OF PURCHASE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO 1 of 8 GE Global Researchof

  2. Terms and Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2 . Tensile Strain SwitchedJ.Properties

  3. Stability measurements of PPL atmospheric pressure arc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roquemore, L.; Zweben, S.J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Wurden, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on the stability of atmospheric pressure arcs have been started at PPL to understand and improve the performance of arc furnaces used for processing applications in metallurgy and hazardous waste treatment. Previous studies have suggested that the violent instabilities in such arcs may be due to kink modes. A 30 kW, 500 Amp CW DC experimental arc furnace was constructed with a graphite cathode and a molten steel anode. The arc plasma is diagnosed with 4000 frames/sec digital camera, Hall probes, and voltage and current monitors. Under certain conditions, the arc exhibits an intermittent helical instability, with the helix rotating at {approx}600 Hz. The nature of the instability is investigated. A possible instability mechanism is the self-magnetic field of the arc, with saturation occurring due to inhomogeneous heating in a helical arc. The effect of external DC and AC magnetic fields on the instability is investigated. Additionally, arc deflection due to external transverse magnetic field is investigated. The deflection angle is found to be proportional to the applied field, and is in good agreement with a simple model of the {rvec J} x {rvec b} force on the arc jet.

  4. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowley, T.J.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project was to conduct model simulations for past and future climate change with respect to the proposed Yucca Mtn. repository. The authors report on three main topics, one of which is boundary conditions for paleo-hindcast studies. These conditions are necessary for the conduction of three to four model simulations. The boundary conditions have been prepared for future runs. The second topic is (a) comparing the atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) with observations and other GCMs; and (b) development of a better precipitation data base for the Yucca Mtn. region for comparisons with models. These tasks have been completed. The third topic is preliminary assessments of future climate change. Energy balance model (EBM) simulations suggest that the greenhouse effect will likely dominate climate change at Yucca Mtn. for the next 10,000 years. The EBM study should improve rational choice of GCM CO{sub 2} scenarios for future climate change.

  5. atmospheric research community: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Geosciences Websites Summary: University Corporation for Atmospheric Research CIGNA DENTAL PREFERRED PROVIDER INSURANCE EFFECTIVE...

  6. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy...

  7. Parallization of Stellar Atmosphere Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hoeflich

    2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel computing has turned out to be the enabling technology to solve complex physical systems. However, the transition from shared memory, vector computers to massively parallel, distributed memory systems and, recently, to hybrid systems poses new challenges to the scientist. We want to present a cook-book (with a very strong, personal bias) based on our experience with parallization of our existing codes. Some of the general tools and communication libraries are discussed. Our approach includes a mixture of algorithm, domain and physical module based parallization. The advantages, scalability and limitations of each are discussed at some examples. We want show that it becomes easier to write parallel code with increasing complexity of the physical problem making stellar atmosphere codes beyond the classical assumptions very suitable.

  8. Conditional data watchpoint management

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdick, Dean Joseph (Austin, TX); Vaidyanathan, Basu (Austin, TX)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, system and computer program product for managing a conditional data watchpoint in a set of instructions being traced is shown in accordance with illustrative embodiments. In one particular embodiment, the method comprises initializing a conditional data watchpoint and determining the watchpoint has been encountered. Upon that determination, examining a current instruction context associated with the encountered watchpoint prior to completion of the current instruction execution, further determining a first action responsive to a positive context examination; otherwise, determining a second action.

  9. Time dependences of atmospheric Carbon dioxide fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalvo, Riccardo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere is critical for predictions regarding future climate changes. A simple mass conservation analysis presented here generates tight estimations for the atmosphere's retention time constant. The analysis uses a leaky integrator model that combines the observed deficit (only less than 40% of CO2 produced from combustion of fossil fuels is actually retained in the atmosphere, while more than 60% is continuously shed) with the exponential growth of fossil fuel burning. It reveals a maximum characteristic time of less than 23 year for the transfer of atmospheric CO2 to a segregation sink. This time constant is further constrained by the rapid disappearance of 14C after the ban of atmospheric atomic bomb tests, which provides a lower limit of 18 years for this transfer. The study also generates evaluations of other CO2 fluxes, exchange time constants and volumes exchanged. Analysis of large harmonic oscillations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, often neglected in th...

  10. IPR Conditions, 25 January 2006 1 Intellectual Property Rights Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Cindio, Fiorella

    IPR Conditions, 25 January 2006 1 Intellectual Property Rights Conditions for Collaborative Research Projects (IPR Conditions) I. GENERAL PRINCIPLES These rules should promote the protection guarantee the protection of the participants' intellectual assets. These IPR Conditions establish rules

  11. 12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

  12. Urban Atmospheres captures a unique, synergistic moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    Urban Atmospheres captures a unique, synergistic moment ≠ expanding urban populations, rapid EDITORS Eric Paulos Intel Research eric@paulos.net Tom Jenkins Royal College of Art thomas

  13. Atmospheric and Surface Science Research Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric and Surface Science Research Laboratory Idaho National Laboratory (INL) researchers are contributing to the scientific understanding of contaminant transport through...

  14. atmospheres: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  15. atmosphere: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  16. atmospherics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  17. Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating the atmospheric CH4 budget, next to the dominant loss mechanism involving reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Here we used a ...

  18. Mineralogy under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Jinfu (CIW)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed measurements of minerals based on the synchrotron source for single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, inelastic scattering, spectroscopy and radiography by using diamond anvil cells. We investigated the properties of iron (Fe), iron-magnesium oxides (Fe, Mg)O, silica(SiO{sub 2}), iron-magnesium silicates (Fe, Mg)SiO{sub 3} under simulated high pressure-high temperature extreme conditions of the Earth's crust, upper mantle, low mantle, core-mantle boundary, outer core, and inner core. The results provide a new window on the investigation of the mineral properties at Earth's conditions.

  19. Assessing the Influence of the MJO on Strong Precipitation Events in Subtropical, Semi-Arid North-Central Chile (30įS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juliá , Cristó bal; Rahn, David A.; Rutllant, José A.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation and Chilean winter precipitation. J. Climate, 25, 1678Ė1688. Becker, E. J., E. H. Berbery, and R. W. Higgins, 2011: Modulation of cold-season U.S. daily precipitation by the MaddenĖJulian oscillation. J. Climate, 24, 5157Ė5166. Carrasco, J. F...- arid climates, precipitation is concentrated in fall and winter (AprilĖSeptember) with large interannual variabil- ity (Fig. 2). Large annual precipitation tends to coincide with the development of a warm event of the El NinėoĖ Southern Oscillation...

  20. Genetic and environmental factors affecting growth and reproductive performance of Santa Ines sheep in the semi-arid region of Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa, Wandrick Hauss de

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    GE?1ETIC AND ENVIRiONMENPAL FACTORS Ar FEC ING GROStTH AND REPRODUCTIVE PERFORYJ1jCE OF SAN A INES SHEEP IN THE SEMI-ARID REGIONi OF BRAZIL A T'ress s WANDRICX HAUSS DE SOUSA Submitted to the Graduate College of Tesas ARMi Unsversity... OF BRAZIL A Thesis by WANDRICK HAUSS DE SOUSA Approved as to style and content by: Thomas C. Cartwri t (Co-Chairman) (Co-Chairman) ( /'(' ~ t:. . \\ , Bo y J. Ragsdale (Member) Gary C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1987 ABSTRACT Genetic...

  1. Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation 1234567 89A64BC7DEF72B4 8629EEC7C72DEEE5.1256/qj.05.87 Some challenges of middle atmosphere data assimilation By S. POLAVARAPU1,2, T. G. SHEPHERD2 Data assimilation is employed at operational weather forecast centres to combine measurements and model

  2. OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE INTERACTION AND TROPICAL CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    radiation is the ultimate source of energy for motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Most absorption of solar radiation takes place on the Earth surface, the majority of which is occupied by oceans. Thus oceanic modulate surface radiative flux. Thus, the ocean and atmosphere are a coupled system and their interaction

  3. Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 aoss Katherine E. White, Ann Arbor ©The Regents of the University of Michigan Research areas Atmospheric Science Atmospheric Dynamics Climate, Climate Modeling & Climate Change Clouds & Precipitation Paleoclimate, Ice

  4. United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions of Agriculture Forest Service coordinator. 1997. Atmospheric and biospheric interactions of gases and energy in the Pacific region century have caused a dramatic increase in global air pollution. This process has accelerated in the past

  5. Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury Noelle Eckley Selin *Reprinted from Mercury in the Environment: Pattern and Process (Chapter 5) pp. 73-80 Copyright © 2012 with kind, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury NOELLE ECKLEY SELIN and their distribution in the atmosphere. This includes

  6. Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilleland, Eric

    Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland Research Applications Laboratory National Center for Atmospheric Research 2007-08 Program on Risk Analysis, Extreme Events and Decision Theory, opening workshop 16-19 September, North Carolina #12;Extremes · Interest in making inferences about large, rare, extreme phenomena

  7. A SEARCH FOR MAGNESIUM IN EUROPA'S ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoerst, S. M. [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Brown, M. E., E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Europa's tenuous atmosphere results from sputtering of the surface. The trace element composition of its atmosphere is therefore related to the composition of Europa's surface. Magnesium salts are often invoked to explain Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer spectra of Europa's surface, thus magnesium may be present in Europa's atmosphere. We have searched for magnesium emission in the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph archival spectra of Europa's atmosphere. Magnesium was not detected and we calculate an upper limit on the magnesium column abundance. This upper limit indicates that either Europa's surface is depleted in magnesium relative to sodium and potassium, or magnesium is not sputtered as efficiently resulting in a relative depletion in its atmosphere.

  8. Chapter 9.1: Department of Atmospheric Science1 The Department of Atmospheric Science was founded in 1962 within the College of Engineering as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in first place among departments of atmosphere and ocean sciences in the nation. Strategic Planning Areas, or full professor levels) in atmospheric dynamics, climate dynamics, atmospheric radiation, atmospheric

  9. ON THE EXISTENCE OF SHOCKS IN IRRADIATED EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Supersonic flows are expected to exist in the atmospheres of irradiated exoplanets, but the question of whether shocks develop lingers. Specifically, it reduces to whether continuous flow in a closed loop may become supersonic and if some portions of the supersonic flow steepen into shocks. We first demonstrate that continuous, supersonic flow may exist in two flavors: isentropic and non-isentropic, with shocks being included in the latter class of solutions. Supersonic flow is a necessary but insufficient condition for shocks to develop. The development of a shock requires the characteristics of neighboring points in a flow to intersect. We demonstrate that the intersection of characteristics may be quantified via the knowledge of the Mach number. Finally, we examine three-dimensional simulations of hot Jovian atmospheres and demonstrate that shock formation is expected to occur mostly on the dayside hemisphere, upstream of the substellar point, because the enhanced temperatures near the substellar point provide a natural pressure barrier for the returning flow. Understanding the role of shocks in irradiated exoplanetary atmospheres is relevant to correctly modeling observables such as the peak offsets of infrared phase curves.

  10. Images reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    You, Yuan; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Hanna, Sarah; Hiranuma, Naruki; Kamal, Saeid; Smith, Mackenzie L.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Weber, Rodney; Shilling, John E.; Dabdub, Donald; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A large fraction of submicron atmospheric particles contains both organic material and inorganic salts. As the relative humidity cycles in the atmosphere, these mixed particles can undergo a range of phase transitions, possibly including liquid-liquid phase separation. If liquid-liquid phase separation occurs, the gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric semi-volatile organic compounds, the scattering and absorption of solar radiation, and the uptake of reactive gas species on atmospheric particles will be affected, with important implications for climate predictions. The actual occurrence of these types of phase transitions within individual atmospheric particles has been considered uncertain, in large part because of the absence of observations for real-world samples. Here, using optical and fluorescence microscopy, we observe the coexistence of two non-crystalline phases in particles generated from real-world samples collected on multiple days in Atlanta, Georgia, and in particles generated in the laboratory using atmospheric conditions. These results reveal that atmospheric particles can undergo liquid-liquid phase separations. Using a box model, we show that liquid-liquid phase separation can result in increased concentrations of gas-phase NO3 and N2O5 in the Atlanta region, due to decreased particle uptake of N2O5.

  11. Effects of atmospheric conditions and control surface deflections on vortex characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenkir, Calvin Edward

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    7, SST Ci'rcorde, C-SA, and others, induce 'tr. ailing r, ing iiI! vor'-ic, s ?aiich pr: sent a hazard Lo stnal1er ait craft. In this Itir!Osti(dation such vr. i tex charac'ieristics as I!ave Fornations, r;0!e Ienrgths, b(eak t&1es, and vortex...''1(is r! ' 0 . L'I' I i I 21, I r'. . r ot' j(IS Ls I'rtn(. 'cst b'r'('1';s OLCLII'I'0 I 11r!01 ' 'I; ' rlr'rr. 'X:' ". :: ":I, '. L '. I'Il . IrI rI(:cray occurred in aparoximately 1/2 the time of a si. -iilsr vortex ! nduced ;. i th ~ head...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere conditions-an interdisciplinary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 2 Nitrogen Cycling in the Earth's System (Biol 544 and SoilS 544; 3 credits, Fall 2011, MWF 8:10-9 am; Johnson 204) Summary: of Sciences,...

  13. An investigation of the atmospheric physical conditions associated with microwave propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riggs, Lowell Pogue

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of Dopartasat) Jsauary 1958 I 4 8 I t/0 C 5 I I 1 I'I u I' t ! I I I II III I The ?riter ?ishes to ackno?ledge the kind assistaace of all the nonhero of tbe gadar Meteorology Seccion of chs Depart?ant of Oceanography and Meteorology in tha... bees foesos4 saisly es ?bat e4ght bs tarss4 wsisgla ysth yroysgacios. " This ayyrosob ~- ylatsly fails is oossi4srstioa sf eoa4itioss else?hers Aas ia ths Lsse4iaco ares or is chs yath ower ?hiah the obserwscioss sro ?a4e. sloe siecle ro4iosos4s...

  14. Leaf water potential in Pinus taeda L. as related to fluctuating soil water and atmospheric conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellison, Stanley Lee

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    growing on Bienville loamy fine sand near Rusk, Texas. The average available water storage capacity was 9. 50 inches in the 8-foot profile. Siruiltaneous measurements of leaf water potential and environmental variables were made weekly at two hour... pressure 2 deficit, temperature, and wind (R 0. 78). A regression equation relating total daily water stress to only vapor pressure deficit and soil water content in the 0- to 4-foot soil layer was also signifi- 2= cant (R = 0. 76). The total daily...

  15. High voltage pulse conditioning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Springfield, Ray M. (Sante Fe, NM); Wheat, Jr., Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

  16. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  17. Time Step Sensitivity of Nonlinear Atmospheric Models: Numerical Convergence, Truncation Error Growth, and Ensemble Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judd, Kevin

    1973; Oran and Boris 1987; Murray 1989; Gershenfeld 1999). Weather and climate prediction models, which to the initial conditions, which is a major source of uncertainty in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP; eTime Step Sensitivity of Nonlinear Atmospheric Models: Numerical Convergence, Truncation Error

  18. Effect of atmosphere change paths on the induced chemical expansion Valentin O.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and the steady-state stress distribution in a membrane reactor for partial oxidation of methane (POM) have been simulated in various conditions. The stress field depends on the atmosphere change history. The calculation and reducing side. At membrane reactor scale these chemo- mechanical stresses affect the mechanical reliability

  19. Atmospheric Environment 36 (2002) 51855196 FTIR measurements of functional groups and organic mass in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    the National Center for Atmospheric Research C-130 aircraft during the passing efficiency of a low, with higher Al/Ca ratios in the boundary layer. Organic compounds were present in high and low dust conditions or may condense onto pre- existing particles. Partly as a result of this vapor-to- particle conversion

  20. Conditions of Employment Modern Apprentice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Conditions of Employment Modern Apprentice 1. GENERAL CONDITIONS Members of staff are subject. Modern Apprentices are required under this agreement to undertake training, attend courses and carry out

  1. Space Science: Atmospheres Evolution of planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    ;Atmospheres / Evolution Heat Sources Compressional Energy Trapped Radioactive Material Tidal Interactions, same A) the surface temperature,Tg, increases. WOW! Simple #12;Temperature vs. time in an Early Epoch

  2. The porous atmosphere of eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir J. Shaviv

    2000-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the wind generated by the great 20 year long super-Eddington outburst of eta-Carinae. We show that using classical stellar atmospheres and winds theory, it is impossible to construct a consistent wind model in which a sufficiently small amount of mass, like the one observed, is shed. One expects the super-Eddington luminosity to drive a thick wind with a mass loss rate substantially higher than the observed one. The easiest way to resolve the inconsistency is if we alleviate the implicit notion that atmospheres are homogeneous. An inhomogeneous atmosphere, or "porous", allows more radiation to escape while exerting a smaller average force. Consequently, such an atmosphere yields a considerably lower mass loss rate for the same total luminosity. Moreover, all the applications of the Eddington Luminosity as a strict luminosity limit should be revised, or at least reanalyzed carefully.

  3. Azores Global Atmosphere Monitoring Complex 1. INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honrath, Richard E.

    to the accuracy of European weather forecasts. Today, they provide a unique base for studies of atmospheric levels. Measurements in the free troposphere (FT) are particularly useful, because trace gas and particle

  4. Adaptive control for Mars atmospheric flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo, Carolina Isabel

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    landing accuracy requirements for a manned space vehicle make it necessary to ?y a controlled entry trajectory rather than a more robust ballistic entry trajectory used for some robotic missions. The large variations in Mars atmospheric properties make a...

  5. Atomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Yoram

    conducted so as to characterize atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic (pollution) and natural (sea saltAtomic Force and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Atmospheric Particles ZAHAVA BARKAY,1 * AMIT 69978, Israel KEY WORDS atmospheric aerosols; atomic force microscopy; scanning electron microscopy

  6. Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Adjoint modeling for atmospheric pollution process sensitivity at regional scale Laurent Menut; 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 3210 Mathematical: atmospheric pollution, tropospheric ozone, urban pollution peaks, adjoint modeling, sensitivity Citation

  7. Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

  8. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  9. Arid, Semiarid, and Savanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lachniet, Matthew S.

    to define more closely the limits of dry climates as pressed in plant growth. His formulas apply primarily ocean currents flow offshore, and on

  10. CO oxidation trends on Pt-group metals from ultrahigh vacuum to near atmospheric pressures: A combined in situ PM-IRAS and reaction kinetics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    oxidation Polarization modulation Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy Reaction kinetics a b s t rCO oxidation trends on Pt-group metals from ultrahigh vacuum to near atmospheric pressures3 Torr) and near atmospheric (1≠102 Torr) pressures in a batch reactor under steady-state conditions

  11. Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from the southeastern Canada Basin2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Sea ice loss and the changing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity of the Arctic Ocean: Insights1 from (Arctic Ocean) to act as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions12 expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high13 pCO2sw (~290-320 atm

  12. Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by...

  13. atmospheric dispersion coefficient: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the earth surface. In general, the atmospheric motion is driven by the intense solar energy arriving at the equator 3 A GIS-based atmospheric dispersion model Computer...

  14. atmospheric dispersion calculations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the earth surface. In general, the atmospheric motion is driven by the intense solar energy arriving at the equator 4 A GIS-based atmospheric dispersion model Computer...

  15. atmospheric dispersion experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the earth surface. In general, the atmospheric motion is driven by the intense solar energy arriving at the equator 2 A GIS-based atmospheric dispersion model Computer...

  16. atmospheric ion measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Atmospheric CERN Preprints Summary: We report the first observation in a high energy neutrino telescope of cascades induced by atmospheric electron neutrinos and by...

  17. Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Mass Spectrometry: A New Approach...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Mass Spectrometry: A New Approach for Airborne Particle Analysis. Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Mass Spectrometry: A New Approach for Airborne...

  18. Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963....

  19. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. An Infrared Spectral Library for Atmospheric Environmental Monitoring. Abstract: Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of several...

  20. atmospheric pressure ionization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Atmospheric Pressure, in Vivo, and Imaging Mass. For example, atmospheric pressure infrared MALDI (AP IR-MALDI), capable of producing ions from small ionization (DESI),5...

  1. Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Scientists and an international research team have announced discovery of...

  2. A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

  3. atmospheric co2 content: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  4. atmospheric sciences exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    annual reviews of faculty performance in accordance 8 Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Physics Websites Summary: Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a...

  5. atmospheric co2 concentrations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  6. atmospheric co2 concentration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  7. atmospheric loading effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    large solar proton Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 7 Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Physics Websites Summary: Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a...

  8. atmospheric co2 measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  9. atmospheric co2 variations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  10. atmospheric sciences: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    annual reviews of faculty performance in accordance 8 Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Physics Websites Summary: Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a...

  11. atmospheric co2 mixing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3...

  12. atmospheric aerosols basic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of atmospheric aerosol. Aplin, KL 2012-01-01 13 1. Introduction The atmospheric greenhouse effect is the basic mechanism Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: 1....

  13. Seasonal and Diurnal Patterns of Spatial Spread, Grouping Dynamics and Influence of Resources on a Free-Ranging Cattle Herd in a Semi-Arid Rangeland in South Texas, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheleuitte-Nieves, Christopher

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Index, an indicator of available forage biomass, was calculated using satellite imagery. Number of GPS fixes was used as an indicator of animal use of shade patches and water and supplemental feeding areas. In this semi-arid environment, herd spread...

  14. Conditional sterility in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

  15. Initial Cladding Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Siegmann

    2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M&O 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in evaluating the post-closure performance of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) in relation to waste form degradation.

  16. The medieval metal industry was the cradle of modern large-scale atmospheric lead pollution in northern Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braennvall, M.L.; Bindler, R.; Renberg, I.; Emteryd, O.; Bartnicki, J.; Billstroem, K.

    1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is great concern for contamination of sensitive ecosystems in high latitudes by long-range transport of heavy metals and other pollutants derived from industrial areas in lower latitudes. Atmospheric pollution of heavy metals has a very long history, and since metals accumulate in the environment, understanding of present-day pollution conditions requires knowledge of past atmospheric deposition. The authors use analyses of lead concentrations and stable lead isotopes ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios) of annually laminated sediments from four lakes in northern Sweden to provide a decadal record of atmospheric lead pollution for the last 3000 years. There is a clear signal in the sediments of airborne pollution from Greek and Roman cultures 2000 years ago, followed by a period of clean conditions 400--900 A.D. From 900 A.D. there was a conspicuous, permanent increase in atmospheric lead pollution fallout, The sediments reveal peaks in atmospheric lead pollution at 1200 and 1530 A.D. comparable to present-day levels. These peaks match the history of metal production in Europe. This study indicates that the contemporary atmospheric pollution climate in northern Europe was established in Medieval time, rather than in the industrial period. Atmospheric lead pollution deposition did not, when seen in a historical perspective, increase as much as usually assumed with the Industrial Revolution.

  17. Importance of Design Conditions for Sizing Air-Conditioning Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaban, N.; Maheshwari, G. P.; Suri, R. K.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The proposed design conditions specific to the location and the application are drastically different than currently used single design conditions for all application and locations. Cooling load estimates fro two building located in Kuwait have been analyzed...

  18. Semiclassical energy conditions and wormholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prado Martin-Moruno

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the nonlinear energy conditions and their quantum extensions. These new energy conditions behave much better than the usual pointwise energy conditions in the presence of semiclassical quantum effects. Analogous quantum extensions for the linear energy conditions are not always satisfied as one enters the quantum realm, but they can be used to constrain the violation of the classical conditions. Thus, the existence of wormholes supported by a fluid which violates the null energy condition in a controlled way is of particular interest.

  19. Atmospheric chemistry impacts and feedbacks on the global carbon cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    prediction. Issues to be addressed include the quantification of the impact of the atmospheric oxidation and the oxidative state of the atmosphere. The end goal is to create a model that can quantitatively predict is required to: Predict 3-D atmospheric CO2 production as a function of the CCSM3 atmospheric chemistry module

  20. New nonlinear mechanisms of midlatitude atmospheric low-frequency variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract

  1. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  2. Magnetized Atmospheres around Accreting Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Zane; R. Turolla; A. Treves

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed investigation of atmospheres around accreting neutron stars with high magnetic field ($B\\gtrsim 10^{12}$ G) and low luminosity ($L\\lesssim 10^{33}$ erg/s). We compute the atmospheric structure, intensity and emergent spectrum for a plane-parallel, pure hydrogen medium by solving the transfer equations for the normal modes coupled to the hydrostatic and energy balance equations. The hard tail found in previous investigations for accreting, non-magnetic neutron stars with comparable luminosity is suppressed and the X-ray spectrum, although still harder than a blackbody at the star effective temperature, is nearly planckian in shape. Spectra from accreting atmospheres, both with high and low fields, are found to exhibit a significant excess at optical wavelengths above the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the X-ray continuum.

  3. A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

  4. Calibration of LSST Instrumental and Atmospheric Photometric Passbands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Axelrod, T.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Barrau, Aurelien; Baumont, Sylvain; /LPSC, Grenoble; Blondin, Stephane; /Marseille, CPPM; Claver, Chuck; /NOAO, Tucson; Gorecki, Alexia; /LPSC, Grenoble; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Krabbendam, Victor; Liang, Ming; Saha, Abhijit; /NOAO, Tucson; Smith, Allyn; /Austin Peay State U.; Smith, R.Chris; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will continuously image the entire sky visible from Cerro Pachon in northern Chile every 3-4 nights throughout the year. The LSST will provide data for a broad range of science investigations that require better than 1% photometric precision across the sky (repeatability and uniformity) and a similar accuracy of measured broadband color. The fast and persistent cadence of the LSST survey will significantly improve the temporal sampling rate with which celestial events and motions are tracked. To achieve these goals, and to optimally utilize the observing calendar, it will be necessary to obtain excellent photometric calibration of data taken over a wide range of observing conditions - even those not normally considered 'photometric'. To achieve this it will be necessary to routinely and accurately measure the full optical passband that includes the atmosphere as well as the instrumental telescope and camera system. The LSST mountain facility will include a new monochromatic dome illumination projector system to measure the detailed wavelength dependence of the instrumental passband for each channel in the system. The facility will also include an auxiliary spectroscopic telescope dedicated to measurement of atmospheric transparency at all locations in the sky during LSST observing. In this paper, we describe these systems and present laboratory and observational data that illustrate their performance.

  5. Controlled atmosphere for fabrication of cermet electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, S.P.; Woods, R.W.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for making an inert electrode composite wherein a metal oxide and a metal are reacted in a gaseous atmosphere at an elevated temperature of at least about 750 C. The metal oxide is at least one of the nickel, iron, tin, zinc and zirconium oxides and the metal is copper, silver, a mixture of copper and silver or a copper-silver alloy. The gaseous atmosphere has an oxygen content that is controlled at about 5--3000 ppm in order to obtain a desired composition in the resulting composite. 2 figs.

  6. Controlled atmosphere for fabrication of cermet electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making an inert electrode composite wherein a metal oxide and a metal are reacted in a gaseous atmosphere at an elevated temperature of at least about 750.degree. C. The metal oxide is at least one of the nickel, iron, tin, zinc and zirconium oxides and the metal is copper, silver, a mixture of copper and silver or a copper-silver alloy. The gaseous atmosphere has an oxygen content that is controlled at about 5-3000 ppm in order to obtain a desired composition in the resulting composite.

  7. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Video

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2 .2004The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement

  8. Condition Monitoring System for Reinforced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    containing dissolved ionic species such as chlorides. Since concrete is a porous material, with timeCondition Monitoring System for Reinforced Concrete Structures PROBLEM THIS TECHNOLOGY SOLVES: Patent pending concrete condition monitoring system providing `real-time' information on temperature

  9. Phenomena of oscillations in atmospheric pressure direct current glow discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Fu-cheng [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)] [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Yan, Wen; Wang, De-zhen [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-sustained oscillations in a dc glow discharge with a semiconductor layer at atmospheric pressure were investigated by means of a one-dimensional fluid model. It is found that the dc glow discharge initially becomes unstable in the subnormal glow region and gives rise to oscillations of plasma parameters. A variety of oscillations with one or more frequencies have been observed under different conditions. The discharge oscillates between the glow discharge mode and the Townsend discharge mode in the oscillations with large amplitude while operates in the subnormal glow discharge mode all the while in the oscillations with small amplitude. Fourier Transform spectra of oscillations reveal the transition mechanism between different oscillations. The effects of semiconductor conductivity on the oscillation frequency of the dominant mode, gas voltage, as well as the discharge current have also been analyzed.

  10. An advanced open-path atmospheric pollution monitor for large areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Large amounts of toxic waste materials, generated in manufacturing fuel for nuclear reactors, are stored in tanks buried over large areas at DOE sites. Flammable and hazardous gases are continually generated by chemical reactions in the waste materials. To prevent explosive concentrations of these gases, the gases are automatically vented to the atmosphere when the pressure exceeds a preset value. Real-time monitoring of the atmosphere above the tanks with automatic alarming is needed to prevent exposing workers to unsafe conditions when venting occurs. This project is to design, develop, and test an atmospheric pollution monitor which can measure concentrations of DOE-specified and EPA-specified hazardous gases over ranges as long as 4km. A CO{sub 2} laser to measure absorption spectra and to determine the distance over which the measurements are made, is combined with an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) to measure thermal emission spectra.

  11. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  12. Clathrate hydrates as a sink of noble gases in Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, C; Ballenegger, V; Picaud, Sylvain

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a statistical thermodynamic approach to determine the composition of clathrate hydrates which may form from a multiple compound gas whose composition is similar to that of Titan's atmosphere. Assuming that noble gases are initially present in this gas phase, we calculate the ratios of xenon, krypton and argon to species trapped in clathrate hydrates. We find that these ratios calculated for xenon and krypton are several orders of magnitude higher than in the coexisting gas at temperature and pressure conditions close to those of Titan's present atmosphere at ground level. Furthermore we show that, by contrast, argon is poorly trapped in these ices. This trapping mechanism implies that the gas-phase is progressively depleted in xenon and krypton when the coexisting clathrate hydrates form whereas the initial abundance of argon remains almost constant. Our results are thus compatible with the deficiency of Titan's atmosphere in xenon and krypton measured by the {\\it Huygens} probe during its descent on J...

  13. Energy conditions and their implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    Energy conditions and their implications Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint;#16;s (Los Alamos) Midwest Relativity 9 November 1999. #12; Abstract: The energy conditions of general- itational #12;elds and cosmological geometries. However, the energy conditions are beginning to look a lot

  14. Twilight for the energy conditions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    Twilight for the energy conditions? Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint;#16;s (CAB, Madrid) Marcel Grossmann 9 Roma July 2000 #12; Abstract: The energy conditions of general relativity per- mit one to deduce very powerful and general theorems. However, the energy conditions are now

  15. Connectivity To Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish DOE and NNSA connectivity to Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) for sites and facilities that have the potential for releasing hazardous materials sufficient to generate certain emergency declarations and to promote efficient use of resources for consequence assessment activities at DOE sites, facilities, operations, and activities in planning for and responding to emergency events. No cancellations.

  16. Exploring the Deep... Ocean-Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Climate oscillations 97 #12;Storing energy To understand how solar radiation affects large-scale processes), and biosphere (living organisms) that are driven by solar energy. The ocean and the atmosphere have the greatest on the others. To fully understand the dynamics of our climate, we must examine the global energy balance

  17. Atmospheric Data Package for the Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Ramsdell, James V.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this data package is to summarize our conceptual understanding of atmospheric transport and deposition, describe how this understanding will be simplified for numerical simulation as part of the Composite Analysis (i.e., implementation model), and finally to provide the input parameters needed for the simulations.

  18. THE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE ROBERT J. RUTTEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    THE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE ROBERT J. RUTTEN Sterrekundig Instituut, Postbus 80 000, NL≠3508 TA, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract. This "rapporteur" report discusses the solar photosphere and low does not seem to jeopardize precise determination of solar abundances in classical fashion. It is still

  19. MIDDLE ATMOSPHERE DYNAMICS ATS 708 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Academic Integrity Policy as found in the General Catalog (http://www.catalog.colostate.edu/FrontPDF/1, 1987, Andrews, Holton, Leovy, Academic Press. · Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics, 2006, Vallis Articles (alphabetically): · Baldwin et al., 2001: The quasi-biennial oscillation. Rev. Geophys., 39, 1979

  20. MIDDLE ATMOSPHERE DYNAMICS AT707 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., Holton, J. R., Leovy, C. B., Academic Press, 489 pp. · Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics, 2006 Review Articles: · Haynes, P. H., 2005: Stratospheric Dynamics. Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech., 37, 263­ 293­Dobson Circulation, Residual (Diabatic) Circulations 7.1 Discovery 7.2 Eliassen's Balanced Response to a Mechanical

  1. Analysis methods for Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu de Naurois

    2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Three different analysis techniques for Atmospheric Imaging System are presented. The classical Hillas parameters based technique is shown to be robust and efficient, but more elaborate techniques can improve the sensitivity of the analysis. A comparison of the different analysis techniques shows that they use different information for gamma-hadron separation, and that it is possible to combine their qualities.

  2. TETTERSTO NATURE Pre-industrial atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    , starting with the Greek and Roman cultures3'4.The cumulative deposition from anthropogenicsourcesin preTETTERSTO NATURE Pre-industrial atmospheric lead contamination detected in Swedish lake sediments for pre-industrial atmospherictrace-metalcontaminationt''it is commonlyassumed that air pollution

  3. Microlensing Effects in Atmospheres of Substars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Berdina; A. A. Minakov

    2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the present work is the study of focusing properties of atmospheres of substars that is necessary for adequate interpreting of observational data and for solving the inverse problem consisting in recovery parameters of 'microlenses' (substars) and sources (quasars). Amplification factor for a quasar image as projected onto the field of microlenses-substars was computed for optical and radio wavelengths.

  4. Propagation of strangelets in the Earth's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei Wu; Ren-Xin Xu; Bo-Qiang Ma

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A new model for the description of the behaviour of strangelets in the Earth's atmosphere is presented. Strangelet fission induced by collision with air nuclei is included. It is shown that strangelets with certain parameters of initial mass and energy may reach depths near sea level, which can be examined by ground-based experiments.

  5. White Dwarf Spectra and Atmosphere Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detlev Koester

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the spectral classification of white dwarfs and some of the physical processes important for their understanding. In the major part of this paper we discuss the input physics and computational methods for one of the most widely used stellar atmosphere codes for white dwarfs.

  6. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, C.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atmospheric Chemistry was held at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island, June 13-18, 1999. The conference was well attended with 151 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  7. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  8. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  9. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: Atmospheres RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folkins, Ian

    convection to start from more levels ∑ Simple modification of convective parameterization Correspondence to of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4), we show that the overall accuracy in the diurnal simulation of convective rise to diurnal cycles in cloud amount [May et al., 2012] and relative humidity [Soden, 2000] which

  10. Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    #12;2 Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere Contents 3 Heavy Snowfall regulations designed to elimi- nate human-caused haze in Big Bend and 155 other National Parks), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), among others. In support of BRAVO, NPS and CIRA scientists

  11. AT 715 (2 Credits) Atmospheric Oxidation Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 1. Develop an understanding of kinetic and equilibrium aspects of important chemical pathways, Journal of Geophysical Research, Atmospheric Chemis- try and Physics (on-line), Journal of the Air: reactions of isoprene oxidation products. Environ. Sci. Tech. 40, 4956-4960. #12;

  12. Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Professor; Recipient, Teaching Innovation Prize; Michigan Distinguished Professor of the Year Allison Mission to Comet 67P / Churyumov- Gerasimenko · Solar and Heliospheric Physics Group · STEREO Mission,OceanicandSpaceSciences Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann

  13. Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , transport, and fate of pollutants in soil, air, and water; improving and protecting land, air, and water, Policy and Management Agricultural Industries and Marketing The Department occupies the entire Soil are predominantly occupied by Soil Morphology and Genesis, Environmental Biophysics, and Atmospheric Sciences, plus

  14. Sommerfeld radiation condition at threshold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik Skibsted

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove Besov space bounds of the resolvent at low energies in any dimension for a class of potentials that are negative and obey a virial condition with these conditions imposed at infinity only. We do not require spherical symmetry. The class of potentials includes in dimension $\\geq3$ the attractive Coulomb potential. There are two boundary values of the resolvent at zero energy which we characterize by radiation conditions. These radiation conditions are zero energy versions of the well-known Sommerfeld radiation condition.

  15. Abstract. Harvesting condensed atmospheric vapour as dew water can be an alternative or complementary potable water resource in specific arid or insular areas. Such radiation-cooled condensing devices use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUILDING - A USTAR INNOVATION CENTER Estimated New Space: USTAR - 200,000 NSF Estimated Completion Date, and coordination of site design with North Chilled Water Plant design. The 5,940 NSF Chilled Water Plant processes across all of campus. The existing distribution system is over 30 years old. Corrosion from ground

  16. Atmospheric Circulation and Tides of "51Peg b-like" Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam P. Showman; Tristan Guillot

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the properties of the atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets at orbital distances smaller than 0.1 AU from their stars. We show that these ``51Peg b-like'' planets are rapidly synchronized by tidal interactions, but that small departures from synchronous rotation can occur because of fluid-dynamical torques within these planets. Previous radiative-transfer and evolution models of such planets assume a homogeneous atmosphere. Nevertheless, we show using simple arguments that, at the photosphere, the day-night temperature difference and characteristic wind speeds may reach ~500 K and ~2 km/s, respectively. Substantial departures from chemical equilibrium are expected. The cloud coverage depends sensitively on the dynamics; clouds could exist predominantly either on the dayside or nightside, depending on the circulation regime. Radiative-transfer models that assume homogeneous conditions are therefore inadequate in describing the atmospheric properties of 51Peg b-like planets. We present preliminary three-dimensional, nonlinear simulations of the atmospheric circulation of HD209458b that indicate plausible patterns for the circulation and generally agree with our simpler estimates. Furthermore, we show that kinetic energy production in the atmosphere can lead to the deposition of substantial energy in the interior, with crucial consequences for the evolution of these planets. Future measurements of reflected and thermally-emitted radiation from these planets will help test our ideas.

  17. Advective Desorption of Uranium (VI) from Contaminated Hanford Vadose Zone Sediments under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Forrester, Steven W.

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Sedimentary, hydrologic, and geochemical variations in the Hanford subsurface environment, as well as compositional differences in contaminating waste streams, have created vast differences in the migration and mobility of uranium within the subsurface environment. A series of hydraulically-saturated and -unsaturated column experiments were performed to i.) assess the effect of water content on the advective desorption and migration of uranium from contaminated sediments, and ii.) evaluate the uranium concentration that can develop in porewater and/or groundwater as a result of desorption/dissolution reactions. Flow rate and moisture content were varied to evaluate the influence of contact time, pore water velocity, and macropore desaturation on aqueous uranium concentrations. Sediments were collected from the T-TX-TY tank farm complex and the 300 Area Process Ponds located on the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington State. The sediments vary in depth, mineralogy, and in contamination events. Experiments were conducted under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of conditions commonly encountered at repository sites across the arid western United States and, in particular, the Hanford site. Results illustrate the release of uranium from these sediments is kinetically controlled and low water contents encountered within the Hanford vadose zone result in the formation of mobile-immobile water regimes, which isolate a fraction of the reactive sites within the sediments, effectively reducing the concentration of uranium released into migrating porewaters.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

  19. Atmospheric performance of the special-purpose Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) thin-airfoil family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tangler, J; Smith, B; Jager, D; Olsen, T

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), in cooperation with SeaWest Energy Group, has completed extensive atmospheric testing of the special-purpose SERI thin-airfoil family during the 1990 wind season. The purpose of this test program was to experimentally verify the predicted performance characteristics of the thin-airfoil family on a geometrically optimized blade, and to compare it to original-equipment blades under atmospheric wind conditions. The tests were run on two identical Micon 65/13 horizontal-axis wind turbines installed side-by-side in a wind farm. The thin-airfoil family 7.96 m blades were installed on one turbine, and AeroStar 7.41 m blades were installed on the other. This paper presents final performance results of the side-by-side comparative field test for both clean and dirty blade conditions. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Extremality conditions for generalized channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Jencova

    2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized channel is a completely positive map that preserves trace on a given subspace. We find conditions under which a generalized channel with respect to a positively generated subspace J is an extreme point in the set of all such generalized channels. As a special case, this yields extremality conditions for quantum protocols. In particular, we obtain new extremality conditions for quantum 1-testers with 2 outcomes, which correspond to yes/no measurements on the set of quantum channels.

  1. Belief Revision through Forgetting Conditionals in Conditional Probabilistic Logic Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weiru

    of probabilistic belief revising, most research focuses on revising a single probabilistic distribution [5, 1, 8, 4Belief Revision through Forgetting Conditionals in Conditional Probabilistic Logic Programs Anbu Yue 1 and Weiru Liu 1 Abstract. In this paper, we present a revision strategy of revis- ing

  2. Performance of the STACEE Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STACEE Collaboration; D. A. Williams; D. Bhattacharya; L. M. Boone; M. C. Chantell; Z. Conner; C. E. Covault; M. Dragovan; P. Fortin; D. Gingrich; D. T. Gregorich; D. S. Hanna; G. Mohanty; R. Mukherjee; R. A. Ong; S. Oser; K. Ragan; R. A. Scalzo; D. R. Schuette; C. G. Theoret; T. O. Tumer; F. Vincent; J. A. Zweerink

    2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is located at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. The field of solar tracking mirrors (heliostats) around a central receiver tower is used to direct Cherenkov light from atmospheric showers onto secondary mirrors on the tower, which in turn image the light onto cameras of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE Collaboration has previously reported a detection of the Crab Nebula with approximately 7 standard deviation significance, using 32 heliostats (STACEE-32). This result demonstrates both the viability of the technique and the suitability of the site. We are in the process of completing an upgrade to 48 heliostats (STACEE-48) en route to an eventual configuration using 64 heliostats (STACEE-64) in early 2001. In this paper, we summarize the results obtained on the sensitivity of STACEE-32 and our expectations for STACEE-48 and STACEE-64.

  3. Performance of the STACEE Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, D A; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Gregorich, D T; Hanna, D S; Mohanty, G B; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Oser, S M; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; SchŁtte, D R; Theoret, C G; TŁmer, T O; Vincent, F; Zweerink, J A

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is located at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. The field of solar tracking mirrors (heliostats) around a central receiver tower is used to direct Cherenkov light from atmospheric showers onto secondary mirrors on the tower, which in turn image the light onto cameras of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE Collaboration has previously reported a detection of the Crab Nebula with approximately 7 standard deviation significance, using 32 heliostats (STACEE-32). This result demonstrates both the viability of the technique and the suitability of the site. We are in the process of completing an upgrade to 48 heliostats (STACEE-48) en route to an eventual configuration using 64 heliostats (STACEE-64) in early 2001. In this paper, we summarize the results obtained on the sensitivity of STACEE-32 and our expectations for STACEE-48 and STACEE-64.

  4. Atmospheric rivers as Lagrangian coherent structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garaboa, Daniel; Huhn, Florian; Perez-MuŮuzuri, Vicente

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that filamentous Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) over the Northern Atlantic Ocean are closely linked to attracting Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) in the large scale wind field. LCSs represent lines of attraction in the evolving flow with a significant impact on all passive tracers. Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE), we extract LCSs from a two-dimensional flow derived from water vapor flux of atmospheric reanalysis data and compare them to the three-dimensional LCS obtained from the wind flow. We correlate the typical filamentous water vapor patterns of ARs with LCSs and find that LCSs bound the filaments on the back side. Passive advective transport of water vapor from tropical latitudes is potentially possible.

  5. On the theory of water level variations in lakes and seas induced by atmospheric disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparger, Carter Reece

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Boundary Conditions: u. (o. q, t) = u- C~, gt) = ~ (W, - K, t) = 0 au. 8u [ Q ? (y-g t) = -+ ? (w, o, t) = ? ? ~ Wpl~ %+ R eQ? x~v Initial Conditions; u. (e?q, o) = q (W, o) = 0 Solution: The expressions %q = co+ 'La ~ exp Q~ J ?= ?in Iy z(g ??p... ~ = constant) ~Q ~ ~ b~ at o~ a+ + \\ 0 a at C. F || I. 11* tl*o ~Co 0o1 Ilsed: In general, the response of a given body of homo- geneous water to atmospheric pressure grad1ents and winds depends on the eddy viscos1ty of the weter, the Coriolis force...

  6. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g., organic and medical waste, drying materials, heating air, calcining and the like.

  7. ATMOSPHERIC CO2 A GLOBAL LIMITING RESOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    Carbondioxideatmosphericburden,PgC Land use Fossil CO2 from land use emissions ­ not fossil fuel combustion ­ was the dominant CO2 Comparison of CO2 mixing ratio from fossil fuel combustion and land use changes 400 380 360 340 cores 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 Forcing,Wm -2 #12;ATMOSPHERIC CO2 EMISSIONS Time series 1700

  8. Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles ¬ĽExchange VisitorsforDepartment ofNoOrganizationDusty Atmosphere

  9. NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Atmospheric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and AchievementsResearchReliabilityand7 November

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope Change #1Impacts |Services SubcommitteeAtmosphere

  11. Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities and specific methods for seeding and planting at each area. evegetation work is scheduled to commence during the first quarter of FY 2011 to minimize the amount of time that sites are unvegetated and more susceptible to invasion by non-native weedy annual species.

  12. Lightning, atmospheric electricity and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, C.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature records indicate that a global warming of 0.5{minus}0.7{degrees}C has occurred over the past century (Hansen and Lebedeff, 1987). Whether this trend is a result of increased trace gas concentrations in the atmosphere, or simply a result of natural variability; is still not known. These temperature trends are derived from thousands of observations worldwide. However, these observations are concentrated largely over continental areas, and then mainly in the northern hemisphere`s populated regions. This northern hemisphere continental bias results in large uncertainties in estimates of global temperature trends. Due to the increasing evidence that the present buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may result in an additional global warming of 1-5{degrees}C by the year 2050 (IPCC, 1990), it is increasingly important to find afternative methods to monitor fluctuations in global surface temperatures. As shown by two recent studies (Williams, 1992; Price, 1993), the global atmospheric electric circuit may provide a promising afternative for monitoring future climate change.

  13. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM); Henins, Ivars (Los Alamos, NM); Babayan, Steve E. (Huntington Beach, CA); Hicks, Robert F. (Los Angeles, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  14. Numerical study on microwave-sustained argon discharge under atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.; Hua, W., E-mail: huaw@scu.edu.cn; Guo, S. Y. [School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)] [School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical study on microwave sustained argon discharge under atmospheric pressure is reported in this paper. The purpose of this study is to investigate both the process and effects of the conditions of microwave-excited gas discharge under atmospheric pressure, thereby aiding improvements in the design of the discharge system, setting the appropriate working time, and controlling the operating conditions. A 3D model is presented, which includes the physical processes of electromagnetic wave propagation, electron transport, heavy species transport, gas flow, and heat transfer. The results can be obtained by means of the fluid approximation. The maxima of the electron density and gas temperature are 4.96?◊?10{sup 18} m{sup ?3} and 2514.8?K, respectively, and the gas pressure remains almost unchanged for typical operating conditions with a gas flow rate of 20 l/min, microwave power of 1000 W, and initial temperature of 473?K. In addition, the conditions (microwave power, gas flow rate, and initial temperature) of discharge are varied to obtain deeper information about the electron density and gas temperature. The results of our numerical study are valid and clearly describe both the physical process and effects of the conditions of microwave-excited argon discharge.

  15. A theoretical framework for volcanic degassing chemistry in a comparative planetology perspective and implications for planetary atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    gases dominated by H2O. This simple pattern broadly mirrors the atmospheres of Venus- Earth of extra-solar planets. Volatile abundances within the planetary body interiors also matter but they play a secondary role. Furthermore, our analysis shows that any difference in redox conditions prevailing during

  16. Trends and inferred emissions of atmospheric high molecular weight perfluorocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivy, Diane Jean

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric observations and atmospheric observation-based global emission estimates are presented for the five high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C 4 F 1 0 ), dodecafluoropentane (C5 F1 2 ), ...

  17. Electrical apparatus for explosive gas atmospheres, Part 0: General introduction†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEC Technical Committee

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Recommendation has been prepared by IEC Technical Committee No. 31, Electrical Apparatus for Explosive Atmospheres; It forms one of a series of publications dealing with electrical apparatus for use in explosive gas atmospheres. This particular...

  18. Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

  19. atmospheric sciences program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Certification for Atmospheric Sciences Undergraduate Students The Computational Science and Engineering certificate program is designed to provide ATMS under- graduate...

  20. Atmospheric particulates in a semi-rural environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Thomas Kelly

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES CHAPTER Page Vli1 iX I INTRODUCTION Air pollution ? general Air pollution ? historical perspective Scope of research Importance of atmospheric particulates Particulates and climatology Particulates and human health 14... of the best definitions of an air pollutant is given by Huschke (1968), "with respect to the atmosphere, any substance within it that is foreign to the 'natural' atmosphere or that exceeds its 'natural' concentration in the atmosphere. The universal...

  1. Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short-term production and synoptic influences on atmospheric 7 Be concentrations Ilya G. Usoskin,1; published 21 March 2009. [1] Variations of the cosmogenic radionuclide 7 Be in the global atmosphere the variations in the 7 Be concentration in the atmosphere for the period from 1 January to 28 February 2005

  2. MET 600: Advanced Atmospheric Dynamics Air-sea interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Joshua Xiouhua

    on earth #12;Energy Conservation: Global Radiation Balance How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;The Earth receives a total amount of radiation variations of TOP solar radiation How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;Albedos of various

  3. Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3 Contents Abstract 2 1 Introduction 6 1.1 Problem background

  4. Singular Vector Analysis for Atmospheric Chemical Transport Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandu, Adrian

    are presented for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001. The singular valuesSingular Vector Analysis for Atmospheric Chemical Transport Models Wenyuan Liao and Adrian Sandu for atmospheric chemical transport models. The distinguishing feature of these models is the presence of stiff

  5. AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, Wiley-Interscience, 2006AT631, Spring 2011 Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosols Tuesdays 9-9:50 AM, 212B ACRC Wednesdays, Lab, 1-4 PM, ACB 10 Instructor: Prof. Sonia Kreidenweis Atmospheric Chemistry Bldg., Room 19 491

  6. Targeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandu, Adrian

    for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001 show that the optimal location of observations, targeted observations. 1 Introduction Our ability to anticipate and manage changes in atmospheric pollutantTargeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models Adrian Sandu Department

  7. High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements David M. Slocum,* Thomas M such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow

  8. European Atmospheric Pollution Imported by Cooler Air Masses to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    European Atmospheric Pollution Imported by Cooler Air Masses to the Eastern Mediterranean during of European pollution are observed in the atmosphere (74 ( 13%). On the other hand, when the Persian Trough). This study demonstrates that atmospheric pollution over the East Mediterranean region during the summer

  9. School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology Strategic Plan March 1 opportunities. Vision The vision of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences is: To lead in innovative research and educate the future leaders in earth and atmospheric sciences for the 21st century, within

  10. MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selin, Noelle Eckley

    MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE: Insights from a global 3D land.S. National Science Foundation Atmospheric Chemistry Program #12;FROM ATMOSPHERE TO FISH: MERCURY RISING Ice core from Wyoming [Schuster et al., ES&T 2002] Mercury deposition has increased by 300% since

  11. MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selin, Noelle Eckley

    MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE: Insights from global modeling Noelle Atmospheric Chemistry Program #12;FROM ATMOSPHERE TO FISH: MERCURY RISING Ice core from Wyoming [Schuster et al., ES&T 2002] Mercury deposition has increased by 300% since industrialization Major anthropogenic

  12. Smelting Associated with the Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hur, J-M.; Jeong, M-S.; Lee, W-K.; Cho, S-H.; Seo, C-S.; Park, S-W.

    2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The smelting process associated with the advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute was studied by using surrogate materials. Considering the vaporization behaviors of input materials, the operation procedure of smelting was set up as (1) removal of residual salts, (2) melting of metal powder, and (3) removal of dross from a metal ingot. The behaviors of porous MgO crucible during smelting were tested and the chemical stability of MgO in the salt-being atmosphere was confirmed.

  13. EFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizes dynamicsPostdoctoralCenters ¬Ľ6,

  14. EFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizes dynamicsPostdoctoralCenters ¬Ľ6,2,

  15. EFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizes dynamicsPostdoctoralCenters ¬Ľ6,2,3,

  16. EFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizes dynamicsPostdoctoralCenters ¬Ľ6,2,3,4,

  17. CPFFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO6, 3/11/13) Cost Plus7,1,

  18. CPFFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO6, 3/11/13) Cost Plus7,1,2,

  19. CPFFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO6, 3/11/13) Cost Plus7,1,2,5,

  20. CPFFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO6, 3/11/13) Cost

  1. LFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample Environment: Magnet and6ledp/ The listing ofLEPA?1,

  2. LFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample Environment: Magnet and6ledp/ The listing ofLEPA?1,2,

  3. LFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample Environment: Magnet and6ledp/ The listing

  4. LFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample Environment: Magnet and6ledp/ The listing4, 9/26/14)

  5. SFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# ,Schools WhenSection BA

  6. SFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# ,Schools WhenSection BA2, 6/14/13)

  7. SFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# ,Schools WhenSection BA2,

  8. SFS Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# ,Schools WhenSection BA2,5, 3/6/15)

  9. An Investigation of Martian Methane & Implications for Future Missions Keywords: Mars, atmosphere; Atmospheres, composition; Spectroscopy; Infrared observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson Jr., James E.

    An Investigation of Martian Methane & Implications for Future Missions Keywords: Mars, atmosphere and Planetary Institute discussing the recent detection of methane in the Martian atmosphere. Methane requires constant renewal in the Martian atmosphere, so this discovery implies the presence of methane sources

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric particles analysis Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Atmospheres by Houghton Energetic Charged-Particle Interactions with Atmospheres... or analysis of Cassini Data 12;Ions Electrons N2 96% CH4 4% + ? Titan's Atmosphere...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric physics Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for: atmospheric physics Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Cloud Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry http:cpac.pku.edu.cn Summary: Cloud Physics and Atmospheric Chemistry http:...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric aerosol size Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for about ten percent of all aerosols in the atmosphere. We... , can actually absorb solar energy and warm the atmosphere. Atmospheric aerosols are very important... by...

  13. CO Oxidation on Pt-Group Metals from Ultrahigh Vacuum to Near Atmospheric Pressures. F. Gao, Y. Cai, K. K. Gath, Y. Wang, M. S. Chen, Q. L. Guo, and D. W. Goodman*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) and X-ray photoelectronCO Oxidation on Pt-Group Metals from Ultrahigh Vacuum to Near Atmospheric Pressures. 1. Rhodium F. 6 found for a Pt(111) catalyst near atmospheric conditions, the reaction rate is linearly

  14. Energetic materials at extreme conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, David Iain Archibald

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to effectively model the behaviour of energetic materials under operational conditions it is essential to obtain detailed structural information for these compounds at elevated temperature and/or pressures. The ...

  15. Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2) CawithMicrofluidicJournalWhatActivities inNOAA Science

  16. Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" GiveFutureFrederick Reines

  17. Emerging Technology for Measuring Atmospheric Aerosol Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles asSecond stage of theEMI SIG

  18. Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4 (Barrels per

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4 (Barrels

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically Induced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssemblyDemandPlasma4

  1. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement andMISR, and4ComplianceCW 2013

  2. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement andMISR, and4ComplianceCW 2013Composition

  3. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement andMISR, and4ComplianceCW

  4. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement andMISR, and4ComplianceCWComposition and

  5. Session Papers Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluatingconstructionSession Name: WorkflowsSession Papers

  6. Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing Smart GridShift End Shift End

  7. Spectral conditions for positive maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dariusz Chruscinski; Andrzej Kossakowski

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a partial classification of positive linear maps in matrix algebras which is based on a family of spectral conditions. This construction generalizes celebrated Choi example of a map which is positive but not completely positive. It is shown how the spectral conditions enable one to construct linear maps on tensor products of matrix algebras which are positive but only on a convex subset of separable elements. Such maps provide basic tools to study quantum entanglement in multipartite systems.

  8. Habitability of waterworlds: runaway greenhouses, atmospheric expansion and multiple climate states of pure water atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are four different stable climate states for pure water atmospheres, as might exist on so-called "waterworlds". I map these as a function of solar constant for planets ranging in size from Mars size to 10 Earth-mass. The states are: globally ice covered (Tsnet absorption of sunlight. Across the range of planet sizes, I account for the atmospheres expanding to high altitudes as they warm. The emitting and absorbing surfaces (optical depth of unity) move to high altitude, making their area larger than the planet surfa...

  9. The Atmospheric Monitoring System of the JEM-EUSO Space Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frias, M D Rodriguez; Bozzo, E; del Peral, L; Neronov, A; Wada, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Atmospheric Monitoring System (AMS) is a mandatory and key device of a space-based mission which aims to detect Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) and Extremely-High Energy Cosmic Rays (EHECR) from Space. JEM-EUSO has a dedicated atmospheric monitoring system that plays a fundamental role in our understanding of the atmospheric conditions in the Field of View (FoV) of the telescope. Our AMS consists of a very challenging space infrared camera and a LIDAR device, that are being fully designed with space qualification to fulfil the scientific requirements of this space mission. The AMS will provide information of the cloud cover in the FoV of JEM-EUSO, as well as measurements of the cloud top altitudes with an accuracy of 500 m and the optical depth profile of the atmosphere transmittance in the direction of each air shower with an accuracy of 0.15 degree and a resolution of 500 m. This will ensure that the energy of the primary UHECR and the depth of maximum development of the EAS ( Extensive Air Shower)...

  10. On detecting biospheres from thermodynamic disequilibrium in planetary atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Catling, David C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric chemical disequilibrium has been proposed as a method for detecting extraterrestrial biospheres from exoplanet observations. Chemical disequilibrium is potentially a generalized biosignature since it makes no assumptions about particular biogenic gases or metabolisms. Here, we present the first rigorous calculations of the thermodynamic chemical disequilibrium in the atmospheres of Solar System planets, in which we quantify the difference in Gibbs free energy of an observed atmosphere compared to that of all the atmospheric gases reacted to equilibrium. The purely gas phase disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere, as measured by this available Gibbs free energy, is not unusual by Solar System standards and smaller than that of Mars. However, Earth's atmosphere is in contact with a surface ocean, which means that gases can react with water, and so a multiphase calculation that includes aqueous species is required. We find that the disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere-ocean system (in joules per mole o...

  11. Experimental study of elliptical jet from sub to supercritical conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind, E-mail: aravind7@iist.ac.in [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala 695547 (India)] [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala 695547 (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The jet mixing at supercritical conditions involves fluid dynamics as well as thermodynamic phenomena. All the jet mixing studies at critical conditions to the present date have focused only on axisymmetric jets. When the liquid jet is injected into supercritical environment, the thermodynamic transition could be well understood by considering one of the important fluid properties such as surface tension since it decides the existence of distinct boundary between the liquid and gaseous phase. It is well known that an elliptical liquid jet undergoes axis-switching phenomena under atmospheric conditions due to the presence of surface tension. The experimental investigations were carried out with low speed elliptical jet under supercritical condition. Investigation of the binary component system with fluoroketone jet and N{sub 2} gas as environment shows that the surface tension force dominates for a large downstream distance, indicating delayed thermodynamic transition. The increase in pressure to critical state at supercritical temperature is found to expedite the thermodynamic transition. The ligament like structures has been observed rather than droplets for supercritical pressures. However, for the single component system with fluoroketone jet and fluoroketone environment shows that the jet disintegrates into droplets as it is subjected to the chamber conditions even for the subcritical pressures and no axis switching phenomenon is observed. For a single component system, as the pressure is increased to critical state, the liquid jet exhibits gas-gas like mixing behavior and that too without exhibiting axis-switching behavior.

  12. The electrodeless discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laroussi, M.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the generation and applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas received increased interest in the plasma research community. Applications such as the surface modification of materials, and the decontamination of matter have been under investigation. In this context, the authors introduce a new means of generating an atmospheric pressure discharge, which is suitable for use in the above-mentioned applications, and in the treatment of undesirable or polluting gases, such as VOC's. This device is a capacitively coupled discharge. It is basically made of a non-conducting tube with two independent loops of wire wrapped around it, and separated by a distance d. A stable discharge is generated inside the tube when an AC voltage of few hundred volts to few kilovolts, at a frequency of few kilohertz, is applied between the loops. One end of the tube is completely open to the outside air, and a seed gas (generally a noble gas such as Helium) is introduced in the tube. The plasma generated with this method is weakly ionized, cold, and is maintained by a relatively low input power (few tens of watts, depending on the size of the tube). In this paper, the discharge electrical characteristics, its radiation emission characteristics, and the measurement of relevant plasma parameters will be presented.

  13. Spectrophotometric Resolution of Stellar Atmospheres with Microlensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Scott Gaudi; Andrew Gould

    1998-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Microlensing is a powerful tool for studying stellar atmospheres because as the source crosses regions of formally infinite magnification (caustics) the surfaceof the star is resolved, thereby allowing one to measure the radial intensity profile, both photometrically and spectroscopically. However, caustic crossing events are relatively rare, and monitoring them requires intensive application of telescope resources. It is therefore essential that the observational parameters needed to accurately measure the intensity profile are quantified. We calculate the expected errors in the recovered radial intensity profile as a function of the unlensed flux, source radius, spatial resolution the recovered intensity profile, and caustic crossing time for the two principle types of caustics: point-mass and binary lenses. We demonstrate that for both cases there exist simple scaling relations between these parameters and the resultant errors. We find that the error as a function of the spatial resolution of the recovered profile, parameterized by the number of radial bins, increases as $N_R^{3/2}$, considerably faster than the naive $N_R^{1/2}$ expectation. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages of binary caustic-crossing events and point-lens events. Binary events are more common, easier to plan for, and provide more homogeneous information about the stellar atmosphere. However, a sub-class of point-mass events with low impact parameters can provide dramatically more information provided that they can be recognized in time to initiate observations.

  14. Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)] [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Ann Stepp, Mary [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)] [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States)] [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States); Trink, Barry [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)] [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

  15. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  16. Black holes, cuspy atmospheres, and galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In cuspy atmospheres, jets driven by supermassive black holes (BHs) offset radiative cooling. The jets fire episodically, but often enough that the cuspy atmosphere does not move very far towards a cooling catastrophe in the intervals of jet inactivity. The ability of energy released on the sub-parsec scale of the BH to balance cooling on scales of several tens of kiloparsecs arises through a combination of the temperature sensitivity of the accretion rate and the way in which the radius of jet disruption varies with ambient density. Accretion of hot gas does not significantly increase BH masses, which are determined by periods of rapid BH growth and star formation when cold gas is briefly abundant at the galactic centre. Hot gas does not accumulate in shallow potential wells. As the Universe ages, deeper wells form, and eventually hot gas accumulates. This gas soon prevents the formation of further stars, since jets powered by the BH prevent it from cooling, and it mops up most cold infalling gas before many stars can form. Thus BHs set the upper limit to the masses of galaxies. The formation of low-mass galaxies is inhibited by a combination of photo-heating and supernova-driven galactic winds. Working in tandem these mechanisms can probably explain the profound difference between the galaxy luminosity function and the mass function of dark halos expected in the cold dark matter cosmology.

  17. Assessment of atmospheric mercury emission reduction measures relevant for application in Poland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlawiczka, S.; Fudala, J. [Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice (Poland)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel combustion for heat and power generation, together with cement production, were the most significant sources of anthropogenic atmospheric mercury emission in Poland in 2003, with 57 and 27% of Hg emission, respectively. It was found that in Poland, Hg emission reduction measures need to be focused on the energy generation sector. Sorbent injection upstream of an electrostatic precipitator or fabric filter, mercury oxidation upstream of a wet or dry flue gas desulphurisation installation, together with Hg capture on sorbents, should be considered as priority in Polish conditions. This refers mainly to fuel combustion processes but also to the production of cement. For economic reasons it seems advisable that, apart from activated carbons as sorbents, application of zeolites obtained from power plant fly ash should also be considered. Application of primary methods seems to be very promising in Polish conditions, although they should be considered rather as an additional option apart from sorbent injection as the best option. Switching from coal to liquid and gaseous fuels shows the highest potential for reducing Hg emission. For chlorine production using the mercury cell electrolysis method, strict monitoring of Hg emissions and good housekeeping of Hg releasing processes seems a promising approach, but the main activity should focus on changing mercury-based technologies into membrane cell methods. Emission abatement potential for the atmospheric mercury in Poland has been roughly assessed, showing that in perspective of 2015, the emission could be reduced to about 25% of the anthropogenic atmospheric Hg emission in 2003.

  18. Evaluation of Hydrometeor Occurrence Profiles in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Climate Model using Atmospheric Classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchand, Roger T.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical profiles of hydrometeor occurrence from the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) climate model are compared with profiles observed by a vertically pointing millimeter wavelength cloud-radar (located in the U.S. Southern Great Plains) as a function of the largescale atmospheric state. The atmospheric state is determined by classifying (or clustering) the large-scale (synoptic) fields produced by the MMF and a numerical weather prediction model using a neural network approach. The comparison shows that for cold frontal and post-cold frontal conditions the MMF produces profiles of hydrometeor occurrence that compare favorably with radar observations, while for warm frontal conditions the model tends to produce hydrometeor fractions that are too large with too much cloud (non-precipitating hydrometeors) above 7 km and too much precipitating hydrometeor coverage below 7 km. We also find that the MMF has difficulty capturing the formation of low clouds and that for all atmospheric states that occur during June, July, and August, the MMF produces too much high and thin cloud, especially above 10 km.

  19. Conditioned changes in pain reactivity: conditioned stimuli elicit hypoalgesia under a wide range of test conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illich, Paul Anthony

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditioned hypoalgesia, two recent reports suggest that a conditioned stimulus (CS) which has been paired with an aversive event may sometimes produce an increase in pain reactivity, or "hyperalgesia" rather than hypoalgesia (Davis & Henderson, 1985...-Evans hooded rats) (Davis & Henderson, 1985; Lysle & Fowler, 1988). Currently, it is not clear what determines whether a stimulus which has been paired with an aversive event will elicit either an increase or decrease in pain reactivity. In the present...

  20. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    in 1970s.6) In order to explain this weakening *1 Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH), Kyoto Univer- sity, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011, Japan (e-mail: tsuda processes of atmospheric gravity waves was proposed.7),8) In the 1980s a notable advance was made

  1. MODELLING THE OVERLAND TRANSPORT OF LEAD DEPOSITED FROM THE ATMOSPHERE IN THE ELBE CATCHMENT OVER FOUR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa-Cabral, Mariza

    unknown. Despite decreasing atmospheric pollution, soil and freshwater systems still indicate high lead on minimizing atmospheric emissions, but also on minimizing soil erosion. Keywords: atmospheric pollution, direct atmospheric deposition, direct runoff, Elbe catchment, erosion, soil pollution, lead, long

  2. Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaskar Kura; Kalpalatha Kambham; Sivaramakrishnan Sangameswaran; Sandhya Potana [University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Description and validation of ERAD: An atmospheric dispersion model for high explosive detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boughton, B.A.; DeLaurentis, J.M.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion (ERAD) model is a three-dimensional numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric transport and diffusion. An integral plume rise technique is used to provide a description of the physical and thermodynamic properties of the cloud of warm gases formed when the explosive detonates. Particle dispersion is treated as a stochastic process which is simulated using a discrete time Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. The stochastic process approach permits a more fundamental treatment of buoyancy effects, calm winds and spatial variations in meteorological conditions. Computational requirements of the three-dimensional simulation are substantially reduced by using a conceptualization in which each Monte Carlo particle represents a small puff that spreads according to a Gaussian law in the horizontal directions. ERAD was evaluated against dosage and deposition measurements obtained during Operation Roller Coaster. The predicted contour areas average within about 50% of the observations. The validation results confirm the model`s representation of the physical processes.

  4. Conditions for successful data assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre J. Chorin; Matthias Morzfeld

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We show, using idealized models, that numerical data assimilation can be successful only if an effective dimension of the problem is not excessive. This effective dimension depends on the noise in the model and the data, and in physically reasonable problems it can be moderate even when the number of variables is huge. We then analyze several data assimilation algorithms, including particle filters and variational methods. We show that well-designed particle filters can solve most of those data assimilation problems that can be solved in principle, and compare the conditions under which variational methods can succeed to the conditions required of particle filters. We also discuss the limitations of our analysis.

  5. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coe, R. G.; Neary, V. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Yu, Y.; Weber, J.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, NM on May 13th-14th, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. hurricanes and other large storms) and to suggest how U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry.

  6. Modeling decade to century scale variability in the atmosphere/ocean [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutzbach, John E.

    2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of the intrinsic variability of a coupled atmosphere/ocean model called The Fast Ocean/Atmosphere Model (FOAM).

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric administration noaa Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Peter Tatro Director, Center for Ocean Exploration... Exploration Program ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  8. Propagation of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, X.; Xiong, Q.; Xiong, Z.; Hu, J.; Zhou, F.; Gong, W.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Tang, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Pan, Y. [College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''plasma bullet'' behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma plumes has recently attracted significant interest. In this paper, a specially designed plasma jet device is used to study this phenomenon. It is found that a helium primary plasma can propagate through the wall of a dielectric tube and keep propagating inside the dielectric tube (secondary plasma). High-speed photographs show that the primary plasma disappears before the secondary plasma starts to propagate. Both plumes propagate at a hypersonic speed. Detailed studies on the dynamics of the plasma plumes show that the local electric field induced by the charges on the surface of the dielectric tube plays an important role in the ignition of the secondary plasma. This indicates that the propagation of the plasma plumes may be attributed to the local electric field induced by the charges in the bulletlike plasma volume.

  9. Thermodynamics of atmospheric circulation on hot Jupiters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Goodman

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric circulation on tidally-locked exoplanets is driven by the absorption and reradiation of heat from the host star. They are natural heat engines, converting heat into mechanical energy. A steady state is possible only if there is a mechanism to dissipate mechanical energy, or if the redistribution of heat is so effective that the Carnot efficiency is driven to zero. Simulations based on primitive, equivalent-barotropic, or shallow-water equations without explicit provision for dissipation of kinetic energy and for recovery of that energy as heat, violate energy conservation. More seriously perhaps, neglect of physical sources of drag may overestimate wind speeds and rates of advection of heat from the day to the night side.

  10. Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana [Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, V Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Pop, Nicolina [Department of Physical Foundations of Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara, V Parvan 2, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Calinoiu, Delia [Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University of Timisoara, Mihai Viteazu 1, 300222 Timisoara (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, ŇngstrŲm's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

  11. Test of Lorentz invariance with atmospheric neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; K. Abe; Y. Haga; Y. Hayato; M. Ikeda; K. Iyogi; J. Kameda; Y. Kishimoto; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; M. Nakahata; Y. Nakano; S. Nakayama; H. Sekiya; M. Shiozawa; Y. Suzuki; A. Takeda; H. Tanaka; T. Tomura; K. Ueno; R. A. Wendell; T. Yokozawa; T. Irvine; T. Kajita; I. Kametani; K. Kaneyuki; K. P. Lee; T. McLachlan; Y. Nishimura; E. Richard; K. Okumura; L. Labarga; P. Fernandez; J. Gustafson; E. Kearns; J. L. Raaf; S. Berkman; H. A. Tanaka; S. Tobayama; J. L. Stone; L. R. Sulak; M. Goldhaber; G. Carminati; W. R. Kropp; S. Mine; P. Weatherly; A. Renshaw; M. B. Smy; H. W. Sobel; V. Takhistov; K. S. Ganezer; B. L. Hartfiel; J. Hill; W. E. Keig; N. Hong; J. Y. Kim; I. T. Lim; T. Akiri; A. Himmel; K. Scholberg; C. W. Walter; T. Wongjirad; T. Ishizuka; S. Tasaka; J. S. Jang; J. G. Learned; S. Matsuno; S. N. Smith; T. Hasegawa; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; T. Kobayashi; T. Nakadaira; K. Nakamura; Y. Oyama; K. Sakashita; T. Sekiguchi; T. Tsukamoto; A. T. Suzuki; Y. Takeuchi; C. Bronner; S. Hirota; K. Huang; K. Ieki; T. Kikawa; A. Minamino; A. Murakami; T. Nakaya; K. Suzuki; S. Takahashi; K. Tateishi; Y. Fukuda; K. Choi; Y. Itow; G. Mitsuka; P. Mijakowski; J. Hignight; J. Imber; C. K. Jung; C. Yanagisawa; H. Ishino; A. Kibayashi; Y. Koshio; T. Mori; M. Sakuda; R. Yamaguchi; T. Yano; Y. Kuno; R. Tacik; S. B. Kim; H. Okazawa; Y. Choi; K. Nishijima; M. Koshiba; Y. Suda; Y. Totsuka; M. Yokoyama; K. Martens; Ll. Marti; M. R. Vagins; J. F. Martin; P. de Perio; A. Konaka; M. J. Wilking; S. Chen; Y. Zhang; K. Connolly; R. J. Wilkes

    2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for neutrino oscillations induced by Lorentz violation has been performed using 4,438 live-days of Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data. The Lorentz violation is included in addition to standard three-flavor oscillations using the non-perturbative Standard Model Extension (SME), allowing the use of the full range of neutrino path lengths, ranging from 15 to 12,800 km, and energies ranging from 100 MeV to more than 100 TeV in the search. No evidence of Lorentz violation was observed, so limits are set on the renormalizable isotropic SME coefficients in the $e\\mu$, $\\mu\\tau$, and $e\\tau$ sectors, improving the existing limits by up to seven orders of magnitude and setting limits for the first time in the neutrino $\\mu\\tau$ sector of the SME.

  12. Wave Heating of the Solar Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding on coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding on the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation, and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us understanding and quantifying magnetic wave heating of the sola...

  13. Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith, Raymond E.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colorado-Ute Electric Association began a study to evaluate options for upgrading and extending the life of its Nucla power station in 1982. Located in southwestern Colorado near the town of Nucla, this station was commissioned in 1959 with a local bituminous coal as its design fuel for three identical stoker-fired units, each rated at 12.6 MW(e). Poor station efficiency, high fuel costs, and spiraling boiler maintenance costs forced the Nucla Station into low priority in the CUEA dispatch order as early as 1981. Among the options CUEA considered was to serve as a host utility to demonstrate Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (AFBC) technology. The anticipated environmental benefits and apparent attractive economics of a circulating AFBC led to Colorado-Ute's decision to proceed with the design and construction of a demonstration project in 1984 at the Nucla facility.

  14. Emulation to simulate low resolution atmospheric data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebbur Venkata Subba Rao, Vishwas [ORNL; Archibald, Richard K [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate simulations require significant compute power, they are complex and therefore it is time consuming to simulate them. We have developed an emulator to simulate unknown climate datasets. The emulator uses stochastic collocation and multi-dimensional in- terpolation to simulate the datasets. We have used the emulator to determine various physical quantities such as temperature, short and long wave cloud forcing, zonal winds etc. The emulation gives results which are very close to those obtained by simulations. The emulator was tested on 2 degree atmospheric datasets. The work evaluates the pros and cons of evaluating the mean first and inter- polating and vice versa. To determine the physical quantities, we have assumed them to be a function of time, longitude, latitude and a random parameter. We have looked at parameters that govern high stable clouds, low stable clouds, timescale for convection etc. The emulator is especially useful as it requires negligible compute times when compared to the simulation itself.

  15. Carbon monoxide in the solar atmosphere I. Numerical method and two-dimensional models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Wedemeyer-Boehm; I. Kamp; J. Bruls; B. Freytag

    2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation hydrodynamic code CO5BOLD has been supplemented with the time-dependent treatment of chemical reaction networks. Advection of particle densities due to the hydrodynamic flow field is also included. The radiative transfer is treated frequency-independently, i.e. grey, so far. The upgraded code has been applied to two-dimensional simulations of carbon monoxide (CO) in the non-magnetic solar photosphere and low chromosphere. For this purpose a reaction network has been constructed, taking into account the reactions which are most important for the formation and dissociation of CO under the physical conditions of the solar atmosphere. The network has been strongly reduced to 27 reactions, involving the chemical species H, H2, C, O, CO, CH, OH, and a representative metal. The resulting CO number density is highest in the cool regions of the reversed granulation pattern at mid-photospheric heights and decreases strongly above. There, the CO abundance stays close to a value of 8.3 on the usual logarithmic abundance scale with [H]=12 but is reduced in hot shock waves which are a ubiquitous phenomenon of the model atmosphere. For comparison, the corresponding equilibrium densities have been calculated, based on the reaction network but also under assumption of instantaneous chemical equilibrium by applying the Rybicki & Hummer (RH) code by Uitenbroek (2001). Owing to the short chemical timescales, the assumption holds for a large fraction of the atmosphere, in particular the photosphere. In contrast, the CO number density deviates strongly from the corresponding equilibrium value in the vicinity of chromospheric shock waves. Simulations with altered reaction network clearly show that the formation channel via hydroxide (OH) is the most important one under the conditions of the solar atmosphere.

  16. THE DEPENDENCE OF BROWN DWARF RADII ON ATMOSPHERIC METALLICITY AND CLOUDS: THEORY AND COMPARISON WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Adam; Nampaisarn, Thane [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Heng, Kevin, E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: tnampais@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: kheng@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Advanced Study, School of Natural Sciences, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing realistic and consistent atmosphere boundary conditions, we have generated evolutionary models for brown dwarfs and very low mass stars (VLMs) for different atmospheric metallicities ([Fe/H]), with and without clouds. We find that the spread in radius at a given mass and age can be as large as {approx}10% to {approx}25%, with higher-metallicity, higher-cloud-thickness atmospheres resulting quite naturally in larger radii. For each 0.1 dex increase in [Fe/H], radii increase by {approx}1% to {approx}2.5%, depending upon the age and mass. We also find that, while for smaller masses and older ages brown dwarf radii decrease with increasing helium fraction (Y, as expected), for more massive brown dwarfs and a wide range of ages they increase with helium fraction. The increase in radius in going from Y = 0.25 to Y = 0.28 can be as large as {approx}0.025 R{sub J} ({approx}2.5%). Furthermore, we find that for VLMs an increase in atmospheric metallicity from 0.0 to 0.5 dex, increases radii by {approx}4%, and from -0.5 to 0.5 dex by {approx}10%. Therefore, we suggest that opacity due to higher metallicity might naturally account for the apparent radius anomalies in some eclipsing VLM systems. Ten to twenty-five percent variations in radius exceed errors stemming from uncertainties in the equation of state alone. This serves to emphasize that transit and eclipse measurements of brown dwarf radii constrain numerous effects collectively, importantly including the atmosphere and condensate cloud models, and not just the equation of state. At all times, one is testing a multi-parameter theory, and not a universal radius-mass relation.

  17. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ThermoChem, under contract to the Department of Energy, conducted extensive research, development and demonstration work on a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (PAFBC) to confirm that advanced technology can meet these performance objectives. The ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC system integrates a pulse combustor with an atmospheric bubbling-bed type fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) In this modular configuration, the pulse combustor burns the fuel fines (typically less than 30 sieve or 600 microns) and the fluidized bed combusts the coarse fuel particles. Since the ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC employs both the pulse combustor and the AFBC technologies, it can handle the full-size range of coarse and fines. The oscillating flow field in the pulse combustor provides for high interphase and intraparticle mass transfer rates. Therefore, the fuel fines essentially burn under kinetic control. Due to the reasonably high temperature (>1093 C but less than the temperature for ash fusion to prevent slagging), combustion of fuel fines is substantially complete at the exit of the pulse combustor. The additional residence time of 1 to 2 seconds in the freeboard of the PAFBC unit then ensures high carbon conversion and, in turn, high combustion efficiency. A laboratory unit was successfully designed, constructed and tested for over 600 hours to confirm that the PAFBC technology could meet the performance objectives. Subsequently, a 50,000 lb/hr PAFBC demonstration steam boiler was designed, constructed and tested at Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina. This Final Report presents the detailed results of this extensive and successful PAFBC research, development and demonstration project.

  18. Conditionally Independent Generalized Competing Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is subjected to corrective maintenance (CM) and condition-based preventive maintenance (PM) actions. In order into a state in which it can perform its function again. Preventive maintenance (PM) is carried out when whether the maintenance is preventive or correc- tive. 2. Characterization of the PM-CM process Let Ht

  19. Introduction Simulation of Pathological conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willson, Stephen J.

    Reference Survey of the Modeling Brain Energy Metabolism and Function -- Report of the work by Larisa. V et State University MATH 690P, Dec. 1. 06 Wen Zhou Modeling Brain Energy #12;Outline Introduction Modeling Simulation of Pathological conditions Conclusion and Discussion Reference Introduction Modeling Energy

  20. atmospheric administration key: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    warming, ocean chemistry, carbon cycle Abstract CO2 released from combustion of fossil fuels equilibrates among the various carbon reservoirs of the atmosphere Matsumoto,...

  1. atmospheric general circulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II. THE CLIMATIC SYSTEM Climate is defined is the basic engine which transforms solar heating into the energy of the atmospheric motions and determines Lucarini, Valerio...

  2. atmosphere revitalization system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mars, Venus and Titan. Atmospheric electricity has controversially been implicated in climate on Earth; here, a comparative approach is employed to review the role of...

  3. atmospheric cloud physics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scale energy generation. Selvam, A M 2000-01-01 58 Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 64 (2002) 19731978 www.elsevier.comlocatejastp Biology and...

  4. atmospheric neutron environments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    component of the atmospheric neutron flux are considered separately. The energy spectra calculated using these equations were found to be in good agreement with data...

  5. atmosphere boundary layer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature The wind speed response to mesoscale SST variability is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current...

  6. atmospheric superficial layer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature The wind speed response to mesoscale SST variability is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current...

  7. atmospheric boundary layer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature The wind speed response to mesoscale SST variability is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current...

  8. atmospheric boundary layers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature The wind speed response to mesoscale SST variability is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current...

  9. atmospheric exposure chambers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dominick 16 atmospheres CiteSeer Summary: (Manuscript received in final form October 29, 2006) AbstractIn this work the theoretical relationship between the clear-sky...

  10. atmospheric fine particulate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interlaced by concentrations of stronger magnetic field at the interface between the umbra and the outer field-free atmosphere. Calculated synthetic images show dark cores like...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospherically deposited radionuclides...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Be in rainwater. Atmospheric inputs of the radionuclides to Cumbria (UK) were recorded. Rainwater... ; lakes; radionuclide; deposition; history; modelling. Reference ... Source:...

  12. DESCRIPTION OF A SPECTRAL ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION MONITORING NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    spectral atmospheric radiation data. The large cylindricalexisting integrated net radiation data is of impor- tance,infrared radiation intensities. The data is permanently

  13. atmospheric infrared sounder: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR Li, Jun 4 Ozone Profile Retrieval from an Advanced Infrared Sounder:...

  14. atmospheric observatory uao: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a 1 kiloton heavy water Cherenkov detector able to detect and reconstruct high-energy muons created from cosmic ray showers and atmospheric neutrino interactions. By...

  15. atmospheric electrons due: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Atmospheric Electrons Compared with Data from HEAT CiteSeer Summary: The GEANTFLUKA detector simulation and particle interaction package was used to develop a Monte Carlo...

  16. atmospheric cherenkov effect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for gamma-ray astronomy. STACEE uses the large mirror area of a solar heliostat facility to achieve a low energy threshold. A prototype...

  17. Effects of atmospheres on bonding characteristics of silver and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperature. To investigate the effects of atmospheres on the bonding characteristics of ceramic joints brazed with Ag-CuO braze filler metals, alumina joints prepared using a...

  18. atmospheric pressure glow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Aircraft Performance: Atmospheric Pressure FAA Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge Chap 10 12 - 21% Oxygen - 1% other gases (argon,...

  19. atmospheric aerosol characteristics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Size Distribution Physics (arXiv) Summary: Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover...

  20. atmospheric aerosol processes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Size Distribution Physics (arXiv) Summary: Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover...

  1. atmospheric aerosols apports: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Size Distribution Physics (arXiv) Summary: Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover...

  2. atmospheric aerosol samples: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Size Distribution Physics (arXiv) Summary: Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover...

  3. atmospheric aerosol particle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    suspension in the fractal fluctuations of vertical wind velocity. The mass or radius (size) distribution for homogeneous suspended atmospheric particulates is expressed as a...

  4. atmospheric aerosol particles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    suspension in the fractal fluctuations of vertical wind velocity. The mass or radius (size) distribution for homogeneous suspended atmospheric particulates is expressed as a...

  5. atmospheric control systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  6. atmospheres psychiatric knowledge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  7. atmospheric parameters uncertainlty: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  8. atmospheric sulphur dioxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon dioxide CERN Preprints Summary: The primary ingredient of Anthropogenic Global Warming hypothesis is the assumption that atmospheric carbon dioxide variations are the cause...

  9. atmospheric radioactive releases: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The present author has kept observation for concentrations of atmospheric radon, radon progeny and thoron progeny for several years at the campus of Fukushima Medical...

  10. atmospheric radioactivity monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The present author has kept observation for concentrations of atmospheric radon, radon progeny and thoron progeny for several years at the campus of Fukushima Medical...

  11. atmosphere radioactive releases: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The present author has kept observation for concentrations of atmospheric radon, radon progeny and thoron progeny for several years at the campus of Fukushima Medical...

  12. atmospheric radon concentration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The present author has kept observation for concentrations of atmospheric radon, radon progeny and thoron progeny for several years at the campus of Fukushima Medical...

  13. Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere Composition and Health Responses to Inhaled Emissions Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of...

  14. atmospheric deposition studies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

  15. atmospheric pressure study: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

  16. atmospheric deposition study: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosion At The Polar Arctic Sunrise Physics (arXiv) Summary: We attempt is to provide accumulated evidence and qualitative understanding of the associated atmospheric phenomena...

  17. atmospheric sulfate studies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  18. atmosphere dosage spectrographique: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  19. accidental atmospheric release: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  20. atmosphere issledovanie zashchitnykh: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  1. atmospheric nuclear bom: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  2. atmospheric control dosage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  3. atmospheric sampling nouvelle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  4. atmosphere combustion catalytique: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  5. atmospheric emissions produced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences Websites Summary: -solid waste for CO2 mitigation and reduction of greenhouse effect gases into the atmosphere. ? 2008 ElsevierCarbonation of alkaline paper mill...

  6. atmosphere gcm implications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gases, and sulfate aerosols are predicted to raise global temperatures via the "greenhouse effect" (IPCC, 1996), growing emissions of SO2Interactions Among Emissions, Atmospheric...

  7. atmosphere estudos termoanaliticos: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to optical depth perturbations. In Earth-type atmospheres sustained planetary greenhouse effect with a stable ground surface temperature can only exist at a particular...

  8. atmospheric emissions control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H? in a forest environment : from canopy to soil MIT - DSpace Summary: Atmospheric hydrogen (H? ), an indirect greenhouse gas, plays a notable role in the chemistry of the...

  9. Estimating atmospheric parameters and reducing noise for multispectral imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for estimating atmospheric radiance and transmittance. An atmospheric estimation system is divided into a first phase and a second phase. The first phase inputs an observed multispectral image and an initial estimate of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band and calculates the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band, which can be used to generate a "corrected" multispectral image that is an estimate of the surface multispectral image. The second phase inputs the observed multispectral image and the surface multispectral image that was generated by the first phase and removes noise from the surface multispectral image by smoothing out change in average deviations of temperatures.

  10. he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry‚??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earth‚??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

  11. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  12. Condition assessment of nonlinear processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Gailey, Paul C. (Athens, OH); Protopopescu, Vladimir A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is presented a reliable technique for measuring condition change in nonlinear data such as brain waves. The nonlinear data is filtered and discretized into windowed data sets. The system dynamics within each data set is represented by a sequence of connected phase-space points, and for each data set a distribution function is derived. New metrics are introduced that evaluate the distance between distribution functions. The metrics are properly renormalized to provide robust and sensitive relative measures of condition change. As an example, these measures can be used on EEG data, to provide timely discrimination between normal, preseizure, seizure, and post-seizure states in epileptic patients. Apparatus utilizing hardware or software to perform the method and provide an indicative output is also disclosed.

  13. Analytical methods under emergency conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedlet, J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This lecture discusses methods for the radiochemical determination of internal contamination of the body under emergency conditions, here defined as a situation in which results on internal radioactive contamination are needed quickly. The purpose of speed is to determine the necessity for medical treatment to increase the natural elimination rate. Analytical methods discussed include whole-body counting, organ counting, wound monitoring, and excreta analysis. 12 references. (ACR)

  14. Water-use efficiency for alternative cooling technologies in arid climates Energy and Buildings, Volume 43, Issues 23, FebruaryMarch 2011, Pages 631-638

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    valued for their reduced energy consumption in comparison to compressor-based air conditioning systems of 2004 found that 94% of homes with air conditioning had compressor-based systems [2]. Only 6% of homes-based air conditioning that utilizes the

  15. A Primer on Energy Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik Curiel

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy condition, in the context of a wide class of spacetime theories (including general relativity), is, crudely speaking, a relation one demands the stress-energy tensor of matter satisfy in order to try to capture the idea that "energy should be positive". The remarkable fact I will discuss in this paper is that such simple, general, almost trivial seeming propositions have profound and far-reaching import for our understanding of the structure of relativistic spacetimes. It is therefore especially surprising when one also learns that we have no clear understanding of the nature of these conditions, what theoretical status they have with respect to fundamental physics, what epistemic status they may have, when we should and should not expect them to be satisfied, and even in many cases how they and their consequences should be interpreted physically. Or so I shall argue, by a detailed analysis of the technical and conceptual character of all the standard conditions used in physics today, including examination of their consequences and the circumstances in which they are believed to be violated.

  16. Pulsed microwave discharge in a capillary filled with atmospheric-pressure gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritsinin, S. I., E-mail: gritsinins@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Gushchin, P. A. [Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas (Russian Federation)] [Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas (Russian Federation); Davydov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Ivanov, E. V. [Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas (Russian Federation)] [Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas (Russian Federation); Kossyi, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulsed microwave coaxial capillary plasma source generating a thin plasma filament along the capillary axis in an atmospheric-pressure argon flow is described. The dynamics of filament formation is studied, and the parameters of the gas and plasma in the contraction region are determined. A physical model of discharge formation and propagation is proposed. The model is based on the assumption that, under the conditions in which the electric fields is substantially below the threshold value, the discharge operates in a specific form known as a self-sustained-non-self-sustained (SNS) microwave discharge.

  17. An atmospheric mixing index for Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Colburn Lee

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was devoted to study of the meteorological conditions undez which adverse concentration of pollutants occurred. Niemeyer (1960) studied air pollution episodes in che eastern United States and suggested that the simul- ' aneous occurrence of (1) very low... by Niemeyer. In his investigation, Holzworth used mixing height (MH) as a parameter to determine the vertical mixing of the air pollutants near the ground. Gross (1970) defined the mixing height as the level through which there is relatively vigor- ous...

  18. Anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with ENSO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, K.M.; Ho, C.H. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the structure of anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) using re-analysis data obtained from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation Office (DAO) and outputs from GEOS climate model simulations. Our results show a very pronounced tropospheric warming over the equatorial central Pacific, with a double maxima located in 15{degrees}N and 15{degrees}/S, symmetric about the equator. This anomaly is in agreement with those found in earlier studies based on satellite estimates and is consistent with the predictions of Rossby wave dynamics. Most interestingly, we find a strong stratospheric temperature signal, which is tightly coupled to, but of opposite sign to the tropospheric anomaly. This temperature anomaly pattern is validated by the GCM simulations with respect to anomalous ENSO sea surface temperature (SST) forcing. The role of interaction between radiation and hydrologic cycle in producing and maintaining the ENSO anomalies is also investigated. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; Doyle, E.F.; DiBella, F.A.

    1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculates through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried. The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter and recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard. 17 figures.

  20. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Doyle, Edward F. (Dedham, MA); DiBella, Francis A. (Roslindale, MA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculated through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard.

  1. Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements Tim Arnolda,1's radiative budget; however, our understand- ing of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited together with an atmo- spheric model and inverse method, we estimate that the global emissions of NF3

  2. Simple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Emily M.

    '' and spatial variations of gaseous dry N deposition (i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ammonia (NH3)), thoughSimple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds Heather E. Golden the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts

  3. Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olver, Peter

    dioxide Water vapor #12;Atmospheric composition (parts per million by volume) · Nitrogen (N2) 780Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere Bill Satzer 3M Company #12;Outline,840 · Oxygen (O2) 209,460 · Argon (Ar) 9340 · Carbon dioxide (CO2) 394 · Methane (CH4) 1.79 · Ozone (O3) 0

  4. Extended Canadian middle atmosphere model: zonal-mean climatology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    and data assimilation; 3334 Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics: Middle atmosphere dynamics (0341, 0342 the Upper Atmos- phere Research Satellite (UARS), such as the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) [Shepherd and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. These observations have provided (or will provide) a unique set of information

  5. EPS 22 The Fluid Earth: Oceans, Atmosphere, Climate & Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    EPS 22 The Fluid Earth: Oceans, Atmosphere, Climate & Environment Spring 2012 Instructors: Steven Hall E Overview Description: EPS22 introduces students to the fluid earth, emphasizing Earth's weather is EPS22? A graphical representation of major topics. Current topics in atmospheric and ocean sciences

  6. atmospheric test site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric test site First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Testing the atmospheric...

  7. CIRES/CSD Research Associate Atmospheric/Physical Research Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    to address atmospheric problems of contemporary interest. A background in atmospheric science is not required or field environment. Experience with optics and optical sensors is highly desirable. Experience by contacting the ADA Coordinator at hr-ada@colorado.edu. The University of Colorado Boulder conducts background

  8. Atmosphere and Ocean: Water (drought topic begins at slide 26)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmosphere and Ocean: Water (drought topic begins at slide 26) UW Hon220c Energy & Environment in the atmosphere: 50-70% of the greenhouse effect; ¬Ĺ the flow of thermal energy from laEtude (like SeaXle and its sister city, Bergen Norway. Meehl et al. Geophysical

  9. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar to those predicted atmospheric CO2 concentrations (¬ĹCO2atm) during Earth's ancient greenhouse episodes is essential for accurately predicting the response of future climate to elevated CO2 levels. Empirical estimates of ¬ĹCO2atm

  10. 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 4 Atmosphere and Surface Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    surface versus rough surface · Light color surface versus dark color surface · Albedo of water surface energy through the atmosphere or water. Solar radiation transfer in the atmosphere #12;© 2015 Pearson of radiation by molecules of matter and its conversion from one form of energy to another. Solar radiation

  11. Atmosphere and Ocean: Earth's Heat Engine: GFD Lab notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmosphere and Ocean: Earth's Heat Engine: GFD Lab notes 18 May 2012 UW Hon220c Energy' of water vapor, CO2 and cloud, makes us much warmer than a Marsian (almost no atmosphere. -550C average 2002 clouds, snow, ice, deserts are bright absorbing areas are dark

  12. Old-field Community, Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aimee Classen

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are in the process of finishing a number of laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse projects, analyzing data, and writing papers. The projects reported addressed these subjects: How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground plant biomass and community structure; Effects of multiple climate changes factors on plant community composition and diversity: what did we learn from a 5-year open-top chamber experiment using constructed old-field communities; Do atmospheric and climatic change factors interact to alter woody seedling emergence, establishment and productivity; Soil moisture surpasses elevated CO{sub 2} and temperature in importance as a control on soil carbon dynamics; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground root and fungal biomass; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter soil microarthropod and microbial communities; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground microbial function; Linking root litter diversity and microbial functioning at a micro scale under current and projected CO{sub 2} concentrations; Multifactor climate change effects on soil ecosystem functioning depend on concurrent changes in plant community composition; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground insect populations; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter festuca endophyte infection; How do climate and atmospheric changes soil carbon stabilization.

  13. Author's personal copy Solar modulation in surface atmospheric electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    Author's personal copy Solar modulation in surface atmospheric electricity R. Giles Harrison a is the major source of air's electrical conductivity over the oceans and well above the continents atmospheric electrical circuit, including the local vertical current density and the related surface potential

  14. Using Hierarchical Simplicial Meshes to Render Atmospheric Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atalay, F. Bet√ľl

    Using Hierarchical Simplicial Meshes to Render Atmospheric Effects F. Betul Atalay David M. Mount natural phenomena. An important problem in this area is that of rendering scenes containing atmospheric and smoke. Generating photorealistic renderings through ray-tracing is computationally very demanding

  15. A Field Experiment to Validate Atmospheric Dispersion and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rise-R.495 A Field Experiment to Validate Atmospheric Dispersion and Dose Models S. P. Nielsen* S Roskilde, Denmark May 1986 #12;RIS√?-R-495 DOUBLE TRACER EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT Pollution Laboratory, Ris√ł National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark Abstract. Two tracers

  16. Trans Boundary Transport of Pollutants by Atmospheric Mineral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    Trans Boundary Transport of Pollutants by Atmospheric Mineral Dust Y I G A L E R E L , * , U R I D, and solid constituents in the atmosphere (3-11). Uptake of pollutants by mineral dust has been shown Jerusalem, Israel The transport of anthropogenic pollution by desert dust in the Eastern Mediterranean

  17. Ris-R-1183(EN) Atmospheric Chemistry of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ris√ł-R-1183(EN) Atmospheric Chemistry of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds with Special Emphasis as semi-rural air is atmospheric transformation of PAHs initiated by OH radicals. Especially during long-range transport (LRT) of air pollution from Central Europe, the nitro-PAH composition in Denmark is dominated

  18. Engineering Identifying the source of an atmospheric pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Engineering Abstract Identifying the source of an atmospheric pollutant or phenomena this question using combinations of atmospheric models and remote sensing observations will be presented challenge currently facing the US EPA in developing secondary standards for the control of this pollutant

  19. Introduction In the past two centuries, atmospheric methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    90 Introduction In the past two centuries, atmospheric methane (Ch4) concentrations have more than doubled. Despite the about 20o times smaller atmospheric burden of methane compared to carbon dioxide (CO2 ; IPCC 4th assessment report, 2007), because on a per molecule basis methane is a much more effective

  20. Interactive Visualization of Modeled Atmospheric Trace Constituents Carmen M. Benkovitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the effects of the emissions of Popocatepetl volcano, located near Mexico City. The effects of stronger of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Chemical Transport Model (CTM) of sulfate in the atmosphere. The visualization on climate. Anthropogenic activities affect the aerosol content of the atmosphere. Anthropogenic emissions

  1. Atmospheric response to solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shell, Karen M.

    Atmospheric response to solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton K. M. Shell and R. Frouin Scripps the absorption of solar radiation, affecting upper ocean temperature and circulation. These changes, in turn: phytoplankton, atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), absorption of solar radiation, seasonal cycle, sea

  2. Atmospheric Modelling of Greenhouse Gases and Air Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    . Increase in mixing height (h) entrains (draws in) air from above the box #12Atmospheric Modelling of Greenhouse Gases and Air Quality John C. Lin Courtenay Strong University of Utah: February 20th, 2013 Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Utah #12;Outline ·CO2 ó Air

  3. Admissibility Conditions for Degenerate Cyclotomic BMW Algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Frederick M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study admissibility conditions for the parameters of degenerate cyclotomic BMW algebras. We show that the u-admissibility condition of Ariki, Mathas and Rui is equivalent to a simple module theoretic condition.

  4. Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Laskin, Alexander; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Gorski, Christopher A.; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a significant source of bioavailable iron in the open ocean. Few measurements have been made to compare the solubility of atmospheric iron from anthropogenic aerosols and other sources. We report an investigation of the iron dissolution of three fly ash samples in acidic aqueous solutions and compare the solubilities with that of Arizona test dust, a reference material of mineral dust. The effects of pH, cloud processing, and solar irradiation on Fe solubility were explored. Similar to previously reported results on mineral dust, iron in aluminosilicate phases provide predominant dissolved iron compared with iron in oxides. Iron solubility of fly ash is higher than Arizona test dust, especially at the higher pH conditions investigated. Simulated atmospheric processing elevates iron solubility due to significant changes in the morphology aluminosilicate glass, a dominantly material in fly ash particle. Iron continuously releases into the aqueous solution as fly ash particles break up into smaller fragments. The assessment of dissolved atmospheric iron deposition fluxes, and their effect on the biogeochemistry at ocean surface should be constrained by taking into account the source, environment pH, Fe speciation, and solar radiation.

  5. Clathrate hydrates as a sink of noble gases in Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Thomas; O. Mousis; V. Ballenegger; S. Picaud

    2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a statistical thermodynamic approach to determine the composition of clathrate hydrates which may form from a multiple compound gas whose composition is similar to that of Titan's atmosphere. Assuming that noble gases are initially present in this gas phase, we calculate the ratios of xenon, krypton and argon to species trapped in clathrate hydrates. We find that these ratios calculated for xenon and krypton are several orders of magnitude higher than in the coexisting gas at temperature and pressure conditions close to those of Titan's present atmosphere at ground level. Furthermore we show that, by contrast, argon is poorly trapped in these ices. This trapping mechanism implies that the gas-phase is progressively depleted in xenon and krypton when the coexisting clathrate hydrates form whereas the initial abundance of argon remains almost constant. Our results are thus compatible with the deficiency of Titan's atmosphere in xenon and krypton measured by the {\\it Huygens} probe during its descent on January 14, 2005. However, in order to interpret the subsolar abundance of primordial Ar also revealed by {\\it Huygens}, other processes that occurred either during the formation of Titan or during its evolution must be also invoked.

  6. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Compact Buried Ducts Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Compact Buried...

  7. Space Conditioning Standing Technical Commitee Presentation ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commitee Presentation Space Conditioning Standing Technical Commitee Presentation This presentation outlines the goals of the Space Conditioning Standing Technical ommittee, as...

  8. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II - Design Options for Locating Ducts within Conditioned Space Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Design Options for Locating Ducts...

  9. ECMWF workshop on Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions, 10-12 Nov 2008 A revised ocean-atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interface #12;1*- Sensible heat flux 6*- Evaporation + int. energy [+ Qlat] ECMWF workshop on Ocean layer) 5- Surface ocean current 7- Surface height 7 1- Continental runoff + internal Energy 8 1*- SurfECMWF workshop on Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions, 10-12 Nov 2008 A revised ocean-atmosphere physical

  10. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  11. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tooman, T.P. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Exploratory Systems Technology Dept.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

  12. A Grid of 3D Stellar Atmosphere Models of Solar Metallicity: I. General Properties, Granulation and Atmospheric Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trampedach, Regner; Collet, Remo; Nordlund, Ňke; Stein, Robert F

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Present grids of stellar atmosphere models are the workhorses in interpreting stellar observations, and determining their fundamental parameters. These models rely on greatly simplified models of convection, however, lending less predictive power to such models of late type stars. We present a grid of improved and more reliable stellar atmosphere models of late type stars, based on deep, 3D, convective, stellar atmosphere simulations. This grid is to be used in general for interpreting observations, and improve stellar and asteroseismic modeling. We solve the Navier Stokes equations in 3D and concurrent with the radiative transfer equation, for a range of atmospheric parameters, covering most of stellar evolution with convection at the surface. We emphasize use of the best available atomic physics for quantitative predictions and comparisons with observations. We present granulation size, convective expansion of the acoustic cavity, asymptotic adiabat, as function of atmospheric parameters. These and other re...

  13. Atmospheric structure determined from satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Keith Shelburne

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the cross section over the Canada region 12 Synoptic conditions and locations of grid points, soundings, and the cross section over the western United States region. 13 Profiles of the average difference and standard deviation of the differences... and 500 mb over the Canada region. 47 Charts of dew-point temperatvre and dew point difference ( C) at 850 and 700 mb over the Cariobean region. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ 49 Charts of dew-point temperature and dew point difference (vC) at 500 mb...

  14. Outside heat transfer coefficients for atmospheric coolers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, David Mark

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the same conditions of operation is given by Robinson ()i. 9). TABLE I Comparison of various authors' values of outside heat transfer coefficients Btugour x square foot x F ~ ) Adams (1 ) 1001 1041 915 74, 6 1021 981 910 Clarke 945 997 841... ozeventing any recycling of the wet air. "M~4~ 1 f jc, : 1 C. X L, w 38 Cooled water fro~ the tower is centrifugally pmnoed through a 2 inch pipe to a rotameter and a I and operated control valve, Figure 8, before entering a 1 1/g inch by 5 foot...

  15. The Atmospheric Signatures of Super-Earths: How to Distinguish Between Hydrogen-Rich and Hydrogen-Poor Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Miller-Ricci; D. Sasselov; S. Seager

    2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Extrasolar super-Earths (1-10 M$_{\\earth}$) are likely to exist with a wide range of atmospheres. Some super-Earths may be able to retain massive hydrogen-rich atmospheres. Others might never accumulate hydrogen or experience significant escape of lightweight elements, resulting in atmospheres more like those of the terrestrial planets in our Solar System. We examine how an observer could differentiate between hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-poor atmospheres by modeling super-Earth emission and transmission spectra, and we find that discrimination is possible by observing the transmission spectrum alone. An Earth-like atmosphere, composed of mostly heavy elements and molecules, will have a very weak transmission signal due to its small atmospheric scale height (since the scale height is inversely proportional to molecular weight). On the other hand, a large hydrogen-rich atmosphere reveals a relatively large transmission signal. The super Earth emission spectrum can additionally contrain the atmospheric composition and temperature structure. Super-Earths with massive hydrogen atmospheres will reveal strong spectral features due to water, whereas those that have lost most of their hydrogen (and have no liquid ocean) will be marked by CO$_2$ features and a lack of H$_2$O. We apply our study specifically to the low-mass planet orbiting an M star, Gl 581c ($M sin i$ = 5 M$_{\\earth}$), although our conclusions are relevant for super-Earths in general. The ability to distinguish hydrogen-rich atmospheres might be essential for interpreting mass and radius observations of planets in the transition between rocky super-Earths and Neptune-like planets.

  16. Attachment I CHPRC CONDITION REPORT FORM Status: Analysis CR NUMBER: CR-2011I 2037

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program Cumulus Humilis Aerosol STATEMENT OFCHPRC CONDITION

  17. Conditions for Successful Extended Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne M Green; Andrew R Liddle

    1996-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate, in a model-independent way, the conditions required to obtain a satisfactory model of extended inflation in which inflation is brought to an end by a first-order phase transition. The constraints are that the correct present strength of the gravitational coupling is obtained, that the present theory of gravity is satisfactorily close to general relativity, that the perturbation spectra from inflation are compatible with large scale structure observations and that the bubble spectrum produced at the phase transition doesn't conflict with the observed level of microwave background anisotropies. We demonstrate that these constraints can be summarized in terms of the behaviour in the conformally related Einstein frame, and can be compactly illustrated graphically. We confirm the failure of existing models including the original extended inflation model, and construct models, albeit rather contrived ones, which satisfy all existing constraints.

  18. CONMOW: Condition Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwin Wiggelinkhuizen; Theo Verbruggen; Henk Braam; Luc Rademakers; Miguel Catalin Tipluica; Andrew Maclean; Axel Juhl Christensen; Edwin Becker; Pr?ftechnik Cm Gmbh (d; Dirk Scheffler; Nordex Energy Gmbh (d

    practice the European project CONMOW (Condition Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms) was started in November

  19. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation details the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Condition Monitoring program at NREL.

  20. A hydrodynamic model for asymmetric explosions of rapidly rotating collapsing supernovae with a toroidal atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. S. Imshennik; K. V. Manukovskii

    2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically solved the two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic problem of the explosion of a low-mass neutron star in a circular orbit. In the initial conditions, we assumed a nonuniform density distribution in the space surrounding the collapsed iron core in the form of a stationary toroidal atmosphere that was previously predicted analytically and computed numerically. The con?guration of the exploded neutron star itself was modeled by a torus with a circular cross section whose central line almost coincided with its circular orbit. Using an equation of state for the stellar matter and the toroidal atmosphere in which the nuclear statistical equilibrium conditions were satisfied, we performed a series of numerical calculations that showed the propagation of a strong divergent shock wave with a total energy of 0.2x10^51 erg at initial explosion energy release of 1.0x10^51 erg. In our calculations, we rigorously took into account the gravitational interaction, including the attraction from a higher-mass (1.9M_solar) neutron star located at the coordinate origin, in accordance with the rotational explosion mechanism for collapsing supernovae.W e compared in detail our results with previous similar results of asymmetric supernova explosion simulations and concluded that we found a lower limit for the total explosion energy.