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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Suppressant: Halon 1301  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Acid Gas Production in Inhibited Diffusion Flames.. ... and Identification of the Breakdown Products of ... Influence of the Ignition Source Energy on the ...

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

2

NEW TOOLS FOR CELL SUPPRESSION IN TAU-ARGUS: ONE PIECE OF THE CASC PROJECT WORK DRAFT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the course of the EU funded project CASC, the software t-ARGUS shall be extended to become a generally applicable standard tool for tabular data protection. The required modifications will affect the facilities provided for (residual) disclosure risk statement, the data structure and the user interface. Methods will have to be implemented for protection of complex hierarchical tables and for table-to-table protection, especially in the context of public use data-base query systems. Extensions will be made concerning secondary cell suppression methodology provided by the package. The package will interface in particular with the GHQUAR hypercube algorithm. Finally, table perturbation tools will be added.

Submitted By The; The Yugoslav; Republic Macedonia; English Only; Invited Paper

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

HALON REPLACEMENT RESEARCH - A HISTORICAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tapscott, RE, “Progress Report on Alternatives and Replacements for Halons,” E&P Forum Halon Phase-Out Workshop, London, United Kingdom ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

4

Suppressant:Water & Aqueous Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suppressant:Water & Aqueous Solutions. ... Reuther, JJ; 1991. Fine Water Sprays for Fire Protection: A Halon Replacement Option.. ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

5

Continuously Changing Ranking of HALON Alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 3. Leadin? 1301 Alternatives F F Baseline: HALON 1301 (CRBr) F - C - Triodide: (CF3I) Fe-25: (C2HFs) F F F -C- ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

6

FIRE SUPPRESSING AGENT: A HALON ALTERNATIVE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... industry in closed-loop systems for automobiles. ... possible Steam inhalation and steam bum Approximately ... used in the trade and automobile industry ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

7

FIRE SUPPRESSION AND INERTION TESTING OF HALON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the agent is important in determining the storage volume requirements. ... minimum inemng concentration for both propane and methane contrasts ...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Argus Power Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argus Power Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Argus Power Technology Place Zhengzhou, Henan Province, China Zip 450001 Product China-based company that manufactures...

9

HALON 1301 USE IN OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The unique aspects of producing oil and gas in the ... Halon 1301 is a critical component to safe production in totally enclosed arctic facilities ...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

10

The ISR Argus 500 system - control of the beam transfer power supplies by the Argus 500 computer operators manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ISR Argus 500 system - control of the beam transfer power supplies by the Argus 500 computer operators manual

Kemp, D

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Argus target chamber  

SciTech Connect

A target chamber for application in the laser fusion program must satisfy some very basic requirements. (1) Provide a vacuum on the order of 10$sup -6$ torr. (2) Support a microscopically small target in a fixed point in space and verify its location within 5 micrometers. (3) Contain an adjustable beam focusing system capable of delivering a number of laser beams onto the target simultaneously, both in time and space. (4) Provide access for diagnostics to evaluate the results of target irradiation. (5) Have flexibility to allow changes in targets, focusing optics and number of beams. The ARGUS laser which is now under construction at LLL will have a target chamber which meets these requirements in a simple economic manner. The chamber and auxiliary equipment are described, with reference to two double beam focusing systems; namely, lenses and ellipsoidal mirrors. Provision is made for future operation with four beams, using ellipsoidal mirrors for two-sided illumination and lens systems for tetragonal and tetrahedral irradiation. (auth)

Rienecker, F. Jr.; Glaros, S.S.; Kobierecki, M.

1975-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

Argonne Software Licensing: ARGUS-PRIMA  

Inputs and Outputs. The inputs to ARGUS-PRIMA consist of time series of explanatory variables for the wind power forecast. These data can include ...

13

How to Make the T-ARGUS Modular Method Applicable to Linked Tables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The software package T-ARGUS offers a very efficient algorithm for secondary cell suppression known as either HiTaS or the Modular approach. The method is well suited for the protection of up to 3-dimensional hierarchical tables. In practice, statistical ...

Peter-Paul Wolf; Sarah Giessing

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

FLAMMABLE LIQUID STOREROOM 1: HALON 1301 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fuel, hydraulic fluid, or lubricating oil) leak. ... ODM) at four heights to measure smoke production. ... in fire suppression for small, tight compart- ments ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

15

Feasibility and design of blast mitigation systems for naval applications using water mist fire suppression systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent trend of using fine water mist systems to replace the legacy HALON- 1301 fire suppression systems warrants further study into other applications of the water mist systems. Preliminary research and investigation ...

Kitchenka, Julie A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Context: Suppression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the Halon Replacement Program for Army Ground Combat Vehicles ... Gas Measurement Using FTIR, GC/MS and Ion Selective Electrode Methods ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

17

Applications of the ARGUS code in accelerator physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ARGUS is a three-dimensional, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code that is being distributed to U.S. accelerator laboratories in collaboration between SAIC and the Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group. It uses a modular architecture that allows multiple physics modules to share common utilities for grid and structure input., memory management, disk I/O, and diagnostics, Physics modules are in place for electrostatic and electromagnetic field solutions., frequency-domain (eigenvalue) solutions, time- dependent PIC, and steady-state PIC simulations. All of the modules are implemented with a domain-decomposition architecture that allows large problems to be broken up into pieces that fit in core and that facilitates the adaptation of ARGUS for parallel processing ARGUS operates on either Cray or workstation platforms, and MOTIF-based user interface is available for X-windows terminals. Applications of ARGUS in accelerator physics and design are described in this paper.

Petillo, J.J.; Mankofsky, A.; Krueger, W.A.; Kostas, C.; Mondelli, A.A.; Drobot, A.T.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

ARG-US RFID System for Management of HIgh-Risk Materials  

operations and aging management, while enhancing safety, security, safeguards and sustainability. Since 2010, ARG-US RFID has been extensively tested

19

The Caribbean spiny lobster, Panuli-rus argus, is distributed from Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

870 The Caribbean spiny lobster, Panuli- rus argus, is distributed from Brazil throughout major commercial fisheries in Florida, the Caribbean and Brazil. Commercially, P. argus is especially seen within a spe- cies. Because previous studies did not include populations from Brazil, Sarver et al

20

HALON 1301 RETROFIT IMPLEMENTATION ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... While turbine and diesel propulsion plants have high temperature surfaces, these cool much faster. Unvented high pressure steam remains in the ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Suppressant: Metal Containing Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for Suppression of Fuel Spray Explosions in Military Vehicle Crew Compartments.. ... Study of Water Mist Suppression of Electrical Fires for ...

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

22

Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the air/suppressant flow in an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the purposes of designing improved Halon-alternative fire suppression strategies for aircraft applications, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the air flow, suppressant transport, and air-suppressant mixing within an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle were performed. The release of inert gases from a Solid Propellant Gas Generator (SPGG) was analyzed at two different injection locations in order to understand the effect of injection position on the flow patterns and the mixing of air and suppression agent. An uncluttered engine nacelle was simulated to provide insight into the global flow features as well as to promote comparisons with previous nacelle fire tests and recent water tunnel tests which included little or no clutter. Oxygen concentration levels, fuel/air residence times that would exist if a small fuel leak were present, velocity contours, and streamline patterns are presented inside the engine nacelle. The numerical results show the influence of the gent release location on regions of potential flame extinction due to oxygen inerting and high flame strain. The occurrence of inflow through the exhaust ducts on the aft end of the nacelle is also predicted. As expected, the predicted oxygen concentration levels were consistently higher than the measured levels since a fire was not modeled in this analysis. Despite differences in the conditions of these simulations and the experiments, good agreement was obtained between the CFD predictions and the experimental measurements.

Lopez, A.R.; Gritzo, L.A.; Hassan, B.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Report on a 2009 mini-demonstration of the ARG-US Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) system in transportation.  

SciTech Connect

The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM), Office of Packaging and Transportation (EM-14), has developed a radio frequency identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system for the management of nuclear materials during storage and transportation. The system, developed by the PCP team at Argonne National Laboratory, consists of hardware (Mk-series sensor tags, fixed and handheld readers, form factor for multiple drum types, seal integrity sensors, and enhanced battery management), software (application programming interface, ARG-US software for local and remote/web applications, secure server and database management), and cellular/satellite communication interfaces for vehicle tracking and item monitoring during transport. The ability of the above system to provide accurate, real-time tracking and monitoring of the status of multiple, certified containers of nuclear materials has been successfully demonstrated in a week-long, 1,700-mile DEMO performed in April 2008. While the feedback from the approximately fifty (50) stakeholders who participated in and/or observed the DEMO progression were very positive and encouraging, two major areas of further improvements - system integration and web application enhancement - were identified in the post-DEMO evaluation. The principal purpose of the MiniDemo described in this report was to verify these two specific improvements. The MiniDemo was conducted on August 28, 2009. In terms of system integration, a hybrid communication interface - combining the RFID item-monitoring features and a commercial vehicle tracking system by Qualcomm - was developed and implemented. In the MiniDemo, the new integrated system worked well in reporting tag status and vehicle location accurately and promptly. There was no incompatibility of components. The robust commercial communication gear, as expected, helped improve system reliability. The MiniDemo confirmed that system integration is technically feasible and reliable with the existing RFID and Qualcomm satellite equipment. In terms of web application, improvements in mapping, tracking, data presentation, and post-incident spatial query reporting were implemented in ARG-US, the application software that manages the dataflow among the RFID tags, readers, and servers. These features were tested in the MiniDemo and found to be satisfactory. The resulting web application is both informative and user-friendly. A joint developmental project is being planned between the PCP and the DOE TRANSCOM that uses the Qualcomm gear in vehicles for tracking and communication of radioactive material shipments across the country. Adding an RFID interface to TRANSCOM is a significant enhancement to the DOE infrastructure for tracking and monitoring shipments of radioactive materials.

Tsai, H.; Chen, K.; Jusko, M.; Craig, B.; Liu, Y.; Decision and Information Sciences

2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

24

PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED MODELING OF HALON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fibrillation, never regained consciousness and died ... 5 min) human inhalation exposures to ... chemicals predicted in humans by physiologically based ...

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

HALON & CFC DESTRUCTION, RECOVERY, RECYCLING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Refrigeration and Air Conditioning .. Foam -- Aerosol and Sterilants ... EMERGING . - Low emissions and cost; commercial unit available for testing. ...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

26

PAPER FOR HALON ALTERNATIVES TECHNICAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ROOMS, HOSPITAL EQUIPMENT SUCH AS CAT SCAN AND ... STORAGE ROOMS LIBRARIES MOTORCRAFT (BOATS) MUSEUMS OFFICE ...

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

27

Envimnmental Aspects of Halon Replacements:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the work to be described subsequently, the modeling capabilities of LLNL and UINC were employed in order to convert the basic laboratory data ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

28

RECOMMENDING EXPOSURE LIMITS FOR HALON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... negative. In the laboratory, HCFC-123 is a mild anesthetic 65 Page 4. ... No epidemiology In vitro tests - Ames test negative Acute ...

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

29

Suppressant: Electric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Suppressant:Electric Fields. Fire Extinguishment of Pool Flames by Means of a DC electric Field.. ...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fire Suppression in Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Imperial Japanese Navy Dry Bay and Ullage Fire Suppression System Concept ... Calibration Plot of Average Normalized Peak-to-valley Signals vs. ...

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

31

Explosion suppression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Cortese, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Argus Primar Software License  

and expenses arise or are alleged to arise, directly or indirectly, from the participation, whether active or passive, or negligence, whether ordinary or gross, ...

33

Pressure suppression containment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (San Jose, CA)

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Pressure suppression containment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 6750 of 28,905 results. 41 - 6750 of 28,905 results. Download CX-005867: Categorical Exclusion Determination 735-A, D-wing, Main Floor ? ARGUS Halon Suppression System Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 03/09/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005867-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005868: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fire Department Flow Test of N-Area Hydrants CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/09/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005868-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002208: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monitor Instruments Mass Spectrometer at Aiken County Technology Laboratory

36

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 9910 of 26,764 results. 01 - 9910 of 26,764 results. Download CX-005867: Categorical Exclusion Determination 735-A, D-wing, Main Floor ? ARGUS Halon Suppression System Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 03/09/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005867-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005868: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fire Department Flow Test of N-Area Hydrants CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/09/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005868-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005869: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Analysis Characterization Methods in the Analytical Development Wet

37

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: South Carolina | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 14, 2013 May 14, 2013 CX-010493: Categorical Exclusion Determination Determining Distribution Coefficients by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/14/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office May 14, 2013 CX-010492: Categorical Exclusion Determination Permeation Testing Metals, Ceramics, and Polymers CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/14/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office May 9, 2013 CX-010498: Categorical Exclusion Determination Crush and Disperse Specimen Preparation Technique CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/09/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office May 7, 2013 CX-010499: Categorical Exclusion Determination 735-A, D-Wing, Main Floor - ARGUS Halon Suppression System Replacement

38

Pressure suppression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

Fort, W.G.S.

1958-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

HALON 1211 ALTERNATIVES FOR FIGHTING JET ENGINE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3. Ignite the fire and start the trickle. 4. Preburn for 60 sec. 5. Load the engine and windmill for 60 sec, initiate the wind. 6. Unload the engine. ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Thermal and catalytic hydrodehalogenation of halon 1301 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... as hydrolysis, steam reforming, dehalogenation, dehydrohalogenation as ... probably be the thermal cleavage of ... of methane-based car,Qon moieties ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

42

PROGRESS TOWARD REPLACING HALON 2402 FOR ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... indicate that all perchlorates examined may have ... Thermodynamic Data (TRCI'HERMO), the NMERI ... and nitrogen tetroxide experimental data. ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

REPLACEMENT OF HALON FIRE EXTINGUISHANTS- THE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This activity will be increasingly managed within the framework of the MOD-wide environmental management system now being adopted. ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

44

NITROGEN GAS AS A HALON REPLACEMENT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... TABLE 4. INERTION CONCENTRATIONS. - m Fuel Inertion Conc., vol.% Butane 40.0 44.0 Propane 42.0 46.2 ... COST AND AVAILABILITY ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

PRINCIPAL SPEAKER ASBESTOS, PCB'S AND HALONS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The government has assumed responsibility for the disposal of used tires financed as you may have guessed by a new tax on every tire sold. ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Presented at HALON OPTIONS TECHNICAL WORKING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The internal measurements were taken by Hughes Associates, Inc. using a KVB/Analect Diamond 20 FTIR with calcium fluoride (CaF2) windows. ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

47

PROCESS FOR CONVERSION OF SURPLUS HALONS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... banned in 1996 and strict import-export and recycling ... of minor products during the gas-phase reaction of ... a) halogen in product HFC gases which is ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

INVESTIGATION INTO HALON 1301 REPLACEMENTS: A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... acetic acid, potassium salt; KC&,O, The chemical selection focuses on dry chemicals in a solution with water. ... acetic acid, sodium salt; CH3CO$4a ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

49

AIR FORCE APPROACH TO TOXICOLOGY OF HALON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... including a thorough investigation of historical tumor data in naive rats and ... and [4-chloro-6-(2,3-xylidino)-2- py~imidinylthio]acetic acid (Wy-14,643 ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

50

HALON ISSUES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES (505) 272 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Brazil Chile Egypt Ghana Jordan Malawi Mexico Phillipines Thailand Tunisia UWWY Zambia ... inventory), Turkey Thailand, ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

51

US ARMY GROUND VEHICLE HALON REPLACEMENT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... test fixture has been constructed from a derelict ground vehicle hull ... exposure levels: ion selective electrodes (grab hag sampling), sorbent tubes ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

52

RESULTS OF HALON 1301 AND HFC-125 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... bottles have an internal volume of 800 in3 and are pressurized to 825 psig at 70°F. For cold discharges, the bottles are kept in a chiller for a ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

53

1 HUMAN HEALTH SAFETY EVALUATION OF HALON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is the establishment of cardiac response of each individual dog to ... 10,000** 7 days** ... test atmosphere the bag should be stored in the dark or under ...

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

IMPACT OF HALON REPLACEMENT ON AIRCRAFT ENGINE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... If the extinguisher unit is installed in a location that adversely affects the aircraft's center of gravity (CG), ballast may have to be added elsewhere. ...

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

55

EXAMINATION AND COMPARISON OF EXISTING HALON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... mA provided the source for the electrical arc. ... the metal conductors, the additional electric energy created ... effect, a small hole was drilled through the ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

56

DIODE LASER-BASED MEASUREMENTS OF FUELS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Recent work [3] has shown that hydrogen fluoride gas (HF) is the principal toxic gas produced during fire suppression by Halon 1301 and by ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

57

Suppressed Charmed B Decay  

SciTech Connect

This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decays and the non-resonant B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} {eta}{pi}{sup +} decays in approximately 230 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10{sup -6}. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle {gamma}, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle {gamma} can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay is sensitive to the angle {gamma} and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly enhance the measurement of this angle. However, the low expected branching fraction for the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay channels could severely impact the measurement. A prerequisite of the measurement of the CKM angle is the observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay on which this thesis reports. The BABAR experiment consists of the BABAR detector and the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The design of the experiment has been optimized for the study of CP violation in the decays of neutral B mesons but is also highly suitable for the search for rare B decays such as the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay. The PEP-II collider operates at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance and is a clean source of B{bar B} meson pairs.

Snoek, Hella Leonie; /Vrije U., Amsterdam

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fire suppression and detection equipment  

SciTech Connect

Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

E.E. Bates [HSB Professional Loss Control, Lexington, KY (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Atomic clocks with suppressed blackbody radiation shift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a nonstandard concept of atomic clocks where the blackbody radiation shift (BBRS) and its temperature fluctuations can be dramatically suppressed (by one to three orders of magnitude) independent of the environmental temperature. The suppression is based on the fact that in a system with two accessible clock transitions (with frequencies $\

Yudin, V I; Okhapkin, M V; Bagayev, S N; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Huntemann, N; Mehlstaubler, T E; Riehle, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Quantifying Precipitation Suppression Due to Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban air pollution and industrial air pollution have been shown qualitatively to suppress rain and snow. Here, precipitation losses over topographical barriers downwind of major coastal urban areas in California and in the land of Israel that ...

Amir Givati; Daniel Rosenfeld

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

Visek, W.J.

1963-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

62

Canonical suppression in microscopic transport models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the occurrence of canonical suppression associated with the conservation of an U(1)-charge in current transport models. For this study a pion gas is simulated within two different transport approaches by incorporating inelastic and volume-limited collisions $\\pi\\pi\\leftrightarrow K\\bar{K}$ for the production of kaon pairs. Both descriptions can dynamically account for the suppression in the yields of rare strange particles in a limited box, being in full accordance with a canonical statistical description.

O. Fochler; S. Vogel; M. Bleicher; C. Greiner; P. Koch-Steinheimer; Z. Xu

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

63

NASA's APPROACH TO HALON ISSUES (407) 867-4454  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the northern polar region caused by energetic protons released from the Sun during intense solar flares. Instruments to ...

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

64

EVALUATION OF SOME HALON SUBSTITUTE AGENTS IN A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... engine simulator is essentially a wind tunnel and ... Simmons.' The purpose of this design is to ... fire pan section, scrubbing tower, agent dispensing ...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

65

Final Technical Report Fires Experienced and Halon 1301 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vehicle and unless the vehicle can drive away or ... also monitored during certain gas generator tests. ... related losses were classified as direct fires and ...

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

66

Atomic clocks with suppressed blackbody radiation shift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a nonstandard concept of atomic clocks where the blackbody radiation shift (BBRS) and its temperature fluctuations can be dramatically suppressed (by one to three orders of magnitude) independent of the environmental temperature. The suppression is based on the fact that in a system with two accessible clock transitions (with frequencies v1 and v2) which are exposed to the same thermal environment, there exists a "synthetic" frequency v_{syn} (v1-e12 v2) largely immune to the BBRS. As an example, it is shown that in the case of ion 171Yb+ it is possible to create a clock in which the BBRS can be suppressed to the fractional level of 10^{-18} in a broad interval near room temperature (300\\pm 15 K). We also propose a realization of our method with the use of an optical frequency comb generator stabilized to both frequencies v1 and v2. Here the frequency v_{syn} is generated as one of the components of the comb spectrum and can be used as an atomic standard.

V. I. Yudin; A. V. Taichenachev; M. V. Okhapkin; S. N. Bagayev; Chr. Tamm; E. Peik; N. Huntemann; T. E. Mehlstaubler; F. Riehle

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

67

Suppressed $B_s$ decays at CDF  

SciTech Connect

We review three recent results of the CDF collaboration on B{sub s}{sup 0} suppressed decays: the first search for CP-violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi} decay, where two CP-violating asymmetries expected to be zero in the Standard Model are measured, and the observation and the branching ratio measurements of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi} f{sub 0}(980) and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi} K{sup (*)} decays.

Dorigo, Mirco

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Test results of lithium pool-air reaction suppression systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered reaction suppression systems were demonstrated to be effective in suppressing lithium pool-air reactions for lithium quantities up to 100 kg. Lithium pool-air reaction suppression system tests were conducted to evaluate suppression system effectiveness for potential use in fusion facilities in mitigating consequences of postulated lithium spills. Small-scale perforated and sacrificial cover plate suppression systems with delayed inert gas purging proved effective in controlling the lithium-air interaction for lithium quantities near 15 kg at initial temperatures up to 450/sup 0/C. A large-scale suppression system with a sacrificial cover, a diverter plate, an inert gas atmosphere, and remotely retrievable catch pans proved effective in controlling lithium pool-air interaction for a 100-kg lithium discharge at an initial temperature of 550/sup 0/C. This suppression system limited the maximum pool temperature to about 600/sup 0/C less than that expected for a similar lithium pool-air reaction without a suppression system. Lithium aerosol release from this large-scale suppression system was a factor of about 10,000 less than that expected for a lithium pool-air reaction with no suppression system. Remote retrieval techniques for lithium cleanup, such as (1) in-place lithium siphoning and overhead crane dismantling, and (2) lithium catch pan removal by use of an overhead crane, were demonstrated as part of this large-scale test.

Jeppson, D.W.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

SEY_suppression_ELCOUD04.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 SLAC-TN-04-045 June 2004 Abstract This note documents a set of expressions used to explore the issue of whether or not it is reasonable to consider a conventional positron source for a Tesla formatted beam. The critical issue is that of energy deposition in the conversion target and the comparison of the induced stress with the ultimate tensile strength of the target material. Since the length of the incident beam pulse is large in comparison to the ratio of beam size to the speed of sound, the concurrent pressure pulse dissipates in a time short compared to the overall pulse duration and one is left with only the Suppression of the Effective Secondary Emission Yield for a Grooved Metal Surface G. Stupakov and M. Pivi

70

Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; George, E.V.; Miller, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

71

Suppression of a Nonpremixed Flame Stabilized by a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Effects of Clutter on Performance of Fire Suppression Agents in Aircraft DIY Bays and Engine Nacelles, Report prepared for Booz, Allen and ...

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion  

SciTech Connect

A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Biological and cultural controls . . . Nonpesticide alternatives can suppress crop pests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternatives can suppress crop pests Nicholas J. Mills Kentsuppression of major arthropod crop pests in California. Wevines, and ?eld and row crops. For example, a historic suc-

Mills, Nicholas J.; Daane, Kent M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Sidelobe Suppression for Robust Beamformer Via the Mixed Norm Constraint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applying a sparse constraint on the beam pattern has been suggested to suppress the sidelobe of the minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamformer recently. To further improve the performance, we add a mixed norm constraint on the beam pattern. ... Keywords: Mixed norm constraint, Robust beamforming, Sidelobe suppression, Sparse constraint

Yipeng Liu; Qun Wan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

CHAPTER: In-Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implantsBOOK TITLE: Implantable Neural Prostheses 2: Techniques and Engineering Approaches, D.M. Zhou and E. Greenbaum, Eds., Springer, NY 2009  

SciTech Connect

The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model 'eye,' beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Sanders, Charlene A [ORNL; Kandagor, Vincent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

'Catch and Suppress' Control of Instabilities in High Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'Catch and Suppress' Control of Instabilities in High Performance 'Catch and Suppress' Control of Instabilities in High Performance Fusion Plasmas Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: sc.fes@science.doe.gov More Information » October 2012 'Catch and Suppress' Control of Instabilities in High Performance Fusion Plasmas Real time steering of microwave beams is used to suppress deleterious modes on DIII-D. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of General Atomics

78

Estimating Suppression of Eddy Mixing by Mean Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle- and tracer-based estimates of lateral diffusivities are used to estimate the suppression of eddy mixing across strong currents. Particles and tracers are advected using a velocity field derived from sea surface height measurements from ...

Andreas Klocker; Raffaele Ferrari; Joseph H. LaCasce

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nuclear Suppression of Dileptons at Large xF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a significant nuclear suppression of the relative production rates (p(d)+A)/(p+d(p)) for the Drell-Yan process at large Feynman xF. Since this is the region of minimal values for the light-front momentum fraction variable x2 in the target nucleus, it is tempting to interpret this as a manifestation of coherence or of a Color Glass Condensate. We demonstrate, however, that this suppression mechanism is governed by the energy conservation restrictions in multiple parton rescatterings in nuclear matter. To eliminate nuclear shadowing effects coming from the coherence, we calculate nuclear suppression in the light-cone dipole approach at large dilepton masses and at energy accessible at FNAL. Our calculations are in a good agreement with data from the E772 experiment. Using the same mechanism we predict also nuclear suppression at forward rapidities in the RHIC energy range.

J. Cepila; J. Nemchik

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

80

Efficiency of background suppression for arterial spin labeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arterial spin labeling (ASL), a technique developed for the measurement of local tissue perfusion with MRI, is heavily dependent on distinguishing irrelevant static tissue signal from the labeled blood. Background suppression ...

Garcia, Dairon, 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CMB quadrupole suppression. II. The early fast roll stage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the effective field theory of inflation, an initialization of the classical dynamics of the inflaton with approximate equipartition between the kinetic and potential energy of the inflaton leads to a brief fast roll stage that precedes the slow roll regime. The fast roll stage leads to an attractive potential in the wave equations for the mode functions of curvature and tensor perturbations. The evolution of the inflationary perturbations is equivalent to the scattering by this potential and a useful dictionary between the scattering data and observables is established. Implementing methods from scattering theory we prove that this attractive potential leads to a suppression of the quadrupole moment for CMB and B-mode angular power spectra. The scale of the potential is determined by the Hubble parameter during slow roll. Within the effective field theory of inflation at the grand unification (GUT) energy scale we find that if inflation lasts a total number of e-folds N{sub tot}{approx}59, there is a 10%-20% suppression of the CMB quadrupole and about 2%-4% suppression of the tensor quadrupole. The suppression of higher multipoles is smaller, falling off as 1/l{sup 2}. The suppression is much smaller for N{sub tot}>59, therefore if the observable suppression originates in the fast roll stage, there is the upper bound N{sub tot}{approx}59.

Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H. J. de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Observatoire de Paris, LERMA, Laboratoire Associe au CNRS UMR 8112, 61, Avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France); LPTHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI) et Denis Diderot (Paris VII), Laboratoire Associe au CNRS UMR 7589, Tour 24, 5eme. etage, 4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Sanchez, N. G. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA, Laboratoire Associe au CNRS UMR 8112, 61, Avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Experience with IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

An intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for RHIC operating with heavy ions. In order to suppress the IBS we designed and implemented new lattice with higher betatron tunes. This lattice had been developed during last three years and had been used for gold ions in yellow ring of the RHIC during d-Au part of the RHIC Run-8. The use of this lattice allowed both significant increases in the luminosity lifetime and the luminosity levels via reduction of beta-stars in the IPS. In this paper we report on the development, the tests and the performance of IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC, including the resulting increases in the peak and the average luminosity. We also report on our plans for future steps with the IBS suppression.

Litvinenko,V.N.; Luo, Y.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Ganetis, G.; Hoff, L.; Louie, W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Montag, C.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

83

Rotational suppression of the Tayler instability in stellar radiation zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of the magnetic field in stellar radiation zones is an important topic in modern astrophysics because the magnetic field can play an important role in several transport phenomena such as mixing and angular momentum transport. We consider the influence of rotation on stability of a predominantly toroidal magnetic field in the radiation zone. We find that the effect of rotation on the stability depends on the magnetic configuration of the basic state. If the toroidal field increases sufficiently rapidly with the spherical radius, the instability cannot be suppressed entirely even by a very fast rotation although the strength of the instability can be significantly reduced. On the other hand, if the field increases slowly enough with the radius or decreases, the instability has a threshold and can be completely suppressed in rapidly rotating stars. We find that in the regions where the instability is entirely suppressed a particular type of magnetohydrodynamic waves may exist which are marginally stabl...

Bonanno, Alfio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Kink instability suppression with stochastic cooling pickup and kicker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kink instability is one of the major beam dynamics issues of the linac-ring based electron ion collider. This head-tail type instability arises from the oscillation of the electron beam inside the opposing ion beam. It must be suppressed to achieve the desired luminosity. There are various ways to suppress the instability, such as tuning the chromaticity in the ion ring or by a dedicated feedback system of the electron beam position at IP, etc. However, each method has its own limitation. In this paper, we will discuss an alternative opportunity of suppressing the kink instability of the proposed eRHIC at BNL using the existing pickup-kicker system of the stochastic cooling system in RHIC.

Hao Y.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Ptitsyn, V.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Suppression of multiphoton intrashell resonances in Li Rydberg atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiphoton intrashell transitions in strongly driven Li (n=25) Rydberg atoms are studied experimentally. Orthogonal dc electric and magnetic fields lift the degeneracy of the n shell and define the eccentricity e of the initial coherent elliptic states, which are formed by laser excitation and subsequent adiabatic transformation. The intrashell transitions are driven by a time-harmonic electric field linearly polarized parallel to the major axis of the ellipse. N-photon resonances with N=1-9 are studied as a function of e. All resonances with N{>=}3 are suppressed at certain e values in between 0 and 1. A similar system was analyzed by Yabuzaki et al. [Phys. Rev. A 10, 1955 (1974)] who found a simple pattern of suppressions that applies also for the present experiments. The results of these experimentally confirm that each time N is increased by two, an additional suppression is observed.

Waheed, A. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Higher Education Commission of Pakistan, Islamabad (Pakistan); Fregenal, D. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cienticas y Tecnicas. R8402AGP S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Frette, O.; Foerre, M.; Hjertaker, B. T.; Preclikova, J. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Horsdal, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Pilskog, I. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7614, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Ion energy recovery experiment based on magnetic electro suppression  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-principle experiment on direct recovery of residual hydrogen ions based on a magnetic electron suppression scheme is described. Ions extracted from a source plasma a few kilovolts above the ground potential (approx. 20 A) are accelerated to 40 keV by a negative potential maintained on a neutralizer gas cell. As the residual ions exit the gas cell, they are deflected from the neutral beam by a magnetic field that also suppresses gas cell electrons and then recovered on a ground-potential surface. Under optimum conditions, a recovery efficiency (the ratio of the net recovered current to the available full-energy ion current) of 80% +- 20% has been obtained. Magnetic suppression of the beam plasma electrons was rather easily achieved; however, handling the fractional-energy ions originating from molecular species (H/sub 2//sup +/ and H/sub 3//sup +/) proved to be extremely important to recovery efficiency.

Kim, J.; Stirling, W.L.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Barber, G.C.; Ponte, N.S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

An alternative model of jet suppression at RHIC energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a simple Glauber-type mechanism for suppression of jet production up to transverse momenta of about 10 GeV/c at RHIC. For processes in this kinematic region, the formation time is smaller than the interval between two successive hard partonic collisions and the subsequent collision influences the jet production. Number of jets then roughly scales with the number of participants. Proportionality to the number of binary collisions is recovered for very high transverse momenta. The model predicts suppression of jet production in d+Au collisions at RHIC.

Roman Lietava; Jan Pisut; Neva Pisutova; Boris Tomasik

2003-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

88

Viscoelastic Suppression of Gravity-Driven Counterflow Instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attempts to achieve ``top kill'' of actively flowing oil wells by insertion of dense drilling ``muds'', i.e., slurries of dense minerals, from above will fail if the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the gravity-driven counterflow produces turbulence that breaks up the denser fluid into small droplets. Here we estimate the droplet size to be sub-mm for fast flows and suggest the addition of a shear-thickening polymer to suppress turbulence. Laboratory experiments show a progression from droplet formation to complete turbulence suppression at the relevant high velocities, illustrating rich new physics accessible by using a shear-thickening liquid in gravity driven counter-streaming flows.

Beiersdorfer, P; Layne, D; Magee, E W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Extra focal convective suppressing solar collector. Final technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report describes work done on the Extra Focal Convective Suppressing Solar Collector. The topics of the report include sensor refinement for the tracking electronics, tracking controller refinement, system optics evaluation, absorber system material evaluation and performance, tracking hardware evaluation and refinement, and full scale prototype construction and testing.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Evidence for the suppressed decay B^- -> DK^-, D -> K^+?^-?^0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a study of the suppressed decay B^- -> DK^-, D -> K^+\\pi^-\\pi^0, where D denotes either a D^0 or a \\bar{D}^0 meson. The decay is sensitive to the CP-violating parameter \\phi_3. Using a data sample of 772 x 10^6 B\\bar{B} pairs collected at the \\Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector, we measure the ratio of branching fractions of the above suppressed decay to the favored decay B^- -> DK^-, D -> K^-\\pi^+\\pi^0. Our result is R_{DK} = [1.98 +/- 0.62(stat.) +/- 0.24(syst.)] x 10^{-2}, which indicates the first evidence of the signal for this suppressed decay with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. We measure the direct CP asymmetry between the suppressed B^- and B^+ decays to be A_{DK} = 0.41 +/- 0.30 (stat.) +/- 0.05 (syst.). We also report measurements for the analogous quantities R_{D\\pi} and A_{D\\pi} for the decay B^- -> D\\pi^-, D -> K^+\\pi^-\\pi^0.

Belle Collaboration; M. Nayak; J. Libby; K. Trabelsi; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; P. Behera; K. Belous; V. Bhardwaj; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; D. ?ervenkov; M. -C. Chang; P. Chang; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; R. Chistov; I. -S. Cho; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; M. Danilov; Z. Doležal; Z. Drásal; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; S. Esen; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; H. Hayashii; Y. Horii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; T. Iwashita; I. Jaegle; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; E. Kato; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; J. B. Kim; M. J. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; P. Kodyš; S. Korpar; P. Krishnan; P. Križan; P. Krokovny; T. Kuhr; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; S. -H. Lee; J. Li; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; Y. Liu; D. Liventsev; P. Lukin; H. Miyake; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; T. Mori; N. Muramatsu; R. Mussa; Y. Nagasaka; M. Nakao; E. Nedelkovska; K. Negishi; C. Ng; N. K. Nisar; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; Y. Onuki; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; C. W. Park; H. Park; T. K. Pedlar; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Röhrken; A. Rostomyan; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; K. Senyo; O. Seon; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; M. Stari?; M. Steder; Z. Suzuki; U. Tamponi; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; M. Uchida; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; S. E. Vahsen; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yusa; V. Zhilich; V. Zhulanov; A. Zupanc

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Evaluation of using active circuitry for substrate noise suppression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of system-on-chips can be severely degraded if noisy circuits interfere with sensitive circuits through the common silicon substrate. Many methods have been proposed to suppress such substrate noise, ranging from designing circuits that ... Keywords: active noise decoupling, substrate coupling, substrate modeling

Rashid Farivar; Simon Kristiansson; Fredrik Ingvarson; Kjell O. Jeppson

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Surge Suppression of Protection Equipment in UHV Substation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyses the producing mechanism of surge at protection equipment's ports, surge test of high level is done for signal ports, communication ports and power ports of specific protection equipment sample. Evaluation is accomplished for the methods ... Keywords: protection equipment, substation, surge suppression

Ma Haijie

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Comments on “Does Air Pollution Really Suppress Precipitation in Israel?”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alpert et al. in a recent paper challenged the quantification of the suppression of orographic precipitation that was shown in two recent papers by Givati and Rosenfeld to occur in Israel. Their main claim was that the results were determined by ...

Amir Givati; Daniel Rosenfeld

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Dynamic Resource Allocation in Disaster Response: Tradeoffs in Wildfire Suppression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Resource Allocation in Disaster Response: Tradeoffs in Wildfire Suppression Nada Petrovic1: Petrovic N, Alderson DL, Carlson JM (2012) Dynamic Resource Allocation in Disaster Response: Tradeoffs with the allocation of limited resources to mitigate the impact of natural disasters inspire fundamentally new

Carlson, Jean

95

Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro  

SciTech Connect

This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

John Leslie Redpath

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Suppression MHD instabilities by IBW heating in HT-7 Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In HT-7 tokamak, the m= 2/1 tearing mode can be effectively suppressed by the ion bernstein wave (IBW) when the location of power deposition is near the q=2 rational surface. Off-axis electron heating and greatly increase of electron density was observed, in the meantime, the particle confinement appears to be improved with the increased of the central line averaged electron density and the drop of Da emission. Induced large ne gradients and pressures were spatially correlated with the IBW deposition profile by theoretical calculation >. It is suggested that off-axis IBW heating modifies the electron pressure profile, and so the current density profile could be redistributed resulting in the suppression of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instability. It provides an integrated way for making combined effects on both the stabilization of tearing modes and controlling of pressure profile.

C. M. Qin; Y. P. Zhao; X. J. Zhang; P. Xu; Y. Yang; the HT-7 team

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Kalman filtering to suppress spurious signals in Adaptive Optics control  

SciTech Connect

In many scenarios, an Adaptive Optics (AO) control system operates in the presence of temporally non-white noise. We use a Kalman filter with a state space formulation that allows suppression of this colored noise, hence improving residual error over the case where the noise is assumed to be white. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new filter in the case of the estimated Gemini Planet Imager tip-tilt environment, where there are both common-path and non-common path vibrations. We discuss how this same framework can also be used to suppress spatial aliasing during predictive wavefront control assuming frozen flow in a low-order AO system without a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, and present experimental measurements from Altair that clearly reveal these aliased components.

Poyneer, L; Veran, J P

2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

98

Endotoxin suppresses surfactant synthesis in cultured rat lung cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulmonary complications secondary to postburn sepsis are a major cause of death in burned patients. Using an in vitro organotypic culture system, we examined the effect of E. coli endotoxin (LPS) on lung cell surfactant synthesis. Our results showed that E. coli endotoxin (1.0, 2.5, 10 micrograms LPS/ml) was capable of suppressing the incorporation of /sup 3/H-choline into de novo synthesized surfactant, lamellar bodies (LB), and common myelin figures (CMF) at 50%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. In a similar study, we were able to show that LPS also inhibited /sup 3/H-palmitate incorporation by cultured lung cells. LPS-induced suppression of surfactant synthesis was reversed by hydrocortisone. Our results suggest that LPS may play a significant role in reducing surfactant synthesis by rat lung cells, and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis-related respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in burn injury.

Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Vector Higgs bosons and possible suppression of flavorchanging neutral current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We replace the scalar Higgs doublet with a vector Higgs boson doublet to the unified electroweak W-S model and find most of important features of W-S model are kept unchanged only the Higgs boson now become vector bosons. Lorentz invariance has been carefully discussed. The most important challenge is there will be three massless vector Higgs bosons. The remarkable effect is the possible suppression of the flavorchanging neutral current compare to the multi-Higgs model.

Xiao Yu Qian

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

100

Suppression of decoherence effects in the quantum kicked rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a method allowing transient suppression of decoherence effects on the atom-optics realization of the kicked rotor. The system is prepared in an initial state with a momentum distribution concentrated in an interval much sharper than the Brillouin zone; the measure of the momentum distribution is restricted to this interval of quasimomenta: As most of the atoms undergoing decoherence processes fall outside this detection range and thus are not detected, the measured signal is effectively decoherence-free.

Maxence Lepers; Véronique Zehnlé; Jean Claude Garreau

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Quantum Suppression of the Rayleigh Instability in Nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A linear stability analysis of metallic nanowires is performed in the free-electron model using quantum chaos techniques. It is found that the classical instability of a long wire under surface tension can be completely suppressed by electronic shell effects, leading to stable cylindrical configurations whose electrical conductance is a magic number 1, 3, 5, 6,... times the quantum of conductance. Our results are quantitatively consistent with recent experiments with alkali metal nanowires.

F. Kassubek; C. A. Stafford; Hermann Grabert; Raymond E. Goldstein

2000-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

102

Suppression of heavy impurities in the ST Tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Two different discharges in the ST Tokamak are described: A discharge dominated by high-Z (iron) impurity (Case A), and one dominated by low-Z (oxygen) impurity (Case B). The oxygen-dominated discharge shows higher electron temperature and longer containment time than the iron-dominated discharge. Suppression of Fe and Mo impurities has been achieved by pulsing in air for a few hundred shots. (auth)

Meservey, E.; Bretz, N.; Dimock, D.; Hinnov, E.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Suppression of shot noise and spontaneous radiation in electron beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shot noise in the electron beam distribution is the main source of noise in high-gain FEL amplifiers, which may affect applications ranging from single- and multi-stage HGHG FELs to an FEL amplifier for coherent electron cooling. This noise also imposes a fundamental limit of about 10{sup 6} on FEL gain, after which SASE FELs saturate. There are several advantages in strongly suppressing this shot noise in the electron beam, and the corresponding spontaneous radiation. For more than a half-century, a traditional passive method has been used successfully in practical low-energy microwave electronic devices to suppress shot noise. Recently, it was proposed for this purpose in FELs. However, being passive, the method has some significant limitations and is hardly suitable for the highly inhomogeneous beams of modern high-gain FELs. I present a novel active method of suppressing, by many orders-of-magnitude, the shot noise in relativistic electron beams. I give a theoretical description of the process, and detail its fundamental limitation.

Litvinenko,V.

2009-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

104

Multi-band OFDM UWB receiver with narrowband interference suppression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multi band orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM) compatible ultra wideband (UWB) receiver with narrowband interference (NBI) suppression capability is presented. The average transmit power of UWB system is limited to -41.3 dBm/MHz in order to not interfere existing narrowband systems. Moreover, it must operate even in the presence of unintentional radiation of FCC Class-B compatible devices. If this unintentional radiation resides in the UWB band, it can jam the communication. Since removing the interference in digital domain requires higher dynamic range of analog front-end than removing it in analog domain, a programmable analog notch filter is used to relax the receiver requirements in the presence of NBI. The baseband filter is placed before the variable gain amplifier (VGA) in order to reduce the signal swing at the VGA input. The frequency hopping period of MB-OFDM puts a lower limit on the settling time of the filter, which is inverse proportional to notch bandwidth. However, notch bandwidth should be low enough not to attenuate the adjacent OFDM tones. Since these requirements are contradictory, optimization is needed to maximize overall performance. Two different NBI suppression schemes are tested. In the first scheme, the notch filter is operating for all sub-bands. In the second scheme, the notch filter is turned on during the sub-band affected by NBI. Simulation results indicate that the UWB system with the first and the second suppression schemes can handle up to 6 dB and 14 dB more NBI power, respectively. The results of this work are not limited to MB-OFDM UWB system, and can be applied to other frequency hopping systems.

Kelleci, Burak

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Effects of Vacuum Fluctuation Suppression on Atomic Decay Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of atomic decay rates as a probe of sub-vacuum phenomena will be studied. Because electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations are essential for radiative decay of excited atomic states, decay rates can serve as a measure of the suppression of vacuum fluctuation in non-classical states, such as squeezed vacuum states. In such states the renormalized expectation value of the square of the electric field or the energy density can be periodically negative, representing suppression of vacuum fluctuations. We explore the extent to which atomic decays can be used to measure the mean squared electric field or energy density. We consider a scheme in which atoms in an excited state transit a closed cavity whose lowest mode contains photons in a non-classical state. The change in the decay probability of the atom in the cavity due to the non-classical state can, under certain circumstances, serve as a measure of the mean squared electric field or energy density in the cavity. We derive a quantum inequality bound on the ...

Ford, L H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Effects of Vacuum Fluctuation Suppression on Atomic Decay Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of atomic decay rates as a probe of sub-vacuum phenomena will be studied. Because electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations are essential for radiative decay of excited atomic states, decay rates can serve as a measure of the suppression of vacuum fluctuation in non-classical states, such as squeezed vacuum states. In such states the renormalized expectation value of the square of the electric field or the energy density can be periodically negative, representing suppression of vacuum fluctuations. We explore the extent to which atomic decays can be used to measure the mean squared electric field or energy density. We consider a scheme in which atoms in an excited state transit a closed cavity whose lowest mode contains photons in a non-classical state. The change in the decay probability of the atom in the cavity due to the non-classical state can, under certain circumstances, serve as a measure of the mean squared electric field or energy density in the cavity. We derive a quantum inequality bound on the decrease in this probability. We also show that the decrease in decay rate can sometimes be a measure of negative energy density or negative squared electric field. We make some estimates of the magnitude of this effect, which indicate that an experimental test might be possible.

L. H. Ford; Thomas A. Roman

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

107

SUPPRESSION OF ENERGETIC ELECTRON TRANSPORT IN FLARES BY DOUBLE LAYERS  

SciTech Connect

During flares and coronal mass ejections, energetic electrons from coronal sources typically have very long lifetimes compared to the transit times across the systems, suggesting confinement in the source region. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to explore the mechanisms of energetic electron transport from the corona to the chromosphere and possible confinement. We set up an initial system of pre-accelerated hot electrons in contact with ambient cold electrons along the local magnetic field and let it evolve over time. Suppression of transport by a nonlinear, highly localized electrostatic electric field (in the form of a double layer) is observed after a short phase of free-streaming by hot electrons. The double layer (DL) emerges at the contact of the two electron populations. It is driven by an ion-electron streaming instability due to the drift of the back-streaming return current electrons interacting with the ions. The DL grows over time and supports a significant drop in temperature and hence reduces heat flux between the two regions that is sustained for the duration of the simulation. This study shows that transport suppression begins when the energetic electrons start to propagate away from a coronal acceleration site. It also implies confinement of energetic electrons with kinetic energies less than the electrostatic energy of the DL for the DL lifetime, which is much longer than the electron transit time through the source region.

Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

Synthesis of Difluoroethylene (C2H2F2) from Halon 1211 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 0.3 s. The exhaust gases were passed ... factors estimated from published correlations for TCD ... in significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions. ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

109

Novel technique of suppressing TBBU in high-energy ERLs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy recovery linacs (ERLs) are an emerging generation of accelerators that promise to revolutionize the fields of high-energy physics and photon sciences. These accelerators combine the advantages of linear accelerators with that of storage rings, and augur the delivery of electron beams of unprecedented power and quality. However, one potential weakness of these devices is transverse beam break-up instability that could severely limit the available beam current. In this paper, I propose a novel method of suppressing these dangerous effects using the chromaticity of the transverse motion. In this short paper I am able only to touch the surface of the method and a complete description of the method with all relevant derivations can be found in [1].

Litvinenko V.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

Electric field suppression of ultracold confined chemical rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider ultracold collisions of polar molecules confined in a one dimensional optical lattice. Using a quantum scattering formalism and a frame transformation method, we calculate elastic and chemical quenching rate constants for fermionic molecules. Taking KRb molecules as a prototype, we find that the rate of quenching collisions is enhanced at zero electric field as the confinement is increased, but that this rate is suppressed when the electric field is turned on. For molecules with 500 nK of collision energy, for realistic molecular densities, and for achievable experimental electric fields and trap confinements, we predict lifetimes of KRb molecules of 1 s. We find a ratio of elastic to quenching collision rates of about 100, which may be sufficient to achieve efficient experimental evaporative cooling of polar KRb molecules.

Quéméner, Goulven

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Enhancement and suppression of heat transfer by MHD turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study of the effect of turbulence on heat transfer within magnetized plasmas for energy injection velocities both larger and smaller that the Alfven speed. We find that in the latter regime the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the former regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale l at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path is larger than l, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective heat transport, which, for the parameters of intracluster medium (ICM) provides effective heat diffusivity that exceeds the classical Spitzer value.

A. Lazarian

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

112

SRAM leakage suppression by minimizing standby supply voltage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suppressing the leakage current in memories is critical in low-power design. By reducing the standby supply voltage (VDD) to its limit, which is the Data Retention Voltage (DRV), leakage power can be substantially reduced. This paper explores how low DRV can be in a standard low leakage SRAM module and analyzes how DRV is affected by parameters such as process variations, chip temperature, and transistor sizing. An analytical model for DRV as a function of process and design parameters is presented, and forms the base for further design space explorations. This model is verified using simulations as well as measurements from a 4KB SRAM chip in a 0.13?m technology. It is demonstrated that an SRAM cell state can be preserved at sub-300mV standby V DD, with more than 90 % leakage power savings. 1.

Huifang Qin; Yu Cao; Dejan Markovic; Andrei Vladimirescu; Jan Rabaey

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Parameter selection for suppressed fuzzy c-means with an application to MRI segmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an algorithm, called the modified suppressed fuzzy c-means (MS-FCM), that simultaneously performs clustering and parameter selection for the suppressed fuzzy c-means (S-FCM) algorithm proposed by [Fan, J.L., Zhen, W.Z., Xie, W.X., ... Keywords: Fuzzy c-means, Fuzzy clustering, Magnetic resonance image segmentation, Parameter selection, Suppressed fuzzy c-means

Wen-Liang Hung; Miin-Shen Yang; De-Hua Chen

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Deployment: Inertion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Halon 1301 Use in Oil and Gas Production Facilities ... Propane Inerting Concertrations of Two Halon Replacement Gases Blended With Nitrogen ...

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

Context: Policy & Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Regulation of Halon and Halon Substitutes. ... Disparities in Environmental Regulations and Their Effect ... Impediments and Incentives for Incorporating ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

116

Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

117

First Observation of Cabibbo-Suppressed ?_c^0 Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed decays $\\Xi_c^0\\rightarrow \\Xi^- K^+$, $\\Xi_c^0\\ra\\Lambda K^+ K^-$ and $\\Xi_c^0\\rightarrow \\Lambda \\phi$, using a data sample of $711\\, \\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+ e^-$ collider. We measure the ratios of branching fractions to be $\\frac{{\\cal B}(\\Xi_c^0\\ra \\Xi^- K^+)}{{\\cal B}(\\Xi^0_c\\ra\\Xi^-\\pi^+)}=(2.75\\pm 0.51\\pm 0.25)\\times 10^{-2}$, $\\frac{{\\cal B}(\\Xi_c^0\\ra\\Lambda K^+ K^-)}{{\\cal B}(\\Xi_c^0\\rightarrow\\Xi^- \\pi^+)}=(2.86\\pm 0.61\\pm 0.24)\\times 10^{-2}$ and $\\frac{{\\cal B}(\\Xi_c^0\\ra \\Lambda\\phi)}{{\\cal B}(\\Xi^0_c\\ra\\Xi^-\\pi^+)}=(3.43\\pm 0.58\\pm 0.32)\\times 10^{-2}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

Belle Collaboration; R. Chistov; I. Adachi; H. Aihara; D. M. Asner; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; J. Brodzicka; T. E. Browder; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; P. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; I. -S. Cho; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; M. Danilov; Z. Doležal; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; D. Epifanov; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; M. Feindt; T. Ferber; A. Frey; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; T. Hara; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; Y. Horii; Y. Hoshi; W. -S. Hou; H. J. Hyun; T. Iijima; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; J. H. Kang; E. Kato; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. T. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; P. Kodyš; S. Korpar; P. Križan; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; S. -H. Lee; J. Li; Y. Li; J. Libby; C. Liu; Y. Liu; D. Liventsev; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; T. Mori; N. Muramatsu; R. Mussa; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; E. Nedelkovska; C. Ng; S. Nishida; O. Nitoh; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; C. Oswald; G. Pakhlova; C. W. Park; H. Park; H. K. Park; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; M. Ritter; M. Röhrken; A. Rostomyan; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; K. Sakai; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; D. Santel; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; O. Seon; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; M. Stari?; M. Steder; M. Sumihama; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; K. Tanida; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; M. Uchida; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Usov; S. E. Vahsen; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; A. Vinokurova; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; B. D. Yabsley; J. Yamaoka; Y. Yamashita; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; Y. Yusa; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; V. Zhulanov; A. Zupanc

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

Measurement of Cabibbo suppressed decays of the $\\tau$ lepton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Branching ratios for the dominant Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the \\tau lepton have been measured by CLEO~II in e^+ e^- annihilation at CESR (\\sqrt{s} \\sim 10.6~GeV) using kaons with momenta below 0.7\\ \\rm GeV/c. The inclusive branching ratio into one charged kaon is (1.60 \\pm 0.12 \\pm 0.19)\\%. For the exclusive decays, B(\\tau \\to K^-) = (0.66 \\pm 0.07 \\pm 0.09)\\%, B(\\tau \\to K^- \\pi^0) = (0.51 \\pm 0.10 \\pm 0.07)\\%, and, based on three events, B(\\tau \\to K^- \\pi^0 \\pi^0) < 0.3\\% at the 90\\% confidence level. These represent significant improvements over previous results. B(\\tau\\to K^- \\pi^0) is measured for the first time with exclusive \\pi^0 reconstruction. hardcopies with figures can be obtained by writing to: Pam Morehouse preprint secretary Newman Lab Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 or by sending mail to: preprints@lns62.lns.cornell.edu

Battle, M; Kwon, Y; Roberts, S; Thorndike, E H; Wang, C H; Dominick, J; Lambrecht, M; Sanghera, S; Shelkov, V; Skwarnicki, T; Stroynowski, R; Volobuev, I P; Wei, G; Zadorozhny, P; Artuso, M; Goldberg, M; He, D; Horwitz, N; Kennett, R; Mountain, R; Moneti, G C; Muheim, F; Mukhin, Y; Playfer, S; Rozen, Y; Stone, S; Thulasidas, M; Vasseur, G; Zhu, G; Bartelt, J; Csorna, S E; Egyed, Z; Jain, V; Kinoshita, K; Edwards, K W; Ogg, M; Britton, D I; Hyatt, E R F; MacFarlane, D B; Patel, P M; Akerib, D S; Barish, B C; Chadha, M; Chan, S; Cowen, D F; Eigen, G; Miller, J S; O'Grady, C; Urheim, J; Weinstein, A J; Acosta, D; Athanas, M; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Sivertz, M; Gronberg, J B; Kutschke, R; Menary, S R; Morrison, R J; Nakanishi, S; Nelson, H N; Nelson, T K; Qiao, C; Richman, J D; Ryd, A; Tajima, H; Sperka, D; Witherell, M S; Procario, M; Balest, R; Cho, K; Daoudi, M; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Lingel, K; Lohner, M; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Bebek, C; Berkelman, K; Bloom, K; Browder, T E; Cassel, David G; Cho, H A; Coffman, D M; Drell, P S; Ehrlich, R; Gaidarev, P B; Galik, R S; García-Sciveres, M; Geiser, B; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Jones, C D; Jones, S L; Kandaswamy, J; Katayama, N; Kim, P C; Kreinick, D L; Ludwig, G S; Masui, J; Mevissen, J; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Salman, S; Sapper, M; Würthwein, F; Avery, P; Freyberger, A P; Rodríguez, J; Stephens, R; Yang, S; Yelton, J; Cinabro, D; Henderson, S; Liu, T; Saulnier, M; Wilson, R; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G; Ong, B; Palmer, M; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Ball, S; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Besson, D; Coppage, D; Copty, N K; Davis, R; Hancock, N; Kelly, M; Kwak, N; Lam, H; Kubota, Y; Lattery, M; Nelson, J K; Patton, S; Perticone, D; Poling, R A; Savinov, V; Schrenk, S; Wang, R; Alam, M S; Kim, I J; Nemati, B; O'Neill, J J; Severini, H; Sun, C R; Zoeller, M M; Crawford, G; Daubenmier, C M; Fulton, R; Fujino, D; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lee, J; Malchow, R L; Skovpen, Y; Sung, M; White, C; Butler, F; Fu, X; Kalbfleisch, G R; Ross, W R; Skubic, P L; Snow, J; Wang, P L; Wood, M; Brown, D N; Fast, J; McIlwain, R L; Miao, T; Miller, D H; Modesitt, M; Payne, D; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Wang Pei Ning

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Error suppression and error correction in adiabatic quantum computation I: techniques and challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is known to possess some intrinsic robustness, though it is likely that some form of error correction will be necessary for large scale computations. Error handling routines developed for circuit-model quantum computation do not transfer easily to the AQC model since these routines typically require high-quality quantum gates, a resource not generally allowed in AQC. There are two main techniques known to suppress errors during an AQC implementation: energy gap protection and dynamical decoupling. Here we show that both these methods are intimately related and can be analyzed within the same formalism. We analyze the effectiveness of such error suppression techniques and identify critical constraints on the performance of error suppression in AQC, suggesting that error suppression by itself is insufficient for large-scale, fault-tolerant AQC and that a form of error correction is needed. We discuss progress towards implementing error correction in AQC and enumerate several key outstanding problems. This work is a companion paper to "Error suppression and error correction in adiabatic quantum computation II: non-equilibrium dynamics"', which provides a dynamical model perspective on the techniques and limitations of error suppression and error correction in AQC. In this paper we discuss the same results within a quantum information framework, permitting an intuitive discussion of error suppression and correction in encoded AQC.

Kevin C. Young; Mohan Sarovar; Robin Blume-Kohout

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

120

Microglial activation induced by brain trauma is suppressed by post-injury treatment with a PARP inhibitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 activity suppresses NF-kB-dependent gene transcription andinhibition suppresses NF-kB- dependent gene transcription inof PARP inhibitors to block NF-kB - mediated inflammatory

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Unconditional quantum-noise suppression via measurement-based quantum feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate unconditional quantum-noise suppression in a collective spin system via feedback control based on quantum non-demolition measurement (QNDM). We perform shot-noise limited collective spin measurements on an ensemble of $3.7\\times 10^5$ laser-cooled 171Yb atoms in their spin-1/2 ground states. Correlation between two sequential QNDMs indicates $-0.80^{+0.11}_{-0.12}\\,\\mathrm{dB}$ quantum noise suppression in a conditional manner. Our feedback control successfully converts the conditional quantum-noise suppression into the unconditional one without significant loss of the noise

Ryotaro Inoue; Shin-Ichi-Ro Tanaka; Ryo Namiki; Takahiro Sagawa; Yoshiro Takahashi

2013-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

122

Frontal Wave Stability during Moist Deformation Frontogenesis. Part II: The Suppression of Nonlinear Wave Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the role of horizontal deformation and the associated frontogenetic ageostrophic circulation in suppressing the development of nonlinear waves is assessed. Unless linear barotropic frontal waves can become nonlinear, the associated ...

Craig H. Bishop; Alan J. Thorpe

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Suppression of ICE and Apoptosis in Mammary Epithelial Cells by Extracellular Matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suppression of ICE and Apoptosis in Mammary Epithelial Cellsmodulate the expression of ICE remain to be elucidated, asdo the in vivo substrates for ICE or related enzymes and the

Boudreau, Nancy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Has Hail Suppression in Eastern Yugoslavia Led to a Reduction in the Frequency of Hail?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An earlier attempt to estimate the effect of hail suppression by silver iodide seeding in eastern parts of Yugoslavia, based on hail-frequency data at stations having professional observers, is extended here. Hail-frequency data only are ...

Fedor Mesinger; Nedeljka Mesinger

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges using a substantially high index bonding elastomer or epoxy to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Fochs, Scott N. (Livermore, CA); Rotter, Mark D. (San Ramon, CA); Letts, Stephan A. (San Ramon, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

Mechanism for the suppression of quantum noise at large scales on expanding space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an exactly-solvable model for the suppression of quantum noise at large scales on expanding space. The suppression arises naturally in the de Broglie-Bohm pilot-wave formulation of quantum theory, according to which the Born probability rule has a dynamical origin. For a scalar field on a radiation-dominated background we construct the exact solution for the time-evolving wave functional and study properties of the associated field trajectories. It is shown that the time evolution of a field mode on expanding space is mathematically equivalent to that of a standard harmonic oscillator with a 'retarded time' that depends on the wavelength of the mode. In the far super-Hubble regime the equivalent oscillator evolves over only one Hubble time, yielding a simple mechanism whereby relaxation to the Born rule can be suppressed on very large scales. We present numerical simulations illustrating how the expansion of space can cause a retardation of relaxation in the super-Hubble regime. Given these results it is natural to expect a suppression of quantum noise at super-Hubble wavelengths. Such suppression could have taken place in a pre-inflationary era, resulting in a large-scale power deficit in the cosmic microwave background.

Samuel Colin; Antony Valentini

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Suppression of dynamics in coupled discrete systems in interaction with an extended environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the suppression of dynamics and occurrence of quiescent states in an extended system of coupled discrete dynamical systems. This phenomenon is induced by interaction with another similar system with a different and damped dynamics which we call an extended environment. Both the system and the environment are in a feedback loop and their mutual influence leads to suppression of dynamic activity. We illustrate this in the specific case of a system of coupled neurons modelled by a 2-dimensional discrete system called Rulkov maps. A detailed analysis is carried out by considering single units of discrete systems where control to steady states is induced by an external damped system. This is then extended to rings and lattices. As an important application, we also present how the excitation waves produced due to defect neurons can be suppressed by interaction with a system of passive cells.

Snehal M. Shekatkar; G. Ambika

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

128

Magnetic turbulence suppression by a helical mode in a cylindrical geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study processes involved in a helical structure formation in reversed field pinch devices, the scaling of a turbulent boundary layer width associated with a vortex structure having large shears of magnetic field and flow is obtained for reduced magnetohydrodynamics. The coherent vortex, with its flow and magnetic shears, interacts with Alfven turbulence, forming a turbulent boundary layer at the edge of the vortex. The layer arises from the balance between turbulence diffusion rates and shearing rates and suppresses the turbulence in the structure. The suppression of turbulence impedes relaxation of the coherent vortex profiles, leading to long coherence times. The scaling of the boundary layer width reveals that both magnetic shear and flow shear can effectively suppress magnetic turbulence.

Kim, J.-H.; Terry, P. W. [Department of Physics and Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation  

SciTech Connect

Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., 575 Kuze Tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

130

Efficient hybrid shunt active power filter for improvement of power factor and harmonic suppression using MATLAB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power quality management is the main problem that the industry is facing today. This is mainly affected by the generation of harmonics. The growing use of electronic equipment produces a large amount of harmonics in distribution systems because of non-sinusoidal ... Keywords: MATLAB 7.6, harmonic suppression, hybrid filter, power quality, shunt active power filter, total harmonic distortion

Jarupula Somlal

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Wind noise suppression in cochlear implants with one and two microphones Student Investigator: Casey Cox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Wind noise suppression in cochlear implants with one and two microphones Student Investigator coding strategy used. However, performance deteriorates significantly in wind noise. Wind noise was to investigate how wind noise affects speech intelligibility in cochlear implant users. Default noise reduction

Peterson, Blake R.

132

Suppression of Stationary Planetary Waves by Internal Gravity Waves in the Mesosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The suppression of stationary planetary waves by internal gravity waves in the mesosphere is treated using a quasi-geostrophic model on a midlatitude beta-plane. The drag forces due to internal gravity waves are parameterized based on the wave ...

Saburo Miyahara

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Use of Oil Refinery Wastes as a Dust Suppression Surfactant for Use in Mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this research, the suitability of a selection of petroleum refinery wastes as a dust suppressant were examined. Dust is a significant problem in surface and underground mining mainly because of its adverse effects on human health and machinery. Hence, dust control and suppression is a vital part of mine planning for mining engineers. Water is the oldest and the cheapest suppressant in dealing with the mine dusts. However, surfactant use has recently been used for a wider range of applications in the mining industry. In order to carry out laboratory experiments, a dust chamber was designed and manufactured. The chamber has an inlet for coal dust entrance and a nozzle for spraying water and the oil refinery wastes. Water and the surfactants were mixed at various ratios and then sprayed onto the coal dusts within the cell. Dust concentration was measured systematically to determine the effects of surfactant containing solution on the coal dust and the data obtained by the measurements were analyzed. The results showed that the oil refinery wastes could be used as a dust suppressant, which may create an economical utilization for the wastes concerned.

Dixon-Hardy, D.W.; Beyhan, S.; Ediz, I.G.; Erarslan, K. [University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

RMP ELM Suppression in DIII-D Plasmas with ITER Similar Shapes and Collisionalities  

SciTech Connect

Large Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) are completely eliminated with small n = 3 resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) in low average triangularity, = 0.26, plasmas and in ITER similar shaped (ISS) plasmas, = 0.53, with ITER relevant collisionalities ve 0.2. Significant differences in the RMP requirements and in the properties of the ELM suppressed plasmas are found when comparing the two triangularities. In ISS plasmas, the current required to suppress ELMs is approximately 25% higher than in low average triangularity plasmas. It is also found that the width of the resonant q95 window required for ELM suppression is smaller in ISS plasmas than in low average triangularity plasmas. An analysis of the positions and widths of resonant magnetic islands across the pedestal region, in the absence of resonant field screening or a self-consistent plasma response, indicates that differences in the shape of the q profile may explain the need for higher RMP coil currents during ELM suppression in ISS plasmas. Changes in the pedestal profiles are compared for each plasma shape as well as with changes in the injected neutral beam power and the RMP amplitude. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of requirements for optimal ELM control coil designs and for establishing the physics basis needed in order to scale this approach to future burning plasma devices such as ITER.

Evans, T.E. [General Atomics, San Diego; Fenstermacher, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Moyer, R.A. [University of California, San Diego; Osborne, T. H. [General Atomics; Watkins, J. G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Gohil, P. [General Atomics; Joseph, I. [University of California, San Diego; Schaffer, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Becoulet, M. [CEA Cadarache, St. Paul lex Durance, France; Boedo, J.A. [University of California, San Diego; Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics; DeGrassie, J. S. [General Atomics, San Diego; Finken, K. H. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald, Germany; Jernigan, Thomas C [ORNL; Jakubowski, M. W. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald, Germany; Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Lehnen, M. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Leonard, A. W. [General Atomics; Lonnroth, J. [Association Euratom-Tekes, Finland; Nardon, E. [CEA Cadarache, St. Paul lex Durance, France; Parail, V. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Schmitz, O. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Unterberg, B. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald, Germany; West, W.P. [General Atomics, San Diego

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Speckle suppression in SAR images using the 2-D GARCH model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel Bayesian-based speckle suppression method for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is presented that preserves the structural features and textural information of the scene. First, the logarithmic transform of the original image is analyzed ... Keywords: 2-D GARCH model, MAP estimation, speckle, statistical modeling, synthetic aperture radar

Maryam Amirmazlaghani; Hamidreza Amindavar; Alireza Moghaddamjoo

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Analyzing space-time sensor network data under suppression and failure in transmission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a fully model-based analysis of the effects of suppression and failure in data transmission with sensor networks. Sensor networks are becoming an increasingly common data collection mechanism in a variety of fields. Sensors can ... Keywords: Hierarchical models, Information loss, Linear constraints, Spatio temporal models, Wireless sensor networks

Gavino Puggioni; Alan E. Gelfand

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Suppression of Bose-Einstein condensation in one-dimensional scale-free random potentials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A perfect Bose gas can condensate in one dimension in the presence of a random potential due to the presence of Lifshitz tails in the one-particle density of states. Here, we show that scale-free correlations in the random potential suppress the disorder induced Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). Within a tight-binding approach, we consider free Bosons moving in a scale-free correlated random potential with spectral density decaying as 1/k{sup {alpha}}. The critical temperature for BEC is shown to vanish in chains with a binary nonstationary potential ({alpha}>1). On the other hand, a weaker suppression of BEC takes place in nonbinarized scale-free potentials. After a slightly increase in the stationary regime, the BEC transition temperature continuously decays as the spectral exponent {alpha}{yields}{infinity}.

Oliveira, I. N. de; Moura, F. A. B. F. de; Caetano, R. A.; Lyra, M. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceio, AL (Brazil)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Inhomogeneous dynamic nuclear polarization and suppression of electron-polarization decay in a quantum dot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the dynamic nuclear polarization process by frequently injecting polarized electron spins into a quantum dot. Due to the suppression of the direct dipolar and indirect electron-mediated nuclear spin interactions, by the frequently injected electron spins, the analytical predictions under the independent spin approximation agree well with quantum numerical simulations. Our results show that the acquired nuclear polarization is highly inhomogeneous, proportional to the square of the local electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction constant, if the injection frequency is high. Utilizing the inhomogeneously polarized nuclear spins as an initial state, we further show that the electron-polarization decay time can be extended 100 times even at a relatively low nuclear polarization (<20%), without much suppression of the fluctuation of the Overhauser field. Our results lay the foundation for future investigations of the effect of DNP in more complex spin systems, such as double quantum dots and nitrogen vacancy centers in diamonds.

Na Wu; Wenkui Ding; Anqi Shi; Wenxian Zhang

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

139

System and method that suppresses intensity fluctuations for free space high-speed optical communication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-speed (Gbps), free space optical communication system is based on spectral encoding of radiation from a wide band light source, such as a laser. By using partially coherent laser beams in combination with a relatively slow photosensor, scintillations can be suppressed by orders of magnitude for distances of more than 10 km. To suppress the intensity fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence, a source with partial transverse coherence in combination with slow response time photodetector is used. Information is encoded in the spectral domain of a wideband optical source by modulation of spectral amplitudes. A non-coherent light source with wide spectrum (an LED, for example) may be used for high-speed communication over short (less than about a mile) distances.

Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Bishop, Alan R. (Los Alamos, NM); Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Santa Fe, NM); Gorshkov, Vacheslav N. (Kiev, UA)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

140

Oxygen suppression in boiling water reactors. Quarterly report 2, January 1--March 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Boiling water reactors (BWR's) generally use high purity, no-additive feedwater. Primary recirculating coolant is neutral pH, and contains 100 to 300 ppB oxygen and stoichiometrically related dissolved hydrogen. However, oxygenated water increases austenitic stainless steel susceptibility to intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when other requisite factors such as stress and sensitization are present. Thus, reduction or elimination of the oxygen in BWR water may preclude cracking incidents. One approach to reduction of the BWR coolant oxygen concentration is to adopt alternate water chemistry (AWC) conditions using an additive(s) to suppress or reverse radiolytic oxygen formation. Several additives are available to do this but they have seen only limited and specialized application in BWR's. The objective of this program is to perform an in-depth engineering evaluation of the potential suppression additives supported by critical experiments where required to resolve substantive uncertainties.

Burley, E.L.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Observation of Shot Noise Suppression at Optical Wavelengths in a Relativistic Electron Beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control of collective properties of relativistic particles is increasingly important in modern accelerators. In particular, shot noise affects accelerator performance by driving instabilities or by competing with coherent processes. We present experimental observations of shot noise suppression in a relativistic beam at the Linac Coherent Light Source. By adjusting the dispersive strength of a chicane, we observe a decrease in the optical transition radiation emitted from a downstream foil. We show agreement between the experimental results, theoretical models, and 3D particle simulations.

Ratner, Daniel; Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

142

Sequential suppression of quarkonia and high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the usual application of the sequential-suppression picture to the dynamics of heavy quarkonia in the hot medium formed in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions, quark-antiquark pairs created in a given bound or unbound state remain in that same state as the medium evolves. We argue that this scenario implicitly assumes an adiabatic evolution of the quarkonia, and we show that the validity of the adiabaticity assumption is questionable.

Dutta, Nirupam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fission-suppressed fusion breeder on the thorium cycle and nonproliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion reactors could be designed to breed fissile material while suppressing fissioning thereby enhancing safety. The produced fuel could be used to startup and makeup fuel for fission reactors. Each fusion reaction can produce typically 0.6 fissile atoms and release about 1.6 times the 14 MeV neutron's energy in the blanket in the fission-suppressed design. This production rate is 2660 kg/1000 MW of fusion power for a year. The revenues would be doubled from such a plant by selling fuel at a price of 60/g and electricity at $0.05/kWh for Q=P fusion /Pinput=4. Fusion reactors could be designed to destroy fission wastes by transmutation and fissioning but this is not a natural use of fusion whereas it is a designed use of fission reactors. Fusion could supply makeup fuel to fission reactors that were dedicated to fissioning wastes with some of their neutrons. The design for safety and heat removal and other items is already accomplished with fission reactors. Whereas fusion reactors have geometry that compromises safety with a complex and thin wall separating the fusion zone from the blanket zone where wastes could be destroyed. Nonproliferation can be enhanced by mixing 233U with 238U. Also nonproliferation is enhanced in typical fission-suppressed designs by generating up to 0.05 232U atoms for each 233U atom produced from thorium

R. W. Moir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Mechanism for the suppression of quantum noise at large scales on expanding space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an exactly-solvable model for the suppression of quantum noise at large scales on expanding space. The suppression arises naturally in the de Broglie-Bohm pilot-wave formulation of quantum theory, according to which the Born probability rule has a dynamical origin. For a scalar field on a radiation-dominated background we construct the exact solution for the time-evolving wave functional and study properties of the associated field trajectories. It is shown that the time evolution of a field mode on expanding space is mathematically equivalent to that of a standard harmonic oscillator with a 'retarded time' that depends on the wavelength of the mode. In the far super-Hubble regime the equivalent oscillator evolves over only one Hubble time, yielding a simple mechanism whereby relaxation to the Born rule can be suppressed on very large scales. We present numerical simulations illustrating how the expansion of space can cause a retardation of relaxation in the super-Hubble regime. Given these results...

Colin, Samuel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Reversible Electron Beam Heating for Suppression of Microbunching Instabilities at Free-Electron Lasers  

SciTech Connect

The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., heating the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) upstream and downstream of a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread is introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then is eliminated in the second TDS. We show the feasibility of the microbunching gain suppression based on calculations and simulations including the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation. Acceptable electron beam and radio-frequency jitter are identified, and inherent options for diagnostics and on-line monitoring of the electron beam's longitudinal phase space are discussed.

Behrens, Christopher; /DESY; Huang, Zhirong; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Relationships Between ELM Suppression, Pedestal Profiles, and Lithium Wall Coatings in NSTX  

SciTech Connect

Recently in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), increasing lithium wall coatings suppressed edge localized modes (ELMs), gradually but not quite monotonically. This work details profile and stability analysis as ELMs disappeared throughout the lithium scan. While the quantity of lithium deposited between discharges did not uniquely determine the presence of ELMs, profile analysis demonstrated that lithium was correlated to wider density and pressure pedestals with peak gradients farther from the separatrix. Moreover, the ELMy and ELM-free discharges were cleanly separated by their density and pedestal widths and peak gradient locations. Ultimately, ELMs were only suppressed when lithium caused the density pedestal to widen and shift inward. These changes in the density gradient were directly reflected in the pressure gradient and calculated bootstrap current. This supports the theory that ELMs in NSTX are caused by peeling and/or ballooning modes, as kink/peeling modes are stabilized when the edge current and pressure gradient shift away from the separatrix. Edge stability analysis using ELITE corroborated this picture, as reconstructed equilibria from ELM-free discharges were generally farther from their kink/peeling stability boundaries than ELMy discharges. We conclude that density profile control provided by lithium is the key first step to ELM suppression in NSTX

D.P. Boyle, R. Maingi, P.B. Snyder, J. Manickam, T.H. Osborne, R.E. Bell, B.P. LeBlanc, and the NSTX Team

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

147

Imaging extrasolar planets by stellar halo suppression in separately-corrected color bands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extra-solar planets have not been imaged directly with existing ground or space telescopes because they are too faint to be seen against the halo of the nearby bright star. Most techniques being explored to suppress the halo are achromatic, with separate correction of diffraction and wavefront errors. Residual speckle structure may be subtracted by differencing images taken through narrowband filters, but photon noise remains and ultimately limits sensitivity. Here we describe two ways to take advantage of narrow bands to reduce speckle photon flux and to obtain better control of systematic errors. Multiple images are formed in separate color bands of 5-10% bandwidth, and recorded by coronagraphic interferometers equipped with active control of wavefront phase and/or amplitude. In one method, a single deformable pupil mirror is used to actively correct both diffraction and wavefront components of the halo. This yields good diffraction suppression for complex pupil obscuration, with high throughput over half the focal plane. In a second method, the coronagraphic interferometer is used as a second stage after conventional apodization. The halo from uncontrollable residual errors in the pupil mask or wavefront is removed by destructive interference made directly at the detector focal plane with an "anti-halo", synthesized by spatial light modulators in the reference arm of the interferometer. In this way very deep suppression may be achieved by control elements with greatly relaxed, and thus achievable, tolerances. In both examples, systematic errors are minimized because the planet imaging cameras themselves also provide the error sensing data.

Johanan L. Codona; Roger Angel

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

148

Investigation of diesel-fuel fire vulnerability parameters in armored personnel carriers due to ballistic penetration. Interim report, March 1984-March 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of full-scale ballistics tests were conducted to evaluate the diesel fuel fire vulnerability parameters in armored personnel carriers due to penetration by 90-mm HEAT rounds. The tests considered fuel cell penetration through 1.5-inch aluminum armor with the four variables: fuel temperature, fuel antimisting additive concentration, air availability, and Halon 1301 fire-suppression system. The test results are summarized.

Kanakia, M.D.; Wright, B.R.

1985-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF SUPPRESSION OF NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION BY LOW DOSES OF LOW LET RADIATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are currently funded (9/01-8/04) by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program to examine mechanisms underlying the suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro by low doses of low LET radiation. For the new studies proposed under Notice 04-21, we intend to follow up on our observation that upregulation of DNA repair may be an important factor and that its importance is dose-dependent. The experimental system will be the human hybrid cell neoplastic transformation assay that we are currently using. We propose to test the following hypothesis: Down-regulation of DNA dsb repair will abrogate the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation. Using the technique of RNA silencing, it is proposed to test the effect of down-regulation of the two major DNA dsb repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), on the dose response relationship for neoplastic transformation. Based on prior studies, we predict that this will result in abrogation of the suppressive effect at doses in the range 1 to 10 cGy, but not at lower doses. The proposed experiments will also help address the question as to which of the two DNA repair pathways may be the most important in causing suppression of transformation. HR is a pathway that is predominant in S and G2 phase cells and is known to be less error-prone than the NHEJ pathway that is predominant in G1 phase. We hypothesize that down-regulation of HR will result in the most effective abrogation of suppression. An important component of this study will be the determination of the how abrogation of DNA dsb repair impacts the spontaneous transformation frequency, presumably a consequence of endogeneous DNA damage. Experiments will be carried out using partially synchronized populations of cells enriched for G1 and S/G2 respectively. In addition to the endpoint of neoplastic transformation the impact of down-regulation of HR and NHEJ on the formation and disappearance of the DNA dsb marker, gamma-H2AX, will be studied.

J.LESIE REDPATH, PH.D.

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

Suppression Oceanic Rippies by Surfactant-Spectral Effects Deduced from Sun-Glitter, Wave-Staff and Microwave Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental results on suppression of fine sea-surface structures by surfactant in terms of the roughness length obtained from wind profiles and of the wave-energy density from sun-glitter photographs, wave-staff measurements, and microwave ...

Jin Wu

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

ASE Suppression in a Diode-Pumped Nd:YLF Regenerative Amplifier Using a Volume Bragg Grating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrument-limited suppression of out-of-band amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is demonstrated for the first time in a Nd:YLF diode-pumped regenerative amplifier using a volume Bragg grating (VBG) as a cavity mirror.

Okishev, A.V.; Dorrer, C.; Smirnov, V.I.; Glebov, L.B.; Zuegel, J.D.

2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

152

RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Todd Lane on "RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Lane, Todd [SNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Butyl benzyl phthalate suppresses the ATP-induced cell proliferation in human osteosarcoma HOS cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), an endocrine disruptor present in the environment, exerts its genomic effects via intracellular steroid receptors and elicits non-genomic effects by interfering with membrane ion-channel receptors. We previously found that BBP blocks the calcium signaling coupled with P2X receptors in PC12 cells (Liu and Chen, 2006). Osteoblast P2X receptors were recently reported to play a role in cell proliferation and bone remodeling. In this present study, the effects of BBP on ATP-induced responses were investigated in human osteosarcoma HOS cells. These receptors mRNA had been detected, named P2X4, P2X7, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y5, P2Y9, and P2Y11, in human osteosarcoma HOS cells by RT-PCR. The enhancement of cell proliferation and the decrease of cytoviability had both been shown to be coupled to stimulation via different concentrations of ATP. BBP suppressed the ATP-induced calcium influx (mainly coupled with P2X) and cell proliferation but not the ATP-induced intracellular calcium release (mainly coupled with P2Y) and cytotoxicity in human osteosarcoma HOS cells. Suramin, a common P2 receptor's antagonist, blocked the ATP-induced calcium signaling, cell proliferation, and cytotoxicity. We suggest that P2X is mainly responsible for cell proliferation, and P2Y might be partially responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. BBP suppressed the calcium signaling coupled with P2X, suppressing cell proliferation. Since the importance of P2X receptors during bone metastasis has recently become apparent, the possible toxic risk of environmental BBP during bone remodeling is a public problem of concern.

Liu, P.-S., E-mail: pslediting@mail.scu.edu.t [Department of Microbiology, Soochow University, Shihlin, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.-Y. [Department of Microbiology, Soochow University, Shihlin, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Defect mode suppression in a photonic crystal structure with a resonance nanocomposite layer  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the key features of the transmission and reflection spectra of a one-dimensional photonic crystal structure in which a nanocomposite layer is sandwiched between dielectric Bragg mirrors. Two orthogonal polarisations of an incident wave correspond to different plasmon resonance frequencies of the nanocomposite. If one of the plasmon frequencies coincides with the defect mode frequency in one of the photonic bandgaps, complete suppression of the defect mode in the transmission spectrum is possible, which makes the spectra of such structures polarisation-sensitive.

Moiseev, Sergey G; Ostatochnikov, Vladimir A; Sementsov, Dmitrii I

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Suppression of decoherence-induced diffusion in the quantum kicked rotor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method that allows transient suppression of spontaneous emission-induced diffusion in the atom-optics realization of the kicked rotor. The system is prepared in an initial state with a momentum distribution concentrated in an interval much sharper than the Brillouin zone; the measure of the momentum distribution is restricted to this interval of quasimomenta. Because most of the atoms undergoing decoherence processes fall outside this detection range and thus are not detected, the measured signal is effectively free of decoherence-induced diffusion effects.

Lepers, Maxence; Zehnle, Veronique; Garreau, Jean Claude [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molecules, Universite Lille 1 Sciences et Technologies, CNRS, F-59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex (France)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Away-side distribution in a parton multiple scattering model and background-suppressed measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of parton multiple scattering in a dense and expanding medium is described. The simulated results reproduce the general features of the data. In particular, in the intermediate trigger momentum region there is a dip-bump structure, while at higher trigger momentum the double bumps merge into a central peak. Also, a new measure is proposed to quantify the azimuthal distribution with the virtue that it suppresses the statistical fluctuations event-by-event, while enhancing the even-structure of the signal.

Charles B. Chiu; Rudolph C. Hwa

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Problems in suppressing cooling flows in clusters of galaxies by global heat conduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I use a simple analytical model to show that simple heat conduction models cannot significantly suppress cluster cooling flows. I build a static medium where heat conduction globally balances radiative cooling, and then perturb it. I show that a perturbation extending over a large fraction of the cooling flow region will grow to the non-linear regime within a Hubble time. Such perturbations are reasonable in clusters which frequently experience mergers and/or AGN activity. This result strengthens previous findings which show that a steady solution does not exist for a constant heat conduction coefficient.

Noam Soker

2003-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

158

Method and system for modulation of gain suppression in high average power laser systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high average power laser system with modulated gain suppression includes an input aperture associated with a first laser beam extraction path and an output aperture associated with the first laser beam extraction path. The system also includes a pinhole creation laser having an optical output directed along a pinhole creation path and an absorbing material positioned along both the first laser beam extraction path and the pinhole creation path. The system further includes a mechanism operable to translate the absorbing material in a direction crossing the first laser beam extraction laser path and a controller operable to modulate the second laser beam.

Bayramian, Andrew James (Manteca, CA)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Search for direct CP-violation in singly-Cabibbo suppressed D+- --> K+ K- pi+- decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for direct CP asymmetry in the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decay D+- --> K+ K- pi+- using a data sample of 476 fb-1 accumulated with the BaBar detector running at and just below the Y(4S) resonance. The CP-violating decay rate asymmetry A_CP is determined to be (0.35 +- 0.30 +- 0.15)%. Model-dependent and model-independent Dalitz plot analysis techniques are used to search for CP-violating asymmetries in the various intermediate states.

BaBar Collaboration; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; J. Garra Tico; E. Grauges; A. Palano; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; D. N. Brown; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; R. Y. So; A. Khan; V. E. Blinov; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; A. N. Yushkov; M. Bondioli; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; F. Liu; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; C. A. West; A. M. Eisner; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. S. Chao; C. H. Cheng; B. Echenard; K. T. Flood; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; A. Y. Rakitin; R. Andreassen; Z. Huard; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; L. Sun; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; W. H. Toki; B. Spaan; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; D. Bernard; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Fioravanti; I. Garzia; E. Luppi; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; B. Bhuyan; V. Prasad; C. L. Lee; M. Morii; A. J. Edwards; A. Adametz; U. Uwer; H. M. Lacker; T. Lueck; P. D. Dauncey; U. Mallik; C. Chen; J. Cochran; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; Z. J. Guo; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; D. Derkach; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; B. Malaescu; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; D. N. Brown; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; K. Griessinger; A. Hafner; E. Prencipe; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; E. Behn; R. Cenci; B. Hamilton; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; C. Dallapiccola; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; G. Sciolla; R. Cheaib; D. Lindemann; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; P. Biassoni; N. Neri; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; P. Sonnek; D. J. Summers; X. Nguyen; M. Simard; P. Taras; G. De Nardo; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; M. Martinelli; G. Raven; C. P. Jessop; J. M. LoSecco; W. F. Wang; K. Honscheid; R. Kass; J. Brau; R. Frey; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; E. Feltresi; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; G. Simi; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; S. Akar; E. Ben-Haim; M. Bomben; G. R. Bonneaud; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; G. Marchiori; J. Ocariz; S. Sitt; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; S. Pacetti; A. Rossi; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; G. Casarosa; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; B. Oberhof; E. Paoloni; A. Perez; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; A. V. Telnov; F. Anulli; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; G. Piredda; C. Bunger; O. Grunberg; T. Hartmann; T. Leddig; C. Voss; R. Waldi; T. Adye; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; G. Hamel de Monchenault; G. Vasseur; Ch. Yeche; D. Aston; D. J. Bard; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; C. Cartaro; M. R. Convery; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie; M. Ebert; R. C. Field; M. Franco Sevilla; B. G. Fulsom; A. M. Gabareen; M. T. Graham; P. Grenier; C. Hast; W. R. Innes; M. H. Kelsey; P. Kim; M. L. Kocian; D. W. G. S. Leith; P. Lewis; B. Lindquist; S. Luitz; V. Luth; H. L. Lynch; D. B. MacFarlane; D. R. Muller; H. Neal; S. Nelson; M. Perl; T. Pulliam; B. N. Ratcliff; A. Roodman; A. A. Salnikov; R. H. Schindler; A. Snyder; D. Su; M. K. Sullivan; J. Va'vra; A. P. Wagner; W. J. Wisniewski; M. Wittgen; D. H. Wright; H. W. Wulsin; C. C. Young; V. Ziegler; W. Park; M. V. Purohit; R. M. White; J. R. Wilson; A. Randle-Conde; S. J. Sekula; M. Bellis; P. R. Burchat; T. S. Miyashita; E. M. T. Puccio; M. S. Alam; J. A. Ernst; R. Gorodeisky; N. Guttman; D. R. Peimer; A. Soffer; P. Lund; S. M. Spanier; J. L. Ritchie; A. M. Ruland; R. F. Schwitters; B. C. Wray; J. M. Izen; X. C. Lou; F. Bianchi; D. Gamba; S. Zambito; L. Lanceri; L. Vitale; F. Martinez-Vidal; A. Oyanguren; P. Villanueva-Perez; H. Ahmed; J. Albert; Sw. Banerjee; F. U. Bernlochner; H. H. F. Choi; G. J. King; R. Kowalewski; M. J. Lewczuk; I. M. Nugent; J. M. Roney; R. J. Sobie; N. Tasneem; T. J. Gershon; P. F. Harrison; T. E. Latham; H. R. Band; S. Dasu; Y. Pan; R. Prepost; S. L. Wu

2012-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

160

Global analysis of J/psi suppression in cold nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interpreting the J/psi suppression reported in nucleus--nucleus collisions at SPS and RHIC requires the quantitative understanding of cold nuclear matter effects, such as the inelastic rescattering of J/psi states in nuclei or the nuclear modification of parton densities. With respect to our former Glauber analysis, we include in the present work the new PHENIX d--Au measurements, and analyze as well all existing data using the EPS08 nuclear parton densities recently released. The largest suppression reported in the new PHENIX analysis leads in turn to an increase of sigma from 3.5 +/- 0.3 mb to 5.4 +/- 2.5 mb using proton PDF. The stronger x-dependence of the G^{A}/G^p ratio in EPS08 as compared to e.g. EKS98 shifts the cross section towards larger values at fixed target energies (x_2 ~ 0.1) while decreasing somehow the value extracted at RHIC (x_2 ~10^{-2}).

Tram, Vi-Nham; 10.1140/epjc/s10052-009-0864-y

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

A271 COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. The first suppression of the important and deleterious m=2/n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is reported using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) to replace the ''missing'' bootstrap current in the island O-point. Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak verify the maximum shrinkage of the m=2/n=1 island occurs when the ECCD location coincides with the q = 2 surface. The DIII-D plasma control system is put into search and suppress mode to make small changes in the toroidal field to find and lock onto the optimum position, based on real time measurements of dB{sub {theta}}/dt, for complete m=2/n=1 NTM suppression by ECCD. The requirements on the ECCD for complete island suppression are well modeled by the modified Rutherford equation for the DIII-D plasma conditions.

PETTY,CC; LAHAYE,LA; LUCE,TC; HUMPHREYS,DA; HYATT,AW; PRATER,R; STRAIT,EJ; WADE,MR

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Calculation of Fire Severity Factors and Fire Non-Suppression Probabilities For A DOE Facility Fire PRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a 12 month period, a fire PRA was developed for a DOE facility using the NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC fire PRA methodology. The fire PRA modeling included calculation of fire severity factors (SFs) and fire non-suppression probabilities (PNS) for each safe shutdown (SSD) component considered in the fire PRA model. The SFs were developed by performing detailed fire modeling through a combination of CFAST fire zone model calculations and Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). Component damage times and automatic fire suppression system actuation times calculated in the CFAST LHS analyses were then input to a time-dependent model of fire non-suppression probability. The fire non-suppression probability model is based on the modeling approach outlined in NUREG/CR-6850 and is supplemented with plant specific data. This paper presents the methodology used in the DOE facility fire PRA for modeling fire-induced SSD component failures and includes discussions of modeling techniques for: • Development of time-dependent fire heat release rate profiles (required as input to CFAST), • Calculation of fire severity factors based on CFAST detailed fire modeling, and • Calculation of fire non-suppression probabilities.

Tom Elicson; Bentley Harwood; Jim Bouchard; Heather Lucek

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fission-suppressed fusion breeder on the thorium cycle and nonproliferation  

SciTech Connect

Fusion reactors could be designed to breed fissile material while suppressing fissioning thereby enhancing safety. The produced fuel could be used to startup and makeup fuel for fission reactors. Each fusion reaction can produce typically 0.6 fissile atoms and release about 1.6 times the 14 MeV neutron's energy in the blanket in the fission-suppressed design. This production rate is 2660 kg/1000 MW of fusion power for a year. The revenues would be doubled from such a plant by selling fuel at a price of 60/g and electricity at $0.05/kWh for Q=P{sub fusion}/P{sub input}=4. Fusion reactors could be designed to destroy fission wastes by transmutation and fissioning but this is not a natural use of fusion whereas it is a designed use of fission reactors. Fusion could supply makeup fuel to fission reactors that were dedicated to fissioning wastes with some of their neutrons. The design for safety and heat removal and other items is already accomplished with fission reactors. Whereas fusion reactors have geometry that compromises safety with a complex and thin wall separating the fusion zone from the blanket zone where wastes could be destroyed. Nonproliferation can be enhanced by mixing {sup 233}U with {sup 238}U. Also nonproliferation is enhanced in typical fission-suppressed designs by generating up to 0.05 {sup 232}U atoms for each {sup 233}U atom produced from thorium, about twice the IAEA standards of 'reduced protection' or 'self protection.' With 2.4%{sup 232}U, high explosive material is predicted to degrade owing to ionizing radiation after a little over 1/2 year and the heat rate is 77 W just after separation and climbs to over 600 W ten years later. The fissile material can be used to fuel most any fission reactor but is especially appropriate for molten salt reactors (MSR) also called liquid fluoride thorium reactors (LFTR) because of the molten fuel does not need hands on fabrication and handling.

Moir, R. W. [Vallecitos Molten Salt Research, 607 E. Vallecitos Rd., Livermore, CA 94550 925-447-8804 (United States)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

L3 Milestone Use Computational Model to Design and Optimize Welding Conditions to Suppress Helium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L3 Milestone L3 Milestone Use Computational Model to Design and Optimize Welding Conditions to Suppress Helium Cracking during Welding June 2012 Wei Zhang and Zhili Feng, ORNL Eric Willis, EPRI Background and Objectives Today, welding is widely used for repair, maintenance and upgrade of nuclear reactor components. As a critical technology to extend the service life of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years, weld technology must be further developed to meet new challenges associated with the aging of the plants, such as control and mitigation of the detrimental effects of weld residual stresses and repair of highly irradiated materials. To meet this goal, fundamental understanding of the "welding" effect is necessary for development of new and improved welding technologies.

165

Suppression of superconductivity by inhomogeneous chiral condensation in the NJL$_2$ model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the possibility of spatially inhomogeneous chiral and Cooper, or superconducting, pairing in the (1+1)-dimensional model by Chodos et al [ Phys. Rev. D61, 045011 (2000)] generalized to continuous chiral invariance. The consideration is performed at nonzero temperature $T$ and quark number chemical potential $\\mu$. It is shown in the framework of the Fulde--Ferrel inhomogeneity ansatz for chiral and Cooper condensates that if $G_1>G_2$, where $G_1$ and $G_2$ are the coupling constants in the quark-antiquark and diquark channels, then in the $(\\mu,T)$-phase diagram the superconducting phase is suppressed by spatially inhomogeneous chiral spiral phase with broken chiral symmetry. In contrast, in the above mentioned original Chodos et al model, where only the opportunity for homogeneous condensates were taken into account, the superconducting phase is realized at sufficiently high values of $\\mu$ at arbitrary values of $G_2>0$, including the interval $0

D. Ebert; T. G. Khunjua; K. G. Klimenko; V. Ch. Zhukovsky

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

166

Noise suppression in reconstruction of low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To improve the image contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratio for low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) using a statistical projection noise suppression algorithm based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion. Methods: Projection images of a contrast phantom, a CatPhan{sup Registered-Sign} 600 phantom and a head phantom were acquired by a Varian 2100EX LINAC with a low-Z (Al) target and low energy x-ray beam (2.5 MeV) at a low-dose level and at a high-dose level. The projections were then processed by minimizing the PWLS objective function. The weighted least square (WLS) term models the noise of measured projection and the penalty term enforces the smoothing constraints of the projection image. The variance of projection data was chosen as the weight for the PWLS objective function and it determined the contribution of each measurement. An anisotropic quadratic form penalty that incorporates the gradient information of projection image was used to preserve edges during noise reduction. Low-Z target MV CBCT images were reconstructed by the FDK algorithm after each projection was processed by the PWLS smoothing. Results: Noise in low-Z target MV CBCT images were greatly suppressed after the PWLS projection smoothing, without noticeable sacrifice of the spatial resolution. Depending on the choice of smoothing parameter, the CNR of selected regions of interest in the PWLS processed low-dose low-Z target MV CBCT image can be higher than the corresponding high-dose image.Conclusion: The CNR of low-Z target MV CBCT images was substantially improved by using PWLS projection smoothing. The PWLS projection smoothing algorithm allows the reconstruction of high contrast low-Z target MV CBCT image with a total dose of as low as 2.3 cGy.

Wang Jing; Robar, James; Guan Huaiqun [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235 (United States); Departments of Radiation Oncology and Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H1V7 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint Vincent Hospital, Worcester, Massachusetts 01608 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Arsenite suppression of involucrin transcription through AP1 promoter sites in cultured human keratinocytes  

SciTech Connect

While preserving keratinocyte proliferative ability, arsenite suppresses cellular differentiation markers by preventing utilization of AP1 transcriptional response elements. In present experiments, arsenite had a dramatic effect in electrophoretic mobility supershift analysis of proteins binding to an involucrin promoter AP1 response element. Without arsenite treatment, binding of JunB and Fra1 was readily detected in nuclear extracts from preconfluent cultures and was not detected a week after confluence, while c-Fos was detected only after confluence. By contrast, band shift of nuclear extracts from arsenite treated cultures showed only JunB and Fra1 binding in postconfluent as well as preconfluent cultures. Immunoblotting of cell extracts showed that arsenite treatment prevented the loss of Fra1 and the increase in c-Fos proteins that occurred after confluence in untreated cultures. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated substantial reduction of c-Fos and acetylated histone H3 at the proximal and distal AP1 response elements in the involucrin promoter and of coactivator p300 at the proximal element. Alteration of AP1 transcription factors was also examined in response to treatment with four metal containing compounds (chromate, vanadate, hemin, divalent cadmium) that also suppress involucrin transcription. These agents all influenced transcription at AP1 elements in a transcriptional reporter assay, but exhibited less effect than arsenite on binding activity assessed by mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation and displayed variable effects on AP1 protein levels. These findings help trace a mechanism by which transcriptional effects of arsenite become manifest and help rationalize the unique action of arsenite, compared to the other agents, to preserve proliferative ability.

Sinitsyna, Nadezda N.; Reznikova, Tatiana V.; Qin Qin; Song, Hyukhwan; Phillips, Marjorie A. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States); Rice, Robert H., E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.ed [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

An efficient modeling method for thermal stratification simulation in a BWR suppression pool  

SciTech Connect

The suppression pool in a BWR plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as LOCA and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; and the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (Available Net Positive Suction Head) and therefore the performance of the pump which draws cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use 0-D lumped parameter methods to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool and therefore have large uncertainty in prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze realistic 3D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, therefore long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. The POOLEX experiments at Finland, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, are used for validation. GOTHIC lumped parameter models are used to obtain boundary conditions for BMIX++ code and CFD simulations. Comparison between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data is discussed in detail.

Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Hua Li; Walter Villanueva; Pavel Kudinov

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for validation. Comparisons between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data are discussed in detail.

Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Apparatus for suppressing formation of vortices in the coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor and associated method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are provided for suppressing the formation of vortices in circulating coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor. A vortex-suppressing plate having a plurality of openings therein is suspended within the lower plenum of a reactor vessel below and generally parallel to the main core support of the reactor. The plate is positioned so as to intersect vortices which may form in the circulating reactor coolant fluid. The intersection of the plate with such vortices disrupts the rotational flow pattern of the vortices, thereby disrupting the formation thereof.

Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA); Garner, Daniel C. (Murrysville, PA); Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ferromagnetism and suppression of metallic clusters in Fe implanted ZnO -- a phenomenon related to defects?  

SciTech Connect

We investigated ZnO(0001) single crystals annealed in high vacuum with respect to their magnetic properties and cluster formation tendency after implant-doping with Fe. While metallic Fe cluster formation is suppressed, no evidence for the relevance of the Fe magnetic moment to the observed ferromagnetism was found. The latter along with the cluster suppression is discussed with respect to defects in the ZnO host matrix, since the crystalline quality of the substrates was lowered due to the preparation as observed by x-ray diffraction.

Arenholz, Elke; Zhou, S.; Potzger, K.; Talut, G.; Reuther, H.; Kuepper, K.; Grenzer, J.; Xu, Q.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Arenholz, E.

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

172

Apparatus for suppressing formation of vortices in the coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor and associated method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are provided for suppressing the formation of vortices in circulating coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor. A vortex-suppressing plate having a plurality of openings therein is suspended within the lower plenum of a reactor vessel below and generally parallel to the main core support of the reactor. The plate is positioned so as to intersect vortices which may form in the circulating reactor coolant fluid. The intersection of the plate with such vortices disrupts the rotational flow pattern of the vortices, thereby disrupting the formation thereof. 3 figures.

Ekeroth, D.E.; Garner, D.C.; Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System, January 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

174

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

175

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility Fire Suppression System, January 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility Fire Suppression System January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

176

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility Fire Suppression System, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility Fire Suppression System January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

177

Independent Oversight Review of the Technical Area 55 Safety Class Fire Suppression System at Los Alamos National Laboratory, December 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Area 55 Technical Area 55 Safety Class Fire Suppression System at Los Alamos National Laboratory December 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose .................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope ....................................................................................................................................................... 2

178

The application of expansion foam on liquefied natural gas (LNG) to suppress LNG vapor and LNG pool fire thermal radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) hazards include LNG flammable vapor dispersion and LNG pool fire thermal radiation. A large LNG pool fire emits high thermal radiation thus preventing fire fighters from approaching and extinguishing the fire. One of the strategies used in the LNG industry and recommended by federal regulation National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 59A is to use expansion foam to suppress LNG vapors and to control LNG fire by reducing the fire size. In its application, expansion foam effectiveness heavily depends on application rate, generator location, and LNG containment pit design. Complicated phenomena involved and previous studies have not completely filled the gaps increases the needs for LNG field experiments involving expansion foam. In addition, alternative LNG vapor dispersion and pool fire suppression methodology, Foamglas® pool fire suppression (PFS), is investigated as well. This dissertation details the research and experiment development. Results regarding important phenomena are presented and discussed. Foamglas® PFS effectiveness is described. Recommendations for advancing current guidelines in LNG vapor dispersion and pool fire suppression methods are developed. The gaps are presented as the future work and recommendation on how to do the experiment better in the future. This will benefit LNG industries to enhance its safety system and to make LNG facilities safer.

Suardin, Jaffee Arizon

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A robust kernel-based fuzzy c-means algorithm by incorporating suppressed and magnified membership for MRI image segmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bias-corrected fuzzy c-means (BCFCM) algorithm with spatial information has been proven effective for image segmentation. It still lacks enough robustness to noise and outliers. Some kernel versions of FCM with spatial constraints, such as KFCM_S1, ... Keywords: Kernel-based FCM, fuzzy c-means (FCM), image segmentation, magic resonance image segmentation, spatial bias correction, suppressed membership

Hsu-Shen Tsai; Wen-Liang Hung; Miin-Shen Yang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Suppression of energy-relaxation-induced decoherence in -type three-level SQUID flux qubits: A dark-state approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Suppression of energy-relaxation-induced decoherence in -type three-level SQUID flux qubits: A dark) We report a theoretical investigation of decoherence induced by energy relaxation of the auxiliary level in the -type three-level SQUID flux qubits. We show that the energy-relaxation-induced decoherence

Chu, Shih-I

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181

Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 131 (2002) 225235 The implications of non-suppressed geomagnetic secular variation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-suppressed geomagnetic secular variation during the Permo-Carboniferous Reversed Superchron Pauline P. Kruivera, Cor G-equator. These red beds are reliable recorders of the geomagnetic field, because the NRM is carried by detrital deviation; Spectral analysis 1. Introduction Prominent features of the geomagnetic field are governed

Utrecht, Universiteit

182

ARG-US RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID) Technology (IN-08-046)  

For years, radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has been used in a variety of applications, from passports to inventory tracking in retail ...

183

ARG-US RFID System for Management of HIgh-Risk Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear fuel cycle industries Hospitals or other areas needing monitoring Oil, gas and hazardous chemicals industries International applications to enhance...

184

Nanoscale strain-induced pair suppression as a vortex-pinning mechanism in high- temperature superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Boosting large-scale superconductor applications require nanostructured conductors with artificial pinning centres immobilizing quantized vortices at high temperature and magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate a highly effective mechanism of artificial pinning centers in solution-derived high-temperature superconductor nanocomposites through generation of nanostrained regions where Cooper pair formation is suppressed. The nanostrained regions identified from transmission electron microscopy devise a very high concentration of partial dislocations associated with intergrowths generated between the randomly oriented nanodots and the epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} matrix. Consequently, an outstanding vortex-pinning enhancement correlated to the nanostrain is demonstrated for four types of randomly oriented nanodot, and a unique evolution towards an isotropic vortex-pinning behaviour, even in the effective anisotropy, is achieved as the nanostrain turns isotropic. We suggest a new vortex-pinning mechanism based on the bond-contraction pairing model, where pair formation is quenched under tensile strain, forming new and effective core-pinning regions.

Llordes, Anna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Palau, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Gazquez, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Coll, M. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Vlad, R. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Pomar, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Arbiol, Jordi [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Guzman, Roger [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ye, S. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Rouco, V [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Sandiumenge, Felip [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ricart, Susagna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Puig, Teresa [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Chataigner, D. [CRISMAT, Caen, France; Vanacken, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Gutierrez, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Moschalkov, V. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Deutscher, G. [Tel Aviv University; Magen Dominguez, Cesar [ORNL; Obradors, Xavier [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Suppression of Beam-Ion Instability in Electron Rings with Multi-Bunch Train Beam Fillings  

SciTech Connect

The ion-caused beam instability in the future light sources and electron damping rings can be serious due to the high beam current and ultra-small emittance of picometer level. One simple and effective mitigation of the instability is a multi-bunch train beam filling pattern which can significantly reduce the ion density near the beam, and therefore reduce the instability growth rate up to two orders of magnitude. The suppression is more effective for high intensity beams with low emittance. The distribution and the field of trapped ions are benchmarked to validate the model used in the paper. The wake field of ion-cloud and the beam-ion instability is investigated both analytically and numerically. We derived a simple formula for the build-up of ion-cloud and instability growth rate with the multi-bunch-train filling pattern. The ion instabilities in ILC damping ring, SuperKEKB and SPEAR3 are used to compare with our analyses. The analyses in this paper agree well with simulations.

Wang, L.; Cai, Y.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; /SLAC; Fukuma, H.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

186

Suppression of stimulated Raman scattering due to localization of electron plasma wave in laser beam filaments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The filamentation of the high power laser beam by taking off-axial contribution is investigated when ponderomotive nonlinearity is taken into account. The splitted profile of the laser beam is obtained due to uneven focusing of the off-axial rays. It is observed that the weak electron plasma wave (EPW) propagating in the z direction is nonlinearly coupled in the modified filamentary regions of the laser beam. The semianalytical solution of the nonlinear coupled EPW equation in the presence of laser beam filaments has been found and it is observed that the nonlinear coupling between these two waves leads to localization of the EPW. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of this EPW is studied and backreflectivity has been calculated. Further, the localization of EPW affects the eigenfrequency and damping of plasma wave. As a result of this, mismatch and modified enhanced Landau damping lead to the disruption of SRS process and a substantial reduction in the backreflectivity. For the typical laser beam and plasma parameters with wavelength ({lambda}=1064 nm), power flux ({approx_equal}10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2}), and plasma density (n/n{sub cr})=0.2; the backreflectivity was found to be suppressed by a factor of around 20%.

Sharma, Prerana; Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Variation in Use of Androgen Suppression With External-Beam Radiotherapy for Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe practice patterns associated with androgen suppression (AS) stratified by disease risk group in patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We identified 2,184 low-risk, 2,339 intermediate-risk, and 2,897 high-risk patients undergoing EBRT for nonmetastatic prostate cancer diagnosed between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2005, in the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. We examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with AS use by multivariate logistic regression. Results: The proportions of patients receiving AS for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk prostate cancer were 32.2%, 56.3%, and 81.5%, respectively. AS use among men in the low-risk disease category varied widely, ranging from 13.6% in Detroit to 47.8% in Kentucky. We observed a significant decline in AS use between 2004 and 2005 within all three disease risk categories. Men aged {>=}75 years or with elevated comorbidity levels were more likely to receive AS. Conclusion: Our results identified apparent overuse and underuse of AS among men within the low-risk and high-risk disease categories, respectively. These results highlight the need for clinician and patient education regarding the appropriate use of AS. Practice patterns among intermediate-risk patients reflect the clinical heterogeneity of this population and underscore the need for better evidence to guide the treatment of these patients.

Swisher-McClure, Samuel, E-mail: Swisher-Mcclure@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollack, Craig E. [Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Christodouleas, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Guzzo, Thomas J. [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Haas, Naomi B. [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Vapiwala, Neha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Fusion versus Breakup: Observation of Large Fusion Suppression for 9 Be + 208 Pb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete fusion excitation functions for 9 Be + 208 Pb have been measured to high precision at near barrier energies. The experimental fusion barrier distribution extracted from these data allows reliable prediction of the expected complete fusion cross-sections. However, the measured cross-sections are only 68 % of those predicted. The large cross-sections observed for incomplete fusion products support the interpretation that this suppression of fusion is caused by 9Be breaking up into charged fragments before reaching the fusion 1 barrier. Implications for the fusion of radioactive nuclei are discussed. 2 Typeset using REVTEXThe recent availability of radioactive beams has made possible the study of the interactions and structure of exotic nuclei far from the line of stability. Unstable neutron–rich nuclei having very weakly bound neutrons exhibit characteristic features such as a neutron halo [1] extending to large radii, associated low–lying dipole modes, and a low energy threshold for breakup. These features may dramatically affect fusion and other reaction

M. Dasgupta; D. J. Hinde; R. D. Butt; R. M. Anjos; A. C. Berriman; N. Carlin; P. R. S. Gomes; C. R. Morton; J. O. Newton; A. Szanto De Toledo; K. Hagino

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Multivent effects in a large scale boiling water reactor pressure suppression system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The steam-driven GKSS pressure suppression test facility, which contains 3 full scale vent pipes, has been used for 5 years to investigate the postulated loss-of-coolant accident in a Mark II and Type 69 boiling water reactor. Using the results from several of these tests, wetwell boundary load data (peak pressures and spectral power) during the chugging stage, have been evaluated for sparse pool response (one and two vents in the three vent pool) and for full pool response (one, two, or three vent operation in pools of constant wetwell pool area per vent). The sparse pool results indicate the pool-system, chug event boundary loads are strongly dependent on wetwell pool area per vent, with the load increasing with decreasing area. The full pool results show a substantial increase in the pool-system, chug event boundary loads upon a change from single cell to double cell operation; only minor change occurs in going from double to triple cell operation.

McCauley, E.W.; Aust, E.; Schwan, H.

1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

190

Electron Quasielastic Scattering at High Energy from $^{56}$Fe, What Suppression?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasielastic electron scattering $(e,e')$ from $^{56}$Fe is calculated at large electron energies (2-4 GeV) and large three momentum transfer (0.5-1.5 GeV/c). We use a relativistic mean-field single particle model for the bound and continuum nucleon wavefunctions based on the $\\sigma-\\omega$ model and we include the effects of electron Coulomb distortion in the calculation. The calculations are compared to high energy data from SLAC and more recent data from Jefferson Laboratory, particularly for kinematics where the energy transfer is less than 500 to 600 MeV and the quasielastic process is expected to dominate the cross section. The effects of the predicted weakening of the strong scalar and vector potentials of the $\\sigma-\\omega$ model at high energy are investigated. Possible evidence for `longitudinal suppression' or modifications of nucleon form factors in the medium is considered, but neither is necessary to explain the quasielastic data for four momentum transfers less than 1 (GeV/c)$^2$.

K. S. Kim; L. E. Wright

2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

Proton Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Is Not Associated With Post-Treatment Testosterone Suppression  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Three independent studies of photon (x-ray) radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer have demonstrated evidence of testosterone suppression after treatment. The present study was undertaken to determine whether this would also be the case with conformal protons. Methods and Materials: Between August 2006 and October 2007, 171 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were enrolled and underwent treatment according to University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute institutional review board-approved PR01 and PR02 protocols. Of the 171 patients, 18 were excluded because they had received androgen deprivation therapy either before (n = 17) or after (n = 1) RT. The pretreatment serum testosterone level was available for 150 of the remaining 153 patients. These 150 patients were included in the present study. The post-treatment levels were compared with the pretreatment levels. Results: The median baseline pretreatment serum testosterone level was 357.9 ng/dL. The median post-treatment testosterone value was 375.5 ng/dL at treatment completion (p = .1935) and 369.9 ng/dL (p = .1336), 348.7 ng/dL (p = .7317), 353.4 ng/dL (p = .6996), and 340.9 ng/dL (p = .1669) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after proton therapy, respectively. Conclusions: Conformal proton therapy to the prostate, as delivered using University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute PR01 and PR02 protocols, did not appear to significantly affect the serum testosterone levels within 24 months after RT.

Nichols, R. Charles, E-mail: rnichols@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Morris, Christopher G.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Henderson, Randal H.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Li Zuofeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph A. [Division of Urology, University of Florida Shands Hospital, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Mendenhall, Nancy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Ghrelin Suppression and Fat Loss after Left Gastric Artery Embolization in Canine Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of left gastric artery embolization (LGAE) on plasma ghrelin levels, abdominal fat, and body weight in beagles. Methods: The institutional animal care and use committee approved this study. Fifteen healthy adult beagles (12 male and three female animals) were randomly divided into three experimental groups: LGAE was proceeded with mixed emulsion of bleomycin A{sub 5} hydrochloride and lipiodol (group A), and polyvinyl alcohol particles (group B). Transcatheter saline injections in the left gastric artery were performed as a control. Weight and fasting plasma ghrelin levels were obtained at baseline and at weekly intervals for 8 weeks after the procedure in all animals. All animals were scanned and measured by multidetector computed tomography at baseline and at week 8 for evaluation of abdominal fat. Results: In LGAE-treated animals, plasma ghrelin and body weight significantly decreased compared to control animals (group A: P = 0.007 and P = 0.000; group B: P = 0.004 and P = 0.000, respectively). Subcutaneous fat size was also significantly reduced (P = 0.011 and P = 0.027 for groups A and B, respectively). The decreasing percentage in ghrelin levels at week 6 (peak of recovery) of LGAE-treated animals were negatively correlated with the size of area supplied by left gastric artery (r = -0.693, P = 0.026). Conclusion: LGAE could suppress the plasma concentration of ghrelin, which results in subcutaneous fat size reduction and weight loss. Compensatory ghrelin production might occur in the remnant gastric fundus after LGAE.

Bawudun, Dilmurat [Xinjiang Medical University, Department of Interventional Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital (China); Xing Yan; Liu Wenya, E-mail: wenyaliu2002@hotmail.com; Huang Yujie [Xinjiang Medical University, Imaging Center, First Affiliated Hospital (China); Ren Weixin [Xinjiang Medical University, Department of Interventional Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital (China); Ma Mei [Xinjiang Medical University, Animal Research Center, First Affiliated Hospital (China); Xu Xiaodong [Xinjiang Medical University, Department of Interventional Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital (China); Teng Gaojun [Southeast University, Department of Radiology, Zhong-da Hospital (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Stratospheric ozone protection: The Montreal Protocol and Title VI of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stratospheric ozone layer protects the surface of the Earth from harmful ultraviolet (UV-B) radiation, which has been causally linked to skin cancer and cataracts, suppression of the human immune system, damage to crops and aquatic organisms, the formation of ground-level zone and the rapid weathering of outdoor plastics. In recent years, scientists have observed a significant deterioration of the ozone layer, particularly over the poles, but increasingly over populated regions as well. This deterioration has been attributed to the atmospheric release of certain man-made halocarbons, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons, methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. Once used extensively as propellants for aerosol sprays (but generally banned for such purposes since 1978), CFCs are widely used today as refrigerants, foams and solvents. All of these chlorinated (CFC, methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride) and brominated (halon) compounds are classified for regulatory purposes as Class I substances because of their significant ozone-depleting potential. Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), developed as alternatives to CFCs and halons for many different applications, have been classified for regulatory purposes as Class II substances because of their relatively less destructive impact on stratospheric ozone. This paper describes the following regulations to reduce destruction of the ozone layer: the Montreal Protocol; Title VI of the Clean air Act Amendments of 1990; Accelerated Phase-out schedules developed by the countries which signed the Montreal Protocol; Use restrictions; Recycling and Emission reduction requirements; Servicing of motor vehicle air conditions; ban on nonessential products; labeling requirements; safe alternatives. 6 refs.

Babst, C.R. III

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and promotes DNA repair after low dose IR exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and KUB5/HERA: a dual acting protein that suppresses genomic instability and promotes DNA repair after low dose IR exposure Julio C. Morales 1 , Amy Rommel 1 , Konstantin Leskov 2 , Walter M. Hittelman 3 , David A. Boothman 1# 1 Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. 3 Department of Experimental Therapeutics, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. # To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: David.Boothman@utsouthwestern.edu Eukaryotic cells can respond to DNA double strand breaks created by low doses of IR by activating homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end- joining (NHEJ) pathways to repair DNA. A yeast two-hybrid screen using Ku70 as

195

Coulomb suppression in the low-energy p-p elastic scattering via the Trojan Horse Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here an important test of the main feature of the Trojan Horse Method (THM), namely the suppression of Coulomb effects in the entrance channel due to off-energy-shell effects. This is done by measuring the THM p-p elastic scattering via the p+d{yields}p+p+n reaction at 4.7 and 5 MeV, corresponding to a p-p relative energy ranging from 80 to 670 keV. In contrast to the on-energy-shell (OES) case, the extracted p-p cross section does not exhibit the Coulomb-nuclear interference minimum due to the suppression of the Coulomb amplitude. This is confirmed by the half-off-energy shell (HOES) calculations and strengthened by the agreement with the calculated OES nuclear cross sections.

Tumino, A. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l'Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Enna 'Kore', Enna (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l'Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station (United States); Campajola, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche-Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, G.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E. [ATOMKI-Debrecen (Hungary); Gialanella, L. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli (Italy)

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

Vibration Suppression and Flywheel Energy Storage in a Drillstring Bottom-Hole-Assembly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, a novel concept for a downhole flywheel energy storage module to be embedded in a bottom-hole-assembly (BHA) is presented and modeled, as an alternative power source to existing lithium-ion battery packs currently deployed in measurement-while-drilling (MWD) or logging-while-drilling (LWD) operations. Lithium-ion batteries disadvantages include deteriorated performance in high temperature, limited lifetime that necessitates frequent replacement which elevates operational costs, and environmental disposal. Extreme and harsh downhole conditions necessitate that the flywheel module withstands temperatures and pressures exceeding 300 ?F and 20 kpsi, respectively, as well as violent vibrations encountered during drilling. Moreover, the flywheel module should adhere to the geometric constraints of the wellbore and its corresponding BHA. Hence, a flywheel sizing procedure was developed that takes into consideration the required energy to be stored, the surrounding environmental conditions, and the geometric constraints. A five-axis magnetic levitation control system was implemented and tuned to maintain continuous suspension of the flywheel under the harsh lateral, axial and torsional drilling vibrations of the BHA. Thus, an integrated finite element model was developed that included the rotordynamic behavior of the flywheel and the BHA, the component dynamics of the magnetic levitation control system, and the cutting dynamics of the drillbit for both PDC and tricone types. The model also included a newly developed coupling between lateral, axial and torsional vibrations. It was demonstrated through simulations conducted by numerical integration that the flywheel maintains levitation due to all different types of external vibration as well as its own lateral vibration due to mass unbalance. Moreover, a passive proof-mass-damper (PPMD) was developed that suppresses axial bit-bounce vibrations as well as torsional vibrations, and was extended to also mitigate lateral vibrations. Optimized values of the mass, stiffness and damping values of the PPMD were obtained by the hybrid analytical-numerical Chebyshev spectral method that was superior in computational efficiency to iterative numerical integration. This also enabled the fine-plotting of an operating stability chart indicating stability regions where bit-bounce and stick-slip are avoided. The proof-mass-damping concept was extended to the flywheel to be an active proof-mass-damper (APMD) where simulations indicated functionality for a light-weight BHA.

Saeed, Ahmed

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseCh 10 Suppression of Leukotriene B4 Generation by ex vivo Neutrophils Isolated from Asthma Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Ch 10 Suppression of Leukotriene B4 Generation by ex vivo Neutrophils Isolated from Asthma Patients Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

198

Novel Americium Treatment Process for Surface Water and Dust Suppression Water  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), a former nuclear weapons production plant, has been remediated under CERCLA and decommissioned to become a National Wildlife Refuge. The site conducted this cleanup effort under the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) that established limits for the discharge of surface and process waters from the site. At the end of 2004, while a number of process buildings were undergoing decommissioning, routine monitoring of a discharge pond (Pond A-4) containing approximately 28 million gallons of water was discovered to have been contaminated with a trace amount of Americium-241 (Am-241). While the amount of Am-241 in the pond waters was very low (0.5 - 0.7 pCi/l), it was above the established Colorado stream standard of 0.15 pCi/l for release to off site drainage waters. The rapid successful treatment of these waters to the regulatory limit was important to the site for two reasons. The first was that the pond was approaching its hold-up limit. Without rapid treatment and release of the Pond A-4 water, typical spring run-off would require water management actions to other drainages onsite or a mass shuttling of water for disposal. The second reason was that this type of contaminated water had not been treated to the stringent stream standard at Rocky Flats before. Technical challenges in treatment could translate to impacts on water and secondary waste management, and ultimately, cost impacts. All of the technical challenges and specific site criteria led to the conclusion that a different approach to the treatment of this problem was necessary and a crash treatability program to identify applicable treatment techniques was undertaken. The goal of this program was to develop treatment options that could be implemented very quickly and would result in the generation of no high volume secondary waste that would be costly to dispose. A novel chemical treatment system was developed and implemented at the RFETS to treat Am-241 contaminated pond water, surface run-off and D and D dust suppression water during the later stages of the D and D effort at Rocky Flats. This novel chemical treatment system allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment of all contaminated waste waters to the very low stream standard of 0.15 pCi/1 with strict compliance to the RFCA discharge criteria for release to off-site surface waters. The rapid development and implementation of the treatment system avoided water management issues that would have had to be addressed if contaminated water had remained in Pond A-4 into the Spring of 2005. Implementation of this treatment system for the Pond A-4 waters and the D and D waters from Buildings 776 and 371 enabled the site to achieve cost-effective treatment that minimized secondary waste generation, avoiding the need for expensive off-site water disposal. Water treatment was conducted for a cost of less than $0.20/gal which included all development costs, capital costs and operational costs. This innovative and rapid response effort saved the RFETS cleanup program well in excess of $30 million for the potential cost of off-site transportation and treatment of radioactive liquid waste. (authors)

Tiepel, E.W.; Pigeon, P. [Golder Associates (United States); Nesta, S. [Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC (United States); Anderson, J. [Rocky Flats Closure Site Services - RFCSS (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Cellular consequences in the suppression of antibody response by the antigen-specific T-cell factor.,]. Exp. Med  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous studies from our laboratory indicated that a soluble factor extracted from carrier-primed suppressor T cells (TsF) ~ inhibits the in vitro secondary antibody response against a hapten coupled to the same carrier. The factor was found to possess determinants controlled by a locus (Ia-4) mapped in the I-J subregion of the mouse H-2 histocompatibility complex (1). Unlike other antigen-specific TsF, there has been shown a strict genetic restriction in that TsF derived from one strain of animals can suppress the response of only H-2 histocompatible strains (2, 3). Furthermore, TsF was shown to be absorbable by splenic T cells, but not by B cells or macrophages of the same H-2 haplotype origin. Such T cells, which were assumed to be the direct targets of TsF, were adherent to a tightly packed nylon-wool column, but were definitely killed by anti-Thy-I antiserum (2). Thus, the suppression of the antibody response by TsF is mediated by an interaction between the TsF and the acceptor site on the target cells. The most reasonable explanation is that such an acceptor site is controlled by a gene closely linked to that for the TsF within the same H-2 complex, as there have been no exceptional cases in which H-2 histoincompatible TsF can initiate the specific suppression. Because little is known about the consequences of this initial interaction between TsF and acceptor T cells, we have performed a series of experiments in which subsequent cellular events after the TsF-acceptor interaction were studied. In this communication, we wish to report that the final suppression of antibody response was, in fact, achieved via the intermediary type of the acceptor T cells. Some properties and the mode of action of this cell type are described. Materials and Methods Antigens. Keyhole limpet hemoeyanin (KLH) was purchased from Calbiochem-Behring

Taniguchi; Takeshi Tokuhisa

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Technical Note: Suppression of artifacts arising from simultaneous cone-beam imaging and RF transponder tracking in prostate radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Artifacts in treatment-room cone-beam reconstructions have been observed at the authors' center when cone-beam acquisition is simultaneous with radio frequency (RF) transponder tracking using the Calypso 4D system (Calypso Medical, Seattle, WA). These artifacts manifest as CT-number modulations and increased CT-noise. The authors present a method for the suppression of the artifacts. Methods: The authors propose a three-stage postprocessing technique that can be applied to image volumes previously reconstructed by a cone-beam system. The stages are (1) segmentation of voxels into air, soft-tissue, and bone; (2) application of a 2D spatial-filter in the axial plane to the soft-tissue voxels; and (3) normalization to remove streaking along the axial-direction. The algorithm was tested on patient data acquired with Synergy XVI cone-beam CT systems (Elekta, Crawley, United Kingdom). Results: The computational demands of the suggested correction are small, taking less than 15 s per cone-beam reconstruction on a desktop PC. For a moderate loss of spatial-resolution, the artifacts are strongly suppressed and low-contrast visibility is improved. Conclusions: The correction technique proposed is fast and effective in removing the artifacts caused by simultaneous cone-beam imaging and RF-transponder tracking.

Poludniowski, Gavin; Webb, Steve; Evans, Philip M. [Joint Department of Physics, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey, SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Suppression of bottomonia states in finite size quark gluon plasma in PbPb collisions at Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bottomonium states due to their varying binding energies dissolve at different temperatures and thus their nuclear modification factors and relative yields have potential to map the properties of Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). We estimate the suppression of bottomonia states due to color screening in an expanding QGP of finite lifetime and size with the conditions relevant for PbPb collisions at LHC. The properties of $\\Upsilon$ states and recent results on their dissociation temperatures have been used as ingredient in the study. The nuclear modification factors and the ratios of yields of $\\Upsilon$ states are then obtained as a function of transverse momentum and centrality. We compare our theoretical calculations with the bottomonia yields measured with CMS in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. The model calculations explain the data very well.

A. Abdulsalam; Prashant Shukla

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

202

Suppression of the stellar enhancement factor and the reaction {sup 85}Rb(p,n){sup 85}Sr  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that a Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor occurs in many endothermic reactions at and far from stability. Contrary to common assumptions, reaction measurements for astrophysics with minimal impact of stellar enhancement should be preferably performed for those reactions instead of their reverses, despite of their negative Q value. As a demonstration, the cross section of the astrophysically relevant {sup 85}Rb(p,n){sup 85}Sr reaction has been measured by activation between 2.16{<=}E{sub c.m.}{<=}3.96 MeV and the astrophysical reaction rates at p process temperatures for (p,n) as well as (n,p) are directly inferred from the data. Additionally, our results confirm a previously derived modification of a global optical proton potential. The presented arguments are also relevant for other {alpha}- and proton-induced reactions in the p, rp, and {nu}p processes.

Rauscher, T. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Kiss, G. G.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Simon, A.; Fueloep, Zs.; Somorjai, E. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4001 Debrecen, P. O. Box 51 (Hungary)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Suppression of Upsilon Production in d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p+p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d+Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p+p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) in the rapidity range |y|<1 in d+Au collisions of R_dAu = 0.67 +/- 0.12 (stat.) +/- 0.04 (sys.) +/- 0.08 (pp sys.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au+Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R_AA=0.36 +/- 0.09 (stat.) +/- 0.01 (sys.) +/- 0.04 (pp sys.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au+Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au+Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark-Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d+Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au+Au can be made.

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; K. Hill; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; G. Wimsatt; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

204

WIND-DRIVEN ACCRETION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. SUPPRESSION OF THE MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY AND LAUNCHING OF THE MAGNETOCENTRIFUGAL WIND  

SciTech Connect

We perform local, vertically stratified shearing-box MHD simulations of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) at a fiducial radius of 1 AU that take into account the effects of both Ohmic resistivity and ambipolar diffusion (AD). The magnetic diffusion coefficients are evaluated self-consistently from a look-up table based on equilibrium chemistry. We first show that the inclusion of AD dramatically changes the conventional picture of layered accretion. Without net vertical magnetic field, the system evolves into a toroidal field dominated configuration with extremely weak turbulence in the far-UV ionization layer that is far too inefficient to drive rapid accretion. In the presence of a weak net vertical field (plasma {beta} {approx} 10{sup 5} at midplane), we find that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is completely suppressed, resulting in a fully laminar flow throughout the vertical extent of the disk. A strong magnetocentrifugal wind is launched that efficiently carries away disk angular momentum and easily accounts for the observed accretion rate in PPDs. Moreover, under a physical disk wind geometry, all the accretion flow proceeds through a strong current layer with a thickness of {approx}0.3H that is offset from disk midplane with radial velocity of up to 0.4 times the sound speed. Both Ohmic resistivity and AD are essential for the suppression of the MRI and wind launching. The efficiency of wind transport increases with increasing net vertical magnetic flux and the penetration depth of the FUV ionization. Our laminar wind solution has important implications on planet formation and global evolution of PPDs.

Bai Xuening; Stone, James M., E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

Electrical current suppression in Pd-doped vanadium pentoxide nanowires caused by reduction in PdO due to hydrogen exposure  

SciTech Connect

Pd nanoparticle-doped vanadium pentoxide nanowires (Pd-VONs) were synthesized. Electrical current suppression was observed when the Pd-VON was exposed to hydrogen gas, which cannot be explained by the work function changes mentioned in previous report such as Pd-doped carbon nanotubes and SnO{sub 2} nanowires. Using the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we found that the reduction in PdO due to hydrogen exposure plays an important role in the current suppression of the Pd-VON.

Kim, Byung Hoon; Oh, Soon-Young; Yu, Han Young; Yun, Yong Ju; Kim, Yark Yeon; Hong, Won G. [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hu Young; Lee, Jeong Yong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Jin [Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hsp105 family proteins suppress staurosporine-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the translocation of Bax to mitochondria in HeLa cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hsp105 (Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta}), major heat shock proteins in mammalian cells, belong to a subgroup of the HSP70 family, HSP105/110. Previously, we have shown that Hsp105{alpha} has completely different effects on stress-induced apoptosis depending on cell type. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Hsp105{alpha} regulates stress-induced apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we established HeLa cells that overexpress either Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta} by removing doxycycline and examined how Hsp105 modifies staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. Apoptotic features such as the externalization of phosphatidylserine on the plasma membrane and nuclear morphological changes were induced by the treatment with STS, and the STS-induced apoptosis was suppressed by overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta}. In addition, we found that overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta} suppressed the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 by preventing the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Furthermore, the translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which results in the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria, was also suppressed by the overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta}. Thus, it is suggested that Hsp105 suppresses the stress-induced apoptosis at its initial step, the translocation of Bax to mitochondria in HeLa cells.

Yamagishi, Nobuyuki [Department of Biochemistry, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, 5 Nakauchi-cho, Misasagi, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8414 (Japan); Ishihara, Keiichi [Department of Biochemistry, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, 5 Nakauchi-cho, Misasagi, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8414 (Japan); Saito, Youhei [Department of Biochemistry, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, 5 Nakauchi-cho, Misasagi, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8414 (Japan); Hatayama, Takumi [Department of Biochemistry, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, 5 Nakauchi-cho, Misasagi, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8414 (Japan)]. E-mail: hatayama@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Bismuth as a modifier of Au Pd catalyst: Enhancing selectivity in alcohol oxidation by suppressing parallel reaction  

SciTech Connect

Bi has been widely employed as a modifier for Pd and Pt based catalyst mainly in order to improve selectivity. We found that when Bi was added to the bimetallic system AuPd, the effect on activity in alcohol oxidation mainly depends on the amount of Bi regardless its position, being negligible when Bi was 0.1 wt% and detectably negative when the amount was increased to 3 wt%. However, the selectivity of the reactions notably varied only when Bi was deposited on the surface of metal nanoparticles suppressing parallel reaction in both benzyl alcohol and glycerol oxidation. After a careful characterization of all the catalysts and additional catalytic tests, we concluded that the Bi influence on the activity of the catalysts could be ascribed to electronic effect whereas the one on selectivity mainly to a geometric modification. Moreover, the Bi-modified AuPd/AC catalyst showed possible application in the production of tartronic acid, a useful intermediate, from glycerol.

Villa, Alberto [Universita di Milano, Italy; Wang, Di [Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, Germany; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Prati, Laura [Universita di Milano, Italy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Nanoscale strain-induced pair suppression as a source of vortex pinning in high-temperature superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Boosting large-scale superconductor applications require nanostructured conductors with artificial pinning centres immobilizing quantized vortices at high temperature and magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate a highly effective mechanism of artificial pinning centres in solution-derived high-temperature superconductor nanocomposites through generation of nanostrained regions where Cooper pair formation is suppressed. The nanostrained regions identified from transmission electron microscopy devise a very high concentration of partial dislocations associated with intergrowths generated between the randomly oriented nanodots and the epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} matrix. Consequently, an outstanding vortex-pinning enhancement correlated to the nanostrain is demonstrated for four types of randomly oriented nanodot, and a unique evolution towards an isotropic vortex-pinning behaviour, even in the effective anisotropy, is achieved as the nanostrain turns isotropic. We suggest a new vortex-pinning mechanism based on the bond-contraction pairing model, where pair formation is quenched under tensile strain, forming new and effective core-pinning regions.

Llordes, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Palau, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Vlad, R. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Pomar, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Arbiol, Jordi [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Guzman, Roger [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Gazquez Alabart, Jaume [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Sandiumenge, Felip [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ricart, Susagna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Puig, Teresa [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Chataigner, D. [CRISMAT, Caen, France; Vanacken, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Gutierrez, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Deutscher, G. [Tel Aviv University; Moschalkov, V. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Obradors, Xavier [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Observation of the Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay {xi}{sup +}{sub c} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}  

SciTech Connect

We report the first observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed charm baryon decay {xi}{sup +}{sub c}{yields}pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +} . We observe 150{+-}22{+-}5 events for the signal. The data were accumulated using the SELEX spectrometer during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, chiefly from a 600 GeV/c {sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching fractions of the decay relative to the Cabibbo-favored {xi}{sup +}{sub c}{yields}{sigma}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {xi}{sup +}{sub c}{yields} {xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be B({xi}{sup +}{sub c}{yields}pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/B({xi}{sup +}{sub c} {yields}{sigma}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) =0.22{+-}0.06{+-}0.03 and B({xi}{sup +}{sub c}{yields}pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/B({xi}{sup +}{sub c} {yields}{xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} )=0.20{+-}0.04{+-}0.02 , respectively. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Jun, S. Y. [Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)] [Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Akchurin, N. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Andreev, V. A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia (Russian Federation)] [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia (Russian Federation); Atamantchouk, A. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia (Russian Federation)] [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia (Russian Federation); Aykac, M. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Balatz, M. Y. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia (Russian Federation); Bondar, N. F. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia (Russian Federation)] [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia (Russian Federation); Bravar, A. [University of Trieste and INFN, Trieste, (Italy)] [University of Trieste and INFN, Trieste, (Italy); Cooper, P. S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)] [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Dauwe, L. J. [University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, Michigan 48502 (United States)] (and others) [University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, Michigan 48502 (United States)

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Driving toroidally asymmetric current through the tokamak scrape-off layer, Part I: Potential for ELM suppression  

SciTech Connect

A potential technique for suppressing edge localized magnetohydrodynamic instabilities (ELMs) is theoretically analyzed. Recent experiments have shown that externally generated resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) can stabilize ELMs by modifying the density profile [T. E. Evans, et al., Nature Phys. 2, 419 (2006); Y. Liang, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265004 (2007)]. Driving toroidally asymmetric current internally, through the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma itself, can also generate RMPs that are close to the required threshold for ELM control. The limiting ion saturation current densities can be achieved by producing potential differences on the order of the electron temperature. Although the threshold is uncertain in future devices, if driven coherently though the SOL, the upper limit for the resulting field would exceed the present experimental threshold. This analysis provides the tools required for estimating the magnitude of the coherent SOL current and RMP generated via toroidally asymmetric biasing of the target. Flux expansion increases the RMP near the X-point, while phase interference due to the shearing of field lines near the X-point reduces the amplitude of the effective SOL perturbation and makes the result sensitive to both toroidal mode number n and the radial coherence width of the biasing region. If the limiting current density decays rapidly enough radially, both the width and the amplitude of the current density drawn from the target will be reduced. The RMP can still exceed the present threshold at low n if the radial location and width of the biasing region are optimally chosen.

Joseph, I; Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Suppressant: Inert Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Influencing the Reported Extinguishing Concentrations of Inert Gases.. ... for the Protection of Machinery Spaces and Gas Turbine Enclosures in ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

PYROGENIC AEROSOL FIRE SUPPRESSANTS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... were indicative of rates obtained from exposure to SFE-A. Monel 400, nickel, and stainless experienced nominal corrosion rates. Zinc, copper, and ...

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Suppressant:Perfluorocarbons (PFCs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Acid Gas Production in Inhibited Diffusion Flames.. ... Evaluation of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for ... to an External Energy Source.. ...

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

Fire Suppression Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... docks and an electrical substation that provided ... pump, located on the ground floor, supplied ... sizes under “normally expected” operating conditions. ...

215

SAE Fire Suppression Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The unconventional shapes of the suppressor bottles (see figure 4) proved to be a considerable design challenge during the development of the ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

216

Blast Effects Suppression System  

The HydroSuppressor system was developed to protect critical facilities from the devastating effects of blast from a vehicle bomb.  HydroSuppressor ...

217

Suppressed Expression of T-Box Transcription Factors is Involved in Senescence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem. The etiology of COPD has been associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, understanding of the molecular interactions that modulate COPD pathogenesis remains only partly resolved. We conducted an exploratory study on COPD etiology to identify the key molecular participants. We used information-theoretic algorithms including Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Inferelator. We captured direct functional associations among genes, given a compendium of gene expression profiles of human lung epithelial cells. A set of genes differentially expressed in COPD, as reported in a previous study were superposed with the resulting transcriptional regulatory networks. After factoring in the properties of the networks, an established COPD susceptibility locus and domain-domain interactions involving protein products of genes in the generated networks, several molecular candidates were predicted to be involved in the etiology of COPD. These include COL4A3, CFLAR, GULP1, PDCD1, CASP10, PAX3, BOK, HSPD1, PITX2, and PML. Furthermore, T-box (TBX) genes and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which are in a direct transcriptional regulatory relationship, emerged as preeminent participants in the etiology of COPD by means of senescence. Contrary to observations in neoplasms, our study reveals that the expression of genes and proteins in the lung samples from patients with COPD indicate an increased tendency towards cellular senescence. The expression of the anti-senescence mediators TBX transcription factors, chromatin modifiers histone deacetylases, and sirtuins was suppressed; while the expression of TBX-regulated cellular senescence markers such as CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CAV1 was elevated in the peripheral lung tissue samples from patients with COPD. The critical balance between senescence and anti-senescence factors is disrupted towards senescence in COPD lungs.

Acquaah-Mensah, George; Malhotra, Deepti; Vulimiri, Madhulika; McDermott, Jason E.; Biswal, Shyam

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

218

Direct Evidence for the Suppression of Charge Stripes in Epitaxial {La1.67Sr0.33NiO4} Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have successfully grown epitaxial La1.67Sr0.33NiO4 films with a small crystalline mosaic using pulsed laser deposition. With synchrotron radiation, the x-ray-diffraction peaks associated with charge stripes have been successfully observed for relatively thick films. Anomalies due to the charge-ordering transition have been examined using four-point probe resistivity measurements. X-ray scattering provides direct evidence for suppression of the stripe phase in thinner samples; the phase disappears for film thicknesses 2600 Angstroms. The suppression appears to be a result of shrinking the stripe phase domains. This may reflect the stripe phase progressing from nematic to isotropic.

Xie,C.; Budnick, J.; Hines, W.; Wells, B.; He, F.; Moodenbaugh, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations and improvement of confinement due to current profile modification by biased electrode in Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics tokamak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvement of plasma confinement is achieved in normal q{sub a} discharges of SINP-tokamak by introducing a biased electrode inside the last closed flux surface. All the important features of high confinement mode are observed biasing the electrode negatively with respect to the vacuum vessel. Arrays of electric and magnetic probes introduced in the edge plasma region reveal suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations over distinct frequency ranges as well as modification of the toroidal current profile due to biasing. Further analysis identifies the electrostatic fluctuations to be due to drift mode and the magnetic fluctuations may be of slow compressional Alfven waves. Both get suppressed due to current profile modification during biasing, hence leading to the improvement of plasma confinement.

Basu, Debjyoti; Pal, Rabindranath [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ghosh, Joydeep; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Suppressing longitudinal double-layer oscillations by using elliptically polarized laser pulses in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration regime  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that well collimated mono-energetic ion beams with a large particle number can be generated in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration regime by using an elliptically polarized laser pulse with appropriate theoretically determined laser polarization ratio. Due to the J Multiplication-Sign B effect, the double-layer charge separation region is imbued with hot electrons that prevent ion pileup, thus suppressing the double-layer oscillations. The proposed mechanism is well confirmed by Particle-in-Cell simulations, and after suppressing the longitudinal double-layer oscillations, the ion beams driven by the elliptically polarized lasers own much better energy spectrum than those by circularly polarized lasers.

Wu Dong; Yan, X. Q. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, C. Y.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Institute of Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, September 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory May 2011 February 2013 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope....................................................................................................................................................... 2

222

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, September 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory May 2011 February 2013 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope....................................................................................................................................................... 2

223

Context: Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Decision Tree for Global Environmental Impact Screening.. ... United Nations Environment Programme's Role in Eliminating Halon Dependency in ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

224

Ozone Depletion and Global Warming an Integrated Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Time frame for decommissioning Weight equivalent for replacements Halon 1301 ODP 16 ... for future destruction. Time frame for decommissioning ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

225

Context: Destruction/Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Context: Destruction/Conversion. ... Process for Conversion of Halon 1211.. Tran, R.; Kennedy, EM; Dlugogorski, BZ; 2000. ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

Context: Usage and Effectiveness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Context: Usage and Effectiveness. US Navy Aircraft Halon 1301 Effectivity Analysis.. Tedeschi, M.; Leach, W.; 1995. ...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Application: Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Option.. Papavergos, PG; 1991. Halon 1301 Use in Oil and Gas Production Facilities: Alaska's North Slope.. Ulmer, PE; 1991. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

228

Two effects relevant for the study of astrophysical reaction rates: {gamma} transitions in capture reactions and Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nucleosynthesis processes involve reactions on several thousand nuclei, both close to and far off stability. The preparation of reaction rates to be used in astrophysical investigations requires experimental and theoretical input. In this context, two interesting aspects are discussed: (i) the relevant {gamma} transition energies in astrophysical capture reactions, and (ii) the newly discovered Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor. The latter makes a number of reactions with negative Q value more favorable for experimental investigation than their inverse reactions, contrary to common belief.

Rauscher, Thomas [Departement Physik, Universitaet Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

229

doi:10.1093/aob/mcn127, available online at www.aob.oxfordjournals.org REVIEW Indirect Suppression of Photosynthesis on Individual Leaves by Arthropod Herbivory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

† Background Herbivory reduces leaf area, disrupts the function of leaves, and ultimately alters yield and productivity. Herbivore damage to foliage typically is assessed in the field by measuring the amount of leaf tissue removed and disrupted. This approach assumes the remaining tissues are unaltered, and plant photosynthesis and water balance function normally. However, recent application of thermal and fluorescent imaging technologies revealed that alterations to photosynthesis and transpiration propagate into remaining undamaged leaf tissue. † Scope and Conclusions This review briefly examines the indirect effects of herbivory on photosynthesis, measured by gas exchange or chlorophyll fluorescence, and identifies four mechanisms contributing to the indirect suppression of photosynthesis in remaining leaf tissues: severed vasculature, altered sink demand, defence-induced autotoxicity, and defence-induced down-regulation of photosynthesis. We review the chlorophyll fluorescence and thermal imaging techniques used to gather layers of spatial data and discuss methods for compiling these layers to achieve greater insight into mechanisms contributing to the indirect suppression of photosynthesis. We also elaborate on a few herbivore-induced gene-regulating mechanisms which modulate photosynthesis and discuss the difficult nature of measuring spatial heterogeneity when combining fluorescence imaging and gas exchange technology. Although few studies have characterized herbivore-induced indirect effects on photosynthesis at the leaf level, an emerging literature suggests that the loss of photosynthetic capacity following herbivory may be greater than

Paul D. Nabity; Jorge A. Zavala; Evan H. Delucia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Strange quark suppression and strange hadron production in pp collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The parton and hadron cascade model PACIAE based on PYTHIA is utilized to systematically investigate strange particle production in pp collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Globally speaking, the PACIAE results of the strange particle rapidity density at midrapidity and the transverse momentum distribution are better than those of PYTHIA (default) in comparison with STAR and ALICE experimental data. This may represent the importance of the parton and hadron rescatterings, as well as the reduction mechanism of strange quark suppression, added in the PACIAE model. The K/{pi} ratios as a function of reaction energy in pp collisions from CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) to LHC energies are also analyzed in this paper.

Long Haiyan; Feng Shengqin; Zhou Daimei; Yan Yuliang; Ma Hailiang; Sa Benhao [Department of Physics, College of Science, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 443002 (China); Institute of Particle Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430082 (China); China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275 (18), Beijing 102413 (China); China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275 (18), Beijing 102413 (China); Institute of Particle Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430082 (China); CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Suppression of ethanol-reinforced behavior by naltrexone is associated with attenuation of the ethanol-induced increase in dialysate dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The opiate antagonist naltrexone suppresses ethanolreinforced behavior in animals and decreases ethanol intake in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying these actions are not well understood. Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that naltrexone attenuates the rewarding properties of ethanol by interfering with ethanol-induced stimulation of dopamine activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Simultaneous measures of the effects of naltrexone on dialysate dopamine levels in the NAcc and on operant responding for oral ethanol were used. Male Wistar rats were trained to selfadminister ethanol (10–15%, w/v) in 0.2 % (w/v) saccharin during daily 30 min sessions and were surgically prepared for intracranial microdialysis. Experiments began after reliable selfadministration was established. Rats were injected with naltrexone (0.25 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline and 10 min later were placed

Rueben A. Gonzales; Friedbert Weiss

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Density-induced suppression of the alpha-particle condensate in nuclear matter and the structure of alpha cluster states in nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At low densities, with decreasing temperatures, in symmetric nuclear matter alpha-particles are formed, which eventually give raise to a quantum condensate with four-nucleon alpha-like correlations (quartetting). Starting with a model of alpha-matter, where undistorted alpha particles interact via an effective interaction such as the Ali-Bodmer potential, the suppression of the condensate fraction at zero temperature with increasing density is considered. Using a Jastrow-Feenberg approach, it is found that the condensate fraction vanishes near saturation density. Additionally, the modification of the internal state of the alpha particle due to medium effects will further reduce the condensate. In finite systems, an enhancement of the S state wave function of the c.o.m. orbital of alpha particle motion is considered as the correspondence to the condensate. Wave functions have been constructed for self-conjugate 4n nuclei which describe the condensate state, but are fully antisymmetrized on the nucleonic level. These condensate-like cluster wave functions have been successfully applied to describe properties of low-density states near the n alpha threshold. Comparison with OCM calculations in 12C and 16O shows strong enhancement of the occupation of the S-state c.o.m. orbital of the alpha-particles. This enhancement is decreasing if the baryon density increases, similar to the density-induced suppression of the condensate fraction in alpha matter. The ground states of 12C and 16O show no enhancement at all, thus a quartetting condensate cannot be formed at saturation densities.

Y. Funaki; H. Horiuchi; G. Röpke; P. Schuck; A. Tohsaki; T. Yamada

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

233

Suppression of the spin pumping in Pd/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayers with nano-oxide layer  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate that the spin pumping effect can be effectively suppressed with a nano-oxide layer. Spin pumping effect manifests itself by an enhancement of the Gilbert damping parameter in normal metal/ferromagnetic hetero-structures, while many spintronics devices prefer smaller damping parameter. Since the spin pumping effect is directly related with the spin dependent interface conductance, we can modify the spin pumping by altering the interface conductance with the nano-oxide layer. We prepared series of Pd/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayers with different pausing time between Pd and Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} depositions in order to control the interface conductance. The Gilbert damping parameters are determined from the line-width measurements in the ferromagnetic resonance spectra for each pausing time sample. They are 0.0490, 0.0296, 0.0278, and 0.0251 for 0, 6, 30, and 60 s pausing time, respectively. We find that the damping parameter of Pd/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} is almost recovered to one of the Cu/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayer with 60 s pausing time, while the static magnetic properties are not noticeably changed.

Kim, Duck-Ho; Kim, Hong-Hyoun; You, Chun-Yeol [Department of Physics, Inha University, Namgu Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Suppression of high-p{sub T} hadrons in Pb+Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear modification factor R{sub AA}(p{sub T}) for large transverse momentum pion spectra in Pb+Pb collisions at {radical}(s)=2.76 TeV is predicted within the next-to-leading order perturbative QCD parton model. The effect of jet quenching is incorporated through medium-modified fragmentation functions within the higher-twist approach. The jet transport parameter that controls medium modification is proportional to the initial parton density, and the coefficient is fixed by data on the suppression of large-p{sub T} hadron spectra obtained at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Data on charged hadron multiplicity dN{sub ch}/d{eta}=1584{+-}80 in central Pb+Pb collisions from the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are used to constrain the initial parton density both for determining the jet transport parameter and the 3 + 1 dimensional (3 + 1D) ideal hydrodynamic evolution of the bulk matter that is employed for the calculation of R{sub PbPb}(p{sub T}) for neutral pions.

Chen Xiaofang; Wang Enke; Zhang Hanzhong [Institute of Particle Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Hirano, Tetsufumi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nuclear Science Division, MS 70R0319, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Wang Xinnian [Institute of Particle Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Nuclear Science Division, MS 70R0319, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

Ogasawara, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); Kubo, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T. [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

First Observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed Decays Xi+(c) ---> Sigma+ pi- pi+ and Xi+(c) ---> Sigma- pi+ pi+ and Measurement of their Branching Ratios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. They observe 56 {+-} 13 over a background of 21, and 23 {+-} 7 over a background of 12 events, respectively, for the signals. The data were accumulated using the SELEX spectrometer during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, chiefly from a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/B({xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.20, and B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.23 {+-} 0.11, respectively. They also report branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}.

Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Engelfried, J.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Akgun, U.; /Iowa U.; Alkhazov, Georgiy; /St. Petersburg, INP; Amaro-Reyes, J.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; /Iowa U.; Balatz, M.Y.; /Moscow, ITEP; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; /San Luis Potosi U.; Bondar, N.F.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab /Michigan U., Flint

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fire suppressing apparatus. [sodium fires  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubed depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

Buttrey, K.E.

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Drizzle Suppression in Ship Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although drizzle was a relatively infrequent occurrence during the Monterey Area Ship Track study, diverse measurements from several sources produced data signals consistent with a reduction in drizzle drops in stratus clouds affected by ship ...

Ronald J. Ferek; Timothy Garrett; Peter V. Hobbs; Scott Strader; Doug Johnson; Jonathan P. Taylor; Kurt Nielsen; Andrew S. Ackerman; Yefim Kogan; Qingfu Liu; Bruce A. Albrecht; David Babb

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

ADVANCEMENT IN SUSTAINABLE FIRE SUPPRESSION ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Typically, gaskets and O-rings are not normally in constant direct contact with an agent. ... IO0 1 ' -12.6 +9.5 +10.6 EPDM 25 1 100 I ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

The mechanism of recA polA lethality: Suppression by RecA-independent recombination repair activated by the lexA(Def) mutation in Escherichia coli  

SciTech Connect

The mechanism of recA polA lethality in Escherichia coli has been studied. Complementation tests have indicated that both the 5{prime} {yields} 3{prime} exonuclease and the polymerization activities of DNA polymerase I are essential for viability in the absence of RecA protein, whereas the viability and DNA replication of DNA polymerase I-defective cells depend on the recombinase activity of RecA. An alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis has indicated that RecA has only a minor role in Okazaki fragment processing. Double-strand break repair is proposed for the major role of RecA in the absence of DNA polymerase I. The lexA(Def)::Tn5 mutation has previously been shown to suppress the temperature-sensitive growth of recA200(Ts) polA25::spc mutants. The lexA(Def) mutation can alleviate impaired DNA synthesis in the recA200(Ts) polA25::spc mutant cells at the restrictive temperature. recF{sup +} is essential for this suppression pathway, recJ and recQ mutations have minor but significant adverse effects on the suppression. The recA200(Ts) allele in the recA200(Ts) polA25::spc lexA(Def) mutant can be replaced by {Delta}recA, indicating that the lexA(Def)-induced suppression is RecA independent. lexA(Def) reduces the sensitivity of {Delta}recA polA25::spc cells to UV damage by {approximately}10{sup 4}-fold. lexA(Def) also restores P1 transduction proficiency to the {Delta}recA polA25::spc mutant to a level that is 7.3% of the recA{sup +} wild type. These results suggest that lexA(Def) activates a RecA-independent, RecF-dependent recombination repair pathway that suppresses the defect in DNA replication in recA polA double mutants. 52 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Cao, Yang; Kogoma, Tokio [Univ. of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

Integration of ARG-US RFID and DOE TRANSCOM* B. Craig, J.H. Lee, J. Anderson, H. Tsai, Y. Liu, and J. Shuler1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration (NNSA), it has been separately proposed that a major part of the funding to build a dedicated shock compression beamline be provided by NNSA. The magnetic field is a key fundamental parameter

Kemner, Ken

242

Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28-40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be performed cautiously.

Vuky, Jacqueline, E-mail: vukyja@ohsu.edu [Section of Community Hematology/Oncology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Pham, Huong T. [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Warren, Sarah; Douglass, Erika [Benaroya Research Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Badiozamani, Kasra [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Madsen, Berit; Hsi, Alex [Peninsula Cancer Center, Poulsbo, WA (United States); Song Guobin [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Context: Small Flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Two Halon Replacement Gases Blended With ... Results From the Dispersed Liquid Agent Fire ... a Laminar Opposed-Flow Natural Gas/Air Diffusion ...

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

A NOVEL DEVICE FOR DISSEMINATING FIRE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... streaming agent. For it to work effectively, the location of the fire must be known ahead of time in order to orient the system Halon ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

REDUCING HYDROGEN FLUORIDE AND OTHER ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with Halons 1301 and 121 I), as well as carbonyl fluoride (COFz) are ... Figures 6 and 7 show typical test results for calcium carbonate and potassium ...

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

Reference Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Tools Current Greenhouse Gas Concentrations Name that compound: The numbers game for CFCs, HFCs, HCFCs, and Halons Conversion Tables and More Glossary Acronyms CDIAC's...

247

NMERI 2003/1/34051 FLUOROALKYL PHOSPHORUS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SUBJECT TERMS phosphorus, fluoroalkyl, fire, extinguishment, halon ... is complete by the time the products enter ... the results of the search have been ...

2013-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

248

EVALUATION OF SELECTED NFPA 2001 AGENTS FOR ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This is a typical energy level ... "V I 2001 Agents,;' 1993 CFC & Halon Alternatives CGnference, Hilton Hotel, Washington, DC, 20-22 Oct. 1993. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

Deployment: Flooding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the Halon Replacement Program for Army Ground Combat Vehicles ... Gas Measurement Using FTIR, GC/MS and Ion Selective Electrode Methods ...

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

Suppression of magnetism and development of superconductivity within the collapsed tetragonal phase of Ca[subscript 0.67]Sr[subscript 0.33]Fe[subscript 2]As[subscript 2] under pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural and electronic characterizations of (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} have been performed as a function of pressure up to 12 GPa using conventional and designer diamond anvil cells. The compound (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} behaves intermediately between its end members, displaying a suppression of magnetism and the onset of superconductivity. Like other members of the AFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} family, (Ca{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33})Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} undergoes a pressure-induced isostructural volume collapse, which we associate with the development of As-As bonding across the mirror plane of the structure. This collapsed tetragonal phase abruptly cuts off the magnetic state and supports superconductivity with a maximum T{sub c} = 22.2 K. The maximum T{sub c} of the superconducting phase is not strongly correlated with any structural parameter, but its proximity to the abrupt suppression of magnetism as well as the volume-collapse transition suggests that magnetic interactions and structural inhomogeneity may play a role in its development.

Jeffries, J.R.; Butch, N.P.; Kirshenbaum, K.; Saha, S.R.; Samudrala, G.; Weir, S.T.; Vohra, Y.K.; Paglione, J. (LLNL); (UAB); (Maryland)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

251

Phase Diagram of KxFe2-ySe2-zSz and the Suppression of its Superconducting State by an Fe2-Se=S Tetrahedron Distortion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report structurally tuned superconductivity in a K{sub x}Fe{sub 2-y}Se{sub 2-z}S{sub z} (0 {le} z {le} 2) phase diagram. Superconducting T{sub c} is suppressed as S is incorporated into the lattice, eventually vanishing at 80% of S. The magnetic and conductivity properties can be related to stoichiometry on a poorly occupied Fe1 site and the local environment of a nearly fully occupied Fe2 site. The decreasing T{sub c} coincides with the increasing Fe1 occupancy and the overall increase in Fe stoichiometry from z = 0 to z = 2. Our results indicate that the irregularity of the Fe2-Se/S tetrahedron is an important controlling parameter that can be used to tune the ground state in the new superconductor family.

Lei H.; Abeykoon, M.; Bozin, E.S.; Wang, K.; Warren, J.B.; Petrovic, C.

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

Phase Diagram of KxFe2-ySe2-zSz and the Suppression of its Superconducting State by an Fe2-Se/S Tetrahedron Distortion  

SciTech Connect

We report structurally tuned superconductivity in a K{sub x}Fe{sub 2-y}Se{sub 2-z}S{sub z} (0 {le} z {le} 2) phase diagram. Superconducting T{sub c} is suppressed as S is incorporated into the lattice, eventually vanishing at 80% of S. The magnetic and conductivity properties can be related to stoichiometry on a poorly occupied Fe1 site and the local environment of a nearly fully occupied Fe2 site. The decreasing T{sub c} coincides with the increasing Fe1 occupancy and the overall increase in Fe stoichiometry from z = 0 to z = 2. Our results indicate that the irregularity of the Fe2-Se/S tetrahedron is an important controlling parameter that can be used to tune the ground state in the new superconductor family.

H Lei; M Abeykoon; E Bozin; K Wang; J Warren; C Petrovic

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Does Ekman Friction Suppress Baroclinic Instability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of Ekman friction on baroclinic instability is reexamined in order to address questions raised by Farrell concerning the existence of normal mode instability in the atmosphere. As the degree of meridional confinement is central to the ...

Shian-Jiann Lin; Raymond T. Pierrehumbert

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

TESTING OF GASEOUS FIRE SUPPRESSANTS IN NARROW ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This allowed to determine a range of conditions suitable for operating the ... A nichrome wire, powered by a low voltage transformer, acts as igniter. ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

Residential Kitchen Fire Suppression Research Needs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Bryner, Nelson NIST Chamblin, William Life Mist ... Kuchnicki, Dick ICC Lawler, Meredith USFA/DHS Love ... CPSC Peterson, Patrick Williams-Pyro Pitts ...

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

FIRE SUPPRESSION PERFORMANCE TESTING OF WATER ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Instead of a full simulation, only the lower portion of ... Flow to the fuel spray continued until 100 ... the damage potential due to spray cooling utilizes the ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

FINE WATER SPRAY FIRE SUPPRESSION ALTERNATIVE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... different products, ie, chemicals, gases, water, etc., being ... of an AB6 STAL GT-35 Jupiter gas turbine. ... to the use of water on operating gas turbines. ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

Real-Time Suppressant Concentration Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In order to convert the volume-flow rate measured ... fed to the digital-to-analog converter connected to ... Table 5 lists the conversion formulas used for ...

1996-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

259

A NUMERICAL MODEL FOR WATER MIST SUPPRESSION ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vapor F ig ure 3 . T emepraturecon to urs ( 1 0 0 0 K ) atd if fe rentva lu esofu lt ra fin em is tconcentrat io ns U = 8 4 cm /sec ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

FIRE SUPPRESSION IN COLD CLIMATES: A TECHNICAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... from crude oil, coupled with an ignition source such as static electricity or a ... the Central Power Station for local fire protection in the turbine hoods of ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ARGONlTE ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY SUPPRESSION ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... significant concentration, ARGONITE! is a non-polluting, non-ozone depleting, and non-greenhouse effect gas. Total flooding ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

SQUID-Based, Asymmetric, Planar Gradiometer Suppresses ...  

... generated, for example, by the human heart or brain. Other potential applications include nondestructive evaluation of materials. ...

263

Mode suppression means for gyrotron cavities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a gyrotron electron tube of the gyro-klystron or gyro-monotron type, having a cavity supporting an electromagnetic mode with circular electric field, spurious resonances can occur in modes having noncircular electric field. These spurious resonances are damped and their frequencies shifted by a circular groove in the cavity parallel to the electric field.

Chodorow, Marvin (Stanford, CA); Symons, Robert S. (Los Altos, CA)

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

Chiral Suppression of Scalar Glueball Decay  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because glueballs are SU(3){sub Flavor} singlets, they are expected to couple equally to u,d, and s quarks, so that equal coupling strengths to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sup +}K{sup -} are predicted. However, we show that chiral symmetry implies the scalar glueball amplitude for G{sub 0} {yields} {bar q}q is proportional to the quark mass, so that mixing with {bar s}s mesons is enhanced and decays to K{sup +}K{sup -} are favored over {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. Together with evidence from lattice calculations and from experiment, this supports the hypothesis that f{sub 0}(1710) is the ground state scalar glueball.

Chanowitz, Michael S.

2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

NEXT-GENERATION FIRE SUPPRESSION TECHNOLOGY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... reignition quenching; - ODP; - global warming potential (GWP ... by the Program Support Office, which provides ... program and management support to ...

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

266

Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

ADVANCED FIRE SUPPRESSION TEST CELL (AFSTC) A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... raceways represent the primary combustible zones of the ... to a space or facility zone is almost ... SF Agent AnalYSN 18 FSTC-SF Climate ConVDll ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

268

Surge Voltage Suppression in Residential Power Circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Of course, this diversion may take place in an ... (30m) away from the HLP, the latter takes over for ... be accepted for shipment from factory stock in- lots ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

269

SCREENING METHODS FOR NEW FIRE SUPPRESSION ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A wind tunnel configuration is proposed to provide the forced flow and to ... The air will be provided from a compressed air bottle farm, or compressor ...

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Flame suppression by aerosols derived from aqueous ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Plug flow boundary conditions at the nozzle exit are ... DMMP and H2O, as a function of dopant loading. ... Load- ings are given as the mole fraction of ...

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

1. Introduction 2. Fire suppression mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... may be similar to an outdoor fire, except for wind influence. b ... to installation of a water mist system in the turbine hoods of the offshore platforms of ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

272

Surge voltage suppression in residential power circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tran- sients in Low Voltage Supply Systems,'' The ... a high-voltage transformer for an oil furnace ... of service entrance SPD of 1960-1970 vintage were ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

273

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 14, 2013 ... According to a National Science Foundation (NSF) statement, the research efforts leading to the Argus II have bridged cellular biology and ...

274

LANL Mobile News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video Lab team makes unique contributions to the first bionic eye The Argus II will help people blinded by the rare hereditary disease retinitis...

275

North American spot crude oil benchmarks likely diverging due to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wind › Geothermal › ... In particular, the Argus Sour Crude Price Index (ASCI), a weighted average of prices for several offshore Gulf of Mexico sour crude grades

276

Artificial Retina Video & Audio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multimedia Presentations PBS logo NY Times: The FDA approves bionic eye February 2013 Video and article Second Sight logo Second Sight 2012 Argus II retinal prosthesis system...

277

Style Guide for Word Users for the NIST Special Publication ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... writing of this book, utilize halon 1211 for engine nacelle and ... example, is it necessary to design a fuel cell so that ... Fixed System (F) or Hand- Held (H ...

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

278

Pr and Cu magnetism in (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}MO{sub 10{minus}{delta}} (M=Nb, Ta): Correlations with a suppression of superconductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetic properties of nonsuperconducting (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}MO{sub 10{minus}{delta}} with M=Nb, Ta are characterized with dc magnetization, specific-heat, and neutron-diffraction experiments. Data for (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}NbO{sub 10{minus}{delta}} reveal complex Cu magnetism marked by antiferromagnetic order below 200 K, spin structure transitions at 130 and 57 K, both collinear and noncollinear antiferromagnetic spin structures, and weak ferromagnetic behavior below 130 K. The data also indicate an anomalous ordering of the Pr spins near 10 K, a large linear contribution to the low-temperature specific heat, and a Pr 4f crystal-field ground state similar to that found in PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Furthermore, there is evidence that the weak ferromagnetic behavior couples to the Pr ordering near 10 K. Identical Pr magnetism and similar Cu magnetism are found in (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}TaO{sub 10{minus}{delta}}, deoxygenated (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}NbO{sub 10{minus}{delta}}, and deoxygenated (Pr{sub 1.5}Ce{sub 0.5})Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}TaO{sub 10{minus}{delta}}. These results indicate that superconductivity is suppressed in these compounds in the same phenomenological manner as in PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. We interpret this as evidence that superconductivity is suppressed by the same mechanism in both structures and propose that a general correlation exists between anomalous Pr magnetism and a lack of superconductivity in these Pr-based high-T{sub C} cuprates. The significance of these results and analyses to understanding and modeling the suppression of superconductivity by Pr in high-T{sub C} cuprates is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Goodwin, T.J.; Shelton, R.N. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Radousky, H.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Rosov, N.; Lynn, J.W. [Reactor Radiation Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Integrated training for the Department of Energy stadnard security system  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been successful in designing and providing technical performance-based training for the Argus security system. This training has been developed for technical and operational staff at facilities installing or using the Argus security system. The Argus training program is designed to instruct candidates to become the trainers for their facilities. The design criteria of the Argus training program includes: Meeting orders of the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense, Being flexible for a changing environment, Customizing lessons to site`s needs, and Configuring for a specific job. The Argus training staff has implemented a successful process for designing and developing integrated training to sup port complex systems, each with its own operational needs, and adapting it to specific sites.

Wadsworth, M.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

SPIN COUPLING RESONANCE AND SUPPRESSION IN THE AGS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spin depolarizing resonances due to coupling may account for as much as a 30 percent loss in polarization in the AGS. The major source of coupling in the AGS is the solenoidal snake. In the past some preliminary work was done to understand this phenomena [1], and a method to overcome these resonances was attempted [2]. However, in the polarized proton run of 2002, the response of these coupled spin.resonances to the strength of the solenoidal snake, skew quadrupoles and vertical and horizontal betatron tune separation was studied to provided a benchmark for a modified DEPOL program [3]. Then using the new DEPOL program, a method to cure the coupled spin resonances in the AGS via spin matching rather than global or local decoupling was explored.

Ranjbar, V H; Ahrens, L; Bai, M; Brown, K; Glenn, W; Huang, H; Luccio, A U; Mackay, W W; Ptitsyn, V; Roser, T

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Shadow Elimination and Blinding Light Suppression for Interactive Projected Displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1 The average cost of office space in the USA is $77 per square foot [10]. #12;2 In this paper we's over- all cost, increases portability, and allows easier retro-fitting of existing spaces, but suffers

Haro, Antonio

282

Fission-Suppressed Fusion, Thorium-Cycle Breeder and Nonproliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion-Fission Hybrids and Transmutation / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems

R. W. Moir

283

Erosion Resistant Coatings for the Suppression of Leading Edge Burr  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Erosion has become increasingly important in the last few years for military aircraft, especially compressor blisks and helicopter components.

284

Working Memory and the Suppression of Reflexive Saccades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are in conflict or opposition (Reason, 1979). As James (1890) memorably observed, ``Persons in going hour'' (p. 155). Inspection of the available literature on this topic reveals that action slips, such as daydreaming, rumination, or listening to the radio (e.g., Norman, 1981; Reason, 1979). Put simply, behavioral

Mitchell, Jason

285

Fire Suppression System Performance of Alternative Agents in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... development on nacelle fire protection followed, Klein (1950a) reported the results of the Jet Engine Fire Protection Program of the US Air Force. ...

1996-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Suppression of Tumorigenesis by Adaptive Response in Mice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the adaptive response in mind, we have investigated the effects of low-dose-rate irradiation on the process of tumorigenesis at a whole body level in mice. Thymic lymphomas...

287

Theoretical Progress on Runaway Electron Suppression by Massive Gas Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 171 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614500

Parks, P.B.

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

288

Suppressed fuzzy-soft learning vector quantization for MRI segmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: A self-organizing map (SOM) is a competitive artificial neural network with unsupervised learning. To increase the SOM learning effect, a fuzzy-soft learning vector quantization (FSLVQ) algorithm has been proposed in the literature, using ... Keywords: CPU time, Learning vector quantization, Magnetic resonance image segmentation, Mean squared error, Self-organizing map

Wen-Liang Hung; De-Hua Chen; Miin-Shen Yang

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Effective Suppression of Electromigration-Induced Cu Dissolution by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main failure modes are void formation and fast Cu dissolution, leading to a ... Method of Selective Electroplating having Strong Adhesion and Exceptional ...

290

Flame inhibition/suppression by water mist: Droplet size ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1. Analysis of the flame structure and critical flame ... In the present work, the inhibition of a one ... sizes, the underlying reason for the breakdown in the ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

291

SUPPRESSION OF PREMIXED FLAMES BY WATER MIST IN ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gathered in orbit was downlinked to Earth in the ... microgravity, using standard flammability limit tubes, was conducted ... heat is lost to the tube walls in ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

292

Suppression of acoustic streaming in tapered pulse tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a pulse tube cryocooler, the gas in the pulse tube can be thought of as an insulating piston, transmitting pressure and velocity from the cold heat exchanger to the hot end of the pulse tube. Unfortunately, convective heat transfer can carry heat from the hot end to the cold end and reduce the net cooling power. Here, the authors discuss one driver of such convection: steady acoustic streaming as generated by interactions between the boundary and the oscillating pressure, velocity, and temperature. Using a perturbation method, they have derived an analytical expression for the streaming in a tapered pulse tube with axially varying mean temperature in the acoustic boundary layer limit. The calculations showed that the streaming depends strongly on the taper angle, the ratio of velocity and pressure amplitudes, and the phase between the velocity and pressure, but it depends only weakly on the mean temperature profile and is independent of the overall oscillatory amplitude. With the appropriate tapering of the tube, streaming can be eliminated for a particular operating condition. Experimentally, the authors have demonstrated that an orifice pulse tube cryocooler with the calculated zero-streaming taper has more cooling power than one with either a cylindrical tube or a tapered pulse tube with twice the optimum taper angle.

Olson, J.R.; Swift, G.W.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Gas Phase Suppression of a Diffusion Flame formed over a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Solid fuels are often found in berthing space, laundry room, and other spaces on a ship and may respond differently from the gaseous or liquid fuels ...

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

294

Traveling-wave device with mass flux suppression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A traveling-wave device is provided with the conventional moving pistons eliminated. Acoustic energy circulates in a direction through a fluid within a torus. A side branch may be connected to the torus for transferring acoustic energy into or out of the torus. A regenerator is located in the torus with a first heat exchanger located on a first side of the regenerator downstream of the regenerator relative to the direction of the circulating acoustic energy; and a second heat exchanger located on an upstream side of the regenerator. The improvement is a mass flux suppressor located in the torus to minimize time-averaged mass flux of the fluid. In one embodiment, the device further includes a thermal buffer column in the torus to thermally isolate the heat exchanger that is at the operating temperature of the device.

Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Backhaus, Scott N. (Los Alamos, NM); Gardner, David L. (White Rock, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Suppression of Energy Discretization Errors in Multigroup Transport Calculations  

SciTech Connect

The Objective of this project is to develop, implement, and test new deterministric methods to solve, as efficiently as possible, multigroup neutron transport problems having an extremely large number of groups. Our approach was to (i) use the standard CMFD method to "coarsen" the space-angle grid, yielding a multigroup diffusion equation, and (ii) use a new multigrid-in-space-and-energy technique to efficiently solve the multigroup diffusion problem. The overall strategy of (i) how to coarsen the spatial and energy grids, and (ii) how to navigate through the various grids, has the goal of minimizing the overall computational effort. This approach yields not only the fine-grid solution, but also coarse-group flux-weighted cross sections that can be used for other related problems.

Larsen, Edward

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

296

Midwinter Suppression of Baroclinic Wave Activity in the Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal variations in baroclinic wave activity and jet stream structure in the Northern Hemisphere are investigated based upon over 20 years of daily data. Baroclinic wave activity at each grid point is represented for each day by an envelope ...

Hisashi Nakamura

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A collaborative botnets suppression system based on overlay network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Botnets are extremely versatile programs used in many network attacks, such as sending large volumes of spam or launching Distributed Denial-of-Service DDoS attacks. Botnets can switch command-and-control servers automatically, which makes completely ...

Fuye Han; Zhen Chen; HongFeng Xu; Haopei Wang; Yong Liang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Does Air Pollution Really Suppress Precipitation in Israel?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trends in the orographic rainfall ratio R0 over Israel are reevaluated. It is shown that the rainfall has not changed significantly over most of the mountainous stations, with some significant increases over the central mountains. The overall ...

P. Alpert; N. Halfon; Z. Levin

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Suppression of MMP-9 by doxycycline in brain arteriovenous malformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduction of total MMP-9 by doxycycline at 10 and 100 !g/ml (con- trol vs doxycycline 10 ! g/ml: 100 ±control, P doxycycline 100 ! g/ml: 100 ± 6

Hashimoto, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Melissa M; Li, Jenny F; Lawton, Michael T; Young, William L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Suppression of MMP-9 by doxycycline in brain arteriovenous malformations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduction of total MMP-9 by doxycycline at 10 and 100 !g/ml (con- trol vs doxycycline 10 ! g/ml: 100 ±control, P doxycycline 100 ! g/ml: 100 ± 6

Hashimoto, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Melissa M; Li, Jenny F; Lawton, Michael T; Young, William L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Low-Pass Filters to Suppress Inertial and Tidal Frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic way is given to design digital filters which allow clear separation of signals with periods of a few days from noise of higher frequency, particularly tidal and inertial. Several examples are given which pass little high-frequency ...

Rory O. R. Y. Thompson

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Suppression of Exponential Electronic Decay in a Charged Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inner-shell ionization of atoms and molecules leads to the creation of highly excited ionic states that often decay by electron emission. The dynamics of the decay is usually assumed to be exponential and the process is characterized by a decay rate. Here we show that in a multiply ionized cluster created by interaction with a high-intensity free-electron laser (FEL) radiation, trapping of the emitted electron by the neighboring ions changes the character of the decay dynamics qualitatively to the extent that it can become oscillatory instead of exponential. Implications of the predicted effect on Coster-Kronig and interatomic Coulombic decay processes induced by FELs are investigated.

Averbukh, Vitali [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan Michael [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Max Planck Advanced Study Group at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

NLRP12 Suppresses Colon Inflammation and Tumorigenesis through the Negative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulation of Noncanonical NF-kB Signaling Irving C. Allen,1 Justin E. Wilson,1 Monika Schneider,2 John D of NLR proteins, including NLRP12, inhibits the transcription factor NF-kB, although physiologic and disease-rele- vant evidence is largely missing. Dysregulated NF-kB activity is associated with colonic

304

Noise Suppression and Spectral Decomposition for State-Dependent Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 (Xk) + 2 (Xk) , (58) the sum of the variance of H(Xk) and the average variance of the added white the underlying state to fluctuate [J. M. G. Vilar and J. M. Rub´i, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 950 (2001)]. This paper conduction discussed in the original paper by Vilar and Rub´i. PACS numbers: 05.40.Ca, 05.45.Tp, 02.70.Hm

Walton, Brian

305

An apparatus for screening fire suppression efficiency of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2. Apparatus There are three major elements in the apparatus: (1) a wind tunnel; (2) a porous cylindrical burner; and (3)a droplet generator. ...

2012-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

Numeric modeling of fire suppression by organophosphorous inhibitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical calculations of the effect of organophosphorous inhibitor (CF3CH2O)3P and its mixtures with carbon dioxide on propane flames are carried out using the three dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in the low Mach number approximation. The k-e model of turbulence, the EDC combustion model and the weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model of radiation are used. The Westbrook global-kinetic scheme with fractional order of reaction was used for the calculation of chemical reaction rate of propane combustion. The empirical expression for the correction factor for the chemical reaction rate was used to model the effect of organophosphorous inhibitor no the reaction. Two series of test calculations for different values of the correction factor are carried out. Dependences of the minimum extinguishing concentration of the inhibitor per carbon dioxide volume concentration in the extinguishing mixtures were obtained. The results of test calculations are shown to agree reasonably with the experimen...

Makhviladze, G M; Zykov, A P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

High Tc SQUID Circuits Suppress Intrinsic Magnetic Field Noise  

John Clarke and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have eliminated excess low frequency noise in high-transition temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum ...

308

Polarimetric Spectral Filter for Adaptive Clutter and Noise Suppression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, spectral decompositions of differential reflectivity, differential phase, and copolar correlation coefficient are used to discriminate between weather and nonweather signals in the spectral domain. This approach gives a greater ...

Dmitri N. Moisseev; V. Chandrasekar

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Suppression of Baroclinic Instability in Horizontally Sheared Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baroclinic instability in the presence of a meridionally sheared barotropic component to the basic flow is studied using a two-level model. The inclusion of a linear shear results in merldionally confined normal modes with growth rates much ...

I. N. James

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Digital Filter Algorithm Based on Whistle Sound Suppression System Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System uses the voice codec chip analog voice signals TLV320AIC23 A/D conversion, digital audio is passed to the DSP chip TMS320VC5409 sequence processing, DSP algorithms using FFT and CZT transform algorithm the number of sequences of audio spectrum ... Keywords: Acoustic feedback, FFT transform, CZT transform, IIR filter, TMS320VC5409

Lei Liu; Honggang Li; Xiaochen Hu

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma by reversal of immune suppression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beginning with the observation that the human enteorvirus, Poliovirus Sabin 1, will lyse human melanoma cells in culture, clinical trials involving two patients with advance melanoma were performed. Parenteral injection of the viable Poliovirus into cutaneous melanoma metastases followed in 24 hours by oral administration of cyclophosphamide. The results of these two trials are described.

Biggs, M.W.; Eiselein, J.E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY Suppression of Adult Lesser Mealworm (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and insulation (Vaughan et al. 1984; Despins et al. 1987). The resultant beetle damage to building support posts beetle larvae, seeking pupation sites, climb building walls and chew into building support struc- tures can weaken the structure and result in costly building repairs. Producer options for manure disposal

Kaufman, Phillip E.

313

Suppressed fusion cross section for neutron halo nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion reactions of neutron-halo nuclei are investigated theoretically with a three-body model. The time-dependent wave-packet method is used to solve the three-body Schrodinger equation. The halo neutron behaves as a spectator during the Coulomb dissociation process of the projectile. The fusion cross sections of 11Be-209Bi and 6He-238U are calculated and are compared with measurements. Our calculation indicates that the fusion cross section is slightly hindered by the presence of weakly bound neutrons.

Makoto Ito; Kazuhiro Yabana; Takashi Nakatsukasa; Manabu Ueda

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

314

Elementary reactions and a mechanism for the suppression of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Single-point energies were computed at the G2 level of ... US Department of Energy (Basic Energy Sciences) and ... R. Gomperts, RL Martin, DJ Fox, J. S ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

315

DISEASE SUPPRESSION WITH COMPOST: HISTORY, PRINCIPLES AND FUTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composts have been used for centuries to maintain soil fertility and plant health. Even so, the mechanisms by which diseases are controlled by composts are just now being elucidated. This paper reviews the recent history on control of plant diseases with composts. Furthermore, the present state of knowledge in this field is reviewed. Finally, potential future opportunities for

Harry A. J. Hoitink; Professor Emeritus; Ligia Zuniga De Ramos; Senior Fullbright

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Suppression of Tin Whiskers in Lead-Free Solder - Energy ...  

Vehicles and Fuels; Wind ... solder has since been replaced with alloys but require acceptance testing standards and mitigation practices to help manufacturers ...

317

NIST Discovers How Strain at Grain Boundaries Suppresses ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and significantly improved performance of superconductors in a wide variety of applications, such as power transmission, power grid reliability and ...

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

318

Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega  

SciTech Connect

We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Artificial Retina Implant Patient Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interviews with Artificial Retina Recipients Interviews with Artificial Retina Recipients Image of Mr. R Mr. R: Argus II recipient (Italy) You Tube video (2012; 2011 implantee) Image of Mr. F Mr. F: Argus II recipient (Italy) You Tube video (2012; 2011 implantee) Image of Mr. P Mr. P: Argus II recipient (France) You Tube video (2012; 2009 implantee) Image of Mr. K Mr. K: Argus II recipient (England) You Tube video (2012; 2009 implantee) Image promoting Mail Online Article Peter L.: Blind man fitted with 'bionic eye' sees for first time in 30 years Mail Online (UK) (2009) Image promoting Mail Online Article Barbara C .: Blind U.S. woman has experimental electronic eye implant CNN video and article (2009) NDTV video and article (2009) Image promoting BBC story Ron: The man with the bionic eye BBC Video and article (2009)

320

Artificial Retina Implant Eligibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Participate to Participate February 14, 2013: BREAKING NEWS FDA Approves Argus II After more than 20 years of research and development, Second Sight Medical Products, Inc., has announced that it's Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System ("Argus II") has received U.S. market approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat individuals with late stage retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This announcement followed receipt of the European approval in 2011, and a unanimous recommendation by the FDA's Ophthalmic Devices Advisory Panel in September 2012 that this revolutionary product be made available to treat this patient population in the U.S. With approval from the FDA, the Argus II is slated to be available later in 2013 in clinical centers across the country. Second Sight will be actively adding sites to make the therapy more readily available and encourages interested facilities and patients to contact them.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nuclear | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARG-US RFID System for Managing High-Risk Materials More Rapid Detection of Strontium in Urine Samples RadTrac: Portable and Compact Tracking of Radioactive Materials Tracking...

322

Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Argus Americas Crude Summit January 22, 2014 | Houston, TX By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator Six key plays account for nearly all recent growth in oil and natural gas production...

323

PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system lends to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including radiation and environmental monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support future development and testing.

Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

324

Seniors and Study Abroad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1301 and Halon 1011 to the Department of Energy Savannah River Site ODS Repository. In total, 5), and DOE. BNL site remediation is conducted by the Environmental Restoration Program in accordance with milestones established under this agreement. 2.3.4.8 Council for Env. Quality: 40 CFR 1500­1508 DOE: 10 CFR

Buckel, Jeffrey A.

325

+3 a -  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a, N N 0 z L 0 I n Page 5. U tr t3 IL 5 a rb Halon O~tionsTechnlcal W a ~ lng Conference 6-8 May 1997 371 8 Page 6. A Y 0 0 C n ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

326

The new power industry; An IPP challenge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As Public Utility Regulatory Policies ACT (PURPA) legislation has evolved and matured, the independent power producer (IPP) has had the opportunity to be in the forefront of new generation. This paper discusses the experience, problems, requirements, and solutions of one IPP installation. The Argus Cogeneration Expansion (ACE) Project is located in Trona, California, adjacent to the Kerr-McGee Chemical Corporation (KMCC) Argus Facility. It is a 108 MWe installation with a Pyroflow coal fueled circulating fluidized bed (CFB) non-reheat boiler which will provide electricity to Southern California Edison's grid and process steam to the adjacent KMCC soda ash manufacturing facility.

Smith, H.E. (Black and Veatch Consulting Engineers, Kansas City, MO (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Parasitic oscillation suppression in solid state lasers using absorbing thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin absorbing film is bonded onto at least certain surfaces of a solid state laser gain medium. An absorbing metal-dielectric multilayer film is optimized for a broad range of incidence angles, and is resistant to the corrosive/erosive effects of a coolant such as water, used in the forced convection cooling of the film. Parasitic oscillations hamper the operation of solid state lasers by causing the decay of stored energy to amplified rays trapped within the gain medium by total and partial internal reflections off the gain medium facets. Zigzag lasers intended for high average power operation require the ASE absorber. 16 figs.

Zapata, L.E.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Functional Significance of Cannabinoid-Mediated, Depolarization-Induced Suppression of Inhibition (DSI) in the Hippocampus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by changing the command volt- age from 70 mV (holding potential) to 0 mV for 1.0 s (1.0 s Depol.). Left top

Gorman, Michael

329

Suppressing nonphysical overheating with a modified implicit Monte Carlo method for time-dependent radiative transfer  

SciTech Connect

In this note we develop a robust implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) algorithm based on more accurately updating the linearized equilibrium radiation energy density. The method does not introduce oscillations in the solution and has the same limit as {Delta}t{yields}{infinity} as the standard Fleck and Cummings IMC method. Moreover, the approach we introduce can be trivially added to current implementations of IMC by changing the definition of the Fleck factor. Using this new method we develop an adaptive scheme that uses either standard IMC or the modified method basing the adaptation on a zero-dimensional problem solved in each cell. Numerical results demonstrate that the new method alleviates both the nonphysical overheating that occurs in standard IMC when the time step is large and significantly diminishes the statistical noise in the solution.

Mcclarren, Ryan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatsch, Todd J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Interference Suppression Consisting of Pre-distortion Filtering and Selective Transmit Diversity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present and evaluate a pre-distortion (PD) scheme for the downlink of Wideband-code division multiple access (W-CDMA) systems considering a Rake in the receiver in order to exploit multipath diversity. Its performance is compared with ... Keywords: Downlink transmission, Frequency-selective channels, Pre-processing, Selective transmit diversity, W-CDMA

Mário Marques Silva; Américo M. Correia; Rui Dinis

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Arginine and the Hofmeister Series: The Role of Ion–Ion Interactions in Protein Aggregation Suppression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-Arginine hydrochloride is a very important aggregation suppressor for which there has been much attention given regarding elucidating its mechanism of action. Little consideration, however, has been given toward other ...

Schneider, Curtiss P.

332

Heat Capacity Evidence for the Suppression of Skyrmions at Large Zeeman Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements on a multilayer two-dimensional electron system (2DES) near Landau level filling ?=1 reveal the disappearance of the nuclear spin contribution to the heat capacity as the ratio ˜g between the Zeeman and Coulomb energies exceeds a critical value ˜gc?0.04. This disappearance suggests the vanishing of the Skyrmion-mediated coupling between the lattice and the nuclear spins as the spin excitations of the 2DES make a transition from Skyrmions to single spin-flips above ˜gc. Our experimental ˜gc is smaller than the calculated ˜gc=0.054 for an ideal 2DES; we discuss possible origins of this discrepancy. PACS numbers: 73.20.Dx, 73.40.Hm, 65.40.-f Typeset using REVTEX 1 The ground state and spin excitations of a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) near Landau level (LL) filling ?=1 have attracted much recent interest [1–9]. At this filling, the Coulomb exchange energy plays a dominant role, leading to a substantially larger quantum Hall effect (QHE) excitation gap than the expected single-particle Zeeman splitting [1].

S. Melinte; E. Grivei; V. Bayot; M. Shayegan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Measurement, Modeling, and Suppression of Substrate Noise in Wide Band Mixed-Signal ICs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Jeppson and C. M. Svensson. "Negative bias stress of MOS devices at high electric fields and degradation

Hansen, René Rydhof

334

Suppression of thermoacoustic instabilities in a swirl combustor through microjet air injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoacoustic or combustion instability, a positive feedback loop coupling heat release rate and acoustic oscillations in a combustor, is one of the greatest challenges currently facing the development of new gas turbine ...

LaBry, Zachary Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Suppression of Phase Separation in LiFePO 4 Nanoparticles During Battery Discharge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a novel electrochemical phase-field model, we question the common belief that LiXFePO? nanoparticles always separate into Li-rich and Li-poor phases during battery discharge. For small currents, spinodal decomposition ...

Bai, Peng

336

Overcoming dendritic cell-mediated suppression of T cell responses in a prostate tumor environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prostate cancer is the most prevalent malignancy in American men, leading to significant mortality each year. This is in part due to a lack of effective treatments for advanced disease. The prostate is considered an ideal ...

Higham, Eileen M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The role of NK cells in selectin-dependent tumor suppression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selectins are a small family of adhesion molecules that are critical for immune cell trafficking. In our laboratory, mice lacking all combinations of selectins have been generated. Previous work from our laboratory has ...

Sobolev, Olga, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Suppression of Phase Separation in LiFePO4 Nanoparticles During Battery Discharge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a novel electrochemical phase-field model, we question the common belief that LixFePO4 nanoparticles separate into Li-rich and Li-poor phases during battery discharge. For small currents, spinodal decomposition or nucleation leads to moving phase boundaries. Above a critical current density (in the Tafel regime), the spinodal disappears, and particles fill homogeneously, which may explain the superior rate capability and long cycle life of nano-LiFePO4 cathodes.

Bai, Peng; Bazant, Martin Z

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Why are the interband transitions among triaxially strongly deformed bands suppressed in even nuclei?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As top-on-top model has made a great success in explaining triaxially strongly deformed (TSD) bands in odd-A nuclei, we extend this model to even-A nuclei, i.e. two particles in different single-particle orbitals outside the triaxial rotor. In the lowest order approximation, the electromagnetic transitions between TSD bands in even-A case are reduced by a factor of 0.04 compared with odd-A case. It is one of the reasons why TSD bands are not yet explicitly observed in even-A nuclei.

Sugawara-Tanabe, Kazuko [Otsuma Women's University, Tama, Tokyo 206-8540 (Japan); Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tanabe, Kosai [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

340

Quarkonium production in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions: suppression vs. enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a brief review of the various scenarios for quarkonium production in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions we focus on the ingredients and assumptions underlying the statistical hadronization model. We then confront model predictions for J/$\\psi$ phase space distributions with the most recent data from the RHIC accelerator. Analysis of the rapidity dependence of the J/$\\psi$ nuclear modification factor yields first evidence for the production of J/$\\psi$ mesons at the phase boundary. We conclude with predictions for charmonium production at the LHC.

P. Braun-Munzinger

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Suppression of Vortex Shedding for Flow Around a Circular Cylinder Using Optimal Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this article we use global control (the entire body is subjected to prescribed motion)compared to the approach of local control (e.g. blowing=suction as reported by Li et al. [41])

C. Homescu; I. M. Navon; Z. Li

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Advanced phase modulation techniques for stimulated brillouin scattering suppression in fiber optic parametric amplifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission over long distances. Increasing demand for higher bandwidth applications and information availability

Coles, James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sasaki, M.S. , Sonoda, E. , Fukushima, T. , Morrison, C. ,M.S. , Tachiiri, S. , Fukushima, T. , Sonoda, E. , Schild,

Schild, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Study of high transverse momentum charged particle suppression in heavy ion collisions at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The charged particle spectrum at large transverse momentum (PT), dominated by hadrons originating from parton fragmentation, is an important observable for studying the properties of the hot, dense medium produced in ...

Yoon, Andre Sungho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Plasma Response and Transport Associated with RMP ELM Suppression on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 186 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619025

Wade, M.R.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

346

Experiments and ELM-Suppression in Double-Null DIII-D Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 295 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618981

Lazarus, E.A.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

347

Suppressed Critical Current in Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors With High Fill-Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we present a new fabrication process that enabled the fabrication of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors SNSPD with fill-factors as high as 88% with gaps between nanowires as small as 12 nm. This ...

Yang, Joel K. W.

348

Transition between Suppressed and Active Phases of Intraseasonal Oscillations in the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) are important large-amplitude and large-scale elements of the tropical Indo-Pacific climate with time scales in the 20–60-day period range, during which time they modulate higher-frequency tropical weather. ...

P. A. Agudelo; J. A. Curry; C. D. Hoyos; P. J. Webster

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evidence of Orographic Precipitation Suppression by Air Pollution–Induced Aerosols in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of trends of the orographic winter precipitation enhancement factor Ro along the coastal mountain ranges of the west coast of the United States show a pattern of decreasing Ro during the last century by as much as ?24% from the southern ...

Daniel Rosenfeld; Amir Givati

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Suppression of Deep Moist Convection near the Southern Great Plains Dryline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep moist convection failed to initiate over the Texas Panhandle on 6 May 1995 despite expectations to the contrary by the forecasters for the Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment (VORTEX). The National Centers for ...

Harald Richter; Lance F. Bosart

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Use Computational Model to Design and Optimize Welding Conditions to Suppress Helium Cracking during Welding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Today, welding is widely used for repair, maintenance and upgrade of nuclear reactor components. As a critical technology to extend the service life of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years, weld...

352

The F-Gas Regulation and HFC Usage in Fire Suppression ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of more than 1 ton per annum of fluorinated greenhouse gases must report quantities exported, and any quantities of gas exported for recycling ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

353

Has fire suppression increased the amount of carbon stored in western U.S. forests?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Entomology, 8, 295 – 303. Makela, A. , and H. T. Valentine (with greater biomass (Makela and Valentine, 2001; but see

Fellows, Aaron W.; Goulden, Michael L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Efficient Alternatives to the Ephraim and Malah Suppression Rule for Audio Signal Enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

–1121, 1984. [3] M. Berouti, R. Schwartz, and J. Makhoul, “Enhancement of speech corrupted by acoustic noise,” in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Acoustics, Speech, Signal Processing, pp. 208–211, Washington, DC, USA, April 1979. [4] R. J. McAulay andM. L. Malpass... loss of generality—the case of a single, windowed segment of audio data. To facilitate a comparison, our notation follows that of [2], except that complex quantities appear in bold. 1.1. A simple Gaussianmodel To date, the most popular methods...

2003-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

355

Phototactic personality in fruit flies and its suppression by serotonin and white  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

one choice tube leads to a lit light-emitting diode (LED) (Fig. 1A, Fig. S1 A and B, and Movie S1). Af

de Bivort, Benjamin

356

The Role of the Central Asian Mountains on the Midwinter Suppression of North Pacific Storminess  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the central Asian mountains on North Pacific storminess is examined using an atmospheric general circulation model by varying the height and the areas of the mountains. A series of model integrations show that the presence of the ...

Hyo-Seok Park; John C. H. Chiang; Seok-Woo Son

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Determining manufacturing parameters to suppress system variance using linear and non-linear models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining manufacturing parameters for a new product is fundamentally a difficult problem, because there has little suggestion information. There are several researches on this topic, and most of them focus on single specific model or the engineer's ... Keywords: Engineering problem, Manufacturing, TFT-LCD

Der-Chiang Li; Wen-Chih Chen; Chiao-Wen Liu; Che-Jung Chang; Chien-Chih Chen

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Midwinter Suppression of Northern Hemisphere Storm Track Activity in the Real Atmosphere and in GCM Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal cycle of the North Pacific and the North Atlantic storm track activity is investigated on the basis of daily National Meteorological Center (now known as NCEP) upper-air analyses (1946–89) and of data from the ECHAM3 T42 atmospheric ...

M. Christoph; U. Ulbrich; P. Speth

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

ENSO Suppression due to Weakening of the North Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC) excite wave patterns that readjust the thermocline globally. This paper examines the impact of a freshwater-induced THC shutdown on the depth of the Pacific thermocline and its ...

A. Timmermann; S-I. An; U. Krebs; H. Goosse

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF A THERMOACOUSTIC-STIRLING ENGINE GENERATOR WITH GEDEON STREAMING SUPPRESSION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thermoacoustic engines, or acoustic heat engines, can efficiently convert high temperature heat into acoustic power while maintaining a simple design with few moving parts. Previous… (more)

Wilcox Jr., Douglas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Midwinter Suppression of the Pacific Storm Track Activity as Seen in Aircraft Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unassimilated observational data, from the years 1979 to 1993, are analyzed and compared to the NCEP–NCAR reanalysis data to confirm the magnitude of the seasonal cycle in Pacific storm track activity. Such a comparison is necessary since recent ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

WEAKLY INTERACTING MASSIVE PARTICLE DARK MATTER AND FIRST STARS: SUPPRESSION OF FRAGMENTATION IN PRIMORDIAL STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

We present the first three-dimensional simulations to include the effects of dark matter annihilation feedback during the collapse of primordial minihalos. We begin our simulations from cosmological initial conditions and account for dark matter annihilation in our treatment of the chemical and thermal evolution of the gas. The dark matter is modeled using an analytical density profile that responds to changes in the peak gas density. We find that the gas can collapse to high densities despite the additional energy input from the dark matter. No objects supported purely by dark matter annihilation heating are formed in our simulations. However, we find that dark matter annihilation heating has a large effect on the evolution of the gas following the formation of the first protostar. Previous simulations without dark matter annihilation found that protostellar disks around Population III stars rapidly fragmented, forming multiple protostars that underwent mergers or ejections. When dark matter annihilation is included, however, these disks become stable to radii of 1000 AU or more. In the cases where fragmentation does occur, it is a wide binary that is formed.

Smith, Rowan J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Iocco, Fabio [Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Schleicher, Dominik R. G. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universitaet, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Hirano, Shingo; Yoshida, Naoki, E-mail: rowan@uni-heidelberg.de [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

Feedback suppression of the internal m = 1 helical mode in a tokamak  

SciTech Connect

A stabilization system that measures the boundary of the plasma filament and controls the perturbation of the magnetic field outside the plasma is discussed. (AIP)

Mikhailovskii, A.B.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A Fusing Switch for Fault Suppression in the SNS High Voltage Converter Modulators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Voltage Converter Modulators (HVCMs) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have operated in excess of a combined 250,000 hours. Performance and reliability improvements to the HVCM are ongoing to increase modulator availability as accelerator system demands increase. There is a relatively large amount of energy storage in the HVCMs, {approx}180 kJ. This energy has the potential to dump into unsuppressed faults, cause damage, and increase the time to repair. The 'fusing switch' concept involves isolation of this stored energy from the location of the most common faults. This paper introduces this concept and its application to the HVCMs.

Kemp, Mark A.; Burkhart, Craig; Nguyen, Minh N.; /SLAC; Anderson, David E.; /Oak Ridge

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

365

Modeling and Performance of Pyroelectric Detector Lithium Niobate under Ringing Signal Suppression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6   Linear Heat Conduction for the Sinusoidal Modulated Heatthe detector. Linear Heat Conduction for the SinusoidalFourier’s law of heat conduction is q x ? T ? ? K A ? x

Peng, Gary Meng Kiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Suppression and Dissipation of Weak Tornadoes in Metropolitan Areas: A Case Study of Greater London  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examination of the distribution of property-damaging tornadoes which have occurred in and around Greater London since 1830 reveals that the inner parts of the metropolis have experienced relatively few tornadoes during the past 150 years compared ...

Derek M. Elsom; G. Terence Meaden

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Simultaneous Velocity Ambiguity Resolution and Noise Suppression for Multifrequency Coherent Doppler Sonar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coherent Doppler sonar is a useful tool for noninvasive measurement of ocean currents, sediment transport, and turbulence in coastal environments. Various methods have been proposed to separately address two of its inherent limitations: velocity ...

Jeremy Dillon; Len Zedel; Alex E. Hay

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Simulation Study of Tremor Suppression and Experiment of Energy Harvesting with Piezoelectric Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this research is to develop a wearable device that could harvest waste mechanical energy of the human hand movement and utilize this… (more)

Ou, Jianqiang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

STAT3 suppresses intestinal tumor invasion via down- regulation of SNAI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Density of Nanoporous Materials Functionalized Liquid" Journal of Materials EngineeringEnergy Density of Nanoporous Materials Functionalized Liquid” Journal of Materials Engineering

Kim, Chang Kyung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

An Overview of Crop Hail Damage and Evaluation of Hail Suppression Efficiency in Bulgaria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The space?time distribution of the crop hail loss-to-risk ratio over the whole. Bulgarian territory has been ascertained using the rank approach. The relationships between hailfall characteristics (sizes and kinetic energy) and the percentage of ...

Petio Simeonov

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Electron and Photon Interactions in the Regime of Strong LPM Suppression  

SciTech Connect

Most searches for ultra-high energy (UHE) astrophysical neutrinos look for radio emission from the electromagnetic and hadronic showers produced in their interactions. The radio frequency spectrum and angular distribution depend on the shower development, so are sensitive to the interaction cross sections. At energies above about 1016 eV (in ice), the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect significantly reduces the cross sections for the two dominant electromagnetic interactions: bremsstrahlung and pair production. At higher energies, above about 1020 eV, the photonuclear cross section becomes larger than that for pair production, and direct pair production and electronuclear interactions become dominant over bremsstrahlung. The electron interaction length reaches a maximum around 1021 eV, and then decreases slowly as the electron energy increases further. In this regime, the growth in the photon cross section and electron energy loss moderates the rise in nu e shower length, which rises from ~;;5 m at 1016 eV to ~;;40 m at 1019 eV and ~;;100 m at 1020 eV, but only to ~;;300 m at 1024 eV. In contrast, without photonuclear and electronuclear interactions, the shower length would be over 10 km at 1024 eV.

Gerhardt, L.; Klein, S.

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

Host suppression and bioinformatics for sequence-based characterization of unknown pathogens.  

SciTech Connect

Bioweapons and emerging infectious diseases pose formidable and growing threats to our national security. Rapid advances in biotechnology and the increasing efficiency of global transportation networks virtually guarantee that the United States will face potentially devastating infectious disease outbreaks caused by novel ('unknown') pathogens either intentionally or accidentally introduced into the population. Unfortunately, our nation's biodefense and public health infrastructure is primarily designed to handle previously characterized ('known') pathogens. While modern DNA assays can identify known pathogens quickly, identifying unknown pathogens currently depends upon slow, classical microbiological methods of isolation and culture that can take weeks to produce actionable information. In many scenarios that delay would be costly, in terms of casualties and economic damage; indeed, it can mean the difference between a manageable public health incident and a full-blown epidemic. To close this gap in our nation's biodefense capability, we will develop, validate, and optimize a system to extract nucleic acids from unknown pathogens present in clinical samples drawn from infected patients. This system will extract nucleic acids from a clinical sample, amplify pathogen and specific host response nucleic acid sequences. These sequences will then be suitable for ultra-high-throughput sequencing (UHTS) carried out by a third party. The data generated from UHTS will then be processed through a new data assimilation and Bioinformatic analysis pipeline that will allow us to characterize an unknown pathogen in hours to days instead of weeks to months. Our methods will require no a priori knowledge of the pathogen, and no isolation or culturing; therefore it will circumvent many of the major roadblocks confronting a clinical microbiologist or virologist when presented with an unknown or engineered pathogen.

Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; Misra, Milind; Meagher, Robert J.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Kaiser, Julia N.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Do Meteorologists Suppress Thunderstorms?: Radar-Derived Statistics and the Behavior of Moist Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorologists and other weather enthusiasts sometimes lament that they live in weather holes—places that receive less exciting weather than do their surroundings. This belief seems to stem from countless hours spent gazing at thunderstorms on ...

Matthew D. Parker; Jason C. Knievel

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Highly stable ultrabroadband mid-IR optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier optimized for superfluorescence suppression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a 9 GW peak power, three-cycle, 2.2 ?m optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification source with 1.5% rms energy and 150 mrad carrier envelope phase fluctuations. These characteristics, in addition to excellent ...

Moses, Jeffrey

375

Bubble point suppression in unconventional liquids rich reservoirs and its impact on oil production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The average pore size in producing unconventional, liquids-rich reservoirs is estimated to be less than 100 nm. At this nano-pore scale, capillary and surface disjoining… (more)

Firincioglu, Tuba

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Novel approaches to Newtonian noise suppression in interferometric gravitational wave detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) attempts to detect ripples in the curvature of spacetime using two large scale interferometers. These detectors are several kilometer long Michelson interferometers ...

Hunter-Jones, Nicholas R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Circuit for echo and noise suppression of acoustic signals transmitted through a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic circuit for digitally processing analog electrical signals produced by at least one acoustic transducer is presented. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a novel digital time delay circuit is utilized which employs an array of First-in-First-out (FiFo) microchips. Also, a bandpass filter is used at the input to this circuit for isolating drill string noise and eliminating high frequency output. 20 figures.

Drumheller, D.S.; Scott, D.D.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

378

Circuit for echo and noise suppression of accoustic signals transmitted through a drill string  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic circuit for digitally processing analog electrical signals produced by at least one acoustic transducer is presented. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a novel digital time delay circuit is utilized which employs an array of First-in-First-out (FiFo) microchips. Also, a bandpass filter is used at the input to this circuit for isolating drill string noise and eliminating high frequency output.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (P.O. Box 676, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Scott, Douglas D. (12911 Kachima Place N.E., Apt. A, Albuquerque, NM 37112)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Modeling and Performance of Pyroelectric Detector Lithium Niobate under Ringing Signal Suppression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

degree Master of Science in Electrical Engineering By GaryPeng Master of Science in Electrical Engineering University

Peng, Gary Meng Kiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Effective suppression of Sn-58Bi/Cu interfacial reactions with minor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-Site Speaker (Planned), Trong Lan Nguyen. Abstract Scope, Overgrowth of the ?-Cu6Sn5 layer between Sn-58 wt.%Bi (Sn-58Bi) ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Argonne's National Security Information Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was asked by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to install the ARG-US RFID equipment in the NNSA vehicles (a Peterbilt truck and a Dodge Sprinter van) and integration with the in-vehicle Omni about the DOE/NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) for voluntary security enhancements

Kemner, Ken

382

U.S. Department of Energy Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was asked by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to install the ARG-US RFID equipment in the NNSA vehicles (a Peterbilt truck and a Dodge Sprinter van) and integration with the in-vehicle Omni about the DOE/NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) for voluntary security enhancements

383

Operating Characteristics in DIII-D ELM-Suppressed RMP H-modes With ITER Similar Shapes (A26245)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 22nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conf., Geneva, Switzerland, 2008; Http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Meetings/fec2008pp.asp, Paper EX/4-122nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference Geneva, CH, 2008999615275

Evans, T.E.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

384

Modeling the interactions between poly(n-vinylpyrrolidone) and gas hydrates: factors involved in suppressing and accelerating hydrate growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas hydrates represent both a bane and a potential boon to the oil and gas industry, and considerable research into hydrate formation has been undertaken. We have recently developed a multi-threaded version of a Monte Carlo crystal growth algorithm and ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulations, PVP, gas hydrates, parallel computing

Brent Wathen; Peter Kwan; Zongchao Jia; Virginia K. Walker

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Inhibition of B-NHEJ in Plateau-Phase Cells Is Not a Direct Consequence of Suppressed Growth Factor Signaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: It has long been known that the proliferation status of a cell is a determinant of radiation response, and the available evidence implicates repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the underlying mechanism. Recent results have shown that a novel, highly error-prone pathway of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) operating as backup (B-NHEJ) processes DSBs in irradiated cells when the canonical, DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase)-dependent pathway of NHEJ (D-NHEJ) is compromised. Notably, B-NHEJ shows marked reduction in efficiency when D-NHEJ-deficient cells cease to grow and enter a plateau phase. This phenomenon is widespread and observed in cells of different species with defects in core components of D-NHEJ, with the notable exception of DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit). Using new, standardized serum-deprivation protocols, we re-examine the growth requirements of B-NHEJ and test the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in its regulation. Methods and Materials: DSB repair was measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in cells maintained under different conditions of growth. Results: Serum deprivation in D-NHEJ-deficient cells causes a rapid reduction in B-NHEJ similar to that measured in normally growing cells that enter the plateau phase of growth. Upon serum deprivation, reduction in B-NHEJ activity is evident at 4 h and reaches a plateau reflecting maximum inhibition at 12-16 h. The inhibition is reversible, and B-NHEJ quickly recovers to the levels of actively growing cells upon supply of serum to serum-deprived cells. Chemical inhibition of EGFR in proliferating cells inhibits only marginally B-NHEJ and addition of EGFR in serum-deprived cells increases only a marginally B-NHEJ. Conclusions: The results document a rapid and fully reversible adaptation of B-NHEJ to growth activity and point to factors beyond EGFR in its regulation. They show notable differences in the regulation of error-prone DSB repair pathways between proliferating and non proliferating cells that may present new treatment design opportunities in radiation therapy.

Singh, Satyendra K.; Bednar, Theresa; Zhang Lihua [Institute of Medical Radiation Biology, University Duisburg-Essen Medical School, Essen (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Radiation Biology, University Duisburg-Essen Medical School, Essen (Germany); Wu, Wenqi [First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou, Urology Department, Minimally Invasive Center, Medical College, 510230 Guangzhou (China)] [First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou, Urology Department, Minimally Invasive Center, Medical College, 510230 Guangzhou (China); Mladenov, Emil [Institute of Medical Radiation Biology, University Duisburg-Essen Medical School, Essen (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Radiation Biology, University Duisburg-Essen Medical School, Essen (Germany); Iliakis, George, E-mail: Georg.Iliakis@uk-essen.de [Institute of Medical Radiation Biology, University Duisburg-Essen Medical School, Essen (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Radiation Biology, University Duisburg-Essen Medical School, Essen (Germany)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Stimulation of the serotonergic activity and suppression of aggression by L-tryptophan treatment in juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract The interest for commercial rearing of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has grown over the last decades. However, heterogeneous growth and cannibalism during early juvenile… (more)

Bakke, Marit

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Investigation of a suppression of asymmetric cell kinetics (SACK) approach for ex vivo expansion of human hematopoietic stem cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is a long-standing challenge faced by both researchers and clinicians. To date, no robust, efficient method for the pure, ex vivo expansion of human HSCs has been ...

Taghizadeh, Rouzbeh R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Suppression of Turbulence by Self-Generated and Imposed Mean Flows M. G. Shats,* H. Xia, and H. Punzmann  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Punzmann Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian in magnetized plasma research, since it offers a very effective method of turbulence control [13

Falkovich, Gregory

389

Long-time electron spin storage via dynamical suppression of hyperfine-induced decoherence in a quantum dot  

SciTech Connect

The coherence time of an electron spin decohered by the nuclear spin environment in a quantum dot can be substantially increased by subjecting the electron to suitable dynamical decoupling sequences. We analyze the performance of high-level decoupling protocols by using a combination of analytical and exact numerical methods, and by paying special attention to the regimes of large interpulse delays and long-time dynamics, which are outside the reach of standard average Hamiltonian theory descriptions. We demonstrate that dynamical decoupling can remain efficient far beyond its formal domain of applicability, and find that a protocol exploiting concatenated design provides best performance for this system in the relevant parameter range. In situations where the initial electron state is known, protocols able to completely freeze decoherence at long times are constructed and characterized. The impact of system and control nonidealities is also assessed, including the effect of intrabath dipolar interaction, magnetic field bias and bath polarization, as well as systematic pulse imperfections. While small bias field and small bath polarization degrade the decoupling fidelity, enhanced performance and temporal modulation result from strong applied fields and high polarizations. Overall, we find that if the relative errors of the control pulse flip angles do not exceed 3%, decoupling protocols can still prolong the coherence time by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

Zhang, W.; Konstantinidis, N.; Dobrovitski, V.; Harmon, B.; Santos, L.; Viola, L.

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

390

Rapid Shutdown Methods for Runaway Electron Suppression by Large Shattered Pellets and Massive Gas Injection in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618345

Jernigan, T.C.

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

Characterization and Suppression of the Electromagnetic Interference Induced Phase Shift in the JLab FEL Photo - Injector Advanced Drive Laser System  

SciTech Connect

The drive laser for the photo-cathode gun used in the JLab Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility had been experiencing various phase shifts on the order of tens of degrees (>20{sup o} at 1497 MHz or >40ps) when changing the Advanced Drive Laser (ADL) [2][3][4] micro-pulse frequencies. These phase shifts introduced multiple complications when trying to setup the accelerator for operation, ultimately inhibiting the robustness and overall performance of the FEL. Through rigorous phase measurements and systematic characterizations, we determined that the phase shifts could be attributed to electromagnetic interference (EMI) coupling into the ADL phase control loop, and subsequently resolved the issue of phase shift to within tenths of a degree (<0.5{sup o} at 1497 MHz or <1ps). The diagnostic method developed and the knowledge gained through the entire process will prove to be invaluable for future designs of similar systems.

F. G. Wilson, D. Sexton, S. Zhang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Inhibiting the Aurora B Kinase Potently Suppresses Repopulation During Fractionated Irradiation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The use of molecular-targeted agents during radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a promising strategy to inhibit repopulation, thereby improving therapeutic outcome. We assessed the combined effectiveness of inhibiting Aurora B kinase and irradiation on human NSCLC cell lines in vitro. Methods and Materials: NSCLC cell lines were exposed to concentrations of AZD1152-hydroxyquinazoline pyrazol anilide (AZD1152-HQPA) inhibiting colony formation by 50% (IC50{sub clone}) in combination with single dose irradiation or different fractionation schedules using multiple 2-Gy fractions per day up to total doses of 4-40 Gy. The total irradiation dose required to control growth of 50% of the plaque monolayers (TCD50) was determined. Apoptosis, G2/M progression, and polyploidization were also analyzed. Results: TCD50 values after single dose irradiation were similar for the H460 and H661 cell lines with 11.4 {+-} 0.2 Gy and 10.7 {+-} 0.3 Gy, respectively. Fractionated irradiation using 3 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day, and 1 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy/day schedules significantly increased TCD50 values for both cell lines grown as plaque monolayers with increasing radiation treatment time. This could be explained by a repopulation effect per day that counteracts 75 {+-} 8% and 27 {+-} 6% of the effect of a 2-Gy fraction in H460 and H661 cells, respectively. AZD1152-HQPA treatment concomitant to radiotherapy significantly decreased the daily repopulation effect (H460: 28 {+-} 5%, H661: 10 {+-} 4% of a 2-Gy fraction per day). Treatment with IC50{sub clone} AZD1152-HPQA did not induce apoptosis, prolong radiation-induced G2 arrest, or delay cell cycle progression before the spindle check point. However, polyploidization was detected, especially in cell lines without functional p53. Conclusions: Inhibition of Aurora B kinase with low AZD1152-HQPA concentrations during irradiation of NSCLC cell lines affects repopulation during radiotherapy. Thus, concomitant Aurora B kinase inhibition and irradiation may be a promising strategy for fast repopulating tumors, which are difficult to cure by dose escalation based on conventional fractionation.

Sak, Ali, E-mail: ali.sak@uni-due.de [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Stuschke, Martin; Groneberg, Michael; Kuebler, Dennis; Poettgen, Christoph [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Radiotherapy, West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eberhardt, Wilfried E.E. [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)] [Department of Medicine (Cancer Research), West German Cancer Centre (WTZ), University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Model of rotary-actuated flexible beam with notch filter vibration suppression controller and torque feedforward load compensation controller  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes ORNL`s development of an environment for the simulation of robotic manipulators. Simulation includes the modeling of kinematics, dynamics, sensors, actuators, control systems, operators, and environments. Models will be used for manipulator design, proposal evaluation, control system design and analysis, graphical preview of proposed motions, safety system development, and training. Of particular interest is the development of models for robotic manipulators having at least one flexible link. As a first application, models have been developed for the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Flexible Beam Test Bed (PNL FBTB), which is a 1-Degree-of-Freedom, flexible arm with a hydraulic base actuator. ORNL transferred control algorithms developed for the PNL FBTB to controlling IGRIP models. A robust notch filter is running in IGRIP controlling a full dynamics model of the PNL test bed. Model results provide a reasonable match to the experimental results (quantitative results are being determined) and can run on ORNL`s Onyx machine in approximately realtime. The flexible beam is modeled as six rigid sections with torsional springs between each segment. The spring constants were adjusted to match the physical response of the flexible beam model to the experimental results. The controller is able to improve performance on the model similar to the improvement seen on the experimental system. Some differences are apparent, most notably because the IGRIP model presently uses a different trajectory planner than the one used by ORNL on the PNL test bed. In the future, the trajectory planner will be modified so that the experiments and models are the same. The successful completion of this work provides the ability to link C code with IGRIP, thus allowing controllers to be developed, tested, and tuned in simulation and then ported directly to hardware systems using the C language.

Bills, K.C.; Kress, R.L.; Kwon, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, C.P. [Battelle, Richland, WA (United States). Dept. of Automation and Measurement Sciences

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Suppressing Thermal Energy Drift In The LLNL Flash X-Ray Accelerator Using Linear Disk Resistor Stacks  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses thermal drift in sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors and their replacement with linear disk resistors from HVR Advanced Power Components. Sodium thiosulfate resistors in the FXR induction linear accelerator application have a temperature coefficient of {approx}1.8%/C. The FXR Marx banks send an 8kJ pulse through eight 524 cm{sup 3} liquid resistors at a repetition rate of up to 1 every 45 seconds. Every pulse increases the temperature of the solution by {approx}0.4 C which produces a 0.7% change in resistance. The typical cooling rate is {approx}0.4 C per minute which results in {approx}0.1% energy drop per pulse during continuous pulsed operations. A radiographic accelerator is extraordinarily sensitive to energy variations. Changes in beam energy produce movement in beam transport, changes in spot size, and large dose variations. If self-heating were the only problem, we could predict the increase in input voltage required to compensate for the energy loss. However, there are other variables that influence the temperature of the resistors such as focus magnet heating, changes in room temperature, changes in cooling water, where the cell is located, etc. Additionally not all of the resistors have equivalent cooling rates and as many as 32 resistors are driven from a single power source. The FXR accelerator group elected to replace the sodium thiosulfate resistors with HVR Linear Disk Resistors in a stack type configuration. With data limited for these resistors when used in oil and at low resistance values, a full characterization needed to be performed. High currents (up to 15kA), high voltages (up to 400kV), and Fast Rise times (<10ns) made a resistor choice difficult. Other solid resistors have been tried and had problems at the connection points and with the fact that the resistivity changed as they absorbed oil. The selected HVR resistors have the advantage of being manufactured with the oil impregnated in to them so this characteristic is minimized while still offering the desired low temperature coefficient of resistance compared to sodium thiosulfate. The characterization experiments and comparison with the sodium thiosulfate liquid resistors will be fully discussed and the final design described.

Kreitzer, B R; Houck, T L; Luchterhand, O C

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

Attainment of Gigavolt Potentials by Fluid Dynamic Suppression of the Stepped Leader its Significance for Thermonuclear Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proposed to levitate a conducting sphere in a high pressure Taylor flow and to charge it up to gigavolt potentials, either mechanically as in a Van de Graaff electrostatic generator, or inductively by a rising magnetic field. If the Taylor flow is sufficiently fast, it should overcome the electric pressure and breakdown by stepped leader formation, leading to the maximum attainable voltage by the Paschen law. Discharging the electrostatically stored energy can be done by controlled breakdown. With gigajoule energies stored and released in about 10^-8 sec, this implies and electric pulse power of the order 10^17 Watt, opening the prospect of large driver energies for thermonuclear ignition.

Winterberg, Friedwardt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Optimal control of quantum gates and suppression of decoherence in a system of interacting two-level particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods of optimal control are applied to a model system of interacting two-level particles (e.g., spin-half atomic nuclei or electrons or two-level atoms) to produce high-fidelity quantum gates while simultaneously negating the detrimental effect of decoherence. One set of particles functions as the quantum information processor, whose evolution is controlled by a time-dependent external field. The other particles are not directly controlled and serve as an effective environment, coupling to which is the source of decoherence. The control objective is to generate target one- and two-qubit unitary gates in the presence of strong environmentally-induced decoherence and under physically motivated restrictions on the control field. The quantum-gate fidelity, expressed in terms of a novel state-independent distance measure, is maximized with respect to the control field using combined genetic and gradient algorithms. The resulting high-fidelity gates demonstrate the feasibility of precisely guiding the quantum evolution via optimal control, even when the system complexity is exacerbated by environmental coupling. It is found that the gate duration has an important effect on the control mechanism and resulting fidelity. An analysis of the sensitivity of the gate performance to random variations in the system parameters reveals a significant degree of robustness attained by the optimal control solutions.

Matthew Grace; Constantin Brif; Herschel Rabitz; Ian A. Walmsley; Robert L. Kosut; Daniel A. Lidar

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

397

Improved Turbulence Profiling with Field-Adapted Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters Using a Bifrequency Doppler Noise Suppression Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel noise reduction method and corresponding technique are presented for improving turbulence measurements with acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) commonly used in field studies of coastal and nearshore regions, rivers, lakes, and ...

D. Hurther; U. Lemmin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Artificial retina: Invention of the year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1513_retina 1513_retina 11/15/2013 The Argus II artificial retina, in which Lawrence Livermore has played a prominent roll, has enough resolution for people to see the lines of a crosswalk, find objects and read letters a couple of centimeters tall. Image by Dan Foley/Second Sight Argus II. Artificial retina: Invention of the year Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov The artificial retina, in which Lawrence Livermore has played a prominent role, has earned a place in the top 25 best inventions of the year 2013 from Time Magazine. The invention also has garnered a 2013 best innovation designation by Popular Science. This Department of Energy funded project resulted in the creation of the first-ever retinal prosthesis -- or bionic eye -- approved in the United

399

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab team makes unique contributions to Lab team makes unique contributions to the first bionic eye June 27, 2013 As part of the multi-institutional Artificial Retina Project, Los Alamos researchers helped develop the first bionic eye. Recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Argus II will help people blinded by the rare hereditary disease retinitis pigmentosa or seniors suffering from severe macular degeneration-diseases that destroy the light-sensing cell in the retina. Los Alamos scientists served as the Advanced Concepts team, focusing on fundamental issues and out-of the box ideas. Significance of the research The Argus II operates by using a miniature camera mounted in eyeglasses that captures images and wirelessly sends the information to a microprocessor (worn on a belt) that converts the data to an electronic signal. Pulses from an electrode

400

Integral field spectroscopy of protoplanetary disks in Orion with VLT FLAMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss integral field spectroscopy of proplyds in M42 using the FLAMES Argus unit and report the first detection of recombination lines of C II and O II from the archetypical Laques-Vidal-2 object. These lines can provide important new diagnostics of the physical conditions in proplyds. We also draw attention to the future capabilities of the MUSE spectrograph in relation to similar studies.

Y. G. Tsamis; J. R. Walsh; D. Péquignot

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Laser fusion monthly -- August 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the monthly progress for the laser fusion research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First it gives facilities report for both the Shiva and Argus projects. Topics discussed include; laser system for the Nova Project; the fusion experiments analysis facility; optical/x-ray streak camera; Shiva Dante System temporal response; 2{omega}{sub 0} experiment; and planning for an ICF engineering test facility.

Ahlstrom, H.G. [ed.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Plate heat exchanger system largest in United States  

SciTech Connect

This article focuses on the largest plate heat exchanger system in the USA having 70,000 sq. ft. of surface area. It is used as a sodium carbonate brine heat exchanger at the Kerr-McGee Chemical Corporation's Argus facility at Searles Valley in California's Mojave Desert. The heat interchange process and operation are discussed. Plate heat exchangers were found to be more cost effective than conventional heat exchangers in the process.

Canning, T. (Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp., Trona, CA); Regan, J.T.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Documentation pckage for the RFID temperature monitoring system (Of Model 9977 packages at NTS).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technical basis for extending the Model 9977 shipping package periodic maintenance beyond the one-year interval to a maximum of five years is based on the performance of the O-ring seals and the environmental conditions. The DOE Packaging Certification Program (PCP) has tasked Argonne National Laboratory to develop a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) temperature monitoring system for use by the facility personnel at DAF/NTS. The RFID temperature monitoring system, depicted in the figure below, consists of the Mk-1 RFId tags, a reader, and a control computer mounted on a mobile platform that can operate as a stand-alone system, or it can be connected to the local IT network. As part of the Conditions of Approval of the CoC, the user must complete the prescribed training to become qualified and be certified for operation of the RFID temperature monitoring system. The training course will be administered by Argonne National Laboratory on behalf of the Headquarters Certifying Official. This is a complete documentation package for the RFID temperature monitoring system of the Model 9977 packagings at NTS. The documentation package will be used for training and certification. The table of contents are: Acceptance Testing Procedure of MK-1 RFID Tags for DOE/EM Nuclear Materials Management Applications; Acceptance Testing Result of MK-1 RFID Tags for DOE/EM Nuclear Materials Management Applications; Performance Test of the Single Bolt Seal Sensor for the Model 9977 Packaging; Calibration of Built-in Thermistors in RFID Tags for Nevada Test Site; Results of Calibration of Built-in Thermistors in RFID Tags; Results of Thermal Calibration of Second Batch of MK-I RFID Tags; Procedure for Installing and Removing MK-1 RFID Tag on Model 9977 Drum; User Guide for RFID Reader and Software for Temperature Monitoring of Model 9977 Drums at NTS; Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) for the ARG-US System; Quality Category for the RFID Temperature Monitoring System; The Documentation Package for the RFID Temperature Monitoring System; Software Test Plan and Results for ARG-US OnSite; Configuration Management Plan (CMP) for the ARG-US System; Requirements Management Plan for the ARG-US System; and Design Management Plan for ARG-US.

Chen, K.; Tsai, H.; Decision and Information Sciences

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Halocarbon Environmental Coefficients and Principal Uses 100-Year Global Ozone Depletion Warming Potential Potential (ODP) Compound (CO2 = 1) (Relative to CFC-11) Principal Uses Chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 1.00 Blowing Agent, Chillers CFC-12 (1) 1.00 Auto A/C, Chillers, & Blowing Agent CFC-113 0.80 Solvent CFC-114 1.00 Solvent CFC-115 (2) 0.60 Solvent, Refrigerant Hydrochlorofluorocarbons HCFC-22 (2) 0.06 Residential A/C HCFC-123 0.02 Refrigerant HCFC-124 0.02 Sterilant HCFC-141b 0.11 CFC Replacement HCFC-142b 0.07 CFC Replacement Bromofluorocarbons Halon-1211 3.00 Fire Extinguishers Halon-1301 10.00 Fire Extinguishers Hydrofluorocarbons HFC-23 0.00 HCFC Byproduct HFC-125 0.00 CFC/HCFC Replacement HFC-134a 0.00 Auto A/C, Refrigeration HFC-152a (1) 0.00 Aerosol Propellant HFC-227ea 0.00 CFC Replacement

405

2013 GRC Poster Session Presenter & Title Easel Suppression of transpiration due to cloud immersion in a seasonally dry Mexican weeping pine plantation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Kinetics of Domestic and Non-domestic Coal, Locally Sourced Biomass Waste, and Their Blends 12

Pohl, Karsten

406

Study on scale formation and suppression in heat-exchange systems for simulated geothermal brines. Final report, January 12, 1976-March 5, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Control of scale formation in heat exchangers using simulated geothermal waters can be achieved by lowering the pH of the water to pH 6 or lower. This does not, however, appear to be an economic approach for highly buffered geothermal brines and would lead to severe corrosion problems. Two commercial scale control agents, Calgon CL-165 and Monsanto Dequest 2060, showed promise of effecting scaling in a minor way and should be tested further on actual geothermal waters. Other scale control methods tested were unsuccessful. These included seeding experiments, turbulence promotin and electostatic and electromagnetic devices reputated to modify scale formation. The experiments were performed with tube-in-shell heat exchangers using simulated geothermal waters prepared from a salt dome solution based brine. The scale formed was primarily silica with a small percent of calcium carbonate and traces of magnesium and iron. Physically it was a hydrous soft solid adhering only lightly to the heat exchange surface. This is not typical of geothermal water scales encountered in high temperature brine operations and the results of the scale control expeirments should be evaluated with that in mind.

Wilson, J.S.; King, J.E.; Bullard, G.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Effect of Vermicompost Tea on the Growth and Yield of Tomato Plants and Suppression of Root Knot Nematode in the Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

auxin like substances from compost. Crop Res. , 24: 323-327.of plant disease by composts. HortSci. 32:184–187.Ingham, E.R. 2000. The compost tea brewing manual. Unisun

Selvaraj, Abira

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory work and studies of full-scale coal-fired boilers have identified two general mechanisms for ash production. The vast majority of the ash is formed from mineral matter that coalesces as the char burns, yielding particles that are normally larger than 0.5 {mu}m. The second major mechanism is the generation of a submicron aerosol through a vaporization/condensation mechanism. Previous work has shown that pulverized bituminous coals that were treated by coal cleaning (via froth flotation) or aerodynamic sizing exhibited altered aerosol emission characteristics. Specifically, the emissions of aerosol for the cleaned and sized coals increased by as much as one order of magnitude. The goals of the present progress are to: (1) perform measurements on carefully characterized coals to identify the means by which the coal treatment increases aerosol yields; (2) investigate means by which coal cleaning can be done in a way that will not increase aerosol yields; (3) identify whether this mechanism can be used to reduce aerosol yields from systems burning straight coal. This paper discusses model description and model formulation, and reports on the progress of furnace design and construction, and coal selection.

Kramlich, J.C.; Hoffman, D.A.; Butcher, E.K.

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

409

Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The production of ash particles from coal combustion limits it`s use as a fuel. On mechanism by which small ash particles are formed is the generation of submicron aerosols through a vaporization/condensation mechanism. Previous work has shown that coal cleaning can lead to increased emissions of aerosols. This research will investigate the means or aerosol formation in coals and the effects that various methods of coal cleaning have on aerosol production, and whether or not cleaning can be performed in a manner that will not lend itself to aerosol formation.

Kramlich, J.C.; Chenevert, B.; Park, J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Causal Inference and Prediction in Health Studies: Environmental Exposures and Schistosomiasis, HIV-1 Genotypic Susceptibility Scores and Virologic Suppression, and Risk of Hospital Readmission for Heart Failure Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hospitalization for congestive heart failure among Medicarepredictors of readmission for heart failure: a systematicof hospital readmission for heart failure: development of a

Sudat, Sylvia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Suppression of nuclear spin diffusion at a GaAs/AlGaAs interface measured with a single quantum dot nano-probe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear spin polarization dynamics are measured in optically pumped individual GaAs/AlGaAs interface quantum dots by detecting the time-dependence of the Overhauser shift in photoluminescence (PL) spectra. Long nuclear polarization decay times of ~ 1 minute have been found indicating inefficient nuclear spin diffusion from the GaAs dot into the surrounding AlGaAs matrix in externally applied magnetic field. A spin diffusion coefficient two orders lower than that previously found in bulk GaAs is deduced.

A. E. Nikolaenko; E. A. Chekhovich; M. N. Makhonin; I. W. Drouzas; A. B. Vankov; J. Skiba-Szymanska; M. S. Skolnick; P. Senellart; A. Lemaitre; A. I. Tartakovskii

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

The Disposition of Silver Released from Soviet OBLAKO Rockets in Precipitation during the Hail Suppression Experiment Grossversuch IV. Part II: Case Studies of Seeded Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes analyses of data collected from four seeded storms during the 1978 summer program of Grossversuch IV in Switzerland. The storms all met the Soviet criteria for hail-forming potential and were seeded with Soviet-type OBLAKO ...

J. P. Lacaux; J. A. Warburton; J. Fournet-Fayard; P. Waldteufel

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Glyphosate’s Suppression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Amino Acid Biosynthesis by the Gut Microbiome: Pathways to Modern Diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup[superscript ®], is the most popular herbicide used worldwide. The industry asserts it is minimally toxic to humans, but here we argue otherwise. Residues are found in the main ...

Samsel, Anthony

414

Light management for landscape restoration| Suppression of a model weedy light-demanding pioneer shrub, Ulex europaeus on Mauna Kea Hawai`i.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The use of planted forests as a restoration tool has been shown to improve landscape health and may control invasive plant species by canopy… (more)

Perry, Cheyenne Hiapo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

SUPPRESSION OF ANTIPHASE DISORDER IN GaAs GROWN ON RELAXED GeSi BUFFERS BY METAL-ORGANIC CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sublattices, the zinc-blende crystal structure possesses lower symmetry than the diamond cubic structure of wrong nearest-neighbor bonds, they are electrically active defects responsible for scattering and non of antiphase disorder requires control of the substrate surface structure prior to GaAs growth. The usage

416

Harnessing the anabolic properties of dark respiration to enhance sink activity at elevated CO2 using Arabidopsis thaliana L. with partially-suppressed mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sink limitations in plants reduce the potential for photosynthesis and yield, particularly under conditions that favour enhanced source activity such as elevated CO2 (EC). Dark… (more)

Weraduwage, Sarathi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 inhibits transcription of IRF3 and IRF7 and suppresses induction of interferon-{beta}  

SciTech Connect

Activation of interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) 3 and 7 is essential for the induction of Type I interferons (IFN) and innate antiviral responses, and herpesviruses have evolved mechanisms to evade such responses. We previously reported that Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1, an immediate-early (IE) protein, inhibits the function of IRF7, but the role of BRLF1, the other IE transactivator, in IRF regulation has not been examined. We now show that BRLF1 expression decreased induction of IFN-{beta}, and reduced expression of IRF3 and IRF7; effects were dependent on N- and C-terminal regions of BRLF1 and its nuclear localization signal. Endogenous IRF3 and IRF7 RNA and protein levels were also decreased during cytolytic EBV infection. Finally, production of IFN-{beta} was decreased during lytic EBV infection and was associated with increased susceptibility to superinfection with Sendai virus. These data suggest a new role for BRLF1 with the ability to evade host innate immune responses.

Bentz, Gretchen L.; Liu Renshui [Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Hahn, Angela M.; Shackelford, Julia [Department of Cellular Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Pagano, Joseph S., E-mail: joseph_pagano@med.unc.ed [Department of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

When excessive perturbation goes wrong and why IPUMS-International relies instead on sampling, suppression, swapping, and other minimally harmful methods to protect privacy of census microdata  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IPUMS-International disseminates population census microdata at no cost for 69 countries. Currently, a series of 212 samples totaling almost a half billion person records are available to researchers. Registration is required for researchers to gain ... Keywords: IPUMS-international, data dissemination, data privacy, microdata samples, population census, statistical disclosure controls

Lara Cleveland; Robert McCaa; Steven Ruggles; Matthew Sobek

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Activities and Accomplishments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activities and Accomplishments Denver * May 11, 2011 Working Groups * Financial Guidance * PSR Improvements * Notification * Communications Webinars * RFID Demonstration and TRANSCOM Enhancements - November 17, 2010 - ARG-US RFID/TRANSCOM Real-time Tracking System - TRANSCOM Enhancements * Communications for Waste Movements - February 24, 2011 - Mixed/LLW Forecast: Baseline Disposition Data and Waste Information Management System (WIMS) - Prospective Shipment Report Improvements Wiki Site * Resource for NTSF members - Information on NTSF meetings and webinars - Ad hoc working group call summaries and documents for review - Information on DOE and other federal agency activities (e.g., NRC rulemaking) * Private site that requires participants to "join" in

420

Laser fusion monthly, February 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report is divided into the following sections: (1) facility reports (Argus and Shiva); (2) Nova project; and (3) fusion experiments. In the Fusion Experiments section of this report, the author describes the results of a series of experiments on Shiva which further the understanding of the production and transport of suprathermal electrons. He found that of the suprathermal electrons which strike a laser irradiated disk target or which interact with the rear surface of a half Cairn hohlraum target, a significant fraction of these electrons orbit the target and strike the rear of the disk. These results have significant implications in the interpretation and modeling of the laser irradiated target experiments.

Ahlstrom, H.G.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Diagnostic measurements related to laser driven inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect

Scientists at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory have been conducting laser driven inertial confinement fusion experiments for over five years. The first proof of the thermonuclear burn came at the Janus target irradiation facility in the spring of 1975. Since that time three succeedingly higher energy facilities have been constructed at Livermore, Cyclops, Argus and Shiva, where increased fusion efficiency has been demonstrated. A new facility, called Nova, is now in the construction phase and we are hopeful that scientific break even (energy released compared to incident laser energy on target) will be demonstrated here in early 1980's. Projected progress of the Livermore program is shown.

Campbell, D.E.

1979-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

422

Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2006) 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine areas of high permeability using isotope transport and exchange analysis Notes Finite element models of single-phase, variable-density fluid flow, conductive- convective heat transfer, fluid-rock isotope exchange, and groundwater residence times were developed. Using detailed seismic reflection data and geologic mapping, a regional cross-sectional model was constructed that extends laterally from the Sierra Nevada to Wildhorse Mesa, west of the Argus Range. The findings suggest that active faults and seismogenic zones in and around the Coso geothermal area have much higher

423

EHS361  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Institutional Computer Room Training 1 - Institutional Computer Room Training Course Syllabus Subject Category: Computer room safety Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 1 hour Medical Approval: None Delivery Mode: Web-based Training Frequency: Every 3 years Course Purpose: The goal of this course is to provide employees with the training needed to work unescorted in the institutional computer rooms which have as fire protection: halon, emergency power off, or "clean agent" fire extinguishers. A secondary goal is to provide the basic understanding of essential safe work procedures common to work in these computer rooms. Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course participants will be able to: * Recall appropriate responses to smoke, fire, or fire alarm in Computing Science Division controlled computer

424

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

425

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Randolph Randolph Location: County Randolph NC American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: Conduct energy audits of six county facilities and create a sustainable energy plan and EEC strategy, 2) lower and replace ceiling and add air return ducting system at the Department of Social Services Building (1997), 3) replace boiler and upgrade climate control system at the County Jail (1997), 4) replace interior lights, climate control, HVAC units, Halon system, and emergency generator at the Randolph Government Center (1987), 5) lower and replace ceiling and install climate controls at the Shaw Building (1976), and 6) replace HVAC system and install climate controls at the Cooperative Extension Building (1976) Conditions: None

426

The ALE/GAGE/AGAGE Network (DB1001)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » ALE/GAGE/AGAGE Network Atmospheric Trace Gases » ALE/GAGE/AGAGE Network The ALE / GAGE / AGAGE Network (DB1001) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1001 Links to Additional Sources Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) home page How halocarbons (CFCs, HFCs, HCFCs, and halons) are named CDIAC data base including some of the same compounds, and a tabulation of their uses and atmospheric lifetimes Investigators R.G. Prinn, R.F. Weiss, P.J. Fraser, P.G. Simmonds, S. O'Doherty, P. Salameh, L. Porter, P. Krummel, R.H.J. Wang, B. Miller, C. Harth, B. Greally, F.A. Van Woy, L.P. Steele, J. Müehle, G. Sturrock, F.N. Alyea, J. Huang, and D.E. Hartley Description In the ALE/GAGE/AGAGE global network program, continuous high frequency gas chromatographic measurements of four biogenic/anthropogenic gases (methane,

427

CX-006424: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006424: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-County-Randolph CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Randolph County, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. Conduct energy audits of six county facilities and create a sustainable energy plan and Energy Efficiency Conservation strategy, 2) lower and replace ceiling and add air return ducting system at the Department of Social Services Building (1997), 3) replace boiler and upgrade climate control system at the County Jail (1997), 4) replace interior lights, climate control, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) units, Halon system, and emergency

428

Quantifying transport between the tropical and mid-latitude lower stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne in situ observations of molecules with a wide range of lifetimes (methane, nitrous oxide, reactive nitrogen, ozone, chlorinated halocarbons, and halon-1211), used in a tropical tracer model, show that mid-latitude air is entrained into the tropical lower stratosphere within about 13.5 months; transport is faster in the reverse direction. Because exchange with the tropics is slower than global photochemical models generally assume, ozone at mid-latitudes appears to be more sensitive to elevated levels of industrial chlorine than is currently predicted. Nevertheless, about 45 percent of air in the tropical ascent region at 21 kilometers is of mid-latitude origin, implying that emissions from supersonic aircraft could reach the middle stratosphere. 49 refs., 5 figs.

Volk, C.M.; Dutton, G.S.; Gilligan, J.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)] [and others

1996-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

Safety implications associated with in-plant pressurized gas storage and distribution systems in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Storage and handling of compressed gases at nuclear power plants were studied to identify any potential safety hazards. Gases investigated were air, acetylene, carbon dioxide, chlorine, Halon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, propane, and sulfur hexaflouride. Physical properties of the gases were reviewed as were applicable industrial codes and standards. Incidents involving pressurized gases in general industry and in the nuclear industry were studied. In this report general hazards such as missiles from ruptures, rocketing of cylinders, pipe whipping, asphyxiation, and toxicity are discussed. Even though some serious injuries and deaths over the years have occurred in industries handling and using pressurized gases, the industrial codes, standards, practices, and procedures are very comprehensive. The most important safety consideration in handling gases is the serious enforcement of these well-known and established methods. Recommendations are made concerning compressed gas cylinder missiles, hydrogen line ruptures or leaks, and identification of lines and equipment.

Guymon, R.H.; Casto, W.R.; Compere, E.L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Kinetic Study of the Combustion of Phosphorus Containing Species  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The combustion of organophosphorus compounds is of great interest for the incineration of chemical warfare agent and their use in flame inhibition as halon replacement. The thermochemical data of these species and the reactions involved at high temperature are not well known, despite some recent experimental studies. With BAC-MP4 ab initio estimations as a basis and semi-empirical estimations for many new compounds, the thermochemistry of organophosphorus compounds is studied. New group additivity values are proposed for enthalpies of formation at 298K, entropies and heat capacities of species involving pentavalent phosphorus bonded to carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, fluorine, nitrogen and sulfur atoms. The kinetic of unimolecular elimination is investigated by modeling pyrolysis experiments of DEMP, TEP and DIMP. A new combustion mechanism is described and applied to the modeling of DMMP reaction in a H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} flame.

Glaude, P.A.; Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

1999-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

431

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Dataset Summary Description The general mission of the Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species group is to quantify the distributions and magnitudes of sources and sinks for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and halogen containing compounds. HATS utilizes numerous types of platforms, including ground-based stations, towers, ocean vessels, aircraft, and balloons, to accomplish its mission. For a detailed mission statement, consult our FAQ. Tags {"nitrous oxide","sulfur hexaflouride",CFC-11,CFC-12,CFC-113,CCl4,CH3CCl3,CH3Cl,halon-1211,HCFC-22,HCFC-142b,halocarbons,chromatograph,aircraft,balloons,vessels,ships,towers,"natural resources",environment,air,"GHG "}

432

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Estimated U.S. Emissions of Halocarbons, 1987-2001 (MMT CO2 Equivalent) Gas 1987 1990 1992 1995 1998 2000 2001 Chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 391 246 207 167 115 105 105 CFC-12 1,166 1,194 853 549 223 182 226 CFC-113 498 158 103 52 0 0 0 CFC-114 N.A. 46 29 16 1 N.A. N.A. CFC-115 N.A. 30 27 22 19 N.A. N.A. Bromofluorocarbons Halon-1211 N.A. 1 1 1 1 N.A. N.A. Halon-1301 N.A. 12 12 12 13 N.A. N.A. Hydrochlorofluorocarbons HCFC-22 116 136 135 123 128 134 137 HCFC-123 N.A. 0 0 0 0 N.A. N.A. HCFC-124 0 0 0 3 4 N.A. N.A. HCFC-141b N.A. 0 0 14 19 4 4 HCFC-142b N.A. 0 2 18 22 26 26 Hydrofluorocarbons HFC-23 48 36 36 28 41 31 22 HFC-125 N.A. 0 1 2 4 5 6 HFC-134a N.A. 1 1 19 35 44 41 Total 2,219 1,861 1,408 1,024 624 532 566 Source(s): Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change, Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis, Jan. 2001, Table 3, p. 47 for GWPs; EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2001, Dec. 2002, Table 29, p. 71 and Table D2, p. D-5 for 1990-2001 emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and

433

A 40 Myr OLD GASEOUS CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK AT 49 CETI: MASSIVE CO-RICH COMET CLOUDS AT YOUNG A-TYPE STARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gaseous molecular disk that orbits the main-sequence A-type star 49 Ceti has been known since 1995, but the stellar age and the origin of the observed carbon monoxide molecules have been unknown. We now identify 49 Ceti as a member of the 40 Myr old Argus Association and present a colliding comet model to explain the high CO concentrations seen at 49 Ceti and the 30 Myr old A-type star HD 21997. The model suggests that massive-400 Earth mass-analogs of the Sun's Kuiper Belt are in orbit around some A-type stars, that these large masses are composed primarily of comet-like objects, and that these objects are rich in CO and perhaps also CO{sub 2}. We identify additional early-type members of the Argus Association and the Tucana/Horologium and Columba Associations; some of these stars display excess mid-infrared emission as measured with the Widefield Infrared Survey Explorer.

Zuckerman, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Song, Inseok, E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: song@physast.uga.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD. XXVI. AP Col: THE CLOSEST (8.4 pc) PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of a multi-technique investigation of the M4.5Ve flare star AP Col, which we discover to be the nearest pre-main-sequence star. These include astrometric data from the CTIO 0.9 m, from which we derive a proper motion of 342.0 {+-} 0.5 mas yr{sup -1}, a trigonometric parallax of 119.21 {+-} 0.98 mas (8.39 {+-} 0.07 pc), and photometry and photometric variability at optical wavelengths. We also provide spectroscopic data, including radial velocity (22.4 {+-} 0.3 km s{sup -1}), lithium equivalent width (EW) (0.28 {+-} 0.02 A), H{alpha} EW (-6.0 to -35 A), vsin i (11 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1}), and gravity indicators from the Siding Spring 2.3 m WiFeS, Lick 3 m Hamilton echelle, and Keck-I HIRES echelle spectrographs. The combined observations demonstrate that AP Col is the closer of only two known systems within 10 pc of the Sun younger than 100 Myr. Given its space motion and apparent age of 12-50 Myr, AP Col is likely a member of the recently proposed {approx}40 Myr old Argus/IC 2391 Association.

Riedel, Adric R.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302-4106 (United States); Murphy, Simon J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Melis, Carl [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Subasavage, John P., E-mail: riedel@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: thenry@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: jao@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: murphysj@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: cmelis@ucsd.edu, E-mail: jsubasavage@ctio.noao.edu [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and the Great Lakes economy: Challenges and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the market for SO{sub 2} emission allowances over time and electric utility compliance choices. For currently high emitting plants ( > 2.5 lb SO{sub 2}/MMBtu), the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) provide for about twice as many SO{sub 2} allowances to be issued per year in Phase 1 (1995--1999) than in Phase 2. Also, considering the scrubber incentives in Phase 1, there is likely to be substantial emission banking for use in Phase 2. Allowance prices are expected to increase over time at a rate less than the return on alternative investments, so utilities which are risk neutral or other potential speculators in the allowance market are not expected to bank allowances. The allowances will be banked by risk averse utilities or the utilities may buy forward contracts for SO{sub 2} allowances. However, speculators may play an important role by selling forward contracts for SO{sub 2} allowances to the risk averse utilities. The Argonne Utility Simulation Model (ARGUS) is being revised to incorporate the provisions of the CAAA acid rain title and to simulate SO{sub 2} allowance prices, compliance choices, capacity expansion, system dispatch, fuel use, and emissions. The revised model (ARGUS2) incorporates unit-level performance data and can incorporate unit-specific compliance decisions when these are known. The model has been designed for convenience in analyzing alternatives scenarios (demand growth rates, technology mix, economic parameters, etc). 1 ref., 5 figs.

Hanson, D.; Molburg, J.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.; Lurie, G.; Fisher, R.; Boyd, G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Fox, J. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

AOScomments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternate Operations Study Alternate Operations Study 2013 Meeting Comments A F N Aces Flandreau Municipal Electric Northwest Iowa Power Cooperative Argus Media H O B Heartland Consumers Power District Otter Tail Power Company Basin Electric Cooperative Otter Tail Power Company 2 Basin Electric Cooperative 2 I Bon Homme Yankton Electric Assoc Irrigation & Electrical Districts Association S Sanborn Electric C L Sioux Valley Energy Central Iowa Power Cooperative L & O Power Cooperative South Dakota Municipal League Central Power Electric Cooperative Lake Region Electric South Dakota Municipal League 2 City of Beresford Lyon Rural Electric Cooperative South Eastern Electric Coop City of Cavalier Lyon-Lincoln Elect Coop City of Henning T City of Laurel M Town of Pickstown City of Melrose Marshall Municipal

437

Artificial Retina In the News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases News Articles Press Releases Mark Humayun Inducted into Institute of Medicine Institute of Medicine press release, 10/12/2009 Artificial Retina Project Wins Prestigious 2009 R&D 100 Award Article and multiple press releases, 07/20/2009 Second Sight to Double Patient Enrollment for Argus(tm) II Retinal Implant U.S. Clinical Trial Second Sight press release, 05/04/09 See more releases in Press Release Archive Recent Articles Bionic eye opens new world of sight for blind National Public Radio, October 20, 2009 Burst of technology helps blind to see New York Times, September 26, 2009 Artificial retina project has ORNL roots ORNL Reporter, August 28, 2009 The "holy grail" of ophthalmic devices Assembly Magazine, August 20, 2009 Artificial-retina project designed to restore sight to the blind

438

Argonne, Evigia finalize licensing agreement for next-gen RFID sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

See related See related New RFID technology tracks and monitors nuclear materials Argonne, Evigia finalize licensing agreement for next-gen RFID sensor technology By Angela Hardin * July 16, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint System enables monitoring, tracking and securing of nuclear material ANN ARBOR, Mich. and ARGONNE, Ill. (July 16, 2012)-Evigia Systems and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory announced today that they have finalized a licensing agreement under which Argonne's patented, application-specific radio-frequency identification (RFID) sensor/seal technology and its custom-developed ARG-US software suite will be further developed and marketed by Evigia as a comprehensive nuclear and hazardous material handling solution. The system, jointly developed by Evigia and Argonne, adds sophisticated

439

Diagnostics systems developments and applications for laser fusion experiments  

SciTech Connect

A variety of systems are required for adequate diagnostics of laser fusion experiments. Picosecond scale temporal measurements are typically made with ultrafast streak cameras. Visible and x-ray sensitive streak cameras with resolutions of 6 psec and 15 psec, respectively, and dynamic recording range in excess of 10/sup 3/ are in regular use on experiments at Livermore. The characteristics of these cameras and their applications to target experiment diagnostics are described. The development and testing of a prototype ultrafast framing system is discussed. Because of the need for ''real time'' data acquisition, analysis, and control systems, techniques for providing directly computer interfaced image data from streak and framing cameras and optical imaging systems are being developed. The status of these developments and the characteristics of the computer interfaced data and control systems on Argus and Shiva are summarized.

Coleman, L.W.

1977-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

Isotope Transport and Exchange within the Coso Geothermal System | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport and Exchange within the Coso Geothermal System Transport and Exchange within the Coso Geothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Isotope Transport and Exchange within the Coso Geothermal System Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We are investigating the plumbing of the Coso geothermal system and the nearby Coso Hot Springs using finite element models of single-phase, variable-density fluid flow, conductive- convective heat transfer, fluid-rock isotope exchange, and groundwater residence times. Using detailed seismic reflection data and geologic mapping, we constructed a regional crosssectional model that extends laterally from the Sierra Nevada to Wildhorse Mesa, west of the Argus Range. The base of the model terminates at the brittle-ductile transition zone. A sensitivity study was

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Good Energies (Canada) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Good Energies (Canada) Good Energies (Canada) Name Good Energies (Canada) Address 586 Argus Road, Suite 200 Place Oakville, Canada Zip L6J 3J3 Product Global investor in renewable energy and energy efficiency industries Year founded 2001 Phone number (905) 338-5831 Website http://www.goodenergies.com/ Coordinates 43.4583456°, -79.6842403° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.4583456,"lon":-79.6842403,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

442

Initial results from ensemble SCM simulations of TWP-ICE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high cloud. The model high cloud is sensitive to the forcing during the suppressed monsoon. There is insufficient low-level cloud during the suppressed monsoon. LW Radiation...

443

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

canisters filled with flame suppressing gas will release their contents into pipes that connect inside the unit. A fire would be suppressed almost instantly, according to...

444

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.1 National Legislation  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Phase Out Schedule of Halocarbons in the U.S. (1) Gas % By % By Chlorofluorocarbons 75% 1994 75% 1994 (CFCs) 100% 1996 (4) 100% 1996 Bromofluorocarbons 100% 1994 (4) 100% 1994 (Halons) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons 35.0% 2004 35% 2003 (HCFCs) 75.0% 2010 75% 2010 90.0% 2015 90% 2015 99.5% 2020 99.5% 2020 100% 2030 (4) 100% 2030 Hydrofluorocarbons N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. (HFCs) Note(s): Source(s): 1989 HCFC consumption + 2.8 % of 1989 CFC consumption 1996 N.A. N.A. 1) The phase out of halocarbons is consistent with Title VI of the Clean Air Act and is in accordance with the Montreal Protocol and Amendments. 2) The amount of gas produced and consumed in this year is established and defined as the base level. To meet basic domestic needs, levels of production are allowed to exceed the base level by up to 10%. 3) After this year, levels of production are no longer

445

Ozone-depleting-substance control and phase-out plan  

SciTech Connect

Title VI of the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 requires regulation of the use and disposal of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) (e.g., Halon, Freon). Several important federal regulations have been promulgated that affect the use of such substances at the Hanford Site. On April 23, 1993, Executive Order (EO) 12843, Procurement Requirements and Policies for Federal Agencies for Ozone-Depleting Substances (EPA 1993) was issued for Federal facilities to conform to the new US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations implementing the Clean Air Act of 1963 (CAA), Section 613, as amended. To implement the requirements of Title VI the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), issued a directive to the Hanford Site contractors on May 25, 1994 (Wisness 1994). The directive assigns Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) the lead in coordinating the development of a sitewide comprehensive implementation plan to be drafted by July 29, 1994 and completed by September 30, 1994. The implementation plan will address several areas where immediate compliance action is required. It will identify all current uses of ODSs and inventories, document the remaining useful life of equipment that contains ODS chemicals, provide a phase-out schedule, and provide a strategy that will be implemented consistently by all the Hanford Site contractors. This plan also addresses the critical and required elements of Federal regulations, the EO, and US Department of Energy (DOE) guidance. This plan is intended to establish a sitewide management system to address the clean air requirements.

Nickels, J.M.; Brown, M.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

International Journal of Fracture 126: 116, 2004. 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the dislocation. These polarization gradients result in strong depoling fields that suppress the polarization

447

1) Ullage Protection Ownership Cost for KC-130J: Explosion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... polyether polyurethane, explosion suppressant charcoal colored, Type IV ... personnel; witnessed maintenance activities; incorporated actual hours 5 ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

John Hastie  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Phase equilibria. Combustion and fire suppression. Mass and optical spectroscopic characterization of inorganic systems. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 25, No. 1, pp. 168173, 2006 Printed in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Rooney AA, Matulka RA, Luebke RW. 2003. Developmental atrazine exposure suppresses immune function

Davidson, Carlos

450

Annu. Rev. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 2000. 40:51961 Copyright 2000 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Rooney AA, Matulka RA, Luebke RW. 2003. Developmental atrazine exposure suppresses immune function

Bradfield, Christopher A.

451

Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory- January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility Fire Suppression System

452

Curcumin: A Review of Anti-Cancer Properties and Therapeutic Activity in Head & Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Curcumin Inhibition of NF-kB activation, Suppression ofand other angionegic decreased NF-kB activation factors, Up-of transcription factor NF-kB is suppressed by curcumin (

Wilken, Reason; Veena, Mysore S; Wang, Marilene B; Srivatsan, Eri S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Processes Governing the Recovery of a Perturbed Thermohaline Circulation in HadCM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an experiment with the latest version of the Hadley Centre climate model the model response has been analyzed after the thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic Ocean has been suppressed. The suppression is induced by a strong initial ...

Michael Vellinga; Richard A. Wood; Jonathan M. Gregory

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

View  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NSAs have to guarantee that no private information from ...... tive to complementary cell suppression, manuscript, Energy Information Admin- istration

455

Project: WUI Building and Fire Codes and Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... assemblies, guidelines for structural design and residential landscaping, and ... with less emphasis on wildland fuels management and suppression. ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

456

Fire Fighting Technology Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... prevention and control of fires to enhance fire fighting operations and equipment, fire suppression, fire investigations, and disaster response. ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fire Protection Handbook, 20th Edition. ... fire suppression; water distribution; fire tests; design applications; performance evaluation; pipes; water mist ...

458

Style Guide for Word Users for the NIST Special Publication ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of modeling suppression of counterflow flames by aerosols is RUN ... reactions with variable thermochemical and transport data. ... Aerosol Properties ...

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

459

NIST - Physical and Chemical Properties Division - Technical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... suppressant. Thus although fluorine can remove hydrogen atoms, the hydrogen fluoride that is formed cannot be recycled. ...

460

Context: Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Yang, JC; Huber, ML; Boyer, CI; 1995. Modeling of Hydrogen Fluoride Formation From Flame Suppressants During Combustion.. ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Application: Cold Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Application: Cold Climate. Fire Suppression in Cold Climates: A Technical Review.. Catchpole, DV; 2000. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

462

FIND AND FIX Y2K EMBEDDED EQUIPMENT RISKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... embedded chip devices - on elevators, fire suppressers, HVAC and physical ... acquired directly through the manufacturer's regular sales organization ...

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

463

Fire Fighting Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... prevention and control of fires to enhance fire fighting operations and equipment, fire suppression, fire investigations, and disaster response. ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

Style Guide for Word Users for the NIST Special Publication ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... suppressant, performing a full battery of screening ... continuing market in a chemical with ... inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy ...

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

465

How the Law Responds to Self-Help  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suppress his invention, however, dynamic disclosure of thisdisclosure reduces the chance that two parties will needlessly develop the same invention.

Lichtman, Douglas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Electron distribution function during lower-hybrid heating  

SciTech Connect

The acceleration of electrons during lower-hybrid heating is suppressed by a nonlinear interaction of parametrically excited waves.

Litvin, S.B.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility- January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System

468

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Concentration by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy ... Next Generation Fire Suppression Technology Program. FY1999 Annual Report. ...

469

Molecular Cell Chemical Genetic Screen for AMPKa2 Substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in longevity and tumor suppression (Apfeld et al., 2004; Greer et al., 2007a; Mair et al., 2011; Shackelford

Ford, James

470

DEVELOPMENTS IN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF GAS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fire suppression mechanism (dilution, cooling, and strain ... oxidizers, such as potassium nitrate or potassium ... like coininon table salt, sodium chloride ...

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

NGP Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... suppression in aircraft. The enclosed CD compiles the collected publications from the program. Final Report (NIST SP 1069). ...

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

472

PROTECTING AGAINST VAPOR EXPLOSIONS WITH WATER ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... developed commercially for fire suppression applications. (7) Johnson and Shale, 1995 IS1 This paper provides a summary ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

473

lambdac-web.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

+ + c BRANCHING FRACTIONS Revised 2002 by P.R. Burchat (Stanford University). Most Λ + c branching fractions are measured relative to the decay mode Λ + c → pK - π + . However, there are no completely model-independent measurements of the absolute branching fraction for Λ + c → pK - π + . Here we describe the measurements that have been used to extract B(Λ + c → pK - π + ), the model- dependence of the results, and the method we have used to average the results. ARGUS (ALBRECHT 88C) and CLEO (CRAWFORD 92) measure B(B → Λ + c X) · B(Λ + c → pK - π + ) to be (0.30 ± 0.12 ± 0.06)% and (0.273 ± 0.051 ± 0.039)%. Under the assumptions that decays of B mesons to baryons are dominated by B → Λ + c X and that Λ + c X final states other than Λ + c N X can be neglected, they also measure B(B → Λ + c X) to be (6.8 ± 0.5 ± 0.3)% (ALBRECHT 92O) and (6.4 ± 0.8 ± 0.8)% (CRAWFORD 92). Combining these results, we get

474

Testing the potential model in the UPSILON system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests of the non-relativistic potential model for bound b anti b states are discussed, using results from the Crystal Ball and ARGUS detectors at DORIS II (DESY) and the CUSB and CLEO detectors at CESR (Cornell). There are many many people who have developed potential models. While the author tries to be complete in reviewing the experimental data, he limits his discussion of potentials to a few contrasting examples. The talk is divided into two main parts. In the first he discusses the /sup 3/S/sub 1/ b anti b states UPSILON, UPSILON', ..., whose measured masses, leptonic widths, and leptonic branching ratios are used to check the static potential V(r) and the strong coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub 3/. In the second part, results on the /sup 3/P, b anti b states chi/sub b/, chi'/sub b/ are used to check the spin dependence of the potential. There are several other classes of states (c anti c, s anti s, c anti q, b anti q, and the as-yet-not seen eta/sub b/ and /sup 1/P/sub 1/ of the b anti b family) which are also important in testing the potential model, but which he did not cover in this talk. 47 references.

Cooper, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics  

SciTech Connect

This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K{sup 0} decays at CERN; recent K{sup 0} decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {rho}{bar {rho}} collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

Hawthorne, J.F. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Market penetration potential of new clean coal technologies  

SciTech Connect

The diverse nature of the electric utility sector, both in terms of supply and demand, will allow numerous new coal-burning technologies to find economic niches within the marketplace. The focus of this paper is on the potential market penetration rate for one clean coal technology, Integrated Gasifier Combined Cycles (IGCC), from 1995 to 2024. The market penetration of IGCC was examined in two power pools that are distinctly different in terms of electric supply and demand. These pools consist of groups of companies that aggregate their resources for dispatching or trading electricity to achieve operating economies through energy exchanges. The first pool is located in the Midwest and is part of the North American Electric Reliability Council's (NERC) East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR) region. The second pool is the Florida subregion of NERC's Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) region. Emphasis is placed on how both the current technology configuration of the power pool and how future demand profiles influence the penetration rate of a new technology. The effects of fuel prices on technology penetration are also examined. The argonne Utility Simulation (ARGUS) model is used to estimate IGCC market penetration under various economic assumptions. 20 refs., 8 figs.

Veselka, T.D.; Rose, K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Forecasting the market for SO sub 2 emission allowances under uncertainty  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the effects of uncertainty and risk aversion on market outcomes for SO{sub 2} emission allowance prices and on electric utility compliance choices. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), which are briefly reviewed here, provide for about twice as many SO{sub 2} allowances to be issued per year in Phase 1 (1995--1999) than in Phase 2. Considering the scrubber incentives in Phase 1, there is likely to be substantial emission banking for use in Phase 2. Allowance prices are expected to increase over time at a rate less than the return on alternative investments, so utilities which are risk neutral, or potential speculators in the allowance market, are not expected to bank allowances. The allowances will be banked by utilities that are risk averse. The Argonne Utility Simulation Model (ARGUS2) is being revised to incorporate the provisions of the CAAA acid rain title and to simulate SO{sub 2} allowance prices, compliance choices, capacity expansion, system dispatch, fuel use, and emissions using a unit level data base and alternative scenario assumptions. 1 fig.

Hanson, D.; Molburg, J.; Fisher, R.; Boyd, G.; Pandola, G.; Lurie, G.; Taxon, T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Proposed method for determining the thickness of glass in solar collector panels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analytical method has been developed for determining the minimum thickness for simply supported, rectangular glass plates subjected to uniform normal pressure environmental loads such as wind, earthquake, snow, and deadweight. The method consists of comparing an analytical prediction of the stress in the glass panel to a glass breakage stress determined from fracture mechanics considerations. Based on extensive analysis using the nonlinear finite element structural analysis program ARGUS, design curves for the structural analysis of simply supported rectangular plates have been developed. These curves yield the center deflection, center stress and corner stress as a function of a dimensionless parameter describing the load intensity. Results are included for plates having length-to-width ratios of 1, 1.5, 2, 3, and 4. The load range considered extends to 1000 times the load at which the behavior of the plate becomes significantly nonlinear. Over the load range analyzed, the analysis shows that the ratio of center deflection to plate thickness for a plate of length-to-width ratio of 4 is less than 70 to 1, whereas linear theory would predict a center deflection about 1200 times the plate thickness. The stress is also markedly lower than would be predicted by linear theory. These analytical results show good agreement with the analytical and experimental work of others.

Moore, D.M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Neutral gas in Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies Haro 11 and ESO 338-IG04 measured through sodium absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. The Lyman alpha emission line of galaxies is an important tool for finding galaxies at high redshift, and thus probe the structure of the early universe. However, the resonance nature of the line and its sensitivity to dust and neutral gas is still not fully understood. Aims. We present measurements of the velocity, covering fraction and optical depth of neutral gas in front of two well known local blue compact galaxies that show Lyman alpha in emission: ESO 338-IG 04 and Haro 11. We thus test observationally the hypothesis that Lyman alpha can escape through neutral gas by being Doppler shifted out of resonance. Methods. We present integral field spectroscopy from the GIRAFFE/Argus spectrograph at VLT/FLAMES in Paranal, Chile. The excellent wavelength resolution allows us to accurately measure the velocity of the ionized and neutral gas through the H-alpha emission and Na D absorption, which traces the ionized medium and cold interstellar gas, respectively. We also present independent measurements w...

Sandberg, A; Hayes, M; Fathi, K; Schaerer, D; Mas-Hesse, J M; Rivera-Thorsen, T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

A two-period model of emission abatement and allowance banking under uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the effects of uncertainty and risk aversion on market outcomes for SO{sub 2} emission allowance prices and on electric utility compliance choices. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) provide about twice as many SO{sub 2} allowances to be issued per year in Phase I (1995--1999) than in Phase II. Also, considering the scrubber incentives in Phase I, there is likely to be substantial emission banking for use in Phase II. Allowance prices may increase over time at a rate less than the return on alternative investments with allowances being banked only by risk averse electric utilities. Speculators are likely to be willing to set allowances in forward markets, which will lower current market prices of allowances relative to a situation with only risk averse utilities in the market. The Argonne Utility Simulation Model (ARGUS2) is being revised to incorporate the provisions of the CAAA acid rain title and to simulate SO{sub 2} allowance prices, compliance choices, capacity expansion, system dispatch, fuel use, and emissions using a unit level data base and alternative scenario assumptions.

Hanson, D.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "argus halon suppression" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

A two-period model of emission abatement and allowance banking under uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the effects of uncertainty and risk aversion on market outcomes for SO{sub 2} emission allowance prices and on electric utility compliance choices. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) provide about twice as many SO{sub 2} allowances to be issued per year in Phase I (1995--1999) than in Phase II. Also, considering the scrubber incentives in Phase I, there is likely to be substantial emission banking for use in Phase II. Allowance prices may increase over time at a rate less than the return on alternative investments with allowances being banked only by risk averse electric utilities. Speculators are likely to be willing to set allowances in forward markets, which will lower current market prices of allowances relative to a situation with only risk averse utilities in the market. The Argonne Utility Simulation Model (ARGUS2) is being revised to incorporate the provisions of the CAAA acid rain title and to simulate SO{sub 2} allowance prices, compliance choices, capacity expansion, system dispatch, fuel use, and emissions using a unit level data base and alternative scenario assumptions.

Hanson, D.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

482

An analysis of SO{sub 2} emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC`s of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

An analysis of SO sub 2 emission compliance under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of SO{sub 2} emission allowance trading under Title 4 of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) is of great interest due to the innovative nature of this market incentive approach. However, it may be a mistake to frame the compliance problem for a utility as a decision to trade or not. Trading of allowances should be the consequence, not the decision. The two meaningful decision variables for a utility are the control approaches chosen for its units and the amount of allowances to hold in its portfolio of assets for the future. The number allowances to be bought or sold (i.e. traded) is determined by the emission reduction and banking decisions. Our preferred approach is to think of the problem in terms of ABC's of the 1990 CAA Amendments: abatement strategy, banking, and cost competitiveness. The implications of the general principles presented in this paper on least cost emission reductions and emissions banking to hedge against risk are being simulated with version 2 of the ARGUS model representing the electric utility sector and regional coal supplies and transportation rates. A rational expectations forecast for allowances prices is being computed. The computed allowance price path has the property that demand for allowances by electric utilities for current use or for banking must equal the supply of allowances issued by the federal government or provided as forward market contracts in private market transactions involving non-utility speculators. From this rational expectations equilibrium forecast, uncertainties are being explored using sensitivity tests. Some of the key issues are the amount of scrubbing and when it is economical to install it, the amount of coal switching and how much low sulfur coal premiums will be bid up; and the amount of emission trading within utilities and among different utilities.

Hanson, D.A.; Cilek, C.M.; Pandola, G.; Taxon, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Macroeconomic impacts of clean coal technologies and acid rain legislation: A comparative analysis  

SciTech Connect

In 1987, the National Association of Manufacturers published a study documenting the negative macroeconomic impacts that could occur if proposed acid rain legislation were passed (NAM 1987). These negative impacts would result from the substantially higher electricity rates that would be needed to finance conventional pollution-control retrofits. The US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) wanted to evaluate the macroeconomic impacts of nonregulatory approaches to reduce the emissions of acid rain precursors. DOE/FE therefore directed Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to determine the potential for clean coal technologies (CCTs) to satisfy future electric load growth and achieve greater long-term reductions in emissions at a lower cost than could be achieved through a legislative mandate. This study documents the macroeconomic impacts of CCT deployment without acid rain legislation and compares these results with the corresponding impacts of using conventional technologies and meeting mandatory emission reductions. The Argonne Utility Simulation (ARGUS) model was used to determine the least-cost solution and incremental levelized system costs* over the period 1995-2030 for three scenarios: (1) a baseline scenario, in which no acid rain controls are mandated and no CCTs are deployed; (2) an acid rain (AR) scenario, in which legislation (S. 1894, 100th Congress) is mandated but no CCTs are deployed; and (3) a CCT scenario, in which maximum CCT deployment (specifically, integrated gasification combined-cycle or IGCC technology in repowering and new or greenfield'' applications) occurs but no acid rain legislation is mandated. The Data Resources Inc. (DRI) annual macroeconomic model (which was extended from 2010 to 2030) was used to compute the macroeconomic impacts of the AR and CCT scenarios. 2 refs., 28 figs.

Edwards, B.K.; South, D.W.; Veselka, T.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Gault, N.J. (DRI/McGraw-Hill Energy Service, Lexington, MA (USA))

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Identification of DNA-Binding Proteins and Protein-Protein ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regulation may be either activation, stimulation, inhibition or suppression. ... genes is mediated by well-coordinated protein–protein interactions between ...

486

COLD DISCHARGE OF CF,I IN A SIMULATED AIRCRAFT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Pitts, WM (eds.), Evaluation of Alternative In-Flight Fire Suppressants for FUN-Scale Testing in Simulated Aircraji Engine Nacelles and Diy B qs ...

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

487

Context: Decomposition Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Pyrotechnically Augmented Liquid Agent System.. ... Suppression of a Laminar Opposed-Flow Natural Gas/Air Diffusion Flame With C3HF7.. ...

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

488

Last updated March 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... connection made through a surge-suppressing component; all had a gas tube for ... overlooking the undesirable side effects of such a tight clamping. ...

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

489

KIVA: Increases engine efficiency while improving fuel economy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in automotive catalytic converters Design of fire suppression systems Pulsed detonation propulsion systems design Benefits: Increases engine efficiency while reducing harmful...

490

National Security & Safety Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 16, 2009 Audit Evaluation Report: IG-0828 The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2009 September 11, 2009 Inspection Report: IG-0821 Fire Suppression and...

491

Transient Overvoltage Protection Coordination in the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1979 Solid-state PowerConversion (All rights reserved) PO Box ... dirficult to suppress since the energies nre con ... but generally nt lower energy levels. ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

492

Simplified Wind Flow Model for the Estimation of Aerodynamic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and the low-frequency fluctuations present in the ABL flow are suppressed; that is, the peak energy of the ... For personal use only; all rights reserved. ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

493

Low Emittance and Solar Control Glazing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emittance and Solar-Control Glazing Low-emittance coatings have a high reflectance in the thermal infrared suppressing infrared radiation transfer thereby imparting additional...

494

Cluster Observations with the South Pole Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

added heat capacity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resistancea regenerator with high heat capacity, and then allowing theis suppressed by the heat capacities of the cryostats. We

Plagge, Thomas Jeffrey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

SBIR Success Story - Southwest Sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... method to suppress signals that result when the ... of our approach allowed Southwest Sciences to develop ... some of the profits in new R&D and have ...

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

496

Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CDNC), cloud optical depth (COD) and the AIE for the pastto the increases observed for COD, the liquid water path (suppressed precipitation), and COD rather than CC. (Although

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Numerical Simulation of Ring Rolling Process for Ni-Base Articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2) Suppression of production cost. 3) Optimization of materials properties. The reduction of lead-time to develop new engines or to modify existing ones tends to  ...

498

When Barriers to Markets Fail: Pipeline Deregulation, Spot Markets, and the Topology of the Natural Gas Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Congress passed the Natural Gas Policy Act in 1978. The Actthe Natural Gas Act." Southern Regu- latory Policyfor natural gas. Introduction Regulatory policies suppressed

De Vany, Arthur; Walls, W. David

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CM Configuration Management DOE U.S. Department of Energy FSS Fire Suppression System HSS Office of Health, Safety and Security LANL Los Alamos National Laboratory LASO Los...

500

A physics-based approach to modelling grassland fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of total suppression, many of America's forests have ... Paper J2.4. (American Meteorological Society) Available at ... fire records in the North Amer- ican ...

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z