National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for argus halon suppression

  1. Memorandum, Managed Phase Out of Halon Fixed Fire Suppression Systems- May 5, 1993

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this memorandum is to provide additional interim departmental criteria on the management of the reduction and potential elimination of Halon fire extinguishing systems within the Department of Energy (DOE). This memorandum supplements the joint Office of Safety and Quality Assurance/Office of Projects and Facilities Management memorandum of September 27, 1990, in which guidance was provided on the installation of new Halon 1301 fixed fire suppression systems and halon 1211 portable fire extinguishers.

  2. Health effects of Halon 1301 exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holness, D.L.; House, R.A. )

    1992-07-01

    An accidental discharge of a Halon 1301 system is reported. Thirty-one workers were assessed, 22 who were present at the time of the discharge, and 9 who worked the next shift. The incident was complicated by a small Freon-22 leak several hours later. Throat, eye, and nasal irritation and lightheadedness were reported by the majority of workers. Workers present during the halon discharge reported significantly more lightheadedness, headache, voice change, cough, and a fast heartbeat than did those who worked the later shift. These differences were significant even after correcting for confounding factors such as age, sex, and sense of anxiety at the time of the incident. The possible causes for the irritant symptoms include breakdown products of Halon 1301 and Freon-22 or contaminants from the halon discharge system. Although these irritant effects may not be an effect of Halon 1301 alone, they may occur in these discharge situations, and workers should be advised of this possibility. The possible cardiac and central nervous system effects also should be considered. The importance of a clear-cut protocol to deal with such incidents as well as worker education are discussed.

  3. Argus NOx/SCR report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-05-15

    This document reports on NOx units at more than 350 coal and gas-fired power plants in the USA. Formerly known as the Argus SCR Report, the data are now expanded to include other forms of NOx control, including selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), low NOx burners and overfire air.

  4. Requirements And Instructions For Shipping Halon To The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Halon Repository

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Disposition of excess Halon 1301 is now done in accordance with Executive Order 13148 — “Greening the Government Through Leadership in Environmental Management ”, Section 505 (c). An SF-122 form (or equivalent documentation) should be approved by the DLA prior to shipment.

  5. Feasibility and design of blast mitigation systems for naval applications using water mist fire suppression systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitchenka, Julie A

    2004-01-01

    The recent trend of using fine water mist systems to replace the legacy HALON- 1301 fire suppression systems warrants further study into other applications of the water mist systems. Preliminary research and investigation ...

  6. Copyright Argus Information and Advisory Services, LLC 2002 All Rights Reserved; Patent Pending Unauthorized Reproduction In Any Form Strictly Prohibited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Robert A.

    Copyright Argus Information and Advisory Services, LLC 2002 ­ All Rights Reserved; Patent Pending #12;Copyright Argus Information and Advisory Services, LLC 2002 ­ All Rights Reserved; Patent Pending;Copyright Argus Information and Advisory Services, LLC 2002 ­ All Rights Reserved; Patent Pending

  7. The Caribbean spiny lobster, Panuli-rus argus, is distributed from Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    870 The Caribbean spiny lobster, Panuli- rus argus, is distributed from Brazil throughout major commercial fisheries in Florida, the Caribbean and Brazil. Commercially, P. argus is especially seen within a spe- cies. Because previous studies did not include populations from Brazil, Sarver et al

  8. ARGUS: Efficient Scalable Continuous Query Optimization for Large-Volume Data Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbonell, Jaime

    , and topological query network optimization. Building on top of a DBMS, the system provides a value-adding package to directly running the continuous queries on the DBMS, ARGUS achieves well over a 100-fold improvement processing becomes increasingly demanding. It readily arises from the existing DBMS applications to manage

  9. Tracking and Monitoring with Dosimeter-Enabled ARG-US RFID System - 12009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.; Lee, H.; De Lurgio, P.; Kearney, C.M.; Craig, B.; Soos, I.H.; Tsai, H.; Liu, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Shuler, J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. 20585 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Automated monitoring and tracking of materials with radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can significantly improve both the operating efficiency of radiological facilities and the application of the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle in them. One such system, called ARG-US, has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Packaging and Certification Program to use in managing sensitive nuclear and radioactive materials. Several ARG-US systems are in various stages of deployment and advanced testing across DOE sites. ARG-US utilizes sensors in the tags to continuously monitor the state of health of the packaging and promptly disseminates alarms to authorized users. In conjunction with global positioning system (GPS) tracking provided by TRANSCOM, the system can also monitor and track packages during transport. A compact dosimeter has been incorporated in the ARG-US tags via an onboard universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter interface. The detector has a wide measurement range for gamma radiation - from 0.1 mSv/h to 8 Sv/h. The detector is able to generate alarms for both high and low radiation and for a high cumulative dose. In a large installation, strategically located dosimeter-enabled tags can yield an accurate, real-time, 2D or 3D dose field map that can be used to enhance facility safety, security, and safeguards. This implementation can also lead to a reduced need for manned surveillance and reduced exposure of personnel to radiation, consistent with the ALARA principle at workplaces. (authors)

  10. Food consumption and digestion time estimation of spotted scat, Scatophagus argus, using X-radiography technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashim, Marina; Abidin, Diana Atiqah Zainal [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Das, Simon K. [Marine Ecosystem Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi (Malaysia); Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Marine Ecosystem Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan M (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    The present study was conducted to investigate the food consumption pattern and gastric emptying time using x-radiography technique in scats fish, Scatophagus argus feeding to satiation in laboratory conditions. Prior to feeding experiment, fish of various sizes were examined their stomach volume, using freshly prepared stomachs ligatured at the tips of the burret, where the maximum amount of distilled water collected in the stomach were measured (ml). Stomach volume is correlated with maximum food intake (S{sub max}) and it can estimate the maximum stomach distension by allometric model i.e volume=0.0000089W{sup 2.93}. Gastric emptying time was estimated using a qualitative X-radiography technique, where the fish of various sizes were fed to satiation at different time since feeding. All the experimental fish was feed into satiation using radio-opaque barium sulphate (BaSO{sub 4}) paste injected in the wet shrimp in proportion to the body weight. The BaSO{sub 4} was found suitable to track the movement of feed/prey in the stomach over time and gastric emptying time of scats fish can be estimated. The results of qualitative X-Radiography observation of gastric motility, showed the fish (200 gm) that fed to maximum satiation meal (circa 11 gm) completely emptied their stomach within 30 - 36 hrs. The results of the present study will provide the first baseline information on the stomach volume, gastric emptying of scats fish in captivity.

  11. SIMP J2154–1055: A NEW LOW-GRAVITY L4? BROWN DWARF CANDIDATE MEMBER OF THE ARGUS ASSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Artigau, Étienne; Malo, Lison; Robert, Jasmin; Nadeau, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    We present SIMP J21543454–1055308, a new L4? brown dwarf identified in the SIMP survey that displays signs of low gravity in its near-infrared spectrum. Using BANYAN II, we show that it is a candidate member of the Argus association, albeit with a 21% probability that it is a contaminant from the field. Measurements of radial velocity and parallax will be needed to verify its membership. If it is a member of Argus (age 30-50 Myr), then this object would have a planetary mass of 10 ± 0.5 M {sub Jup}.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the air/suppressant flow in an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Gritzo, L.A.; Hassan, B.

    1997-06-01

    For the purposes of designing improved Halon-alternative fire suppression strategies for aircraft applications, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the air flow, suppressant transport, and air-suppressant mixing within an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle were performed. The release of inert gases from a Solid Propellant Gas Generator (SPGG) was analyzed at two different injection locations in order to understand the effect of injection position on the flow patterns and the mixing of air and suppression agent. An uncluttered engine nacelle was simulated to provide insight into the global flow features as well as to promote comparisons with previous nacelle fire tests and recent water tunnel tests which included little or no clutter. Oxygen concentration levels, fuel/air residence times that would exist if a small fuel leak were present, velocity contours, and streamline patterns are presented inside the engine nacelle. The numerical results show the influence of the gent release location on regions of potential flame extinction due to oxygen inerting and high flame strain. The occurrence of inflow through the exhaust ducts on the aft end of the nacelle is also predicted. As expected, the predicted oxygen concentration levels were consistently higher than the measured levels since a fire was not modeled in this analysis. Despite differences in the conditions of these simulations and the experiments, good agreement was obtained between the CFD predictions and the experimental measurements.

  13. Cancer: A suppression switch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starobinets, H; Debnath, J

    2013-01-01

    Cancer A suppression switch The status of the protein p53it seems that p53 acts as a switch in pancreatic cancer thatthe ability of p53 to switch the clinical outcome of

  14. Explosion suppression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Cortese, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  15. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  16. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  17. Pressure suppression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  18. Pressure suppression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  19. A formula for charmonium suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pena, C., E-mail: pena@ift.uni.wroc.pl; Blaschke, D., E-mail: blaschke@ift.uni.wroc.pl [University of Wroclaw, Institute for Theoretical Physics (Poland)

    2012-07-15

    In this work a formula for charmonium suppression obtained by Matsui in 1989 is analytically generalized for the case of complex cc-barpotential described by a 3-dimensional and isotropic time-dependent harmonic oscillator (THO). It is suggested that under certain scheme the formula can be applied to describe J/{psi} suppression in heavy-ion collisions at CERN-SPS, RHIC, and LHC with the advantage of analytical tractability.

  20. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie; /Vrije U., Amsterdam

    2011-11-28

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decays and the non-resonant B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} {eta}{pi}{sup +} decays in approximately 230 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10{sup -6}. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle {gamma}, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle {gamma} can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay is sensitive to the angle {gamma} and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly enhance the measurement of this angle. However, the low expected branching fraction for the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay channels could severely impact the measurement. A prerequisite of the measurement of the CKM angle is the observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay on which this thesis reports. The BABAR experiment consists of the BABAR detector and the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The design of the experiment has been optimized for the study of CP violation in the decays of neutral B mesons but is also highly suitable for the search for rare B decays such as the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay. The PEP-II collider operates at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance and is a clean source of B{bar B} meson pairs.

  1. Soft substrates suppress droplet splashing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howland, Christopher J; Style, Robert W; Castrejón-Pita, A A

    2015-01-01

    Droplets splash when they impact dry, flat substrates above a critical velocity that depends on parameters such as droplet size, viscosity and air pressure. We show that substrate stiffness also impacts the splashing threshold by imaging ethanol drops impacting silicone gels of different stiffnesses. Splashing is significantly suppressed: droplets on the softest substrates need over 70% more kinetic energy to splash than they do on rigid substrates. We show that splash suppression is likely to be due to energy losses caused by deformations of soft substrates during the first few microseconds of impact. We find that solids with Youngs modulus $\\lesssim O(10^5)$Pa suppress splashing, in agreement with simple scaling arguments. Thus materials like soft gels and elastomers can be used as simple coatings for effective splash prevention.

  2. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edward S. (Ames, IA); Xue, Yongjun (Norwich, NY)

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  3. New technology suppresses coke dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    A brief account is given of the technique of electrostatic fogging which has been tested successfully at a Canadian steel mill to control coke dust in the respirable size range. A spray of very fine droplets (<10 MUm) has an electrostatic charge imparted to each droplet. The spray of electrostatically-charged fog suppresses the dust by a combination of scrubbing and electrostatic attraction.

  4. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  5. Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&1! Running&Title:&BRAIN&OSCILLATIONS&MEDIATE&MEMORY&SUPPRESSION&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&1! & ! Running&Title:&BRAIN&OSCILLATIONS&MEDIATE&MEMORY&SUPPRESSION& & & Brain&oscillations&mediate&successful&suppression&of&unwanted&memories& Gerd&T.&Waldhauser1,&Karl1Heinz.de& Phone:&+49(0)753118815707& Fax:&+49(0)753118814829& #12;Brain&oscillations&mediate&memory&suppression&2

  6. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.E. Bates [HSB Professional Loss Control, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  7. Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution First author: Amir Givati The Hebrew January 2004 #12;ABSTRACT: Urban and industrial air pollution has been shown qualitatively to suppress. The evidence suggests that air pollution aerosols that are incorporated in orographic clouds slow down cloud

  8. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY LETTERS Chronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    BIOGEOCHEMISTRY LETTERS Chronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition and sequester soil carbon dioxide emis- sions, offsetting a substantial portion of greenhouse gas forcing of the climate system. Although a number of factors are responsible for this terrestrial carbon sink, atmospheric nitrogen

  9. Suppression of Grain Boundaries in Graphene Growth on Superstructured...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Suppression of Grain Boundaries in Graphene Growth on Superstructured Mn-Cu(111) Surface Prev Next Title: Suppression of Grain Boundaries in Graphene Growth on...

  10. Benefits of ARG-US "Smart Drum"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC. dis_SmartDrumBroch_072014rc Environmental Management management system ensures long-life operation -- up to 10 years without battery replacement. On-board memory prompts an instantaneous alert/alarm to system operator. Tags enable continuous monitoring via local

  11. Argus Power Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S JumpArchuleta County,Argillic-Advanced ArgillicWebsite

  12. Water Mist Suppression in Conjunction with Displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Water Mist Suppression in Conjunction with Displacement Ventilation By Benjamin Piers Hume-2758 #12;#12;Displacement Water Mist System Masters of Fire Engineering Thesis 2003 i A man of genius makes Water Mist System Masters of Fire Engineering Thesis 2003 ii #12;Displacement Water Mist System Masters

  13. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  14. Suppression of Stable Flies on Cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2004-07-01

    : cultural, biological and chemical. Cultural control: Using cultural control methods involves manipulating the environ- ment to reduce insect pest populations. The most economical method for suppressing sta- ble fly populations is sanitation. In confined..., although parasitic wasps offer some measure of control, they do not produce immediate results, and they are not 100 per- cent effective. Therefore, do not use biological control alone but in concert with other meth- ods, such as sanitation. Chemical...

  15. Subspace modelling for structured noise suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiqiang Xu; Laura Rebollo-Neira; A. Plastino

    2009-08-07

    The problem of structured noise suppression is addressed by i)modelling the subspaces hosting the components of the signal conveying the information and ii)applying a non-extensive nonlinear technique for effecting the right separation. Although the approach is applicable to all situations satisfying the hypothesis of the proposed framework, this work is motivated by a particular scenario, namely, the cancellation of low frequency noise in broadband seismic signals.

  16. Active Vibration Suppression of Sandwich Beams using Piezoelectric Shear Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vel, Senthil

    on the effectiveness of the piezo- electric shear mechanism for active vibration suppression. In this paper, weActive Vibration Suppression of Sandwich Beams using Piezoelectric Shear Actuators Senthil S. Vel1 of the piezoelectric actuators to cause transverse shear deformation of the sandwich beam. Active vibration suppression

  17. CHAPTER: In-Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implantsBOOK TITLE: Implantable Neural Prostheses 2: Techniques and Engineering Approaches, D.M. Zhou and E. Greenbaum, Eds., Springer, NY 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Sanders, Charlene A [ORNL; Kandagor, Vincent [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model 'eye,' beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

  18. Chaos suppression in gas-solid fluidization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pence, D.V.; Beasley, D.E.

    1997-07-01

    The present study examines the effect of an opposing oscillatory flow on local, instantaneous heat transfer and pressure in a laboratory scale gas-fluidized bed. The experimental facility models a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (PAFBC), a hybrid combustor concept that couples a pulsed combustor with an atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed. Time-varying data were acquired at eight angular positions around a horizontal cylinder submerged in a monodisperse distribution of particles having a weight mean diameter of 345 {micro}m. Total flow rates employed in the present study ranged from 10 to 40% greater than the flow required for minimum fluidization. Spectral analyses of local, instantaneous heat flux and pressure clearly indicate that the bed hydrodynamics were significantly altered by the opposing secondary flow. The behavior of time-varying local pressure and heat transfer in fluidized beds in the absence of a secondary flow is consistent with deterministic chaos. Kolmogorov entropy estimates from local, instantaneous pressure suggest that the degree of chaotic behavior was substantially suppressed for operating conditions with low primary and secondary flow rates, and a secondary flow forcing frequency of 15 Hz. In contrast, entropy estimates from measurements of local, instantaneous heat transfer suggest no clear indication of chaos suppression for these operating conditions.

  19. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firth, Bruce E.; Kirk, Sharon E.; Gavaskar, Vasudeo S.

    2015-09-22

    A method for suppressing isomerization of an olefin metathesis product produced in a metathesis reaction includes adding an isomerization suppression agent to a mixture that includes the olefin metathesis product and residual metathesis catalyst from the metathesis reaction under conditions that are sufficient to passivate at least a portion of the residual metathesis catalyst. The isomerization suppression agent is phosphorous acid, a phosphorous acid ester, phosphinic acid, a phosphinic acid ester or combinations thereof. Methods of refining natural oils are described.

  20. Vibration suppression, stabilization, motion planning and tracking for flexible beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siranosian, Antranik Antonio

    2009-01-01

    B.2 The Virtual Vibration Absorber and Polynomial B.3vi B Experimental Vibration Suppression Results . . . . .H. Chen and C. M. Liaw, “Vibration acceleration control of

  1. A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-14

    A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

  2. Desert dust suppressing precipitation: A possible desertification feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Desert dust suppressing precipitation: A possible desertification feedback loop Daniel Rosenfeld of land use exposing the topsoil can initiate such a desertification feedback process. Satellite

  3. SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lanz, Lauranne; Bitsakis, Theodoros; Appleton, Philip N.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Lacy, Mark; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Nyland, Kristina; Meier, David S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Chang, Philip; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Martín, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    NGC 1266 is a nearby lenticular galaxy that harbors a massive outflow of molecular gas powered by the mechanical energy of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). It has been speculated that such outflows hinder star formation (SF) in their host galaxies, providing a form of feedback to the process of galaxy formation. Previous studies, however, indicated that only jets from extremely rare, high-power quasars or radio galaxies could impart significant feedback on their hosts. Here we present detailed observations of the gas and dust continuum of NGC 1266 at millimeter wavelengths. Our observations show that molecular gas is being driven out of the nuclear region at M-dot {sub out}?110 M{sub ?} yr{sup –1}, of which the vast majority cannot escape the nucleus. Only 2 M {sub ?} yr{sup –1} is actually capable of escaping the galaxy. Most of the molecular gas that remains is very inefficient at forming stars. The far-infrared emission is dominated by an ultra-compact (? 50 pc) source that could either be powered by an AGN or by an ultra-compact starburst. The ratio of the SF surface density (?{sub SFR}) to the gas surface density (?{sub H{sub 2}}) indicates that SF is suppressed by a factor of ?50 compared to normal star-forming galaxies if all gas is forming stars, and ?150 for the outskirt (98%) dense molecular gas if the central region is powered by an ultra-compact starburst. The AGN-driven bulk outflow could account for this extreme suppression by hindering the fragmentation and gravitational collapse necessary to form stars through a process of turbulent injection. This result suggests that even relatively common, low-power AGNs are able to alter the evolution of their host galaxies as their black holes grow onto the M-? relation.

  4. Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo1 , Bithika Khargharia2 , Bernard P. Zeigler2 , Maria J. Vasconcelos3 Abstract In this paper we discuss modeling and simulation of forest fire simulation-based predictions of forest fire spread and suppression in uniform and non-uniform environmental

  5. Speculative Execution Exception Recovery Write-back Suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahlke, Scott A.

    Speculative Execution Exception Recovery using Write-back Suppression Roger A. Bringmann Scott A or extra register pressure. This paper introduces a new architecture scheme referred to as write-back that with a modest amount of hardware, write- back suppression supports accurate reporting and handling of exceptions

  6. APPLICATIONS Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ntaimo, Lewis

    APPLICATIONS Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo Department of Industrial. Speedway Tucson, AZ 85721 In this article, the authors discuss modeling and simulation of forest fire to obtain timely simulation-based predictions of forest fire spread and suppression in uniform

  7. Large Scale Power Suppression in a Multifield Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Frazer, Jonathan; Sousa, Kepa

    2015-01-01

    Power suppression of the cosmic microwave background on the largest observable scales could provide valuable clues about the particle physics underlying inflation. Here we consider the prospect of power suppression in the context of the multifield landscape. Based on the assumption that our observable universe emerges from a tunnelling event and that the relevant features originate purely from inflationary dynamics, we find that the power spectrum not only contains information on single-field dynamics, but also places strong con- straints on all scalar fields present in the theory. We find that the simplest single-field models giving rise to power suppression do not generalise to multifield models in a straightforward way, as the resulting superhorizon evolution of the curvature perturbation tends to erase any power suppression present at horizon crossing. On the other hand, multifield effects do present a means of generating power suppression which to our knowledge has so far not been considered. We propose ...

  8. Active Vibration Suppression of Sandwich Beams using Piezoelectric Shear Actuators: Experiments and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vel, Senthil

    Active Vibration Suppression of Sandwich Beams using Piezoelectric Shear Actuators: Experiments assessment of the vibration suppression of smart structures using piezoelectric shear actuators. Experimental of the sandwich beam. Active vibration suppression is achieved using either positive position feedback or strain

  9. Estimating Suppression of Eddy Mixing by Mean Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klocker, Andreas

    Particle- and tracer-based estimates of lateral diffusivities are used to estimate the suppression of eddy mixing across strong currents. Particles and tracers are advected using a velocity field derived from sea surface ...

  10. Mutations that suppress the thermosensitivity of green fluorescent protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haseloff, Jim

    Mutations that suppress the thermosensitivity of green fluorescent protein Kirby R. Siemering*, Ralph Golbik, Richard Sever* and Jim Haseloff* Background: The green fluorescent protein (GFP temperatures. Background The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the bio- luminescent jellyfish Aequorea

  11. J/Psi suppression in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW; Sa, BW.

    2000-01-01

    Using a multiphase transport model, we study the relative importance of J/psi suppression mechanisms due to plasma screening, gluon scattering, and hadron absorption in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion ...

  12. Nuclear Suppression of Dileptons at Large xF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cepila; J. Nemchik

    2009-10-09

    We study a significant nuclear suppression of the relative production rates (p(d)+A)/(p+d(p)) for the Drell-Yan process at large Feynman xF. Since this is the region of minimal values for the light-front momentum fraction variable x2 in the target nucleus, it is tempting to interpret this as a manifestation of coherence or of a Color Glass Condensate. We demonstrate, however, that this suppression mechanism is governed by the energy conservation restrictions in multiple parton rescatterings in nuclear matter. To eliminate nuclear shadowing effects coming from the coherence, we calculate nuclear suppression in the light-cone dipole approach at large dilepton masses and at energy accessible at FNAL. Our calculations are in a good agreement with data from the E772 experiment. Using the same mechanism we predict also nuclear suppression at forward rapidities in the RHIC energy range.

  13. Design fires for tunnel water mist suppression systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvel, Ricky O

    Water mist systems are unable to suppress or control large fires, therefore the ‘design fire’ for a water mist system in a tunnel should not be specified in terms of peak heat release rate, but rather in terms of the ...

  14. Suppression of Cavity Formation in Ceramics: Prospects for Superplasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppression of Cavity Formation in Ceramics: Prospects for Superplasticity A. G. EVANS* Materials, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 Ceramics exhibit macroscopic stressistrain rate relations- tive surface diffusivities must be selected. I. Introduction HEN polycrystalline ceramic materials

  15. Vibration suppression, stabilization, motion planning and tracking for flexible beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siranosian, Antranik Antonio

    2009-01-01

    22] J. P. Den Hartog, Mechanical Vibrations, 3rd ed. McGraw-absorber reduces vibrations of a mechanical system it isimprove vibration suppression on a mechanical system forced

  16. Suppression of pool fires with HRC-125 in a simulated engine nacelle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, David R. (INS, Inc., Lexington Park, MD); Hewson, John C.

    2007-06-01

    CFD simulations are conducted to predict the distribution of fire suppressant in an engine nacelle and to predict the suppression of pool fires by the application of this suppressant. In the baseline configuration, which is based on an installed system, suppressant is injected through four nozzles at a rate fast enough to suppress all simulated pool fires. Variations that reduce the mass of the suppression system (reducing the impact of the suppression system on meeting mission needs) are considered, including a reduction in the rate of suppressant injection, a reduction in the mass of suppressant and a reduction in the number of nozzles. In general, these variations should work to reduce the effectiveness of the suppression system, but the CFD results point out certain changes that have negligible impact, at least for the range of phenomena considered here. The results are compared with measurements where available. Comparisons with suppressant measurements are reasonable. A series of twenty-three fire suppression tests were conducted to check the predictions. The pre-test predictions were generally successful in identifying the range of successful suppression tests. In two separate cases, each where one nozzle of the suppression system was capped, the simulation results did indicate a failure to suppress for a condition where the tests indicated successful suppression. When the test-suppressant discharge rate was reduced by roughly 25%, the tests were in agreement with the predictions. That is, the simulations predict a failure to suppress slightly before observed in these cases.

  17. Suppression of Heterodera schachtii Populations by Dactylella oviparasitica in Four Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olatinwo, R; Becker, J Ole; Borneman, J

    2006-01-01

    R. Keeney, eds. Methods of soil analysis: Part 2. Chemicalresponsible for speci?c soil suppressiveness to plantto nonsuppressive soil produced stable suppressiveness over

  18. Selection of hydrate suppression methods for gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, S.D.; Covington, K.K.; Collie, J.T. III

    1999-07-01

    This paper will discuss and compare the methods used to suppress hydrate formation in natural gas streams. Included in the comparison will be regenerated systems using ethylene glycol and non-regenerated systems using methanol. A comparison will be made between the quantities of methanol and ethylene glycol required to achieve a given a suppression. A discussion of BTEX emissions resulting from the ethylene glycol regenerator along with the effect or process variables on these emissions is also given.

  19. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firth, Bruce E.; Kirk, Sharon E.

    2015-10-27

    A method for suppressing isomerization of an olefin metathesis product produced in a metathesis reaction includes adding an isomerization suppression agent that includes nitric acid to a mixture that includes the olefin metathesis product and residual metathesis catalyst from the metathesis reaction under conditions that are sufficient to passivate at least a portion of the residual metathesis catalyst. Methods of refining a natural oil are described.

  20. CMB quadrupole suppression: II. The early fast roll stage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Boyanovsky; H. J. de Vega; N. G. Sanchez

    2007-03-12

    Within the effective field theory of inflation, an initialization of the classical dynamics of the inflaton with approximate equipartition between the kinetic and potential energy of the inflaton leads to a brief fast roll stage that precedes the slow roll regime. The fast roll stage leads to an attractive potential in the wave equations for the mode functions of curvature and tensor perturbations. The evolution of the inflationary perturbations is equivalent to the scattering by this potential and a useful dictionary between the scattering data and observables is established.Implementing methods from scattering theory we prove that this attractive potential leads to a suppression of the quadrupole moment for CMB and B-mode angular power spectra. The scale of the potential is determined by the Hubble parameter during slow roll. Within the effective field theory of inflation at the grand unification (GUT) energy scale we find that if inflation lasts a total number of efolds N_{tot} ~ 59, there is a 10-20% suppression of the CMB quadrupole and about 2-4% suppression of the tensor quadrupole. The suppression of higher multipoles is smaller, falling off as 1/l^2. The suppression is much smaller for N_{tot} > 59, therefore if the observable suppression originates in the fast roll stage, there is the upper bound N_{tot} ~ 59.

  1. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andi Cucoanes; Pau Novella; Anatael Cabrera; Muriel Fallot; Anthony Onillon; Michel Obolensky; Frederic Yermia

    2015-01-02

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications on the global $\\theta_{13}$ knowledge today. First, Double Chooz, in its final configuration, is the only experiment benefiting from a negligible reactor flux error due to a $\\sim$90\\% geometrical suppression. Second, Daya Bay and RENO could benefit from their partial geometrical cancellation, yielding a potential $\\sim$50\\% error suppression, thus significantly improving the global $\\theta_{13}$ precision today. And third, we illustrate the rationale behind further error suppression upon the exploitation of the inter-reactor error correlations, so far neglected. So, our publication is a key step forward in the context of high precision neutrino reactor experiments providing insight on the suppression of their intrinsic flux error uncertainty, thus affecting past and current experimental results, as well as the design of future experiments.

  2. Arsenite suppression of BMP signaling in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Marjorie A.; Qin, Qin [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States); Hu, Qin; Zhao, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Rice, Robert H., E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Arsenic, a human skin carcinogen, suppresses differentiation of cultured keratinocytes. Exploring the mechanism of this suppression revealed that BMP-6 greatly increased levels of mRNA for keratins 1 and 10, two of the earliest differentiation markers expressed, a process prevented by co-treatment with arsenite. BMP also stimulated, and arsenite suppressed, mRNA for FOXN1, an important transcription factor driving early keratinocyte differentiation. Keratin mRNAs increased slowly after BMP-6 addition, suggesting they are indirect transcriptional targets. Inhibition of Notch1 activation blocked BMP induction of keratins 1 and 10, while FOXN1 induction was largely unaffected. Supporting a requirement for Notch1 signaling in keratin induction, BMP increased levels of activated Notch1, which was blocked by arsenite. BMP also greatly decreased active ERK, while co-treatment with arsenite maintained active ERK. Inhibition of ERK signaling mimicked BMP by inducing keratin and FOXN1 mRNAs and by increasing active Notch1, effects blocked by arsenite. Of 6 dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) targeting ERK, two were induced by BMP unless prevented by simultaneous exposure to arsenite and EGF. Knockdown of DUSP2 or DUSP14 using shRNAs greatly reduced FOXN1 and keratins 1 and 10 mRNA levels and their induction by BMP. Knockdown also decreased activated Notch1, keratin 1 and keratin 10 protein levels, both in the presence and absence of BMP. Thus, one of the earliest effects of BMP is induction of DUSPs, which increases FOXN1 transcription factor and activates Notch1, both required for keratin gene expression. Arsenite prevents this cascade by maintaining ERK signaling, at least in part by suppressing DUSP expression. - Highlights: • BMP induces FOXN1 transcription. • BMP induces DUSP2 and DUSP14, suppressing ERK activation. • Arsenite suppresses levels of phosphorylated Smad1/5 and FOXN1 and DUSP mRNA. • These actions rationalize arsenite suppression of keratinocyte differentiation.

  3. Suppression of Neoclassical Tearing Modes by the Magnetic Well in Shear-Optimised Tokamak Discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppression of Neoclassical Tearing Modes by the Magnetic Well in Shear-Optimised Tokamak Discharges

  4. Suppression of radio frequency knock out in stacked beams by phase shifting the betatron oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, K M

    1957-01-01

    Suppression of radio frequency knock out in stacked beams by phase shifting the betatron oscillations

  5. Large Scale Power Suppression in a Multifield Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose J. Blanco-Pillado; Mafalda Dias; Jonathan Frazer; Kepa Sousa

    2015-03-25

    Power suppression of the cosmic microwave background on the largest observable scales could provide valuable clues about the particle physics underlying inflation. Here we consider the prospect of power suppression in the context of the multifield landscape. Based on the assumption that our observable universe emerges from a tunnelling event and that the relevant features originate purely from inflationary dynamics, we find that the power spectrum not only contains information on single-field dynamics, but also places strong con- straints on all scalar fields present in the theory. We find that the simplest single-field models giving rise to power suppression do not generalise to multifield models in a straightforward way, as the resulting superhorizon evolution of the curvature perturbation tends to erase any power suppression present at horizon crossing. On the other hand, multifield effects do present a means of generating power suppression which to our knowledge has so far not been considered. We propose a mechanism to illustrate this, which we dub flume inflation.

  6. Stimulus-dependent suppression of chaos in recurrent neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajan, Kanaka; Abbott, L. F.; Sompolinsky, Haim [Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Icahn 262, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Neuroscience and Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032-2695 (United States); Racah Institute of Physics, Interdisciplinary Center for Neural Computation, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2010-07-15

    Neuronal activity arises from an interaction between ongoing firing generated spontaneously by neural circuits and responses driven by external stimuli. Using mean-field analysis, we ask how a neural network that intrinsically generates chaotic patterns of activity can remain sensitive to extrinsic input. We find that inputs not only drive network responses, but they also actively suppress ongoing activity, ultimately leading to a phase transition in which chaos is completely eliminated. The critical input intensity at the phase transition is a nonmonotonic function of stimulus frequency, revealing a 'resonant' frequency at which the input is most effective at suppressing chaos even though the power spectrum of the spontaneous activity peaks at zero and falls exponentially. A prediction of our analysis is that the variance of neural responses should be most strongly suppressed at frequencies matching the range over which many sensory systems operate.

  7. Kink instability suppression with stochastic cooling pickup and kicker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao Y.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2012-05-20

    The kink instability is one of the major beam dynamics issues of the linac-ring based electron ion collider. This head-tail type instability arises from the oscillation of the electron beam inside the opposing ion beam. It must be suppressed to achieve the desired luminosity. There are various ways to suppress the instability, such as tuning the chromaticity in the ion ring or by a dedicated feedback system of the electron beam position at IP, etc. However, each method has its own limitation. In this paper, we will discuss an alternative opportunity of suppressing the kink instability of the proposed eRHIC at BNL using the existing pickup-kicker system of the stochastic cooling system in RHIC.

  8. Experience with IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko,V.N.; Luo, Y.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Ganetis, G.; Hoff, L.; Louie, W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Montag, C.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-06-23

    An intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for RHIC operating with heavy ions. In order to suppress the IBS we designed and implemented new lattice with higher betatron tunes. This lattice had been developed during last three years and had been used for gold ions in yellow ring of the RHIC during d-Au part of the RHIC Run-8. The use of this lattice allowed both significant increases in the luminosity lifetime and the luminosity levels via reduction of beta-stars in the IPS. In this paper we report on the development, the tests and the performance of IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC, including the resulting increases in the peak and the average luminosity. We also report on our plans for future steps with the IBS suppression.

  9. Technology Assessment of Dust Suppression Techniques Applied During Structural Demolition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, J.F.; Ebadian, M.A.; Williams, P.T.; Dua, S.K.

    1998-10-20

    Hanford, Fernald, Savannah River, and other sites are currently reviewing technologies that can be implemented to demolish buildings in a cost-effective manner. In order to demolish a structure properly and, at the same time, minimize the amount of dust generated from a given technology, an evaluation must be conducted to choose the most appropriate dust suppression technology given site-specific conditions. Thus, the purpose of this research, which was carried out at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University, was to conduct an experimental study of dust aerosol abatement (dust suppression) methods as applied to nuclear D and D. This experimental study targeted the problem of dust suppression during the demolition of nuclear facilities. The resulting data were employed to assist in the development of mathematical correlations that can be applied to predict dust generation during structural demolition.

  10. Suppressing Proton Decay in Theories with Localised Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobby S. Acharya; Roberto Valandro

    2006-08-01

    We calculate the contribution to the proton decay amplitude from Kaluza-Klein lepto-quarks in theories with extra dimensions, localised fermions and gauge fields which propagate in the bulk. Such models naturally occur within the context of M-theory. In SU(5) models we show that carefully including all such modes gives a distinctive pattern of decays through various channels including a strong suppression of decays into neutrinos or right handed positrons. By contrast there is no such suppression for SO(10).

  11. An alternative model of jet suppression at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lietava, R; Pisútová, N; Tomasik, Boris; Lietava, Roman; Pisut, Jan; Pisutova, Neva; Tomasik, Boris

    2003-01-01

    We propose a simple Glauber-type mechanism for suppression of jet production up to transverse momenta of about 10 GeV/c at RHIC. For processes in this kinematic region, the formation time is smaller than the interval between two successive hard partonic collisions and the subsequent collision influences the jet production. Number of jets then roughly scales with the number of participants. Proportionality to the number of binary collisions is recovered for very high transverse momenta. The model predicts suppression of jet production in d+Au collisions at RHIC.

  12. IBS suppression lattice in RHIC: theory and experimental verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov,A.V.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Cupolo, J.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Hoff, L.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Louie, W.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-08-25

    Intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation with heavy ions. Over the last few years the process of IBS was carefully studied in RHIC with dedicated IBS measurements and their comparison with the theoretical models. A new lattice was recently designed and implemented in RHIC to suppress transverse IBS growth, which lowered the average arc dispersion by about 20% [1]. This lattice became operational during RHIC Run-8. We review the IBS suppression mechanism, IBS measurements before and after the lattice change, and comparisons with predictions.

  13. An alternative model of jet suppression at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Lietava; Jan Pisut; Neva Pisutova; Boris Tomasik

    2003-02-10

    We propose a simple Glauber-type mechanism for suppression of jet production up to transverse momenta of about 10 GeV/c at RHIC. For processes in this kinematic region, the formation time is smaller than the interval between two successive hard partonic collisions and the subsequent collision influences the jet production. Number of jets then roughly scales with the number of participants. Proportionality to the number of binary collisions is recovered for very high transverse momenta. The model predicts suppression of jet production in d+Au collisions at RHIC.

  14. ARGUS-PRIMA: Wind Power Prediction | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See EnergyCurrent : 0.0 Waiting for0 -IssueARGONNE

  15. Noise Suppression and Spectral Decomposition for State-Dependent Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    Noise Suppression and Spectral Decomposition for State-Dependent Noise in the Presence been shown that the observed noise amplitude of an intrinsically noisy system may be reduced by causing noise reduction in terms of the low-frequency end of the spectrum as well as the integrated spectrum

  16. Fission-suppressed hybrid reactor: the fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Coops, M.S.

    1982-12-01

    Results of a conceptual design study of a /sup 233/U-producing fusion breeder are presented. The majority of the study was devoted to conceptual design and evaluation of a fission-suppressed blanket and to fuel cycle issues such as fuel reprocessing, fuel handling, and fuel management. Studies in the areas of fusion engineering, reactor safety, and economics were also performed.

  17. Microreview Elicitation and suppression of microbe-associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheen, Jen

    Microreview Elicitation and suppression of microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity in plant­microbe interactions Ping He, Libo Shan and Jen Sheen* Department of Molecular Biology. Summary Recent studies have uncovered fascinating molecular mechanisms underlying plant­microbe

  18. Dynamical systems modeling of Continuous Flash Suppression Daisuke Shimaoka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    : Binocular rivalry Adaptation Neural modeling a b s t r a c t Continuous Flash Suppression (CFS is considered to be involved in CFS, but does not reproduce CFS. We then extend the model by including of visibility observed in CFS. In addition, this model captured some defining characteristics of CFS

  19. Novel rf mems tunable filters with adjustable spurious suppression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekar, Vikram

    2009-05-15

    by introducing a transmission zero at spurious resonance frequency. Measurement results for the fabricated tapped-resonator filters show an improvement of the upper rejection skirt due to spurious suppression to a level of -40 dB, with insertion loss of 1.2-1.5 d...

  20. ROBUST RESIDUAL VIBRATION SUPPRESSION USING IIR DIGITAL FILTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    ROBUST RESIDUAL VIBRATION SUPPRESSION USING IIR DIGITAL FILTERS D. Economou a , C. Mavroidis b and I. Antoniadis a a National Technical University of Athens Department of Mechanical Engineering, 9 Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

  1. Using multiple perspectives to suppress information and complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelsey, R.L. |; Webster, R.B.; Hartley, R.T.

    1998-09-01

    Dissemination of battlespace information involves getting information to particular warfighters that is both useful and in a form that facilitates the tasks of those particular warfighters. There are two issues which motivate this problem of dissemination. The first issue deals with disseminating pertinent information to a particular warfighter. This can be thought of as information suppression. The second issue deals with facilitating the use of the information by tailoring the computer interface to the specific tasks of an individual warfighter. This can be thought of as interface complexity suppression. This paper presents a framework for suppressing information using an object-based knowledge representation methodology. This methodology has the ability to represent knowledge and information in multiple perspectives. Information can be suppressed by creating a perspective specific to an individual warfighter. In this way, only the information pertinent and useful to a warfighter is made available to that warfighter. Information is not removed, lost, or changed, but spread among multiple perspectives. Interface complexity is managed in a similar manner. Rather than have one generalized computer interface to access all information, the computer interface can be divided into interface elements. Interface elements can then be selected and arranged into a perspective-specific interface. This is done in a manner to facilitate completion of tasks contained in that perspective. A basic battlespace domain containing ground and air elements and associated warfighters is used to exercise the methodology.

  2. Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Leslie Redpath

    2012-05-01

    This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

  3. Has fire suppression increased the amount of carbon stored in western U.S. forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fellows, Aaron W.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    precipitation (MAP), forest type, and fire regime. [ 7 ] Thein mid-elevation conifer forests, where fire suppression is20th century fire suppression in western US forests, and a

  4. The optimal suppression of a low-cost technology by a durable-good monopoly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Perloff, Jeffrey M

    1994-01-01

    SUPPRESSION OF A LOW-COST TECHNOLOGY BY A DURABLE-GOODsuppression of a low-cost technology by a durable-goodSuppression of a Low-Cost Technology by a Durable-Good

  5. Suppression of the Rhines effect and the location of vortices on Saturn A. B. Penny,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, David S.

    Suppression of the Rhines effect and the location of vortices on Saturn A. B. Penny,1 A. P. Showman latitudes on Saturn. Citation: Penny, A. B., A. P. Showman, and D. S. Choi (2010), Suppression of the Rhines

  6. Suppression MHD instabilities by IBW heating in HT-7 Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Qin; Y. P. Zhao; X. J. Zhang; P. Xu; Y. Yang; the HT-7 team

    2010-01-21

    In HT-7 tokamak, the m= 2/1 tearing mode can be effectively suppressed by the ion bernstein wave (IBW) when the location of power deposition is near the q=2 rational surface. Off-axis electron heating and greatly increase of electron density was observed, in the meantime, the particle confinement appears to be improved with the increased of the central line averaged electron density and the drop of Da emission. Induced large ne gradients and pressures were spatially correlated with the IBW deposition profile by theoretical calculation >. It is suggested that off-axis IBW heating modifies the electron pressure profile, and so the current density profile could be redistributed resulting in the suppression of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instability. It provides an integrated way for making combined effects on both the stabilization of tearing modes and controlling of pressure profile.

  7. Vector Higgs bosons and possible suppression of flavorchanging neutral current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao Yu Qian

    2006-10-17

    We replace the scalar Higgs doublet with a vector Higgs boson doublet to the unified electroweak W-S model and find most of important features of W-S model are kept unchanged only the Higgs boson now become vector bosons. Lorentz invariance has been carefully discussed. The most important challenge is there will be three massless vector Higgs bosons. The remarkable effect is the possible suppression of the flavorchanging neutral current compare to the multi-Higgs model.

  8. Suppression of quantum chaos in a quantum computer hardware

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lages, J.; Shepelyansky, D. L. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, UMR 5152 du CNRS, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2006-08-15

    We present numerical and analytical studies of a quantum computer proposed by the Yamamoto group in Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 017901 (2002). The stable and quantum chaos regimes in the quantum computer hardware are identified as a function of magnetic field gradient and dipole-dipole couplings between qubits on a square lattice. It is shown that a strong magnetic field gradient leads to suppression of quantum chaos.

  9. Suppression of quantum chaos in a quantum computer hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lages; D. L. Shepelyansky

    2005-10-14

    We present numerical and analytical studies of a quantum computer proposed by the Yamamoto group in Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 017901 (2002). The stable and quantum chaos regimes in the quantum computer hardware are identified as a function of magnetic field gradient and dipole-dipole couplings between qubits on a square lattice. It is shown that a strong magnetic field gradient leads to suppression of quantum chaos.

  10. Suppression of Rayleigh Taylor instability in strongly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-06-15

    The Rayleigh Taylor instability in a strongly coupled plasma medium has been investigated using the equations of generalized hydrodynamics. It is demonstrated that the visco-elasticity of the strongly coupled medium due to strong inter particle correlations leads to a suppression of the Rayleigh Taylor instability unless certain threshold conditions are met. The relevance of these results to experiments on laser compression of matter to high densities including those related to inertial confinement fusion using lasers has also been shown.

  11. Suppression of auger recombination in ""giant"" core/shell nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia Santamaria, Florencio; Vela, Javier; Schaller, Richard D; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Klimov, Victor I; Chen, Yongfen

    2009-01-01

    Many potential applications of semiconductor nanocrystals are hindered by nonradiative Auger recombination wherein the electron-hole (exciton) recombination energy is transferred to a third charge carrier. This process severely limits the lifetime and bandwidth of optical gain, leads to large nonradiative losses in light emitting diodes and photovoltaic cells, and is believed to be responsible for intermittency ('blinking') of emission from single nanocrystals. The development of nanostructures in which Auger recombination is suppressed has been a longstanding goal in colloidal nanocrystal research. Here, we demonstrate that such suppression is possible using so-called 'giant' nanocrystals that consist of a small CdSe core and a thick CdS shell. These nanostructures exhibit a very long biexciton lifetime ({approx}10 ns) that is likely dominated by radiative decay instead of non-radiative Auger recombination. As a result of suppressed Auger recombination, even high-order multiexcitons exhibit high emission efficiencies, which allows us to demonstrate optical amplification with an extraordinarily large bandwidth (>500 me V) and record low excitation thresholds.

  12. Vibration Suppression: Reducced-Order ModeVResidual Mode Filter Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vibration Suppression: Reducced-Order ModeVResidual Mode Filter Control Using Smart Structures with large flexible antennas, andor flexible support structures, suppressing vibrations caused by on on the development of improved vibration suppression techniques for flexible spacecraft structures using smart

  13. Edinburgh Research Explorer ERK2 Suppresses Self-Renewal Capacity of Embryonic Stem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehn, Philipp

    Edinburgh Research Explorer ERK2 Suppresses Self-Renewal Capacity of Embryonic Stem Cells, T 2013, 'ERK2 Suppresses Self-Renewal Capacity of Embryonic Stem Cells, but Is Not Required for Multi date: 26. Jun. 2014 #12;ERK2 Suppresses Self-Renewal Capacity of Embryonic Stem Cells

  14. Efficiency-Droop Suppression by Using Large-Bandgap AlGaInN Thin Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Efficiency-Droop Suppression by Using Large-Bandgap AlGaInN Thin Barrier Layers in InGaN Quantum DOI: 10.1109/JPHOT.2013.2255028 1943-0655/$31.00 Ó2013 IEEE #12;Efficiency-Droop Suppression by Using with the consideration of carrier transport effect for efficiency droop suppression. The lattice-matched Al

  15. Semiclassical suppression of weak anisotropies of a generic Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Valerio Battisti; Riccardo Belvedere; Giovanni Montani

    2009-06-11

    A semiclassical mechanism which suppresses the weak anisotropies of an inhomogeneous cosmological model is developed. In particular, a wave function of this Universe having a meaningful probabilistic interpretation is obtained that is in agreement with the Copenhagen School. It describes the evolution of the anisotropies with respect to the isotropic scale factor which is regarded as a semiclassical variable playing an observer-like role. Near the cosmological singularity the solution spreads over all values of the anisotropies while, when the Universe expands sufficiently, the closed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model appears to be the favorite state.

  16. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Kramer, G.; Liu, D.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; White, R.

    2015-01-01

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fastmore »Wave heating.« less

  17. Suppression of Dilepton Production in Hot Hadronic Matter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, C.; Lee, S. H.; Ko, Che Ming.

    1995-01-01

    VOLUME 52, NUMBER 2 Suppression of dilepton production in hot hadronic matter AUGUST 1995 )jc Chungsik Song, ' Su Houng Lee, ~ and Che Ming Ko ~ Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843...) and g~(x), which trans- form as $t g(x)+g R(x) =h(x)(t tt gL tt under h(x) E [SU(2)v]??t and gz z e [SU(2)L z] zt,?t. Introducing the vector meson V?as the gauge field of the local symmetry and the photon M as an external gauge field of the global...

  18. Testing for new physics in singly Cabibbo suppressed D decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuval Grossman; Alexander L. Kagan; Jure Zupan

    2012-04-16

    We devise tests for a new physics origin of the recently measured direct CP violation in singly Cabibbo suppressed D decays. The tests take the form of sum rules for the CP asymmetries in various D decays. They are based on the fact that within the standard model CP violation arises from interference of the dominant tree amplitudes with the Delta I=1/2 penguin amplitudes. The sum rules would be violated if the observed CP violation is due to new physics contributions to the effective weak Hamiltonian that change isospin by Delta I=3/2.

  19. Strangeness suppression of qq¯ creation observed in exclusive reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mestayer, M. D.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; et al

    2014-10-10

    In this study, we measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ?K+, p?0, and n?+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq¯ creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq¯ pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  20. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Kramer, G.; Liu, D.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; White, R.

    2015-01-01

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fast Wave heating.

  1. Reliability study of an emerging fire suppression system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, David A.; Rossati, Lyric M.; Fritz, Nathan K.; Cournoyer, Michael E.; Granzow, Howard N.

    2015-02-07

    Self-contained fire extinguishers are a robust, reliable and minimally invasive means of fire suppression for gloveboxes. Plutonium gloveboxes are known to present harsh environmental conditions for polymer materials, these include radiation damage and chemical exposure, both of which tend to degrade the lifetime of engineered polymer components. The primary component of interest in self-contained fire extinguishers is the nylon 6-6 machined tube that comprises the main body of the system.Thermo-mechanical modeling and characterization of nylon 6-6 for use in plutonium glovebox applications has been carried out. Data has been generated regarding property degradation leading to poor, or reduced, engineering performancemore »of nylon 6-6 components. In this study, nylon 6-6 tensile specimens conforming to the casing of self-contained fire extinguisher systems have been exposed to hydrochloric, nitric, and sulfuric acids. This information was used to predict the performance of a load bearing engineering component comprised of nylon 6-6 and designed to operate in a consistent manner over a specified time period. The study provides a fundamental understanding of the engineering performance of the fire suppression system and the effects of environmental degradation due to acid exposure on engineering performance. Data generated help identify the limitations of self-contained fire extinguishers. No critical areas of concern for plutonium glovebox applications of nylon 6-6 have been identified when considering exposure to mineral acid.« less

  2. Concrete Dust Suppression System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The improved technology is a water-based dust suppression system for controlling concrete dust generated by demolition equipment, in this case a demolition ram. This demonstration was performed to assess the effectiveness of this system to (1) minimize the amount of water used to suppress potentially contaminated dust, (2) focus the water spray on the dust-generating source and (3) minimize the dust cloud generated by the demolition activity. The technology successfully reduced the water required by a factor of eight compared to the traditional (baseline) method, controlled the dust generated, and permitted a reduction in the work force. The water spray can be focused at the ram point, but it is affected by wind. Prior to the use of this dust control system, dust generated by the demolition ram was controlled manually by spraying with fire hoses (the baseline technology). The improved technology is 18% less expensive than the baseline technology for the conditions and parameters of this demonstration, however, the automated system can save up to 80% versus the baseline whenever waste water treatment costs are considered. For demolishing one high-walled room and a long slab with a total of 413 m{sup 3} (14,580 ft{sup 3}) of concrete, the savings are $105,000 (waste water treatment included). The improved technology reduced the need for water consumption and treatment by about 88% which results in most of the savings.

  3. Short wavelength limits of current shot noise suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nause, Ariel; Dyunin, Egor; Gover, Avraham

    2014-08-15

    Shot noise in electron beam was assumed to be one of the features beyond control of accelerator physics. Current results attained in experiments at Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven and Linac Coherent Light Source in Stanford suggest that the control of the shot noise in electron beam (and therefore of spontaneous radiation and Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission of Free Electron Lasers) is feasible at least in the visible range of the spectrum. Here, we present a general linear formulation for collective micro-dynamics of e-beam noise and its control. Specifically, we compare two schemes for current noise suppression: a quarter plasma wavelength drift section and a combined drift/dispersive (transverse magnetic field) section. We examine and compare their limits of applicability at short wavelengths via considerations of electron phase-spread and the related Landau damping effect.

  4. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Nesbitt, Loyd B. (San Jose, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  5. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Nesbitt, L.B.

    1997-01-21

    A system is disclosed for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs. 3 figs.

  6. Unified Description of Charmonium Suppression in QGP Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Captain R; Ganesh, S; Mishra, M

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that the quarkonia suppression in a thermal QCD medium created at heavy ion collisions is a complex interplay of various physical processes. In this article we put together most of these processes in a unified way to calculate the charmonium survival probability (nuclear modification factor) at energies available at relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. We have included shadowing as the dominant cold nuclear matter (CNM) effect. Further, gluo-dissociation and collision damping has been included which provide width to the spectral function of charmonia in a thermal medium and causes the dissociation of charmonium along with usual colour screening. We include the colour screening using our recently proposed modified Chu and Matsui model. Furthermore we incorporate the recombination of uncorrelated charm and anti-charm quark for the regeneration of charmonium over the entire temporal evolution of QGP medium. Finally...

  7. Method and apparatus for suppressing waves in a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.

    2005-10-04

    Methods and apparatus for suppression of wave energy within a fluid-filled borehole using a low pressure acoustic barrier. In one embodiment, a flexible diaphragm type device is configured as an open bottomed tubular structure for disposition in a borehole to be filled with a gas to create a barrier to wave energy, including tube waves. In another embodiment, an expandable umbrella type device is used to define a chamber in which a gas is disposed. In yet another embodiment, a reverse acting bladder type device is suspended in the borehole. Due to its reverse acting properties, the bladder expands when internal pressure is reduced, and the reverse acting bladder device extends across the borehole to provide a low pressure wave energy barrier.

  8. Dynamic instability of microtubules: effect of catastrophe-suppressing drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pankaj Kumar Mishra; Ambarish Kunwar; Sutapa Mukherji; Debashish Chowdhury

    2007-02-21

    Microtubules are stiff filamentary proteins that constitute an important component of the cytoskeleton of cells. These are known to exhibit a dynamic instability. A steadily growing microtubule can suddenly start depolymerizing very rapidly; this phenomenon is known as ``catastrophe''. However, often a shrinking microtubule is ``rescued'' and starts polymerizing again. Here we develope a model for the polymerization-depolymerization dynamics of microtubules in the presence of {\\it catastrophe-suppressing drugs}. Solving the dynamical equations in the steady-state, we derive exact analytical expressions for the length distributions of the microtubules tipped with drug-bound tubulin subunits as well as those of the microtubules, in the growing and shrinking phases, tipped with drug-free pure tubulin subunits. We also examine the stability of the steady-state solutions.

  9. Has fire suppression increased the amount of carbon stored in western U.S. forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fellows, Aaron W.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    and M. L. Goulden (2008), Has fire suppression increased thecarbon storage in the United States. 2. The role of fireand fire management, Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr. , 9, 145 – 170,

  10. Colour Deconfinement and J/Psi Suppression in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Satz

    1997-11-11

    1. Introduction 2. Charmomium Dissociation and Colour Deconfinement 3. J/Psi Production in Nuclear Collisions 4. Anomalous J/Psi Suppression 5. Outlook and Summary

  11. Noise suppression and enhanced focusability in plasma Raman amplifier with multi-frequency pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noise suppression and enhanced focusability in plasma Raman amplifier with multi-frequency pump A that backscatter of the desired seed pulse proceeds, the usual methods of noise suppression do not apply. In ideally uniform plasmas, the Raman instability of the plasma noise and precursor amplification

  12. Fabrication and Optimal Strain Sensor Placement in an Instrumented Disk Drive Suspension for Vibration Suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Roberto

    for Vibration Suppression Kenn Oldham, Stanley Kon Computer Mechanics Laboratory (CML) University of California drive suspension with vibra- tion sensing strain gages can enhance vibration suppression in hard disk bits. As the industry targets bit densities of 1 terabit per square inch, airflow induced vibration

  13. TITLE: ACTIVE VIBRATION SUPPRESSION OF SMART STRUCTURES USING PIEZOELECTRIC SHEAR ACTUATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vel, Senthil

    TITLE: ACTIVE VIBRATION SUPPRESSION OF SMART STRUCTURES USING PIEZOELECTRIC SHEAR ACTUATORS Authors Current active vibration suppression systems usually consist of piezoelectric extension actuators bonded of polarization to cause shear deformation of the material. We present an exact analysis and active vibration

  14. Suppression of quantum chaos in a quantum computer hardware J. Lages* and D. L. Shepelyansky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    Suppression of quantum chaos in a quantum computer hardware J. Lages* and D. L. Shepelyansky computer proposed by the Yamamoto group in Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 017901 2002 . The stable and quantum chaos gradient leads to suppression of quantum chaos. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.74.026208 PACS number s : 05.45.Mt

  15. Timedomain MRSI quantitation combining multivoxel processing, FIR based solvent suppression and prior knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time­domain MRSI quantitation combining multivoxel processing, FIR based solvent suppression and prior knowledge P. Pels#, L. Vanhamme#, S. Van Hu#el#, and P. Van Hecke + # Katholieke Universiteit processing using a FIR filter for solvent suppression. The advantage of this multivoxel approach

  16. Natural Kinds and Induction in the Special [Author Suppressed for Blind Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickel, Bernhard

    Natural Kinds and Induction in the Special Sciences [Author Suppressed for Blind Review] March 10 to investigate concerns a contrast [Acknowledgments suppressed for blind review.] 1See, e.g., Boyd (1988, 1991 conditions is it appropriate to infer that this is so on the basis of the knowledge that a non

  17. Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image of Mathematics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, 4 Elekta Oy, Helsinki, Finland Abstract Ultra-low. (2013) Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image

  18. Efficient Methods of Clutter Suppression for Coexisting Land and Weather Clutter Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yýlmaz, Özgür

    1 Efficient Methods of Clutter Suppression for Coexisting Land and Weather Clutter Systems C¸ a and weather clutter signals is a common problem in many radar applications. Although the optimal method for land-weather clutter suppression is known, it is usually not amenable to implementation due

  19. Efficient Methods of Clutter Suppression for Coexisting Land and Weather Clutter Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candan, Cagatay

    Efficient Methods of Clutter Suppression for Coexisting Land and Weather Clutter Systems The removal of coexisting land and weather clutter signals is a common problem in many radar applications. Although the optimal method for land-weather clutter suppression is known, it is usually not amenable

  20. Assessment of compost for suppression of Fusarium Patch (Microdochium nivale) and Typhula Blight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Greg J.

    Assessment of compost for suppression of Fusarium Patch (Microdochium nivale) and Typhula Blight 2001; accepted 21 May 2002 Abstract Two composts were evaluated for suppression of Fusarium Patch of compost applied at either 48.7 or 97:4kg=100m2 reduced snow mold severity to levels not significantly

  1. IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 3, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2003 595 Active Structural Error Suppression in MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhongping

    -run perturbations are presented. Index Terms--Error suppression, microelectromechanical sys- tems (MEMS), rate integrating gyroscopes, smart MEMS. I. INTRODUCTION AS MICROELECTROMECHANICAL systems (MEMS) inertial sensorsIEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 3, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2003 595 Active Structural Error Suppression in MEMS

  2. Active vibration suppression of a exible structure using smart material and a modular control patch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Active vibration suppression of a ¯exible structure using smart material and a modular control patch G Song1 *, S P Schmidt2 and B N Agrawal2 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of vibration suppression of a ¯exible structure using smart materials and a miniaturized digital controller

  3. Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we need them most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we inferences of air pollution suppressing precipitation lead us to investigate historical climate records of precipitation in locations that are dominated by clouds that are most susceptible to the detrimental impacts

  4. Quadrature mixture LO suppression via DSW DAC noise dither

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dubbert, Dale F. (Cedar Crest, NM); Dudley, Peter A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-08-21

    A Quadrature Error Corrected Digital Waveform Synthesizer (QECDWS) employs frequency dependent phase error corrections to, in effect, pre-distort the phase characteristic of the chirp to compensate for the frequency dependent phase nonlinearity of the RF and microwave subsystem. In addition, the QECDWS can employ frequency dependent correction vectors to the quadrature amplitude and phase of the synthesized output. The quadrature corrections cancel the radars' quadrature upconverter (mixer) errors to null the unwanted spectral image. A result is the direct generation of an RF waveform, which has a theoretical chirp bandwidth equal to the QECDWS clock frequency (1 to 1.2 GHz) with the high Spurious Free Dynamic Range (SFDR) necessary for high dynamic range radar systems such as SAR. To correct for the problematic upconverter local oscillator (LO) leakage, precision DC offsets can be applied over the chirped pulse using a pseudo-random noise dither. The present dither technique can effectively produce a quadrature DC bias which has the precision required to adequately suppress the LO leakage. A calibration technique can be employed to calculate both the quadrature correction vectors and the LO-nulling DC offsets using the radar built-in test capability.

  5. Unified Description of Charmonium Suppression in QGP Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Captain R. Singh; P. K. Srivastava; S. Ganesh; M. Mishra

    2015-05-21

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that the quarkonia suppression in a thermal QCD medium created at heavy ion collisions is a complex interplay of various physical processes. In this article we put together most of these processes in a unified way to calculate the charmonium survival probability (nuclear modification factor) at energies available at relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. We have included shadowing as the dominant cold nuclear matter (CNM) effect. Further, gluo-dissociation and collision damping has been included which provide width to the spectral function of charmonia in a thermal medium and causes the dissociation of charmonium along with usual colour screening. We include the colour screening using our recently proposed modified Chu and Matsui model. Furthermore we incorporate the recombination of uncorrelated charm and anti-charm quark for the regeneration of charmonium over the entire temporal evolution of QGP medium. Finally we do the feed-down correction from the excited states to calculate the survival probability of charmonium. We find that our unified model suitably describes the experimental nuclear modification data of $J/\\psi$ at RHIC and LHC simultaneously.

  6. Suppression of phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary Portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng-Peng Ye; Fan-Zhong Chen; Yan-Qing Sheng; Guo-Ying Sheng; Jia-Mo Fu

    2006-08-15

    In this study, the effect of suppression on phosphate liberation from eutrophic lake sediment by using fly ash and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated by small scale experiment. A system including sediment, lake water, and several kinds of capping materials was designed to clarify the suppression of phosphate liberation from sediment under the anaerobic condition. The suppression efficiencies of fly ash, OPC and glass bead used as control material were also determined, and these effects were discussed. The suppression efficiency of glass bead was 44.4%, and those of fly ash and OPC were 84.4%, 94.9%, respectively. The suppression by fly ash and OPC was mainly carried out by the adsorption effect, in addition to the covering effect. The suppression efficiency depended on the amounts of the material used, and about 90% of liberated phosphate was suppressed by fly ash of 10.0 Kg m{sup -2}, and OPC of 6.0 Kg m{sup -2}. The concentrations of heavy metals, such as mercury, cadmium, lead, copper, zinc, chromium, silver, arsenic and nickel, in fly ash and OPC were lower than those in the environmental materials. And it was considered that the concentrations of heavy metals in fly ash and OPC were too low to influence the ecosystem in natural water region.

  7. Theoretical and experimental investigations on damper performance for suppression of thermoacoustic oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    Theoretical and experimental investigations on damper performance for suppression of thermoacoustic of thermoacoustic oscillations using Helmholtz dampers. The developed theory has been validated using a novel experimental method. In thermoacoustics the constructive interference between the heat release and the acoustic

  8. Determination of Suppression Concentration for Clean Agents Exposed to a Continuously-Energized Heated Metal Surface'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Womeldorf, Carole

    Determination of Suppression Concentration for Clean Agents Exposed to a Continuously-Energized energized electrical equipment where the nonconductivity ofthe extinguishing agent is of importance. NFPA concentration under conditionswhere energized electrical equipment can not be disconnected from electrical

  9. Suppressing nonphysical reflections in Green's function estimates using source-receiver interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppressing nonphysical reflections in Green's function estimates using source-receiver interferometry Simon King1 and Andrew Curtis2 ABSTRACT Seismic interferometry retrieves the Green's function of sources. Theory requires that sources completely surround the two receivers, but constraints

  10. Experiments in sideband suppression on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, C.J.; Coyle, M.R.; Paxton, A.H. (Mission Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Laser and Optical R and D Group); O'Shea, P.G.; Bender, S.C.; Byrd, D.A.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.: Pitcher, E.J.; Zaugg, T.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Two versions of the Phase-Step Mirror'' (PSM), a novel optical component that prevents the formation of sidebands in a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) were tested on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) APEX FEL. Sideband suppression and frequency control with high extraction efficiency and single line, transform limited operation were demonstrated. The results of our LANL experiments and computer simulations showed that for very high gain applications, the first-order sideband is completely suppressed, but the laser gain is so strong that on about pass 300 the sideband at the second-order or next free spectral range of the PSM appears. This second-order sideband may be suppressed by designing a PSM with grooves having two alternating depths, one chosen to suppress the first-order sideband, and the other, the second-order sideband.

  11. Experiments in sideband suppression on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, C.J.; Coyle, M.R.; Paxton, A.H. [Mission Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Laser and Optical R and D Group; O`Shea, P.G.; Bender, S.C.; Byrd, D.A.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.: Pitcher, E.J.; Zaugg, T.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Two versions of the ``Phase-Step Mirror`` (PSM), a novel optical component that prevents the formation of sidebands in a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) were tested on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) APEX FEL. Sideband suppression and frequency control with high extraction efficiency and single line, transform limited operation were demonstrated. The results of our LANL experiments and computer simulations showed that for very high gain applications, the first-order sideband is completely suppressed, but the laser gain is so strong that on about pass 300 the sideband at the second-order or next free spectral range of the PSM appears. This second-order sideband may be suppressed by designing a PSM with grooves having two alternating depths, one chosen to suppress the first-order sideband, and the other, the second-order sideband.

  12. Vibration suppression of laminated composite plates using embedded smart material layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Sivasubramaniam

    2000-01-01

    In this study, a complete theoretical formulation of laminated composite plates with integrated smart material layers that serve as sensors and/or actuators is presented for the vibration suppression of laminated composite plates. The third...

  13. A Forest Fire Simulation Tool for Economic Planning in Fire Suppression Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    A Forest Fire Simulation Tool for Economic Planning in Fire Suppression Management Models fire spread behavior of forest fires provides important information for decision-making. Specific resource positioning to control and extinguish forest fire, decisions can be validated before

  14. A Fault Tolerant 3-Phase Adjustable Speed Drive Topology with Common Mode Voltage Suppression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Pawan

    2014-05-21

    reconfiguration are performed in a controlled manner using triacs/anti-parallel thyristors/solid state relays. In normal operation, the auxiliary leg is controlled to actively suppress common mode voltage. For inverter IGBT failures (short circuit and open circuit...

  15. Wideband phased array antennas and compact, harmonic-suppressed microstrip filters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Wen-Hua

    2009-05-15

    . Since the electromagnetic spectrum is limited and has to be shared, interference is getting serious as more and more wireless applications emerge. Filters are key components to prevent harmonic interference. The harmonic signals can be suppressed...

  16. Turbidity suppression from the ballistic to the diffusive regime in biological tissues using optical phase conjugation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDowell, Emily J.

    We describe the amplitude and resolution trends of the signals acquired by turbidity suppression through optical phase conjugation (TSOPC) with samples that span the ballistic and diffusive scattering regimes. In these ...

  17. Suppression of x-rays generated by runaway electrons in ATF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; England, A.C.; Eberle, C.C.; Devan, W.R.; Harris, J.H.; Jernigan, T.C.; Kindsfather, R.R.; Morris, R.N.; Murakami, M.; Neilson, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray emission from runaway electrons on ATF is a serious issue. Runaway suppression techniques used on Heliotron-E are not adequate for ATF. Three approaches have been developed to suppress runaway production. Monitoring devices have been installed in occupied areas and personnel access and exposure will be limited. Additional shielding will be added as required. These systems will be ready for installation and testing on ATF prior to commissioning or first plasma operation.

  18. Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Fochs, Scott N. (Livermore, CA); Rotter, Mark D. (San Ramon, CA); Letts, Stephan A. (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-02-22

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and/or parasitic oscillation modes in a laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing material arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE, parasitic oscillation modes and/or residual pump energy can be effectively suppressed.

  19. The justification-suppression model of prejudice : an approach to the history of prejudice research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crandall, C. S.; Eshleman, Amy

    2005-01-01

    : genuine prejudice, suppression, justification, and reported/experienced prejudice. The order in which we discuss the elements of the model is the same order in which the elements of the prejudice processes typically develop within the individual... institutions for local classroom use, whether in readers or reprinted volumes or other use, must contact the editors for permission. The justification-suppression model of prejudice: An approach to the history of prejudice research Christian S...

  20. Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Fochs, Scott N. (Livermore, CA); Rotter, Mark D. (San Ramon, CA); Letts, Stephan A. (San Ramon, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges using a substantially high index bonding elastomer or epoxy to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

  1. Tracking multiple generation and suppression of secondary electrons on periodic triangular surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.; Wang, J. G.; Zhu, M.; Peng, J. C.; Xie, J. L.; Wu, X. L.; Guo, L. T.; Chang, C.; Xiong, Z. F.; Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084

    2013-12-15

    To research the dynamic course of multipactor suppression on the periodically patterned surface, tens of electron collision processes are tracked by numerical calculation. The influences of microwave frequency, amplitude of RF electric field, slope angle, the local field enhancement, and the tilted incident electric field on the multipactor suppression are studied by tracking multi-generation electrons' trajectories, hopping and flight time, collision energy, and secondary emission yield. Meanwhile, the dynamic processes of secondary electrons on the periodic surface are analyzed by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The PIC results are consistent with the analytical results in which the electrons fly reciprocatingly between the slopes and impact on the slopes; the methods of increasing the slope angle, enlarging the RF field, and lowering the frequency in a certain range are helpful to enhance the multipactor suppression steadily and persistently.

  2. The Use of Oil Refinery Wastes as a Dust Suppression Surfactant for Use in Mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon-Hardy, D.W.; Beyhan, S.; Ediz, I.G.; Erarslan, K.

    2008-10-15

    In this research, the suitability of a selection of petroleum refinery wastes as a dust suppressant were examined. Dust is a significant problem in surface and underground mining mainly because of its adverse effects on human health and machinery. Hence, dust control and suppression is a vital part of mine planning for mining engineers. Water is the oldest and the cheapest suppressant in dealing with the mine dusts. However, surfactant use has recently been used for a wider range of applications in the mining industry. In order to carry out laboratory experiments, a dust chamber was designed and manufactured. The chamber has an inlet for coal dust entrance and a nozzle for spraying water and the oil refinery wastes. Water and the surfactants were mixed at various ratios and then sprayed onto the coal dusts within the cell. Dust concentration was measured systematically to determine the effects of surfactant containing solution on the coal dust and the data obtained by the measurements were analyzed. The results showed that the oil refinery wastes could be used as a dust suppressant, which may create an economical utilization for the wastes concerned.

  3. Suppression of 2 phase-slip due to hidden zero modes in one dimensional topological superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    Suppression of 2 phase-slip due to hidden zero modes in one dimensional topological superconductors-dimensional topological superconducting wires. These wires have been proposed as building blocks for topologically in decoherence. Phase slips in topological superconductors are peculiar for the reason that they occur

  4. Poster Session 08: Bystander and other Low Dose Effect Exogenous carbon monoxide suppresses adaptive response induced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Poster Session 08: Bystander and other Low Dose Effect Exogenous carbon monoxide suppresses; adaptive response; zebrafish embryos Journal of Radiation Research, 2014, 55, i115 Supplement doi: 10 prepared medium with the chemical at different time points after the application of the priming dose. Our

  5. Experimental Study of Active Vibration Suppression Structure Using Modular Control Patch*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental Study of Active Vibration Suppression Structure Using Modular Control Patch* Gangbing results of vibration suppressicln of a flexible structure using a miniaturized digital controller, called for the United States Air Force for future space vibration control. In this research, the MCP is used

  6. Feedback suppression of rotating external kink instabilities in the presence of noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    =vA/a, but a conducting wall at the plasma boundary can interact with the mode. The resulting plasma-wall mode is termed experimental demonstration of active feedback suppression of rotating external kink modes near the ideal wall limit in a tokamak using Kalman filtering to discriminate the n=1 kink mode from background noise

  7. Streptomyces competition and co-evolution in relation to plant disease suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    of secondary metabolite production among Streptomyces is due in part to genomic structure, with abundantStreptomyces competition and co-evolution in relation to plant disease suppression Linda L. Kinkel a,*, Daniel C. Schlatter a , Matthew G. Bakker b , Brett E. Arenz a a Department of Plant Pathology

  8. 2008 IEEE Electrical Performance of Electronic Packaging Suppression of Vertical Coupling using Electromagnetic Band Gap Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    2008 IEEE Electrical Performance of Electronic Packaging Suppression of Vertical Coupling using Electromagnetic Band Gap Structures Nithya Sankaran, Suzanne Huh, Madhavan Swaminathan and Rao Tummala Packaging are presented. I. Introduction Multilayer packaging plays a vital role in producing highly miniaturized, low

  9. LArGe - Active background suppression using argon scintillation for the GERDA $0???$-experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Agostini; M. Barnabé-Heider; D. Budjáš; C. Cattadori; A. Gangapshev; K. Gusev; M. Heisel; M. Junker; A. Klimenko; A. Lubashevskiy; K. Pelczar; S. Schönert; A. Smolnikov; G. Zuzel

    2015-06-11

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m$^3$, 1.4 tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times $10^3$ have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12$-$4.6)$\\cdot 10^{-2}$ cts/(keV$\\cdot$kg$\\cdot$y) (90% C.L.), which is at the level of GERDA Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural $^{42}$Ar abundance (parallel to GERDA), and have indication for the $2\

  10. Suppressing unwanted memories reduces their unconscious influence via targeted cortical inhibition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henson, Rik

    . These findings suggest a neurobio- logical model of how motivated forgetting affects the unconscious expressionSuppressing unwanted memories reduces their unconscious influence via targeted cortical inhibition memories can continue to exert strong unconscious effects that may compromise mental health. Here we show

  11. Sensor-less Vibration Suppression and Scan Compensation for Piezoelectric Tube Nanopositioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    applications requiring precision positioning e.g. nanomachining [2], [3] etc. A piezoelectric scanner comprisesSensor-less Vibration Suppression and Scan Compensation for Piezoelectric Tube Nanopositioners (Invited Paper) Andrew J. Fleming and S. O. Reza Moheimani Abstract-- Piezoelectric tube scanners

  12. Sensitivity of Harmonic Injection and its Spatial Evolution for Nonlinear Distortion Suppression in a TWT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Aarti

    Sensitivity of Harmonic Injection and its Spatial Evolution for Nonlinear Distortion Suppression presents an experimental investigation of the spatial evolution and sensitivity of third-order nonlinear injection without injection (d) Output Fig. 1 Spatial evolution of the wave spectrum along the TWT axis

  13. A Critical Evaluation of Fire Suppression Effects in the Boreal Forest of Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    A Critical Evaluation of Fire Suppression Effects in the Boreal Forest of Ontario S.R.J. Bridge, K-since-fire techniques to spatial fire data (1921­1995) for the western and eastern boreal regions of Ontario and compare cycle in the boreal forest of Ontario. FOR. SCI. 51(1):41­50. Key Words: Forest fires, fire frequency

  14. Suppression of Hepatitis C Virus Genome Replication in Cells with RNA-Cleaving DNA Enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    Suppression of Hepatitis C Virus Genome Replication in Cells with RNA-Cleaving DNA Enzymes, the hepatitis C virus nonstructural gene 3 (HCV NS3) RNA that encodes viral helicase and protease, from a pool. These selected DNAzyme and shRNA may be a viable therapeutic intervention to inhibit HCV replication in hepatic

  15. Suppression of transformation and tumorigenicity after transfer of chromosome 4 into glioblastoma multiforme cell line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pershouse, M.A.; Hadi, A.; Steck, P.A. [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Locations of tumor suppressor genes have primarily been found based upon chromosomal alterations or deletions and allelic deletions. Evidence for tumor suppressor genes has also been provided by mono-chromosomal transfer of implicated chromosomes into tumor cells and demonstrated a suppression of their malignant phenotype. We have demonstrated that the transfer of chromosome 10 into the human glioblastoma cell line, U251, suppressed its tumorigenic phenotype. As part of this study, chromosomes 2 and 4 were introduced into U251 cells by microcell-mediated chromosomal transfer. Cells containing a transferred chromosome 2 failed to alter their tumorigenic phenotype. The hybrid clones containing a transferred chromosome 4 exhibited an unexpected suppression of their transformed and tumorigenic phenotype in vivo and in vitro (previous molecular and cytogenetic analyses have shown only a 20 to 30% frequency of alterations to chromosome 4 (considered random) in human gliomas). The presence of novel chromosomes was confirmed by molecular and karyotypic analyses. The hybrid cells containing a transferred chromosome 4 displayed a significant decrease in their saturation density, a decrease in their exponential growth rate, and an altered cellular morphology. The hybrid cells failed to proliferate in soft agarose. The introduction of chromosome 4 completely suppressed tumor formation when the hybrid cells were injected into nude mice. These findings indicate that chromosome 4 is the possible site of a tumor suppressor gene that is directly involved in glioma oncogenesis.

  16. LOW DISTORTION ACOUSTIC NOISE SUPPRESSION USING A PERCEPTUAL MODEL FOR SPEECH SIGNALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabal, Peter

    LOW DISTORTION ACOUSTIC NOISE SUPPRESSION USING A PERCEPTUAL MODEL FOR SPEECH SIGNALS Joachim, such as musical noise, and distortion of the speech signal. By employing an auditory model, psychoacoustic effects. By using techniques from audio enhancement and a sophisticated perceptual model, a large degree of noise

  17. Star Formation Suppression Due to Jet Feedback in Radio Galaxies with Shocked Warm Molecular Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanz, Lauranne; Alatalo, Katherine; Appleton, Philip N

    2015-01-01

    We present Herschel observations of 22 radio galaxies, selected for the presence of shocked, warm molecular hydrogen emission. We measured and modeled spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in 33 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared to investigate the impact of jet feedback on star formation activity. These galaxies are massive, early-type galaxies with normal gas-to-dust ratios, covering a range of optical and IR colors. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) is suppressed by a factor of ~3-6, depending on how molecular gas mass is estimated. We suggest this suppression is due to the shocks driven by the radio jets injecting turbulence into the interstellar medium (ISM), which also powers the luminous warm H2 line emission. Approximately 25% of the sample shows suppression by more than a factor of 10. However, the degree of SFR suppression does not correlate with indicators of jet feedback including jet power, diffuse X-ray emission, or intensity of warm molecular H2 emission, suggesting that whi...

  18. Time series study of urban rainfall suppression during clean-up periods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Jun

    2008-10-10

    . Effects of Pollutant Aerosols on Precipitation……………….... 3 3. Our Focus………………………………………………………. 6 II STUDY OF SUPPRESSION OF PRECIPITATION IN AIR POLLUTIONS BY ANALYZING DATA FROM...)......................................................................................... 21 6 Trends of ratio of annual precipitation amount of Culver City (CC) and Pasadena (PA)...................................................................................... 23 7 The relationship between precipitation and TSP...

  19. Optimal noise suppression in Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) configured for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Optimal noise suppression in Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) configured 131543); published 14 October 2010 An optimal setup in the sense of imaging resolution for the Fresnel of America OCIS codes: 090.1995, 030.6140, 110.4280. 1. Introduction Fresnel incoherent correlation

  20. The promoters of human cell cycle genes integrate signals from two tumor suppressive pathways during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domany, Eytan

    The promoters of human cell cycle genes integrate signals from two tumor suppressive pathways.9.05 Deciphering regulatory events that drive malignant transformation represents a major challenge for systemsINK4A tumor suppressors inactivation. This cluster predominantly consists of cell cycle genes

  1. PROPER FILTER DESIGN PROCEDURE FOR VIBRATION SUPPRESSION USING DELAY-ERROR-ORDER CURVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    PROPER FILTER DESIGN PROCEDURE FOR VIBRATION SUPPRESSION USING DELAY-ERROR-ORDER CURVES D. Economou of Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical Design and Control Systems Division, 9 Heroon Polytechniou Str., 15773@central.ntua.gr B Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace

  2. Vibration Suppression and Optimal Repetitive Disturbance Rejection Control in Semi-Nyquist Frequency Region using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    suppression and disturbance rejec- tion even in the semi-Nyquist frequency region. First, the continuous and to reject disturbance in high frequency re- gion because the Nyquist frequency is relatively low-sample performance to reject disturbance in the semi-Nyquist frequency region [6]. On the other hand, authors

  3. Is it possible to observe a suppressing of $?$-decay caused by an atomic substance - plasma transition ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Vasiliev

    2006-04-24

    It is supposed that $\\beta$-decay can be slightly suppressed at an atomic substance - plasma transition under a plasma electron gas action. The estimation shows that this effect can give a relative difference of the decay amount on a level of $10^{-4}$.

  4. New insights to cloud seeding for enhancing precipitation and for hail suppression Daniel Rosenfeld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    New insights to cloud seeding for enhancing precipitation and for hail suppression Daniel Rosenfeld microphysical observations of the impacts of aerosols on cloud microstructure and precipitation forming- forming processes to the role of aerosols in the rate of conversion of cloud droplets into precipitation

  5. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yanyan; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Hongzhi; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Teng, Weiping; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein ? (C/EBP?) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBP? and PPAR?. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBP? and C/EBP? was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  6. Noise suppression of a differential detector under high-levels of illumination in terahertz electro-optic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noise suppression of a differential detector under high-levels of illumination in terahertz electro that these distortions significantly reduce the ability of the detector to suppress laser amplitude noise. 1 #12. Based on our measurements, we provide experimenters with recommendations to improve the amplitude noise

  7. hal-00196724,version1-13Dec2007 DNA ejection from bacteriophage: towards a general behavior for osmotic suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    for osmotic suppression experiments M. Castelnovo and A. Evilevitch (Dated: December 18, 2007) We present the osmotic ejection suppression technique. Our datas are analyzed by revisiting the current theories of DNA], fluorescent staining and light scattering monitoring T5 and ejection kinetics [6, 7, 8, 9], and osmotic

  8. IEEE TRANSACTION ON KNOWLEDGE AND DATA ENGINEERING, VOL. X, NO. X, XXX 2011 1 Failure-Aware Cascaded Suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jun

    IEEE TRANSACTION ON KNOWLEDGE AND DATA ENGINEERING, VOL. X, NO. X, XXX 2011 1 Failure-Aware Cascaded Suppression in Wireless Sensor Networks Yi Zhang, Kristian Lum, and Jun Yang Abstract constraints on battery-powered nodes, it is critical to minimize communication. Suppression has been proposed

  9. A molecular explanation for the long-term suppression of circadian rhythms by a single light pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldbeter, Albert

    A molecular explanation for the long-term suppression of circadian rhythms by a single light pulse explanation for the long-term suppression of circadian rhythms by a single light pulse. Am J Physiol rhythms in Drosophila based on transcriptional regulation, we show how a single, critical pulse of light

  10. Matrix Suppression as a Guideline for Reliable Quantification of Peptides by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    Matrix Suppression as a Guideline for Reliable Quantification of Peptides by Matrix-Assisted Laser, Daejeon 305-806, Korea ABSTRACT: We propose to divide matrix suppression in matrix- assisted laser can be accounted for by constructing the calibration curve in the form of peptide-to-matrix ion

  11. Fusion Technologies for Tritium-Suppressed D-D Fusion White Paper prepared for FESAC Materials Science Subcommittee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Fusion Technologies for Tritium-Suppressed D-D Fusion White Paper prepared for FESAC Materials, Columbia University 2 Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT December 19, 2011 Summary The proposal for tritium-suppressed D-D fusion and the understanding of the turbulent pinch in magnetically confined plasma

  12. Cabibbo-angle-favored, -suppressed, and -doubly-suppressed D r arrow PP and D r arrow VP decays in SU(3) symmetry with final-state interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, R.C.; Kamal, A.N. (University of Alberta, Edmonton, (Canada). Theoretical Physics Institute University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Department of Physics)

    1991-02-01

    We have studied Cabibbo-angle-favored, -suppressed, and -doubly-suppressed {ital D}{r arrow}{ital PP} and {ital D}{r arrow}{ital VP} decays in a nonet-symmetry and a broken-nonet-symmetry scheme, with the inclusion of final-state-interaction phases. For {ital D}{r arrow}{ital VP} decays, the implications of sextet dominance are also investigated. In the discussion we have argued that the symmetry approach, as also the diagrammatic approach used by other authors, does not fare as well in describing {ital D}{r arrow}{ital VP} decays as the factorization approach, particularly in describing {ital B}({ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup +}{r arrow}{omega}{pi}{sup +}), {ital B}({ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup +}{r arrow}{phi}{pi}{sup +}), and {ital B}({ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup +}{r arrow}{rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}).

  13. Low concentrations of bisphenol a suppress thyroid hormone receptor transcription through a nongenomic mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo; Tang, Yuan; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Yuan, Ye; Zhao, Bao-Quan; Chao, Xi-Juan; Zhu, Ben-Zhan

    2012-02-15

    Bisphenol (BPA) is one of the highest-volume chemicals produced worldwide, and human exposure to BPA is thought to be ubiquitous. Various rodent and in vitro studies have shown that thyroid hormone (TH) function can be impaired by BPA. However, it is still unknown if low concentrations of BPA can suppress the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) transcription. The present study aims to investigate the possible suppressing effects of low concentrations of BPA on TR transcription and the involved mechanism(s) in CV-1 cells derived from cercopithecus aethiops monkey kidneys. Using gene reporter assays, BPA at concentrations as low as 10{sup ?9} M suppresses TR or steroid receptor coactivator-1(SRC-1)-enhanced TR transcription, but not reducing TR/SRC-1 interaction in mammalian two-hybrid and glutathione S-transferase pull-down studies. It has been further shown that both nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) and silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) are recruited to the TR-?1 by BPA in the presence of physiologic concentrations of T3 or T4. However, the overexpression of ?3 integrin or c-Src significantly reduces BPA-induced recruitment of N-CoR/SMRT to TR or suppression of TR transcription. Furthermore, BPA inhibits the T3/T4-mediated interassociation of the ?3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-?1 pathways by the co-immunoprecipitation. These results indicate that low concentrations of BPA suppress the TR transcription by disrupting physiologic concentrations of T3/T4-mediated ?3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-?1 pathways, followed by recruiting N-CoR/SMRT to TR-?1, providing a novel insight regarding the TH disruption effects of low concentration BPA. -- Highlights: ? Environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA suppress TR transcription. ? BPA recruits the N-CoR/SMRT to TR under the physiologic concentrations of T3/T4. ? BPA disrupts T3/T4-mediated ?3 integrin/c-Src/MAPK/TR-?1 pathways.

  14. System and method that suppresses intensity fluctuations for free space high-speed optical communication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Bishop, Alan R. (Los Alamos, NM); Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Santa Fe, NM); Gorshkov, Vacheslav N. (Kiev, UA)

    2009-10-13

    A high-speed (Gbps), free space optical communication system is based on spectral encoding of radiation from a wide band light source, such as a laser. By using partially coherent laser beams in combination with a relatively slow photosensor, scintillations can be suppressed by orders of magnitude for distances of more than 10 km. To suppress the intensity fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence, a source with partial transverse coherence in combination with slow response time photodetector is used. Information is encoded in the spectral domain of a wideband optical source by modulation of spectral amplitudes. A non-coherent light source with wide spectrum (an LED, for example) may be used for high-speed communication over short (less than about a mile) distances.

  15. Protein A suppresses immune responses during Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in guinea pigs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-06

    Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fc? and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host Bmore »cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity.« less

  16. Alternative approach for fire suppression of class A, B and C fires in gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberger, Mark S; Tsiagkouris, James A

    2011-02-10

    Department of Energy (DOE) Orders and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards require fire suppression in gloveboxes. Several potential solutions have been and are currently being considered at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective is to provide reliable, minimally invasive, and seismically robust fire suppression capable of extinguishing Class A, B, and C fires; achieve compliance with DOE and NFPA requirements; and provide value-added improvements to fire safety in gloveboxes. This report provides a brief summary of current approaches and also documents the successful fire tests conducted to prove that one approach, specifically Fire Foe{trademark} tubes, is capable of achieving the requirement to provide reliable fire protection in gloveboxes in a cost-effective manner.

  17. Jet suppression and the flavor dependence of partonic energy loss with ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosek, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, a hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced. One manifestation of the energy loss of jets propagating through the medium is a lower yield of jets emerging from the medium than ?expected in the absence of medium effects. Therefore modifications of the jet yield are directly sensitive to the energy loss mechanism. Furthermore, jets with different ?flavor content are expected to be affected by the medium in different ways. Parton showers initiated by quarks tend to have fewer fragments carrying a larger fraction of ?the total jet energy than those resulting from gluons. Jets containing heavy quarks may lose less energy as the large quark mass suppresses the amount of medium-induced ?radiation. This would lead to different relative contributions of inelastic and elastic energy loss. In this talk, the latest ATLAS results on single jet suppression will ?be presented. Measurements of the nuclear modification factor, RAA, for fully reconstr...

  18. Jet suppression and the flavor dependence of partonic energy loss with ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosek, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, a hot medium with a high density of unscreened color charges is produced. One manifestation of the energy loss of jets propagating through the medium is a lower yield of jets and hadrons emerging from this medium than expected in the absence of medium effects. Therefore modifications of the jet yield are directly sensitive to the energy loss mechanism. Furthermore, jets with different flavor content are expected to be affected by the medium in different ways. In this publication, the latest ATLAS results on single hadron suppression along with the complementary measurements of single jet suppression are presented. Rapidity dependence, which is sensitive to the relative energy loss between quark and gluon jets, is discussed. Finally, a new measurement of jet fragmentation functions is presented.

  19. Suppression of space broadening of exciton polariton beams by Bloch oscillation effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Xudong; Zhang, Yongyou

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically study the transport of exciton polaritons under different applied photon potentials. The relation between the photon potentials and the thickness of the cavity layer is calculated by the finite element simulation. The theoretical analysis and numerical calculation indicate that the cavity photon potential is proportional to the thickness of the cavity layer with the coefficient being about $1.8$ meV/nm. Further, the periodic and linear photon potentials are considered to control the transport of the exciton polaritons in weak- and strong-field pump situations. In both situations the periodic potential cannot by itself effectively suppress the scatterings of the disorder potentials of the cavity photons and excitons and the nonlinear exciton-exciton interaction. When the linear potential is added to the cavity photons, the polariton transport exhibits the Bloch oscillation behavior. Importantly, the polariton Bloch oscillation can strongly suppress the space broadening due to the disorder pote...

  20. High-energy suppression of the Higgsstrahlung cross-section in the Minimal Composite Higgs Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katy Hartling; Heather E. Logan

    2013-02-05

    If the Higgs boson is composite, signs of this compositeness should appear via a formfactor-like suppression of Higgs scattering cross sections at momentum transfers above the compositeness scale. We explore this by computing the cross section for e+e- ---> ZH (Higgsstrahlung) in a warped five-dimensional gauge-Higgs unification model known as the Minimal Composite Higgs Model (MCHM). We observe that the Higgsstrahlung cross section in the MCHM is strongly suppressed compared to that in the Standard Model at center-of-mass energies above the scale of the first Kaluza-Klein excitations, due to cancellations among the contributions of successive Z boson Kaluza-Klein modes. We also show that the magnitude and sign of the coupling of the first Kaluza-Klein mode can be measured at a future electron-positron collider such as the proposed International Linear Collider or Compact Linear Collider.

  1. An ion guide laser ion source for isobar-suppressed rare isotope beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raeder, Sebastian Ames, Friedhelm; Bishop, Daryl; Bricault, Pierre; Kunz, Peter; Mjøs, Anders; Heggen, Henning; Institute of Applied Physics, TU Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 7, 64289 Darmstadt ; Lassen, Jens Teigelhöfer, Andrea; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2

    2014-03-15

    Modern experiments at isotope separator on-line (ISOL) facilities like ISAC at TRIUMF often depend critically on the purity of the delivered rare isotope beams. Therefore, highly selective ion sources are essential. This article presents the development and successful on-line operation of an ion guide laser ion source (IG-LIS) for the production of ion beams free of isobaric contamination. Thermionic ions from the hot ISOL target are suppressed by an electrostatic potential barrier, while neutral radio nuclides effusing out are resonantly ionized by laser radiation within a quadrupole ion guide behind this barrier. The IG-LIS was developed through detailed thermal and ion optics simulation studies and off-line tests with stable isotopes. In a first on-line run with a SiC target a suppression of surface-ionized Na contaminants in the ion beam of up to six orders of magnitude was demonstrated.

  2. SURFACE FILMS TO SUPPRESS FIELD EMISSION IN HIGH-POWER MICROWAVE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay l

    2014-02-07

    Results are reported on attempts to reduce the RF breakdown probability on copper accelerator structures by applying thin surface films that could suppress field emission of electrons. Techniques for application and testing of copper samples with films of metals with work functions higher than copper are described, principally for application of platinum films, since platinum has the second highest work function of any metal. Techniques for application of insulating films are also described, since these can suppress field emission and damage on account of dielectric shielding of fields at the copper surface, and on account of the greater hardness of insulating films, as compared with copper. In particular, application of zirconium oxide films on high-field portions of a 11.424 GHz SLAC cavity structure for breakdown tests are described.

  3. NO.sub.x catalyst and method of suppressing sulfate formation in an exhaust purification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balmer-Millar, Mari Lou (Chillicothe, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL); Panov, Alexander G. (Peoria, IL)

    2007-06-26

    The activity and durability of a zeolite lean-burn NOx catalyst can be increased by loading metal cations on the outer surface of the zeolite. However, the metal loadings can also oxidize sulfur dioxide to cause sulfate formation in the exhaust. The present invention is a method of suppressing sulfate formation in an exhaust purification system including a NO.sub.x catalyst. The NO.sub.x catalyst includes a zeolite loaded with at least one metal. The metal is selected from among an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal, a lanthanide metal, a noble metal, and a transition metal. In order to suppress sulfate formation, at least a portion of the loaded metal is complexed with at least one of sulfate, phosphate, and carbonate.

  4. Suppression of the four-wave mixing amplification via Raman absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanov, Gleb; Novikova, I

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to controllably suppress the effect of the four-wave mixing caused by the coupling of the strong control optical field to both optical transitions in the $\\Lambda$ system under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency. At sufficiently high atomic density, this process leads to amplification of a weak optical signal field, that is detrimental for the fidelity of any EIT-based quantum information applications. Here we show that an additional absorption resonance centered around the idler field frequency, generated in such a four-wave mixing process, may efficiently suppress the unwanted signal amplification without affecting properties of the EIT interaction. We discuss the possibility of creating such tunable absorption using two-photon Raman absorption resonances in the other Rb isotope, and present some preliminary experimental results.

  5. Suppression criteria of parasitic mode oscillations in a gyrotron beam tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Sinha, A. K.; Singh, T. P.

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents the design criteria of the parasitic mode oscillations suppression for a periodic, ceramic, and copper loaded gyrotron beam tunnel. In such a type of beam tunnel, the suppression of parasitic mode oscillations is an important design problem. A method of beam-wave coupling coefficient and its mathematical formulation are presented. The developed design criteria are used in the beam tunnel design of a 42 GHz gyrotron to be developed for the Indian TOKAMAK system. The role of the thickness and the radius of the beam tunnel copper rings to obtain the developed design criteria are also discussed. The commercially available electromagnetic code CST and the electron trajectory code EGUN are used for the simulations.

  6. First measurement of suppressed B- -> D0 K- decays through the ADS method in hadron collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garosi, Paola

    2011-01-01

    We report the first measurement of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries of suppressed B- -> DK- decays in hadron collisions, using the approach proposed by Atwood, Dunietz, and Soni (ADS) to determine the CKM angle gamma in 7.0 fb^-1 of data. The ADS parameters are determined with accuracy comparable with B-factory measurements and significantly improve the global knowledge of the angle gamma.

  7. Impaired methylation as a novel mechanism for proteasome suppression in liver cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osna, Natalia A.; White, Ronda L.; Donohue, Terrence M.; Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68105 ; Beard, Michael R.; Tuma, Dean J.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68105

    2010-01-08

    The proteasome is a multi-catalytic protein degradation enzyme that is regulated by ethanol-induced oxidative stress; such suppression is attributed to CYP2E1-generated metabolites. However, under certain conditions, it appears that in addition to oxidative stress, other mechanisms are also involved in proteasome regulation. This study investigated whether impaired protein methylation that occurs during exposure of liver cells to ethanol, may contribute to suppression of proteasome activity. We measured the chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity in Huh7CYP cells, hepatocytes, liver cytosols and nuclear extracts or purified 20S proteasome under conditions that maintain or prevent protein methylation. Reduction of proteasome activity of hepatoma cell and hepatocytes by ethanol or tubercidin was prevented by simultaneous treatment with S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Moreover, the tubercidin-induced decline in proteasome activity occurred in both nuclear and cytosolic fractions. In vitro exposure of cell cytosolic fractions or highly purified 20S proteasome to low SAM:S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) ratios in the buffer also suppressed proteasome function, indicating that one or more methyltransferase(s) may be associated with proteasomal subunits. Immunoblotting a purified 20S rabbit red cell proteasome preparation using methyl lysine-specific antibodies revealed a 25 kDa proteasome subunit that showed positive reactivity with anti-methyl lysine. This reactivity was modified when 20S proteasome was exposed to differential SAM:SAH ratios. We conclude that impaired methylation of proteasome subunits suppressed proteasome activity in liver cells indicating an additional, yet novel mechanism of proteasome activity regulation by ethanol.

  8. First measurement of suppressed B- -> D0 K- decays through the ADS method in hadron collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola Garosi; for the CDF Collaboration

    2011-10-11

    We report the first measurement of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries of suppressed B- -> DK- decays in hadron collisions, using the approach proposed by Atwood, Dunietz, and Soni (ADS) to determine the CKM angle gamma in 7.0 fb^-1 of data. The ADS parameters are determined with accuracy comparable with B-factory measurements and significantly improve the global knowledge of the angle gamma.

  9. Observation of Shot Noise Suppression at Optical Wavelengths in a Relativistic Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, Daniel; Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-06-19

    Control of collective properties of relativistic particles is increasingly important in modern accelerators. In particular, shot noise affects accelerator performance by driving instabilities or by competing with coherent processes. We present experimental observations of shot noise suppression in a relativistic beam at the Linac Coherent Light Source. By adjusting the dispersive strength of a chicane, we observe a decrease in the optical transition radiation emitted from a downstream foil. We show agreement between the experimental results, theoretical models, and 3D particle simulations.

  10. The evolution of sex ratio distorter suppression impacts across a 25cM genomic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornett, E. A.; Moran, B.; Reynolds, L. A.; Charlat, S.; Tazzyman, S.; Wedell, N.; Jiggins, C. D.; Hurst, G. D. D.

    2014-01-01

    transcriptome sequencing (see Methods and 121 Materials, NCBI SRA accession: SRP045735). These markers were then tested for co-segregation 122 with suppression in order to identify the linkage groups associated with male host survival. Female 123 butterflies... assembler to create the first set of Expressed Sequence Tags (EST) for H. bolina. The 488 trimmed reads have been deposited as one male, and one female, partial transcriptome datasets in 489 the NCBI SRA database, accession SRP045735. 490 491...

  11. Advances in the Understanding of ELM Suppression by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in DIII-D and Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazikian, R.

    2014-09-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have expanding the operating window for RMP ELM suppression to higher q95 with dominant electron heating and fully non-inductive current drive relevant to advanced modes of ITER operation. Robust ELM suppression has also been obtained with a reduced coil set, mitigating the risk of coil failure in maintaining ELM suppression in ITER. These results significantly expand the operating space and reduce risk for obtaining RMP ELM suppression in ITER. Efforts have also been made to search for 3D cause of ELM suppression. No internal non-axisymmetric structure is detected at the top of the pedestal, indicating that the dominant effect of the RMP is to produce an n=0 transport modification of the profiles. Linear two fluid MHD simulations using M3D-C1 indicate resonant field penetration and significant magnetic stochasticity at the top of the pedestal, consistent with the absence of detectable 3D structure in that region. A profile database was developed to compare the scaling of the pedestal and global confinement with the applied 3D field strength in ELM suppressed and ELM mitigated plasmas. The EPED pedestal model accurately predicts the measured pedestal pressure at the threshold of ELM suppression, increasing confidence in theoretical projections to ITER pedestal conditions. Both the H-factor (H(sub)98y2) and thermal energy confinement time do not degrade substantially with applied RMP fields near the threshold of ELM suppression, enhancing confidence in the compatibility of ITER high performance operation with RMP ELM suppression.

  12. Reversible Electron Beam Heating for Suppression of Microbunching Instabilities at Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, Christopher; /DESY; Huang, Zhirong; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-05-30

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., heating the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) upstream and downstream of a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread is introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then is eliminated in the second TDS. We show the feasibility of the microbunching gain suppression based on calculations and simulations including the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation. Acceptable electron beam and radio-frequency jitter are identified, and inherent options for diagnostics and on-line monitoring of the electron beam's longitudinal phase space are discussed.

  13. Geant4 Model Validation of Compton Suppressed System for Process monitoring of Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Sarah; Unlu, Kenan; Orton, Christopher R.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear material accountancy is of continuous concern for the regulatory, safeguards, and verification communities. In particular, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities pose one of the most difficult accountancy challenges: monitoring highly radioactive, fluid sample streams in near real-time. The Multi-Isotope Process monitor will allow for near-real-time indication of process alterations using passive gamma-ray detection coupled with multivariate analysis techniques to guard against potential material diversion or to enhance domestic process monitoring. The Compton continuum from the dominant 661.7 keV 137Cs fission product peak obscures lower energy lines which could be used for spectral and multivariate analysis. Compton suppression may be able to mitigate the challenges posed by the high continuum caused by scattering. A Monte Carlo simulation using the Geant4 toolkit is being developed to predict the expected suppressed spectrum from spent fuel samples to estimate the reduction in the Compton continuum. Despite the lack of timing information between decay events in the particle management of Geant4, encouraging results were recorded utilizing only the information within individual decays without accounting for accidental coincidences. The model has been validated with single and cascade decay emitters in two steps: as an unsuppressed system and with suppression activated. Results of the Geant4 model validation will be presented.

  14. Experimental investigation of sedimentation of LOCA - generated fibrous debris and sludge in BWR suppression pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souto, F.J.; Rao, D.V.

    1995-12-01

    Several tests were conducted in a 1:2.4 scale model of a Mark I suppression pool to investigate the behavior of fibrous insulation and sludge debris under LOCA conditions. NUKON{trademark} shreds, manually cut and tore up in a leaf shredder, and iron oxide particles were used to simulate fibrous and sludge debris, respectively. The suppression pool model included four downcomers fitted with pistons to simulate the steam-water oscillations during chugging expected during a LOCA. The study was conducted to provide debris settling velocity data for the models used in the BLOCKAGE computer code, developed to estimate the ECCS pump head loss due to clogging of the strainers with LOCA generated debris. The tests showed that the debris, both fibrous and particulate, remains fully mixed during chugging; they also showed that, during chugging, the fibrous debris underwent fragmentation into smaller sizes, including individual fibers. Measured concentrations showed that fibrous debris settled slower than the sludge, and that the settling behavior of each material is independent of the presence of the other material. Finally, these tests showed that the assumption of considering uniform debris concentration during strainer calculations is reasonable. The tests did not consider the effects of the operation of the ECCS on the transport of debris in the suppression pool.

  15. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF SUPPRESSION OF NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION BY LOW DOSES OF LOW LET RADIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.LESIE REDPATH, PH.D.

    2011-03-29

    We are currently funded (9/01-8/04) by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program to examine mechanisms underlying the suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro by low doses of low LET radiation. For the new studies proposed under Notice 04-21, we intend to follow up on our observation that upregulation of DNA repair may be an important factor and that its importance is dose-dependent. The experimental system will be the human hybrid cell neoplastic transformation assay that we are currently using. We propose to test the following hypothesis: Down-regulation of DNA dsb repair will abrogate the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation. Using the technique of RNA silencing, it is proposed to test the effect of down-regulation of the two major DNA dsb repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), on the dose response relationship for neoplastic transformation. Based on prior studies, we predict that this will result in abrogation of the suppressive effect at doses in the range 1 to 10 cGy, but not at lower doses. The proposed experiments will also help address the question as to which of the two DNA repair pathways may be the most important in causing suppression of transformation. HR is a pathway that is predominant in S and G2 phase cells and is known to be less error-prone than the NHEJ pathway that is predominant in G1 phase. We hypothesize that down-regulation of HR will result in the most effective abrogation of suppression. An important component of this study will be the determination of the how abrogation of DNA dsb repair impacts the spontaneous transformation frequency, presumably a consequence of endogeneous DNA damage. Experiments will be carried out using partially synchronized populations of cells enriched for G1 and S/G2 respectively. In addition to the endpoint of neoplastic transformation the impact of down-regulation of HR and NHEJ on the formation and disappearance of the DNA dsb marker, gamma-H2AX, will be studied.

  16. EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE AND CONFINEMENT ON SPINY WBSTERS, PANULIRUS ARGUS, USED AS ATTRACTANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN THE FWRIDA TRAP FISHERY JOHN H. HUNT,t WILLIAM G. LYONS,2 AND FRANK S. KENNEDY, JR.2 ABSTRACT 'fraps to be effective attractants of other lobsters (Yang and Obert 1978; Lyons and Kennedy 1981; Kennedy 1982). Some of the harvest season (Lyons and Kennedy 1981). 'Florida Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Marine

  17. ARG-US RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID) Technology (IN-08-046) -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See EnergyCurrent : 0.0 Waiting for0 -Issue 607LogosONARCS

  18. ARG-US Remote Area Modular Monitoring (RAMM) | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See EnergyCurrent : 0.0 Waiting for0 -Issue

  19. RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lane, Todd [SNL

    2013-02-11

    Todd Lane on "RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  20. Fasting-induced suppression of circulating luteinizing hormone is caused by altered luteinizing hormone releasing-hormone secretion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farr, Jaime Alan

    1992-01-01

    FASTING-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF CIRCULATING LUTEINIZING HORMONE IS CAUSED IIY ALTERED LUTEINIZING HORMONE RELEASING-HORMONE SECREI'ION A Thesis JAIME ALAN FARR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Veterinary Anatomy FASTING-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF CIRCULATING LUTEINIZING HORMONE IS CAUSED BY ALTERED LUTEINIZING HORMONE RELEASING-HORMONE SECRETION A...

  1. Yield and suppression of electrons from open heavy-flavor decays in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders Knospe

    2011-12-31

    Measurements by the STAR and PHENIX collaborations indicate that a quark-gluon plasma, a hot and dense state of matter in which quarks and gluons are not confined inside hadrons, is formed in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Charm and bottom quarks have been predicted to interact with the medium differently than the light quarks; a study of heavy quark interactions with the medium provides an important test of theoretical models of the quark-gluon plasma. The spectrum of non-photonic electrons (and positrons) is dominated by electrons from the semileptonic decays of D and B mesons. Therefore, non-photonic electrons serve as proxies for heavy quarks. A measurement of the modification of the non-photonic electron spectrum in nucleus-nucleus collisions relative to p + p collisions allows the interactions of heavy quarks with the medium to be studied. Previous measurements indicate that high-transverse-momentum non-photonic electrons are suppressed in Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV (center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair) relative to p + p collisions at the same energy. The magnitude of that suppression is larger than was anticipated and it has been a challenge for theoretical models to predict the in-medium energy loss of light and heavy quarks simultaneously. This dissertation presents the first measurement of the yield of non-photonic electrons from open heavy-flavor decays in Cu + Cu collisions at 200 GeV and the suppression of that yield relative to p + p collisions. A comparison of this result to similar results for Au + Au collisions provides some indication that the geometry of a heavy-ion collision affects the average amount of energy loss by heavy quarks passing through the quark-gluon plasma.

  2. Speckle noise suppression using a helix-free ferroelectric liquid crystal cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, A L; Andreeva, T B; Kompanets, I N; Zalyapin, N V

    2014-12-31

    We have studied the method for suppressing speckle noise in patterns produced by a laser based on a fast-response electro-optical cell with a ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) in which helicoid is absent, i.e., compensated for. The character of smectic layer deformation in an electric field is considered along with the mechanism of spatially inhomogeneous phase modulation of a laser beam passing through the cell which is accompanied by the destruction of phase relations in the beam. Advantages of a helix-free FLC cell are pointed out as compared to helical crystal cells studied previously. (liquid crystal devices)

  3. Theory of suppressing avalanche process of carrier in short pulse laser irradiated dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Hongxiang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, WG; Yuan, XD; Xiang, Xia; Sun, Kai; Gao, Fei

    2014-05-28

    A theory for controlling avalanche process of carrier during short pulse laser irradiation is proposed. We show that avalanche process of conduction band electrons (CBEs) is determined by the occupation number of phonons in dielectrics. The theory provides a way to suppress avalanche process and a direct judgment for the contribution of avalanche process and photon ionization process to the generation of CBEs. The obtained temperature dependent rate equation shows that the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics, e.g., fused silica, increase nonlinearly with the decreases of temperature. Present theory predicts a new approach to improve the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics.

  4. Strangeness Suppression of qq- Creation Observed in Exclusive Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mestayer, M.? D.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K.? P.; Aghasyan, M.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.? S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W.? J.; Brooks, W.? K.; Burkert, V.? D.; Carman, D.? S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P.? L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A.? El; Fassi, L.? El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. ?A.; Forest, T.? A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. ?P.; Giovanetti, K. ?L.; Girod, F. ?X.; Goetz, J.? T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K.? A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S.? M.; Hyde, C.?. E; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D.?. G; Jiang, H.; Jo, H.? S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. ?V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W. ?I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.? Y.; MacGregor, I.? J.?D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C.? A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.? A.; Moody, C.? I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A.? I.; Pappalardo, L.? L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J.? W.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A.? J.?R.; Raue, B.? A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M.?. S; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.? A.; Simonyan, A.; Sokhan, D.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A.? V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.? K.; Watts, D.? P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L.? B.; Wood, M.? H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z.? W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-10-01

    We measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ?K+, p?0, and n?+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq¯ creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq¯ pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  5. Method and system for modulation of gain suppression in high average power laser systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayramian, Andrew James (Manteca, CA)

    2012-07-31

    A high average power laser system with modulated gain suppression includes an input aperture associated with a first laser beam extraction path and an output aperture associated with the first laser beam extraction path. The system also includes a pinhole creation laser having an optical output directed along a pinhole creation path and an absorbing material positioned along both the first laser beam extraction path and the pinhole creation path. The system further includes a mechanism operable to translate the absorbing material in a direction crossing the first laser beam extraction laser path and a controller operable to modulate the second laser beam.

  6. Efficient Alternatives to the Ephraim and Malah Suppression Rule for Audio Signal Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-09-08

    –1121, 1984. [3] M. Berouti, R. Schwartz, and J. Makhoul, “Enhancement of speech corrupted by acoustic noise,” in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Acoustics, Speech, Signal Processing, pp. 208–211, Washington, DC, USA, April 1979. [4] R. J. McAulay andM. L. Malpass... - con, “Optimizing speech enhancement by exploiting masking Alternative Suppression Rules for Audio Signal Enhancement 1051 properties of the human ear,” in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Acous- tics, Speech, Signal Processing, vol. 1, pp. 800–803, Detroit, Mich...

  7. Centrality dependence of forward $J/\\psi$ suppression in high energy proton-nucleus collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ducloué, B; Mäntysaari, H

    2016-01-01

    The production of forward $J/\\psi$ mesons in proton-nucleus collisions can provide important information on gluon saturation. In a previous work we studied this process in the Color Glass Condensate framework, describing the target using a dipole cross section fitted to HERA inclusive data and extrapolated to the case of a nuclear target using the optical Glauber model. In this work we study the centrality dependence of the nuclear suppression in this model and compare our results with recent LHC data for this observable.

  8. Suppression of Heating Rates in Cryogenic Surface-Electrode Ion Traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Yufei Ge; Paul Antohi; David Leibrandt; Kenneth R. Brown; Isaac L. Chuang

    2007-11-16

    Dense arrays of trapped ions provide one way of scaling up ion trap quantum information processing. However, miniaturization of ion traps is currently limited by sharply increasing motional state decoherence at sub-100 um ion-electrode distances. We characterize heating rates in cryogenically cooled surface-electrode traps, with characteristic sizes in 75 um to 150 um range. Upon cooling to 6 K, the measured rates are suppressed by 7 orders of magnitude, two orders of magnitude below previously published data of similarly sized traps operated at room temperature. The observed noise depends strongly on fabrication process, which suggests further improvements are possible.

  9. Suppression of narrow-band transparency in a metasurface induced by a strongly enhanced electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamayama, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Kanji

    2015-01-01

    We realize a suppression of an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) like transmission in a metasurface induced by a local electric field that is strongly enhanced based on two approaches: squeezing of electromagnetic energy in resonant metasurfaces and enhancement of electromagnetic energy density associated with a low group velocity. The EIT-like metasurface consists of a pair of radiatively coupled cut-wire resonators, and it can effect both field enhancement approaches simultaneously. The strongly enhanced local electric field generates an air discharge plasma at either of the gaps of the cut-wire resonators, which causes the EIT-like metasurface to change into two kinds of Lorentz type metasurfaces.

  10. Stability and surface diffusion at lithium-electrolyte interphases with connections to dendrite suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozhabes, Yalcin; Arias, T A

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an ab initio exploration of fundamental mechanisms with direct relevance to dendrite formation at lithium-electrolyte interfaces. Specifically, we explore surface diffusion barriers and solvated surface energies of typical solid-electrolyte interphase layers of lithium metal electrodes. Our results indicate that surface diffusion is an important mechanism for understanding the recently observed dendrite suppression from lithium-halide passivating layers, which were motivated by our previous work. Our results uncover possible mechanisms underlying a new pathway for mitigating dendridic electrodeposition of lithium on metal and thereby contribute to the ongoing efforts to develop stable lithium metal anodes for rechargeable battery systems.

  11. Dynamics of double layers, ion acceleration, and heat flux suppression during solar flares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2014-09-20

    Observations of flare-heated electrons in the corona typically suggest confinement of electrons. The confinement mechanism, however, remains unclear. The transport of coronal hot electrons into ambient plasma was recently investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Electron transport was significantly suppressed by the formation of a highly localized, nonlinear electrostatic potential in the form of a double layer (DL). In this work large-scale PIC simulations are performed to explore the dynamics of DLs in larger systems where, instead of a single DL, multiple DLs are generated. The primary DL accelerates return current electrons, resulting in high velocity electron beams that interact with ambient ions. This forms a Buneman unstable system that spawns more DLs. Trapping of heated return current electrons between multiple DLs strongly suppresses electron transport. DLs also accelerate ambient ions and produce strong ion flows over an extended region. This clarifies the mechanism by which hot electrons in the corona couple to and accelerate ions to form the solar wind. These new dynamics in larger systems reveal a more likely picture of DL development and their impact on the ambient plasma in the solar corona. They are applicable to the preparation for in situ coronal space missions like the Solar Probe Plus.

  12. Lasing and suppressed cavity-pulling effect of Cesium active optical clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhichao; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the collective emission behavior and suppressed cavity-pulling effect of four-level active optical clock with Cesium atoms. Thermal Cesium atoms in a glass cell velocity selective pumped with a 455.5 nm laser operating at 6S$_{1/2}$ to 7P$_{3/2}$ transition are used as lasing medium. Population inverted Cesium atoms between 7S$_{1/2}$ and 6P$_{3/2}$ levels are optical weakly coupled by a pair cavity mirrors working at deep bad-cavity regime with a finesse of 4.3, and the ratio between cavity bandwidth and gain bandwidth is approximately 45. With increased 455.5 nm pumping laser intensity, the output power of cesium active optical clock at 1469.9 nm from 7S$_{1/2}$ level to 6P$_{3/2}$ level shows a threshold and reach a power of 13 $\\mu$W. Active optical clock would dramatically improve the optical clock stability since the lasing frequency does not follow the cavity length variation exactly, but in a form of suppressed cavity pulling effect. In this letter the cavity pulling effe...

  13. Deconfinement as an entropic self-destruction: a solution for the quarkonium suppression puzzle?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E. [Stony Brook Univ, Department of Physics and Astronomy, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Department of Physics, Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The entropic approach to dissociation of bound states immersed in strongly coupled systems is developed. In such systems, the excitations of the bound state are often delocalized and characterized by a large entropy, so that the bound state is strongly entangled with the rest of the statistical system. If this entropy S increases with the separation r between the constituents of the bound state, S=S(r), then the resulting entropic force F=T ?S/?r (T is temperature) can drive the dissociation process. As a specific example, we consider the case of heavy quarkonium in strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, where lattice QCD indicates a large amount of entropy associated with the heavy quark pair at temperatures 0.9Tc?T?1.5Tc (Tc is the deconfinement temperature); this entropy S(r) grows with the interquark distance r. We argue that the entropic mechanism results in an anomalously strong quarkonium suppression in the temperature range near Tc. This entropic self-destruction may thus explain why the experimentally measured quarkonium nuclear modification factor at RHIC (lower energy density) is smaller than at LHC (higher energy density), possibly resolving the “quarkonium suppression puzzle”—all of the previously known mechanisms of quarkonium dissociation operate more effectively at higher energy densities, and this contradicts the data. Moreover, we find that near Tc the entropic force leads to delocalization of the bound hadron states; we argue that this delocalization may be the mechanism underlying deconfinement.

  14. Search for CP Violation in Neutral D Meson Cabibbo-suppressed Three-body Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2008-09-23

    Using 385 fb^-1 of e^+e^- collision data collected at center-of-mass energies around 10.6 GeV, we search for time-integrated CP violation in the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decays D0/D0bar --> pi^- pi^+ pi^0 and D0/D0bar --> K^- K^+ pi^0. Our model-independent and model-dependent analyses show no evidence of CP violation in these decays. The intermediate amplitudes include well-defined flavor states [e.g., rho(770)^+- pi^-+, K*(892)^+- K^-+] and CP-odd eigenstates [e.g., rho(770)^0 pi^0, phi(1020) pi^0]. With the null results of the previous analyses for CP-even eigenstates D0/D0bar --> K^+ K^- and D0/D0bar --> pi^+ pi^-, we conclude that any CP violation in the singly Cabibbo-suppressed charm decays occurs at a rate which is not larger than a few percent. These results are in accord with the Standard Model predictions, and provide constraints on some models beyond the Standard Model.

  15. Deconfinement as an entropic self-destruction: A solution for the quarkonium suppression puzzle?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2014-10-02

    The entropic approach to dissociation of bound states immersed in strongly coupled systems is developed. In such systems, the excitations of the bound state are often delocalized and characterized by a large entropy, so that the bound state is strongly entangled with the rest of the statistical system. If this entropy S increases with the separation r between the constituents of the bound state, S=S(r), then the resulting entropic force F=T ?S/?r (T is temperature) can drive the dissociation process. As a specific example, we consider the case of heavy quarkonium in strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, where lattice QCD indicatesmore »a large amount of entropy associated with the heavy quark pair at temperatures 0.9Tc ? T ? 1.5Tc (Tc is the deconfinement temperature); this entropy S(r) grows with the interquark distance r. We argue that the entropic mechanism results in an anomalously strong quarkonium suppression in the temperature range near Tc. This entropic self-destruction may thus explain why the experimentally measured quarkonium nuclear modification factor at RHIC (lower energy density) is smaller than at LHC (higher energy density), possibly resolving the “quarkonium suppression puzzle”—all of the previously known mechanisms of quarkonium dissociation operate more effectively at higher energy densities, and this contradicts the data. As a result, we find that near Tc the entropic force leads to delocalization of the bound hadron states; we argue that this delocalization may be the mechanism underlying deconfinement.« less

  16. Calculation of Fire Severity Factors and Fire Non-Suppression Probabilities For A DOE Facility Fire PRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Elicson; Bentley Harwood; Jim Bouchard; Heather Lucek

    2011-03-01

    Over a 12 month period, a fire PRA was developed for a DOE facility using the NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC fire PRA methodology. The fire PRA modeling included calculation of fire severity factors (SFs) and fire non-suppression probabilities (PNS) for each safe shutdown (SSD) component considered in the fire PRA model. The SFs were developed by performing detailed fire modeling through a combination of CFAST fire zone model calculations and Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). Component damage times and automatic fire suppression system actuation times calculated in the CFAST LHS analyses were then input to a time-dependent model of fire non-suppression probability. The fire non-suppression probability model is based on the modeling approach outlined in NUREG/CR-6850 and is supplemented with plant specific data. This paper presents the methodology used in the DOE facility fire PRA for modeling fire-induced SSD component failures and includes discussions of modeling techniques for: • Development of time-dependent fire heat release rate profiles (required as input to CFAST), • Calculation of fire severity factors based on CFAST detailed fire modeling, and • Calculation of fire non-suppression probabilities.

  17. An assessment of alternatives and technologies for replacing ozone- depleting substances at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, C.W.; Miller, K.B.; Friedman, J.R.; Rapoport, R.D.; Conover, D.R.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Koss, T.C.

    1992-10-01

    Title VI of the Clean Air Act, as amended, mandates a production phase-out for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). These requirements will have a significant impact on US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Currently, DOE uses ODSs in three major activities: fire suppression (halon), refrigeration and cooling (chlorofluorocarbons [CFCs]), and cleaning that requires solvents (CFCs, methyl chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride). This report provides basic information on methods and strategies to phase out use of ODSs at DOE facilities.

  18. Suppression of hepatic stellate cell activation by microRNA-29b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekiya, Yumiko; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Liver Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka ; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Liver Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka; PhoenixBio Co. Ltd., Hiroshima ; Ikeda, Kazuo; Kawada, Norifumi; Liver Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during the activation of hepatic stellate cells in primary culture. {yields} Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs. {yields} It blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-b mRNAs essential for stellate cell activation. {yields} miR-29b overexpression led stellate cells to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their star-like morphology. {yields} miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in the regulation of cellular functions including proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. It has been previously shown that the miR-29 family is involved in regulating type I collagen expression by interacting with the 3'UTR of its mRNA. Here, we investigated the roles of miR-29b in the activation of mouse primary-cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a principal collagen-producing cell in the liver. Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during HSC activation in primary culture. Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs and additionally blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-{beta}, which are key genes involved in the activation of HSCs. Further, overexpression of miR-29b led HSCs to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their quiescent star-like cell morphology. Although phosphorylation of FAK, ERK, and Akt, and the mRNA expression of c-jun was unaffected, miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. These results suggested that miR-29b is involved in the activation of HSCs and could be a candidate molecule for suppressing their activation and consequent liver fibrosis.

  19. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, Rachel K.; Hutchinson, Lee M.; Burpee, Benjamin T.; Tupper, Emily J.; Pelletier, Jonathan H.; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R.; Malay, Ethan T.; Evans, Brieana L.; Velez, Alejandro; Gosse, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 ?M treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 ?M. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. -- Highlights: ?The effects of triclosan on mast cell function using a murine mast cell model. ?Triclosan strongly inhibits degranulation of mast cells. ?Triclosan suppresses membrane ruffling of activated mast cells. ?Triclosan's effects persist when early mast cell signaling events are bypassed. ?Supports use of triclosan as a topical treatment for eczema.

  20. Suppression of the asymmetric competition mode in the relativistic Ku-band coaxial transit-time oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Junpu; He, Juntao; Zhang, Jiande; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Lei [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-10-15

    A relativistic Ku-band coaxial transit-time oscillator has been proposed in our previous work. In the experiments, we find that the asymmetric competition mode in the device limits the microwave power with the increase of the input electric power. For solving such a problem, the methods for analysis and suppression of the asymmetric competition mode in the device are investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the structure and the material of the collector, the concentricity, and the electron emission uniformity play an important part in the suppression of the asymmetric competition mode in the relativistic Ku-band transit-time oscillator. In the subsequent experiments, the asymmetric mode was suppressed effectively. At a low guiding magnetic field of 0.7?T, a microwave pulse with power of 1?GW, frequency of 14.3?GHz close to the simulation one, and efficiency of 20% was generated.

  1. Suppression of Y production in d + Au + and Au + Au collisions at ?sNN =200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    none,

    2014-07-01

    We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| more »1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state part on energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  2. Suppression of upsilon Production in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at root s=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state part on energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  3. Suppression of upsilon Production in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at root s=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| more »1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state part on energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  4. Investigation of the suppression effect of polyethylene glycol on copper electroplating by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hung, C.-C.; Lee, W.-H.; Wang, Y.-L.; Chan, D.-Y.; Hwang, G.-J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); College of Science and Engineering, National University of Tainan, Tainan 700, Taiwan (China)

    2008-09-15

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is an additive that is commonly used as a suppressor in the semiconductor copper (Cu)-electroplating process. In this study, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to analyze the electrochemical behavior of PEG in the Cu-electroplating process. Polarization analysis, cyclic-voltammetry stripping, and cell voltage versus plating time were examined to clarify the suppression behavior of PEG. The equivalent circuit simulated from the EIS data shows that PEG inhibited the Cu-electroplating rate by increasing the charge-transfer resistance as well as the resistance of the adsorption layer. The presence of a large inductance demonstrated the strong adsorption of cuprous-PEG-chloride complexes on the Cu surface during the Cu-electroplating process. Increasing the PEG concentration appears to increase the resistances of charge transfer, the adsorption layer, and the inductance of the electroplating system.

  5. Suppression of Non-photonic Electrons from Enhancement of Charm Baryons in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Sorensen; X. Dong

    2006-02-06

    At intermediate transverse momentum (2 electrons less frequently than charm meson decays, the non-photonic electron spectrum is sensitive to the Lambda_c/D ratio. In this report we study the dependence of the non-photonic electron spectrum on the baryon-to-meson ratio for charm hadrons. As an example, we take the Lambda_c/D ratio to have the same form as the Lambda/K^0_S ratio. In this case, even if the total charm quark yield in Au+Au collisions scales with the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions (N_bin), the electron spectrum at 2 < p_T < 5 GeV/c is suppressed relative to N_bin scaled p+p collisions by as much as 20%.

  6. Quantum suppression law in a 3-D photonic chip implementing the Fast Fourier Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Crespi; Roberto Osellame; Roberta Ramponi; Marco Bentivegna; Fulvio Flamini; Nicolò Spagnolo; Niko Viggianiello; Luca Innocenti; Paolo Mataloni; Fabio Sciarrino

    2015-08-04

    The identification of phenomena able to pinpoint quantum interference is attracting large interest. Indeed, a generalization of the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect valid for any number of photons and optical modes would represent an important leap ahead both from a fundamental perspective and for practical applications, such as certification of photonic quantum devices, whose computational speedup is expected to depend critically on multiparticle interference. Quantum distinctive features have been predicted for many particles injected into multimode interferometers implementing the Fourier transformation in the Fock space. In this work we develop a scalable approach for the implementation of quantum fast Fourier transform using 3-D photonic integrated interferometers, fabricated via femtosecond laser writing technique. We observe the quantum suppression of a large number of output states with 4- and 8-mode optical circuits: the experimental results demonstrate genuine quantum interference between the injected photons, thus offering a powerful tool for diagnostic of photonic platforms.

  7. Suppressing the non-Gaussian statistics of Renewable Power from Wind and Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anvari, M; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi; Wächter, M; Milan, P; Heinemann, D; Peinke, Joachim; Lorenz, E

    2015-01-01

    The power from wind and solar exhibits a nonlinear flickering variability, which typically occurs at time scales of a few seconds. We show that high-frequency monitoring of such renewable powers enables us to detect a transition, controlled by the field size, where the output power qualitatively changes its behaviour from a flickering type to a diffusive stochastic behaviour. We find that the intermittency and strong non-Gaussian behavior in cumulative power of the total field, even for a country-wide installation still survives for both renewable sources. To overcome the short time intermittency, we introduce a time-delayed feedback method for power output of wind farm and solar field that can change further the underlying stochastic process and suppress their strong non- gaussian fluctuations.

  8. Operation of a high purity germanium crystal in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John L. Orrell; Craig E. Aalseth; John F. Amsbaugh; Peter J. Doe; Todd W. Hossbach

    2006-10-11

    A high purity germanium crystal was operated in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer. Spectroscopic quality resolution of less than 1% of the full-width half maximum of full energy deposition peaks was demonstrated. The construction of the small apparatus used to obtain these results is reported. The design concept is to use the liquid argon bath to both cool the germanium crystal to operating temperatures and act as a scintillating veto. The scintillation light from the liquid argon can veto cosmic-rays, external primordial radiation, and gamma radiation that does not fully deposit within the germanium crystal. This technique was investigated for its potential impact on ultra-low background gamma-ray spectroscopy. This work is based on a concept initially developed for future germanium-based neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments.

  9. Superradiance, subradiance, and suppressed superradiance of dipoles near a metal interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choquette, J. J. [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Physics, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5 (Canada); Marzlin, Karl-Peter [Department of Physics, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5 (Canada); Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Sanders, B. C. [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    We theoretically characterize the collective radiative behavior of N classical emitters near an interface between different dielectrics that supports the transfer of surface plasmon modes into the far-field of electromagnetic radiation. The phenomena of superradiance and surface plasmons can be combined to amplify the emitted radiation intensity S as S=AN{sup 2}S{sub 0} compared to a single emitter's intensity S{sub 0} in free space. For a practical case study within the article A=240, compared to A=1 in free space. We furthermore demonstrate that there are collective modes for which the intensity of the emitted radiation is suppressed by 2 orders of magnitude despite their supperadiant emission characteristics. A method to control the emission characteristics of the system and to switch from super- to subradiant behavior with a suitably detuned external driving field is devised.

  10. Effect of power oscillations on suppression pool heating during ATWS (Anticipated Transients Without Scram) conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Nine selected Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) have been simulated on the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA), to determine how power and flow oscillations, similar to those that did or could have occurred at the LaSalle-2 boiling Water Reactor (BWR), could affect the rate of Pressure Suppression Pool heating. It has been determined that the pool can reach its temperature limit of 80{degree}C in 4.3 min. after Turbine Trip without Bypass, if the feedwater pumps are not tripped. The pool will not reach its limit, if Boron is injected, even when oscillations are encountered. Simultaneous turbine and recirculation pump trips, introduced under stable conditions, can lead to instability. 2 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Radar signal pre-processing to suppress surface bounce and multipath

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieroni, David W; Mast, Jeffrey E; Beer, N. Reginald

    2013-12-31

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes that return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  12. Wide angle Compton scattering on the proton: study of power suppressed corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kivel, N

    2015-01-01

    We study the wide angle Compton scattering process on a proton within the soft collinear factorization (SCET) framework. The main purpose of this work is to estimate the effect due to certain power suppressed corrections. We consider all possible kinematical power corrections and also include the subleading amplitudes describing the scattering with nucleon helicity flip. Under certain assumptions we present a leading-order factorization formula for these amplitudes which includes the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. We apply the formalism and perform a phenomenological analysis of the cross section and asymmetries in the wide angle Compton scattering on a proton. We assume that in the relevant kinematical region where $-t,-u>2.5$~GeV$^{2}$ the dominant contribution is provided by the soft-spectator mechanism. The hard coefficient functions of the corresponding SCET operators are taken in the leading-order approximation. The analysis of existing cross section data shows that the contribution of the heli...

  13. Suppression of the centrifugal barrier effects in the off-energy-shell neutron+$^{17}$O interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gulino; C. Spitaleri; X. D. Tang; G. L. Guardo; L. Lamia; S. Cherubini; B. Bucher; V. Burjan; M. Couder; P. Davies; R. deBoer; X. Fang; V. Z. Goldberg; Z. Hons; V. Kroha; L. Lamm; M. La Cognata; C. Li; C. Ma; J. Mrazek; A. M. Mukhamedzhanov; M. Notani; S. OBrien; R. G. Pizzone; G. G. Rapisarda; D. Roberson; M. L. Sergi; W. Tan; I. . J. Thompson; M. Wiescher

    2012-12-11

    The reaction $^{17}$O($n,\\alpha$)$^{14}$C was studied at energies from $E_{cm}=0$ to $E_{cm}=350$ keV using the quasi-free deuteron break-up in the three body reaction $^{17}$O$+d \\rightarrow \\alpha+ ^{14}$C$+p$, extending the Trojan Horse indirect method (THM) to neutron-induced reactions. It is found that the $^{18}$O excited state at $E^*=8.125 \\pm 0.002$ MeV observed in THM experiments is absent in the direct measurement because of its high centrifugal barrier. The angular distributions of the populated resonances have been measured for the first time. The results unambiguously indicate the ability of the THM to overcome the centrifugal barrier suppression effect and to pick out the contribution of the bare nuclear interaction.

  14. Self-suppression of double tearing modes via Alfven resonance in rotating tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Zhengxiong; Wei Lai; Liu Yue [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Beams of the Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang Xiaogang [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Reversed magnetic shear configuration, a key method for improving plasma confinement in advanced tokamaks, is prone to exciting double tearing modes (DTMs) that can severely degrade the plasma confinement. In this letter, we reveal a new mechanism of suppressing the DTM instability due to the self-induced Alfven resonance in rotating tokamak plasmas. The linear growth rate is reduced from {approx}S{sub Hp}{sup -1/3} of the fast DTM regime to {approx}S{sub Hp}{sup -3/5} of the slow single tearing mode regime, where S{sub Hp} is magnetic Reynolds number. Instead of generating magnetic islands at the inner rational surface that can greatly enhance plasma transport in the core region, the formation of current sheets at resonance layers not only prevents the fast nonlinear DTM reconnection phase but also contributes to plasma heating.

  15. Apparatus for suppressing formation of vortices in the coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor and associated method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA); Garner, Daniel C. (Murrysville, PA); Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for suppressing the formation of vortices in circulating coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor. A vortex-suppressing plate having a plurality of openings therein is suspended within the lower plenum of a reactor vessel below and generally parallel to the main core support of the reactor. The plate is positioned so as to intersect vortices which may form in the circulating reactor coolant fluid. The intersection of the plate with such vortices disrupts the rotational flow pattern of the vortices, thereby disrupting the formation thereof.

  16. Measuring central-spin interaction with a spin bath by pulsed ENDOR: Towards suppression of spin diffusion decoherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Balian; M. B. A. Kunze; M. H. Mohammady; G. W. Morley; W. M. Witzel; C. W. M. Kay; T. S. Monteiro

    2012-10-08

    We present pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) experiments which enable us to characterize the coupling between bismuth donor spin qubits in Si and the surrounding spin bath of 29Si impurities which provides the dominant decoherence mechanism (nuclear spin diffusion) at low temperatures (expansion simulations show near-complete suppression of spin diffusion, at optimal working points. The suppression takes the form of sharply peaked divergences of the spin diffusion coherence time, in contrast with previously identified broader regions of insensitivity to classical fluctuations. ENDOR data suggest that anisotropic contributions are comparatively weak, so the form of the divergences is largely independent of crystal orientation.

  17. Apparatus for suppressing formation of vortices in the coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor and associated method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekeroth, D.E.; Garner, D.C.; Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.

    1993-11-30

    An apparatus and method are provided for suppressing the formation of vortices in circulating coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor. A vortex-suppressing plate having a plurality of openings therein is suspended within the lower plenum of a reactor vessel below and generally parallel to the main core support of the reactor. The plate is positioned so as to intersect vortices which may form in the circulating reactor coolant fluid. The intersection of the plate with such vortices disrupts the rotational flow pattern of the vortices, thereby disrupting the formation thereof. 3 figures.

  18. An efficient modeling method for thermal stratification simulation in a BWR suppression pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Hua Li; Walter Villanueva; Pavel Kudinov

    2012-09-01

    The suppression pool in a BWR plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as LOCA and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; and the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (Available Net Positive Suction Head) and therefore the performance of the pump which draws cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use 0-D lumped parameter methods to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool and therefore have large uncertainty in prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze realistic 3D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, therefore long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. The POOLEX experiments at Finland, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, are used for validation. GOTHIC lumped parameter models are used to obtain boundary conditions for BMIX++ code and CFD simulations. Comparison between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data is discussed in detail.

  19. Deconfinement as an entropic self-destruction: A solution for the quarkonium suppression puzzle?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2014-10-01

    The entropic approach to dissociation of bound states immersed in strongly coupled systems is developed. In such systems, the excitations of the bound state are often delocalized and characterized by a large entropy, so that the bound state is strongly entangled with the rest of the statistical system. If this entropy S increases with the separation r between the constituents of the bound state, S=S(r), then the resulting entropic force F=T ?S/?r (T is temperature) can drive the dissociation process. As a specific example, we consider the case of heavy quarkonium in strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, where lattice QCD indicates a large amount of entropy associated with the heavy quark pair at temperatures 0.9Tc?T?1.5Tc (Tc is the deconfinement temperature); this entropy S(r) grows with the interquark distance r. We argue that the entropic mechanism results in an anomalously strong quarkonium suppression in the temperature range near Tc. This entropic self-destruction may thus explain why the experimentally measured quarkonium nuclear modification factor at RHIC (lower energy density) is smaller than at LHC (higher energy density), possibly resolving the “quarkonium suppression puzzle”—all of the previously known mechanisms of quarkonium dissociation operate more effectively at higher energy densities, and this contradicts the data. Moreover, we find that near Tc the entropic force leads to delocalization of the bound hadron states; we argue that this delocalization may be the mechanism underlying deconfinement.

  20. Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for validation. Comparisons between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data are discussed in detail.

  1. Noise suppression in reconstruction of low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jing; Robar, James; Guan Huaiqun

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To improve the image contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratio for low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) using a statistical projection noise suppression algorithm based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion. Methods: Projection images of a contrast phantom, a CatPhan{sup Registered-Sign} 600 phantom and a head phantom were acquired by a Varian 2100EX LINAC with a low-Z (Al) target and low energy x-ray beam (2.5 MeV) at a low-dose level and at a high-dose level. The projections were then processed by minimizing the PWLS objective function. The weighted least square (WLS) term models the noise of measured projection and the penalty term enforces the smoothing constraints of the projection image. The variance of projection data was chosen as the weight for the PWLS objective function and it determined the contribution of each measurement. An anisotropic quadratic form penalty that incorporates the gradient information of projection image was used to preserve edges during noise reduction. Low-Z target MV CBCT images were reconstructed by the FDK algorithm after each projection was processed by the PWLS smoothing. Results: Noise in low-Z target MV CBCT images were greatly suppressed after the PWLS projection smoothing, without noticeable sacrifice of the spatial resolution. Depending on the choice of smoothing parameter, the CNR of selected regions of interest in the PWLS processed low-dose low-Z target MV CBCT image can be higher than the corresponding high-dose image.Conclusion: The CNR of low-Z target MV CBCT images was substantially improved by using PWLS projection smoothing. The PWLS projection smoothing algorithm allows the reconstruction of high contrast low-Z target MV CBCT image with a total dose of as low as 2.3 cGy.

  2. The FBXW7 {beta}-form is suppressed in human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Zhaodi; Inomata, Kenichi; Ishizawa, Kota; Horii, Akira . E-mail: horii@mail.tains.tohoku.ac.jp

    2007-03-23

    FBXW7 (F-box and WD40 domain protein 7) is an F-box protein with 7 tandem WDs (tryptophan-aspartic acid) that functions as a phosphoepitope-specific substrate recognition component of SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) ubiquitin ligases and catalyzes the ubiquitination of proteins promoting cell proliferation, such as CCNE1, MYC, AURKA, NOTCH1, and JUN, which are frequently activated in a wide range of human cancers. FBXW7 is a candidate tumor suppressor, and mutations have been reported in some human tumors. In this study, we analyzed 84 human tumor cell lines in search for genetic alterations of FBXW7, as well as mRNA and protein expressional changes, and compared them with expression levels of the CCNE1, MYC, and AURKA proteins. We found a novel nonsense mutation in a colon cancer cell line SCC and confirmed the missense mutations in SKOV3, an ovarian cancer cell line, and LoVo, a colon cancer cell line. Moreover, suppressed expression of FBXW7 accompanied by activation of the target proteins were observed in ovarian, colon, endometrial, gastric, and prostate cancers. It is notable that highly suppressed mRNA expression of the FBXW7 {beta}-form was found in all the human glioma cell lines analyzed; enhanced expressions of CCNE1, MYC, and AURKA were observed in these cells. Our present results imply that FBXW7 plays a pivotal role in many tissues by controlling the amount of cell cycle promoter proteins and that dysfunction of this protein is one of the essential steps in carcinogenesis in multiple organs.

  3. Network Modeling Identifies Molecular Functions Targeted by miR-204 to Suppress Head and Neck Tumor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstein, Mark

    Network Modeling Identifies Molecular Functions Targeted by miR-204 to Suppress Head and Neck Tumor targets predicted by sequence-alignment databases and the relative low accuracy of such predictions which with tumor progression in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). We further demonstrate

  4. A Model of the Lateral Geniculate Complex of the Turtle Visual System: Noise Suppression and Target Motion Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Bijoy K.

    A Model of the Lateral Geniculate Complex of the Turtle Visual System: Noise Suppression and Target-Cybernetics and Intelligent Systems (CBCIS) at Texas Tech University, served as my thesis advisor and com- mittee chair of this work - showing an unwavering dedication to the topic of modeling vision neural systems. As a long

  5. CD8+ T cell antiviral activity: mechanism of induction and the suppression of emerging feline immunodeficiency virus strains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Anagha

    2007-09-17

    autologous cells and was probably not FIV specific. Suppression was maximum when the inducer cells and the effector CD8+ T cells were in contact with each other, suggesting a potential role for membrane antigen interactions and/or cytokines in the induction...

  6. Hyaluronan suppresses prostate tumor cell proliferation through diminished expression of N-cadherin and aberrant growth factor receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; Goodrich, Nathaniel P.; McAtee, Caitlin O.; Haferbier, Katie [Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Oakley, Gregory G.; Wahl, James K. [Department of Oral Biology, University of Nebraska College of Dentistry, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)] [Department of Oral Biology, University of Nebraska College of Dentistry, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Simpson, Melanie A., E-mail: msimpson2@unl.edu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Eppley Cancer Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production has been functionally implicated in prostate tumorigenesis and metastasis. We previously used prostate tumor cells overexpressing the HA synthesizing enzyme HAS3 or the clinically relevant hyaluronidase Hyal1 to show that excess HA production suppresses tumor growth, while HA turnover accelerates spontaneous metastasis from the prostate. Here, we examined pathways responsible for effects of HAS3 and Hyal1 on tumor cell phenotype. Detailed characterization of cell cycle progression revealed that expression of Hyal1 accelerated cell cycle re-entry following synchronization, whereas HAS3 alone delayed entry. Hyal1 expressing cells exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to sustain ERK phosphorylation upon stimulation by growth factors, and in their expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. In contrast, HAS3 expressing cells showed prolonged ERK phosphorylation and increased expression of both p21 and p27, in asynchronous and synchronized cultures. Changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins were accompanied by HA-induced suppression of N-cadherin, while E-cadherin expression and {beta}-catenin expression and distribution remained unchanged. Our results are consistent with a model in which excess HA synthesis suppresses cell proliferation by promoting homotypic E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion, consequently signaling to elevate cell cycle inhibitor expression and suppress G1- to S-phase transition.

  7. ADAPTIVE SUPPRESSION OF CCD SIGNAL-DEPENDENT NOISE IN LIGHT SPACE Hilda Faraji and James MacLean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLean, W. James

    ADAPTIVE SUPPRESSION OF CCD SIGNAL-DEPENDENT NOISE IN LIGHT SPACE Hilda Faraji and James Mac on the estimated noise model in light space. Our adaptive system demonstrates efficient noise removal per- formance IN LIGHT SPACE We use adaptive filters to learn the local signal and noise characteristics so

  8. Plant foliar disease suppression mediated by composted forms of paper mill residuals exhibits molecular features of induced resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Plant foliar disease suppression mediated by composted forms of paper mill residuals exhibits Arabidopsis thaliana grown in soil from field plots amended with composted forms of paper mill residuals (PMR with plants grown in soil from field plots amended with a non-composted PMR or non-amended soils. Similar

  9. Compost: A study of the development process and end-product potential for suppression of turfgrass disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Greg J.

    Review Compost: A study of the development process and end-product potential for suppression stable, humi®ed forms and inorganic products (CO2, H2O, ammonia, nitrate, methane), and releases heat of competition for nutrients, antibiosis, lytic and other extracellular enzyme production, parasitism, predation

  10. Mode Evolution and Transmission Suppression in a Perforated Ultrathin Metallic Film with a Triangular Array of Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mode Evolution and Transmission Suppression in a Perforated Ultrathin Metallic Film in a perforated ultrathin metallic film (PUMF) with a periodic triangular array of holes. It is found for the future studies in PUMF-based structures and devices. Keywords Surface plasmon . Perforated ultrathin

  11. Improving frequency selection of driven pulses using derivative-based transition suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Motzoi; Frank K. Wilhelm

    2013-10-31

    Many techniques in quantum control rely on frequency separation as a means for suppressing unwanted couplings. In its simplest form, the mechanism relies on the low bandwidth of control pulses of long duration. Here we perform a higher-order quantum-mechanical treatment that allows for higher precision and shorter times. In particular, we identify three kinds of off-resonant effects: i) simultaneous unwanted driven couplings (e.g. due to drive crosstalk), ii) additional (initially undriven) transitions such as those in an infinite ladder system, and iii) sideband frequencies of the driving waveform such as we find in corrections to the rotating wave approximation. With a framework that is applicable to all three cases, in addition to the known adiabatic error responsible for a shift of the energy levels we typically see in the spectroscopy of such systems, we derive error terms in a controlled expansion corresponding to higher order adiabatic effects and diabatic excitations. We show, by also expanding the driving waveform in a basis of different order derivatives of a trial function (typically a Gaussian) these different error terms can be corrected for in a systematic way hence strongly improving quantum control of systems with dense spectra.

  12. Wide angle Compton scattering on the proton: study of power suppressed corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kivel; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2015-04-04

    We study the wide angle Compton scattering process on a proton within the soft collinear factorization (SCET) framework. The main purpose of this work is to estimate the effect due to certain power suppressed corrections. We consider all possible kinematical power corrections and also include the subleading amplitudes describing the scattering with nucleon helicity flip. Under certain assumptions we present a leading-order factorization formula for these amplitudes which includes the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. We apply the formalism and perform a phenomenological analysis of the cross section and asymmetries in the wide angle Compton scattering on a proton. We assume that in the relevant kinematical region where $-t,-u>2.5$~GeV$^{2}$ the dominant contribution is provided by the soft-spectator mechanism. The hard coefficient functions of the corresponding SCET operators are taken in the leading-order approximation. The analysis of existing cross section data shows that the contribution of the helicity flip amplitudes to this observable is quite small and comparable with other expected theoretical uncertainties. We also show predictions for double polarization observables for which experimental information exists.

  13. Environmental factors affecting long-term stabilization of radon suppression covers for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.K.; Long, L.W.; Reis, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon suppression cover applied to uranium mill tailings. To help determine design stresses for the tailings piles, environmental parameters are characterized for the five active uranium-producing regions on a site-specific basis. Only conventional uranium mills that are currently operating or that are scheduled to open in the mid 1980s are considered. Available data indicate that flooding has the most potential for disrupting a tailings pile. The arid regions of the Wyoming Basins and the Colorado Plateau are subject to brief storms of high intensity. The Texas Gulf Coast has the highest potential for extreme precipitation from hurricane-related storms. Wind data indicate average wind speeds from 3 to 6 m/sec for the sites, but extremes of 40 m/sec can be expected. Tornado risks range from low to moderate. The Colorado Plateau has the highest seismic potential, with maximum acceleration caused by earthquakes ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 g. Any direct effect from volcanic eruption is negligible, as all mills are located 90 km or more from an igneous or hydrothermal system.

  14. Method and apparatus for suppressing regenerative instability and related chatter in machine tools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Segalman, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Redmond, James M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Methods of and apparatuses for mitigating chatter vibrations in machine tools or components thereof. Chatter therein is suppressed by periodically or continuously varying the stiffness of the cutting tool (or some component of the cutting tool), and hence the resonant frequency of the cutting tool (or some component thereof). The varying of resonant frequency of the cutting tool can be accomplished by modulating the stiffness of the cutting tool, the cutting tool holder, or any other component of the support for the cutting tool. By periodically altering the impedance of the cutting tool assembly, chatter is mitigated. In one embodiment, a cyclic electric (or magnetic) field is applied to the spindle quill which contains an electro-rheological (or magneto-rheological) fluid. The variable yield stress in the fluid affects the coupling of the spindle to the machine tool structure, changing the natural frequency of oscillation. Altering the modal characteristics in this fashion disrupts the modulation of current tool vibrations with previous tool vibrations recorded on the workpiece surface.

  15. Method and apparatus for suppressing regenerative instability and related chatter in machine tools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Segalman, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Redmond, James M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    Methods of and apparatuses for mitigating chatter vibrations in machine tools or components thereof. Chatter therein is suppressed by periodically or continuously varying the stiffness of the cutting tool (or some component of the cutting tool), and hence the resonant frequency of the cutting tool (or some component thereof). The varying of resonant frequency of the cutting tool can be accomplished by modulating the stiffness of the cutting tool, the cutting tool holder, or any other component of the support for the cutting tool. By periodically altering the impedance of the cutting tool assembly, chatter is mitigated. In one embodiment, a cyclic electric (or magnetic) field is applied to the spindle quill which contains an electro-rheological (or magneto-rheological) fluid. The variable yield stress in the fluid affects the coupling of the spindle to the machine tool structure, changing the natural frequency of oscillation. Altering the modal characteristics in this fashion disrupts the modulation of current tool vibrations with previous tool vibrations recorded on the workpiece surface.

  16. Apparatus and method for suppressing vibration and displacement of a bellows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    Flexible bellows are utilized between two systems, such as a pumping system and a process station, to partially absorb system vibrations and to compensate for misalignment between the systems. It is common practice to either clamp a rigid spacer between flanges of the two systems to separate them from each other, or to maintain the bellows in unsupported relationship between these systems. In the former bellows arrangement, the rigid spacer transmits vibratory energy between the two systems and the bellows tends to function as an undamped or underdamped unit that resonates at its own frequency to create additional vibratory energy, transmitted to the systems. In the latter, unsupported bellows arrangement, the pressure differential prevalent between the fluid flowing through the bellows and ambient normally causes extension or retraction of the bellows and resulting misalignment problems. The present invention substantially solves the above vibration and misalignment problems by providing an inflatable tube in surrounding relationship about a bellows to suppress vibration and displacement thereof. A method for isolating first and second systems from each other to prevent the transmission of vibratory energy therebetween comprises the steps of attaching at least one flexible bellows between the systems, surrounding the bellows with an inflatable tube, and maintaining a predetermined pressure in the tube to urge the tube in flexible contact with at least some of the convolutions of the bellows.

  17. Suppression of sludge formation by two-stage hydrocracking of vacuum residue at high conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mochida, I.; Zhao, X.; Sakanishi, K. (Inst. of Advanced Material Study, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka 816 (JP))

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on hydrocracked products from Arabian light vacuum residue at high conversion into distillate ({gt}50%) that were analyzed in order to reveal how sludge formation was suppressed in the two-stage reaction. Although the asphaltene in the starting residue was highly soluble in the starting maltene in spite of is largest molecular weight, single-stage hydrocracking at a higher temperature of 420{degrees}C increased the aromaticity of the asphaltene through extensive deaklylation and dehydrogenation, leading to sludge formation. In contrast, two-stage hydrocracking at 390{degrees}C--3 h/420{degrees}C--1/h accomplished effective depolymerization of the asphaltene, high conversion being achieved without sludge. The carbon aromaticity (f{sub a}) of the produced asphaltene was maintained rather low, although its amount in the product was much the same regardless of the reaction conditions. The heptane-soluble maltenes in the hydrocracked oils exhibited variable dissolving abilities against the asphaltene according to the content and aromaticity of its aromatic fraction, also influencing sludge formation. Hydrocracking produced paraffins through the hydrogenative deaklylation of long-chain alkylbenzenes, decreasing f{sub a} and the dissolving ability of the hydrocracked maltene.

  18. Suppression of renal fibrosis by galectin-1 in high glucose-treated renal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okano, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kaokano@kc.twmu.ac.jp; Tsuruta, Yuki; Yamashita, Tetsuri; Takano, Mari; Echida, Yoshihisa; Nitta, Kosaku

    2010-11-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the ability of intracellular galectin-1 (Gal-1), a prototype of endogenous lectin, to prevent renal fibrosis by regulating cell signaling under a high glucose (HG) condition. We demonstrated that overexpression of Gal-1 reduces type I collagen (COL1) expression and transcription in human renal epithelial cells under HG conditions and transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) stimulation. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) is stimulated by Gal-1. HG conditions and TGF-{beta}1 treatment augment expression and nuclear translocation of Gal-1. In contrast, targeted inhibition of Gal-1 expression reduces COL1 expression and increases MMP1 expression. The Smad3 signaling pathway is inhibited, whereas two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), are activated by Gal-1, indicating that Gal-1 regulates these signaling pathways in COL1 production. Using specific inhibitors of Smad3, ERK, and p38 MAPK, we showed that ERK MAPK activated by Gal-1 plays an inhibitory role in COL1 transcription and that activation of the p38 MAPK pathway by Gal-1 plays a negative role in MMP1 production. Taken together, two MAPK pathways are stimulated by increasing levels of Gal-1 in the HG condition, leading to suppression of COL1 expression and increase of MMP1 expression.

  19. Coherence Effects in Charmonium Production off Nuclei : Consequences for J/?Suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Capella

    2002-07-16

    The probabilistic Glauber formula for nuclear absorption used in the literature is only valid at low energies and $x_+ \\simeq 0$. Due to energy conservation, $\\sigma_{abs}$ is replaced by an effective cross-section $\\sigma_{abs} + x_+^{\\gamma}$ ($\\sigma_{c\\bar{c}-N} - \\sigma_{abs})$ which increases with $x_+$ and tends to the total $c\\bar{c}-N$ cross-section $\\sigma_{c\\bar{c}-N}$. Experimental data can be described with $\\sigma_{abs} \\sim 4 \\div 5$mb and $\\sigma_{c\\bar{c}-N} \\sim 15 \\div 20$mb. At high energies, due to the increase of the coherence length, this formula changes. The main change is the replacement of $\\sigma_{abs}$ by $\\sigma_{c\\bar{c}-N}$ -- for all values of $x_+$, as $s \\to \\infty$. Thus, if $\\sigma_{c\\bar{c}-N} > \\sigma_{abs}$ the $J/\\psi$ suppression due to nuclear interaction will increase with energy.

  20. Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2009-10-15

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the 'recombination mediators'. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as 'recombination co-mediators'. Defects in either recombination mediators or comediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic restabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51.

  1. Variation in Use of Androgen Suppression With External-Beam Radiotherapy for Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Pollack, Craig E.; Christodouleas, John P.; Guzzo, Thomas J.; Haas, Naomi B.; Vapiwala, Neha; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To describe practice patterns associated with androgen suppression (AS) stratified by disease risk group in patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We identified 2,184 low-risk, 2,339 intermediate-risk, and 2,897 high-risk patients undergoing EBRT for nonmetastatic prostate cancer diagnosed between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2005, in the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. We examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with AS use by multivariate logistic regression. Results: The proportions of patients receiving AS for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk prostate cancer were 32.2%, 56.3%, and 81.5%, respectively. AS use among men in the low-risk disease category varied widely, ranging from 13.6% in Detroit to 47.8% in Kentucky. We observed a significant decline in AS use between 2004 and 2005 within all three disease risk categories. Men aged {>=}75 years or with elevated comorbidity levels were more likely to receive AS. Conclusion: Our results identified apparent overuse and underuse of AS among men within the low-risk and high-risk disease categories, respectively. These results highlight the need for clinician and patient education regarding the appropriate use of AS. Practice patterns among intermediate-risk patients reflect the clinical heterogeneity of this population and underscore the need for better evidence to guide the treatment of these patients.

  2. Observation of the electromagnetic doubly OZI-suppressed decay $J/? \\rightarrow ??^{0}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BESIII Collaboration; M. Ablikim; M. N. Achasov; X. C. Ai; O. Albayrak; M. Albrecht; D. J. Ambrose; A. Amoroso; F. F. An; Q. An; J. Z. Bai; R. Baldini Ferroli; Y. Ban; D. W. Bennett; J. V. Bennett; M. Bertani; D. Bettoni; J. M. Bian; F. Bianchi; E. Boger; O. Bondarenko; I. Boyko; R. A. Briere; H. Cai; X. Cai; O. Cakir; A. Calcaterra; G. F. Cao; S. A. Cetin; J. F. Chang; G. Chelkov; G. Chen; H. S. Chen; H. Y. Chen; J. C. Chen; M. L. Chen; S. J. Chen; X. Chen; X. R. Chen; Y. B. Chen; H. P. Cheng; X. K. Chu; G. Cibinetto; D. Cronin-Hennessy; H. L. Dai; J. P. Dai; A. Dbeyssi; D. Dedovich; Z. Y. Deng; A. Denig; I. Denysenko; M. Destefanis; F. De Mori; Y. Ding; C. Dong; J. Dong; L. Y. Dong; M. Y. Dong; S. X. Du; P. F. Duan; J. Z. Fan; J. Fang; S. S. Fang; X. Fang; Y. Fang; L. Fava; F. Feldbauer; G. Felici; C. Q. Feng; E. Fioravanti; M. Fritsch; C. D. Fu; Q. Gao; X. Y. Gao; Y. Gao; Z. Gao; I. Garzia; C. Geng; K. Goetzen; W. X. Gong; W. Gradl; M. Greco; M. H. Gu; Y. T. Gu; Y. H. Guan; A. Q. Guo; L. B. Guo; Y. Guo; Y. P. Guo; Z. Haddadi; A. Hafner; S. Han; Y. L. Han; X. Q. Hao; F. A. Harris; K. L. He; Z. Y. He; T. Held; Y. K. Heng; Z. L. Hou; C. Hu; H. M. Hu; J. F. Hu; T. Hu; Y. Hu; G. M. Huang; G. S. Huang; H. P. Huang; J. S. Huang; X. T. Huang; Y. Huang; T. Hussain; Q. Ji; Q. P. Ji; X. B. Ji; X. L. Ji; L. L. Jiang; L. W. Jiang; X. S. Jiang; J. B. Jiao; Z. Jiao; D. P. Jin; S. Jin; T. Johansson; A. Julin; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; X. L. Kang; X. S. Kang; M. Kavatsyuk; B. C. Ke; R. Kliemt; B. Kloss; O. B. Kolcu; B. Kopf; M. Kornicer; W. Kuehn; A. Kupsc; W. Lai; J. S. Lange; M. Lara; P. Larin; C. Leng; C. H. Li; Cheng Li; D. M. Li; F. Li; G. Li; H. B. Li; J. C. Li; Jin Li; K. Li; K. Li; Lei Li; P. R. Li; T. Li; W. D. Li; W. G. Li; X. L. Li; X. M. Li; X. N. Li; X. Q. Li; Z. B. Li; H. Liang; Y. F. Liang; Y. T. Liang; G. R. Liao; D. X. Lin; B. J. Liu; C. X. Liu; F. H. Liu; Fang Liu; Feng Liu; H. B. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. H. Liu; H. M. Liu; J. Liu; J. P. Liu; J. Y. Liu; K. Liu; K. Y. Liu; L. D. Liu; P. L. Liu; Q. Liu; S. B. Liu; X. Liu; X. X. Liu; Y. B. Liu; Z. A. Liu; Zhiqiang Liu; Zhiqing Liu; H. Loehner; X. C. Lou; H. J. Lu; J. G. Lu; R. Q. Lu; Y. Lu; Y. P. Lu; C. L. Luo; M. X. Luo; T. Luo; X. L. Luo; M. Lv; X. R. Lyu; F. C. Ma; H. L. Ma; L. L. Ma; Q. M. Ma; S. Ma; T. Ma; X. N. Ma; X. Y. Ma; F. E. Maas; M. Maggiora; Q. A. Malik; Y. J. Mao; Z. P. Mao; S. Marcello; J. G. Messchendorp; J. Min; T. J. Min; R. E. Mitchell; X. H. Mo; Y. J. Mo; C. Morales Morales; K. Moriya; N. Yu. Muchnoi; H. Muramatsu; Y. Nefedov; F. Nerling; I. B. Nikolaev; Z. Ning; S. Nisar; S. L. Niu; X. Y. Niu; S. L. Olsen; Q. Ouyang; S. Pacetti; P. Patteri; M. Pelizaeus; H. P. Peng; K. Peters; J. Pettersson; J. L. Ping; R. G. Ping; R. Poling; Y. N. Pu; M. Qi; S. Qian; C. F. Qiao; L. Q. Qin; N. Qin; X. S. Qin; Y. Qin; Z. H. Qin; J. F. Qiu; K. H. Rashid; C. F. Redmer; H. L. Ren; M. Ripka; G. Rong; X. D. Ruan; V. Santoro; A. Sarantsev; M. Savrié; K. Schoenning; S. Schumann; W. Shan; M. Shao; C. P. Shen; P. X. Shen; X. Y. Shen; H. Y. Sheng; W. M. Song; X. Y. Song; S. Sosio; S. Spataro; G. X. Sun; J. F. Sun; S. S. Sun; Y. J. Sun; Y. Z. Sun; Z. J. Sun; Z. T. Sun; C. J. Tang; X. Tang; I. Tapan; E. H. Thorndike; M. Tiemens; D. Toth; M. Ullrich; I. Uman; G. S. Varner; B. Wang; B. L. Wang; D. Wang; D. Y. Wang; K. Wang; L. L. Wang; L. S. Wang; M. Wang; P. Wang; P. L. Wang; Q. J. Wa ng; S. G. Wang; W. Wang; X. F. Wang; Y. D. Wang; Y. F. Wang; Y. Q. Wang; Z. Wang; Z. G. Wang; Z. H. Wang; Z. Y. Wang; T. Weber; D. H. Wei; J. B. Wei; P. Weidenkaff; S. P. Wen; U. Wiedner; M. Wolke; L. H. Wu; Z. Wu; L. G. Xia; Y. Xia; D. Xiao; Z. J. Xiao; Y. G. Xie; Q. L. Xiu; G. F. Xu; L. Xu; Q. J. Xu; Q. N. Xu; X. P. Xu; L. Yan; W. B. Yan; W. C. Yan; Y. H. Ya n; H. X. Yang; L. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. X. Yang; H. Ye; M. Ye; M. H. Ye; J. H. Yin; B. X. Yu; C. X. Yu; H. W. Yu; J. S. Yu; C . Z. Yuan; W. L. Yuan; Y. Yuan; A. Yuncu; A. A. Zafar; A. Zallo; Y. Zeng; B. X. Zhang; B. Y. Zhang; C. Zhang; C. C. Zhang; D. H. Zhang; H. H. Zhang; H. Y. Zhang; J. J. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; J. Q. Zhang; J. W. Zhang; J. Y. Zhang; J. Z. Zhang; K. Zhang; L. Zhang; S. H. Zhang; X. Y. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Y. H. Zhang; Y. T. Zhang; Z. H. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; Z. Y. Zhang; G. Zhao; J. W. Zhao; J. Y. Zhao; J. Z. Zhao; Lei Zhao; Ling Zhao; M. G. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Q. W. Zhao; S. J. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; Y. B. Zhao; Z. G. Zhao; A. Zhemchugov; B. Zheng; J. P. Zheng; W. J. Zheng; Y. H. Zheng; B. Zhong; L. Zhou; Li Zhou; X. Zh ou; X. K. Zhou; X. R. Zhou; X. Y. Zhou; K. Zhu; K. J. Zhu; S. Zhu; X. L. Zhu; Y. C. Zhu; Y. S. Zhu; Z. A. Zhu; J. Zhuang; L. Zotti; B. S. Zou; J. H. Zou

    2015-06-02

    Using a sample of $1.31$ billion $J/\\psi$ events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we report the observation of the decay $J/\\psi \\rightarrow \\phi\\pi^{0}$, which is the first evidence for a doubly Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka suppressed electromagnetic $J/\\psi$ decay. A clear structure is observed in the $K^{+} K^{-}$ mass spectrum around 1.02 GeV/$c^2$, which can be attributed to interference between $J/\\psi \\rightarrow \\phi\\pi^{0}$ and $J/\\psi \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{0}$ decays. Due to this interference, two possible solutions are found. The corresponding measured values of the branching fraction of $J/\\psi \\to \\phi\\pi^{0}$ are $[2.94 \\pm 0.16\\text{(stat.)} \\pm 0.16\\text{(syst.)}] \\times 10^{-6}$ and $[1.24 \\pm 0.33\\text{(stat.)} \\pm 0.30\\text{(syst.)}] \\times 10^{-7}$.

  3. Suppression of Star Formation in the Hosts of Low-Excitation Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    The feedback from radio-loud active galactic nuclei (R-AGN) may help maintain low star formation (SF) rates in their early-type hosts, but the observational evidence for this mechanism has been inconclusive. We study systematic differences of aggregate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of various subsets of $\\sim$4000 low-redshift R-AGN from Best & Heckman (2012) with respect to (currently) inactive control samples selected to have matching redshift, stellar mass, population age, axis ratio, and environment. Aggregate SEDs, ranging from the ultraviolet (UV) through mid-infrared (mid-IR, 22 $\\mu$m), were constructed using a Bayesian method that eliminates biases from non-detections in GALEX and WISE. We study rare high-excitation sources separately from low-excitation ones, which we split by environment and host properties. We find that both the UV and mid-IR emission of non-cluster R-AGNs (80% of sample) are suppressed by $\\sim$0.2 dex relative to that of the control group, especially for moderately ma...

  4. Norathyriol Suppresses Skin Cancers Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation by Targeting ERK Kinases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jixia; Malakhova, Margarita; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Reddy, Kanamata; Kurinov, Igor; Carper, Andria; Langfald, Alyssa; Oi, Naomi; Kim, Myoung Ok; Zhu, Feng; Sosa, Carlos P.; Zhou, Keyuan; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2012-06-27

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is the leading factor in the development of skin cancer, prompting great interest in chemopreventive agents for this disease. In this study, we report the discovery of norathyriol, a plant-derived chemopreventive compound identified through an in silico virtual screening of the Chinese Medicine Library. Norathyriol is a metabolite of mangiferin found in mango, Hypericum elegans, and Tripterospermum lanceolatum and is known to have anticancer activity. Mechanistic investigations determined that norathyriol acted as an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activity to attenuate UVB-induced phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling cascades. We confirmed the direct and specific binding of norathyriol with ERK2 through a cocrystal structural analysis. The xanthone moiety in norathyriol acted as an adenine mimetic to anchor the compound by hydrogen bonds to the hinge region of the protein ATP-binding site on ERK2. Norathyriol inhibited in vitro cell growth in mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ cells at the level of G{sub 2}-M phase arrest. In mouse skin tumorigenesis assays, norathyriol significantly suppressed solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Further analysis indicated that norathyriol mediates its chemopreventive activity by inhibiting the ERK-dependent activity of transcriptional factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B during UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Taken together, our results identify norathyriol as a safe new chemopreventive agent that is highly effective against development of UV-induced skin cancer.

  5. The Theory and Applications of Parametric Excitation and Suppression of Oscillations in Continua: State of the Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazachkov, Ivan V

    2015-01-01

    The results by development of physical, mathematical and numerical models for parametric excitation and suppression of oscillations on the interfaces separating continuous media, for carrying out computing, physical and natural experiments by revealing the new phenomena and parametric effects, and for their use in improvement the existing and creation the perspective highly efficient technological processes are presented. Scientific novelty of this work consists in development of the theory and applications of parametric excitation and suppression of oscillations on the boundaries of continua on the samples of three tasks classes: flat and radial spreading film flows of viscous incompressible liquids, conductive as well as non-conductive ones; surfaces of phase transition from a liquid state into a solid one; and heterogeneous granular media. The external actions considered are: alternating electromagnetic, vibration, acoustic and thermal fields. Along with linear the non-linear parametric oscillations are in...

  6. Background Suppression Using Pulse Shape Analysis with a BEGe Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Search with GERDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budjas, Dusan; Schoenert, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chkvorets, Oleg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, P3E 2C6 Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-12-17

    A pulse shape analysis for distinguishing between double beta decay-like interactions and multiple-scattered photons was performed for the first time using a BEGe-type detector. This discrimination method is included in the research and development for the second phase of the GERDA experiment, since active background suppression techniques are necessary to reach sensitivity for the {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double beta decay half life of >10{sup 26} years. A suppression of backgrounds in the energy region of interest around the {sup 76}Ge Q{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} = 2039 keV is demonstrated, with (0.93{+-}0.08)% survival probability for events from {sup 60}Co, (21{+-}3)% for {sup 226}Ra, and (40{+-}2)% for {sup 228}Th. This performance is achieved with (89{+-}1)% acceptance of {sup 228}Th double escape events, which are analogous to double beta decay.

  7. An improved suppression method of the transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage with two reflectors in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Danni [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Suppression of the transverse-electromagnetic (TEM) mode leakage is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier with high gain, because a small microwave leakage from the buncher or the output cavity could overwhelm the input signal with low power. In this paper, a specially designed reflector is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage, whose axial electric field is approximately zero at the beam radial position. Theoretical analysis indicates that the reflector introduces little influence on the normal modulation of the beam while keeping a high reflection coefficient. By using two such reflectors with different eigen frequencies located in front of the buncher cavity and the output cavity, respectively, an improved triaxial klystron amplifier is presented. The simulation results show that the reflectors substantially decrease the TEM mode leakage power and achieve very good isolation among the cavities. The improved triaxial klystron amplifier can operate normally with 10's kW microwave injection without self-oscillations.

  8. Carbamazepine suppresses calpain-mediated autophagy impairment after ischemia/reperfusion in mouse livers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jae-Sung, E-mail: Jae.Kim@surgery.ufl.edu; Wang, Jin-Hee, E-mail: jin-hee.wang@surgery.ufl.edu; Biel, Thomas G., E-mail: Thomas.Biel@surgery.ufl.edu; Kim, Do-Sung, E-mail: do-sung.kim@surgery.med.ufl.edu; Flores-Toro, Joseph A., E-mail: Joseph.Flores-Toro@surgery.ufl.edu; Vijayvargiya, Richa, E-mail: rvijayvargiya@ufl.edu; Zendejas, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.zendejas@surgery.ufl.edu; Behrns, Kevin E., E-mail: Kevin.Behrns@surgery.ufl.edu

    2013-12-15

    Onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays a causative role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Current therapeutic strategies for reducing reperfusion injury remain disappointing. Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated, catabolic process that timely eliminates abnormal or damaged cellular constituents and organelles such as dysfunctional mitochondria. I/R induces calcium overloading and calpain activation, leading to degradation of key autophagy-related proteins (Atg). Carbamazepine (CBZ), an FDA-approved anticonvulsant drug, has recently been reported to increase autophagy. We investigated the effects of CBZ on hepatic I/R injury. Hepatocytes and livers from male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to simulated in vitro, as well as in vivo I/R, respectively. Cell death, intracellular calcium, calpain activity, changes in autophagy-related proteins (Atg), autophagic flux, MPT and mitochondrial membrane potential after I/R were analyzed in the presence and absence of 20 ?M CBZ. CBZ significantly increased hepatocyte viability after reperfusion. Confocal microscopy revealed that CBZ prevented calcium overloading, the onset of the MPT and mitochondrial depolarization. Immunoblotting and fluorometric analysis showed that CBZ blocked calpain activation, depletion of Atg7 and Beclin-1 and loss of autophagic flux after reperfusion. Intravital multiphoton imaging of anesthetized mice demonstrated that CBZ substantially reversed autophagic defects and mitochondrial dysfunction after I/R in vivo. In conclusion, CBZ prevents calcium overloading and calpain activation, which, in turn, suppresses Atg7 and Beclin-1 depletion, defective autophagy, onset of the MPT and cell death after I/R. - Highlights: • A mechanism of carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced cytoprotection in livers is proposed. • Impaired autophagy is a key event contributing to lethal reperfusion injury. • The importance of autophagy is extended and confirmed in an in vivo model. • CBZ is a potential agent to improve liver function after liver surgery.

  9. Inflation that runs naturally: Gravitational waves and suppression of power at large and small scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn E. Minor; Manoj Kaplinghat

    2015-03-08

    We point out three correlated predictions of the axion monodromy inflation model: large amplitude of gravitational waves, suppression of power on horizon scales and on scales relevant for the formation of dwarf galaxies. While these predictions are likely generic to models with oscillations in the inflaton potential, the axion monodromy model naturally accommodates the required running spectral index through Planck-scale corrections to the inflaton potential. Applying this model to a combined data set of Planck, ACT, SPT, and WMAP low-$\\ell$ polarization cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, we find a best-fit tensor-to-scalar ratio $r_{0.05} = 0.07^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$ due to gravitational waves, which may have been observed by the BICEP2 experiment. Despite the contribution of gravitational waves, the total power on large scales (CMB power spectrum at low multipoles) is lower than the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology with a power-law spectrum of initial perturbations and no gravitational waves, thus mitigating some of the tension on large scales. There is also a reduction in the matter power spectrum of 20-30\\% at scales corresponding to $k = 10~{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, which are relevant for dwarf galaxy formation. This will alleviate some of the unsolved small-scale structure problems in the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology. The inferred matter power spectrum is also found to be consistent with recent Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest data, which is in tension with the Planck-favored $\\Lambda$CDM model with power-law primordial power spectrum.

  10. Search for CP violation in singly Cabibbo suppressed four-body D decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinelli, Maurizio; /Bari U.

    2011-06-22

    We search for CP violation in a sample of 4.7 x 10{sup 4} singly Cabibbo suppressed D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays and 1.8(2.6) x 10{sup 4} D{sub (s)}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sup +} {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} decays. CP violation is searched for in the difference between the T-odd asymmetries, obtained using triple product correlations, measured for D and {bar D} decays. The measured CP violation parameters are A{sub T}(D{sup 0}) = (1.0 {+-} 5.1(stat) {+-} 4.4(syst)) x 10{sup -3}, A{sub T}(D{sup +}) = (-11.96 {+-} 10.04(stat) {+-} 4.81(syst)) x 10{sup -3} and A{sub T}(D{sub s}{sup +}) = (-13.57 {+-} 7.67(stat) {+-} 4.82(syst)) x 10{sup -3}. This search for CP violation showed that the T-odd correlations are a powerful tool to measure the CP violating observable A{sub T}. The relative simplicity of an analysis based on T-odd correlations and the high quality results that can be obtained, allow to consider this tool as fundamental to search for CP violation in four-body decays. Even if the CP violation has not been found, excluding any New Physics effect to the sensitivity of about 0.5%, it is still worth to search for CP violation in D decays. The high statistics that can be obtained at the LHC or by the proposed high luminosity B-factories, make this topic to be considered in high consideration by experiments such as LHCb, SuperB or SuperBelle. The results outlined in this thesis strongly suggest to include a similar analysis into the Physics program of these experiments.

  11. Proton Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Is Not Associated With Post-Treatment Testosterone Suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R. Charles, E-mail: rnichols@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Morris, Christopher G.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Henderson, Randal H.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Li Zuofeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph A. [Division of Urology, University of Florida Shands Hospital, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Mendenhall, Nancy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Three independent studies of photon (x-ray) radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer have demonstrated evidence of testosterone suppression after treatment. The present study was undertaken to determine whether this would also be the case with conformal protons. Methods and Materials: Between August 2006 and October 2007, 171 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were enrolled and underwent treatment according to University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute institutional review board-approved PR01 and PR02 protocols. Of the 171 patients, 18 were excluded because they had received androgen deprivation therapy either before (n = 17) or after (n = 1) RT. The pretreatment serum testosterone level was available for 150 of the remaining 153 patients. These 150 patients were included in the present study. The post-treatment levels were compared with the pretreatment levels. Results: The median baseline pretreatment serum testosterone level was 357.9 ng/dL. The median post-treatment testosterone value was 375.5 ng/dL at treatment completion (p = .1935) and 369.9 ng/dL (p = .1336), 348.7 ng/dL (p = .7317), 353.4 ng/dL (p = .6996), and 340.9 ng/dL (p = .1669) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after proton therapy, respectively. Conclusions: Conformal proton therapy to the prostate, as delivered using University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute PR01 and PR02 protocols, did not appear to significantly affect the serum testosterone levels within 24 months after RT.

  12. Receptor for advanced glycation end products inhibits proliferation in osteoblast through suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guofeng [Department of Emergency Surgery, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China)] [Department of Emergency Surgery, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China); Xu, Jingren [Department of Traditional Chinese Orthopaedics, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China)] [Department of Traditional Chinese Orthopaedics, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China); Li, Zengchun, E-mail: lizc.2007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Emergency Surgery, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China)] [Department of Emergency Surgery, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression suppresses cell proliferation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases ERK and PI3K signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes PI3K signaling restored by RAGE blockade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes ERK signaling restored by RAGE blockade. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a crucial role in bone metabolism. However, the role of RAGE in the control of osteoblast proliferation is not yet evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrate that RAGE overexpression inhibits osteoblast proliferation in vitro. The negative regulation of RAGE on cell proliferation results from suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, and is restored by RAGE neutralizing antibody. Prevention of Wnt signaling using Sfrp1 or DKK1 rescues RAGE-decreased PI3K and ERK signaling and cell proliferation, indicating that the altered cell growth in RAGE overexpressing cells is in part secondary to alterations in Wnt signaling. Consistently, RAGE overexpression inhibits the expression of Wnt targets cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is partially reversed by RAGE blockade. Overall, these results suggest that RAGE inhibits osteoblast proliferation via suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, which provides novel mechanisms by which RAGE regulates osteoblast growth.

  13. THE SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION AND THE EFFECT OF THE GALAXY ENVIRONMENT IN LOW-REDSHIFT GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Mulchaey, John S.; Bai, Lei; Ponman, Trevor J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Dariush, Ali

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the interaction between galaxies and their surroundings is central to building a coherent picture of galaxy evolution. Here we use Galaxy Evolution Explorer imaging of a statistically representative sample of 23 galaxy groups at z Almost-Equal-To 0.06 to explore how local and global group environments affect the UV properties and dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs) of their member galaxies. The data provide SFRs out to beyond 2R{sub 200} in all groups, down to a completeness limit and limiting galaxy stellar mass of 0.06 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, respectively. At fixed galaxy stellar mass, we find that the fraction of star-forming group members is suppressed relative to the field out to an average radius of R Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Mpc Almost-Equal-To 2R{sub 200}, mirroring results for massive clusters. For the first time, we also report a similar suppression of the specific SFR within such galaxies, on average by 40% relative to the field, thus directly revealing the impact of the group environment in quenching star formation within infalling galaxies. At fixed galaxy density and stellar mass, this suppression is stronger in more massive groups, implying that both local and global group environments play a role in quenching. The results favor an average quenching timescale of {approx}> 2 Gyr and strongly suggest that a combination of tidal interactions and starvation is responsible. Despite their past and ongoing quenching, galaxy groups with more than four members still account for at least {approx}25% of the total UV output in the nearby universe.

  14. Self-Assembled Monolayers of n-Alkanethiols Suppress Hydrogen Evolution and Increase the Efficiency of Rechargeable Iron Battery Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkhandi, S; Yang, B; Manohar, AK; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-01-09

    Iron-based rechargeable batteries, because of their low cost, eco-friendliness, and durability, are extremely attractive for large-scale energy storage. A principal challenge in the deployment of these batteries is their relatively low electrical efficiency. The low efficiency is due to parasitic hydrogen evolution that occurs on the iron electrode during charging and idle stand. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that linear alkanethiols are very effective in suppressing hydrogen evolution on alkaline iron battery electrodes. The alkanethiols form self-assembled monolayers on the iron electrodes. The degree of suppression of hydrogen evolution by the alkanethiols was found to be greater than 90%, and the effectiveness of the alkanethiol increased with the chain length. Through steady-state potentiostatic polarization studies and impedance measurements on high-purity iron disk electrodes, we show that the self-assembly of alkanethiols suppressed the parasitic reaction by reducing the interfacial area available for the electrochemical reaction. We have modeled the effect of chain length of the alkanethiol on the surface coverage, charge-transfer resistance, and double-layer capacitance of the interface using a simple model that also yields a value for the interchain interaction energy. We have verified the improvement in charging efficiency resulting from the use of the alkanethiols in practical rechargeable iron battery electrodes. The results of battery tests indicate that alkanethiols yield among the highest faradaic efficiencies reported for the rechargeable iron electrodes, enabling the prospect of a large-scale energy storage solution based on low-cost iron-based rechargeable batteries.

  15. Tensor to scalar ratio and large scale power suppression from pre-slow roll initial conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lello, Louis; Boyanovsky, Daniel, E-mail: lal81@pitt.edu, E-mail: boyan@pitt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We study the corrections to the power spectra of curvature and tensor perturbations and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in single field slow roll inflation with standard kinetic term due to initial conditions imprinted by a ''fast-roll'' stage prior to slow roll. For a wide range of initial inflaton kinetic energy, this stage lasts only a few e-folds and merges smoothly with slow-roll thereby leading to non-Bunch-Davies initial conditions for modes that exit the Hubble radius during slow roll. We describe a program that yields the dynamics in the fast-roll stage while matching to the slow roll stage in a manner that is independent of the inflationary potentials. Corrections to the power spectra are encoded in a ''transfer function'' for initial conditions T{sub ?}(k), P{sub ?}(k) = P{sup BD}{sub ?}(k)T{sub ?}(k), implying a modification of the ''consistency condition'' for the tensor to scalar ratio at a pivot scale k{sub 0}: r(k{sub 0}) = ?8n{sub T}(k{sub 0}) [T{sub T}(k{sub 0})/T{sub R}(k{sub 0})]. We obtain T{sub ?}(k) to leading order in a Born approximation valid for modes of observational relevance today. A fit yields T{sub ?}(k) = 1+A{sub ?}k{sup ?p}cos [2??k/H{sub sr}+?{sub ?}], with 1.5?suppression of the quadrupole and oscillatory features in both P{sub R}(k) and r(k{sub 0}) with a period of the order of the Hubble scale during slow roll inflation. The results are quite general and independent of the specific inflationary potentials, depending solely on the ratio of kinetic to potential energy ? and the slow roll parameters ?{sub V}, ?{sub V} to leading order in slow roll. For a wide range of ? and the values of ?{sub V}; ?{sub V} corresponding to the upper bounds from Planck, we find that the low quadrupole is consistent with the results from Planck, and the oscillations in r(k{sub 0}) as a function of k{sub 0} could be observable if the modes corresponding to the quadrupole and the pivot scale crossed the Hubble radius very few (2–3) e-folds after the onset of slow roll. We comment on possible impact on the recent BICEP2 results.

  16. Novel Americium Treatment Process for Surface Water and Dust Suppression Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiepel, E.W.; Pigeon, P.; Nesta, S.; Anderson, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), a former nuclear weapons production plant, has been remediated under CERCLA and decommissioned to become a National Wildlife Refuge. The site conducted this cleanup effort under the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) that established limits for the discharge of surface and process waters from the site. At the end of 2004, while a number of process buildings were undergoing decommissioning, routine monitoring of a discharge pond (Pond A-4) containing approximately 28 million gallons of water was discovered to have been contaminated with a trace amount of Americium-241 (Am-241). While the amount of Am-241 in the pond waters was very low (0.5 - 0.7 pCi/l), it was above the established Colorado stream standard of 0.15 pCi/l for release to off site drainage waters. The rapid successful treatment of these waters to the regulatory limit was important to the site for two reasons. The first was that the pond was approaching its hold-up limit. Without rapid treatment and release of the Pond A-4 water, typical spring run-off would require water management actions to other drainages onsite or a mass shuttling of water for disposal. The second reason was that this type of contaminated water had not been treated to the stringent stream standard at Rocky Flats before. Technical challenges in treatment could translate to impacts on water and secondary waste management, and ultimately, cost impacts. All of the technical challenges and specific site criteria led to the conclusion that a different approach to the treatment of this problem was necessary and a crash treatability program to identify applicable treatment techniques was undertaken. The goal of this program was to develop treatment options that could be implemented very quickly and would result in the generation of no high volume secondary waste that would be costly to dispose. A novel chemical treatment system was developed and implemented at the RFETS to treat Am-241 contaminated pond water, surface run-off and D and D dust suppression water during the later stages of the D and D effort at Rocky Flats. This novel chemical treatment system allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment of all contaminated waste waters to the very low stream standard of 0.15 pCi/1 with strict compliance to the RFCA discharge criteria for release to off-site surface waters. The rapid development and implementation of the treatment system avoided water management issues that would have had to be addressed if contaminated water had remained in Pond A-4 into the Spring of 2005. Implementation of this treatment system for the Pond A-4 waters and the D and D waters from Buildings 776 and 371 enabled the site to achieve cost-effective treatment that minimized secondary waste generation, avoiding the need for expensive off-site water disposal. Water treatment was conducted for a cost of less than $0.20/gal which included all development costs, capital costs and operational costs. This innovative and rapid response effort saved the RFETS cleanup program well in excess of $30 million for the potential cost of off-site transportation and treatment of radioactive liquid waste. (authors)

  17. Precocious suppression of baryon diffusion and transport in a baryon rich strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rougemont, Romulo

    2015-01-01

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculations at nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures $T=130-300$ MeV and baryon chemical potentials $\\mu_B=0-400$ MeV. Diffusive transport is predicted to be already suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram in a way that is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities.

  18. Effectiveness of two spraying systems for bollworm suppression, canopy penetration, and drift reduction in the Rolling Plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, John Robert Calvert

    1986-01-01

    for small droplets to drift (Wodageneh and Matthews 1981). ~AA' y. ' f CDA ~tt 1 . ft f' t CDA y y developed in Great Britain in the early 1950s by E. J. Bals (Freed 1982). Various hand held models have been successfully used in tropical countries... Effectiveness of Two Spraying Systems for Bollworm Suppression, Canopy Penetration, and Drift Reduction in the Rolling Plains of Texas (May 1986) John Robert Calvert Robinson, B. S. , Texas ARM University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: J. E. Slosser J. K...

  19. Interaction of nucleus and plastome in sunflower. III. Suppression of phenotypic expression of plastid mutation by alien nucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beletskii, Yu.D.; Razoriteleva, E.K.

    1988-11-01

    Four plastome mutations of type chlorina were crossed as female parents with variety Mayak. It was demonstrated that a three-phases hybridization led to the loss of chlorophyll defect in F/sub 1/. The suppression of plastic mutation is controlled by a single dominant gene. Four viable plastid mutants were used in the study-en: chlorina-1 (1-24), en:chlorina-3 (1-138), en:chlorina-5 (2-25), and en:chlorina-7 (2-43).

  20. Alloy Engineering of Defect Properties in Semiconductors: Suppression of Deep Levels in 2D Transition-metal Dichalcogenides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Bing; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby G; Wei, Su-Huai; Liu, Feng

    2015-09-18

    Developing practical approaches to effectively reduce the deep defect levels in semiconductors is critical for their use in electronic and optoelectronic devices, but this is still a very challenging task. In this Letter, we propose that specific alloying can provide an effective means to suppress the deep defect levels in semiconductors while maintaining their basic electronic properties. Specifically, we demonstrate that for such 2D transition-metal dichalcogenides as MoSe2 and WSe2, in which the most abundant defects that can induce deep levels are anion vacancies, the deep levels can be effectively suppressed in Mo1-xWxSe2 alloys at low W concentrations. This surprisingmore »phenomenon is associated with the fact that the global alloy concentration can substantially tune the band edge energies, whereas the preferred locations of Se vacancies around W atoms control the defect level locally. Our findings illustrate a new concept of alloy engineering and provide a promising approach to control the defect properties of semiconductors.« less

  1. Sumoylation of Smad3 stimulates its nuclear export during PIASy-mediated suppression of TGF-{beta} signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imoto, Seiyu; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Kamitani, Shinya; Muromoto, Ryuta; Sekine, Yuichi; Matsuda, Tadashi, E-mail: tmatsuda@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2008-05-30

    Sma- and MAD-related protein 3 (Smad3) plays crucial roles in the transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta})-mediated signaling pathway, which produce a variety of cellular responses, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In our previous study, we demonstrated that protein inhibitor of activated STATy (PIASy) suppresses TGF-{beta} signaling by interacting with and sumoylating Smad3. In the present study, we examined the molecular mechanisms of Smad3 sumoylation during PIASy-mediated suppression of TGF-{beta} signaling. We found that small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction of endogenous PIASy expression enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced gene expression. Importantly, coexpression of Smad3 with PIASy and SUMO1 affected the DNA-binding activity of Smad3. Furthermore, coexpression of Smad3 with PIASy and SUMO1 stimulated the nuclear export of Smad3. Finally, fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses revealed that Smad3 interacted with SUMO1 in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that PIASy regulates TGF-{beta}/Smad3-mediated signaling by stimulating sumoylation and nuclear export of Smad3.

  2. Corrigendum to “Suppression of ? production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at ? SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of ? meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ? yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore »rapidity range |y| dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  3. Corrigendum to “Suppression of ? production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at ? SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L. [AGH Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland)

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of ? meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ? yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  4. Suppression of Upsilon Production in d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; K. Hill; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; G. Wimsatt; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2015-01-21

    We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p+p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d+Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p+p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) in the rapidity range |y|<1 in d+Au collisions of R_dAu = 0.79 +/- 0.24 (stat.) +/- 0.03 (sys.) +/- 0.10 (pp sys.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au+Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R_AA=0.49 +/- 0.1 (stat.) +/- 0.02 (sys.) +/- 0.06 (pp sys.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au+Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au+Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark-Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d+Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au+Au can be made.

  5. Suppression of Aggregation in Natural-Semiflexible/Flexible Polyanion Mixtures, and Direct Check of the OSF Model using SANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabien Bonnet; Ralph Schweins; François Boué; Eric Buhler

    2009-04-06

    Aggregation and other interactions are suppressed for a biological semiflexible polyelectrolyte, hyaluronan (HA), when it is embedded in a mixture with another negatively charged and flexible polyelectrolyte chain, sodium polystyrene sulfonate. We see directly HA only in the mixture using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering, isotopic labelling and contrast matching. At low ionic strength, for which aggregation is usually seen for pure HA solutions, an unambiguous set of experimental results shows that we neither observe HA aggregation nor a polyelectrolyte peak (observed for solutions of single species); instead we observe a wormlike chain behaviour characteristic of single chain with a variation of the persistence length with the square of the Debye screening length, Le~\\kappa^-2, as formerly predicted by Odijk and not yet observed on a polymer chain.

  6. Suppression of infrared instability in trans-sonic flows by condensation of zero-frequency short wave length phonons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xavier Busch; Florent Michel; Renaud Parentani

    2015-02-06

    We analyze the peculiar infrared instability that characterizes stationary inhomogeneous flows when their velocity crosses the sound speed by decreasing values. For definiteness, we work in the context of one dimensional atomic Bose condensates. These flows are unstable under ultra low real frequency perturbations because of the unbounded mode amplification near the sonic horizon. This results in a condensation of low frequency phonons which produces a spatially structured flow in the supersonic domain. Numerical simulations reveal that this zero-frequency undulation suppresses the instability when its spatial extension is infinite, and when its phase is near that of a "shadow soliton" solution attached to the sonic horizon. These phenomena are akin to the condensation of rotons in flowing superfluid helium-4 when exceeding the Landau velocity. They also pertain to shallow water waves propagating on transcritical flows.

  7. Experimental Study of Three-body Cabibbo-suppressed D0 Decays and Extraction of Cp Violation Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Kalanand; /Nehru U.

    2008-02-22

    The authors present measurements of the relative branching ratios, Dalitz plot structures and CP-asymmetry values in the three-body singly Cabibbo-suppressed decays D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} and D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy ring at SLAC. The author applies the results of the D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} analysis to extracting CP-violation parameters related to the CKM angle {gamma} (or {phi}{sub 3}) using the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} K{sup -}.

  8. Blinking suppression of CdTe quantum dots on epitaxial graphene and the analysis with Marcus electron transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Takuya; Tamai, Naoto, E-mail: tamai@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Kutsuma, Yasunori; Kurita, Atsusi; Kaneko, Tadaaki [Department of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-08-25

    We have prepared epitaxial graphene by a Si sublimation method from 4H-SiC. Single-particle spectroscopy of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) on epitaxial graphene covered with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) showed the suppression of luminescence blinking and ?10 times decreased luminescence intensity as compared with those on a glass. The electronic coupling constant, H{sub 01}, between CdTe QDs and graphene was calculated to be (3.3?±?0.4)?×?10{sup 2?}cm{sup ?1} in PVP and (3.7?±?0.8)?×?10{sup 2?}cm{sup ?1} in PEG based on Marcus theory of electron transfer and Tang-Marcus model of blinking with statistical distribution.

  9. Narrow-band injection seeding of a terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser: Selection and suppression of longitudinal modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nong, Hanond, E-mail: Nong.Hanond@rub.de; Markmann, Sergej; Hekmat, Negar; Jukam, Nathan, E-mail: Nathan.Jukam@rub.de [Arbeitsgruppe Terahertz Spektroskopie und Technologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany); Pal, Shovon [Arbeitsgruppe Terahertz Spektroskopie und Technologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany); Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany); Mohandas, Reshma A.; Dean, Paul; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    A periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal with multiple poling periods is used to generate tunable narrow-bandwidth THz pulses for injection seeding a quantum cascade laser (QCL). We demonstrate that longitudinal modes of the quantum cascade laser close to the gain maximum can be selected or suppressed according to the seed spectrum. The QCL emission spectra obtained by electro-optic sampling from the quantum cascade laser, in the most favorable case, shows high selectivity and amplification of the longitudinal modes that overlap the frequency of the narrow-band seed. Proper selection of the narrow-band THz seed from the PPLN crystal discretely tunes the longitudinal mode emission of the quantum cascade laser. Moreover, the THz wave build-up within the laser cavity is studied as a function of the round-trip time. When the seed frequency is outside the maximum of the gain spectrum the laser emission shifts to the preferential longitudinal mode.

  10. Design and Analysis of a Spurious Switching Suppression Technique Equipped Low Power Multiplier with Hybrid Encoding Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saravanan, S

    2010-01-01

    Multiplication is an arithmetic operation that is mostly used in Digital Signal Processing (DSP) and communication applications. Efficient implementation of the multipliers is required in many applications. The design and analysis of Spurious Switching Suppression Technique (SSST) equipped low power multiplier with hybrid encoding is presented in this paper. The proposed encoding technique reduces the number of switching activity and dynamic power consumption by analyzing the bit patterns in the input data. In this proposed encoding scheme, the operation is executed depends upon the number of 1s and its position in the multiplier data. The architecture of the proposed multiplier is designed using a low power full adder which consumes less power than the other adder architectures. The switching activity of the proposed multiplier has been reduced by 86 percent and 46percent compared with conventional and Booth multiplier respectively. It is observed from the device level simulation using TANNER 12.6 EDA that t...

  11. Suppression of somatic expansion delays the onset of pathophysiology in a mouse model of Huntington’s Disease

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Budworth, Helen; Harris, Faye R.; Williams, Paul; Lee, Do Yup; Holt, Amy; Pahnke, Jens; Szczesny, Bartosz; Acevedo-Torres, Karina; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; McMurray, Cynthia T.; et al

    2015-08-06

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is caused by inheritance of a single disease-length allele harboring an expanded CAG repeat, which continues to expand in somatic tissues with age. The inherited disease allele expresses a toxic protein, and whether further somatic expansion adds to toxicity is unknown. We have created an HD mouse model that resolves the effects of the inherited and somatic expansions. We show here that suppressing somatic expansion substantially delays the onset of disease in littermates that inherit the same disease-length allele. Furthermore, a pharmacological inhibitor, XJB-5-131, inhibits the lengthening of the repeat tracks, and correlates with rescue of motormore »decline in these animals. The results provide evidence that pharmacological approaches to offset disease progression are possible.« less

  12. Electrical current suppression in Pd-doped vanadium pentoxide nanowires caused by reduction in PdO due to hydrogen exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Byung Hoon; Oh, Soon-Young; Yu, Han Young; Yun, Yong Ju; Kim, Yark Yeon; Hong, Won G.; Jeong, Hu Young; Lee, Jeong Yong; Kim, Hae Jin

    2010-04-19

    Pd nanoparticle-doped vanadium pentoxide nanowires (Pd-VONs) were synthesized. Electrical current suppression was observed when the Pd-VON was exposed to hydrogen gas, which cannot be explained by the work function changes mentioned in previous report such as Pd-doped carbon nanotubes and SnO{sub 2} nanowires. Using the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we found that the reduction in PdO due to hydrogen exposure plays an important role in the current suppression of the Pd-VON.

  13. WIND-DRIVEN ACCRETION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. SUPPRESSION OF THE MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY AND LAUNCHING OF THE MAGNETOCENTRIFUGAL WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Xuening; Stone, James M., E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-05-20

    We perform local, vertically stratified shearing-box MHD simulations of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) at a fiducial radius of 1 AU that take into account the effects of both Ohmic resistivity and ambipolar diffusion (AD). The magnetic diffusion coefficients are evaluated self-consistently from a look-up table based on equilibrium chemistry. We first show that the inclusion of AD dramatically changes the conventional picture of layered accretion. Without net vertical magnetic field, the system evolves into a toroidal field dominated configuration with extremely weak turbulence in the far-UV ionization layer that is far too inefficient to drive rapid accretion. In the presence of a weak net vertical field (plasma {beta} {approx} 10{sup 5} at midplane), we find that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is completely suppressed, resulting in a fully laminar flow throughout the vertical extent of the disk. A strong magnetocentrifugal wind is launched that efficiently carries away disk angular momentum and easily accounts for the observed accretion rate in PPDs. Moreover, under a physical disk wind geometry, all the accretion flow proceeds through a strong current layer with a thickness of {approx}0.3H that is offset from disk midplane with radial velocity of up to 0.4 times the sound speed. Both Ohmic resistivity and AD are essential for the suppression of the MRI and wind launching. The efficiency of wind transport increases with increasing net vertical magnetic flux and the penetration depth of the FUV ionization. Our laminar wind solution has important implications on planet formation and global evolution of PPDs.

  14. Acute Toxicity in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Androgen Suppression and Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pervez, Nadeem, E-mail: nadeempe@cancerboard.ab.c [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Small, Cormac [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); MacKenzie, Marc [Division of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Division of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Mihai, Alina; Amanie, John; Murtha, Albert [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Field, Colin [Division of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Murray, David [Division of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Fallone, Gino [Division of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Pearcey, Robert, E-mail: robertpe@cancerboard.ab.c [Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To report acute toxicity resulting from radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation and hypofractionation using intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) treatment combined with androgen suppression in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients with a histological diagnosis of high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma (having either a clinical Stage of >=T3a or an initial prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level of >=20 ng/ml or a Gleason score of 8 to 10 or a combination of a PSA concentration of >15 ng/ml and a Gleason score of 7) were enrolled. RT prescription was 68 Gy in 25 fractions (2.72 Gy/fraction) over 5 weeks to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles. The pelvic lymph nodes and distal seminal vesicles concurrently received 45 Gy in 25 fractions. The patients were treated with helical TomoTherapy-based IMRT and underwent daily megavoltage CT image-guided verification prior to each treatment. Acute toxicity scores were recorded weekly during RT and at 3 months post-RT, using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity scales. Results: All patients completed RT and follow up for 3 months. The maximum acute toxicity scores were as follows: 21 (35%) patients had Grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity; 4 (6.67%) patients had Grade 3 genitourinary (GU) toxicity; and 30 (33.33%) patients had Grade 2 GU toxicity. These toxicity scores were reduced after RT; there were only 8 (13.6%) patients with Grade 1 GI toxicity, 11 (18.97%) with Grade 1 GU toxicity, and 5 (8.62%) with Grade 2 GU toxicity at 3 months follow up. Only the V60 to the rectum correlated with the GI toxicity. Conclusion: Dose escalation using a hypofractionated schedule to the prostate with concurrent pelvic lymph node RT and long-term androgen suppression therapy is well tolerated acutely. Longer follow up for outcome and late toxicity is required.

  15. Ascorbic acid suppresses endotoxemia and NF-?B signaling cascade in alcoholic liver fibrosis in guinea pigs: A mechanistic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhilash, P.A.; Harikrishnan, R.; Indira, M.

    2014-01-15

    Alcohol consumption increases the small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and intestinal permeability of endotoxin. The endotoxin mediated inflammatory signaling plays a major role in alcoholic liver fibrosis. We evaluated the effect of ascorbic acid (AA), silymarin and alcohol abstention on the alcohol induced endotoxemia and NF-?B activation cascade pathway in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). Guinea pigs were administered ethanol at a daily dose of 4 g/kg b.wt for 90 days. After 90 days, ethanol administration was stopped. The ethanol treated animals were divided into abstention, silymarin (250 mg/kg b.wt) and AA (250 mg/kg b.wt) supplemented groups and maintained for 30 days. The SIBO, intestinal permeability and endotoxin were significantly increased in the ethanol group. The mRNA expressions of intestinal proteins claudin, occludin and zona occludens-1 were significantly decreased in ethanol group. The mRNA levels of inflammatory receptors, activity of IKK? and the protein expressions of phospho-I?B?, NF-?B, TNF-?, TGF-?{sub 1} and IL-6 were also altered in ethanol group. The expressions of fibrosis markers ?-SMA, ?{sub 1} (I) collagen and sirius red staining in the liver revealed the induction of fibrosis. But the supplementation of AA could induce greater reduction of ethanol induced SIBO, intestinal barrier defects, NF-?B activation and liver fibrosis than silymarin. The possible mechanism may be the inhibitory effect of AA on SIBO, intestinal barrier defect and IKK?, which decreased the activation of NF-?B and synthesis of cytokines. This might have led to suppression of HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • Alcohol increases intestinal bacterial overgrowth and permeability of endotoxin. • Endotoxin mediated inflammation plays a major role in alcoholic liver fibrosis. • Ascorbic acid reduces endotoxemia, NF-?B activation and proinflammatory cytokines. • AA's action is by inhibition of SIBO, IKK? and alteration of intestinal permeability. • This might have led to suppression of HSCs activation and liver fibrosis.

  16. Suppression of thermal conductivity in graphene nanoribbons with rough edges Alexander V. Savin,1,2 Yuri S. Kivshar,2 and Bambi Hu3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Moscow 119991, Russia 2Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian, the thermal properties of graphene are also of both fundamental and practical im- portance. SeveralSuppression of thermal conductivity in graphene nanoribbons with rough edges Alexander V. Savin,1

  17. Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template The source of the midwinter suppression in storminess over the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Gerard

    explanation has proven elusive. In the mid-latitudes, temperature gradients and jet stream winds reach feature of storminess over the Pacific Ocean is that when the strength of the jet stream exceeds 45ms-1 midwinter suppression tend to exhibit stronger-than-normal jet stream winds and vice versa for a weak

  18. Suppression of strain coupling in perovskite La0.6Sr0.1TiO3 by cation disorder Christopher J. Howard and Zhaoming Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Suppression of strain coupling in perovskite La0.6Sr0.1TiO3 by cation disorder Christopher J of the degree of cation order in perovskites with carefully selected compositions might therefore provide not seem to have been applied to ferroelastic transitions in perovskites, however, and the purpose

  19. Measurement of Branching Ratios for Non-leptonic Cabibbo-suppressed Decays of the Charmed-Strange Baryon Xic+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez Jauregui, Eric; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2008-08-01

    We studied several {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} decay modes, most of them with a hyperon in the final state, and determined their branching ratios. The data used in this analysis come from the fixed target experiment SELEX, a multi-stage spectrometer with high acceptance for forward interactions, that took data during 1996 and 1997 at Fermilab with 600 GeV=c (mainly {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}) and 540 GeV/c (mainly p) beams incident on copper and carbon targets. The thesis mainly details the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be: {Lambda}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.184 {+-} 0.086. Systematic studies have been performed in order to check the stability of the measurements varying all cuts used in the selection of events over a wide interval and we do not observe evidence of any trend, so the systematic error is negligible in the final results because the quadrature sum of the total error is not affected. The branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} are measured to check the methodology of the analysis. The branching ratio of the decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is measured relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}, while the one of the decay mode {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} is relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, as they have been reported earlier. The results for the control modes are: {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +}) = 0.716 {+-} 0.144 and {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Gamma}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.382 {+-} 0.104. The branching ratio of the decay mode {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -} {pi}{sup +} relative to {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} is considered as another control mode, the measured value is {Gamma}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Gamma}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.194 {+-} 0.054. Systematic studies have been also performed for the control modes and all systematic variations are also small compared to the statistical error. We also report the first observation of two more decay modes, the Cabibbo-suppressed decay {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} K{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, but their branching ratios have not been measured up to now.

  20. Search for a Low-Mass Neutral Higgs Boson with Suppressed Couplings to Fermions Using Events with Multiphoton Final States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernández; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; López, O González; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Fernández, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2016-01-01

    A search for a Higgs boson with suppressed couplings to fermions, $h_f$, assumed to be the neutral, lower-mass partner of the Higgs boson discovered at the Large Hadron Collider, is reported. Such a Higgs boson could exist in extensions of the standard model with two Higgs doublets, and could be produced via $p\\bar{p} \\to H^\\pm h_f \\to W^* h_f h_f \\to 4\\gamma + X$, where $H^\\pm$ is a charged Higgs boson. This analysis uses all events with at least three photons in the final state from proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96~TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.2~${\\rm fb}^{-1}$. No evidence of a signal is observed in the data. Values of Higgs-boson masses between 10 and 100 GeV/$c^2$ are excluded at 95\\% Bayesian credibility.

  1. Tumor suppressive microRNA-133a regulates novel targets: Moesin contributes to cancer cell proliferation and invasion in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, Takashi; Nohata, Nijiro; Fuse, Miki [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Kikkawa, Naoko [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Fujimura, Lisa; Watanabe-Takano, Haruko [Biomedical Research Center, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Biomedical Research Center, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Yamada, Yasutoshi; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Enokida, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masayuki [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)] [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Okamoto, Yoshitaka [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Seki, Naohiko, E-mail: naoseki@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)] [Department of Functional Genomics, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor suppressive microRNA-133a regulates moesin (MSN) expression in HNSCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of MSN in HNSCC cells suppressed proliferation, migration and invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression level of MSN was significantly up-regulated in cancer tissues. -- Abstract: Recently, many studies suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the development, invasion and metastasis of various types of human cancers. Our recent study revealed that expression of microRNA-133a (miR-133a) was significantly reduced in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and that restoration of miR-133a inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HNSCC cell lines, suggesting that miR-133a function as a tumor suppressor. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of miR-133a transfectants and TargetScan database showed that moesin (MSN) was a promising candidate of miR-133a target gene. MSN is a member of the ERM (ezrin, radixin and moesin) protein family and ERM function as cross-linkers between plasma membrane and actin-based cytoskeleton. The functions of MSN in cancers are controversial in previous reports. In this study, we focused on MSN and investigated whether MSN was regulated by tumor suppressive miR-133a and contributed to HNSCC oncogenesis. Restoration of miR-133a in HNSCC cell lines (FaDu, HSC3, IMC-3 and SAS) suppressed the MSN expression both in mRNA and protein level. Silencing study of MSN in HNSCC cell lines demonstrated significant inhibitions of cell proliferation, migration and invasion activities in si-MSN transfectants. In clinical specimen with HNSCC, the expression level of MSN was significantly up-regulated in cancer tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. These data suggest that MSN may function as oncogene and is regulated by tumor suppressive miR-133a. Our analysis data of novel tumor-suppressive miR-133a-mediated cancer pathways could provide new insights into the potential mechanisms of HNSCC oncogenesis.

  2. Pressure Effect on the Structural Transition and Suppression of the High-Spin State in the Triple-Layer T'-La?Ni?O?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, J.-G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.; Zhou, H. D.; Matsubayashi, K.; Uwatoko, Y.; Kong, P. P.; Jin, C. Q.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.

    2012-06-08

    We report a comprehensive high-pressure study on the triple-layer T'-La?Ni?O? with a suite of experimental probes, including structure determination, magnetic, and transport properties up to 50 GPa. Consistent with a recent ab inito calculation, application of hydrostatic pressure suppresses an insulator-metal spin-state transition at Pc?6 GPa. However, a low-spin metallic phase does not emerge after the high-spin state is suppressed to the lowest temperature. For P>20 GPa, the ambient T' structure transforms gradually to a T†-type structure, which involves a structural reconstruction from fluorite La–O?–La blocks under low pressures to rock-salt LaO-LaO blocks under high pressures. Absence of the metallicmore »phase under pressure has been discussed in terms of local displacements of O²? ions in the fluorite block under pressure before a global T† phase is established.« less

  3. Suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations and improvement of confinement due to current profile modification by biased electrode in Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Debjyoti; Pal, Rabindranath [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ghosh, Joydeep; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Improvement of plasma confinement is achieved in normal q{sub a} discharges of SINP-tokamak by introducing a biased electrode inside the last closed flux surface. All the important features of high confinement mode are observed biasing the electrode negatively with respect to the vacuum vessel. Arrays of electric and magnetic probes introduced in the edge plasma region reveal suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations over distinct frequency ranges as well as modification of the toroidal current profile due to biasing. Further analysis identifies the electrostatic fluctuations to be due to drift mode and the magnetic fluctuations may be of slow compressional Alfven waves. Both get suppressed due to current profile modification during biasing, hence leading to the improvement of plasma confinement.

  4. Fire suppressing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buttrey, Kenneth E. (Northridge, CA)

    1982-11-02

    Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubes depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

  5. Top-Down Suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, JA; Zanto, TP

    2015-01-01

    cortex contribute to top-down modulation of visual2003). Neural mechanisms of top-down control during spatialC. D. , & Li, W. (2013). Top-down influences on visual

  6. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Jian-Yong; State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an ; Huang, Yi; Li, Ji-Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei; Meng, Yan-Ling; Yan, Bo; Bian, Yong-Qian; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Wei-Zhong; and others

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  7. A non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity with suppression of transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Zhu, Danni; Qiu, Yongfeng

    2014-01-15

    The triaxial klystron amplifier is an efficient high power relativistic klystron amplifier operating at high frequencies due to its coaxial structure with large radius. However, the coaxial structures result in coupling problems among the cavities as the TEM mode is not cut-off in the coaxial tube. Therefore, the suppression of the TEM mode leakage, especially the leakage from the buncher cavity to the input cavity, is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier. In this paper, a non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage. The cold cavity analysis shows that the non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity can significantly suppress the TEM mode generation compared to a uniform three-gap buncher cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the power leakage to the input cavity is less than 1.5‰ of the negative power in the buncher cavity and the buncher cavity can efficiently modulate an intense relativistic electron beam free of self-oscillations. A fundamental current modulation depth of 117% is achieved by employing the proposed non-uniform buncher cavity into an X-band triaxial amplifier, which results in the high efficiency generation of high power microwave.

  8. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-? D(? K+?-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3more »as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- ? D(? K+?-)?- decay are also reported.« less

  9. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Gonzalez, Alvarez B. [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-? D(? K+?-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3 as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- ? D(? K+?-)?- decay are also reported.

  10. SIRT1 inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, by suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Il-Rae [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)] [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of) [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Moon, Jeong [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)] [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young-Whan [Department of Horticultural Bioscience, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Horticultural Bioscience, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Horio, Yoshiyuki [Department of Pharmacology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Oh, Sangtaek [Department of Advanced Fermentation Fusion Science and Technology, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Advanced Fermentation Fusion Science and Technology, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa, E-mail: younghc@pusan.ac.kr [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)] [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inhibits protein levels of {beta}-catenin and its transcriptional activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for the decrease of {beta}-catenin expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is not required for GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 but for proteosome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing PAUF. -- Abstract: Because we found in a recent study that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, induces a rapid proliferation of pancreatic cells by up-regulation of {beta}-catenin, we postulated that {beta}-catenin might be a target molecule for pancreatic cancer treatment. We thus speculated whether SIRT1, known to target {beta}-catenin in a colon cancer model, suppresses {beta}-catenin in those pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF (Panc-PAUF). We further evaluated whether such suppression would lead to inhibition of the proliferation of these cells. The ectopic expression of either SIRT1 or resveratrol (an activator of SIRT1) suppressed levels of {beta}-catenin protein and its transcriptional activity in Panc-PAUF cells. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 expression by siRNA enhanced {beta}-catenin expression and transcriptional activity. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for reduction of {beta}-catenin. Treatment with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, restored {beta}-catenin protein levels, suggesting that SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin requires proteasomal activity. It was reported that inhibition of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 stabilizes {beta}-catenin in colon cancer cells, but suppression of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 using siRNA in the presence of resveratrol instead diminished {beta}-catenin protein levels in Panc-PAUF cells. This suggests that GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 are not involved in SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin in the cells. Finally, activation of SIRT1 inhibited the proliferation of Panc-PAUF cells by down-regulation of cyclin-D1, a target molecule of {beta}-catenin. These results suggest that SIRT1 activation may be a therapeutic strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF via the down-regulation of {beta}-catenin.

  11. Suppression of alkylating agent induced cell transformation and gastric ulceration by low-dose alkylating agent pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onodera, Akira; Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kobegakuin University, 1-1-3 Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 ; Kawai, Yuichi; Kashimura, Asako; Ogita, Fumiya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Itoh, Norio

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Low-dose MNNG pretreatment suppresses high-dose MNNG induced in vitro transformation. •Gastric ulcers induced by high-dose MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. •Efficacy of low-dose MNNG related to resistance of mutation and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Exposure to mild stress by chemicals and radiation causes DNA damage and leads to acquired stress resistance. Although the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of safety assessment assumes risk from any dose, evidence from radiological research demonstrates a conflicting hormetic phenomenon known as the hormesis effect. However, the mechanisms underlying radiation hormesis have not yet been clarified, and little is known about the effects of low doses of chemical carcinogens. We analyzed the efficacy of pretreatment with low doses of the alkylating agent N-methyl-N?-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) on the subsequent induction of cell transformation and gastric ulceration by high-dose MNNG. We used an in vitro Balb/3T3 A31-1-1 cell transformation test and monitored the formation of gastric ulcers in 5-week-old male ICR mice that were administered MNNG in drinking water. The treatment concentrations of MNNG were determined by the cell survival rate and past reports. For low-dose in vitro and in vivo experiments, MNNG was used at 0.028 ?M, and 2.8 ?g/mL, respectively. The frequency of cell transformation induced by 10 ?m MNNG was decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment to levels similar to that of spontaneous transformation. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mutation frequencies induced by 10 ?m MNNG were decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment. Importantly, low-dose MNNG pretreatment had no effect on cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the number of gastric ulcers induced by 1 mg/mL MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. These data indicate that low-dose pretreatment with carcinogens may play a beneficial role in the prevention of chemical toxicity under specified conditions.

  12. Measurement of the Color-Suppressed B0->D(*)0 pi0 /omega/eta/eta Prime Branching Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prudent, X

    2008-11-05

    The authors report results on the branching fraction (BF) measurement of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}{prime}, and D*{sup 0}{eta}{prime}. They measure the branching fractions BF(D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (2.78 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.20) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.78 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.23) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D{sup 0}{eta}) = (2.41 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.17) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D*{sup 0}{eta}) = (2.32 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.22) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D{sup 0}{omega}) = (2.77 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.22) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D*{sup 0}{omega}) = (4.44 {+-} 0.23 {+-} 0.61) x 10{sup -4}, BF(D{sup 0}{eta}{prime}) = (1.38 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.22) x 10{sup -4} and BF(D*{sup 0}{eta}{prime}) = (1.29 {+-} 0.23 {+-} 0.23) x 10{sup -4}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The result is based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance from 1999 to 2007, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The measurements are compared to theoretical predictions by factorization, SCET and pQCD. The presence of final state interactions predictions by factorization, SCET and pQCD. The presence of final state interactions is confirmed and the measurements seem to be more in favor of SCET compared to pQCD.

  13. Preclinical evaluation of destruxin B as a novel Wnt signaling target suppressing proliferation and metastasis of colorectal cancer using non-invasive bioluminescence imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, Chi-Tai; Center of Excellence for Cancer Research, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan ; Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Ye, Min; Wu, Wen-Shi; Chang, Tung-Chen; Wang, Liang-Shun; Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan ; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan ; Wu, Alexander T.H.; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2012-05-15

    In continuation to our studies toward the identification of direct anti-cancer targets, here we showed that destruxin B (DB) from Metarhizium anisopliae suppressed the proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in human colorectal cancer (CRC) HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. Additionally, DB induced apoptosis in HT29 cells by decreased expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL while increased pro-apoptotic Bax. On the other hand, DB attenuated Wnt-signaling by downregulation of ?-catenin, Tcf4 and ?-catenin/Tcf4 transcriptional activity, concomitantly with decreased expression of ?-catenin target genes cyclin D1, c-myc and survivin. Furthermore, DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through suppressed MMPs-2 and -9 enzymatic activities. We also found that DB targeted the MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt pathway by reduced expression of Akt, IKK-?, JNK, NF-?B, c-Jun and c-Fos while increased that of I?B?. Finally, we demonstrated that DB inhibited tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice using non-invasive bioluminescence technique. Consistently, tumor samples from DB-treated mice demonstrated suppressed expression of ?-catenin, cyclin D1, survivin, and endothelial marker CD31 while increased caspase-3 expression. Collectively, our data supports DB as an inhibitor of Wnt/?-catenin/Tcf signaling pathway that may be beneficial in the CRC management. Highlights: ? Destruxin B (DB) inhibited colorectal cancer cells growth and induced apoptosis. ? MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt cascade cooperates in DB induced apoptosis. ? DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through MMP-9. ? DB attenuated Wnt-signaling components ?-catenin, Tcf4. ? DB attenuated cyclin D1, c-myc, survivin and tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice.

  14. MicroRNA-101 mediates the suppressive effect of laminar shear stress on mTOR expression in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Kui; Fan, Wendong; Wang, Xing; Ke, Xiao [Division of Cardiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)] [Division of Cardiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Wu, Guifu, E-mail: eecpchina@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory on Assisted Circulation, Ministry of Health, Guangzhou 510080 (China)] [Key Laboratory on Assisted Circulation, Ministry of Health, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Hu, Chengheng, E-mail: huchenghengpci@yahoo.com.cn [Division of Cardiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)] [Division of Cardiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laminar shear stress upregulates miR-101 expression in vascular endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-101 represses mTOR expression through a specific 3 Prime UTR binding site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-101 inhibits G1/S transition and endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blockade of miR-101 attenuates the suppressive effect of laminar flow on mTOR expression. -- Abstract: Shear stress associated with blood flow plays an important role in regulating gene expression and cell function in endothelial cells (ECs). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are highly conserved, small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate the expression of target genes by binding to the mRNA 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime UTR) at the posttranscriptional level involved in diverse cellular processes. This study demonstrates that microRNA-101 in response to laminar shear stress (LSS) is involved in the flow regulation of gene expression in ECs. qRT-PCR analysis showed that miR-101 expression was significantly upregulated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to 12 dyn/cm{sup 2} laminar shear stress for 12 h. We found that transfection of miR-101 significantly decreased the luciferase activity of plasmid reporter containing the 3 Prime UTR of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) gene. Western analysis revealed that the protein level of mTOR was significantly reduced in ECs transfected with miR-101. Furthermore, miR-101 overexpression induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition and suppressed endothelial cell proliferation. Finally, transfection of miR-101 inhibitors attenuated the suppressive effects of LSS on mTOR expression, which identified the efficacy of loss-of-function of miR-101 in laminar flow-treated ECs. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that upregulation of miR-101 in response to LSS contributes to the suppressive effects of LSS on mTOR expression and EC proliferation. These studies advance our understanding of the posttranscriptional mechanisms by which shear stress modulates endothelial homeostasis.

  15. Osthole inhibits the invasive ability of human lung adenocarcinoma cells via suppression of NF-?B-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, Shang-Jyh [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Respiratory Therapy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei Taiwan (China); Su, Jen-Liang [Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China) [Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Center for Molecular Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chi-Kuan [Graduate Institute of Toxicology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Toxicology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yu, Ming-Chih; Bai, Kuan-Jen; Chang, Jer-Hua [Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Bien, Mauo-Ying [School of Respiratory Therapy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei Taiwan (China) [School of Respiratory Therapy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei Taiwan (China); Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shun-Fa [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chien, Ming-Hsien, E-mail: mhchien1976@gmail.com [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-05-15

    The induction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 is particularly important for the invasiveness of various cancer cells. Osthole, a natural coumarin derivative extracted from traditional Chinese medicines, is known to inhibit the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells, but the effect of osthole on the invasiveness of tumor cells is largely unknown. This study determines whether and by what mechanism osthole inhibits invasion in CL1-5 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Herein, we found that osthole effectively inhibited the migratory and invasive abilities of CL1-5 cells. A zymographic assay showed that osthole inhibited the proteolytic activity of MMP-9 in CL1-5 cells. Inhibition of migration, invasion, and MMP2 and/or MMP-9 proteolytic activities was also observed in other lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (H1299 and A549). We further found that osthole inhibited MMP-9 expression at the messenger RNA and protein levels. Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that osthole inhibited the transcriptional activity of MMP-9 by suppressing the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor (NF)-?B in the MMP-9 promoter. Using reporter assays with point-mutated promoter constructs further confirmed that the inhibitory effect of osthole requires an NF-?B binding site on the MMP-9 promoter. Western blot and immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that osthole inhibited NF-?B activity by inhibiting I?B-? degradation and NF-?B p65 nuclear translocation. In conclusion, we demonstrated that osthole inhibits NF-?B-mediated MMP-9 expression, resulting in suppression of lung cancer cell invasion and migration, and osthole might be a potential agent for preventing the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer. -- Highlights: ? Osthole treatment inhibits lung adenocarcinoma cells migration and invasion. ? Osthole reduces the expression and proteolytic activity of MMP-9. ? Osthole inhibits MMP-9 transcription via suppression of NF-?B binding activity. ? Osthole inhibits I?B? degradation and NF-?B nucleus translocation. ? Osthole suppresses EMT by repressing vimentin and inducing E-cadherin expression.

  16. Pressure Effect on the Structural Transition and Suppression of the High-Spin State in the Triple-Layer T'-La?Ni?O?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.-G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.; Zhou, H. D.; Matsubayashi, K.; Uwatoko, Y.; Kong, P. P.; Jin, C. Q.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.

    2012-06-08

    We report a comprehensive high-pressure study on the triple-layer T'-La?Ni?O? with a suite of experimental probes, including structure determination, magnetic, and transport properties up to 50 GPa. Consistent with a recent ab inito calculation, application of hydrostatic pressure suppresses an insulator-metal spin-state transition at Pc?6 GPa. However, a low-spin metallic phase does not emerge after the high-spin state is suppressed to the lowest temperature. For P>20 GPa, the ambient T' structure transforms gradually to a T-type structure, which involves a structural reconstruction from fluorite La–O?–La blocks under low pressures to rock-salt LaO-LaO blocks under high pressures. Absence of the metallic phase under pressure has been discussed in terms of local displacements of O²? ions in the fluorite block under pressure before a global T† phase is established.

  17. Suppression of Away-Side Jet Fragments with Respect to the Reaction Plane in Au+Au Collisions at s_NN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Awes, Terry C [ORNL; Cianciolo, Vince [ORNL; Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Enokizono, Akitomo [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Read Jr, Kenneth F [ORNL; Silvermyr, David O [ORNL; Sorensen, Soren P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Stankus, Paul W [ORNL; PHENIX, Collaboration [The

    2011-01-01

    Pair correlations between large transverse momentum neutral pion triggers (p{sub T}=4-7 GeV/c) and charged hadron partners (p{sub T}=3-7 GeV/c) in central (0%-20%) and midcentral (20%-60%) Au+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr S{sub NN}}=200 GeV are presented as a function of trigger orientation with respect to the reaction plane. The particles are at larger momentum than where jet shape modifications have been observed, and the correlations are sensitive to the energy loss of partons traveling through hot dense matter. An out-of-plane trigger particle produces only 26{+-}20% of the away-side pairs that are observed opposite of an in-plane trigger particle for midcentral (20%-60%) collisions. In contrast, near-side jet fragments are consistent with no suppression or dependence on trigger orientation with respect to the reaction plane. These observations are qualitatively consistent with a picture of little near-side parton energy loss either due to surface bias or fluctuations and increased away-side parton energy loss due to a long path through the medium. The away-side suppression as a function of reaction-plane angle is shown to be sensitive to both the energy loss mechanism and the space-time evolution of heavy-ion collisions.

  18. InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing the Auger recombination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Sun, Xiao Wei, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Demir, Hilmi Volkan, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-07-21

    In conventional InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), thin InGaN quantum wells are usually adopted to mitigate the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), caused due to strong polarization induced electric field, through spatially confining electrons and holes in small recombination volumes. However, this inevitably increases the carrier density in quantum wells, which in turn aggravates the Auger recombination, since the Auger recombination scales with the third power of the carrier density. As a result, the efficiency droop of the Auger recombination severely limits the LED performance. Here, we proposed and showed wide InGaN quantum wells with the InN composition linearly grading along the growth orientation in LED structures suppressing the Auger recombination and the QCSE simultaneously. Theoretically, the physical mechanisms behind the Auger recombination suppression are also revealed. The proposed LED structure has experimentally demonstrated significant improvement in optical output power and efficiency droop, proving to be an effective solution to this important problem of Auger recombination.

  19. Ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 negatively regulates TNF{alpha}-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via suppressing ERK activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Li, Jinqing; Dong, Xiaoyu; Potts, Jay D. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)] [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Tang, Dong-Qi [Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610-0275 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610-0275 (United States); Li, Dong-Sheng, E-mail: dsli@yymc.edu.cn [Hubei Key Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, Tai He Hospital, Yunyang Medical College, 32 S. Renmin Rd., Shiyan, Hubei 442000 (China)] [Hubei Key Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, Tai He Hospital, Yunyang Medical College, 32 S. Renmin Rd., Shiyan, Hubei 442000 (China); Cui, Taixing, E-mail: taixing.cui@uscmed.sc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)] [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) appear to be critical regulators of a multitude of processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and inflammation. We have recently demonstrated that a DUB of ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) inhibits vascular lesion formation via suppressing inflammatory responses in vasculature. However, the precise underlying mechanism remains to be defined. Herein, we report that a posttranscriptional up-regulation of UCH-L1 provides a negative feedback to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In rat adult VSMCs, adenoviral over-expression of UCH-L1 inhibited TNF{alpha}-induced activation of ERK and DNA synthesis. In contrast, over-expression of UCH-L1 did not affect platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced VSMC proliferation and activation of growth stimulating cascades including ERK. TNF{alpha} hardly altered UCH-L1 mRNA expression and stability; however, up-regulated UCH-L1 protein expression via increasing UCH-L1 translation. These results uncover a novel mechanism by which UCH-L1 suppresses vascular inflammation.

  20. Tamoxifen inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma through suppression of PKC/MEK/ERK and PKC/PI3K/Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan) [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Department of Pharmacy, Nara Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, 1248-1 Ikoma, Nara 630-0293 (Japan); Tsubaki, Masanobu [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yamazoe, Yuzuru [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Ogaki, Mitsuhiko [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan); Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Kusunoki, Takashi [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishida, Shozo, E-mail: nishida@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    In melanoma, several signaling pathways are constitutively activated. Among these, the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways are activated through multiple signal transduction molecules and appear to play major roles in melanoma progression. Recently, it has been reported that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen reagent, inhibits PKC signaling in estrogen-negative and estrogen-independent cancer cell lines. Thus, we investigated whether tamoxifen inhibited tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited lung metastasis, cell migration, and invasion at concentrations that did not show anti-proliferative effects on B16BL6 cells. Tamoxifen also inhibited the mRNA expressions and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, tamoxifen suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt through the inhibition of PKC{alpha} and PKC{delta} phosphorylation. However, other signal transduction factor, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was unaffected. The results indicate that tamoxifen suppresses the PKC/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK and PKC/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting B16BL6 cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, tamoxifen markedly inhibited not only developing but also clinically evident metastasis. These findings suggest that tamoxifen has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis.

  1. SU-E-J-243: Possibility of Exposure Dose Reduction of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in An Image Guided Patient Positioning System by Using Various Noise Suppression Filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamezawa, H; Arimura, H; Ohki, M; Shirieda, K; Kameda, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of exposure dose reduction of the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image guided patient positioning system by using 6 noise suppression filters. Methods: First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT (X-ray volume imaging system, Elekta Co.) images were acquired with a reference dose of 86.2 mGy (weighted CT dose index: CTDIw) and various low doses of 1.4 to 43.1 mGy, respectively. Second, an automated rigid registration for three axes was performed for estimating setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images, which were processed by 6 noise suppression filters, i.e., averaging filter (AF), median filter (MF), Gaussian filter (GF), bilateral filter (BF), edge preserving smoothing filter (EPF) and adaptive partial median filter (AMF). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as an Euclidean distance between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT image and RD-CBCT image. Finally, the relationships between the residual error and CTDIw were obtained for 6 noise suppression filters, and then the CTDIw for LD-CBCT images processed by the noise suppression filters were measured at the same residual error, which was obtained with the RD-CBCT. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom and two cancer patients. Results: For the phantom, the exposure dose could be reduced from 61% (GF) to 78% (AMF) by applying the noise suppression filters to the CBCT images. The exposure dose in a prostate cancer case could be reduced from 8% (AF) to 61% (AMF), and the exposure dose in a lung cancer case could be reduced from 9% (AF) to 37% (AMF). Conclusion: Using noise suppression filters, particularly an adaptive partial median filter, could be feasible to decrease the additional exposure dose to patients in image guided patient positioning systems.

  2. Albendazole inhibits endothelial cell migration, tube formation, vasopermeability, VEGF receptor-2 expression and suppresses retinal neovascularization in ROP model of angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pourgholami, Mohammad H.; Khachigian, Levon M.; Fahmy, Roger G.; Badar, Samina; Wang, Lisa; Chu, Stephanie Wai Ling; Morris, David Lawson

    2010-07-09

    The angiogenic process begins with the cell proliferation and migration into the primary vascular network, and leads to vascularization of previously avascular tissues and organs as well to growth and remodeling of the initially homogeneous capillary plexus to form a new microcirculation. Additionally, an increase in microvascular permeability is a crucial step in angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a central role in angiogenesis. We have previously reported that albendazole suppresses VEGF levels and inhibits malignant ascites formation, suggesting a possible effect on angiogenesis. This study was therefore designed to investigate the antiangiogenic effect of albendazole in non-cancerous models of angiogenesis. In vitro, treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with albendazole led to inhibition of tube formation, migration, permeability and down-regulation of the VEGF type 2 receptor (VEGFR-2). In vivo albendazole profoundly inhibited hyperoxia-induced retinal angiogenesis in mice. These results provide new insights into the antiangiogenic effects of albendazole.

  3. The suppression effect of a periodic surface with semicircular grooves on the high power microwave long pill-box window multipactor phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xue, E-mail: zhangxue.iecas@yahoo.com; Wang, Yong; Fan, Junjie; Zhong, Yong; Zhang, Rui [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Peking, 100190 China (China)

    2014-09-15

    To improve the transmitting power in an S-band klystron, a long pill-box window that has a disk with grooves with a semicircular cross section is theoretically investigated and simulated. A Monte-Carlo algorithm is used to track the secondary electron trajectories and analyze the multipactor scenario in the long pill-box window and on the grooved surface. Extending the height of the long-box window can decrease the normal electric field on the surface of the window disk, but the single surface multipactor still exists. It is confirmed that the window disk with periodic semicircular grooves can explicitly suppress the multipactor and predominantly depresses the local field enhancement and the bottom continuous multipactor. The difference between semicircular and sharp boundary grooves is clarified numerically and analytically.

  4. Hydrogen-doping stabilized metallic VO{sub 2} (R) thin films and their application to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances in the terahertz regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yong; Pan, Xuan; Bernussi, Ayrton A.; Fan, Zhaoyang, E-mail: Zhaoyang.Fan@ttu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Karaoglan-Bebek, Gulten [Department of Physics and Nano Tech Center, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Holtz, Mark [Department of Physics and MSEC, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    We demonstrate that catalyst-assisted hydrogen spillover doping of VO{sub 2} thin films significantly alters the metal-insulator transition characteristics and stabilizes the metallic rutile phase at room temperature. With hydrogen inserted into the VO{sub 2} lattice, high resolution X-ray diffraction reveals expansion of the V-V chain separation when compared to the VO{sub 2}(R) phase. The donated free electrons, possibly from O-H bond formation, stabilize the VO{sub 2}(R) to low temperatures. By controlling the amount of dopants to obtain mixed insulating and metallic phases, VO{sub 2} resistivity can be continuously tuned until a critical condition is achieved that suppresses Fabry-Perot resonances. Our results demonstrate that hydrogen spillover is an effective technique to tune the electrical and optical properties of VO{sub 2} thin films.

  5. J/Psi suppression, percolation model and the critical energy density in AA collisions at SPS and RHIC energies with the account of centrality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Feofilov; O. Kochebina

    2009-07-09

    Experimental data on the onset of a so-called anomalous J/psi suppression in PbPb collisions at the SPS are considered in the framework of string percolation model. This onset is observed at a certain collision centrality, characterized by the number of nucleons-participants (Npart) related to the impact-parameter. Modified Bjorken formula calculations are performed for the local energy densities in AA collisions at different impact-parameters and with detailed account of the latest data available on the charged particles densities at midrapidity. Finally we compare variations of mean local energy and of string densities and match the occurrence of the critical percolation phenomenon with the critical energy density value, considering them at the same values of Npart. Similar analysis was performed for recent RHIC data and the results are discussed.

  6. Prospective Study Evaluating Postoperative Radiotherapy Plus 2-Year Androgen Suppression for Post-Radical Prostatectomy Patients With Pathologic T3 Disease and/or Positive Surgical Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)], E-mail: choo.c@mayo.edu; Danjoux, Cyril; Gardner, Sandra; Morton, Gerard; Szumacher, Ewa; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Cheung, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pearse, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a combined approach of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) for patients with pathologic T3 disease (pT3) and/or positive surgical margins (PSM) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients with pT3 and/or PSM after RP were treated with RT plus 2-year AS, as per a pilot, prospective study. Androgen suppression started within 1 month after the completion of RT and consisted of nilutamide for 4 weeks and buserelin acetate depot subcutaneously every 2 months for 2 years. Relapse-free rate, including freedom from prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic factors for relapse. Prostate-specific antigen relapse was defined as a PSA rise above 0.2 ng/mL, with two consecutive increases over a minimum of 3 months. Results: The median age was 61 years at the time of RP. The median interval between RP and postoperative RT was 4.2 months. Forty-nine patients had undetectable PSA (<0.2 ng/mL), and 29 had persistently detectable postoperative PSA at the time of the protocol treatment. Median follow-up from RT was 6.4 years. Relapse-free rates at 5 and 7 years were 94.4% and 86.3%, respectively. Survival rates were 96% at 5 years and 93.1% at 7 years. On Cox regression analysis, persistently detectable postoperative PSA and pT3b-T4 were significant predictors for relapse. Conclusion: The combined treatment of postoperative RT plus 2-year AS yielded encouraging results for patients with pT3 and/or PSM and warrants a confirmatory study.

  7. Density-induced suppression of the alpha-particle condensate in nuclear matter and the structure of alpha cluster states in nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Funaki; H. Horiuchi; G. Röpke; P. Schuck; A. Tohsaki; T. Yamada

    2008-01-21

    At low densities, with decreasing temperatures, in symmetric nuclear matter alpha-particles are formed, which eventually give raise to a quantum condensate with four-nucleon alpha-like correlations (quartetting). Starting with a model of alpha-matter, where undistorted alpha particles interact via an effective interaction such as the Ali-Bodmer potential, the suppression of the condensate fraction at zero temperature with increasing density is considered. Using a Jastrow-Feenberg approach, it is found that the condensate fraction vanishes near saturation density. Additionally, the modification of the internal state of the alpha particle due to medium effects will further reduce the condensate. In finite systems, an enhancement of the S state wave function of the c.o.m. orbital of alpha particle motion is considered as the correspondence to the condensate. Wave functions have been constructed for self-conjugate 4n nuclei which describe the condensate state, but are fully antisymmetrized on the nucleonic level. These condensate-like cluster wave functions have been successfully applied to describe properties of low-density states near the n alpha threshold. Comparison with OCM calculations in 12C and 16O shows strong enhancement of the occupation of the S-state c.o.m. orbital of the alpha-particles. This enhancement is decreasing if the baryon density increases, similar to the density-induced suppression of the condensate fraction in alpha matter. The ground states of 12C and 16O show no enhancement at all, thus a quartetting condensate cannot be formed at saturation densities.

  8. Measurement of the Jet Radius and Transverse Momentum Dependence of Inclusive Jet Suppression in Lead–lead Collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Measurements of inclusive jet suppression in heavy ion collisions at the LHC provide direct sensitivity to the physics of jet quenching. In a sample of lead–lead collisions at ?s[subscript NN] =2.76 TeV corresponding to ...

  9. Suppression of spin polarization in graphene nanoribbons by edge defects and impurities Bing Huang,1 Feng Liu,2,* Jian Wu,1 Bing-Lin Gu,1 and Wenhui Duan1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Suppression of spin polarization in graphene nanoribbons by edge defects and impurities Bing Huang polarization in graphene nanoribbons GNRs with zigzag edges by using density-functional- theory calculations.75. a Graphene nanoribbons GNRs have attracted much re- cent interest because of their unique electronic

  10. Ascofuranone suppresses EGF-induced HIF-1? protein synthesis by inhibition of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, Yun-Jeong; Cho, Hyun-Ji [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Daegu 705-718 (Korea, Republic of); Magae, Junji [Magae Bioscience Institute, 49-4 Fujimidai, Tsukuba 300-1263 (Japan); Lee, In-Kyu [Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu 700-721 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Keun-Gyu, E-mail: kpark@knu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu 700-721 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Young-Chae, E-mail: ycchang@cu.ac.kr [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Daegu 705-718 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 plays an important role in tumor progression, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this study, we investigated the potential molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-angiogenic effect of ascofuranone, an isoprenoid antibiotic from Ascochyta viciae, in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-1 responsive human breast cancer cells. Ascofuranone significantly and selectively suppressed EGF-induced HIF-1? protein accumulation, whereas it did not affect the expression of HIF-1?. Furthermore, ascofuranone inhibited the transcriptional activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by reducing protein HIF-1?. Mechanistically, we found that the inhibitory effects of ascofuranone on HIF-1? protein expression are associated with the inhibition of synthesis HIF-1? through an EGF-dependent mechanism. In addition, ascofuranone suppressed EGF-induced phosphorylation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6 kinase, but the phosphorylation of ERK/JNK/p38 kinase was not affected by ascofuranone. These results suggest that ascofuranone suppresses EGF-induced HIF-1? protein translation through the inhibition of Akt/mTOR/p70S6 kinase signaling pathways and plays a novel role in the anti-angiogenic action. - Highlights: • Inhibitory effect of ascofuranone on HIF-1? expression is EGF-specific regulation. • Ascofuranone decreases HIF-1? protein synthesis through Akt/mTOR pathways. • Ascofuranone suppresses EGF-induced VEGF production and tumor angiogenesis.

  11. VOLUME 81, NUMBER 23 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 7 DECEMBER 1998 Dynamical Bloch Band Suppression in an Optical Lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Suppression in an Optical Lattice K. W. Madison, M. C. Fischer, R. B. Diener, Qian Niu, and M. G. Raizen-cooled atoms in an optical lattice, rather than electrons in a superlattice. The main advantage of our system in the lowest band of a one-dimensional optical lattice. We then modulate the position of the potential

  12. Suppression of activation energy and superconductivity by the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles in CuTl-1223 matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Qasim, Irfan; Mumtaz, M.; Zubair, M.; Nadeem, K.; Khurram, A. A.

    2014-05-28

    Low anisotropic (Cu{sub 0.5}Tl{sub 0.5})Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10??} (CuTl-1223) high T{sub c} superconducting matrix was synthesized by solid-state reaction and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared separately by co-precipitation method. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were added with different concentrations during the final sintering cycle of CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix to get the required (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub y}/CuTl-1223, y?=?0.0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.5?wt.?%, composites. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and dc-resistivity (?) measurements. The activation energy and superconductivity were suppressed with increasing concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles in (CuTl-1223) matrix. The XRD analysis showed that the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles did not affect the crystal structure of the parent CuTl-1223 superconducting phase. The suppression of activation energy and superconducting properties is most probably due to weak flux pinning in the samples. The possible reason of weak flux pinning is reduction of weak links and enhanced inter-grain coupling due to the presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles at the grain boundaries. The presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles at the grain boundaries possibly reduced the number of flux pinning centers, which were present in the form of weak links in the pure CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix. The increase in the values of inter-grain coupling (?) deduced from the fluctuation induced conductivity analysis with the increased concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles is a theoretical evidence of improved inter-grain coupling.

  13. Analysis of the chemical behavior of iodine in the suppression tank of the LOFT facility during experiment LP-FP-2 with IODE and IMPAIR-2/M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herranz, L.E.; Polo, J. (Nuclear Technology Inst., Madrid (Spain). Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas)

    1994-05-01

    The significance of iodine for source term quantification has been studied by investigating its chemical behavior under the prototypical conditions of a hypothetical severe accident within the containment. As a result, some computer codes were developed and their validation is currently under way. The loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) program was one of the most relevant research projects in the area of nuclear safety. Its last experiment, LP-FP-2, simulated a V-sequence. A great deal of information was recorded on the fission product release, transport, and deposition. A theoretical approach to the chemical behavior of iodine in the blowdown suppression tank (BST) of the LOFT facility was attempted with the IODE and IMPAIR-2/M codes. The comparison of the predictions with the existing experimental data led to the conclusion that the BST system behaved as a low-volatility system, with most of the iodine in the form of the soluble nonvolatile species iodide. Only a partial conversion to volatile molecular iodine was observed due to the presence of radiation. However, the intensity of the [gamma] field was so weak that this transformation was not quantitatively meaningful.

  14. Suppression of the spin pumping in Pd/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayers with nano-oxide layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Duck-Ho; Kim, Hong-Hyoun; You, Chun-Yeol

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate that the spin pumping effect can be effectively suppressed with a nano-oxide layer. Spin pumping effect manifests itself by an enhancement of the Gilbert damping parameter in normal metal/ferromagnetic hetero-structures, while many spintronics devices prefer smaller damping parameter. Since the spin pumping effect is directly related with the spin dependent interface conductance, we can modify the spin pumping by altering the interface conductance with the nano-oxide layer. We prepared series of Pd/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayers with different pausing time between Pd and Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} depositions in order to control the interface conductance. The Gilbert damping parameters are determined from the line-width measurements in the ferromagnetic resonance spectra for each pausing time sample. They are 0.0490, 0.0296, 0.0278, and 0.0251 for 0, 6, 30, and 60 s pausing time, respectively. We find that the damping parameter of Pd/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} is almost recovered to one of the Cu/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayer with 60 s pausing time, while the static magnetic properties are not noticeably changed.

  15. Suppression of Charged Particle Production at Large Transverse Momentum in Central Pb-Pb Collisions at sNN = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aamodt, K. [University of Oslo, Norway; Awes, Terry C [ORNL; Read Jr, Kenneth F [ORNL; Silvermyr, David O [ORNL; ALICE, Collaboration [The

    2011-01-01

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of primary charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 2.76 TeV have been measured by the ALICE Collaboration at the LHC. The data are presented for central and peripheral collisions, corresponding to 0--5% and 70-80% of the hadronic Pb-PB cross section. The measured charged particle spectra in |{eta}| < 0.8 and 0.3 < p{sub T} < 20 GeV/c are compared to the expectation in pp collisions at the same {radical}s{sub NN}, scaled by the number of underlying nucleon-nucleon collisions. The comparison is expressed in terms of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA}. The result indicates only weak medium effects (R{sub AA} {approx} 0.7) in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, R{sub AA} reaches a minimum of about 0.14 at p{sub T} = 6--7 GeV/c and increases significantly at larger p{sub T}. The measured suppression of high-p{sub T} particles is stronger than that observed at lower collision energies, indicating that a very dense medium is formed in central Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC.

  16. Deposition of High-Quality a-Si:H by Suppressing Growth of a-Si Clusters in SiH4 Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, Yukio [Kyushu Electric College, Fukuoka 812-0018 (Japan); Shiratani, Masaharu; Koga, Kazunori [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2005-10-31

    The density of Si-particles in a small size range below 10nm (referred to as clusters) in SiH4 capacitively-coupled high-frequency discharges amounts to 1011cm-3 even under deposition conditions of device-quality a-Si:H films. The results reported until now regarding the growth of such clusters are shown to be reasonably understood by taking into account the effects of gas flow on the growth. The Si-H2 bond formation in the a-Si films are found to be mainly contributed by incorporation of large clusters (clusters in a range above about 0.5 nm in size) rather than higher-order-silane (HOS) radicals [SinHx (n<5, x<2n+2)] in the plasma. By employing the cluster-suppressed plasma CVD reactors, the remarkable decrease in Si-H2 bond density in the films is realized, leading to the deposition of a-Si:H films of less light-induced degradation. Based on the knowledge of cluster growth obtained until now, the reactor with a potentiality of high rate deposition of high-quality films is proposed and its preliminary results are presented.

  17. First Observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed Decays Xi+(c) ---> Sigma+ pi- pi+ and Xi+(c) ---> Sigma- pi+ pi+ and Measurement of their Branching Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, Georgiy; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab /Michigan U., Flint

    2008-04-01

    The authors report the first observation of two Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. They observe 56 {+-} 13 over a background of 21, and 23 {+-} 7 over a background of 12 events, respectively, for the signals. The data were accumulated using the SELEX spectrometer during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, chiefly from a 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} beam. The branching ratios of the decays relative to the Cabibbo-favored {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} are measured to be B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/B({xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.20, and B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/B({Xi}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.23 {+-} 0.11, respectively. They also report branching ratios for the same decay modes of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} relative to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}.

  18. Pulse shape discrimination studies with a Broad-Energy Germanium detector for signal identification and background suppression in the GERDA double beta decay experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dušan Budjáš; Marik Barnabé Heider; Oleg Chkvorets; Nikita Khanbekov; Stefan Schönert

    2009-09-22

    First studies of event discrimination with a Broad-Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector are presented. A novel pulse shape method, exploiting the characteristic electrical field distribution inside BEGe detectors, allows to identify efficiently single-site events and to reject multi-site events. The first are typical for neutrinoless double beta decays (0-nu-2-beta) and the latter for backgrounds from gamma-ray interactions. The obtained survival probabilities of backgrounds at energies close to Q(76Ge) = 2039 keV are 0.93% for events from 60Co, 21% from 226Ra and 40% from 228Th. This background suppression is achieved with 89% acceptance of 228Th double escape events, which are dominated by single site interactions. Approximately equal acceptance is expected for 0-nu-2-beta-decay events. Collimated beam and Compton coincidence measurements demonstrate that the discrimination is largely independent of the interaction location inside the crystal and validate the pulse-shape cut in the energy range of Q(76Ge). The application of BEGe detectors in the GERDA and the Majorana double beta decay experiments is under study.

  19. Fire suppressing apparatus. [sodium fires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buttrey, K.E.

    1980-12-19

    Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubed depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

  20. Key role of microRNA-15a in the KLF4 suppressions of proliferation and angiogenesis in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Xuemei; Li, Aiqin; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Tengfei; Shen, Qiang; Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Science of Ministry of Education, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 ; Cui, Qinghua; Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Science of Ministry of Education, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 ; Qin, Xiaomei; Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Science of Ministry of Education, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •This is the first demonstration that miR-15a is a novel target gene of KLF4. •A novel finding that KLF4 increases the expression of miR-15a in ECs and VSMCs. •The novel mechanism is that KLF4 inhibits the proliferation of ECs via miR-15a. •The novel mechanism is that KLF4 inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs via miR-15. •miR-15a mediates the anti-angiogenic activity of KLF4. -- Abstract: While recent insights indicate that the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is indispensable for vascular homeostasis, its exact role in proliferation and angiogenesis and how it functions remain unresolved. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of KLF4 in the proliferations of endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, as well as the angiogenesis. The overexpression of KLF4 in endothelial cells significantly impaired tube formation. KLF4 inhibited the formation of a vascular network in implanted Matrigel plugs in nude mice. Importantly, we found that KLF4 significantly upregulated the miR-15a expression in endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, and conversely, KLF4 depletion reduced the amount of miR-15a. Furthermore, KLF4 blocked cell cycle progression and decreased cyclin D1 expression in endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells through the induction of miR-15a. Intriguingly, the delivery of a miR-15a antagomir to nude mice resulted in marked attenuation of the anti-angiogenic effect of KLF4. Collectively, our present study provide the first evidence that miR-15a as a direct transcriptional target of KLF4 that mediates the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic actions of KLF4, which indicates that KLF4 upregulation of miR-15a may represent a therapeutic option to suppress proliferative vascular disorders.

  1. Suppressing the Skin-Core Structure of Injection-Molded Isotactic Polypropylene via Combination of an in situ Microfibrillar Network and an Interfacial Compatibilizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X Yi; C Chen; G Zhong; L Xu; J Tang; X Ji; B Hsiao; Z Li

    2011-12-31

    Injection-molded semicrystalline polymer parts generally exhibited a so-called skin-core structure basically as a result of the large gradients of temperature, shear rate, stress, and pressure fields created by the boundary conditions of injection molding. Suppression of the skin-core structure is a long-term practical challenge. In the current work, the skin-core structure of the conventional injection-molded isotactic polypropylene (iPP) was largely relieved by the cooperative effects of an in situ microfibrillar network and interfacial compatibilizer. The in situ poly(ethylene terephthalate) microfibrils of 1-8 {micro}m in diameter and large aspect ratios of above 40 tended to entangle with each other to generate a microfibrillar network in the iPP melt. During injection molding, the iPP molecules experienced confined flow in the microchannels or pores formed by the microfibrillar network, which could redistribute and homogenize the flow field of polymer melt. Addition of the compatibilizer, glycidyl methacrylate-grafted iPP, restrained the molecular orientation but facilitated preservation of oriented molecules due to the chemical bonds at the interface between PET microfibrils and iPP. The cooperative effects of in situ microfibrillar network and interfacial compatibilizer led to almost the same molecular orientation across the whole thickness of the injection-molded parts. Additionally, the content of {beta} crystals in different layers of injection-molded iPP parts depended on the combined effects of the molecular orientation, the amount of oriented crystals, and the crystallization time between 105 and 140 C. The presence of the interfacial compatibilizer facilitated formation of the {beta} crystals because of preservation of the oriented molecules.

  2. siRNA-mediated knockdown against CDCA1 and KNTC2, both frequently overexpressed in colorectal and gastric cancers, suppresses cell proliferation and induces apoptosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaneko, Naoyuki; Department of Surgery, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8575 ; Miura, Koh; Gu, Zhaodi; Karasawa, Hideaki; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Tsukamoto, Nobukazu; Yokoyama, Satoru; Yamamura, Akihiro; Department of Surgery, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8575 ; Nagase, Hiroki; Shibata, Chikashi; Sasaki, Iwao; Horii, Akira

    2009-12-25

    Ndc80 has been shown to play an important role in stable microtubule-kinetochore attachment, chromosome alignment, and spindle checkpoint activation in mitosis. It is composed of two heterodimers, CDCA1-KNTC2 and SPC24-SPC25. Overexpression of CDCA1 and KNTC2 is reported to be associated with poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), and siRNA-mediated knockdown against CDCA1 or KNTC2 has been found to inhibit cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in NSCLC, ovarian cancer, cervical cancer and glioma. Therefore, CDCA1 and KNTC2 can be considered good candidates for molecular target therapy as well as diagnosis in some cancers. However, the role of the Ndc80 complex in colorectal and gastric cancers (CRC and GC) still remains unclear. In the present study, we used qRT-PCR to evaluate the expression levels of CDCA1, KNTC2, SPC24 and SPC25 in CRC and GC and employed siRNA-mediated knockdown to examine cell proliferation and apoptosis. mRNA overexpression of these four genes was observed in CRCs and GCs when compared with the corresponding normal mucosae. Additionally, the expression levels of tumor/normal ratios of CDCA1, KNTC2, SPC24 and SPC25 correlated with each other in CRCs. MTT assays revealed that cell growths after the siRNA-mediated knockdown of either CDCA1 or KNTC2 were significantly suppressed, and flow cytometry analyses revealed significant increases of the subG1 fractions after knockdown against both genes. Our present results suggest that expressional control of component molecules of Ndc80 can be utilized for molecular target therapy of patients with CRC and GC.

  3. Propofol pretreatment attenuates LPS-induced granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production in cultured hepatocytes by suppressing MAPK/ERK activity and NF-{kappa}B translocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jawan, Bruno [Department of Anesthesiology and Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung Hsien 833, Taiwan (China); Kao, Y.-H. [Department of Anesthesiology and Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung Hsien 833, Taiwan (China); Department of Biological Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70 Lien-Hai Road, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Goto, Shigeru [Department of Surgery and Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung Hsien 833, Taiwan (China); Department of Surgery, Iwao Hospital, 3059-1 Kawakami, Yufuin, Oita 879-5102 (Japan); Pan, M.-C. [Department of Anesthesiology and Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung Hsien 833, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-C.; Hsu, L.-W.; Nakano, Toshiaki; Lai, C.-Y.; Sun, C.-K.; Cheng, Y.-F. [Department of Surgery and Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung Hsien 833, Taiwan (China); Tai, M.-H. [Department of Biological Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70 Lien-Hai Road, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, 386 Ta-Chung 1st Road, Kaohsiung 813, Taiwan (China)] (and others)

    2008-06-15

    Propofol (PPF), a widely used intravenous anesthetic for induction and maintenance of anesthesia during surgeries, was found to possess suppressive effect on host immunity. This study aimed at investigating whether PPF plays a modulatory role in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine expression in a cell line of rat hepatocytes. Morphological observation and viability assay showed that PPF exhibits no cytotoxicity at concentrations up to 300 {mu}M after 48 h incubation. Pretreatment with 100 {mu}M PPF for 24 h prior to LPS stimulation was performed to investigate the modulatory effect on LPS-induced inflammatory gene production. The results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that PPF pretreatment significantly suppressed the LPS-induced toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, CD14, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene expression. Western blotting analysis showed that PPF pretreatment potentiated the LPS-induced TLR-4 downregulation. Flow cytometrical analysis revealed that PPF pretreatment showed no modulatory effect on the LPS-upregulated CD14 expression on hepatocytes. In addition, PPF pretreatment attenuated the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) and I{kappa}B{alpha}, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B primed by LPS. Moreover, addition of PD98059, a MAPK kinase inhibitor, significantly suppressed the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and GM-CSF production, suggesting that the PPF-attenuated GM-CSF production in hepatocytes may be attributed to its suppressive effect on MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. In conclusion, PPF as an anesthetic may clinically benefit those patients who are vulnerable to sepsis by alleviating sepsis-related inflammatory response in livers.

  4. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Gonzalez, Alvarez B. [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-? D(? K+?-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3 as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- ? D(? K+?-)?- decay are also reported.

  5. Analysis of D0 -> K+ pi- pi0 Decays: Search for D0-D0bar Mixing, and Measurements of the Doubly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Rate and Resonance Contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Michael Galante

    2005-12-13

    Analyzing D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays, herein are presented the methods and results of a search for D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing, a measurement of the branching ratio R {equivalent_to} {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}), and measurements of the contributions from D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{rho}{sup -}, K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}; 230.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected from the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider during 2000-2004 (Runs 1-4) are analyzed. An event-level tagging technique is developed, which facilitates the accurate determination of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed resonance contributions by suppressing background from Cabibbo-favored decays. The branching ratio is measured as R = (0.214 {+-} 0.008 (stat) {+-} 0.008 (syst))%, with (46.1 {+-} 3.3 (stat) {+-} 2.9 (syst))% of D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays proceeding through the channel D{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data are consistent with the null-D-mixing hypothesis at a confidence level of 10%, and the expected value of {+-} {radical}(x{sup 2} + y{sup 2}) is measured as -0.013 {+-} 0.010 (stat), indicating negative interference between mixing and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay. The expected value of the integrated mixing rate is (x{sup 2} + y{sup 2})/2 = (0.013 {+-} 0.013 (stat))%.

  6. Strangeness suppression of qq¯ creation observed in exclusive reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mestayer, M. D.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W. I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Simonyan, A.; Sokhan, D.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-10-10

    In this study, we measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ?K+, p?0, and n?+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq¯ creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq¯ pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  7. Anthropogenic emissions during Arctas-A: mean transport characteristics and regional case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrigan, D. L; Fuelberg, H. E; Simpson, I. J; Blake, D. R; Carmichael, G. R; Diskin, G. S

    2011-01-01

    O. : Global budget of carbonyl sulfide: Temporal and spatialThe mass budget of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sul- fide,chloride Halon-1211 Carbonyl sulfide Tetrachloroethene HCFC-

  8. Proposed mechanism to represent the suppression of dark current density by four orders with low energy light ion (H{sup ?}) implantation in quaternary alloy-capped InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, A.; Ghadi, H.; Mathur, K.L.; Basu, A.; Subrahmanyam, N.B.V.; Singh, P.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Here we propose a carrier transport mechanism for low energy H{sup ?} ions implanted InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors supportive of the experimental results obtained. Dark current density suppression of up to four orders was observed in the implanted quantum dot infrared photodetectors, which further demonstrates that they are effectively operational. We concentrated on determining how defect-related material and structural changes attributed to implantation helped in dark current density reduction for InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors. This is the first study to report the electrical carrier transport mechanism of H{sup ?} ion-implanted InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors.

  9. Suppression of thermal carrier escape and efficient photo-carrier generation by two-step photon absorption in InAs quantum dot intermediate-band solar cells using a dot-in-well structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asahi, S.; Teranishi, H.; Kasamatsu, N.; Kada, T.; Kaizu, T.; Kita, T.

    2014-08-14

    We investigated the effects of an increase in the barrier height on the enhancement of the efficiency of two-step photo-excitation in InAs quantum dot (QD) solar cells with a dot-in-well structure. Thermal carrier escape of electrons pumped in QD states was drastically reduced by sandwiching InAs/GaAs QDs with a high potential barrier of Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As. The thermal activation energy increased with the introduction of the barrier. The high potential barrier caused suppression of thermal carrier escape and helped realize a high electron density in the QD states. We observed efficient two-step photon absorption as a result of the high occupancy of the QD states at room temperature.

  10. Branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays B[over-bar] 0 to D[superscript (*)0?0, D[superscript (*)0]?, D[superscript (*)0]?, and D[superscript(*)0]?? and measurement of the polarization in the decay B[over-bar] 0-->D[superscript *0]?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays B? 0-->D0?0, D*0?0, D0?, D*0?, D0?, D*0?, D0??, and D*0??. We measure the branching fractions (×10-4): B(B? 0?D0?0)=2.69±0.09±0.13, B(B? ...

  11. Airfoil Vortex Induced Vibration suppression devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Evan J. (Evan Joseph)

    2007-01-01

    Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV) is a major concern of the offshore oil industry. This problem leads to fatigue failure in the marine risers and causes costly replacement of the risers. Appendages such as helical strakes ...

  12. Suppressing CMB low multipoles with ISW effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Santanu; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: tarun@iucaa.ernet.in

    2014-02-01

    Recent results of Planck data reveal that the power [1,2] in the low multipoles of the CMB angular power spectrum, approximately up to l = 30, is significantly lower than the theoretically predicted in the best fit ?CDM model. There are different known physical effects that can affect the power at low multipoles, such as features in the primordial power spectrum (PPS) in some models of inflation and ISW effect. In this paper we investigate the possibility of invoking the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect to explain the power deficit at low multipoles. The ISW effect that originates from the late time expansion history of the universe is rich in possibilities given the limited understanding of the origin of dark energy (DE). It is a common understanding that the ISW effect adds to the power at the low multipoles of the CMB angular power spectrum. In this paper we carry out an analytic study to show that there are some expansion histories in which the ISW effect, instead of adding power, provides negative contribution to the power at low multipoles. Guided by the analytic study, we present examples of the features required in the late time expansion history of the universe that could explain the power deficiency through the ISW effect. We also show that an ISW origin of power deficiency is consistent, at present, with other cosmological observations that probe the expansion history such as distance modulus, matter power spectrum and the evolution of cluster number count. We also show that the ISW effect may be distinguished from power deficit originating from features in the PPS using the measurements of the CMB polarization spectrum at low multipoles expected from Planck. We conclude that the power at low multipoles of the CMB anisotropy could well be closely linked to Dark Energy puzzle in cosmology and this observation could be actually pointing to richer phenomenology of DE beyond the cosmological constant ?.

  13. Suppressing cascades of load in interdependent networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolpert, Robert L

    network, for instance, turns turbines and cools nuclear reactors in the electrical grid, which powers), and many new high-capacity transmission lines are planned to interconnect grids in the United States within individual power grids using probabilistic models (15), linearized electric power dynamics

  14. Suppression of automotive radio frequency interference 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Cleon Crosby

    1969-01-01

    of the spark plug and dlstribijtor gap brcakdo'sns is r epr educed by sc'ri tchi ng from an equiva- lent capacj cor befo'. gap Lreakdo'sn to an equivalent gap res j stance aiel:i ndu'':!nce dur. , nrJ b i akdo~sn This capa- bil i tV i ' . &ne &of the major... into lumped clem!'. nts and by providing equiva. 'ent cir uits for the disirib!!tor and spark plug gapa in both co! ducting and non ? conducti. ng states. Unfor unatcly, the state variable rr. odel recuires a grea. i deal of computer time in order...

  15. Remote electrical arc suppression by laser filamentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Elise; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of narrow plasma channels formed in the filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses, with a DC high voltage. The laser filaments prevent electrical arcs by triggering corona that neutralize the high-voltage electrodes. This phenomenon, due to the electric field modulation and free electron release around the filament, opens new prospects to lightning and over-voltage mitigation.

  16. Suppressing cascades of load in interdependent networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Souza, Raissa

    'Souzab,c,d,e , and E. A. Leichtf a Department of Mathematics, b Complexity Sciences Center, c Department of Mechanical in coupled electric grids and other infrastructure, we study the Bak­ Tang­Wiesenfeld sandpile model network, for instance, turns turbines and cools nuclear reactors in the electrical grid, which powers

  17. Mode suppression means for gyrotron cavities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chodorow, Marvin (Stanford, CA); Symons, Robert S. (Los Altos, CA)

    1983-08-09

    In a gyrotron electron tube of the gyro-klystron or gyro-monotron type, having a cavity supporting an electromagnetic mode with circular electric field, spurious resonances can occur in modes having noncircular electric field. These spurious resonances are damped and their frequencies shifted by a circular groove in the cavity parallel to the electric field.

  18. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-04-10

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  19. Raman laser with controllable suppression of parasitics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E. Victor (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Method and apparatus for switching energy out of a Raman laser optical cavity. Coherent radiation at both the pump and first Stokes wave frequencies are introduced into the optical cavity from the same direction, and a second Stokes wave is utilized to switch the energy out of the cavity.

  20. UNILATERAL TECHNOLOGY SUPPRESSION: APPROPRIATE ANTITRUST AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamos, Michael I.

    that there is little reason to change the current law: a patent holder that is the inventor or the employer of the inventor is free simply to withhold the patented technology from the marketplace, while a patent holder that an inventor of technology should be permitted to patent the inven- tion even if there is an intent not to use

  1. Blast Effects Suppression System - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimetic Dye MoleculesBlake Case BlakeBlast

  2. Suppression of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Functionalized

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback System inStatusand carbon(JournalWIMPMathematical

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors in Combination with Local OK-432 Injection Prolongs Survival and Suppresses Distant Tumor Growth in the Rabbit Model with Intra- and Extrahepatic VX2 Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kageyama, Ken, E-mail: kageyamaken0112@gmail.com; Yamamoto, Akira, E-mail: loveakirayamamoto@gmail.com; Okuma, Tomohisa, E-mail: o-kuma@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Hamamoto, Shinichi, E-mail: hamashin_tigers1975@yahoo.co.jp; Takeshita, Toru, E-mail: takeshita3595@view.ocn.ne.jp; Sakai, Yukimasa, E-mail: sakaiy@trust.ocn.ne.jp; Nishida, Norifumi, E-mail: norifumin@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki, E-mail: tmatsuoka@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Miki, Yukio, E-mail: yukio.miki@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Osaka City University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)] [Osaka City University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate survival and distant tumor growth after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and local OK-432 injection at a single tumor site in a rabbit model with intra- and extrahepatic VX2 tumors and to examine the effect of this combination therapy, which we termed immuno-radiofrequency ablation (immunoRFA), on systemic antitumor immunity in a rechallenge test. Methods: Our institutional animal care committee approved all experiments. VX2 tumors were implanted to three sites: two in the liver and one in the left ear. Rabbits were randomized into four groups of seven to receive control, RFA alone, OK-432 alone, and immunoRFA treatments at a single liver tumor at 1 week after implantation. Untreated liver and ear tumor volumes were measured after the treatment. As the rechallenge test, tumors were reimplanted into the right ear of rabbits, which survived the 35 weeks and were followed up without additional treatment. Statistical significance was examined by log-rank test for survival and Student's t test for tumor volume. Results: Survival was significantly prolonged in the immunoRFA group compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Untreated liver and ear tumor sizes became significantly smaller after immunoRFA compared to controls (P < 0.05). In the rechallenge test, the reimplanted tumors regressed without further therapy compared to the ear tumors of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: ImmunoRFA led to improved survival and suppression of distant untreated tumor growth. Decreases in size of the distant untreated tumors and reimplanted tumors suggested that systemic antitumor immunity was enhanced by immunoRFA.

  4. Anticancer effect of genistein on BG-1 ovarian cancer growth induced by 17 ?-estradiol or bisphenol A via the suppression of the crosstalk between estrogen receptor alpha and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Min-Ah; Kang, Nam-Hee; Yi, Bo-Rim; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between estrogen receptor (ER) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathway plays an important role in proliferation of and resistance to endocrine therapy to estrogen dependent cancers. Estrogen (E2) upregulates the expression of components of IGF-1 system and induces the downstream of mitogenic signaling cascades via phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). In the present study, we evaluated the xenoestrogenic effect of bisphenol A (BPA) and antiproliferative activity of genistein (GEN) in accordance with the influence on this crosstalk. BPA was determined to affect this crosstalk by upregulating mRNA expressions of ER? and IGF-1R and inducing phosphorylation of IRS-1 and Akt in protein level in BG-1 ovarian cancer cells as E2 did. In the mouse model xenografted with BG-1 cells, BPA significantly increased a tumor burden of mice and expressions of ER?, pIRS-1, and cyclin D1 in tumor mass compared to vehicle, indicating that BPA induces ovarian cancer growth by promoting the crosstalk between ER and IGF-1R signals. On the other hand, GEN effectively reversed estrogenicity of BPA by reversing mRNA and protein expressions of ER?, IGF-1R, pIRS-1, and pAkt induced by BPA in cellular model and also significantly decreased tumor growth and in vivo expressions of ER?, pIRS-1, and pAkt in xenografted mouse model. Also, GEN was confirmed to have an antiproliferative effect by inducing apoptotic signaling cascades. Taken together, these results suggest that GEN effectively reversed the increased proliferation of BG-1 ovarian cancer by suppressing the crosstalk between ER? and IGF-1R signaling pathways upregulated by BPA or E2.

  5. Systematics of the charged-hadron P_T spectrum and the nuclear suppression factor in heavy-ion collisions from sqrt{s}=200 GeV to sqrt{s} =2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorsten Renk; Hannu Holopainen; Risto Paatelainen; Kari J. Eskola

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, our goal is to make a simultaneous analysis of the high- and low-P_T parts of the charged-hadron P_T spectrum measured by the ALICE collaboration in central Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt{s}=2.76 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), based on models which have been successfully applied and constrained in Au-Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). For the hydrodynamical modeling with which we obtain the low-P_T spectrum, we have computed the initial conditions based on perturbative QCD (pQCD) minijet production and saturation. The sensitivity of the obtained charged-hadron P_T spectrum on the hydrodynamic model parameters is studied. For the high-P_T part, we apply a number of parton-medium interaction models, which are tuned to describe the nuclear suppression factor R_AA measured at the RHIC in central Au-Au collisions at sqrt{s}=200 GeV. We find that the higher kinematic reach of the LHC, manifest in the hardening of the pQCD parton spectral slope, is in principle very efficient in discriminating the various models. However, due to the uncertainties in the p-p baseline, none of the tested models can be firmly ruled out with the present ALICE data. Comparison with the LHC data in this approach also shows that the matching of the hydrodynamic and pQCD+jet quenching components leaves fairly little room for other hadron production mechanisms in the cross-over region P_T=4-5 GeV.

  6. Flame Inhibition by Phosphorus-Containing Compounds over a Range of Equivalence Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayaweera, T M; Melius, C F; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Korobeinichev, O P; Shvartsberg, V M; Shmakov, A G; Rybitskaya, I V; Curran, H

    2004-03-17

    There is much interest in the combustion mechanism of organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) due to their role as potential halon replacements in fire suppression. A continuing investigation of the inhibition activity of organophosphorus compounds under a range of equivalence ratios was performed experimentally and computationally, as measured by the burning velocity. Updates to a previous mechanism were made by the addition and modification of reactions in the mechanism for a more complete description of the recombination reactions. In this work, the laminar flame speed is measured experimentally and calculated numerically for a premixed propane/air flame, under a range of equivalence ratios, undoped and doped with dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). A detailed investigation of the catalytic cycles involved in the recombination of key flame radicals is made for two equivalence ratios, lean and rich. From this, the importance of different catalytic cycles involved in the lean versus rich case is discussed. Although the importance of certain cycles is different under different stoichiometries, the OPCs are similarly effective across the range, demonstrating the robustness of OPCs as flame suppressants. In addition, it is shown that the phosphorus compounds are most active in the high temperature region of the flame. This may, in part, explain their high level of inhibition effectiveness.

  7. Rise of the Ellsworth mountains and parts of the East Antarctic coast observed with GPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulds, James E.

    . Argus,1 Geoffrey Blewitt,2 W. Richard Peltier,3 and Corné Kreemer2 Received 5 May 2011; revised 7 July at 5 ± 4 mm/yr (95% confidence limits), as in the postglacial rebound model of Peltier, but 10 mm to the Antarctic plate. Citation: Argus, D. F., G. Blewitt, W. R. Peltier, and C. Kreemer (2011), Rise

  8. Universal anti-baryon density in $e^+e^-$,$?p$, pp, pA and AA collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haidong Liu; Zhangbu Xu

    2006-10-24

    We compiled the systematical measurements of anti-nucleus production in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions as well as those in $pp$, $p\\bar{p}$, $\\gamma p$ and $e^{+}e^{-}$ at various beam energies. The anti-baryon phase space density inferred from $\\bar{d}/\\bar{p}$ ratio in $A+A$, $p+A$, $pp(\\bar{p})$ and $\\gamma p$ collisions is found to follow a universal distribution as a function of center of mass of beam energy and can be described in a statistical model. We demonstrated that anti-baryon density in all the collisions is the highest when the collisions are dominated by the processes of $g+g$ or $\\bar{q}+g$. In $e^+e^-$ collisions at LEP, the cross section of $q\\bar{q}g$ is suppressed by a factor of strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ relative to $q\\bar{q}$. This can consistently explain the $\\bar{d}$ suppression observed by ALEPH relative to that in $e^+e^-\\to ggg$ by ARGUS. We discuss the implications to the baryon enhancement at high transverse momentum at RHIC when jet is quenched.

  9. Compliance Status 2011 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    within permit limits. There were no unexpected opacity excursions noted during the year for either Boiler 6 or Boiler 7; opacity excursions were only noted during testing periods. Halon portable fire

  10. Experimental and Computational Study of Flame Inhibition Mechanisms of Halogenated Compounds in C1-C3 Alkanes Flames 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osorio Amado, Carmen H

    2013-07-30

    has been found to meet all of the exigent criteria. Further progress in this research requires fundamental combustion knowledge that can help us understand the unique performance of Halon 1301, to prevent this search from becoming a tedious trial...

  11. NOAA Ship THOMAS JEFFERSON S-222 The National Oceanic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a plane captured by sidescan sonar Mounted on the hull of the ship and its launches, the multibeam bulbs throughout the ship, low sulfur diesel fuel, 15ppm oily water separators, Halon 1301 aboard

  12. Camera Networks for Building Shape Models from Video Computer Vision Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pless, Robert

    , and the wisdomofhis metaphorre- gardingthe power ofnew eyes isstrongly reflected inancient Greek mythology. Recall Argus, the hundred-eyed guardian of Hera, the goddess of Olympus, who alone defeated a whole army

  13. Cultivating a Green Political Landscape: Lessons for Climate Change Policy from the Defeat of California’s Proposition 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biber, Eric

    2013-01-01

    as much as in Alaska. Crude Oil Production, U.S. E NERGY I07/microsoft-powerpoint-argus-crude-oil-summit-presentation-emissions deficit from crude oil refining must be offset by

  14. PPPL extends system for suppressing instabilities to long-pulse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at instabilities called islands and generates electrical current that eliminates the islands. The process links software-controlled mirrors to detection equipment, creating a...

  15. Simulations of the electron cloud buildups and suppressions in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    United States Language: English Subject: 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; BUILDUP; CLOUDS; ELECTRODES; ELECTRONS; FERMILAB TEVATRON; PROTONS; SOLENOIDS Accelerators...

  16. Performance analysis of interference suppression techniques for multiple antenna systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amihood, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    in Electrical Engineering (Communication Theory and Systems)in Electrical Engineering (Communication Theory and Systems)USA M.S. , Electrical Engineering (Communication Theory and

  17. Higher-order mode suppression in chalcogenide negative curvature fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    . Søndergaard, and A. Bjarklev, "Analysis of air-guiding photonic bandgap fibers," Opt. Lett. 25(2), 96­98 (2000, "Leakage loss and bandgap analysis in air-core photonic bandgap fiber for nonsilica glasses," Opt. Express

  18. Oil palm phenolics suppresses oxidative stress and inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundaresan, Abaya Meenakshi

    2013-01-01

    Water-soluble Oil Palm Phenolics (OPP), derived from Elaeis guineensis, contains a unique blend of plant phenolics. Recent cell and animal studies have demonstrated positive health benefits in a number of different organ ...

  19. Time-Hopping Sequence Design for Narrowband Interference Suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavcic, Aleksandar

    bandwidth and low power limitation makes UWB an attractive technology for high data- rate, short range of time-hopping codes for UWB systems that deploy impulse radio architecture. We give a methodology as any radio technology having a spectrum that occupies a bandwidth greater than 25% of the center

  20. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radio-Suppression of Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelward, Bevin P

    2009-09-16

    The major goal of this project is to contribute toward the elucidation of the impact of long term low dose radiation on genomic stability. We have created and characterized novel technologies for delivering long term low dose radiation to animals, and we have studied genomic stability by applying cutting edge molecular analysis technologies. Remarkably, we have found that a dose rate that is 300X higher than background radiation does not lead to any detectable genomic damage, nor is there any significant change in gene expression for genes pertinent to the DNA damage response. These results point to the critical importance of dose rate, rather than just total dose, when evaluating public health risks and when creating regulatory guidelines. In addition to these studies, we have also further developed a mouse model for quantifying cells that have undergone a large scale DNA sequence rearrangement via homologous recombination, and we have applied these mice in studies of both low dose radiation and space radiation. In addition to more traditional approaches for assessing genomic stability, we have also explored radiation and possible beneficial effects (adaptive response), long term effects (persistent effects) and effects on communication among cells (bystander effects), both in vitro and in vivo. In terms of the adaptive response, we have not observed any significant induction of an adaptive response following long term low dose radiation in vivo, delivered at 300X background. In terms of persistent and bystander effects, we have revealed evidence of a bystander effect in vivo and with researchers at and demonstrated for the first time the molecular mechanism by which cells “remember” radiation exposure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms by which radiation can induce genomic instability is fundamental to our ability to assess the biological impact of low dose radiation. Finally, in a parallel set of studies we have explored the effects of heavy iron particle radiation on large scale sequence rearrangements and we have discovered tissue specific differences in sensitivity to homologous recombination. DOE support has given rise to critical new knowledge about the biological impact of low dose rate radiation and about the underlying mechanisms that govern genomic stability in response to radiation exposure. This work has spurred interest in radiation among MIT scientists, and has fostered ongoing research projects that will continue to contribute toward our understanding of the biological effects of low dose radiation exposure.

  1. Dynamical epidemic suppression using stochastic prediction and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Schwartz; L. Billings; E. M. Bollt

    2005-10-18

    We consider the effects of noise on a model of epidemic outbreaks, where the outbreaks appear. randomly. Using a constructive transition approach that predicts large outbreaks, prior to their occurrence, we derive an adaptive control. scheme that prevents large outbreaks from occurring. The theory inapplicable to a wide range of stochastic processes with underlying deterministic structure.

  2. Swirl-counter-swirl microjets for thermoacoustic instability suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F; LaBry, Zachary A; Shanbhogue, Santosh J; Speth, Raymond L

    2014-04-29

    Combustor. The combustor includes an axially symmetric tube along with means for introducing fuel and air into the tube. A swirler is disposed within the tube to impart rotation in a first direction to the air/fuel mixture. A plurality of holes downstream of the swirler are disposed around the tube and offset at an angle relative to an inward normal to the tube wall. Air is injected through the offset holes to impart rotation to the air/fuel mixture in a second direction opposite to the first direction. A combustion chamber having a diameter larger than that of the tube receives and burns the air/fuel mixture from the tube.

  3. Alamethicin Suppresses Methanogenesis and Promotes Acetogenesis in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , or tides is used to drive CO2 conver- sion, this process is also an attractive method for energy storage Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USAa ; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USAb Microbial

  4. The Suppression of Energy Discretization Errors in Multigroup Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The Objective of this project is to develop, implement, and test new deterministric methods to solve, as efficiently as possible, multigroup neutron transport problems having an extremely large number of groups. Our approach was to (i) use the standard CMFD method to "coarsen" the space-angle grid, yielding a multigroup diffusion equation, and (ii) use a new multigrid-in-space-and-energy technique to efficiently solve the multigroup diffusion problem. The overall strategy of (i) how to coarsen the spatial and energy grids, and (ii) how to navigate through the various grids, has the goal of minimizing the overall computational effort. This approach yields not only the fine-grid solution, but also coarse-group flux-weighted cross sections that can be used for other related problems.

  5. SURVEY OF NOISE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS FOR ENGINE GENERATOR SETS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; ENGINES; NOISE POLLUTION ABATEMENT; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; ELECTRIC GENERATORS No abstract prepared....

  6. Fate of Magnesium Chloride Brine Applied to Suppress Dust from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mass ratio and the total dissolved Cl- concentration of pore water show that brine contamination occurs primarily within 13 m of treated roads, but can extend as much as 30 m...

  7. Anti-viral RNAi and its suppression in plants. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J.

    2010-01-16

    Fig. 2.5 siRNAs and proteins detection in hydroxyapatite fractions from TBSV ? P19???????????????????????????. 34 Fig. 2.6 DEAE chromatography after hydroxyapatite chromatography of TBSV ?19- infected plant tissue... Fig. 3.5 siRNA assay for TRV-infected plant tissue extract chromatography fractions??????????????????????????... 57 ix...

  8. Mechanisms underlying cross-orientation suppression in cat visual cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferster, David

    for by the behavior of geniculate relay cells: contrast saturation and rectification in relay cell responses, when of presynaptic geniculate relay cells. Where the feed-forward model has traditionally failed, however the response to simulta- neously presented stimuli at the preferred orientation (test stimuli)3

  9. ACTIVE SUPPRESSION OF TORSIONAL OSCILLATIONS Joachim Bcker1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noé, Reinhold

    the control design had to deal with was the backlash of the gear and of the cardan shafts that introduces caused by elasticity and gear play. Disadvantageous effects caused by this are noticeable vibrations structure consisting of a nonlinear observer to estimate the torque in the gear and a controller, which

  10. ERPs and Neural Oscillations during Volitional Suppression of Memory Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Tim

    , Nick Ketz1*, Matthew V. Mollison1*, Erika Nyhus2 , Marie T. Banich1,3 , and Tim Curran1 Abstract, indicating that cognitive control can influence long-term memory retrieval (Depue, Banich, & Curran, 2006

  11. Suppression of premixed combustion dynamics utilizing microjet air injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudgins, Duane Edward

    2008-01-01

    The problem of thermoacoustic instability in continuous combustion systems is a major challenge in the field of propulsion and power generation. With the current environmental and political pressure that is being placed ...

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLES A Conserved Mechanism of Bract Suppression in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, David

    ORGANS (UFO) (Hepworth et al., 2006). In addition, several genes with a general role in promoting leaf

  13. Active Vibration Suppression of a Smart Beam Cem ONAT+,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaman, Yavuz

    -bonded piezoelectric patches. In this particular application, a group of PZT patches closed to the root of the beam on piezoelectric materials have successfully paved ways for active vibration control applications by means of using aforementioned group of sensor/actuator piezoelectric patches. The PI Dµ controller

  14. Suppression of decoherence in a graphene monolayer ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, D., E-mail: smirnov@nano.uni-hannover.de; Rode, J. C.; Haug, R. J. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstr. 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2014-08-25

    The influence of high magnetic fields on coherent transport is investigated. A monolayer graphene quantum ring is fabricated and the Aharonov-Bohm effect is observed. For increased magnitude of the magnetic field, higher harmonics appear. This phenomenon is attributed to an increase of the phase coherence length due to reduction of spin flip scattering.

  15. Optimized pulse sequences for suppressing unwanted transitions in quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. Schroeder; G. S. Agarwal

    2010-10-25

    We investigate the nature of the pulse sequence so that unwanted transitions in quantum systems can be inhibited optimally. For this purpose we show that the sequence of pulses proposed by Uhrig [Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{98}, 100504 (2007)] in the context of inhibition of environmental dephasing effects is optimal. We derive exact results for inhibiting the transitions and confirm the results numerically. We posit a very significant improvement by usage of the Uhrig sequence over an equidistant sequence in decoupling a quantum system from unwanted transitions. The physics of inhibition is the destructive interference between transition amplitudes before and after each pulse.

  16. Numeric modeling of fire suppression by organophosphorous inhibitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makhviladze, G M; Zykov, A P

    2008-01-01

    Numerical calculations of the effect of organophosphorous inhibitor (CF3CH2O)3P and its mixtures with carbon dioxide on propane flames are carried out using the three dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in the low Mach number approximation. The k-e model of turbulence, the EDC combustion model and the weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model of radiation are used. The Westbrook global-kinetic scheme with fractional order of reaction was used for the calculation of chemical reaction rate of propane combustion. The empirical expression for the correction factor for the chemical reaction rate was used to model the effect of organophosphorous inhibitor no the reaction. Two series of test calculations for different values of the correction factor are carried out. Dependences of the minimum extinguishing concentration of the inhibitor per carbon dioxide volume concentration in the extinguishing mixtures were obtained. The results of test calculations are shown to agree reasonably with the experimen...

  17. STAT3 regulated ARF expression suppresses prostate cancer metastasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pencik, Jan; Schlederer, Michaela; Gruber, Wolfgang; Unger, Christine; Walker, Steven M.; Chalaris, Athena; Marié, Isabelle J.; Hassler, Melanie R.; Javaheri, Tahereh; Aksoy, Osman; Blayney, Jaine K.; Prutsch, Nicole; Skucha, Anna; Herac, Merima; Krämer, Oliver H.; Mazal, Peter; Grebien, Florian; Egger, Gerda; Poli, Valeria; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Eferl, Robert; Esterbauer, Harald; Kennedy, Richard; Fend, Falko; Scharpf, Marcus; Braun, Martin; Perner, Sven; Levy, David E.; Malcolm, Tim; Turner, Suzanne D.; Haitel, Andrea; Susani, Martin; Moazzami, Ali; Rose-John, Stefan; Aberger, Fritz; Merkel, Olaf; Moriggl, Richard; Culig, Zoran; Dolznig, Helmut; Kenner, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    P cells due to the lack of JAK1 gene expression. Cancer Res 65, 3447-53 (2005). 32. Hedvat, M. et al. The JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 potently blocks Stat3 signaling and oncogenesis in solid tumors. Cancer Cell 16, 487-97 (2009). 33. Lou, W., Ni, Z., Dyer... . Nat Rev Cancer 6, 663-73 (2006). 49. Chen, Z. et al. Differential p53-independent outcomes of p19(Arf) loss in oncogenesis. Sci Signal 2, ra44 (2009). 50. Kamijo, T., Bodner, S., van de Kamp, E., Randle, D.H. & Sherr, C.J. Tumor spectrum in ARF...

  18. Multi-band OFDM UWB receiver with narrowband interference suppression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelleci, Burak

    2009-05-15

    removing the interference in digital domain requires higher dynamic range of analog front-end than removing it in analog domain, a programmable analog notch filter is used to relax the receiver requirements in the presence of NBI. The baseband filter...

  19. Suppressing coherent noise in radar applications with long dwell times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Christopher Thomas; Mozaffar, S. N.; Akins, T. L.

    2005-07-01

    digitally in the transmit waveform and removed digitally following digitization in the receiver. Experimental demonstration of this concept resulted in an additional noise floor reduction of 15 to 20 dB (compared to the conventional coherent averaging alone...

  20. Observation of suppressed terahertz absorption in photoexcited graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frenzel, Alex James

    When light is absorbed by a semiconductor, photoexcited charge carriers enhance the absorption of far-infrared radiation due to intraband transitions. We observe the opposite behavior in monolayer graphene, a zero-gap ...

  1. Precipitates Suppress Mobility Of Metals in Soil and Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    concern. Excessive amounts of metals accumulating in soils can be toxic to humans, animals, and plants ­ levels that are potentially toxic to humans, animals, and plants. Predicting the movement of environ Competitive Grants Program. To be placed on the mailing list for this publication or to receive additional

  2. Suppression of breakers in stormy seas by an oil film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Charles

    2015-01-01

    G. L. Dyer, ‘The Use of Oil to Lessen the Dangerous Effect4. Beehler, ‘The Use of Oil to Still the Waves’, 705; G.Littlehales, ‘Why a Film of Oil Can Calm the Sea’, Popular

  3. Viscoelastic Suppression of Gravity-Driven Counterflow Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan I.

    : December 8, 2010) Abstract Attempts to achieve "top-kill" of flowing oil wells by pumping dense drilling in the gravity driven counterflow produces turbulence that breaks up the denser fluid into small droplets. Here;Dense fluids, i.e., mineral suspensions called "mud" [1, 2], are introduced into oil wells to provide

  4. Suppression of microbunching instability using bending magnets in FEL linacs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2014-01-01

    using bending magnets in FEL linacs Ji Qiang, Chad E.for free electron laser (FEL) radiation. In this letter, weaccelerators for next generation FEL light sources. Instead

  5. Metastasis suppression: a role of the Dice(r)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valastyan, Scott

    Recent studies have implicated the microRNA biogenesis enzyme Dicer as a suppressor of breast carcinoma metastasis and elucidated upstream signaling pathways that control Dicer levels.

  6. Suppressed fusion cross section for neutron halo nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Ito; Kazuhiro Yabana; Takashi Nakatsukasa; Manabu Ueda

    2006-01-20

    Fusion reactions of neutron-halo nuclei are investigated theoretically with a three-body model. The time-dependent wave-packet method is used to solve the three-body Schrodinger equation. The halo neutron behaves as a spectator during the Coulomb dissociation process of the projectile. The fusion cross sections of 11Be-209Bi and 6He-238U are calculated and are compared with measurements. Our calculation indicates that the fusion cross section is slightly hindered by the presence of weakly bound neutrons.

  7. Optimized pulse sequences for suppressing unwanted transitions in quantum systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, C. A.; Agarwal, G. S. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St. Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    We investigate the nature of the pulse sequence so that unwanted transitions in quantum systems can be inhibited optimally. For this purpose we show that the sequence of pulses proposed by Uhrig [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 100504 (2007)] in the context of inhibition of environmental dephasing effects is optimal. We derive exact results for inhibiting the transitions and confirm the results numerically. We posit a very significant improvement by usage of the Uhrig sequence over an equidistant sequence in decoupling a quantum system from unwanted transitions. The physics of inhibition is the destructive interference between transition amplitudes before and after each pulse.

  8. Traveling-wave device with mass flux suppression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Backhaus, Scott N. (Los Alamos, NM); Gardner, David L. (White Rock, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A traveling-wave device is provided with the conventional moving pistons eliminated. Acoustic energy circulates in a direction through a fluid within a torus. A side branch may be connected to the torus for transferring acoustic energy into or out of the torus. A regenerator is located in the torus with a first heat exchanger located on a first side of the regenerator downstream of the regenerator relative to the direction of the circulating acoustic energy; and a second heat exchanger located on an upstream side of the regenerator. The improvement is a mass flux suppressor located in the torus to minimize time-averaged mass flux of the fluid. In one embodiment, the device further includes a thermal buffer column in the torus to thermally isolate the heat exchanger that is at the operating temperature of the device.

  9. Suppression of Proinflammatory Cytokines in FunctionalizedFullerene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22) Country of Publication: Egypt Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text...

  10. Suppression of probe background signals via B1 field inhomogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jian

    2011-01-01

    the rest of the paper. Zirconia rotor and Torlon spinningin combination with Zirconia rotor and Kel-F spinning tips,5 mm (o.d. , 200 ?L) Doty Zirconia rotor and stuffed it with

  11. Vibration suppression, stabilization, motion planning and tracking for flexible beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siranosian, Antranik Antonio

    2009-01-01

    on the frequency of the disturbance. The perturbationvibrations at the frequency of the disturbance. Extremumexists a disturbance of varying frequency, then it would be

  12. S4: A spatial-spectral model for speckle suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fergus, Rob; Hogg, David W.; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Brenner, Douglas; Pueyo, Laurent

    2014-10-20

    High dynamic range imagers aim to block or eliminate light from a very bright primary star in order to make it possible to detect and measure far fainter companions; in real systems, a small fraction of the primary light is scattered, diffracted, and unocculted. We introduce S4, a flexible data-driven model for the unocculted (and highly speckled) light in the P1640 spectroscopic coronagraph. The model uses principal components analysis (PCA) to capture the spatial structure and wavelength dependence of the speckles, but not the signal produced by any companion. Consequently, the residual typically includes the companion signal. The companion can thus be found by filtering this error signal with a fixed companion model. The approach is sensitive to companions that are of the order of a percent of the brightness of the speckles, or up to 10{sup –7} times the brightness of the primary star. This outperforms existing methods by a factor of two to three and is close to the shot-noise physical limit.

  13. Heavy pollution suppresses light rain in China: observations and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gong, Daoyi; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai R.; Bennartz, Ralph; Chen, Deliang; Wang, Weiguo

    2009-08-15

    Long-term observational data reveal that both the frequency and amount of light rain have decreased in eastern China (EC) for 1956-2005 with high spatial coherency. This is different from the trend of total rainfall observed in EC, which decreases in northern EC and increases in southern EC. To examine the cause of the light rain trends, we analyzed the long-term variability of atmospheric water vapor and its correlation with light rain events. Results show very weak relationships between large-scale moisture transport and light rain in EC. This suggests that light rain trend in EC is not driven by large-scale circulation changes. Because of human activities, pollutant emission has increased dramatically in China for the last few decades, leading to significant reductions in visibility between 1960 and 2000. Cloud-resolving model simulations show that aerosols corresponding to heavily polluted conditions can significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and reduce droplet sizes compared to pristine conditions. This can lead to a significant decline in raindrop concentration and delay raindrop formation because smaller cloud droplets are less efficient in the collision and coalescence processes. Together with weaker convection, the precipitation frequency and amount are significantly reduced in the polluted case. Satellite data also reveal higher CDNC and smaller droplet size over polluted land in EC relative to pristine regions, which is consistent with the model results. This evidence suggests that the significantly increased aerosol particles produced by air pollution are at least partly responsible for the decreased light rain events observed in China over the past fifty years.

  14. No more periods? Oral contraception and menstrual suppression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunson, Dr Jessie

    Oral contraception, or ‘The Pill’, is widely used by women to control how often they have a period. In many countries using oral contraception in this way has remained unofficial practice. However, in 2003 the first FDA ...

  15. Spatio-temporal Brain Dynamics Underlying Saccade Execution, Suppression, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Doug

    of simultaneous remote eyetracking and MEG record- ing. The coupling of behavioral and neuroimaging technologies that process target location information and those that govern eye movement control (Mays & Sparks, 1980 in neurologically intact humans using positron emission tomography (PET) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (f

  16. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiangtao; Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 ; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-?B-dependent genes, including interleukin 1? (IL-1?), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  17. Suppression and Enhancement of Boiling Associated with Multiple Droplet Impingement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yuxuan

    2014-05-01

    Spray cooling has proven to be efficient in managing thermal load in high power applications. Reliability of electronic products lies on the thermal management and understanding of heat transfer mechanisms of the most commonly used thermal...

  18. Enhancement and Suppression of Photocurrent in Si Photodiodes by

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal(Patent) |(Journal Article) | SciTechCarbontina

  19. Enhancement and Suppression of Photocurrent in Si Photodiodes by

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal(Patent) |(Journal Article) |

  20. 'Catch and Suppress' Control of Instabilities in High Performance

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life of Enrico FermiU.S.Resources »Fusion

  1. Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; ,

    2012-02-14

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

  2. Compliance Status 2012 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    excursions on January 4, 2012 for Boiler 6 due to the sudden buildup of soot across the transmissometer light path, for which there was no apparent cause. Subsequent shutdown of the boiler and cleaning for Boiler 6 and 7 were only noted during testing periods. Halon portable fire extinguishers continue

  3. Revised UV absorption spectra, ozone depletion potentials, and global warming potentials for the ozone-depleting substances CF2Br2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, Charles H.

    Revised UV absorption spectra, ozone depletion potentials, and global warming potentials for the ozone-depleting substances CF2Br2, CF2ClBr, and CF2BrCF2Br Dimitrios K. Papanastasiou,1,2,5 Nabilah. [1] The contribution of Halons, bromine-containing haloalkanes, to stratospheric ozone depletion

  4. Jane Gray Research Greenhouse And VLSB 6th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jane Gray Research Greenhouse And VLSB 6th floor Greenhouse Greenhouse User Policies University of California, Berkeley #12;Introduction The Jane Gray Research Greenhouse is 3,600 square foot research of Integrative Biology. The greenhouse uses ARGUS computer automated environmental control technology

  5. In The Proceedings of the 46th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors & Ergonomics Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Wayne

    In The Proceedings of the 46th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors & Ergonomics Society-ecological approach to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative strategies interacting with slightly different, and action. The strategies we evaluate affect the target acquisition phase of the Argus Prime task. In our

  6. Behav Ecol Sociobiol (1985) 17:253-255 Behavioral Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.

    1985-01-01

    to be a case of female-choice sexual selection. Introduction Darwin (1871) proposed that sexual dimorphism results from sexual selection, which can take two forms. In one, members of one sex, usually males. The elaborate plumes of birds of paradise (Le Croy 1981), the argus pheasant (Davidson 1981), * To whom offprint

  7. Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    . These operations can result in elevated radiological risks to the facility and workers. ARG-US -- meaning and should be developed for and deployed in nuclear and radiological facilities to aid operation and reduceAlpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory

  8. Space geodesy constrains ice age terminal deglaciation: The global ICE-6G_C (VM5a) model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    . Peltier1 , D. F. Argus2 , and R. Drummond1 1 Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto] or a combination of such influences [Vettoretti and Peltier, 2003]. Simple ice sheet coupled climate models have been successful in explaining the origins of this 100 kyr cyclic behavior [Tarasov and Peltier, 1997

  9. First observation of the decay B-0 -> D*D+*(-)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1999-04-01

    ] Particle Data Group, C. Caso et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 3,1 (1998). [4] R. Aleksan et al., Phys. Lett. B 317, 173 (1993). [5] I. Dunietz et al., Phys. Rev. D 43, 2193 (1991). [6] CLEO Collaboration, D. Gibaut et al., Phys. Rev. D 53, 4734 (1996); ARGUS...

  10. Flore du Qubec et du Labrador nordiques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nordiques Délimitation du territoire : 54 ­ 63 °N, 57 ­ 81 °O Zones de végétation : boréale, subarctique et Québec-Labrador nordique (nord de 54°N) #12;Équipe Collaborateurs Description des familles ARGUS, George spécimens dont plus de ~ 42000 de QFA; plus de 48000 spécimens empruntés ­ 150 ans de récolte - Herbiers du

  11. Fall Electronic Bulletin 2013 The Center for Real Estate is pleased to present our Fall E-Bulletin. We hope that you enjoy this

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheradvar, Arash

    Fall Electronic Bulletin 2013 The Center for Real Estate is pleased to present our Fall E Chairs New Public Real Estate Course Offering ­ Argus Training 2013 EVENT HIGHLIGHTS CRE Breakfast Flow College Series Welcome New Real Estate Lecturers 2013-2014 CRE NAIOP SOCAL Fellow Spotlight

  12. Our primary technical problem was to support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in modernizing its management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    #12;Problem Our primary technical problem was to support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE; or any high- risk, high-value materials handlers. ARG-US -- meaning "watchful guardian" -- can continuously monitor and track tagged packages containing nuclear and other hazardous materials during storage

  13. Overcoming dendritic cell-mediated suppression of T cell responses in a prostate tumor environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higham, Eileen M

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent malignancy in American men, leading to significant mortality each year. This is in part due to a lack of effective treatments for advanced disease. The prostate is considered an ideal ...

  14. :Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate, a histone acetyltransferase inhibitor, inhibits EBV-induced B Lymphocytr transformation via suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Ching-Tsan

    expression in respiratory epithelium. Inflammation, 2002. 26(5): p. 233-41. 3. Syed, D.N., et al., Green tea.8 1. Chen, L.F. and W.C. Greene, Regulation of distinct biological activities of the NF-kappaB transcription factor complex by acetylation. J Mol Med, 2003. 81(9): p. 549-57. 2. Chen, P.C., et al., A green

  15. Assessment of Parasitic Activity of Fusarium Strains Obtained from a Heterodera schachtii-Suppressive Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xuebiao; Yin, Bei; Borneman, James; Becker, J. Ole

    2008-01-01

    presence of pathogen- antagonistic microorganisms and haveIdentifying microorganisms involved in speci?c pathogen

  16. Microbial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Greg J.

    , diversity, fungi pathogen, pink snow mould, phospholipid analysis, plant microorganism, turfgrass SummaryMicrobial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen Composting is the degradation of organic materials through the activities of diverse microorganisms

  17. Suppressed Critical Current in Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors With High Fill-Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Joel K. W.

    In this work we present a new fabrication process that enabled the fabrication of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors SNSPD with fill-factors as high as 88% with gaps between nanowires as small as 12 nm. This ...

  18. Trajectories with suppressed tensor-to-scalar ratio in Aligned Natural Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Peloso; Caner Unal

    2015-04-10

    In Aligned Natural Inflation, an alignment between different potential terms produces an inflaton excursion greater than the axion scales in the potential. We show that, starting from a general potential of two axions with two aligned potential terms, the effective theory for the resulting light direction is characterized by four parameters: an effective potential scale, an effective axion constant, and two extra parameters (related to ratios of the axion scales and the potential scales in the $2-$field theory). For all choices of these extra parameters, the model can support inflation along valleys (in the $2-$field space) that end in minima of the potential. This leads to a phenomenology similar to that of single field Natural Inflation. For a significant range of the extra two parameters, the model possesses also higher altitude inflationary trajectories passing through saddle points of the $2-$field potential, and disconnected from any minimum. These plateaus end when the heavier direction becomes unstable, and therefore all of inflation takes place close to the saddle point, where - due to the higher altitude - the potential is flatter (smaller $\\epsilon$ parameter). As a consequence, a tensor-to-scalar ratio $r = {\\rm O } \\left( 10^{-4} - 10^{-2} \\right)$ can be easily achieved in the allowed $n_s$ region, well within the latest $1 \\sigma$ CMB contours.

  19. The role of phenoloxidase suppression in QX disease outbreaks among Sydney rock oysters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftos, David

    disease. Oysters from the same brood stock were harvested from QX prone and QX free growing areas over negative correlation between phenoloxidase activity and the intensity of parasitic infection ( p = 0 prevented effective management of QX disease in endemic areas. Current management regimes rely only

  20. Suppression of fiber modal noise induced radial velocity errors for bright emission-line calibration sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  1. Clinical Correlates and Neural Substrates of P50 Suppression Deficits in Schizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Holly Kendall

    2015-01-01

    of negative symptoms (SANS). Iowa City: University of Iowa.of Negative Symptoms (SANS; Andreasen, 1984a) or the PANSS2000) demonstrated that the SANS total score accounted for

  2. Mechanical Overstimulation of Hair Bundles: Suppression and Recovery of Active Motility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KAO, ALBERT

    2013-01-01

    Motility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MechanicalChannels upon Spontaneous Mechanical Oscillations in HairJ. , 101, 603 (2011) Mechanical Overstimulation of Hair

  3. Mechanical fluctuations suppress the threshold of soft-glassy solids : the secular drift scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeline Pons; Axelle Amon; Thierry Darnige; Jérôme Crassous; Eric Clément

    2015-09-01

    We propose a dynamical mechanism leading to the fluidization of soft-glassy amorphous mate-rial driven below the yield-stress by external mechanical fluctuations. The model is based on the combination of memory effect and non-linearity, leading to an accumulation of tiny effects over a long-term. We test this scenario on a granular packing driven mechanically below the Coulomb threshold. We bring evidences for an effective viscous response directly related to small stress modulations in agreement with the theoretical prediction of a generic secular drift.

  4. Novel approaches to Newtonian noise suppression in interferometric gravitational wave detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter-Jones, Nicholas R

    2011-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) attempts to detect ripples in the curvature of spacetime using two large scale interferometers. These detectors are several kilometer long Michelson interferometers ...

  5. Has fire suppression increased the amount of carbon stored in western U.S. forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fellows, Aaron W.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Davis. Chang, C. -R. (1996), Ecosystem responses to fire andvariations in fire regimes, Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project:1990), Simulating cumulative fire effects in ponderosa pine/

  6. Luminosity and cooling of highly magnetised white dwarfs: Suppression of luminosity by strong magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Mukul; Mukerjee, Subroto

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the luminosity and cooling of highly magnetised white dwarfs. We consider white dwarfs with electron-degenerate core and nondegenerate surface layers where cooling occurs by diffusion of photons. We find the temperature and density profiles in the surface layers or envelope of white dwarfs for radially constant and varying magnetic fields by solving the magnetostatic equilibrium and photon diffusion equations in a Newtonian framework. We also obtain the properties of white dwarfs at the core-envelope interface, when the core is assumed to be practically isothermal due to large thermal conductivity. With the increase in magnetic field, the interface temperature and density are found to be increasing. While the interface radius also increases with the increase in magnetic field when the field is hypothesised to be constant throughout the star, the interface radius decreases for varying fields. However, for white dwarfs having fixed interface radius or interface temperature, we find that the lumin...

  7. Dkk-3, a Secreted Wnt Antagonist, Suppresses Tumorigenic Potential and Pulmonary Metastasis in Osteosarcoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    er surgical intervention, adju- vant chemotherapy is given,using intensive neoadjuvant/adju- vant chemotherapy and wide

  8. Suppression of Quantum Dot Blinking in DTT-Doped Polymer Films Josh Antelman,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalet, Xavier

    a charge carrier is ejected from the core (via an Auger process or charge tunneling) and trapped on its molecules which are mobile electron donors serve to occupy surface electron traps, preventing contributors to carrier trap states is the shell surface. Charge carriers may be trapped either in surface

  9. Dual inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase synergistically suppresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    95616; b Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003; c Center growth and metastasis. However, the functional interactions of these two pathways in cancer are unknown

  10. Suppression of Photon-Echo As a Signature of Chaos Maksym Kryvohuz and Jianshu Cao*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Jianshu

    or chaotic) that underlies particular energy level statistics is of interest to chemical physicists on the ground electronic potential energy surface is assumed to be quasi-periodic with Poisson statistics of nuclear levels. Poisson statistics of vibrational energy levels in the ground electronic state

  11. Suppression of thermoacoustic instabilities in a swirl combustor through microjet air injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaBry, Zachary Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Thermoacoustic or combustion instability, a positive feedback loop coupling heat release rate and acoustic oscillations in a combustor, is one of the greatest challenges currently facing the development of new gas turbine ...

  12. Potential immunological consequences of pharmacological suppression of gastric acid production in patients with multiple sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, Sangita; Benedict, Stephen H; Lynch, Sharon G; LeVine, Steven M

    2012-01-01

    in patients with multiple sclerosis. BMC Medicine 2012 10:adverse effects in multiple sclerosis. Ann Neurol 2011, 69:cytotoxicity in multiple sclerosis by central nervous system

  13. Investigation of MCMV-induced suppression of TNF production in vitro and in vivo 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Sara Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) immediate early 1 (IE1) protein has been described as a trans-activator of viral and host gene expression. However, the precise role that IE1 plays in the viral life cycle, and in ...

  14. Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauci, Vincent

    limitation had been lifted by the simulated acid rain S deposition. Citation: Gauci, V., N. B. Dise, G process and so the duration of paddy inundation and the employment of mid-season field drainage both

  15. Distributed control in a mean-field cortical network model: Implications for seizure suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ching, ShiNung

    Brain electrical stimulation (BES) has long been suggested as a means of controlling pathological brain activity. In epilepsy, control of a spatially localized source, the seizure focus, may normalize neuronal dynamics. ...

  16. Chapter C-XV-1 Complementary Waveforms for Sidelobe Suppression and Radar Polarimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezeshki, Ali

    by the ability to control new degrees of freedom and each new generation of radar platforms requires fundamental are increasingly being equipped with arbitrary wave- form generators which enable transmission of different that effectively utilize the degrees of freedom available to current and future generation of radar systems

  17. Isoprene Suppression of New Par1cle Forma1on on Long Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) Ernie Lewis (Brookhaven Na1onal Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973) Figure 2 · New particle formation (NPF) occurs in the atmosphere in the formation of sulfuric acid. · It s hypothesized that the frequency of NPF will be positively correlated

  18. Phototactic personality in fruit flies and its suppression by serotonin and white

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Bivort, Benjamin

    one choice tube leads to a lit light-emitting diode (LED) (Fig. 1A, Fig. S1 A and B, and Movie S1). Af

  19. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2012-01-01

    precise reflective X-ray optics,” Nucl. Instrum. and Methods70 (2001). [2] P. Z. Takacs, “X- ray optics metrology,” in [Handbook of Optics], 3rd ed. , Vol. V, M. Bass, Ed. ,

  20. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2011-01-01

    slope measurements with x-ray optics Zulfiqar Ali, Curtis L.with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppressionscanning, metrology of x-ray optics, deflectometry Abstract

  1. Emotion Regulation and Vulnerability to Depression: Spontaneous Versus Instructed Use of Emotion Suppression and Reappraisal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    Emotion Regulation and Vulnerability to Depression: Spontaneous Versus Instructed Use of Emotion vulnerability is related to difficulties with emotion regulation by comparing recovered-depressed and never of emotion regulation strategies. In the second phase, sad mood was induced using a film clip, and the degree

  2. Suppressible pinning of Abrikosov vortices : effects of magnetic vortex arrays on thin superconducting films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Kevin Daniel

    2008-01-01

    penetration through the superconductive film as it relatesThus, to sustain superconductivity throughout the materialthe mixed state, type-II superconductors have characteristic

  3. Suppression of vertical instability in elongated current-carrying plasmas by applying stellarator rotational transform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ArchMiller, M. C.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Ennis, D. A.; Hanson, J. D.; Hartwell, G. J.; Hebert, J. D.; Herfindal, J. L.; Knowlton, S. F.; Ma, X.; Maurer, D. A.; Pandya, M. D.; Traverso, P. [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The passive stability of vertically elongated current-carrying toroidal plasmas has been investigated in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid, a stellarator/tokamak hybrid device. In this experiment, the fractional transform f, defined as the ratio of the imposed external rotational transform from stellarator coils to the total rotational transform, was varied from 0.04 to 0.50, and the elongation ? was varied from 1.4 to 2.2. Plasmas that were vertically unstable were evidenced by motion of the plasma in the vertical direction. Vertical drifts are measured with a set of poloidal field pickup coils. A three chord horizontally viewing interferometer and a soft X-ray diode array confirmed the drifts. Plasmas with low fractional transform and high elongation are the most susceptible to vertical instability, consistent with analytic predictions that the vertical mode in elongated plasmas can be stabilized by the poloidal field of a relatively weak stellarator equilibrium.

  4. Global and Local Loss Suppression in the UA9 Crystal Collimation Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montesano, S

    2012-01-01

    UA9 was operated in the CERN-SPS for some years in view of investigating the feasibility of the halo collimation assisted by bent crystals. Silicon crystals 2 mm long with bending angles of about 150 ?rad are used as primary collimators. The crystal collimation process is obtained consistently through channeling with high efficiency. The loss profiles in the area of the crystal collimator setup and in the downstream dispersion suppressor area show a steady reduction of slightly less than one order of magnitude at the onset of the channeling process. This result holds both for protons and for lead ions. The corresponding loss map in the accelerator ring is accordingly reduced. These observations strongly support our expectation that the coherent deflection of the beam halo by a bent crystal should enhance the collimation efficiency in hadron colliders, such as LHC.

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans NPR-1–mediated behaviors are suppressed in the presence of mucoid bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Kirthi C.

    Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a diverse range of behaviors in response to bacteria. The presence of bacterial food influences C. elegans aerotaxis, aggregation, locomotion, and pathogen avoidance behaviors through the ...

  6. Electrodynamic Vibration Suppression S. Behrens, A. J. Fleming and S. O. R. Moheimani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    suspension systems,7 isolation platforms,8 magnetic levitation9, 10 and magnetic bearings.11 Placing four major advantages over piezoelectric shunt damping; simple transducer manufacturing, smaller shunt through experimentation on a simple electromagnetic mass spring damper system. Theoretical results

  7. Isoprene suppression of new particle formation in a mixed deciduous forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    in Hyytiala, Southern Finland, 1996–2001, Boreal Environ.environ- ments, such as Finland boreal forests (Sihto etin Michigan, Amazon, and Finland forests. Refer to Table S1

  8. Received 14 Nov 2014 | Accepted 31 Mar 2015 | Published 8 May 2015 Perovskitefullerene hybrid materials suppress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    and strong light absorption. Progress in perovskite photovoltaics has benefited from the use of mesoporous to pixel), lasers (which require planarity for low-scatter waveguiding) and flexible photovoltaics (which

  9. Bacterial Effector HopF2 Suppresses Arabidopsis Immunity by Targeting BAK1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Jinggeng

    2013-07-19

    -associated molecular patterns (PAMPs or MAMPs) through membrane- localized receptor-like kinases (RLKs) (Boller and Felix, 2009; Jones and Dangl, 2006). PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) plays a pivotal role in defense against a broad spectrum of potential pathogens... (Boller and Felix, 2009; Jones and Dangl, 2006). A 22-amino- acid peptide from N-terminus of bacterial flagellin, flg22, can be perceived by Arabidopsis RLK flagellin-sensing 2 (FLS2), and induces FLS2 association with another plasma membrane...

  10. Prion-like proteins sequester and suppress the toxicity of huntingtin exon 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hesse, William R.

    Expansions of preexisting polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts in at least nine different proteins cause devastating neurodegenerative diseases. There are many unique features to these pathologies, but there must also be unifying ...

  11. Prepulse controlled splitting of relativistically self-guided channel and suppression of Raman forward scattering instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng University, Chia-Yi 621, Taiwan J. Wang Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia is preionized, identifying ionization wakefield as the seeding mechanism for this process. © 2004 American

  12. Using Topography to Meet Wildlife and Fuels Treatment Objectives in Fire-Suppressed Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Emma C.; Viers, Joshua H.; Quinn, James F.; North, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    5 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Using Topography to Meet Wildlifeand composition varied with topography at both stand andalso often varies with topography in the Sierra Nevada. Many

  13. Two Approaches to Repetition Suppression Uta Noppeney1,2* and Will D. Penny1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    . These discrepancies might be due to the different efficien- cies with which the particular contrasts were estimated

  14. Synchrony suppression in ensembles of coupled oscillators via adaptive vanishing feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potsdam, Universität

    of Tehran, Tehran, Iran 2 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran (Received 16 May 2013; accepted 18 July 2013; published online 13 August not only in physical and technical systems (lasers, Josephson junctions, spin-torque oscillators

  15. Circuit for echo and noise suppression of acoustic signals transmitted through a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.; Scott, D.D.

    1993-12-28

    An electronic circuit for digitally processing analog electrical signals produced by at least one acoustic transducer is presented. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a novel digital time delay circuit is utilized which employs an array of First-in-First-out (FiFo) microchips. Also, a bandpass filter is used at the input to this circuit for isolating drill string noise and eliminating high frequency output. 20 figures.

  16. Integration of Piezoelectric Sensing and Control for Nano-Scale Vibration Suppression in Hard Disk Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix, Sarah Helen

    2010-01-01

    IEEE Transactions on Mechatronics 10 (2005) 378–384. [6] R.IEEE Transactions on Mechatronics 11 (2006) 339–345. [22] P.

  17. RhoJ Regulates Melanoma Chemoresistance by Suppressing Pathways that Sense DNA Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Hsiang; Aruri, Jayavani; Kapadia, Rubina; Mehr, Hootan; White, Michael A.; Ganesan, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    Pathways that Sense DNA Damage $watermark-text Hsiang Ho 1 ,16. Roos WP, Kaina B. DNA damage-induced apoptosis: FromDNA lesions to the DNA damage response and apoptosis. Cancer

  18. Coherent-feedback control strategy to suppress spontaneous switching in ultra-low power optical bistability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideo Mabuchi

    2011-01-18

    An optical resonator with intracavity Kerr nonlinearity can exhibit dispersive bistability suitable for all-optical switching. With nanophotonic elements it may be possible to achieve attojoule switching energies, which would be very attractive for ultra-low power operation but potentially problematic because of quantum fluctuation-induced spontaneous switching. In this manuscript I derive a quantum-optical model of two Kerr-nonlinear ring resonators connected in a coherent feedback loop, and show via numerical simulation that a properly designed `controller' cavity can significantly reduce the spontaneous switching rate of a bistable `plant' cavity in a completely embedded and autonomous manner.

  19. Attentional Deployment Is Not Necessary for Successful Emotion Regulation via Cognitive Reappraisal or Expressive Suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochsner, Kevin

    theories of emotion, cognitive reappraisal is a successful emotion regulation strategy because it involves a greater impact on emotional regulation success than processes common to both strategies, such as attention health (Gross & Munoz, 1995) and adaptive functioning within our complex social envi- ronments (Gross

  20. Suppression of alpha formation probability around the N = 126 shell closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Chong; Liotta, R. J.; Wyss, R.; Andreyev, A. N.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P.

    2011-10-28

    {alpha} formation amplitudes extracted from experimental data are presented and an abrupt change around the N = 126 shell closure is noted. It is explained as a sudden hindrance of the clustering of nucleons. The clustering induced by the pairing mode acting upon the four nucleons is inhibited if the configuration space does not allow a proper manifestation of the pairing collectivity.

  1. Integration of Piezoelectric Sensing and Control for Nano-Scale Vibration Suppression in Hard Disk Drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix, Sarah Helen

    2010-01-01

    piezoelectric transducers and microwave filter applications,piezoelectric actuators, does not perform as well for sensing applications.applications, referred to as “self-sensing,” uses an electronic circuit to extract a sensing signal from a piezoelectric

  2. Suppression of Notch Signaling in the Neonatal Mouse Ovary Decreases Primordial Follicle Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayo, Kelly E.

    Daniel J. Trombly, Teresa K. Woodruff, and Kelly E. Mayo Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology

  3. Suppression of Lipid Autoxidation by Small Amounts of Isotope-reinforced Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsui, Hui Su

    2013-01-01

    ml borosilicate glass tubes with PTFE lined screw caps untilml borosilicate glass tubes with PTFE lined screw caps untilBorosilicate glass tube with a PTFE lined screw cap. Lipid

  4. Advanced phase modulation techniques for stimulated brillouin scattering suppression in fiber optic parametric amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, James

    2009-01-01

    OSA - Optical Spectrum Analyzer The FOPA, depicted in FigureOSA - Optical Spectrum Analyzer, HNLF - Highly NonlinearAmplifier, OSA - Optical Spectrum Analyzer, VOA - Variable

  5. Suppression of citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella, with an attract-and-kill formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    -protective properties that is dispensed as 50-ll droplets using custom-made calibrated pumps. A formulation containing 0 did not result in statistically better efficacy than 3 000 droplets ha)1 , there was a noticeable

  6. Doping suppression and mobility enhancement of graphene transistors fabricated using an adhesion promoting dry transfer process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheol Shin, Woo; Hun Mun, Jeong; Yong Kim, Taek; Choi, Sung-Yool; Jin Cho, Byung, E-mail: bjcho@kaist.edu, E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Taeshik; Kim, Taek-Soo, E-mail: bjcho@kaist.edu, E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-09

    We present the facile dry transfer of graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on copper film to a functional device substrate. High quality uniform dry transfer of graphene to oxidized silicon substrate was achieved by exploiting the beneficial features of a poly(4-vinylphenol) adhesive layer involving a strong adhesion energy to graphene and negligible influence on the electronic and structural properties of graphene. The graphene field effect transistors (FETs) fabricated using the dry transfer process exhibit excellent electrical performance in terms of high FET mobility and low intrinsic doping level, which proves the feasibility of our approach in graphene-based nanoelectronics.

  7. A channel-selection criterion for suppressing reverberation in cochlear implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Hazrati, Oldooz; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2011-11-05

    when processed by the IRM speech coding strategy with the threshold set to #4;5 dB. In each electrodo- gram, time is shown along the abscissa and the electrode number is shown along the ordinate. J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 5, May 2011 Kokkinakis... when processed by the IRM speech coding strategy with the threshold set to #4;5 dB. In each electrodo- gram, time is shown along the abscissa and the electrode number is shown along the ordinate. J. Acoust. Soc. Am., Vol. 129, No. 5, May 2011 Kokkinakis...

  8. Fire Safety Journal 43 (2008) 2435 Suppression of fuel and air stream diluted methaneair partially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    2008-01-01

    experimentally and numerically investigated. Experiments were conducted both in our normal-gravity laboratory as the gravitational acceleration is reduced. Radiation heat losses are observed to increase with increasing diluent alternatives that are both environmentally benign and pose a minimum threat to human well being in confined

  9. Suppression of chaotic vibrations in a nonlinear half-car model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tusset, Ângelo Marcelo E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Piccirillo, Vinícius E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Janzen, Frederic Conrad E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Lenz, Wagner Barth E-mail: piccirillo@utfpr.edu.br E-mail: wagner-barth@hotmail.com; Balthazar, José Manoel; Fonseca Brasil, Reyolando M. L. R. da

    2014-12-10

    The present work investigates the nonlinear response of a half-car model. The disturbances of the road are assumed to be sinusoidal. After constructing the bifurcation diagram, we using the 0-1 test for identify the chaotic motion. The principal objective of this study is to eliminate the chaotic behaviour of the chassis and reduce its vibration, and for this reason a control system for semi-active vehicle suspension with magnetorheological damper is proposed. The control mechanism is designed based on SDRE technique, where the control parameter is the voltage applied to the coil of the damper. Numerical results show that the proposed control method is effective in significantly reducing of the chassis vibration, increasing therefore, passenger comfort.

  10. Oxidative stress suppression by luteolin-induced heme oxygenase-1 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Gui-bo; Sun, Xiao; Wang, Min [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China); Ye, Jing-xue [Jilin Agricultural University, No.2888, Xincheng Street, Changchun, 130021, Jilin (China)] [Jilin Agricultural University, No.2888, Xincheng Street, Changchun, 130021, Jilin (China); Si, Jian-yong [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China); Xu, Hui-bo [Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences of Jilin Province, Gongnongda road 1745, Changchun, 130021, Jiblin (China)] [Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences of Jilin Province, Gongnongda road 1745, Changchun, 130021, Jiblin (China); Meng, Xiang-bao; Qin, Meng; Sun, Jing [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China); Wang, Hong-wei, E-mail: hwang@nju.edu.cn [Center for Translational Medicine and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Center for Translational Medicine and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Sun, Xiao-bo, E-mail: sunsubmit@163.com [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Luteolin, a flavonoid that exhibits antioxidative properties, exerts myocardial protection effects. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. To investigate the effects of luteolin on myocardial injury protection and its possible mechanisms, a myocardial injury model was established with intragastric administration of 4 mg/kg isoproterenol (ISO) to male Sprague–Dawley rats (200–220 g) daily for 2 days. We found that pretreatment of luteolin (160, 80 and 40 mg/kg, i.g., respectively) daily for 15 days can prevent ISO-induced myocardial damage, including decrease of serum cardiac enzymes, improvement electrocardiography and heart vacuolation. Luteolin also improved the free radical scavenging and antioxidant potential, suggesting one possible mechanism of luteolin-induced cardio-protection is mediated by blocking the oxidative stress. To clarify the mechanisms, we performed the in vitro study by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced cytotoxicty model in H9c2 cells. We found that luteolin pretreatment prevented apoptosis, increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and enhanced the binding of Nrf2 to the antioxidant response element, providing an adaptive survival response against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-derived oxidative cytotoxicity. The addition of Znpp, a selective HO-1 competitive inhibitor, reduced the cytoprotective ability of luteolin, indicating the vital role of HO-1 on these effects. Luteolin also activated Akt and ERK, whereas the addition of LY294002 and U0126, the pharmacologic inhibitors of PI3K and ERK, attenuated luteolin-induced HO-1 expression and cytoprotective effect. Taken together, the above findings suggest that luteolin protects against myocardial injury and enhances cellular antioxidant defense capacity through the activation of Akt and ERK signal pathways that leads to Nrf2 activation, and subsequently HO-1 induction. -- Highlights: ? Luteolin prevents isoproterenol-induced myocardial damage. ? Luteolin enhances cellular antioxidant defense capacity. ? Luteolin increases the expression of heme oxygenase-1 protein levels. ? Luteolin activates Akt and ERK signal pathways.

  11. New insights to cloud seeding for enhancing precipitation and hail suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    that seeding of thin super-cooled layer clouds could glaciate the cloud and so create light snow. This has been (Rosenfeld, 2000) particulate air pollution. We "seed" the clouds negatively by pollution aerosols on a much

  12. Luminosity and cooling of highly magnetised white dwarfs: Suppression of luminosity by strong magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukul Bhattacharya; Banibrata Mukhopadhyay; Subroto Mukerjee

    2015-09-03

    We investigate the luminosity and cooling of highly magnetised white dwarfs. We consider white dwarfs with electron-degenerate core and nondegenerate surface layers where cooling occurs by diffusion of photons. We find the temperature and density profiles in the surface layers or envelope of white dwarfs for radially constant and varying magnetic fields by solving the magnetostatic equilibrium and photon diffusion equations in a Newtonian framework. We also obtain the properties of white dwarfs at the core-envelope interface, when the core is assumed to be practically isothermal due to large thermal conductivity. With the increase in magnetic field, the interface temperature and density are found to be increasing. While the interface radius also increases with the increase in magnetic field when the field is hypothesised to be constant throughout the star, the interface radius decreases for varying fields. However, for white dwarfs having fixed interface radius or interface temperature, we find that the luminosity significantly decreases, falling in the range ~ 10^{-6}-10^{-13} solar luminosity, with the increase in magnetic field strength at the interface and hence envelope, in the corresponding range ~ 10^9-10^{11} G, in particular for the varying magnetic fields which are expected to be more realistic. This is remarkable as it argues for magnetised white dwarfs to be dimmer and be practically hidden in the H-R diagram. We also find the cooling rates corresponding to these luminosities. Interestingly, the decrease in temperature with time, for the fields under consideration, is not found to be appreciable --- at most by a factor of two and that is also for the constant field cases.

  13. The role of NK cells in selectin-dependent tumor suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobolev, Olga, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    Selectins are a small family of adhesion molecules that are critical for immune cell trafficking. In our laboratory, mice lacking all combinations of selectins have been generated. Previous work from our laboratory has ...

  14. Paclitaxel coating of the luminal surface of hemodialysis grafts with effective suppression of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    on the outer surface. Methods: A peristaltic pump and a double-solvent (water and acetone) system were used flow is a prerequisite for such maintenance hemodialysis. Grafts made of expanded poly

  15. Growth suppression of MCF-7 cancer cell-derived xenografts in nude mice by caveolin-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Ping [Center for Systems Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road 15, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Wang Xiaohui; Li Fei; Qi Baoju [Department of General Surgery, Xuan Wu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhu Hua [Center for Systems Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road 15, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Liu Shuang; Cui Yeqing [Department of General Surgery, Xuan Wu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Chen Jianwen [Center for Systems Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road 15, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)], E-mail: chenmaci@sun5.ibp.ac.cn

    2008-11-07

    Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae membrane domains that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling and oncogenesis. However, the exact functional role of caveolin-1 still remains controversial. In this report, utilizing MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells stably transfected with caveolin-1 (MCF-7/cav-1 cells), we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression dramatically inhibits invasion and migration of these cells. Importantly, in vivo experiments employing xenograft tumor models demonstrated that expression of caveolin-1 results in significant growth inhibition of breast tumors. Moreover, a dramatic delay in tumor progression was observed in MCF-7/cav-1 cells as compared with MCF-7 cells. Histological analysis of tumor sections demonstrated a marked decrease in the percentage of proliferating tumor cells (Ki-67 assay) along with an increase in apoptotic tumor cells (TUNEL assay) in MCF-7/cav-1-treated animals. Our current findings provide for the first time in vivo evidence that caveolin-1 can indeed function as a tumor suppressor in human breast adenocarcinoma derived from MCF-7 cells rather than as a tumor promoter.

  16. TNAP, a Novel Repressor of NF-B-inducing Kinase, Suppresses NF-B Activation*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wen-Hui

    responses, oncogenesis, apoptosis, and neuronal signaling (1­5). To date two principal pathways for NF- B

  17. Recessive genetic deregulation abrogates c-myc suppression by interferon and is implicated in oncogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimchi, A.; Resnitzky, D.; Ber, R.; Gat, G.

    1988-07-01

    Previously the authors demonstrated that many hematopoietic tumor cells are resistant to the inhibitory effects that interferon exerts on c-myc mRNA expression without losing other receptor-mediated intracellular responses. They report here that this partial resistance was overridden in two independent stable somatic cell hybrids prepared by fusion between sensitive and resistant cells. The c-myc mRNA transcribed from the active allele of the resistant parent cell was reduced by interferon within the context of the cell hybrid. It was therefore concluded that changes in the cis-acting sequences of c-myc were not involved in this type of relaxed regulation and that resistance resulted rather from inactivation or loss of postreceptor elements which operate in trans. The growth-stimulating effect that this genetic deregulation might have on cells was tested in experimental systems of cell differentiation in which an autocrine interferon is produced. For that purpose the authors isolated variant clones of M1 myeloid cells which were partially resistant to alpha and beta interferons and tested their growth behaviour during in vitro-induced differentiation. The resistant clones displayed higher proliferative activity on days 2 and 3 of differentiation than did the sensitive clones, which stopped proliferating. The loss of c-myc responses to the self-produced interferon disrupted the normal cessation of growth during differentiation and therefore might lead cells along the pathway of neoplasia.

  18. Systemic Elevation of PTEN Induces a Tumor-Suppressive Metabolic State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Cao, Isabel

    Decremental loss of PTEN results in cancer susceptibility and tumor progression. PTEN elevation might therefore be an attractive option for cancer prevention and therapy. We have generated several transgenic mouse lines ...

  19. Advanced phase modulation techniques for stimulated brillouin scattering suppression in fiber optic parametric amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, James

    2009-01-01

    s-1. —Measurement Results Integ Pwr: -Markers B 190.3398 THzMeasurement Results Integ Pwr: 0.375 dBrn MeanWL: 1575.03832

  20. Potential immunological consequences of pharmacological suppression of gastric acid production in patients with multiple sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, Sangita; Benedict, Stephen H.; Lynch, Sharon G.; LeVine, Steven M.

    2012-06-07

    lesions in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus associated with cimetidine [82], lymphocytic infiltration in patients with breast cancer associated with famotidine [83], and exacerbation of psoriasis associated with H2R antagonists [84]. Proton pump...: Exacerbation of psoriasis during treatment with H2 antagonists. Ugeskr Laeger 1991, 153:132. 85. Shin JM, Sachs G: Pharmacology of proton pump inhibitors. Curr Gastroenterol Rep 2008, 10:528-534. 86. Ohara T, Arakawa T: Lansoprazole decreases peripheral blood...