Sample records for areva eagle rock

  1. EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThis EISStatementUtah, andtoAmericanCape Wind Energy

  2. EIS-0471: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support Proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction, operation, and decommissioning of the proposed Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility (EREF), a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility to be located in a rural area in western Bonneville County, Idaho. (DOE adopted this EIS issued by NRC on 04/13/2007.)

  3. The geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Tertiary igneous rocks of the Eagle Mountains, Van Horn, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Ronald Alan

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkaline Ign ~ ~ cons ~ ~ ~ Rocks 21 42 D I S CUSS I QN e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Petrogenesis 50 50 Source magma. Fractionation . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 50 52 Origin of West Texas Nagmas... of Permian and Cretaceous age. The only Permian rocks in the area are represented by the Hueco Limestone Formation. The Cretaceous System, however, is represented by the entire Comanche and Gulf Series (Fig. 2). The Hueco Formation is of marine origin...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia-AREVA Commission Solar Thermal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECResearch & CapabilitiesCapabilitiesSandia-AREVA Commission Solar ThermalMolten Salt Energy-Storage Demonstration Sandia-AREVA Commission Solar ThermalMolten Salt...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Areva Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy Advanced Nuclear EnergyCouncilSandia's WorkAreva Solar

  6. Rocks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »SubmitterJ. NorbyN.Rocks Rocks Rocks have been

  7. Eagle Project Update Eagle P3 Project Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    ) offers 11-minute travel time to Westminster #12;5 Eagle P3 Project Scope · Overall capital cost $2 for cost effective index · Allows RTD to spread the cost of the project over a longer time periodEagle Project Update Eagle P3 Project Update Rick Clarke Assistant General Manager, Capital

  8. Microsoft Word - Appd J AREVA_Exec_Summ_Flysheet.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fabricated to baseline conditions in the pilot facility in Lynchburg using the AREVA compacting process. Each of the irradiation capsules used during these sequences will be...

  9. Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision hasESE Alcohol Jump to:EXARGeothermal Facility

  10. AREVA Extension Request | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley ResponsibleSubmissionofDepartmentNo.7-052 ofFocusAREA FAQ #AREVA

  11. Eagle County, Colorado Summary of Reported Data | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary of Reported Data Eagle County, Colorado Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Eagle County, Colorado. Eagle...

  12. Rock-physics templates for hydrocarbon source rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    May 27, 2014 ... to model the degree of maturity of the shale and obtain its elastic ...... Luna, Gacheta and Eagle Ford Shale Formations using digital rock ... In N. D. Naeser and T. H. McCulloh, editors, Thermal History of Sedimentary Basins:.

  13. Eagle County, Colorado Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Dashboard Eagle County, Colorado Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Eagle County, Colorado, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bbnpbban0003798pmcd...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - areva technical days Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NC) to provide and manage nuclear materials for civil and military uses. France... advisor positions to top industry executives (AREVA, TOTAL), from the president of the...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - areva reference document Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NC) to provide and manage nuclear materials for civil and military uses. France... advisor positions to top industry executives (AREVA, TOTAL), from the president of the...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - areva fuel solutions Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Too expensive... : Average cost overrun in first round of reactors: 207% Areva EPR in Finland: already 50%+ overrun 12 Source: Laughlin, Robert B. - Department of Physics,...

  17. Fracture Conductivity of the Eagle Ford Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzek, James J

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    such as the Eagle Ford Shale. This work investigates the fracture conductivities of seven Eagle Ford Shale samples collected from an outcrop of facies B. Rough fractures were induced in the samples and laboratory experiments that closely followed the API RP-61...

  18. ENERGY RESOURCES INTERNATIONAL, INC. ERI-2142.16-1301

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    available supply. For example, (i) the construction and deployment schedule of the Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility (EREF) was placed on hold by AREVA in December 2011 as part of a...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - areva group facilities Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AND DISPATCH FOR MIDWEST ISO DAY-AHEAD CO-OPTIMIZED ENERGY AND ANCILLARY SERVICE MARKET Summary: is with AREVA T&D Inc., Redmond, WA. Yonghong Chen is with Midwest ISO,...

  20. Eagle County- Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In an effort to reduce county-wide energy consumption and improve the environment, Eagle County established their own efficient building code (ECO-Green Build) which applies to all new construction...

  1. Where Eagles FlyTM CHARLES COUNTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    with the development of new energetic systems, CECD's expansion calls for the creation of other areas of excellenceWhere Eagles FlyTM CHARLES COUNTY MARYLAND CENTER FOR ENERGETIC CONCEPTS DEVELOPMENT Dr. D. K Phone 301.405.5294 Fax 301.314.9477 dkanand@umd.edu Website: www.cecd.umd.edu ENERGETICS TECHNOLOGY

  2. Drugs and oil flow through the Eagle Ford Shale.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Michael Perry

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This report is a work of original reporting which investigates the proliferation of drug use and drug trafficking in the Eagle Ford Shale, a region (more)

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Distributors Inc...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    promotes global sustainability. Golden Eagle was also recognized for its recycling and energy-efficiency initiatives, employee carpooling, and its green transportation program....

  4. Eagle Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision hasESE Alcohol Jump to:EXAR CorporationEagle

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: ScanEagle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreaking Work on CriegeeElectronicsAssociationScaled WindScanEagle

  6. Sharing Experiences within AREVA D and D Project Portfolio: Four Illustrations - 13049

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chabeuf, Jean-Michel; Varet, Thierry [AREVA Site Value Development Business Unit, La Hague Site (France)] [AREVA Site Value Development Business Unit, La Hague Site (France); AREVA Site Value Development Business Unit, La Hague Site

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past ten years, AREVA has performed D and D operations on a wide range of nuclear sites, such as Marcoule and La Hague recycling plants, to Cadarache MOX fuel fabrication plant or Veurey and Annecy metallic Uranium machining plants. Each site is different from the other but some lessons can be shared through this D and D portfolio. In that respect, knowledge management is one of AREVA D and D Technical Department main missions. Four illustrations demonstrate the interest of knowledge share. Waste management is one of the key activities in D and D; It requires a specific characterization methodology, adapted logistics, and optimized waste channels, all of which have been developed over the years by AREVA teams on the site of Marcoule while they are rather new to La Hague, whose main activity remains fuel reprocessing despite the launch of UP2 400 D and D program. The transfer of know how has thus been organized over the past two years. Plasma cutting has been used extensively in Marcoule for years, while prohibited on the site of La Hague following questions raised about the risks associated wit Ruthenium sublimation. La Hague Technical Department has thus developed an experimental protocol to quantify and contain the Ruthenium risk, the result of which will then be applied to Marcoule where the Ruthenium issue has appeared in recent operations. Commissioning and operating fission products evaporators is a rather standard activity on UP2 800 and UP3, while the associated experience has been decreasing in Marcoule following final shutdown in 1998. When the French atomic Energy commission decided to build and operate a new evaporator to concentrate rinsing effluents prior to vitrification in 2009, AREVA La Hague operators were mobilized to test and commission the new equipment, and train local operators. Concrete scabbling is the final stage prior to the free release of a nuclear facility. In the context of Veurey and Annecy final cleanup and declassification, large scale concrete scabbling operations were conducted, and lead to the industrialization of the process and qualification of a new process, NiThrow{sup TM} scabbling technology, developed by AREVA. This experience has now been injected into La Hague D and D scenario and has allowed a significant gain in time and cost for scabbling operations. In short, the variety of experiences and sites under the responsibility of AREVA D and D teams present significant challenges, and yet provide a unique opportunity to innovate and qualify new tools and methods which can then be shared throughout the sites. (authors)

  7. Study of Golden Eagles Migration in the Calgary Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Tianqing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eagles Migration in the Calgary Canada A thesis submitted inMigration in the Calgary Canada by Tianqing Liao Master ofMountains of Calgary, Canada. The project began in March

  8. Assessment of Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xinglai

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    , and to assess Eagle Ford shale oil and gas reserves, contingent resources, and prospective resources. I first developed a Bayesian methodology to generate probabilistic decline curves using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) that can quantify the reserves...

  9. Use of east Texas reservoirs by wintering bald eagles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Sandra Joy

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Human Activities CONCLUSION Lakeshore Disturbances and Management Recommendations Public Attitude The Future . LITERATURE CITED APPENDIX - OTHER AVIAN SPECIES THIS RESEARCHER COMMONLY OBSERVED SHARING EAST TEXAS RESERVOIRS WITH BALD EAGLES... for the presence of late-departing eagles. 28 Project managers for each Corps of Engineers reservoir in the study area, river authorities, power plant personnel, regional U. S. Forest Service offices, and lumber- companies were contacted in person...

  10. Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The archaeology of early Egypt: Social transformations inAlexander 1938 Rock-drawings of southern Upper Egypt. Vol.1. London: The Egypt Exploration Society. 1939 Rock-drawings

  11. R and D Programs and Policy within the CEA-AREVA Joint Vitrification Lab (LCV) - 13592

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piroux, Jean Christophe [AREVA NC Marcoule LCV (France)] [AREVA NC Marcoule LCV (France); Paradis, Luc; Ladirat, Christian [CEA Marcoule LCV (France)] [CEA Marcoule LCV (France); Brueziere, Jerome; Chauvin, Eric [AREVA NC Paris La Defense (France)] [AREVA NC Paris La Defense (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste management is a key issue for the reprocessing industry; furthermore, vitrification is considered as the reference for nuclear waste management. In order to further improve and strengthen their historical cooperation in high temperature waste management, the CEA, R and D organization, and AREVA, Industrial Operator, decided, in September 2010, to create a Joint Vitrification Laboratory within the framework of a strategic partnership. The main objectives of the CEA-AREVA Joint Vitrification Laboratory (LCV) are (i) support AREVA's activities, notably in its La Hague plants and for new projects, (ii) strengthen the CEA's lead as a reference laboratory in the field of waste conditioning. The LCV is mandated to provide strong, innovative solutions through the performance of R and D on processes and materials for vitrification, fusion and incineration, for high, intermediate and low level waste. The activities carried out in the LCV include academic research on containment matrices (formulation, long-term behaviour), and the improvement of current technologies/development of new ones in lab-scale to full-scale pilot facilities, in non-radioactive and radioactive conditions, including modelling and experimental tools. This paper focuses on the programs and policy managed within the LCV, as well as the means employed by the CEA and AREVA to meet common short-,mid- and long-term challenges, from a scientific and industrial point of view. Among other things, we discuss the technical support provided for the La Hague vitrification facilities on hot melter and CCIM technologies, the start-up of new processes (decommissioning effluents, UMo FP) with CCIM, the preparation of future processes by means of an assessment of new technologies and containment matrices (improved glasses, ceramics, etc.), as well as incineration/vitrification for organic and metallic mixed waste or metallic fusion. The close relationship between the R and D teams and industrial operators enables the LCV to propose attractive waste management solutions, with appropriate schedules and optimized development costs, making allowance for R and D constraints, engineering requirements and the industrial environment. (authors)

  12. Georgia Southern University Office of Career Services Eagle Career Net/NACElink Privacy and Use of Data Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Georgia Southern University Office of Career Services Eagle Career Net/NACElink Privacy and Use of Data Policy Georgia Southern University Office of Career Services Eagle Career Net/NACElink Privacy and the NACElink Network to provide student with Eagle Career Net. Eagle Career Net is our online system

  13. EA-1905: Double Eagle Water System, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA, prepared by the U.S. Department of the Interiors Bureau of Land Management Carlsbad Field Office and adopted by DOE, evaluates the expansion and upgrade of the City of Carlsbads Double Eagle Water System.

  14. Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel [AREVA, 3315 Old Forest Road, Lynchburg, Virginia, 24506 (United States); Carre, Franck [CEA, Saclay (France)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated electric plant. Depending on the process heat temperature and power needs, up to 80 % of the nuclear heat is converted into useful power. An important feature of the design is the standardization of the heat source, as independent as possible of the process heat application. This should expedite licensing. The essential conditions for success include: 1. Timely adapted licensing process and regulations, codes and standards for such application and design; 2. An industry oriented R and D program to meet the technological challenges making the best use of the international collaboration. Gen IV could be the vector; 3. Identification of an end user (or a consortium of) willing to fund a FOAK. (authors)

  15. Areva Alternate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2014, the Department of Energy issued $6.5 billion in loan guarantees to GPC and OPC to support the construction of the nations next generation of advanced nuclear reactors.

  16. White Rock

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Furnished house for rent in rural White Rock Bright and sunny Ideal for a young family Safe neighborhood 10 min drive to LANL 1300 per month, basic utilities included 1180 sq ft....

  17. Science Requirements for EAGLE for the E-ELT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Evans; M. D. Lehnert; J. -G. Cuby; S. L. Morris; A. M. Swinbank; W. D. Taylor; D. M. Alexander; N. P. F. Lorente; Y. Clenet; T. Paumard

    2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of the EAGLE science case, which spans spatially-resolved spectroscopy of targets from five key science areas - ranging from studies of heavily-obscured Galactic star clusters, right out to the first galaxies at the highest redshifts. Here we summarise the requirements adopted for study and also evaluate the availability of natural guide stars in example fields, which will impact on the adaptive optics performance and architecture.

  18. National Bald Eagle Management Guidelines | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3Informationof EnergyNapaInformation UsEagle Management

  19. City of Eagle River, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (Utility Company) JumpDoerun, Georgia (UtilityDyersburg Place:Eagle

  20. Water Use in the Eagle Ford Shale: An Economic and Policy Analysis of Water Supply and Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnett, Benton; Healy, Kevin; Jiang, Zhongnan; LeClere, David; McLaughlin, Leslie; Roberts, Joey; Steadman, Maxwell

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inaccessible shale reserves to produce abundant amounts of oil and gas. The oil and gas proliferation in the Eagle Ford has seen exponential growth, and production is not anticipated to decline until 2025. In addition, a typical HF well in the Eagle Ford... Figures Figure 1: Map of the Eagle Ford Shale Oil, Gas and Condensate Play .......................................................... 4 Figure 2: Production Growth within the Eagle Ford Shale...

  1. Production patterns in Eagle Ford Shale (Decline Curve Analysis) Muoz Torres, J.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    , the Eagle Ford Shale (EFS) play has had a remarkable development in natural gas and oil production. EFSEG39 Production patterns in Eagle Ford Shale (Decline Curve Analysis) Muñoz Torres, J.1 javier (bcf) of natural gas and 8,049 thousand barrels of oil. Up to 2020, it is expected that natural gas

  2. Status of verification and validation of AREVA's ARCADIA{sup R} code system for PWR applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porsch, D. [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); P.O.Box 1109, 91001 Erlangen (Germany); Leberig, M.; Kuch, S. [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); Magat, P. [AREVA, AREVA NP SAS, Paris (France); Segard, K. [AREVA, AREVA NP Inc., Lynchburg (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2010 the submittal of Topical Reports for ARCADIA{sup R} and COBRA-FLX, the thermal-hydraulic module of ARCADIA{sup R}, to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concluded a major step in the development of AREVA's new code system for core design and safety analyses. This submittal was dedicated to the application of the code system to uranium fuel in pressurized water reactors. The submitted information comprised results for plants operated in the US (France)) and Germany and provided uncertainties for in-core measuring systems with traveling in-core detectors and for the aero-ball system of the EPR. A reduction of the uncertainties in the prediction of F{sub AH} and F{sub Q} of > 1 % (absolute) was derived compared to the current code systems. This paper extents the verification and validation base for uranium based fuel and demonstrates the basic capabilities of ARCADIA{sup R} of describing MOX. The achieved status of verification and validation is described in detail. All applications followed the same standard without any specific calibration. The paper gives also insight in the new capability of 3D full core steady-state and transient pin-by-pin/sub-channel-by-sub-channel calculations and the opportunities offered by this feature. The gain of margins with increasing detail of the representation is outlined. Currently, the strategies for worldwide implementation of ARCADIA{sup R} are developed. (authors)

  3. Decontamination of Nuclear Liquid Wastes Status of CEA and AREVA R and D: Application to Fukushima Waste Waters - 12312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournel, B.; Barre, Y.; Lepeytre, C.; Peycelon, H. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Grandjean, A. [Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR5257 CEA-CNRS-UM2-ENSCM, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Prevost, T.; Valery, J.F. [AREVA NC, Paris La Defense (France); Shilova, E.; Viel, P. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS/SPCSI, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid wastes decontamination processes are mainly based on two techniques: Bulk processes and the so called Cartridges processes. The first technique has been developed for the French nuclear fuel reprocessing industry since the 60's in Marcoule and La Hague. It is a proven and mature technology which has been successfully and quickly implemented by AREVA at Fukushima site for the processing of contaminated waters. The second technique, involving cartridges processes, offers new opportunities for the use of innovative adsorbents. The AREVA process developed for Fukushima and some results obtained on site will be presented as well as laboratory scale results obtained in CEA laboratories. Examples of new adsorbents development for liquid wastes decontamination are also given. A chemical process unit based on co-precipitation technique has been successfully and quickly implemented by AREVA at Fukushima site for the processing of contaminated waters. The asset of this technique is its ability to process large volumes in a continuous mode. Several chemical products can be used to address specific radioelements such as: Cs, Sr, Ru. Its drawback is the production of sludge (about 1% in volume of initial liquid volume). CEA developed strategies to model the co-precipitation phenomena in order to firstly minimize the quantity of added chemical reactants and secondly, minimize the size of co-precipitation units. We are on the way to design compact units that could be mobilized very quickly and efficiently in case of an accidental situation. Addressing the problem of sludge conditioning, cementation appears to be a very attractive solution. Fukushima accident has focused attention on optimizations that should be taken into account in future studies: - To better take account for non-typical aqueous matrixes like seawater; - To enlarge the spectrum of radioelements that can be efficiently processed and especially short lives radioelements that are usually less present in standard effluents resulting from nuclear activities; - To develop reversible solid adsorbents for cartridge-type applications in order to minimize wastes. (authors)

  4. Assessment of the Mexican Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morales Velasco, Carlos Armando

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    was not quantified. In November 2011, Petr?leos Mexicanos (PEMEX) estimated prospective gas resources in the different plays. For the Upper Cretaceous (which includes the Eagle Ford shale) the estimates were 54-106-171 TCF (P90-P50-P10). For the Eagle Ford... and Agua Nueva shales combined resources were estimated to be 27-87 TCF (P90-P10) (PEMEX 2011). An assessment of the Eagle Ford shale oil and gas resources in the US is being done by the Crisman Institute for Petroleum Research at Texas A&M University...

  5. Water Value and Environmental Implications of Hydraulic Fracturing: Eagle-Ford Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, W.; Lacewell, R.; Zinn, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to develop implications based on industry, government and institutional data, and draw conclusions relative to impacts on the environment, realized amount of water, and value of water used for a typical well in the Eagle-Ford development, a water...

  6. WINDExchange Webinar: Wind Energy and Eagles: The Problem, the Permit, and the Path Forward

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Save the date for this free webinar. Wally Erickson of WEST, Inc. will present on the conservation and permitting challenges associated with wind and eagles; Annie Mudge of Cox, Castle &...

  7. Molecular hydrogen abundances of galaxies in the EAGLE simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagos, Claudia del P; Schaye, Joop; Furlong, Michelle; Frenk, Carlos S; Bower, Richard G; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom; Trayford, James W; Bahe, Yannick M; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the abundance of galactic molecular hydrogen (H$_2$) in the "Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments" (EAGLE) cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We assign H$_2$ masses to gas particles in the simulations in post-processing using two different prescriptions that depend on the local dust-to-gas ratio and the interstellar radiation field. Both result in H$_2$ galaxy mass functions that agree well with observations in the local and high-redshift Universe. The simulations reproduce the observed scaling relations between the mass of H$_2$ and the stellar mass, star formation rate and stellar surface density. Towards high edshifts, galaxies in the simulations display larger H$_2$ mass fractions, and correspondingly lower H$_2$ depletion timescales, also in good agreement with observations. The comoving mass density of H$_2$ in units of the critical density, $\\Omega_{\\rm H_2}$, peaks at $z\\approx 1.2-1.5$, later than the predicted peak of the cosmic star formation rate activity, a...

  8. Star Formation in the Eagle Nebula and NGC 6611

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Elmegreen; J. Palous; J. M. Oliveira; R. D. Jeffries; J. Th Van Loon

    Abstract. We present IZJHKL ? photometry of the core of the cluster NGC6611 in the Eagle Nebula. This photometry is used to constrain the Initial Mass Function (IMF) and the circumstellar disk frequency of the young stellar objects. Optical spectroscopy of 258 objects is used to confirm membership and constrain contamination as well as individual reddening estimates. Our overall aim is to assess the influence of the ionizing radiation from the massive stars on the formation and evolution of young low-mass stars and their disks. The disk frequency determined from the JHKL ? colour-colour diagram suggests that the ionizing radiation from the massive stars has little effect on disk evolution (Oliveira et al. 2005). The cluster IMF seems indistinguishable from those of quieter environments; however towards lower masses the tell-tale signs of an environmental influence are expected to become more noticeable, a question we are currently addressing with our recently acquired ultra-deep (ACS and NICMOS) HST images.

  9. Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, M.; Swanson-Hysell, N. L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and significance of magnetism in sedimentary rocks. Journal1997. Rock Magnetism. zdemir, O Dunlop, D. J. & Oon July 30, 2013 ROCK MAGNETISM: REMAGNETIZED CARBONATES

  10. Eagle Point Golf Course Stormwater Assessment UNCW-CMS Report 09-05

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    , at seven locations. Two sites receive surface runoff from off-site, one site receives water from off-site of the input sites that receive stormwater runoff from off-site. Concurrent with these elevated counts, the two entering the course from off-site via stormwater runoff is a significant problem to Eagle Point Golf Course

  11. The Future of BPM: Flying with the Eagles or Scratching with the Chickens?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    The Future of BPM: Flying with the Eagles or Scratching with the Chickens? Peter Dadam Institute-oriented architectures, business process management (BPM) systems, and BPM in general receive a lot of attention to be performed manually today. In fact, BPM has a great potential. However, to realize this potential in practice

  12. Key Economic Drivers Impacting Eagle Ford Development from Resource to Reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Busto Pinzon, Andres Mauricio

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    single-well, 100-well, and Full-wellin each of the proposed production regions of the Eagle Ford shale, with calibrated probabilistic inputs for each region. Single-well results show how it is hard to produce complete distributions of reserves all across the play...

  13. Occurrence of Multiple Fluid Phases Across a Basin, in the Same Shale Gas Formation Eagle Ford Shale Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Yao

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Shale gas and oil are playing a significant role in US energy independence by reversing declining production trends. Successful exploration and development of the Eagle Ford Shale Play requires reservoir characterization, recognition of fluid...

  14. Chandra Observations of the Eagle Nebula. I. Embedded Young Stellar Objects near the Pillars of Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsky, J L; Mytyk, A; Andersen, C M; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Gagne, Marc; Mytyk, Anna; Andersen, Mark McCaughrean & Morten

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and analyze the first high-resolution X-ray images ever obtained of the Eagle Nebula star-forming region. On 2001 July 30 the Chandra X-ray Observatory obtained a 78 ks image of the Eagle Nebula (M 16) that includes the core of the young galactic cluster NGC 6611 and the dark columns of dust and cold molecular gas in M 16 known as the Pillars of Creation. We find a total of 1101 X-ray sources in the 17'x17' ACIS-I field of view. Most of the X-ray sources are low mass pre-main-sequence or high-mass main-sequence stars in this young cluster. A handful of hard X-ray sources in the pillars are spatially coincident with deeply embedded young stellar objects seen in high-resolution near-infrared images recently obtained with the VLT (McCaughrean & Andersen 2002). In this paper, we focus on the 40 X-ray sources in and around Pillars 1-4 at the heart of the Eagle Nebula. None of the X-ray sources are associated with the evaporating gaseous globules (EGGs) first observed by Hester et al. (1996) in HST W...

  15. Chandra Observations of the Eagle Nebula. I. Embedded Young Stellar Objects near the Pillars of Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey L. Linsky; Marc Gagne; Anna Mytyk; Mark McCaughrean; Morten Andersen

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and analyze the first high-resolution X-ray images ever obtained of the Eagle Nebula star-forming region. On 2001 July 30 the Chandra X-ray Observatory obtained a 78 ks image of the Eagle Nebula (M 16) that includes the core of the young galactic cluster NGC 6611 and the dark columns of dust and cold molecular gas in M 16 known as the Pillars of Creation. We find a total of 1101 X-ray sources in the 17'x17' ACIS-I field of view. Most of the X-ray sources are low mass pre-main-sequence or high-mass main-sequence stars in this young cluster. A handful of hard X-ray sources in the pillars are spatially coincident with deeply embedded young stellar objects seen in high-resolution near-infrared images recently obtained with the VLT (McCaughrean & Andersen 2002). In this paper, we focus on the 40 X-ray sources in and around Pillars 1-4 at the heart of the Eagle Nebula. None of the X-ray sources are associated with the evaporating gaseous globules (EGGs) first observed by Hester et al. (1996) in HST WFPC2 images of M 16, implying that either the EGGs do not contain protostars or that the protostars have not yet become X-ray active. Eight X-ray counts are coincident with the Herbig-Haro object HH216, implying log L_X~30.0.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: AREVA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwardsSafeguardsEngineers Wind EnergyAMF3ANLARDEC

  17. A review of "The Eye of the Eagle: John Donne and the Legacy of Ignatius Loyola" by Francesca Bugliani Knox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Mitchell M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18 seventeenth-century news Francesca Bugliani Knox. #31;e Eye of the Eagle: John Donne and the Legacy of Ignatius Loyola. Bern: Peter Lang, 2011. Religions and Discourse Series. 342 pp. $75.95. Review by #21;#18;#19;#24;#23;#30; #21;. #23...;#25;#31;#31;#18;#26;, #25;#29;#8;#29;#26;#19;#25;#27;#25; #24;#20; #30;#8;#30; (#26;#18;#20;#29;#5; #7;#25; #26;). When I spotted the provocative title of Francesca Bugliani Knox?s #31;e Eye of the Eagle: John Donne and the Legacy of Ignatius Loyola for the #15;rst...

  18. Software Engineer RockAuto www.RockAuto.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Software Engineer RockAuto www.RockAuto.com Position Description Software is the foundation Familiarity with open-source development technologies like PHP, Perl, JavaScript and C (Linux system Lane, Madison, WI 53719) Why RockAuto? Strategic and tactical impact. We're an e-commerce company

  19. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

  20. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  1. The EAGLE simulations of galaxy formation: calibration of subgrid physics and model variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crain, Robert A; Bower, Richard G; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Frenk, Carlos S; McCarthy, Ian G; Helly, John C; Jenkins, Adrian; Rosas-Guevara, Yetli M; White, Simon D M; Trayford, James W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from thirteen cosmological simulations that explore the parameter space of the "Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments" (EAGLE) simulation project. Four of the simulations follow the evolution of a periodic cube L = 50 cMpc on a side, and each employs a different subgrid model of the energetic feedback associated with star formation. The relevant parameters were adjusted so that the simulations each reproduce the observed galaxy stellar mass function at z = 0.1. Three of the simulations fail to form disc galaxies as extended as observed, and we show analytically that this is a consequence of numerical radiative losses that reduce the efficiency of stellar feedback in high-density gas. Such losses are greatly reduced in the fourth simulation - the EAGLE reference model - by injecting more energy in higher density gas. This model produces galaxies with the observed size distribution, and also reproduces many galaxy scaling relations. In the remaining nine simulations, a sin...

  2. Rock Properties Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  3. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these recorded sources important rock pedagogical tools inwere a primary source of western rock music for young fans,Nevertheless, a source of funding for rock music performance

  4. Iron and Steel Phosphate Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Phosphate Rock Platinum Potash Pumice Quartz Crystal Rare Earths Rhenium Rubidium Salt Sand and Gravel Graphite Peat Sulfur Beryllium Gypsum Perlite Talc Bismuth Hafnium Phosphate Rock Tantalum Boron Helium on the USGS--the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards

  5. Life Under Rocks Grade Level: First

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Procedure: Find a small and large rock (rock should be on a solid surface and not sunk in sand or muck

  6. Strength of transversely isotropic rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, Jianyong, 1975-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a new Anisotropic Matsuoka-Nakai (AMN) criterion to characterize the failure of transversely isotropic rocks under true triaxial stress states. One major obstacle in formulating an anisotropic criterion ...

  7. The distribution of neutral hydrogen around high-redshift galaxies and quasars in the EAGLE simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmati, Alireza; Bower, Richard G; Crain, Robert A; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed high covering fractions of neutral hydrogen (HI) with column densities above $\\sim 10^{17} \\rm{cm}^{-2}$ around Lyman-Break Galaxies (LBGs) and bright quasars at redshifts z ~ 2-3 has been identified as a challenge for simulations of galaxy formation. We use the EAGLE cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation, which has been shown to reproduce a wide range of galaxy properties and for which the subgrid feedback was calibrated without considering gas properties, to study the distribution of HI around high-redshift galaxies. We predict the covering fractions of strong HI absorbers ($N_{\\rm{HI}} \\gtrsim 10^{17} \\rm{cm}^{-2}$) inside haloes to increase rapidly with redshift but to depend only weakly on halo mass. For massive ($M_{200} \\gtrsim 10^{12} {\\rm M_{\\odot}}$) halos the covering fraction profiles are nearly scale-invariant and we provide fitting functions that reproduce the simulation results. While efficient feedback is required to increase the HI covering fractions to the high observed values...

  8. Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

  9. Evaluating the Economics of Best Management Practices for Tarrant Regional Water Districts Eagle Mountain Lake Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason L.

    manag e me n t unit of analys i s is one designated wetland project encompassing 20.6 acres. In-Lake BMPs Based on feedback from TRWD personne l , it was noted that BMP 20 (Hypolimnetic Aeration ) and BMP 21 (P Inactiva t i o n with Alum... years. The manage me n t unit of analysi s is one designa t e d hypol i mn e t i c aerat i o n proj ec t withi n the Eagle Mountai n Lake watersh e d . BMP 21 P Inactivation with Alum. T h e addition of powdered alum at variou s lake depths...

  10. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) Lining Main Canal Final

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    rights of 100.0 ac-ft per year, and 1,085,966.0 ac-ft of non-consumptive hydro-electric water rights. The District contracts for delivery of water to Maverick County and the City of Eagle Pass. The District does not contract to deliver water to any... industrial customer other than the AEP/Central Power and Light Hydro- electric Power Plant (with the non-consumptive hydro-electric water mentioned above). Currently, the District is the only source of water for the City of Eagle Pass and the towns...

  11. Advanced stimulation technology deployment program, Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company, Eagle Gas Sands, Cedar Creek Anticline, Southeastern Montana. Topical report, August-December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, T.W.; Zander, D.M.; Bessler, M.R.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company (WBI) implemented an AST pilot program to improve production from wells completed in the Eagle formation along the Cedar Creek Anticline in southeastern Montana. Extensive pre- and post-fracture Absolute Open Flow Testing was used to evaluate the benefits of stimulation. Additional, gas production doubled when compared to direct offsets completed in previous years. This report summarizes the documentation of AST methodologies applied by WBI to an infill drilling program in the Eagle formation along the Cedar Creek Anticline.

  12. Safety Criticality Standards Using the French CRISTAL Code Package: Application to the AREVA NP UO{sub 2} Fuel Fabrication Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doucet, M.; Durant Terrasson, L.; Mouton, J. [AREVA-NP (France)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Criticality safety evaluations implement requirements to proof of sufficient sub critical margins outside of the reactor environment for example in fuel fabrication plants. Basic criticality data (i.e., criticality standards) are used in the determination of sub critical margins for all processes involving plutonium or enriched uranium. There are several criticality international standards, e.g., ARH-600, which is one the US nuclear industry relies on. The French Nuclear Safety Authority (DGSNR and its advising body IRSN) has requested AREVA NP to review the criticality standards used for the evaluation of its Low Enriched Uranium fuel fabrication plants with CRISTAL V0, the recently updated French criticality evaluation package. Criticality safety is a concern for every phase of the fabrication process including UF{sub 6} cylinder storage, UF{sub 6}-UO{sub 2} conversion, powder storage, pelletizing, rod loading, assembly fabrication, and assembly transportation. Until 2003, the accepted criticality standards were based on the French CEA work performed in the late seventies with the APOLLO1 cell/assembly computer code. APOLLO1 is a spectral code, used for evaluating the basic characteristics of fuel assemblies for reactor physics applications, which has been enhanced to perform criticality safety calculations. Throughout the years, CRISTAL, starting with APOLLO1 and MORET 3 (a 3D Monte Carlo code), has been improved to account for the growth of its qualification database and for increasing user requirements. Today, CRISTAL V0 is an up-to-date computational tool incorporating a modern basic microscopic cross section set based on JEF2.2 and the comprehensive APOLLO2 and MORET 4 codes. APOLLO2 is well suited for criticality standards calculations as it includes a sophisticated self shielding approach, a P{sub ij} flux determination, and a 1D transport (S{sub n}) process. CRISTAL V0 is the result of more than five years of development work focusing on theoretical approaches and the implementation of user-friendly graphical interfaces. Due to its comprehensive physical simulation and thanks to its broad qualification database with more than a thousand benchmark/calculation comparisons, CRISTAL V0 provides outstanding and reliable accuracy for criticality evaluations for configurations covering the entire fuel cycle (i.e. from enrichment, pellet/assembly fabrication, transportation, to fuel reprocessing). After a brief description of the calculation scheme and the physics algorithms used in this code package, results for the various fissile media encountered in a UO{sub 2} fuel fabrication plant will be detailed and discussed. (authors)

  13. Lichen: the challenge for rock art conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra Elaine

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the effects that lichens have on rock surfaces in which ancient rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) may be found. The study area includes four sites in the United States: one quartzite site in southwest Minnesota, two...

  14. Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas

    Rock magnetism of remagnetized carbonate rocks: another look MIKE JACKSON* & NICHOLAS L. SWANSON-HYSELL Institute for Rock Magnetism, Winchell School of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minnesota, US, dominantly in the super- paramagnetic and stable single-domain size range, also give rise to distinctive rock-magnetic

  15. Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    the source rock slope (Figure 1), the falling mass strikes the talus slope and breaks up and/or bounces1 Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps J. Deparis, D reviews seismograms from 10 rock-fall events recorded between 1992 and 2001 by the permanent seismological

  16. NOPR AREVA | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2 to:Diesel Engines|ForeignNNSA issuesAON NOPR AON

  17. Areva Koblitz | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300AlgoilEnergy InformationArcata,Koblitz Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  18. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  19. Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods,Rock Sampling Details Activities (18) Areas

  20. EIS-0471: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support Proposed Eagle

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThis EISStatementUtah, andtoAmericanCape Wind EnergyRock

  1. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  2. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  3. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  4. The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Robert James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I incorporate results from the XRF and projectile pointRay Fluorescence (hereafter, XRF) to help affiliate rock artstudies or reports in which XRF analysis have been done.

  5. Assessment of the geothermal resources of Carson-Eagle valleys and Big Smoky Valley, Nevada. First annual report, May 1, 1979-May 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, D.T.; Koenig, B.A.; Flynn, T.; Bruce, J.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two geothermal investigations were completed in three Nevada locations. The regions studied were selected from areas outlined as having direct utilization potential (Trexler and others, 1979) and included the Carson-Eagle Valley, Bis Smoky Valley and Caliente. Studies were organized around the completion of a group of tasks in each area. These tasks included: geologic reconnaissance, gravity surveys, aerial photography, fluid sampling and analysis, shallow depth temperature probe surveys, soil mercury surveys, shallow electrical resistivity measurements, and temperature gradient hole drilling. Goals of the project were to provide regional information about the nature and extent of the resources and to offer a critical evaluation of the techniques employed. Results from the work in the Carson-Eagle Valley and Big Smoky Valley are presented. (MHR)

  6. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  7. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as in its modes of fandom, production and dissemination. Inaspects of rock music fandom: America had everything a youngthe beginnings of rock music fandom in India, even while, as

  8. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  9. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  10. FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, K.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the piezoelectric source plate and the rock surface. With aThe S^j sources were bonded to the rock surface with a fast-^ source plate was epoxied in position on the rock specimen.

  11. aspo hard rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 conditions for rock mass models is...

  12. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from reservoir rock formation. - Task 2: Carbonation study of minerals. - Task 3: Mechanical behaviors of carbonated minerals. - Task 4: Modeling of CO2- reservoir rock...

  13. Rock bed behavior and reverse thermosiphon effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, J.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two rock beds, in the Mark Jones and Doug Balcomb houses, have been instrumented, monitored, and analyzed. Observed experimental operation has been compared with, or explained by, theoretical predictions. The latter are based on one-dimensional finite-difference computer calculation of rock bed charging and discharging, with fixed or variable inputs of air flow rate and temperature. Both rock beds exhibit appreciable loss of stored heat caused by lack of backdraft dampers or incomplete closure of such dampers. These topics are discussed, and some improvements that might be made in future installations are noted.

  14. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) Lining Main Canal Preliminary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    municipal/domestic water rights of 2,049.0 ac-ft per year, recreation water rights of 100.0 ac-ft per year, and 1,085,966.0 ac-ft of non-consumptive hydro-electric water rights. The District contracts for delivery of water to Maverick County and the City... of Eagle Pass. The District does not contract to deliver water to any industrial customer other than the AEP/Central Power and Light Hydro- electric Power Plant (with the non-consumptive hydro-electric water mentioned above). Currently, the District...

  15. Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

  16. Oilfield rock bits: Are they a commodity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the quality of various types of rock drill bits and evaluates cost of these bits against service and performance to determine if bits should be viewed as a commodity when drilling a production or exploration well. Continuing advancements in materials technology, machining capabilities, hydraulics arrangements, bearing configuration, seal technology and cutter design continue to push the performance curve for oilfield rock bits. However, some very important advancements are patented, proprietary features of individual manufacturers. This paper reviews some of these design and performance features to help determine if they are worth the extra investment based on actual field drilling experience.

  17. Metamorphic Rocks, Processes, and Resources Metamorphic rocks are rocks changed from one form to another by intense heat, intense pressure,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    important ­ Rising temperature causes water to be released from unstable minerals ­ Hot water very reactive refers to the temperature and pressure under which a rock was metamorphosed, considered low grade or high ­ If range exceeded, new mineral structures result ­ If temperature gets high enough, melting will occur

  18. Radiocarbon dating of ancient rock paintings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilger, W.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Southon, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents progress made on a technique for {sup 14}C dating pictographs. A low-temperature oxygen plasma is used coupled with high-vacuum technologies to selectively remove C-containing material in the paints without contamination from inorganic carbon from rock substrates or accretions.

  19. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  20. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  1. Life cycle assessment of a rock crusher

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landfield, A.H.; Karra, V.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nordberg, Inc., a capital equipment manufacturer, performed a Life Cycle Assessment study on its rock crusher to aid in making decisions on product design and energy improvements. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a relatively new cutting edge environmental tool recently standardized by ISO that provides quantitative environmental and energy data on products or processes. This paper commences with a brief introduction to LCA and presents the system boundaries, modeling and assumptions for the rock crusher study. System boundaries include all life major cycle stages except manufacturing and assembly of the crusher. Results of the LCA show that over 99% of most of the flows into and out of the system may be attributed to the use phase of the rock crusher. Within the use phase itself, over 95% of each environmental inflow and outflow (with some exceptions) are attributed to electricity consumption, and not the replacement of spares/wears or lubricating oil over the lifetime of the crusher. Results tables and charts present selected environmental flows, including CO{sub 2} NOx, SOx, particulate matter, and energy consumption, for each of the rock crusher life cycle stages and the use phase. This paper aims to demonstrate the benefits of adopting a rigorous scientific approach to assess energy and environmental impacts over the life cycle of capital equipment. Nordberg has used these results to enhance its engineering efforts toward developing an even more energy efficient machine to further progress its vision of providing economic solutions to its customers by reducing the crusher operating (mainly electricity) costs.

  2. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  3. Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

  4. Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

  5. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems and rock fall source and impact areas, it meters from a rock fall source area. The success possible to the rock fall source areas, spacing

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - archean metavolcanic rocks Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Krner, 1985). However, the tectonic setting and age of metavolcanic rocks in Egypt are poorly... metavolcanic rocks. Metavolcanic rocks in Egypt were described by...

  7. Site Name: Granite Rock Date: 2005-2007, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McPhee-Shaw, Erika

    Site Name: Granite Rock Date: 2005-2007, 2009 Partners/Collaborators: CC&R Description: Work-native plants identified on Granite Rock site: Bristly Ox Tongue Picris echioides Bull Thistle Cirsium vulgare

  8. Modeling of crack initiation, propagation and coalescence in rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonalves da Silva, Bruno Miguel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural or artificial fracturing of rock plays a very important role in geologic processes and for engineered structures in and on rock. Fracturing is associated with crack initiation, propagation and coalescence, which ...

  9. Inversion of seismic attributes for petrophysical parameters and rock facies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahraeeni, Mohammad Sadegh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of rock and fluid properties such as porosity, clay content, and water saturation is essential for exploration and development of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Rock and fluid property maps obtained from such predictions ...

  10. Overview of conservation treatments applied to rock glyph archaeological sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandridge, Debra E

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock glyphs, ubiquitously referred to as rock art, are often the most highly visible components of archaeological sites. Such artifacts, therefore, are most prone to deterioration and degradation from human caused and natural elements...

  11. Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, USA Abstract Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of about 80 rhyolite and associated lacustrine rocks has...

  12. Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Abstract Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of about 80 rhyolite and associated lacustrine rocks has...

  13. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Phillips, 2004)...

  14. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995)...

  15. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration...

  16. VancouverParksville White RockNew Westminster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtenay VancouverParksville Abbotsford White RockNew Westminster Squamish Chilliwack Port McNeill Powell

  17. Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish Author(s): Ronald I. Dorn Source: American;Rock Varnish Over thousandsofyears,a thincoatingofclay,cementedtorocksbymanganese and iron that appeared "smooth, black, and as ifcoated with plumbago." Indian legends explained that these rocks had been

  18. Understanding Through-Composition in Post-Rock, Math-Metal, and other Post-Millennial Rock Genres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborn, Brad

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the dawn of experimental rocks second coming in the new millennium, experimental artists have begun distancing themselves from Top-40 artists through formal structures that eschew recapitulatory verse/chorus ...

  19. Idaho_WarEagle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSLtheIndustryMitch204PeakTwitchell Site

  20. American Eagle American Flyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palace . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Indian Motorcycle Cafe, Lounge & Retail . . . . . 44 Jack's Slopeside* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Giggleworks*. . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Ice Skating Rentals*. . . . . . . . 28 Indian Motorcycle

  1. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  2. GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 2. Rock Cycle 1. How do each of the three major rock types form? Include the source of the material and the rock-forming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    ? Include the source of the material and the rock-forming process. Igneous rocks form from the hiGEOL 103 Writing Assignment 2. Rock Cycle 1. How do each of the three major rock types form-temperature (650-1200 C) melting of other rocks (ign. mmorphic, or sed), following by cooling, possibly

  3. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in airwater system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  4. Rock Chalk Report, May 7, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Trouble seeing something? view it online or To unsubscribe, click here or send an email to: unsubscribe- 87@pacmail.em.marketinghq.net. May 7, 2014 Rock Chalk Report The Official Newsletter of Kansas Athletics... an email to: unsubscribe-87@pacmail.em.marketinghq.net. 2014, University of Kansas. The team names, logos and uniform designs are registered trademarks of the teams indicated. No logos, photographs or graphics in this email may be reproduced without...

  5. Rock, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods,Rock Sampling Details Activities (18)

  6. Hydrothermally Deposited Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energythe Second Workshop onDeposited Rock Jump to:

  7. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Gage for measuring displacements in rock samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David J. (Albuquerque, NM); McNamee, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gage for measuring diametral displacement within a rock sample for use in a rock mechanics laboratory and in the field, comprises a support ring housing a linear variable differential transformer, a mounting screw, and a leaf spring. The mounting screw is adjustable and defines a first point of contact with the rock sample. The leaf spring has opposite ends fixed to the inner periphery of the mounting ring. An intermediate portion of the leaf spring projecting radially inward from the ring is formed with a dimple defining a second point of contact with the sample. The first and second points of contact are diametrically opposed to each other. The LVDT is mounted in the ring with its axis parallel to the line of measurement and its core rod received in the dimple of the leaf spring. Any change in the length of the line between the first and second support points is directly communicated to the LVDT. The leaf spring is rigid to completely support lateral forces so that the LVDT is free of all load for improved precision.

  9. Seismic and Acoustic Investigations of Rock Fall Initiation, Processes, and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Valerie Louise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Happy Isles and the 1999 Glacier Point rock falls, there was an attempt to monitor rock fall in Yosemite Valley

  10. ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clinton Lum

    2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

  11. AREVA NP Inc. Technical Data Record

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    58 Document No.: 12-9151202-001 Pebble Bed Reactor Cost and Schedule Report List of Tables (continued) Page Page 8 TABLE 4-24: SUMMARY OF OTHER COMMERCIAL...

  12. Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

  13. Rim Rock Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm Jump to:SectorRim Rock Wind Farm

  14. Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods, Illinois:239178°,is a927003°,AtIsland,Rock

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Crystalline Rock Repository Developments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0EnergySandia Involves Wind-FarmCool Earth SolarCrystalline Rock

  16. Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

  17. Rock types, pore types, and hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coalson, E.B.; Hartmann, D.J.; Thomas, J.B.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proposed exploration-oriented method of classifying porosity in sedimentary rocks is based on microscopic examination cores or cuttings. Factors include geometry, size, abundance, and connectivity of the pores. The porosity classification is predictive of key petrophysical characteristics: porosity-permeability relationships, capillary pressures, and (less certainly) relative permeabilities. For instance, intercrystalline macroporosity typically is associated with high permeability for a given porosity, low capillarity, and favorable relative permeabilities. This is found to be true whether this porosity type occurs in a sucrosic dolomite or in a sandstone with pervasive quartz overgrowths. This predictive method was applied in three Rocky Mountain oil plays. Subtle pore throat traps could be recognized in the J sandstone (Cretaceous) in the Denver basin of Colorado by means of porosity permeability plotting. Variations in hydrocarbon productivity from a Teapot Formation (Cretaceous) field in the Powder River basin of Wyoming were related to porosity types and microfacies; the relationships were applied to exploration. Rock and porosity typing in the Red River Formation (Ordovician) reconciled apparent inconsistencies between drill-stem test, log, and mud-log data from a Williston basin wildcat. The well was reevaluated and completed successfully, resulting in a new field discovery. In each of these three examples, petrophysics was fundamental for proper evaluation of wildcat wells and exploration plays.

  18. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock.

  19. Active control of underground stresses through rock pressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandergrift, T.L.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To significantly increase the stability of underground excavations while exploiting the full advantages of confined rock strength, methods must be developed to actively control the distribution of stresses near the excavation. This US Bureau of Mines study examines theoretical and practical aspects of rock pressurization, an active stress control concept that induces compressive stress in the wall rock through repeated hydraulic fracturing with a settable fluid. Numerical analyses performed by incorporating the rock pressurization concept into a variety of boundary-element models indicate that rock pressurization has the potential to improve underground excavation stability in three ways: (1) by relocating stress concentrations away from the weak opening surface to stronger, confined wall rock; (2) by inducing additional stresses in a biaxial stress field to reduce the difference between the principal stress components near the surface of the opening, and (3) by counteracting the tensile stresses induced in the rock around internally loaded openings. Practical aspects of the rock pressurization concept were investigated through a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments. The use of sulfur as a settable fluid for hydraulic fracturing was demonstrated, although problems related to sulfur viscosity suggest that other molten materials, such as wax, may be better suited to practical field application of the rock pressurization concept.

  20. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1989 - 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The purpose of this study was to analyze deep core...

  1. Scientists Pass Solid Particles Through Rock in DOE-Sponsored...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    rock fractures in the laboratory. This technology has the potential for mapping fracture systems in detail and aid in determining reservoir characteristics. This research was...

  2. Microsoft Word - CX-Hat_Rock_Switch_14June2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Glenn Russell Project Manager -TPCV-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Hat Rock Switching Station Replacement...

  3. Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on Mechanical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagenesis transforms an unconsolidated loose sed- imentOur emphasis is on unconsolidated sand and sandstone. Thesedi- mentary rock: unconsolidated sand and sandstone. The

  4. archean supracrustal rocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 164 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  5. alkalic rock: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interesting than whales's research interests include sustainable transportation, life-cycle assessment, and the national security Zhang, Junshan 120 ELASTIC ROCK PROPERTIES OF...

  6. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify...

  7. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    chemistrybutchercarbonationmechanism.pdf More Documents & Publications Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Interfaces Innovative...

  8. User`s guide to EAGLES Version 1.1: An electric- and gasoline-vehicle fuel-efficiency software package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, W.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EAGLES is an interactive microcomputer software package for the analysis of fuel efficiency in electric-vehicle (EV) applications or the estimation of fuel economy for a gasoline vehicle. The principal objective of the EV analysis is to enable the prediction of EV performance on the basis of laboratory test data for batteries. The EV model included in the software package provides a second-by-second simulation of battery voltage and current for any specified vehicle velocity/time or power/time profile. The capability of the battery is modeled by an algorithm that relates the battery voltage to the withdrawn (or charged) current, taking into account the effect of battery depth-of-discharge. Alternatively, the software package can be used to determine the size of the battery needed to satisfy given vehicle mission requirements. For gasoline vehicles, a generic fuel-economy model based on data from EPA Test Car List 1991 is included in the software package. For both types of vehicles, effects of heating/cooling loads on vehicle performance, including range penalty for EVs, can be studied. Also available is an option to estimate the time needed by a specified vehicle to reach a certain speed with the application of a constant power and an option to compute the fraction of time and/or distance in a driving cycle at speeds exceeding a specified value. Certain parameters can be changed interactively prior to a run.

  9. GEOS898 History on the Rocks Assignment 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Tracy D.

    can be broken down into four major rock groups (i.e. Clastic, biogenic, organic, chemical Flow chart for identifying sedimentary rocks (most text books have this or can be found on line) Acid, distribution of layers and chemistry. It is worthwhile for the teacher to spend about 10 minutes reviewing

  10. ROCK: A Robust Clustering Algorithm for Categorical Attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennsylvania, University of

    ROCK: A Robust Clustering Algorithm for Categorical Attributes Sudipto Guha Stanford University/proximity between a pair of data points. We develop a robust hierarchical clustering algorithm ROCK that employs measures that are relevant in situations where a domain expert/similarity table is the only source

  11. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250C, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

  12. Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raney, Robert 1987-

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    /water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how...

  13. Have you always had a rock collection? Are interesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5/2013 GEOLOGY Have you always had a rock collection? Are interesting landforms your favorite vacation sites? Would you like to help someone locate groundwater or oil-bearing rock formations? If you answered yes to any of these questions, maybe geology is the field for you. Wichita State University

  14. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Slick Rock sites in order to revise the October 1977 engineering radioactive uranium mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 387,000 tons of tailings at the Slick Rock sites constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The five alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, consolidation of the piles, and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings sites. Cost estimates for the five options range from about $6,800,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $11,000,000 for disposal at a distance of about 6.5 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Slick Rock tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $800/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by conventional or heap leach plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present, nor for the foreseeable future.

  15. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods,Rock Sampling Details Activities

  16. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods,Rock Sampling Details ActivitiesGeothermal

  17. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods,Rock Sampling Details

  18. Estimation of hydrologic properties of an unsaturated, fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klavetter, E.A.; Peters, R.R.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document, two distinctly different approaches are used to develop continuum models to evaluate water movement in a fractured rock mass. Both models provide methods for estimating rock-mass hydrologic properties. Comparisons made over a range of different tuff properties show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between estimates of rock-mass hydrologic properties made by the two models. This document presents a general discussion of: (1) the hydrology of Yucca Mountain, and the conceptual hydrological model currently being used for the Yucca Mountain site, (2) the development of two models that may be used to estimate the hydrologic properties of a fractured, porous rock mass, and (3) a comparison of the hydrologic properties estimated by these two models. Although the models were developed in response to hydrologic characterization requirements at Yucca Mountain, they can be applied to water movement in any fractured rock mass that satisfies the given assumptions.

  19. Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balick, Lee K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gillespie, Alan [UN. WASHINGTON; French, Andrew [USDA-ARS; Danilina, Iryna [UN. WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

  20. Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

  1. Full waveform inversion of a 3-D source inside an artificial rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    To, A C; Glaser, Steven D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a 3-D Source Inside an Artificial Rock Albert C. To andof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate inof a 3-D source inside an artificial rock plate is

  2. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  3. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  4. Rock Hill Utilities- Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed...

  5. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in fractured porous rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baek, Inseok

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical methods have been applied for the prediction of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through water-saturated fractured porous rock. The presence of colloids may enhance the transport of radionuclides in groundwater by reducing...

  6. Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)...

  7. FREE ROCKING OF PRISMATIC BLOCKS By P. R. Lipscombe1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    FREE ROCKING OF PRISMATIC BLOCKS By P. R. Lipscombe1 and S. Pellegrino2 ABSTRACT: This paper. This cycle comes to an end when the block becomes vertical and starts to rotate again about A. Because some

  8. Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan, Badr H.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

  9. Mimbres rock art: a graphic legacy of cultural expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tidemann, Kathryn

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock art abounds along the Mimbres River banks and drainage tributaries reflecting the rich cultural remains of the ancient Mimbres people. The Mimbres are a well established cultural group who lived in southwest New Mexico and northern Mexico from...

  10. DNAPL remediation of fractured rock evaluated via numerical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Ti Wee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractured rock formations represent a valuable source of groundwater and can be highly susceptible to contamination by dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The goal of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness ...

  11. Figure 2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Stratigraphic Summary of Ages, Names and Rock Types in the ANWR 1002 and Coastal Plain Area of the Alaska North Slope. Potentially Productive Reservoirs and Plays Assessed by...

  12. Drilling Complete on Australian Hot Dry Rock Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first commercial attempt to create a commercial geothermal power plant using hot dry rock technology reached a crucial milestone on January 22, when a production well successfully reached its target depth.

  13. Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System, Fenton Hill, New Mexico- Tracer Test Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  14. ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an in-situ jointed granite. Intl. J. Rock Mech. and Min.of Groundwaters in the Stripa Granite: Results and Preof water through Westerly Granite at temperatures of 100 -

  15. Characterizing Flow in Oil Reservoir Rock Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, David W.

    In this paper, a 3D Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulator for modeling grain scale fluid flow in porous rock is presented. The versatility of the SPH method has driven its use in increasingly complex areas of flow ...

  16. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keys, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore pressure and fracture...

  17. Experimental Study on Rock Deformation and Permeability Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Jihui

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a petroleum reservoir would inevitably induce a rearrangement of the in-situ stress field. The rearrangement of the stress field would then bring about a deformation of the reservoir rock and a change of the permeability...

  18. A Study of Hydraulic Fracturing Initiation in Transversely Isotropic Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serajian, Vahid

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    fractures and also can be used to develop information about in-situ rock properties using failure pressure values observed in the field. Finally, mechanical and permeability anisotropy are measured using Pulse Permeameter and triaxial tests on Pierre shale....

  19. Drill-back studies examine fractured, heated rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Flexser, S.; Myer, L.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the effects of heating on the mineralogical, geochemical, and mechanical properties of rock by high-level radioactive waste, cores are being examined from holes penetrating locations where electric heaters simulated the presence of a waste canister, and from holes penetration natural hydrothermal systems. Results to date indicate the localized mobility and deposition of uranium in an open fracture in heated granitic rock, the mobility of U in a breccia zone in an active hydrothermal system in tuff, and the presence of U in relatively high concentration in fracture-lining material in tuff. Mechanical -- property studies indicate that differences in compressional- and shear-wave parameters between heated and less heated rock can be attributed to differences in the density of microcracks. Emphasis has shifted from initial studies of granitic rock at Stripa, Sweden to current investigations of welded tuff at the Nevada Test Site. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Rock glacier monitoring with low-cost GPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moving stations on rock glacier Low-cost L1 GPS receivers (blox) Power source: solar panels Local data Rock glacier GPS antennaGPS antenna Solar panelSolar panel Box incl.Box incl. -GPS receiverData logger Instruments Solar panelSolar panel (24W, 12V, 50x50cm)(24W, 12V, 50x50cm) Costs per station: 2

  1. Reservoir rock-property calculations from thin section measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneed, David Richard

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESERVOIR ROCK-PROPERTY CALCULATIONS FROM THIN SECTION MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by DAVID RICHARD SNEED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Geology RESERVOIR ROCK-PROPERTY CALCULATIONS FROM THIN SECTION MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by DAVID RICHARD SNEED Approved as to style and content by: Robert R. Berg (Chair of Committee) ~ c(. Thomas T. Tieh (Member...

  2. Rock climbing sub-worlds: a segmentation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapelje, Brandon Wayne

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ROCK CLIMBING SUB-WORLDS: A SEGMENTATION STUDY A Thesis by BRANDON WAYNE RAPELJE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2004 Major Subject: Recreation, Park & Tourism Sciences ROCK CLIMBING SUB-WORLDS: A SEGMENTATION STUDY A Thesis by BRANDON WAYNE RAPELJE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  3. International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences 38 (2001) 9951027 Bayesian estimation of rock mass boundary conditions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ernie

    of rock mass boundary conditions with applications to the AECL underground research laboratory F. Tonon*,1 of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canada. The procedure

  4. On Two-Phase Relative Permeability and Capillary Pressure of Rough-Walled Rock Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess ed, K.; Tsang, Y.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Single Rock Joints", Licentiate Thesis, Lulea Universityof Technology, Lulea, Sweden. Heiba, A. A. , Sahimi, M. ,

  5. SPE 159255-PP Rock Classification from Conventional Well Logs in Hydrocarbon-Bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdn, Carlos

    typing method for application in hydrocarbon-bearing shale (specifically source rock) reservoirs using conventional well logs and core data. Source rock reservoirs are known to be highly heterogeneous and often, petrophysical description of source rock reservoirs with well logs has been focused to quantifying rock

  6. Response of Red-Tailed Hawks and Golden Eagles to Topographical Features, Weather, and Abundance of a Dominant Prey Species at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California: April 1999-December 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, S.

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies have shown that raptors flying within the Altamont Pass WRA are vulnerable to fatal turbine collisions, possibly because of their specific foraging and flight behavior. Between June 1999 and June 2000, I conducted 346.5 hours of raptor observations within the Atlamont Pass WRA. Behavior was recorded in relation to characteristics of the topography (slope aspect, elevation, and inclination), the weather, and ground squirrel abundance, as determined by active burrow entrances. The most significant finding of this study revealed that red-tailed hawks and golden eagles flew more in strong winds than in weak winds, particularly along hillsides facing into prevailing winds (as opposed to hillsides shielded from the wind). This is likely a result of the birds' use of declivity currents for lift during flights. These results suggest that certain combinations of topography and weather produce wind currents that are sought out by foraging red-tailed hawks and golden eagles within the Altamont Pass WRA. To decrease raptor mortality, mitigation measures can be targeted to specific areas likely to attract foraging raptors because of their capacity to create particularly favorable wind currents.

  7. MECHANICAL DEGRADATION OF EMPLACEMENT DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN - A CASE STUDY IN ROCK MECHANICS, PART 1: NONLITHOPHYSAL ROCK, PART 2: LITHOPHYSAL ROCK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Lin, D. Kicker, B. Damjanac, M. Board, and M. Karakouzian

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for a US high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation throughout the regulatory period for repository performance.

  8. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use.

  9. Chemical and petrological characteristics of the intrusive rocks of the Quitman Mountains, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seay, Christopher Sidney

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the behavior of elements in a magmatic environment. Due to the relatively small size of the Quitman intru- sion, the diversity of rock types, and the shallow depth of the source magma as evidenced by the composition and tex- ture of the rocks, it provides... faulted Creta- ceous sedimentary rocks. These Cretaceous rocks consist of some 12, 000 feet of marine shales, sandstones and limestones, and non-marine sandstones and shales. In places, volcanic rocks, mainly tuffaceous rhyolites and andesites...

  10. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka [RAWRA, Czech Republic

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  11. Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on MechanicalProperties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

    2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a general, physics-based approach to numericalreconstruction of the geometrical structure and mechanical properties ofnatural sedimentary rock in 3D. Our procedure consists of three mainsteps: sedimentation, compaction, and diagenesis, followed by theverification of rock mechanical properties. The dynamic geologicprocesses of grain sedimentation and compaction are simulated by solvinga dimensionless form of Newton's equations of motion for an ensemble ofgrains. The diagenetic rock transformation is modeled using a cementationalgorithm, which accounts for the effect of rock grain size on therelative rate of cement overgrowth. Our emphasis is on unconsolidatedsand and sandstone. The main input parameters are the grain sizedistribution, the final rock porosity, the type and amount of cement andclay minerals, and grain mechanical properties: the inter-grain frictioncoefficient, the cement strength, and the grain stiffness moduli. We usea simulated 2D Fontainebleau sandstone to obtain the grain mechanicalproperties. This Fontainebleau sandstone is also used to study theinitiation, growth, and coalescence of micro-cracks under increasingvertical stress. The box fractal dimension of the micro-crackdistribution, and its variation with the applied stress areestimated.

  12. Potential for tunneling based on rock and soil melting. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rock-melting drill was invented at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1960. Electrically heated, laboratory-scale drills were subsequently shown to penetrate igneous rocks at usefully high rates, with moderate power consumptions. The development of compact nuclear reactors and of heat pipes now makes possible the extension of this technology to much larger melting penetrators, potentially capable of producing holes up to several meters in diameter and several tens of kilometers long or deep. Development of a rapid, versatile, economical method of boring large, long shafts and tunnels offers solutions to many of man's most urgent ecological, scientific, raw-materials, and energy-supply problems. A melting method appears to be the most promising and flexible means of producing such holes. It is relatively insensitive to the composition, hardness, structure, and temperature of the rock, and offers the possibilities of producing self-supporting, glass-lined holes in almost any formation and (using a technique called lithofracturing) of eliminating the debris-removal problem by forcing molten rock into cracks created in the bore wall. Large rock-melting penetrators, called Electric Subterrenes or Nuclear Subterrenes according to the energy source used, are discussed in this report, together with problems anticipated in their development. It is concluded that this development is within the grasp of present technology.

  13. Mechanical interaction between rock, buffer and canister in repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgesson, L. [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The bentonite clay buffer, which is used in the repository concept of Sweden as well as many other countries, has an important role for mechanical protection of the canister. Of special interest is the effect of a rock shear, i.e. displacement of the rock along a fracture intersecting the deposition hole, on the canister. The article shows the results of some FEM calculations of a rock shear when the new composite copper/steel canister, is used. The effect of the swelling pressure from the bentonite before shear and the effect of a symmetric as well as an asymmetric rock shear will be shown. The calculations have been preceded by extensive laboratory tests and verification calculations by which material models for the buffer and proper calculation techniques have been developed. The material model for the clay is an elastic plastic model in which porous elasticity, based on the effective stress theory, is combined with Drucker-Prager plasticity. The results indicate that the bentonite clay acts as a very good mechanical buffer against such rock displacements. Although plastic yielding may occur, mainly in the copper, the plastic strain is not more than a few percent just after the shear.

  14. Superhard nanophase cutter materials for rock drilling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voronov, O.; Tompa, G.; Sadangi, R.; Kear, B.; Wilson, C.; Yan, P.

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Pressure-High Temperature (LPHT) System has been developed for sintering of nanophase cutter and anvil materials. Microstructured and nanostructured cutters were sintered and studied for rock drilling applications. The WC/Co anvils were sintered and used for development of High Pressure-High Temperature (HPHT) Systems. Binderless diamond and superhard nanophase cutter materials were manufactured with help of HPHT Systems. The diamond materials were studied for rock machining and drilling applications. Binderless Polycrystalline Diamonds (BPCD) have high thermal stability and can be used in geothermal drilling of hard rock formations. Nanophase Polycrystalline Diamonds (NPCD) are under study in precision machining of optical lenses. Triphasic Diamond/Carbide/Metal Composites (TDCC) will be commercialized in drilling and machining applications.

  15. Damage-induced nonassociated inelastic flow in rock salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model recently developed by CHAN, et al. (1992), for describing time-dependent, pressure-sensitive inelastic flow and damage evolution in crystalline solids was evaluated against triaxial creep experiments on rock salt. Guided by experimental observations, the kinetic equation and the flow law for damage-induced inelastic flow in the model were modified to account for the development of damage and inelastic dilatation in the transient creep regime. The revised model was then utilized to obtain the creep response and damage evolution in rock salt as a function of confining pressure and stress difference. Comparison between model calculation and experiment revealed that damage-induced inelastic flow is nonassociated, dilatational, and contributes significantly to the macroscopic strain rate observed in rock salt deformed at low confining pressures. The inelastic strain rate and volumetric strain due to damage decrease with increasing confining pressures, and all are suppressed at sufficiently high confining pressures.

  16. Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlueter, E.M.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding transport properties of sedimentary rocks, including permeability, relative permeability, and electrical conductivity, is of great importance for petroleum engineering, waste isolation, environmental restoration, and other applications. These transport properties axe controlled to a great extent by the pore structure. How pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media are investigated analytically and experimentally. Hydraulic and electrical conductivity of sedimentary rocks are predicted from the microscopic geometry of the pore space. Cross-sectional areas and perimeters of individual pores are estimated from two-dimensional scanning electron microscope (SEM) photomicrographs of rock sections. Results, using Berea, Boise, Massilon, and Saint-Gilles sandstones show close agreement between the predicted and measured permeabilities. Good to fair agreement is found in the case of electrical conductivity. In particular, good agreement is found for a poorly cemented rock such as Saint-Gilles sandstone, whereas the agreement is not very good for well-cemented rocks. The possible reasons for this are investigated. The surface conductance contribution of clay minerals to the overall electrical conductivity is assessed. The effect of partial hydrocarbon saturation on overall rock conductivity, and on the Archie saturation exponent, is discussed. The region of validity of the well-known Kozeny-Carman permeability formulae for consolidated porous media and their relationship to the microscopic spatial variations of channel dimensions are established. It is found that the permeabilities predicted by the Kozeny-Carman equations are valid within a factor of three of the observed values methods.

  17. Ozone generation by rock fracture: Earthquake early warning?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baragiola, Raul A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Hedges, Dawn [Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the production of up to 10 ppm ozone during crushing and grinding of typical terrestrial crust rocks in air, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at atmospheric pressure, but not in helium or nitrogen. Ozone is formed by exoelectrons emitted by high electric fields, resulting from charge separation during fracture. The results suggest that ground level ozone produced by rock fracture, besides its potential health hazard, can be used for early warning in earthquakes and other catastrophes, such as landslides or land shifts in excavation tunnels and underground mines.

  18. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

  19. RockPort Capital Partners (California) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods,Rock Sampling DetailsRockPort Capital Partners

  20. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

  1. Geohydromechanical Processes in the Excavation Damaged Zone in Crystalline Rock, Rock Salt, and Indurated and Plastic Clays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Bernier, Frederic; Davies, Christophe

    2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The creation of an excavation disturbed zone or excavation damaged zone is expected around all man-made openings in geologic formations. Macro- and micro-fracturing, and in general a redistribution of in situ stresses and rearrangement of rock structures, will occur in this zone, resulting in drastic changes of permeability to flow, mainly through the fractures and cracks induced by excavation. Such an EDZ may have significant implications for the operation and long-term performance of an underground nuclear waste repository. Various issues of concern need to be evaluated, such as processes creating fractures in the excavation damaged zone, the degree of permeability increase, and the potential for sealing or healing (with permeability reduction) in the zone. In recent years, efforts along these lines have been made for a potential repository in four rock types-crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay-and these efforts have involved field, laboratory, and theoretical studies. The present work involves a synthesis of the ideas and issues that emerged from presentations and discussions on EDZ in these four rock types at a CLUSTER Conference and Workshop held in Luxembourg in November, 2003. First, definitions of excavation disturbed and excavation damaged zones are proposed. Then, an approach is suggested for the synthesis and intercomparison of geohydromechanical processes in the EDZ for the four rock types (crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay). Comparison tables of relevant processes, associated factors, and modeling and testing techniques are developed. A discussion of the general state-of-the-art and outstanding issues are also presented. A substantial bibliography of relevant papers on the subject is supplied at the end of the paper.

  2. ConocoPhillips Canada rocks UAlberta science and engineering students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    ConocoPhillips Canada rocks UAlberta science and engineering students Teaching, research spaces. As an ongoing supporter of geoscience field schools, ConocoPhillips Canada has provided more than $3.1 million Program at the U of A, the only one of its kind in Canada. "The support from ConocoPhillips Canada

  3. Characterization of Geomechanical Poroelastic Parameters in Tight Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen Valdes, Clotilde Raquel

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In petroleum engineering and geophysics, it is often assumed that the rocks are completely rigid bodies with a totally interconnected pore space and that the fluid within the pores does not affect and are independent of the strains in the porous...

  4. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  5. Elastic properties of saturated porous rocks with aligned fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Several treatments of the porous media with aligned fractures have been ...... a function of background porosity /p for water-satu- rated rock (Kf = 2.25 ? 109 Pa). .... that are in hydraulic equilibrium with the fractures, the fluid will squeeze from...

  6. Investigation of a hydraulic impact a technology in rock breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in mining industry. The impact process of a high speed piston on liquid water, previously introduced on the environment such as fly rocks, air blast, noise pollution and toxic fumes. When blasting occurs close to residential areas, or during tunnel construction, environmental protection regulation could seriously affect

  7. Gravimeter yields rock density for cavern during operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folle, S.; Rolfs, O. [Kavernen Bau- and Betriebs-GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    1996-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing underground cavities and especially planning for caverns in salt formations for storage require investigations of several questions that are posed in this paper. A downhole gravimeter can determine rock density in a natural gas storage cavern while it is in operation or still being solution mined. Operating conditions or solution mining in progress precludes use of a standard density tool during conventional well-logging procedures. Rock density is one of the principal input parameters for rock mechanical investigations in specifying optimum pressure levels in storage caverns. The advantages and disadvantages of the system, as well as of the technical logging procedures, follow. The gravimeter tool: measures rock densities up to approximately 20 m into the formation; logs through casing (independent of a drilling rig); is unaffected by drilling mud; is unaffected by size and variation of caliber. But it also: does not measure continuously; makes logging time-consuming and requires a certain mobilization time; delivers data whose accuracy depends o the homogeneity of the formation or level of information available on the structure in question.

  8. Morphology and dynamics of explosive vents through cohesive rock formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galland, Olivier

    to test the effects of these parameters. The experiments were used to test the effect of 2 on vent simulations were used to test the effect of 3 on vent morphology and dynamics. In the numerical models we see to underground explosions that blast the overlaying rock formations [e.g., Gisler, 2009]. This phenomenon occurs

  9. Process of breaking and rendering permeable a subterranean rock mass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lekas, Mitchell A. (Concord, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of the present invention involves the following steps: producing, as by hydrofracing, a substantially horizontal fracture in the subterranean rock mass to be processed; emplacing an explosive charge in the mass in spaced juxtaposed position to the fracture; enlarging the fracture to create a void space thereat, an initial lifting of the overburden, and to provide a free face juxtaposed to and arranged to cooperate with the emplaced explosive charge; and exploding the charge against the free face for fragmenting the rock and to distribute the space, thus providing fractured, pervious, rubble-ized rock in an enclosed subterranean chamber. Firing of the charge provides a further lifting of the overburden, an enlargement of the chamber and a larger void space to distribute throughout the rubble-ized rock within the chamber. In some forms of the invention an explosive charge is used to produce a transitory enlargement of the fracture, and the juxtaposed emplaced charge is fired during the critical period of enlargement of the fracture.

  10. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Methods for detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sands. (2) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

  11. Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated with Unconsolidated Marine Sediments Diana associated with unconsolidated marine sediments. The goals are to predict gas-hydrate concentration from intercalated with unconsolidated sediments. We show that the geometrical details of how gas hy- drates

  12. SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing well logs and microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. We report results of three studies in this report. The first one deals with fractures and faults that provide the primary control on the underground fluid flow through low permeability massive carbonate rocks. Fault cores often represent lower transmissibility whereas the surrounding damaged rocks and main slip surfaces are high transmissibility elements. We determined the physical properties of fault rocks collected in and around the fault cores of large normal faults in central Italy. After studying the P- and S-wave velocity variation during cycles of confining pressure, we conclude that a rigid pore frame characterizes the fault gouge whereas the fractured limestone comprises pores with a larger aspect ratio. The second study was to characterize the seismic properties of brine as its temperature decreases from 25 C to -21 C. The purpose was to understand how the transmitted wave changes with the onset of freezing. The main practical reason for this experiment was to use partially frozen brine as an analogue for a mixture of methane hydrate and water present in the pore space of a gas hydrate reservoir. In the third study we analyzed variations in dynamic moduli in various carbonate reservoirs. The investigations include log and laboratory data from velocity, porosity, permeability, and attenuation measurements.

  13. Wave Generation from Explosions in Rock Cavities CANGLI LIU1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    Wave Generation from Explosions in Rock Cavities CANGLI LIU1 and THOMAS J. AHRENS1 Abstract Ð We have developed a measurement method to monitor P- and S-waves generated from laboratory diameter cavities. Stress waves generated by the explosions were recorded within a radius of 25 cm

  14. 2008 Rock Deformation GRC - Conference August 3-8, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James G. Hirth

    2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRC on Rock Deformation highlights the latest research in brittle and ductile rock mechanics from experimental, field and theoretical perspectives. The conference promotes a multi-disciplinary forum for assessing our understanding of rock strength and related physical properties in the Earth. The theme for the 2008 conference is 'Real-time Rheology'. Using ever-improving geophysical techniques, our ability to constrain the rheological behavior during earthquakes and post-seismic creep has improved significantly. Such data are used to investigate the frictional behavior of faults, processes responsible for strain localization, the viscosity of the lower crust, and viscous coupling between the crust and mantle. Seismological data also provide information on the rheology of the lower crust and mantle through analysis of seismic attenuation and anisotropy. Geologists are improving our understanding of rheology by combining novel analyses of microstructures in naturally deformed rocks with petrologic data. This conference will bring together experts and students in these research areas with experimentalists and theoreticians studying the same processes. We will discuss and assess where agreement exists on rheological constraints derived at different length/time scales using different techniques - and where new insight is required. To encompass the elements of these topics, speakers and discussion leaders with backgrounds in geodesy, experimental rock deformation, structural geology, earthquake seismology, geodynamics, glaciology, materials science, and mineral physics will be invited to the conference. Thematic sessions will be organized on the dynamics of earthquake rupture, the rheology of the lower crust and coupling with the upper mantle, the measurement and interpretation of seismic attenuation and anisotropy, the dynamics of ice sheets and the coupling of reactive porous flow and brittle deformation for understanding geothermal and chemical properties of the shallow crust that are important for developing ideas in CO2 sequestration, geothermal and petrochemical research and the mechanics of shallow faults.

  15. Fundamental Investigation of Pore Pressure Prediction During Drilling from the Mechanical Behavior of Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivas Cardona, Juan 1980-

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was conducted as a preliminary effort to develop a methodology to predict pore pressure in a rock formation during drilling, for all types of rocks and situations. Specifically, it was investigated whether or not the virgin pore...

  16. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems I. Fluid...

  17. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems II....

  18. Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Yvonne

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the heat source and encounters cooler rock, it condenses,fractured rock near the radioactive-decay heat source isrock, giving rise to a reflux of liquid back to the heat source.

  19. Transport and seismoelectric properties of porous permeable rock : numerical modeling and laboratory measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to better understand the transport and seismoelectric (SE) properties of porous permeable rock. Accurate information of rock transport properties, together with pore geometry, can aid us to ...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid volcano-plutonic rocks Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the first of a long string of bad jokes, and start looking at rocks. Get yer hiking boots ready. Purpose... will be placed on the field relationships of the various rock units...

  1. Search for underground openings for in situ test facilities in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Strisower, B.; Corrigan, D.J.; Graf, A.N.; O'Brien, M.T.; Pratt, H.; Board, M.; Hustrulid, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a few exceptions, crystalline rocks in this study were limited to plutonic rocks and medium to high-grade metamorphic rocks. Nearly 1700 underground mines, possibly occurring in crystalline rock, were initially identified. Application of criteria resulted in the identification of 60 potential sites. Within this number, 26 mines and 4 civil works were identified as having potential in that they fulfilled the criteria. Thirty other mines may have similar potential. Most of the mines identified are near the contact between a pluton and older sedimentary, volcanic and metamorphic rocks. However, some mines and the civil works are well within plutonic or metamorphic rock masses. Civil works, notably underground galleries associated with pumped storage hydroelectric facilities, are generally located in tectonically stable regions, in relatively homogeneous crystalline rock bodies. A program is recommended which would identify one or more sites where a concordance exists between geologic setting, company amenability, accessibility and facilities to conduct in situ tests in crystalline rock.

  2. Tracer Fluid Flow through Porous Media: Theory Applied to Acid Stimulation Treatments in Carbonate Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakaria Mohamed Reda, Ahmed

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Most carbonate rocks are heterogeneous at multiple length scales. These heterogeneities strongly influence the outcome of the acid stimulation treatments which are routinely performed to improve well productivity. At the pore scale, carbonate rocks...

  3. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excavated Hard Rock Caverns. Pacific Northwest Laboratory,Lux, K.H. Design of salt caverns for the storage of naturalgas storage in unlined rock caverns. Int J Rock Mech Min Sc

  4. Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties in Hard Rock, Ph.D. Thesis, Lulea Universityof Technology, Lulea, Sweden. Kolditz, O. and C. Clauser, (

  5. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and in induratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at Grimsel. In Coupled Thermo-Hydro- Mechanical-ChemicalCOUPLED HYDRO-MECHANICAL PROCESSES IN CRYTALLINE ROCK AND IN

  6. URTeC 1620617 Thermal Shock in Reservoir Rock Enhances the Hydraulic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    URTeC 1620617 Thermal Shock in Reservoir Rock Enhances the Hydraulic Fracturing of Gas Shales Saeid through strain and stress. As the temperature diffuses from hydraulic fracture into reservoir the rock matrix beyond hydraulic fracturing stimulation by cooling down the rock. The physics

  7. Organic Geochemistry of the CenomanianTuronian Bahloul Formation Petroleum Source Rock, Central and Northern Tunisia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Organic Geochemistry of the CenomanianTuronian Bahloul Formation Petroleum Source Rock, Central and around diapirs of the Triassic salt. Key words: Organic matter, Petroleum Source Rock, Cenomanian (TOC) determination, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, extractable organic matter content (EOM) fractionation

  8. SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO Belanger, Laura (M.S., Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering) Source and Effect of Acid Rock (the weathering of disseminated pyrite) sources of acid rock drainage (ARD). Stream waters

  9. The Rock Varnish Revolution: New Insights from Microlaminations and the Contributions of Tanzhuo Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    in potential source materials. In the ensuing two centu- ries, investigations into rock varnish have beenThe Rock Varnish Revolution: New Insights from Microlaminations and the Contributions of Tanzhuo Liu Ronald I. Dorn* School of Geographical Sciences, Arizona State University Abstract Rock varnish

  10. Chemical weathering of granitic rock: experiments and Pb-Li isotopes tracing Romain Millot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    is to better constrain the processes of water/rock interactions both in terms of source (dissolutionChemical weathering of granitic rock: experiments and Pb-Li isotopes tracing Romain Millot Philippe of weathering. In order to go further and to better characterize water/rock interactions, we performed

  11. Organic matter characteristics of CenomanianTuronian source rocks: implications for petroleum and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Organic matter characteristics of CenomanianTuronian source rocks: implications for petroleum from the Senegal margin basin, believed to be the main source rocks in the area, have been matter sources; Depositional environment; Petroleum source rock #12;1. Introduction Fig. 1. (a) Map

  12. SIZE COMPOSITION AND GROWTH OF YOUNG ROCK CRAB, CANCER IRRORATUS, ON A ROCKY BEACH IN MAINE!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Because rock crab is a valuable commercial species as well as an important food source of lobsters (EnnisSIZE COMPOSITION AND GROWTH OF YOUNG ROCK CRAB, CANCER IRRORATUS, ON A ROCKY BEACH IN MAINE! JAY S KROUSE' ABSTRACT Monthly hand collections of small rock crab, Cancer irrorallls, were made from

  13. Creep of Two Alpine Rock Glaciers Observation and Modelling (tztal-and Stubai Alps, Austria)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brckl, Ewald

    glaciers. The source areas of these rock glaciers are situated at altitudes of 2700 to 2800 m aCreep of Two Alpine Rock Glaciers Observation and Modelling (tztal- and Stubai Alps, Austria), Wolfram Mostler (Innsbruck) Abstract Our study concentrates on two active rock glaciers in the Eastern

  14. Bidirectional Seismic Behavior of Controlled Rocking Four-Legged Bridge Steel Truss Piers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    Bidirectional Seismic Behavior of Controlled Rocking Four-Legged Bridge Steel Truss Piers Michael rocking bridge steel truss piers to three components of seismic excitation are presented in this paper. The controlled rocking approach for seismic protection allows a pier to uplift from its base, limiting the force

  15. Determining the modal mineralogy of mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks using thermal emission spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Victoria E.

    Determining the modal mineralogy of mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks using thermal emission, Tempe Abstract. The modal mineralogies of 20 mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks were determined from mineralogical information from thermal infrared emission spectra of bulk rock samples. Furthermore, convolution

  16. Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda R Pace

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

  17. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  18. Stephen C. Ruppel Principal Investigator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    distribution and thermal maturity Upscaling Wireline log & 3D calibration Rock mechanics: geomechanical Shale, Texas, Louisiana Eagle Ford Shale, South Texas Pearsall Shale, Gulf Coast Basin Bakken Shale

  19. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  20. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  1. Neutron Production from the Fracture of Piezoelectric Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical explanation is provided for the experimental evidence that fracturing piezoelectric rocks produces neutrons. The elastic energy micro-crack production ultimately yields the macroscopic fracture. The mechanical energy is converted by the piezoelectric effect into electric field energy. The electric field energy decays via radio frequency (microwave) electric field oscillations. The radio frequency electric fields accelerate the condensed matter electrons which then collide with protons producing neutrons and neutrinos.

  2. Rock mechanics aspects of blowout self-containment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbarnejad Nesheli, Babak

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    on the linear elastic behavior of rock are excellent tools for designing and optimizing the trajectory of the borehole. Therefore, linear elastic models are the dominant models in most currently available simulators. For instance, Van Oort, Nicholson, and D... boreholes. For example, Van Oort, Nicholson, and D?Agostino 24 provided a numerical finite-element elasto-plastic model for mud weight prediction, which is more realistic and less conservative than previous models. They calibrated and validated...

  3. Compaction around a rigid, circular inclusion in partially molten rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alisic, Laura; Rudge, John F.; Katz, Richard F.; Wells, Garth N.; Rhebergen, Sander

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    , 3Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK, 4Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Abstract Conservation laws that describe the behavior of partially molten mantle rock have been established for several... of melt from the mantle control the chemical evolution of the mantle and crust over geological time. Observations of petrological and isotopic disequilibrium suggest that melt extraction to produce oceanic crust is rapid and potentially localized...

  4. Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, G. W.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

  5. Protected Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bits For Hard Rock Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Lee Cardenas

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two bits were designed. One bit was fabricated and tested at Terra-Tek's Drilling Research Laboratory. Fabrication of the second bit was not completed due to complications in fabrication and meeting scheduled test dates at the test facility. A conical bit was tested in a Carthage Marble (compressive strength 14,500 psi) and Sierra White Granite (compressive strength 28,200 psi). During the testing, Hydraulic Horsepower, Bit Weight, Rotation Rate, were varied for the Conical Bit, a Varel Tricone Bit and Varel PDC bit. The Conical Bi did cut rock at a reasonable rate in both rocks. Beneficial effects from the near and through cutter water nozzles were not evident in the marble due to test conditions and were not conclusive in the granite due to test conditions. At atmospheric drilling, the Conical Bit's penetration rate was as good as the standard PDC bit and better than the Tricone Bit. Torque requirements for the Conical Bit were higher than that required for the Standard Bits. Spudding the conical bit into the rock required some care to avoid overloading the nose cutters. The nose design should be evaluated to improve the bit's spudding characteristics.

  6. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado. Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VP) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the groundwater from further degradation. Remedial actions at the Slick Rock sites must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  7. Measurements of water vapor adsorption on the Geysers rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Horita, Juske; Simonson, John M.; Mesmer, Robert E.

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers was measured at 150 C and at 200 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 ? p/p0 ? 0.98, where p0 is the saturated water vapor pressure. The rocks were crushed and sieved into three fractions of different grain sizes (with different specific surface areas). Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, BET surface area analyses were performed by Porous Materials Inc. on the same rock samples using nitrogen or krypton adsorption measurements at 77 K. Specific surface areas and pore volumes were determined. These parameters are important in estimating water retention capability of a porous material. The same laboratory also determined the densities of the samples by helium pycnometry. Their results were then compared with our own density values obtained by measuring the effect of buoyancy in compressed argon. One of the goals of this project is to determine the dependence of the water retention capacity of the rocks as a function of temperature. The results show a significant dependence of the adsorption and desorption isotherms on the grain size of the sample. The increase in the amount of water retained with temperature observed previously (Shang et al., 1994a, 1994b, 1995) between 90 and 130C for various reservoir rocks from The Geysers may be due to the contribution of slow chemical adsorption and may be dependent on the time allowed for equilibration. In contrast with the results of Shang et al. (1994a, 1994b, 1995), some closed and nearly closed hysteresis loops on the water adsorption/desorption isotherms (with closing points at p/p0 ? 0.6) were obtained in this study. In these cases the effects of activated processes were not present, and no increase in water adsorption with temperature was observed

  8. 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    as the temperature increased. The aging of low permeability cores saturated with oil had little effect in the rate44 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine

  9. 0022-3530/93 $3.00 Long-Term Evolution of Fluid-Rock Interactions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Mark D.

    in the evolving Sierra Nevada magmatic arc is preserved in metavolcanic rocks of the Ritter Range pendant oxygen isotopic values of the rocks of the lower section indicate that these rocks interacted extensively with coeval volcanic centers. Metavolcanic rocks of the upper section evidently interacted with meteoris

  10. Hazard investigation of the Portillo Rock Avalanche site, central Andes, Chile, using an integrated field mapping and numerical modelling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be required to trigger another rockslide from the original source area. The rock slope was otherwise foundHazard investigation of the Portillo Rock Avalanche site, central Andes, Chile, using an integrated Chilean Andes This paper reports a detailed rock slope hazard investigation of the Portillo Rock Avalanche

  11. The Distinct Element Method - Application to Structures in Jointed Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J.P.; Glen, L.; Blair, S.; Heuze, F.

    2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Distinct Element Method (DEM) is a meshfree method with applications to rock mechanics, mining sciences, simulations of nuclear repositories, and the stability of underground structures. Continuum mesh-based methods have been applied successfully to many problems in geophysics. Even if the geology includes fractures and faults, when sufficiently large length scales are considered a continuum approximation may be sufficient. However, a large class of problems exist where individual rock joints must be taken into account. This includes problems where the structures of interest have sizes comparable with the block size. In addition, it is possible that while the structure may experience loads which do no measurable damage to individual blocks, some joints may fail. This may launch smaller blocks as dangerous projectiles or even cause total failure of a tunnel. Traditional grid-based continuum approaches are wholly unsuited to this class of problem. It is possible to introduce discontinuities or slide lines into existing grid-based methods, however, such limited approaches can break down when new contacts form between blocks. The distinct element method (DEM) is an alternative, meshfree approach. The DEM can directly approximate the block structure of the jointed rock using arbitrary polyhedra. Using this approach, preexisting joints are readily incorporated into the DEM model. In addition, the method detects all new contacts between blocks resulting from relative block motion. We will describe the background of the DEM and review previous application of the DEM to geophysical problems. Finally we present preliminary results from a investigation into the stability of underground structures subjected to dynamic loading.

  12. Energy Efficiency Upgrades for Little Rock Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Dunlap, M.A.

    2000-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Little Rock Air Force Base (LRAFB), in partnership with the local utility, Entergy Services, Inc., has reduced energy costs and used savings from investments in high-efficiency equipment to maintain and improve the condition of base housing and other facilities. Three projects were completed, with over $10 million invested. Major accomplishments include replacing air-to-air heat pumps with high-efficiency ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) in more than 1,500 base housing units, lighting modifications to 10 buildings, upgrade of HVAC equipment in the base's enlisted club, and energy-efficient lighting retrofits for LRAFB's flight simulator.

  13. A correlation of rock compressibility with temperature and pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudhary, Bijoy Kumar

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoir rocks to higher temperatures. Tests were conducted on 17 specimens cut from 5 sandstone cores and 0 4 specimens cut from one limestone core at temperatures of 76 F, 0 0 0 200 F, 300 F, and 400 F and at pressures ranging from 100-14, 000 0 psi.... The net change in 0 0 pore volume from 100-14, 000 psi ranges between 4. 0 /o and 9. 6 /o 0 0 at room temperature and 5. 1 ? 14. 1 /o at 400 F. A definite trend was established between pore volume compressibility and porosity of the specimens tested...

  14. CD-3: Crystalline Rock - Basement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline Rock - Basement Jump to: navigation, search

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rock Island Arsenal - IL 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne CoColorado RioMill Site -Rock

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- WNI Split Rock Site - 043

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -Miami - FL06TN 04Split Rock

  17. Property:CapRockLithology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County,InformationInformation PelletsParticipant JumpCapRockLithology Jump

  18. Window Rock, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamson County,Bay, OR) JumpPhoto fromWindbladeWindham is aRock,

  19. Electrical Conductivity of Soils and Rocks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revisionWind,Soils and Rocks Jump to: navigation, search

  20. Alum Rock, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil JumpAltergy Systems Place: Folsom,IncAltoona, Iowa:Rock, California:

  1. Castle Rock, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascade Sierra Solutions CSSCass County isCastalia,Rock,

  2. Method and apparatus for determining two-phase flow in rock fracture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Persoff, Peter (Oakland, CA); Pruess, Karsten (Berkeley, CA); Myer, Larry (Benicia, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method and apparatus as disclosed for measuring the permeability of multiple phases through a rock fracture. The improvement in the method comprises delivering the respective phases through manifolds to uniformly deliver and collect the respective phases to and from opposite edges of the rock fracture in a distributed manner across the edge of the fracture. The improved apparatus comprises first and second manifolds comprising bores extending within porous blocks parallel to the rock fracture for distributing and collecting the wetting phase to and from surfaces of the porous blocks, which respectively face the opposite edges of the rock fracture. The improved apparatus further comprises other manifolds in the form of plenums located adjacent the respective porous blocks for uniform delivery of the non-wetting phase to parallel grooves disposed on the respective surfaces of the porous blocks facing the opposite edges of the rock fracture and generally perpendicular to the rock fracture.

  3. Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P. (Arlington, VA); Simon, Jonathon N. (San Leandro, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (<500 Hz), high sensitivity (.mu.G), with minimal power usage. The capacitors are connected to a power supply (battery) and to sensor interface electronics, which may include an analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, etc. The sensor (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

  4. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  5. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

  6. ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiens, Roger

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  7. ChemCam Rock Laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LANL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instr... Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components are concurrently being assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France, and will be delivered to JPL in July. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2009. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  8. Release of uranium and thorium from granitic rocks during in situ weathering and initial erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledger, Ernest Broughton

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their concentrations in unweathered or slightly weathered granitic rocks, soils developed on granitic rocks, and material from a granitic source transported by a local stream. "Uranium maps", obtained by fission track analysis, are used to understand the mode... OF URANIUM AND THORIUM IN THE GRANITIC 17 19 30 30 31 38 SOURCE ROCKS . 44 REDISTRIBUTION OF URANIUM AND THORIUM IN GRANITIC MATERIALS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION 77 CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES APPENDIX VITA 105 108 112 113...

  9. Petrography and prediction of reservoir rock properties in the Sussex Sandstone, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Richard Hoyt

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine rock composition and texture. Composition was established by point count of 100 grains. Framework grains were identified and counted as monocrystalline quartz, polycrystalline quartz, volcanic rock fragments, potassium feldspar, plagioclase... and quiet water deposition of shale was resumed. The sandstone is classified as a volcanic aronite based on a det: ital composition averaging 59 percent quartz, including both monccrystalline and polycrystalline varieties, 18 percent rock frag- ments...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - archaean sedimentary rocks Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Archaean," the rocks are ... Source: Hamilton, Warren B. - Department of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines Collection: Geosciences 87 Geologic Time Name...

  11. Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and calcite whose 18O values record the temperatures and isotopic compositions of fluids prevailing during at least two different episodes of rock-fluid interaction. The first...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - altered granitic rock Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    whereas Turgutlu rocks can be considered ... Source: UCLA, Ion Microprobe Facility Collection: Geosciences Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41...

  13. Bibliography of the geological and geophysical aspects of hot dry rock geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Sayer, S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first issue of an annual compilation of references that are useful to the exploration, understanding and development of the hot dry rock geothermal resource.

  14. On White's model of attenuation in rocks with partial gas saturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, N. C.; Seriff, A. J.

    approximate theory for the calculation of attenuation and dispersion of compressional seismic waves in porous rocks filled mostly with brine but containing...

  15. DESCRIPTION OF THE BAKKEN FORMATIONS ROCK PROPERTIES OF THE WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kocoglu, Sebnem 1983-

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??It is possible to determine rock properties by utilizing seismic inversion techniques. The inversion technique is the most frequently used, by which the seismic interpreters (more)

  16. Rock Sampling At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012) Exploration Activity Details...

  17. Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

  18. Petrophysical rock classification in the Cotton Valley tight-gas sandstone reservoir with a clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Petrophysical rock classification in the Cotton Valley tight-gas sandstone reservoir classification method with field data acquired in the Cotton Valley tight-gas sandstone reservoir located

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid rock discharges Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dioxide from acidic brine. For a brine-rock ... Source: Heller, Paul - Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming Collection: Geosciences 55 Chapter 1....

  20. A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  1. Paradox of Peroxy Defects and Positive Holes in Rocks Part II: Outflow of Electric Currents from Stressed Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoville, John; Freund, Friedemann

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the electrical properties of rocks is of fundamental interest. We report on currents generated when stresses are applied. Loading the center of gabbro tiles, 30x30x0.9 cm$^3$, across a 5 cm diameter piston, leads to positive currents flowing from the center to the unstressed edges. Changing the constant rate of loading over 5 orders of magnitude from 0.2 kPa/s to 20 MPa/s produces positive currents, which start to flow already at low stress levels, <5 MPa. The currents increase as long as stresses increase. At constant load they flow for hours, days, even weeks and months, slowly decreasing with time. When stresses are removed, they rapidly disappear but can be made to reappear upon reloading. These currents are consistent with the stress-activation of peroxy defects, such as O$_3$Si-OO-SiO$_3$, in the matrix of rock-forming minerals. The peroxy break-up leads to positive holes h$^{\\bullet}$, i.e. electronic states associated with O$^-$ in a matrix of O$^{2-}$, plus electrons, e'. Propagating...

  2. Microsoft Word - AREVA Benchmarking Site Visit and Interview...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    benefits that DOE should consider; * Considerable time needs to be allocated to conduct extensive start-up and acceptance testing prior to initial operations with spent...

  3. Review of AREVA's Facilities and Modeling Capabilities Dennis Gottuso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    and engineering (including large R&D programs) for uranium mining, Canadian nuclear reactors, licensing

  4. areva sustainable development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rays is used. Photovoltaics currently relies on three technologies. Monocrystalline and polycrystalline cells are silicon-based. Thin-film cells use semi-conductor materials....

  5. areva nc recycling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 329 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  6. Overview of AREVA Logistics Business Unit Capabilities and Expertise |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy Series |DOE's goal is to provide safe,Overview

  7. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Shaw Areva MOX Services, LLC MOX

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 Frontera GenerationMedicine - AssistantOfficeSPRO

  8. Areva University of Idaho JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo Feng Bio Energy Co Ltd

  9. Overview of AREVA Logistics Business Unit Capabilities and Expertise

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactorBatteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies

  10. Washington Post Energy Conference Presented by Areva | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartment of EnergyWas

  11. Washington Post Energy Conference Presented by Areva | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.| DepartmentVolvo TrucksofPost Energy Conference Presented

  12. Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microgeometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlueter, E.M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate through analysis and experiment how pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media. Our approach is to measure fluid permeability and electrical conductivity of rock samples using single and multiple fluid phases that can be frozen in place (wetting and nonwetting) over a range of pore pressures. These experiments are analyzed in terms of the microphysics and microchemistry of the processes involved to provide a theoretical basis for the macroscopic constitutive relationships between fluid-flow and geophysical properties that we develop. The purpose of these experiments and their analyses is to advance the understanding of the mechanisms and factors that control fluid transport in porous media. This understanding is important in characterizing porous media properties and heterogeneities before simulating and monitoring the progress of complex flow processes at the field scale in permeable media.

  13. Predicting the transport properties of sedimentary rocks from microgeometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlueter, E.M.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author investigates through analysis and experiment how pore geometry, topology, and the physics and chemistry of mineral-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions affect the flow of fluids through consolidated/partially consolidated porous media. The approach is to measure fluid permeability and electrical conductivity of rock samples using single and multiple fluid phases that can be frozen in place (wetting and nonwetting) over a range of pore pressures. These experiments are analyzed in terms of the microphysics and microchemistry of the processes involved to provide a theoretical basis for the macroscopic constitutive relationships between fluid-flow and geophysical properties that the authors develop. The purpose of these experiments and their analyses is to advance the understanding of the mechanisms and factors that control fluid transport in porous media. This understanding is important in characterizing porous media properties and heterogeneities before simulating and monitoring the progress of complex flow processes at the field scale in permeable media.

  14. Saturated Zone Plumes in Volcanic Rock: Implications for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Kelkar; R. Roback; B. Robinson; G. Srinivasan; C. Jones; P. Reimus

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a literature survey of the occurrences of radionuclide plumes in saturated, fractured rocks. Three sites, Idaho National laboratory, Hanford, and Oak Ridge are discussed in detail. Results of a modeling study are also presented showing that the length to width ratio of a plume starting within the repository footprint at the Yucca Mountain Project site, decreases from about 20:1 for the base case to about 4:1 for a higher value of transverse dispersivity, indicating enhanced lateral spreading of the plume. Due to the definition of regulatory requirements, this lateral spreading does not directly impact breakthrough curves at the 18 km compliance boundary, however it increases the potential that a plume will encounter reducing conditions, thus significantly retarding the transport of sorbing radionuclides.

  15. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  16. Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Robert (Chelan County Public Utility District No. 1, Power Operations Department, Wenatchee, WA)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead (Oncoryhnchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1--August 31, 1996. This was the twelfth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish collected by species, (2) number of fin clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) total number of fish showing signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT), (4) percent of descaled fish, and (5) daily average river flow, powerhouse {number_sign}1 flow, powerhouse {number_sign}2 flow and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the water budget, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows during the downstream migration of juvenile salmonids.

  17. CO/sub 2/ foam flooding performance vs. rock wettability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lescure, B.M.; Claridge, E.L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO/sub 2/ flooding projects have shown large potential for oil recovery, but in many cases the volumetric sweep efficiency is greatly limited by gravity tonguing and/or viscous fingering. To reduce these effects foam could be used as an alternative to WAG CO/sub 2/ injection. Experiments on the CO/sub 2/ foam process were conducted in a 1/4 5-spot reservoir model in order to investigate the effect of rock wetting state and total CO/sub 2/ slug size on secondary and tertiary extra-oil recovery. Laboratory model results show that the process is more successful in an oil-wet medium than in a water-wet medium due to larger surfactant adsorption in the water-wet medium. Also, requirements for optimal CO/sub 2/ slug size are smaller than in the WAG process, with larger extra oil recovery for both secondary and tertiary floods.

  18. Sedimentary basin geochemistry and fluid/rock interactions workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental research related to organic geochemistry, fluid-rock interactions, and the processes by which fluids migrate through basins has long been a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Geosciences program. Objectives of this program were to emphasize those principles and processes which would be applicable to a wide range of problems associated with petroleum discovery, occurrence and extraction, waste disposal of all kinds, and environmental management. To gain a better understanding of the progress being made in understanding basinal fluids, their geochemistry and movement, and related research, and to enhance communication and interaction between principal investigators and DOE and other Federal program managers interested in this topic, this workshop was organized by the School of Geology and Geophysics and held in Norman, Oklahoma in November, 1991.

  19. Spatial statistics for predicting flow through a rock fracture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coakley, K.J.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid flow through a single rock fracture depends on the shape of the space between the upper and lower pieces of rock which define the fracture. In this thesis, the normalized flow through a fracture, i.e. the equivalent permeability of a fracture, is predicted in terms of spatial statistics computed from the arrangement of voids, i.e. open spaces, and contact areas within the fracture. Patterns of voids and contact areas, with complexity typical of experimental data, are simulated by clipping a correlated Gaussian process defined on a N by N pixel square region. The voids have constant aperture; the distance between the upper and lower surfaces which define the fracture is either zero or a constant. Local flow is assumed to be proportional to local aperture cubed times local pressure gradient. The flow through a pattern of voids and contact areas is solved using a finite-difference method. After solving for the flow through simulated 10 by 10 by 30 pixel patterns of voids and contact areas, a model to predict equivalent permeability is developed. The first model is for patterns with 80% voids where all voids have the same aperture. The equivalent permeability of a pattern is predicted in terms of spatial statistics computed from the arrangement of voids and contact areas within the pattern. Four spatial statistics are examined. The change point statistic measures how often adjacent pixel alternate from void to contact area (or vice versa ) in the rows of the patterns which are parallel to the overall flow direction. 37 refs., 66 figs., 41 tabs.

  20. The UK geothermal hot dry rock R&D programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, Paul; Stedman, Ann; Symons, Geoff

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UK hot dry rock research and development programme is funded by the Department of Energy and aims to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial exploitation of HDR in the UK. The philosophy of the UK programme has been to proceed to a full-scale prototype HDR power station via a number of stages: Phase 1--Experiments at shallow depth (300 m) to assess the feasibility of enhancing the permeability of the rock. Phase 2--Studies at intermediate depth (2500 m) to determine the feasibility of creating a viable HDR subsurface heat exchanger. Phase 3--Establishment of an HDR prototype at commercial depth. The programme has run over a 15 year period, and has been formally reviewed at stages throughout its progress. The 1987 review towards the end of Phase 2 identified a number of technical objectives for continuing research and proposed that the initial design stage of the deep HDR prototype should start. Phase 3A is now complete. It addressed: the feasibility of creating an underground HDR heat exchanger suitable for commercial operation; techniques for improving hydraulic performance and correcting short circuits in HDR systems; modeling of the performance, resource size and economic aspects of HDR systems. The work has been conducted by a number of contractors, including Cambome School of Mines, Sunderland and Sheffield City Polytechnics and RTZ Consultants Limited. This paper focuses upon the experimental work at Rosemanowes in Cornwall and the recently completed conceptual design of a prototype HDR power station. The economics of HDR-generated electricity are also discussed and the conclusions of a 1990 program review are presented. Details of the HDR program to 1994, as announced by the UK Department of Energy in February 1991, are included.

  1. Source and tectono-metamorphic evolution of mafic and pelitic metasedimentary rocks from the central Quetico metasedimentary belt, Archean Superior Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Source and tectono-metamorphic evolution of mafic and pelitic metasedimentary rocks from, was conducted in order to evaluate the origin, source and evolution of sedimentary rocks, including mafic rocks previously mapped as ultramafics rocks. Bulk chemical compositions of these rocks show a mixing with two end

  2. Can Rock-Eval pyrolysis assess the biogeochemical composition of organic matter during peatification?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    as a screening tool to investigate soil organic matter (SOM) chemistry and vulnerability. In order to test the validity of Rock-Eval as an indicator of SOM chemistry and of OM transformations, we compared classical Rock-Eval-derived parameters (Total Organic Carbon - TOC, Hydrogen Index - HI and Oxygen Index - OI

  3. Final Report: Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normann, Randy A.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  4. Using LIDAR in Highway Rock Cuts Norbert H. Maerz, Ph. D., P. Eng,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, Norbert H.

    the data needed to begin the process of modeling the rock raveling process. INTRODUCTION LIDAR damage, injury, and even death. Highways impeded by even small spills of rock material by blasting techniques to facilitate the highway construction. A constant danger to the motoring public

  5. Diffusion-driven extreme lithium isotopic fractionation in country rocks of the Tin Mountain pegmatite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Diffusion-driven extreme lithium isotopic fractionation in country rocks of the Tin Mountain rocks (amphibolites and schists) of the Tin Mountain pegmatite show systematic changes with distance; fluid infiltration; Tin Mountain pegmatite 1. Introduction Lithium is a fluid-mobile, moderately

  6. RIS-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RIS-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT Mathematical treatment project. Abstract. A mathematical model for the brine migration in rock salt around an infinite line heat source is set up. The tempera- ture field around the time dependent heat source is calculated by use

  7. Organic carbon sources and transformations in mangrove sediments: A Rock-Eval pyrolysis approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Organic carbon sources and transformations in mangrove sediments: A Rock-Eval pyrolysis approach C'Orlans, CNRS/INSU, Universit d'Orlans, 1A rue de la Frollerie, 45071 Orlans, France Abstract A Rock cycling in this specific environment using a method that allows monitoring the depth evolution of sources

  8. Assimilation of Ultramafic Rock in Subduction-Related Magmatic Arcs Author(s): Peter B. Kelemen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assimilation of Ultramafic Rock in Subduction-Related Magmatic Arcs Author(s): Peter B. Kelemen Source: The Journal of Geology, Vol. 94, No. 6 (Nov., 1986), pp. 829-843 Published by: The University. http://www.jstor.org #12;ASSIMILATION OF ULTRAMAFIC ROCK IN SUBDUCTION-RELATED MAGMATIC ARCS1 PETER B

  9. Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User's Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterizing Hydraulic Properties and Ground-Water Chemistry in Fractured-Rock Aquifers: A User source for science about the Earth, its natural and living resources, natural hazards., 2007, Characterizing hydraulic properties and ground-water chemistry in fractured-rock aquifers: A user

  10. TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Laurel

    TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1 , L produces a strong spectral band contrast. This also gives varnish its shiny appearance. On Earth rock varnish may have a microbial origin [3]. Clays are transported from an external source and deposited

  11. Rock magnetic investigation of possible sources of the Bangui magnetic anomaly1 , M., Quesnel2*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Rock magnetic investigation of possible sources of the Bangui magnetic anomaly1 2 Ouabego1,2 , M slices of such28 metamorphic rocks, or by an iron-rich mafic source, or by a combination of these two29 source using constraints19 from satellite and ground magnetic field measurements, as well as from surface

  12. alternative is rock or other noncombustible material; avoid bark or wood chip mulch in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alternative is rock or other noncombustible material; avoid bark or wood chip mulch in this area. 6 needles and leaves to eliminate an ignition source for firebrands, especially during the hot, dry weather escape drill. Know where safety areas are within your subdivision. Meadows, rock outcrops, and wide roads

  13. SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER, and Architectural Engineering 2006 #12;ii This thesis entitled: Sources and Effects of Mining-Related and Natural Acid Rock Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison County, Colorado

  14. Eric Moulton, Ferri Hassani, Pejman Nekoovaght Microwave-Assisted Heating in Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Eric Moulton, Ferri Hassani, Pejman Nekoovaght Microwave-Assisted Heating in Rock INTRODUCTION to expensive replacements. Expansive heating through microwaves breaks up the rock, which reduces the stress the mechanisms and parameters governing the heating rate of a material. Department of Mining and Materials

  15. Vug waves: A mechanism for coupled rock deformation and fluid migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtzman, Ben

    Vug waves: A mechanism for coupled rock deformation and fluid migration Jason Phipps Morgan-migration mechanism in which a rock deforms by the movement of a penny-shaped, fluid-filled crack dislocation across, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA (holtz007@tc.umn.edu) [1] Vug waves are a joint deformation/fluid

  16. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS ON THE HYDRAULIC AND THERMOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF FRACTURED CRYSTALLINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of in s i t u j o i n t e d granite." I n t . J . Rock Mech.1979. "Waste disposal i n granite: Preliminary r e s u l t sintact samples of basalt, granite, marble, and other rocks.

  17. Isotope systematics of ore-bearing granites and host rocks of the Orlovka-Spokoinoe mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Isotope systematics of ore-bearing granites and host rocks of the Orlovka-Spokoinoe mining district and Spokoinoe granite massifs and their host rocks in the Orlovka- Spokoinoe mining district, Eastern Transbaikalia, Russia. Pb isotope analyses indicate one common Pb source for all three granite massifs

  18. Who are Climbing the Walls? An Exploration of the Social World of Indoor Rock Climbing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurten, Jason Henry

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and attention has been focused on completing my study. I would like to thank the rock climbing community at Texas A&M for being so welcoming and for being willing to open up their community and share themselves with the leisure studies world. They have... ................................................................................. 39 Serious Leisure .................................................................... 44 Indoor Rock Climbing Social World ? The Climbing Community...

  19. IMA Preprints Series (2002) Micro-and macro-scopic models of rock fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMA Preprints Series (2002) Micro- and macro-scopic models of rock fracture Donald L. Turcotte to some earthquakes. Key words: rock mechanics, damage, fracture, critical point, power-law scaling, self involve a sin- gle fracture propagating through an homogeneous solid. However, this is an idealized case

  20. IMA Preprints Series (2002) Micro and macroscopic models of rock fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMA Preprints Series (2002) Micro­ and macro­scopic models of rock fracture Donald L. Turcotte to some earthquakes. Key words: rock mechanics, damage, fracture, critical point, power­law scaling, self involve a sin­ gle fracture propagating through an homogeneous solid. However, this is an idealized case

  1. IntroductIon The range-restricted Rock Firefinch Lagonosticta sangui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    conservation importance within the Jos Plateau Forest-Grassland Mosaic eco-region, Nigeria. Typical of the Jos Plateau landscape are rocky outcrops and isolated, sparsely vegetated granitic hills of rounded bare rock of the habitat associations and population density of the Rock Firefinch have centered on the Amurum Forest

  2. NITROGEN REMOVAL FOR ON-SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL: A RECIRCULATING SAND FILTER/ROCK TANK DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    NITROGEN REMOVAL FOR ON-SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL: A RECIRCULATING SAND FILTER/ROCK TANK DESIGN, C. G. McKiel ABSTRACT: The nitrogen removal abilities of recirculating sand filter/rock tank (RSF) systems and conventional septic tank/soil absorption trench systems were compared in a field laboratory

  3. Mineralogical characterization of protolith and fault rocks from the SAFOD Main Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mineralogical characterization of protolith and fault rocks from the SAFOD Main Hole John G. Solum influence is not yet fully known. Faults containing these mineralogical phases are prime candidates), Mineralogical characterization of protolith and fault rocks from the SAFOD Main Hole, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L

  4. RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy and geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baxter, Ethan F.

    RoBOT: "Rocks Beneath Our Toes" An experiential learning opportunity in mineralogy with Boston University undergraduates to analyze the mineralogy and unravel the unique story that each rock into modern scientific methods of geochemistry and mineralogy and to unlock for them the exciting

  5. Organic solvent alteration of hydraulic properties of sedimentary rocks of low permeability: a review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sklarew, D.S.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the current literature on hydrophysical interactions of organic solutes with sedimentary rocks of low permeability is presented. The motivation was the premise that low permeability rocks may act as secondary (aquifer) barriers for the containment of hazardous organic wastes, thus preventing these wastes from contaminating the groundwater. However, this premise may be incorrect if organic wastes can affect the hydraulic conductivity of these rocks. The results indicate that very little work has been done concerning interactions of organics with consolidated subsurface materials. Available information on three related topics was summarized: the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of clays, case studies concerning the interactions of organic compounds with clays and sedimentary rocks, and the effect of shales on inorganic transport. These studies give an indication of some research areas that need to be explored with regard to the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks; these research needs are briefly summarized. 42 refs.

  6. Use of ``rock-typing`` to characterize carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikwuakor, K.C.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to apply techniques of ``rock-typing`` and quantitative formation evaluation to borehole measurements in order to identify reservoir and non-reservoir rock-types and their properties within the ``C`` zone of the Ordovician Red River carbonates in the northeast Montana and northwest North Dakota areas of the Williston Basin. Rock-typing discriminates rock units according to their pore-size distribution. Formation evaluation estimates porosities and pore fluid saturation. Rock-types were discriminated using crossplots involving three rock-typing criteria: (1) linear relationship between bulk density and porosity, (2) linear relationship between acoustic interval transit-time and porosity, and (3) linear relationship between acoustic interval transit-time and bulk density. Each rock-type was quantitatively characterized by the slopes and intercepts established for different crossplots involving the above variables, as well as porosities and fluid saturations associated with the rock-types. All the existing production was confirmed through quantitative formation evaluation. Highly porous dolomites and anhydritic dolomites contribute most of the production, and constitute the best reservoir rock-types. The results of this study can be applied in field development and in-fill drilling. Potential targets would be areas of porosity pinchouts and those areas where highly porous zones are downdip from non-porous and tight dolomites. Such areas are abundant. In order to model reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations, a more localized (e.g. field scale) study, expanded to involve other rock-typing criteria, is necessary.

  7. Szczepanik, Z., Milne, D., Kostakis, K., Eberhardt, E. Long Term Laboratory Strength Tests in Hard Rock. ISRM 2003Technology roadmap for rock mechanics, South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 2003.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Metallurgy, 2003. Long Term Laboratory Strength Tests in Hard Rock Z. Szczepanik* , D. Milne* , K. Kostakis

  8. Effectiveness of rock wall terraces on soil conservation and crop performance in a southern Honduras steepland farming system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, Hector Enrique

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect that rock wall terraces have on soil and water conservation and crop production was studied on a steepland farm in southern Honduras during the 1995 growing season. The research compared a site with 10 year old rock terraces...

  9. Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Wei

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    range kg/yr Cl sources and sinks Water or rock mass mol/kgtemperature at the source of fluid-rock reactions, asto identify the fluid-rock reactions at source. In addition,

  10. Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new site would have to be selected in parallel with the confirmatory studies because it would have to be modeled as part of the studies and because its similarity to other candidate sites must be known well enough to assure that results at the selected site are relevant to many others. Also, the industry partners in the joint effort at the new site must be part of the confirmatory studies, because they must be convinced of the economic feasibility. This meeting may have brought together the core of people who can make such a joint effort take place. EPRI sponsored the organization of this meeting in order to provide utilities with an update on the prospects for power generation via heat mining. Although the emerging rules for electric utilities competing in power generation make it very unlikely that the rate-payers of any one utility (or small group of utilities) can pay the differential to support this new heat mining research and development effort, the community represented at this meeting may be able to make the case for national or international support of a new heat mining effort, based on the potential size and economics of this resource as a benefit for the nation as a whole and as a contribution to reduced emissions of fossil CO{sub 2} worldwide.

  11. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos F. Jov Coln; Philippe F. Weck; David H. Sassani; Liange Zheng; Jonny Rutqvist; Carl I. Steefel; Kunhwi Kim; Seiji Nakagawa; James Houseworth; Jens Birkholzer; Florie A. Caporuscio; Michael Cheshire; Michael S. Rearick; Mary K. McCarney; Mavrik Zavarin; Ana Benedicto; Annie B. Kersting; Mark Sutton; James Jerden; Kurt E. Frey; Jacqueline M. Copple; William Ebert

    2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70s and mid 80s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: ? Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; ? Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; ? Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; ? Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment; ? ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

  12. Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006), The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of Enhanced2000), A Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Concept Utilizing

  13. Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoir storage project in Sesta, Italy [1]; as well as two pilot tests in rock caverns associated with abandoned

  14. INVESTIGATION OF SCALE EFFECTS IN HARD ROCKS Richard Simon, Dept of civil, geological & mining engng cole Polytechnique, Montral, Qubec, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    with few or no joints. R?SUM? Les roches et massifs rocheux présentent une variation des propriétés and pores to shear bands in rocks, to joints and faults in rock masses. When the volume of the rock. This volume is called large size unit block. At the rock mass scale, where new types of defects are present

  15. RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE IN MINED CAVERNS IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK-RESULTS OF FIELD INVESTIGATIONS AT STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Storage in Mined CavernsProgram Summary. LawrenceWASTE STORAGE IN MINED CAVERNS IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK- BESULTS

  16. Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in cavern sealing and operation. The MDCF model is used in three simulations of field experiments in which indirect measures were obtained of the generation of damage. The results of the simulations help to verify the model and suggest that the model captures the correct fracture behavior of rock salt. The model is used in this work to estimate the generation and location of damage around a cylindrical storage cavern. The results are interesting because stress conditions around the cylindrical cavern do not lead to large amounts of damage. Moreover, the damage is such that general failure can not readily occur, nor does the extent of the damage suggest possible increased permeation when the surrounding salt is impermeable.

  17. Isotopic evidence of a near surface history for the source rocks of the central Coast Plutonic Complex, British Columbia, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetmore, Paul H.

    Isotopic evidence of a near surface history for the source rocks of the central Coast Plutonic portion of the source rocks resided at near surface levels at some time prior to burial and partial an evolved crustal source. We argue that these data indicate that the rocks that formed the source region

  18. A LARGE ROCK AVALANCHE ONTO MORSRJKULL GLACIER, SOUTH-EAST ICELAND. ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR ICE-SURFACE EVOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    , indicating a rapid process. Photogrammetric studies of the source-area estimates the volume of the rock1 A LARGE ROCK AVALANCHE ONTO MORSRJKULL GLACIER, SOUTH-EAST ICELAND. ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR ICE, IS-600 Akureyri, Iceland Abstract In spring 2007, a large rock avalanche descended onto

  19. Isotopic Evidence of a Near Surface History for the Source Rocks of the Central Coast Mountains Batholith, British

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetmore, Paul H.

    Isotopic Evidence of a Near Surface History for the Source Rocks of the Central Coast Mountains from 322 Ma to ~50 Ma indicate that the source regions for these rocks were relatively uniform and typical for island arcs around the Pacific. Initial whole-rock 87 Sr/86 Sr range from 0.7032 up to 0

  20. Geochemical evidence of a near-surface history for source rocks of the central Coast Mountains Batholith, British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetmore, Paul H.

    Geochemical evidence of a near-surface history for source rocks of the central Coast Mountains to ,50 Ma, indicate that the source regions for these rocks were relatively uniform and typical abundance of deep crustal or upper-mantle source rocks (DePaolo 1981; Kistler 1990; Chen and Tilton 1991; De

  1. Improved microstructure of cement-based composites through the addition of rock wool particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wei-Ting [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan 32546, Taiwan (China); Cheng, An, E-mail: ancheng@niu.edu.tw [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Huang, Ran; Zou, Si-Yu [Dept. of Harbor and River Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock wool is an inorganic fibrous substance produced by steam blasting and cooling molten glass. As with other industrial by-products, rock wool particles can be used as cementitious materials or ultra fine fillers in cement-based composites. This study investigated the microstructure of mortar specimens produced with cement-based composites that include various forms of rock wool particles. It conducted compressive strength testing, rapid chloride penetration tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and scanning electronic microscopy to evaluate the macro- and micro-properties of the cement-based composites. Test results indicate that inclusion of rock wool particles in composites improved compressive strength and reduced chloride ion penetration at the age of 91 days due to the reduction of calcium hydroxide content. Microscopic analysis confirms that the use of rock wool particles contributed to the formation of a denser, more compact microstructure within the hardened paste. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis shows few changes in formation of pozzolanic reaction products and no new hydrations are formed with incorporating rock wool particles. - Highlights: We report the microstructural characterization of cement-based composites. Different mixes produced with various rock wool particles have been tested. The influence of different mixes on macro and micro properties has been discussed. The macro properties are included compressive strength and permeability. XRD and SEM observations confirm the pozzolanic reaction in the resulting pastes.

  2. The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates of subsurface temperatures derived from heat flow measurements.

  3. Inversion of Scattered Waves for Material Properties in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri A.; Johnson, Lane R.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors apply a recently developed low-frequency, non-linear inversion method which includes near and far field terms to a crosshole data set to determine the bulk and shear modulus, as well as the density for a fractured zone in a granitic rock mass. The method uses the scattered elastic wavefield which is extracted from the recorded data before the inversion is performed. The inversion result is appraised by investigating the resolution and standard deviation of the model estimates. The sensitivity of the three parameters to different features of the medium is revealed. While the bulk modulus appears to be sensitive to voids and welded contacts, the density is mostly affected by fractured zones. The shear modulus is least constrained due to the absence of S wave anisotropy information. It is shown that the three medium parameters are generally sensitive to other medium features than those determined by velocity inversions. Thus this method is viewed as a complimentary approach to travel time tomography which provides more insight into the material properties of inhomogeneous media.

  4. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  5. Prospects for hot dry rock in the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, M.E.; Murphy, H.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. The program was reviewed five times in the past three years. Three of these reviews were done by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and a fourth was conducted by the National Research Council at the request of DOE. In addition, HDR was evaluated in the Energy Research Advisory Board's Solid Earth Sciences Report. Recent economic studies for HDR have been performed by Bechtel National, Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute, and the United Kingdom. These studies are reviewed in light of recent progress at Fenton Hill in reducing drilling costs, and mapping and in identifying drilling targets. All of the attention focused on HDR has resulted in evaluating the way in which HDR fits within the nation's energy mix and in estimating when HDR will contribute to energy security. To establish a framework for evaluating the future of HDR, the status and progress of HDR are reviewed and the remaining Fenton Hill program is outlined. Recommendations are also made for follow-on activities that will lead to achieving full development of HDR technologies in the appropriate time frame.

  6. Experimental Control of Transport and Current Reversals in a Deterministic Optical Rocking Ratchet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro V. Arzola; Karen Volke-Seplveda; Jos L. Mateos

    2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimental demonstration of a deterministic optical rocking ratchet. A periodic and asymmetric light pattern is created to interact with dielectric microparticles in water, giving rise to a ratchet potential. The sample is moved with respect to the pattern with an unbiased time-periodic rocking function, which tilts the potential in alternating opposite directions. We obtain a current of particles whose direction can be controlled in real time and show that particles of different sizes may experience opposite currents. Moreover, we observed current reversals as a function of the magnitude and period of the rocking force.

  7. Hydrological and water quality characteristics of three rock glaciers: Blanca Massif, Colorado, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMorett, Joseph Lawrence

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interstitially or as discrete lenses. The geometry of a rock glacier is conducive not only to the formation and growth of ice, but also to the entrapment of water in the fluid state. It is the ice and the trapped water that are important in providing a source... and the trapped water that are important in providing a source for maintaining flow of many alpine streams during the summer. In many alpine areas of the world, streams flow from the frontal slopes of rock glaciers. Although rock glaciers have been studied...

  8. Strontium-85 and plutonium-239 sorption in rock samples from the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, C.F.V.; Lu, N.; Marusak, N.L.; Scheber, B.; Chipera, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Daukeyev, D.; Khromushin, I. [National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adsorption and desorption of strontium and plutonium were studied as a function of rock type and simulated ground waters from the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS). Seven different rock types were obtained from the Balapan Region of the STS and were subjected to x-ray diffraction analyses. Two different ground waters were simulated using data supplied by the National Nuclear Center. The results indicate the sorption of strontium is strongly dependent on the minerals present in the rock species and on the total ionic strength of the ground water whereas, in all cases, plutonium was strongly irreversibly sorbed.

  9. The Effect of Rock Phosphate Upon the Corn Possibility of Phosphoric Acid of the Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Veterinary Medicine, A. and M. College of Texas. **In cooperation with United Statee Department of Agriculture. THE EFFECT OF ROCK PHOSPHATE UPON THE CORN POS- SIBILITY OF PHOSPHORIC ACID OF THE SOIL. In connection vith oil-fertilit~ stuclies..., it is important to lcnow the relation between the effect of the phosphoric acid of the rock phosphate on crops and the phosphoric acid that can be withdrawn from the soil by crops. The phosphoric acid of rock phosphate is readily soluble in K/5 nitric acid...

  10. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miquel County. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 63 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 15 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The sites are within 1 mile of each other and are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,300 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}). In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designing site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

  11. The nature of fire-cracked rock: new insights from ethnoarchaeological and laboratory experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Michael A

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermal weathering better than metamorphic or sedimentary rock types. Ethnoarchaeological results are applied to six archaeological FCR features, and provide new insights on the use-history of five of the features. Microscopic observations...

  12. Rock Physics Characterization of Organic-Rich Shale Formations to Predict Organic Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, Brandon

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    rely on to assess the economic potential of these formations are: total organic carbon (TOC), thermal maturity, hydrocarbon saturation, porosity, mineralogy and brittleness. In this thesis, I investigate rock physics models and methods for the possible...

  13. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock Mechanics University of Lulea S-95187 Lu1ea SWEDEN Dr.University Q of Lund and Lulea Institute of Technology,bentonite/quartz buffer mass, Lulea Institute of Technology,

  14. Experimental Validation of Pore-Level Calculations of Static and Dynamic Petrophysical Properties of Clastic Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    . The calculations are based on high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) digital images of actual clastic rocks of Petroleum Engineers is prohibited. Permission to reproduce in print is restricted to an ab- stract

  15. Effects of tunneling on groundwater flow and swelling of clay-sulfate rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butscher, Christoph

    [1] Swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunneling. It is triggered by the transformation of the sulfate mineral anhydrite into gypsum as a result of water inflow in anhydrite-containing layers after tunnel ...

  16. A STATISTICAL FRACTURE MECHANICS APPROACH TO THE STRENGTH OF BRITTLE ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratigan, J.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strength-size relation of granite", International Journal ofsample size for Bohus granite", Rock Mechanics, 10, pp201Point Bending-Sierra White Granite 6.3 Four Point Bending-

  17. Probabilistic Seismic Demand Model and Fragility Estimates for Symmetric Rigid Blocks Subject to Rocking Motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhtiary, Esmaeel

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a probability model to predict the maximum rotation of rocking bodies exposed to seismic excitations given specific earthquake intensity measures. After obtaining the nonlinear equations of motion and clarification...

  18. Properties of CO2-Rich Pore Fluids and Their Effect on Porosity Evolution in EGS Rocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Quantify key parameters critically needed for developing and validating numerical modeling of chemical interactions between EGS reservoir rocks and supercritical CO2and CO2-rich aqueous fluids.

  19. Subsurface Geology of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, Schon S.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Precambrian rock penetrated by wells EE-2A and -3A belongs to one or more granitic to granodioritic plutons. The plutonic rock contains two major xenolith zones of amphibolite, locally surrounded by fine-grained mafic rock of hybrid igneous origin. The granodiorite is cut by numerous leucogranite dikes that diminish in abundance with depth. The most prominent structural feature is the main breccia zone, in which the rock is highly fractured and moderately altered. This zone is at least 75 m thick and is of uncertain but near-horizontal orientation. Fracture abundance decreases with increasing depth below the main breccia zone, and fractures tend to be associated with leucogranite dikes. This association suggests that at least some of the fractures making up the geothermal reservoir are of Precambrian age or have long-range orientations controlled by the presence of Precambrian-age granitic dikes.

  20. A pore-scale model of two-phase flow in water-wet rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, Dmitriy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    705708. DMITRIY SILIN AND TAD PATZEK 4. F. G. Avkhadiev andWET ROCK DMITRIY SILIN AND TAD PATZEK Lawrence Berkeleypermeability. DMITRIY SILIN AND TAD PATZEK a generic network

  1. Direct Prediction of the Absolute Permeability of Unconsolidated and Consolidated Reservoir Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    SPE 90084 Direct Prediction of the Absolute Permeability of Unconsolidated and Consolidated unconsolidated rocks whose micro-tomographic images cannot be obtained. The lattice-Boltzmann method is used

  2. Documenting Visual Quality Controls on the Evaluation of Petroleum Reservoir-rocks through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Manuel M.

    ) processes control the distribution of porosity and permeability within petroleum reservoir rocks and prediction of the quality (porosity, permeability) of petroleum reservoirs during their exploration and production. The description and documentation of key petrographic features is an important tool

  3. Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Interfaces

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project obectives: Utilize synchrotron X-ray measurements, to monitor all aspects of atomic to nanoscale structural changes resulting from chemical interactions of scCO2-H2O binary fluids with rocks under environments directly relevant to EGS.

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - aggregates rock and stone Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12;15 Figure A. 10: Picture BB07C1B... Beam Mark: BB07 Cut Location and View: Concrete Type: Self consolidating Aggregate: River Rock Cut ID... : Self consolidating...

  5. Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammadova, Elnara

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research...

  6. Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W. (David William)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

  7. ForPeerReview Interpretation of hydraulic rock types with resistivity logs in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Subject Areas: Borehole and log interpretation, Integrated workflows and best practices (with broad hydraulic rock types. Core data and well logs acquired from a deep-drilling exploration well penetrating

  8. Numerical and analytical modeling of heat transfer between fluid and fractured rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling of heat transfer between fluid and fractured rocks is of particular importance for energy extraction analysis in EGS, and therefore represents a critical component of EGS design and performance evaluation. In ...

  9. Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

  10. The development and utilization of a high-speed laboratory rock drilling apparatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Jeffrey Dale

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT AND UTILIZATION OF A HIGH-SPEED LABORATORY ROCK DRILLING APPARATUS A Thesis by JEFFREY DALE DAY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AGM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT AND UTILIZATION OF A HIGH-SPEED LABORATORY ROCK DRILLING APPARATUS A Thesis by JEFFREY DALE DAY Approved as to style and content by: Hans C. Juvkam-Wold (Chair of Committee...

  11. Depositional and diagenetic history of some Jurassic carbonates, Indian Rock-Gilmer Field, Upshur County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fall, Steven Anthony

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the origin of the paleostructure which pro- duced the shallow marine environments during Cotton Valley/Haynesvi lie deposition was a Paleozoic high. The Indian Rock-Gilmer Field was a shallow area in the Jurassic Cotton Valley/Haynesville sea situated...~ ~ ~ 0 '''j DEPOSITIONAL AND DIAGENETIC HISTORY OF SOME JURASSIC CARBONATES, INDIAN ROCK-GILMER FIELD, UPSHUR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by STEVEN ANTHONY FALL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment...

  12. Hydrogeologic and topographic factors influencing well yields in fractured crystalline rocks - Seoul, Republic of Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sang-Il

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , it is necessary to evaluate the factors affecting specific capacity. Siddiqui and Parizek (1971) state that the specific capacity of' a well may be affected by the well radiils, srdilrated thickness of rock penetrated by the well and several other factors.... (Siegel, 1956). In the present study, it was applied to evaluate the significance of differences in the effects of topographic setting, rock type, and distance from the Han River on the productivity of wells (Table 2). The statistic, V, used...

  13. Relationship between meteorological variables and total suspended and heavy metal particulates in Little Rock, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avery, Mary Gwendolyn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES AND TOTAL SUSPENDED AND HEAVY NFXAL PARTICULATES IN LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS A Thesis MARY GWENDOLl'N AVERY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Meteorology RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES AND TOTAL SUSPENDED AND HEAVY METAL PARTICULATES IN LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS A Thesis MARY GWENDOLYN AVERY Approved...

  14. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B. (ed.)

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

  15. On grouting using a suspension of ultrafine clay on artificially cracked rock samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Y.; Sakaguchi, T.; Nishiyama, K. [Kumagai Gumi Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear and Energy Dept.; Fujiwara, A. [Radioactive Waste Management Center, Tokyo (Japan). Second Research Div.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been increasing social interest in the effective disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. The use of underground rock caverns is considered as a possible repository space. This paper presents a new grouting method which uses a suspension of liquefied ultrafine clay in fractured rock masses. In order to demonstrate the effect to block open cracks, two experiments were carried out on large-sized granite samples with open cracks. The experiments proved the method to be highly effective.

  16. Uranium occurrence in igneous rocks of the central Davis Mountains, west Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaftenaar, Wendy Elizabeth

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in granite after control- led leaching, and the same phenomenon was observed as a result of in situ weathering and initial erosion of granitic rocks by Tieh and oth- ers (1980) . There is evidence that uranium loss can occur in certain acces- sory... URANIUM OCCURRENCE IN IGNEOUS ROCKS OF THE' CENTRAL DAVIS MOUNTAINS, WEST TEXAS A Thesis by WENDY ELIZABETH SCHAFTENAAR Submitted to the Graduate college of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  17. Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Jin, Lixin [University of Texas, El Paso; Buss, Heather [University of Bristol, UK; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During weathering, rocks release nutrients and storewater vital for growth ofmicrobial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter fromtwo types of featureswhose dimensions vary from6 nmto 40 lm: pores and bumps on pore grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by amass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than 1 lm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from 1.5%to 8.5%and 3 to 23 m2 g1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across themm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistentwith development of amoremonodisperse pore networkwith smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction front in the spheroidally weathering quartz diorite. In that rock, Dm is approximately 2.8 andDs is approximately 2.5 prior to weathering. These two fractals transform during weathering to multiple surface fractals as micro-cracking reduces the size of diffusion-limited subzones of thematrix.Across the reaction front of plagioclase in the quartz diorite, the specific surface area and porosity change very little until the pointwhere the rock disaggregates into saprolite. The different patterns in porosity development of the two rocks are attributed to advective infiltration plus diffusion in the rock that spheroidally fractures versus diffusion-only in the rock that does not. Fracturing apparently diminishes the size of the diffusion-limited parts of the spheroidally weathering rock system to promote infiltration of meteoric fluids, thereforeexplaining the faster weathering advance rate into that rock.

  18. Mechanical defradation of Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain- A Modeling Case Study. Part I: Nonlithophysal Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Lin; D. Kicker; B. Damjanac; M. Board; M. Karakouzian

    2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines rock mechanics investigations associated with mechanical degradation of planned emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, which is the designated site for the proposed U.S. high-level nuclear waste repository. The factors leading to drift degradation include stresses from the overburden, stresses induced by the heat released from the emplaced waste, stresses due to seismically related ground motions, and time-dependent strength degradation. The welded tuff emplacement horizon consists of two groups of rock with distinct engineering properties: nonlithophysal units and lithophysal units, based on the relative proportion of lithophysal cavities. The term 'lithophysal' refers to hollow, bubble like cavities in volcanic rock that are surrounded by a porous rim formed by fine-grained alkali feldspar, quartz, and other minerals. Lithophysae are typically a few centimeters to a few decimeters in diameter. Part I of the paper concentrates on the generally hard, strong, and fractured nonlithophysal rock. The degradation behavior of the tunnels in the nonlithophysal rock is controlled by the occurrence of keyblocks. A statistically equivalent fracture model was generated based on extensive underground fracture mapping data from the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Three-dimensional distinct block analyses, generated with the fracture patterns randomly selected from the fracture model, were developed with the consideration of in situ, thermal, and seismic loads. In this study, field data, laboratory data, and numerical analyses are well integrated to provide a solution for the unique problem of modeling drift degradation.

  19. Compressed air energy storage monitoring to support refrigerated mined rock cavern technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Moo Yul; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for the Compressed Air Energy Storage Monitoring to Support Refrigerated-Mined Rock Cavern Technology (CAES Monitoring to Support RMRCT) (DE-FC26-01NT40868) project to have been conducted by CAES Development Co., along with Sandia National Laboratories. This document provides a final report covering tasks 1.0 and subtasks 2.1, 2.2, and 2.5 of task 2.0 of the Statement of Project Objectives and constitutes the final project deliverable. The proposed work was to have provided physical measurements and analyses of large-scale rock mass response to pressure cycling. The goal was to develop proof-of-concept data for a previously developed and DOE sponsored technology (RMRCT or Refrigerated-Mined Rock Cavern Technology). In the RMRCT concept, a room and pillar mine developed in rock serves as a pressure vessel. That vessel will need to contain pressure of about 1370 psi (and cycle down to 300 psi). The measurements gathered in this study would have provided a means to determine directly rock mass response during cyclic loading on the same scale, under similar pressure conditions. The CAES project has been delayed due to national economic unrest in the energy sector.

  20. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada Jonny Rutqvist 1* , LennartSafety Commission, Ottawa, Canada * Corresponding author.laboratory (URL) in Canada. Four different numerical models

  1. Uranium and its relationship to host rock mineralogy in an unoxidized roll front in the Jackson group, South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasse, Eric Martin

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    environment produced in the over- lying rocks by the sulfate caprock of the dome. ~at ati r h Stratigraphy was a major control of uranium mineralization in south Texas. The area has a combination of uranium rich source rocks, permeable host rocks... m1d-Tertiary volcanic activ1ty in northern Mexico. This mater1al is generally thought to nave been the source of uranium for the ore deposits in the area . Source Rocks. Tuff is a good source of uranium because 1t has a h1gh original uranium...

  2. Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006), The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of Enhanced2000), A Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Concept UtilizingEnergy has broadly defined Enhanced (or Engineered) Geothermal

  3. Eagle Feather Tutoring Native American Cultural Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .m. - 3 p.m. CHEM 111 General Chemistry I CHEM 113 General Chemistry II CIVE 260 Engineering Mechanics@rams.colostate.edu Mon. 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. Wed. 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. Thurs. 8 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. CHEM 111 General Chemistry I CHEM 112 General Chemistry I Lab CHEM 113 General Chemistry II CHEM 114 General Chemistry II Lab CHEM 341

  4. Eagle County, Colorado | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Smart is working with local utility providers to find aggregated data that reflect total energy usage and intensity by home type. The program is using this information to select...

  5. Water for Energy in the Eagle Ford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water and Hydraulic Fracturing 12/18/2013 CATEE Conference San Antonio, TX Dr. Calvin Finch Texas A&M Water Conservation and Technology Center ESL-KT-13-12-44 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16...-18 ESL-KT-13-12-44 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 ESL-KT-13-12-44 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Water Components ?Water for Drilling...

  6. Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified as ASHRAEDuvalJusticeEPS CorpEVI|

  7. Eagle, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified as ASHRAEDuvalJusticeEPS4726258°, -122.8028177°

  8. Eagle, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified as ASHRAEDuvalJusticeEPS4726258°, -122.8028177°56°,

  9. Eagle, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified as ASHRAEDuvalJusticeEPS4726258°,

  10. Eagle, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified as

  11. Eagle, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by

  12. Organic geochemistry and correlation of Paleozoic source rocks and Trenton crude oils, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, J. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shale samples from four cores of the New Albany and Antrim Shales (Devonian) and from six cores of the Maquoketa Group (Ordovician), representing a broad geographic area of Indiana, have been analyzed for total organic carbon, total sulfur, pyrolysis yield (Rock-Eval), bitumen content, and illite crystallinity data. These data indicate that the New Albany, Antrim, and Maquoketa shales contain a sufficient quantity and quality of organic matter to be good petroleum source rocks. Bitumen ratios, Rock-Eval yields, gas chromatography of saturated hydrocarbons, and illite crystallinity data show that the Maquoketa shales have reached a higher level of thermal maturity than the New Albany and Antrim shales. The level of thermal maturity of the Maquoketa shales suggested a maximum burial depth considerably greater than the present depth.

  13. Mobility promotes and jeopardizes biodiversity in rock-paper-scissors games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Tobias; Frey, Erwin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiversity is essential to the viability of ecological systems. Species diversity in ecosystems is promoted by cyclic, non-hierarchical interactions among competing populations. Such non-transitive relations lead to an evolution with central features represented by the `rock-paper-scissors' game, where rock crushes scissors, scissors cut paper, and paper wraps rock. In combination with spatial dispersal of static populations, this type of competition results in the stable coexistence of all species and the long-term maintenance of biodiversity. However, population mobility is a central feature of real ecosystems: animals migrate, bacteria run and tumble. Here, we observe a critical influence of mobility on species diversity. When mobility exceeds a certain value, biodiversity is jeopardized and lost. In contrast, below this critical threshold all subpopulations coexist and an entanglement of travelling spiral waves forms in the course of temporal evolution. We establish that this phenomenon is robust, it do...

  14. Petroleum potential of lower and middle Paleozoic rocks in Nebraska portion of Mid-Continent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, M.P. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Central North America during the Paleozoic was characterized by northern (Williston) and southern (Anadarko) depositional regimes separated by a stable Transcontinental arch. Nebraska lies on the southern flank of this arch and contains the northern zero edges of the lower and middle Paleozoic rocks of the southern regime. Most of these rocks are secondary dolomites with zones of excellent intercrystalline porosity. The Reagan-LaMotte Sandstones and the overlying Arbuckle dolomites are overlapped by Middle Ordovician rocks toward the Transcontinental arch. Rocks equivalent to the Simpson consist of a basal sand (St. Peter) and overlying interbedded gray-green shales and dolomitic limestones. An uppermost shale facies is present in the Upper Ordovician (Viola-Maquoketa) eastward and southward across Nebraska. The dolomite facies extends northward into the Williston basin. The Silurian dolomites, originally more widely deposited, are overlapped by Devonian dolomites in southeastern Nebraska. Upper Devonian rocks exhibit a regional facies change from carbonate to green-gray shale to black shale southeastward across the Mid-Continent. Mississippian carbonates overlap the Devonian westward and northward across the Transcontinental arch. Pennsylvanian uplift and erosion were widespread, producing numerous stratigraphic traps. Sands related to the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity produce along the Cambridge arch. Arbuckle, Simpson, Viola, and Hunton production is present in the Forest City basin and along the Central Kansas uplift. Although source rocks are scarce and the maturation is marginal, current theories of long-distance oil migration encourage exploration in the extensive lower and middle Paleozoic reservoirs in this portion of the Mid-Continent.

  15. Ordovician petroleum source rocks and aspects of hydrocarbon generation in Canadian portion of Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osadetz, K.G.; Snowdon, L.R.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accumulation of rich petroleum source rocks - starved bituminous mudrocks in both the Winnipeg Formation (Middle Ordovician) and Bighorn Group (Upper Ordovician) - is controlled by cyclical deepening events with a frequency of approximately 2 m.y. Tectonics control both this frequency and the location of starved subbasins of source rock accumulation. Deepening cycles initiated starvation of offshore portions of the inner detrital and medial carbonate facies belts. Persistence of starved offshore settings was aided by marginal onlap and strandline migration in the inner detrital facies belt, and by low carbonate productivity in the medial carbonate facies belt. Low carbonate productivity was accompanied by high rates of planktonic productivity. Periodic anoxia, as a consequence of high rates of planktonic organic productivity accompanying wind-driven equatorial upwellings, is the preferred mechanism for suppressing carbonate productivity within the epeiric sea. The planktonic, although problematic, form Gloecapsamorpha prisca Zalesskey 1917 is the main contributing organism to source rock alginites. A long-ranging alga (Cambrian to Silurian), it forms kukersites in Middle and Upper Ordovician rocks of the Williston basin as a consequence of environmental controls - starvation and periodic anoxia. Source rocks composed of this organic matter type generate oils of distinctive composition at relatively high levels of thermal maturity (transformation ratio = 10% at 0.78% R/sub o/). In the Canadian portion of the Williston basin, such levels of thermal maturity occur at present depths greater than 2950 m within a region of geothermal gradient anomalies associated with the Nesson anticline. Approximately 193 million bbl (30.7 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/) of oil has been expelled into secondary migration pathways from thermally mature source rocks in the Canadian portion of the basin.

  16. Petroleum source rock richness, type and maturity for four rock units on the Alaskan North Slope: are they sources for the two oil types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoon, L.B.; Claypool, G.E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive petroleum geochemical study assessed the petroleum resources on the Alaskan North Slope. The collection and interpretation of geochemical data not only from exploratory wells drilled in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) but also from wells drilled to the east in the Prudhoe Bay area and from rocks exposed in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and in the Brooks Range from Cape Lisburne to the United States/Canadian border were studied. More than 17 different kinds of rock analyses, eight different oil analyses, and three gas analyses are being used to evaluate rock (outcrop samples, core, drill cuttings), oil (seeps, drill stem test, oil-stained core, producing well), and gas (drill stem test, producing well) samples on the North Slope. To date, the more than 60,000 analyses completed on these samples were placed into a computer-based file for storage and retrieval in tabular, graphical, or map form numerous graphical software programs were written to facilitate interpretation.

  17. Sizing of a hot dry rock reservoir from a hydraulic fracturing experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs do not lend themselves to the standard methods of reservoir sizing developed in the petroleum industry such as the buildup/drawdown test. In a HDR reservoir the reservoir is created by the injection of fluid. This process of hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock usually involves injection of a large volume (5 million gallons) at high rates (40BPM). A methodology is presented for sizing the HDR reservoir created during the hydraulic fracturing process. The reservoir created during a recent fracturing experiment is sized using the techniques presented. This reservoir is then investigated for commercial potential by simulation of long term power production. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  18. The effects of acid contact time and rock surfaces on acid fracture conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melendez Castillo, Maria Georgina

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    -in), ? c is closure stress (psi), and S RE is rock embedment strength (psi). In equation 1.3, the constant 13.9 is the corrected value from the original equation which presents a typographical error 3 as 19.9. Equation 1.2 presents the Dissolved Rock... ? = (1.1) 822.0 1 )(265.0 DRECC = (1.2) psiSforSxC RERE 000,200:),ln(3.19.1310 3 2 <

  19. Micromechanics and homogenization techniques for analyzing the continuum damage of rock salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVries, K.L. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Allen, D.H. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Hurtado, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a model for evaluating microcrack development and dilatant behavior of crystalline rocks. The model is developed within the concepts of continuum mechanics, with special emphasis on the development of internal boundaries in the continuum by utilizing fracture mechanics based cohesive zone models. The model is capable of describing the evolution from initial debonding through complete separation and subsequent void growth of an interface. An example problem of a rock salt specimen subjected to a high deviatoric load and low confinement is presented that predicts preferential opening of fractures oriented parallel with the maximum compressive stress axis.

  20. Variation in physical rock properties determined from sonic logs at a South Texas lignite mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cato, Kerry Don

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or underburden units which were identified as potential problem units. S1gn1ficance of Study In the planning and design of a Gulf Coast lignite mi ne, a need exists to deter nine the variability of phys1cal rock properties within strati graphic units...VARIATION IN PHVSICAL ROCK PROPERTIES DETERMINED FROM SONIC LOGS AT A SOUTH TEXAS LIGNITE MINE A Thesis by KERRV OON CATO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  1. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Appendix C to Attachment 3, Calculations. Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains calculations for: Slick Rock processing sites background ground water quality; Slick Rock processing sites lysimeter water quality; Slick Rock processing sites on-site and downgradient ground water quality; Slick Rock disposal site background water quality; Burro Canyon disposal site, Slick Rock, Colorado, average hydraulic gradients and average liner ground water velocities in the upper, middle, and lower sandstone units of the Burro Canyon formation; Slick Rock--Burro Canyon disposal site, Burro Canyon pumping and slug tests--analyses; water balance and surface contours--Burro Canyon disposal cell; and analytical calculation of drawdown in a hypothetical well completed in the upper sandstone unit of the Burro Canyon formation.

  2. Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt's Initiation of Rock Coating Research Author(s): Ronald I. Dorn, David H. Krinsley, Jeffrey Ditto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt's Initiation of Rock Coating Research Author(s): Ronald I. Dorn, David H. Krinsley, Jeffrey Ditto Reviewed work(s): Source: The Journal of Geology, Vol. 120, No. 1 Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt's Initiation of Rock Coating Research Ronald I. Dorn,1, * David H. Krinsley

  3. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 126 (2001) 93108 Rock-magnetic properties of TRM carrying baked and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 126 (2001) 93108 Rock-magnetic properties of TRM produced large areas of thermally altered sedimentary rocks with large magnetic moments. The natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) intensities and low

  4. Experimental and theoretical studies of spectral alteration in ultrasonic waves resulting from nonlinear elastic response in rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.A.; McCall, K.R.; Meegan, G.D. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments in rock show a large nonlinear elastic wave response, far greater than that of gases, liquids and most other solids. The large response is attributed to structural defects in rock including microcracks and grain boundaries. In the earth, a large nonlinear response may be responsible for significant spectral alteration at amplitudes and distances currently considered to be well within the linear elastic regime.

  5. SEISMIC MONITORING APPLIED TO MINES SAFETY AND OPTIMAL DESIGN OF MINE LAYOUTS IN HARD ROCK MASS SITATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SEISMIC MONITORING APPLIED TO MINES SAFETY AND OPTIMAL DESIGN OF MINE LAYOUTS IN HARD ROCK MASSRockMechanics, School of Mines ofNancy, France. ABSTRACT : The paper intends to show how seismic data can be usefülly rock, tabular situations are usually associated with induced, seismic activity, i.e. the occurrence

  6. Specific Methods for the Evaluation of Hydraulic Properties in Fractured Hard-rock J.C. Marchala,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Specific Methods for the Evaluation of Hydraulic Properties in Fractured Hard-rock Aquifers J, marechal@ngri.res.in Abstract: Blocs underlined by fractures networks mainly compose hard-rock aquifers. The complexity of flows through fractures makes inadequate the use of classical techniques for the interpretation

  7. 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    , followed by waterflooding, were performed at reservoir conditions to investigate rock wettability. A two Berea and Spraberry cores at reservoir conditions to illustrate the actual process of waterflooding- 31 - 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS

  8. Seasonal melting and the formation of sedimentary rocks on Mars, with predictions for the Gale Crater mound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kite, Edwin

    Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301, USA e Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University distribution of sedimentary rocks. The global distribution of snowmelt has maxima in Valles Marineris. The pattern of sedimentary rocks on Mars is most consistent with a model Mars paleoclimate that only rarely

  9. FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GF FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By R.M. Flores,1 A.M. Ochs,2 and L.R. Bader1 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey 2 Consultant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 1999

  10. EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF THE LOAD-FOLLOWING POTENTIAL OF A HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF THE LOAD-FOLLOWING POTENTIAL OF A HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR. The objective of this cyclic load-following experiment was to investigate the performance of the reservoir, this series of cyclic flow tests is referred to as the Load-Following Experiment, with the objective

  11. Sorptivity of rocks and soils of the van Genuchten-Mualem type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hydrological process that will have great relevance to the performance of the proposed underground radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is that of the absorption of water from a water-filled fracture into the adjacent unsaturated rock formation. The rate at which water is imbibed by a rock depends on the hydrological properties of the rock and on the initial saturation (or initial capillary suction) of the formation. The hydrological properties that affect imbibition are the relative permeability function and the capillary pressure function. These functions are often collectively referred to as the `characteristic functions` of the porous medium. For one-dimensional absorption, it can be shown that, regardless of the details of the characteristic functions, the total amount of water imbibed by the formation, per unit surface area, will be proportional to the square root of the elapsed time. Hence the ability of a rock or soil to imbibe water can be quantified by a parameter known as the sorptivity S, which is defined such that the cumulative volumetric liquid influx per unit area is given by Q = S{radical}t. The paper discusses the simplification of these characteristic functions of porous medium.

  12. Brazilian uranium mine decommissioning-chemical and radiological study of waste rock piles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiikmann, L. O. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil, Pocos de Caldas (Brazil)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pocos de Caldas plateau is a high-natural-radioactivity area in the state of Minas Gerais, southeast Brazil. Uranium occurrence in the plateau was first observed in 1948. Mining started in 1977 with mine scouring, and the first ore pile was constructed in 1981. Waste rocks are derived from the mine material. The analysis of core samples is discussed.

  13. THE CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO ETHANOL USING GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DERIVED FROM HOT DRY ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    97505 THE CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO ETHANOL USING GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DERIVED FROM HOT DRY ROCK of biomass to fuel ethanol is considerable. In addition, combining these two renewable energy resources of wedding an HDR geothermal power source to a biomass conversion process is flexibility, both in plant

  14. Oldest rocks, earliest life, heaviest impacts, and the HadeanArchaean transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    , of these rocks were deposited in water. There was clearly no shortage of water on the Earths surface at around 3, the sta- bilisation of liquid water, and the decreasing impact rate, made for an increasingly predictable.8 Ga. Maybe planet Mars was still flowing with surface water then, or it might already have par- tially

  15. Interaction between CO2-rich solutions and reservoir-seal rocks. Experimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    coal systems 5.Use of CO2 in enhanced coal bed methane recovery 6.Other suggested options (basalts, oilInteraction between CO2-rich solutions and reservoir-seal rocks. Experimentation María García formations (after Cook, 1999). Geological Storage Options for CO2 1.Depleted oil and gas reservoirs 2.Use

  16. EA-1987: Parker-Headgate Rock and Parker-Bouse Rebuild Project, Arizona and California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOEs Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that will assess the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild the existing Parker Dam-Headgate Rock and Parker Dam-Bouse 161-kilovolt transmission lines along the Colorado River in western Arizona and eastern California.

  17. Production of 239 Pu from a natural Uranium disk and "hot" rock using a neutron howitzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Steiner; Aaron Anderson; Michael De Marco

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron howitzer was used to produce 239Np from the targets of natural U and a hot rock. An intrinsic Germanium detector enabled the observations of the gamma rays in the decay of 239Np and a determination of its half life of 2.3 days. This shows that 239Pu had been produced in both targets

  18. Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Three soil types, plus rock, determine the slope or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Safety First Safety Last Safety Always · Three soil types, plus rock, determine the slope or safety to be at least 2 feet from the edge. Excavation Requirements Safety Tip #10 If you see a mistake and don't fix it on the reverse side of this safety tip sheet. Please refrain from reading the information verbatim

  19. Parameter estimation from flowing fluid temperature logging data in unsaturated fractured rock using multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Tsang, Y.; Finsterle, S.

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple conceptual model has been recently developed for analyzing pressure and temperature data from flowing fluid temperature logging (FFTL) in unsaturated fractured rock. Using this conceptual model, we developed an analytical solution for FFTL pressure response, and a semianalytical solution for FFTL temperature response. We also proposed a method for estimating fracture permeability from FFTL temperature data. The conceptual model was based on some simplifying assumptions, particularly that a single-phase airflow model was used. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive numerical model of multiphase flow and heat transfer associated with FFTL. Using this numerical model, we perform a number of forward simulations to determine the parameters that have the strongest influence on the pressure and temperature response from FFTL. We then use the iTOUGH2 optimization code to estimate these most sensitive parameters through inverse modeling and to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimated parameters. We conclude that FFTL can be utilized to determine permeability, porosity, and thermal conductivity of the fracture rock. Two other parameters, which are not properties of the fractured rock, have strong influence on FFTL response. These are pressure and temperature in the borehole that were at equilibrium with the fractured rock formation at the beginning of FFTL. We illustrate how these parameters can also be estimated from FFTL data.

  20. Technical Note Improved Optimization and Visualization of Drilling Directions for Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haneberg, William C.

    INTRODUCTION Characterization of planar discontinuities such as bedding, joints, and faults is an essential control in situ block sizes that can be important when assessing the adequacy of potential riprap or armor-stone sources, the susceptibility of bridge foundations to scour during floods, and the sizes of rock blocks

  1. Solidification pipes: from solder pots to igneous rocks M. Stewart Siua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander

    Solidification pipes: from solder pots to igneous rocks M. Stewart Siua and Dmitry Budkerb resolidification. We use a simple model to describe the shape of the pipe and compare it with experimental results in volume of thallium during solidification. Such formation is sometimes known as "pipe" in metallurgy [2

  2. Explosion in the Granite Field: Hardening and Softening Behavior in Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, I N; Antoun, T H; Glenn, L A

    2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of rock materials under quasistatic conditions are well characterized in laboratory experiments. Unfortunately, quasistatic data alone are not sufficient to calibrate models for use to describe inelastic wave propagation associated with conventional and nuclear explosions, or with impact. First, rock properties are size-dependent. properties measured using laboratory samples on the order of a few centimeters in size need to be modified to adequately describe wave propagation in a problem on the order of a few hundred meters in size. Second, there is lack of data about the damage (softening) behavior of rock because most laboratory tests focus on the pre-peak hardening region with very little emphasis on the post-peak softening region. This paper presents a model for granite that accounts for both the hardening and softening of geologic materials, and also provides a simple description of rubblized rock. The model is shown to reproduce results of quasistatic triaxial experiments as well as peak velocity and peak displacement attenuation from a compendium of dynamic wave propagation experiments that includes US and French nuclear tests in granite.

  3. Explosion in the Granite Field: Hardening and Softening Behavior in Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, I N; Antoun, T H; Glenn, L A

    2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of rock materials under quasistatic conditions are well characterized in laboratory experiments. Unfortunately, quasistatic data alone are not sufficient to calibrate models for use to describe inelastic wave propagation associated with conventional and nuclear explosions, or with impact. First, rock properties are size-dependent. properties measured using laboratory samples on the order of a few centimeters in size need to be modified to adequately describe wave propagation in a problem on the order of a few hundred meters in size. Second, there is lack of data about the damage (softening) behavior of rock because most laboratory tests focus on the pre-peak hardening region with very little emphasis on the post-peak softening region. This paper presents a model for granite that accounts for both the hardening and softening of geologic materials, and also provides a simple description of rubblized rock. The model is shown to reproduce results of quasistatic triaxial experiments as well as peak velocity and peak displacement attenuation from a compendium of dynamic wave propagation experiments that includes US and French nuclear tests in granite.

  4. ORNITHOCOPROPHILOUS PLANTS OF MOUNT DESERT ROCK, A REMOTE BIRD-NESTING ISLAND IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    ORNITHOCOPROPHILOUS PLANTS OF MOUNT DESERT ROCK, A REMOTE BIRD-NESTING ISLAND IN THE GULF OF MAINE for the maintenance of plant communities (Cruden 1966; Gillham 1970; Howe and Smallwood 1982; Mulder and Keall 2001 to botanists as they often determine which plant species are dispersed and become established in such remote

  5. Rock County Region (March 16, 2009) Washtenaw County (February 6, 2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Region (March 26, 2008) Tri-County Region (August 12, 2008) Lenawee County (August 20, 2008) GeneseeWisconsin Rock County Region (March 16, 2009) Michigan Washtenaw County (February 6, 2008) Grayling County (August 27, 2008) Wixom (December 4, 2008) Pontiac (December 19, 2008) West Michigan Region (March

  6. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA David Duchane and Donald Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA by David Duchane and Donald Brown Los of the world's store of geothermal energy. The real potential for growth in the use of geothermal energy lies system. Water is circulated around a closed loop to extract thermal energy from an engineered geothermal

  7. Geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    source of geothermal energy, is ulti- 0024-4937/$ - see front matter D 2005 Published by Elsevier BGeochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Geysers geothermal area, California Coast Ranges Axel K Potsdam, Germany c Philippine Geothermal, Inc., Makati, Philippines Received 1 May 2004; accepted 25 May

  8. Development of hot dry rock geothermal resources; technical and economic issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tester, J.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical and economic issues related to the commercial feasibility of hot dry rock geothermal energy for producing electricity and heat are discussed. Topics covered include resource characteristics, reservoir thermal capacity and lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, financial risk and anticipated rate of return. The current status of research and deveopment efforts in the US are also summarized.

  9. Hydrochemical Impacts of Limestone Rock Mining Ghinwa M. Naja & Rosanna Rivero &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    . 2002). Even though the environmental impacts of ore and coal mining have been adequately investigated, the impact of limestone rock mining has not been well studied. Water Air Soil Pollut DOI 10.1007/s11270-mail: mnaja@evergladesfoundation.org #12;Quarrying of limestone aggregate currently repre- sents in the USA

  10. AN ATLAS OF MARS SEDIMENTARY ROCKS AS SEEN BY HIRISE ROSS A. BEYER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Shane

    AN ATLAS OF MARS SEDIMENTARY ROCKS AS SEEN BY HIRISE ROSS A. BEYER Sagan Center at the SETI. The atlas of photographs collected during the Hayden (1872) expedition to the Yellowstone region earlier epochs of Mars, we should not expect any trace of them to be visible on the Mariner IV photographs

  11. Electrical conductivity of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Electrical conductivity of minerals and rocks Shun-ichiro Karato1 and Duojun Wang1,2 1 : Yale-Blackwell #12;2 SUMMARY Electrical conductivity of most minerals is sensitive to hydrogen (water) content, temperature, major element chemistry and oxygen fugacity. The influence of these parameters on electrical

  12. Micro-meter Crack Response to Rock Blast Vibrations, Wind Gusts & Weather Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micro-meter Crack Response to Rock Blast Vibrations, Wind Gusts & Weather Effects C. H. Dowding,1 effects. These measurements substantiate the conservancy of the 12.5 mm/s (0.5 in./s) blasting vibration blasting. Measurements in this case study now extend weather effects to include wind. While it has been

  13. A pore-scale model of two-phase flow in water-wet rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A finite-difference discretization of Stokes equations is used to simulate flow in the pore space of natural rocks. Numerical solutions are obtained using the method of artificial compressibility. In conjunction with Maximal Inscribed Spheres method, these computations produce relative permeability curves. The results of computations are in agreement with laboratory measurements.

  14. Mineral and Rock Physics [MR] MR21B MCW:Level 1 Tuesday 0800h

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    Mineral and Rock Physics [MR] MR21B MCW:Level 1 Tuesday 0800h Structural Refinement Studies Kunz, Advanced Light Source MR21B-0018 The Crystal Structure of Diopside at Pressure to 10 Gpa tetrahedra and M1 octahedra to try and understand the observed changes in pyroxenes with changing P, T, and x

  15. Vertebrates from the Late Triassic Thecodontosaurus-bearing rocks of Durdham Down, Clifton (Bristol, UK)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    vertebrate faunas from these fissure fills have been found in many limestone quarries of the area, some-bearing rocks, collected in the 1830s from the quarries at Durdham Down, and can therefore for the first time Down (Bristol, UK) has not been investigated, largely because the quarries are built over. Other

  16. 2D pore-scale simulation of wide-band electromagnetic dispersion of saturated rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Engineering,Austin,Texas; presently Chevron NorthAmerica Exploration and Production, Houston,Texas. E dispersion of saturated rocks. INTRODUCTION Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarization process The complex,Austin,Texas. E-mail: cverdin@mail.utexas.edu. © 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.All rights reserved

  17. MERTL, S., BRCKL, E., 2007. Observation of fracture processes in creeping rock masses by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brückl, Ewald

    , sliding, and rolling). Subcritical crack growth may control deformation velocity (Brückl and Parotidis related to pore water pressure. However, additional observational quantities related to the development/year. The rock mass deforms by the mechanisms of brittle rheology and subcritical crack growth may control

  18. Rock-Fluid Chemistry Impacts on Shale Hydraulic Fracture and Microfracture Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aderibigbe, Aderonke

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of surface chemical effects in hydraulic fracturing of shale is studied using the results of unconfined compression tests and Brazilian tests on Mancos shale- cored at depths of 20-60 ft. The rock mineralogy, total organic carbon and cation...

  19. Magnetofossil spike during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum: Ferromagnetic resonance, rock magnetic, and electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnetofossil spike during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum: Ferromagnetic resonance, rock,2 Timothy D. Raub,3,4 Dirk Schumann,5 Hojatollah Vali,5 Alexei V. Smirnov,3,6 and Joseph L. Kirschvink1 controversial hypothesis that a cometary impact triggered the PETM. Here we present ferromagnetic resonance (FMR

  20. Antarctic glaciers and rock weathering: Exploring chemical and mineralogy processes within the blue ice fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    Antarctic glaciers and rock weathering: Exploring chemical and mineralogy processes within the blue of Geographical and Earth Sciences, we will determine the mineralogy and chemical composition of a suite mineralogy, porosity & permeability)? Does the volume of weathering products and their mineralogy

  1. Aggregate production: Fines generation during rock crushing M.S. Guimaraes a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palomino, Angelica M.

    Aggregate production: Fines generation during rock crushing M.S. Guimaraes a , J.R. Valdes b , A.M.: +1 814 865 9427; fax: +1 814 863 7304. E-mail address: amp26@psu.edu (A.M. Palomino). 0301

  2. Coal is a combustible sedimentary rock and a valuable economic resource. During the Pennsylvanian Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Coal is a combustible sedimentary rock and a valuable economic resource. During the Pennsylvanian of years produced the bituminous coals currently found in southwestern Indiana. Bituminous coals in Indiana currently ranks as the seventh-largest coal-producing state in the nation and has an estimated 17.57 billion

  3. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  4. Fracture Dissolution of Carbonate Rock: An Innovative Process for Gas Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James W. Castle; Ronald W. Falta; David Bruce; Larry Murdoch; Scott E. Brame; Donald Brooks

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project is to develop and assess the feasibility and economic viability of an innovative concept that may lead to commercialization of new gas-storage capacity near major markets. The investigation involves a new approach to developing underground gas storage in carbonate rock, which is present near major markets in many areas of the United States. Because of the lack of conventional gas storage and the projected growth in demand for storage capacity, many of these areas are likely to experience shortfalls in gas deliverability. Since depleted gas reservoirs and salt formations are nearly non-existent in many areas, alternatives to conventional methods of gas storage are required. The need for improved methods of gas storage, particularly for ways to meet peak demand, is increasing. Gas-market conditions are driving the need for higher deliverability and more flexibility in injection/withdrawal cycling. In order to meet these needs, the project involves an innovative approach to developing underground storage capacity by creating caverns in carbonate rock formations by acid dissolution. The basic concept of the acid-dissolution method is to drill to depth, fracture the carbonate rock layer as needed, and then create a cavern using an aqueous acid to dissolve the carbonate rock. Assessing feasibility of the acid-dissolution method included a regional geologic investigation. Data were compiled and analyzed from carbonate formations in six states: Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New York. To analyze the requirements for creating storage volume, the following aspects of the dissolution process were examined: weight and volume of rock to be dissolved; gas storage pressure, temperature, and volume at depth; rock solubility; and acid costs. Hydrochloric acid was determined to be the best acid to use because of low cost, high acid solubility, fast reaction rates with carbonate rock, and highly soluble products (calcium chloride) that allow for the easy removal of calcium waste from the well. Physical and chemical analysis of core samples taken from prospective geologic formations for the acid dissolution process confirmed that many of the limestone samples readily dissolved in concentrated hydrochloric acid. Further, some samples contained oily residues that may help to seal the walls of the final cavern structure. These results suggest that there exist carbonate rock formations well suited for the dissolution technology and that the presence of inert impurities had no noticeable effect on the dissolution rate for the carbonate rock. A sensitivity analysis was performed for characteristics of hydraulic fractures induced in carbonate formations to enhance the dissolution process. Multiple fracture simulations were conducted using modeling software that has a fully 3-D fracture geometry package. The simulations, which predict the distribution of fracture geometry and fracture conductivity, show that the stress difference between adjacent beds is the physical property of the formations that has the greatest influence on fracture characteristics by restricting vertical growth. The results indicate that by modifying the fracturing fluid, proppant type, or pumping rate, a fracture can be created with characteristics within a predictable range, which contributes to predicting the geometry of storage caverns created by acid dissolution of carbonate formations. A series of three-dimensional simulations of cavern formation were used to investigate three different configurations of the acid-dissolution process: (a) injection into an open borehole with production from that same borehole and no fracture; (b) injection into an open borehole with production from that same borehole, with an open fracture; and (c) injection into an open borehole connected by a fracture to an adjacent borehole from which the fluids are produced. The two-well configuration maximizes the overall mass transfer from the rock to the fluid, but it results in a complex cavern shape. Numerical simulations were performed to evalua

  5. Hot-dry-rock geothermal-energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.; Ponder, G.M. (comps.)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year 1981, activities of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program were concentrated in four principal areas: (1) data collection to permit improved estimates of the hot dry rock geothermal energy resource base of various regions of the United States and of the United States as a whole, combined with detailed investigations of several areas that appear particularly promising either for further energy extraction experiments or for future commercial development; (2) successful completion of a 9-month, continuous, closed-loop, recirculating flow test in the enlarged Phase I System at Fenton Hill, New Mexico - a pressurized-water heat-extraction loop developed in low-permeability granitic rock by hydraulic fracturing; (3) successful completion at a depth of 4084 m (13,933 ft) of well EE-3, the production well of a larger, deeper, and hotter, Phase II System at Fenton Hill. Well EE-3 was directionally drilled with control of both azimuth and inclination. Its inclined section is about 380 m (1250 ft) vertically above the injection well, EE-2, which was completed in FY80; and (4) supporting activities included new developments in downhole instrumentation and equipment, geochemical and geophysical studies, rock-mechanics and fluid-mechanics investigations, computer analyses and modeling, and overall system design. Under an International Energy Agency agreement, the New Energy Development Organization, representing the Government of Japan has joined Kernforschungsanlage-Juelich GmbH, representing the Federal Republic of Germany, and the US Department of Energy as an active participant in the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Project.

  6. Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718, Berkeley, CA February 1999 Critical Biogeochemical Parameters Used for In Situ Bioremediation of Solvents in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718, Berkeley, CA February 1999 169 in monitoring wells near the injection point. #12;Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718

  7. EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater...

  8. Rock Mechanics and Enhanced Geothermal Systems: A DOE-sponsored Workshop to Explore Research Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francois Heuze; Peter Smeallie; Derek Elsworth; Joel L. Renner

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop on rock mechanics and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) was held in Cambridge, Mass., on June 20-21 2003, before the Soil and Rock America 2003 International Conference at MIT. Its purpose was to bring together experts in the field of rock mechanics and geothermal systems to encourage innovative thinking, explore new ideas, and identify research needs in the areas of rock mechanics and rock engineering applied to enhanced geothermal systems. The agenda is shown in Appendix A. The workshop included experts in the fields of rock mechanics and engineering, geological engineering, geophysics, drilling, the geothermal energy production from industry, universities and government agencies, and laboratories. The list of participants is shown is Appendix B. The first day consisted of formal presentations. These are summarized in Chapter 1 of the report. By the end of the first day, two broad topic areas were defined: reservoir characterization and reservoir performance. Working groups were formed for each topic. They met and reported in plenary on the second day. The working group summaries are described in Chapter 2. The final session of the workshop was devoted to reaching consensus recommendations. These recommendations are given in Chapter 3. That objective was achieved. All the working group recommendations were considered and, in order to arrive at a practical research agenda usable by the workshop sponsors, workshop recommendations were reduced to a total of seven topics. These topics were divided in three priority groups, as follows. First-priority research topics (2): {sm_bullet} Define the pre-existing and time-dependent geometry and physical characteristics of the reservoir and its fracture network. That includes the identification of hydraulically controlling fractures. {sm_bullet} Characterize the physical and chemical processes affecting the reservoir geophysical parameters and influencing the transport properties of fractures. Incorporate those processes in reservoir simulators. Second-priority research topics (4): {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced fracture detection geophysical methods, such as 3-D surface seismics, borehole seismics, and imaging using earthquake data. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test enhanced stress measurement techniques, such as borehole breakout analysis, tilt-meters, and earthquake focal mechanism analysis. {sm_bullet} Implement and proof-test high-temperature down-hole tools for short-term and long-term diagnostics, such as borehole imaging, geophone arrays, packers, and electrical tools.

  9. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for testing including: (a) Danian chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream limestone, (c) Indiana limestone, (d) Ekofisk chalk, (e) Oil Creek sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand. During the second quarter experiments were begun on these rock types. A series of reconnaissance experiments have been carried out on all but the Ekofisk (for which there is a preliminary data set already inhouse). A series of triaxial tests have been conducted on the Danian chalk, the Cordoba Cream limestone, the Indiana limestone, and sand samples to make a preliminary determination of the deformational mechanisms present in these samples.

  10. The cretaceous source rocks in the Zagros Foothills of Iran: An example of a large size intracratonic basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordenave, M.L. (TOTAL, Cedex (France)); Huc, A.Y. (Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Zagros orogenic belt of Iran is one of the world most prolific petroleum producing area. However, most of the oil production is originated from a relatively small area, the 60,000 km[sup 2] wide Dezful Embayment which contains approximately 12% of the proven oil global reserves. The distribution of the oil and gas fields results from the area extent of six identified source rock layers, their thermal history and reservoir, cap rock and trap availability. In this paper, the emphasis is three of the layers of Cretaceous sources rocks. The Garau facies was deposited during the Neocomian to Albian interval over Lurestan, Northeast Khuzestan and extends over the extreme northeast part of Fars, the Kazhdumi source rock which deposited over the Dezful Embayment, and eventually the Senonian Gurpi Formation which has marginal source rock characteristics in limited areas of Khuzestan and Northern Fars. The deposition environment of these source rock layers corresponds to semipermanent depressions, included in an overall shallow water intracratonic basin communicating with the South Tethys Ocean. These depressions became anoxic when climatic oceanographical and geological conditions were adequate, i.e., humid climate, high stand water, influxes of fine grained clastics and the existence of sills separating the depression from the open sea. Distribution maps of these source rock layers resulting from extensive field work and well control are also given. The maturation history of source rocks is reconstructed from a set of isopachs. It was found that the main contributor to the oil reserves is the Kazhdumi source rock which is associated with excellent calcareous reservoirs.

  11. Dynamic fluid loss in hydraulic fracturing under realistic shear conditions in high-permeability rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarrete, R.C.; Cawiezel, K.E.; Constien, V.G. [Dowell Schlumberger, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the dynamic fluid loss of hydraulic fracturing fluids under realistic shear conditions is presented. During a hydraulic fracturing treatment, a polymeric solution is pumped under pressure down the well to create and propagate a fracture. Part of the fluid leaks into the rock formation, leaving a skin layer of polymer or polymer filter cake, at the rock surface or in the pore space. This study focuses on the effects of shear rate and permeability on dynamic fluid-loss behavior of crosslinked and linear fracturing gels. Previous studies of dynamic fluid loss have mainly been with low-permeability cores and constant shear rates. Here, the effect of shear history and fluid-loss additive on the dynamic leakoff of high-permeability cores is examined.

  12. Production casing for hot-dry-rock wells EE-2 and EE-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, R.W.; Pettitt, R.; Sims, J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production casing for a pair of hot dry rock (HDR) energy extraction wells had to be designed for unique conditions. Two hot dry rock wells (EE-2 and EE-3) were drilled and production casing installed at Fenton Hill, NM for the Los Alamos National Laboratory HDR program. The design of the production casing and subsequent completion operations in these wells revealed that thermal cycling, anticipated operating pressures, and wear during downhole operations are major considerations for both casing specifications and installation procedures. The first well (Energy Extraction No. 2; EE-2) is intended to be the injection well and EE-3 the production well. The top joint strain in EE-3 was monitored during installation, cementing and tensioning.

  13. Revegetation and rock cover for stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings disposal sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beedlow, P.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidelines for using vegetation and rock to protect inactive uranium mill tailings from erosion were developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technology Development program. Information on soils, climate, and vegetation were collected for 20 inactive tailings sites in the western United States. Sites were grouped according to similarities in climate and vegetation. Soil loss for those sites was characterized using the Universal Soil Loss Equation. Test plots were used to evaluate (1) the interaction between vegetation and sealant barrier systems and (2) the effects of surface rock on soil water and vegetation. Lysimeter and simulation studies were used to direct and support field experiments. 49 references, 17 figures, 16 tables.

  14. Cell body rocking is a dominant mechanism for flagellar synchronization in a swimming algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Veikko; Howard, Jonathon; Friedrich, Benjamin M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas swims with two flagella, which can synchronize their beat. Synchronized beating is required to swim both fast and straight. A long-standing hypothesis proposes that synchronization of flagella results from hydrodynamic coupling, but the details are not understood. Here, we present realistic hydrodynamic computations and high-speed tracking experiments of swimming cells that show how a perturbation from the synchronized state causes rotational motion of the cell body. This rotation feeds back on the flagellar dynamics via hydrodynamic friction forces and rapidly restores the synchronized state in our theory. We calculate that this `cell body rocking' provides the dominant contribution to synchronization in swimming cells, whereas direct hydrodynamic interactions between the flagella contribute negligibly. We experimentally confirmed the coupling between flagellar beating and cell body rocking predicted by our theory. We propose that the interplay of flagellar beating a...

  15. MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen C. Ruppel

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excellent progress has been made on all project objectives and goals. All tasks have been completed in the Phase 1 study area, the initial area of project focus. Primary elements of this work include the following: The stratigraphic architecture has been established through correlation of wireline logs guided by core and outcrop studies of facies and cyclicity. A porosity model has been developed that creates a basis for calculation of porosity for wells in the study area. Rock fabrics have been defined by sampling, analysis, and description of cores and used to create transforms for calculating permeability and oil saturation from porosity data. Finally, a preliminary 3-D model has been constructed that incorporates stratigraphic architecture, rock-fabric data, and petrophysical data. Reservoir volumetrics calculated from the model show that a very large fraction of the original oil in place remains.

  16. An underground characterization program for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in plutonic rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, P.M.; Everitt, R.A. [AECL Research, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) is developing a concept for disposing of nuclear fuel waste that involves placing and sealing it in a disposal vault excavated 500 to 1,000 m deep in the stable plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. In this concept, engineered and natural barriers serve to isolate the waste from the biosphere. Since 1983, underground characterization and testing in support of the CNFWMP has been ongoing at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in southeastern Manitoba. This paper draws on experience gained at the URL to recommend an approach to underground characterization that would provide the necessary information to make design decisions for a disposal vault in plutonic rock.

  17. A versatile facility for laboratory studies of viscoelastic and poroelastic behaviour of rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Ian [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Schijns, Heather; Schmitt, Douglas R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Mu Junjie; Delmenico, Alison [Department of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel laboratory equipment has been modified to allow both torsional and flexural oscillation measurements at sub-microstrain amplitudes, thereby providing seismic-frequency constraints on both the shear and compressional wave properties of cylindrical rock specimens within the linear regime. The new flexural mode capability has been tested on experimental assemblies containing fused silica control specimens. Close consistency between the experimental data and the results of numerical modelling with both finite-difference and finite-element methods demonstrates the viability of the new technique. The capability to perform such measurements under conditions of independently controlled confining and pore-fluid pressure, with emerging strategies for distinguishing between local (squirt) and global (specimen-wide) fluid flow, will have particular application to the study of frequency-dependent seismic properties expected of cracked and fluid-saturated rocks of the Earth's upper crust.

  18. A study to improve the engineering properties of limestone rock asphalt paving mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodwin, Philip Wayne

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    asphalt is a naturally occuring calcareous material with its interstices filled with natural bitumen. Deposits of this material exist in various locations throughout the United States. The 1 imestone rock asphalt materials used for thi s study... streets, parking lots, etc . Since the aggregate contains natural bitumen, the amount of additional asp baltic binder required to produce a quality paving mixture is reduced. Consequently, the cost of building a road with this material is reduced...

  19. Fundamentals of log analysis. Part 10: Determining rock mechanical property values from log analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, E.R.; McCain, W.D. Jr. [S.A. Holditch and Associates, Inc., College Station, TX (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correct design and execution of well completions, including hydraulic fracturing, can enhance a reservoir`s productivity. Success in this optimization depends in part on being able to predict how hydraulic fracturing affects performance. Controls on the performance of a hydraulically fractured well are the fracture, reservoir characteristics and the well. This article will cover methods for obtaining values of in-situ stress in a specific rock layer and the in-situ stress profile, and determining Young`s modulus.

  20. Tests of US rock salt for long-term stability of CAES reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehle, R.M.; Thoms, R.L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on laboratory tests to assess the effects of compressed air energy storage (CAES) on rock salt within the US. The project included a conventional laboratory test phase, with triaxial test machines, and a bench-scale test phase performed in salt mines in southern Louisiana. Limited numerical modeling also was performed to serve as a guide in selecting test layouts and for interpreting test data.

  1. Peer Review of the Hot Dry Rock Project at Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly describes the history of the hot dry rock experiment project conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, from about 1971 through 1995. The authors identify the primary lessons learned and techniques developed during the course of the Fenton Hill project, and summarize the extent to which these technologies have been transferred to the U.S. geothermal industry.

  2. An experimental investigation of leading edge vortical flow about a delta wing during wing rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Michael Denis

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    tunnel and water tunnel tests. The hysteresis in the C, versus y, during water tunnel testing, traveled in the opposite direction of the wind tunnel results. Visualization of the water tunnel vortical flowfields provided quantified right and left vortex... locations at specific roll angles during wing rock. The contribution to the rolling moment based on these vortex positions was analyzed. The results show a decrease in rolling moment before reaching the maximum roll amplitude and an increase in rolling...

  3. Displacement of oil from reservoir rock using high molecular weight polymer solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barzi, Houshang

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    underground reservoirs by the injection of water containing chemicals to increase its viscosity. Some laboratory research and field trials have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of viscous water in dis- placing oil from reservoir rock.... ia. Twenty-eight experiments were conducted. In twenty-two experiments oil was displaced from un- consolidated sand packs using polymers with viscosity that ranged from 160 cp to 3 cp. In five experiments crude oil was displaced. from...

  4. A LANL Scientist's Dream Takes Off to Zap Rocks on Mars

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wiens, Roger

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Roger Wiens, with a team of 40 people at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the collaboration of the French space institute IRAP, created ChemCam, a laser spectrometer and telescope device aboard the Curiosity rover. ChemCam will blast rocks from as far as 7 meters, vaporize bits of their surfaces, and spectroscopically determine their chemical composition, aiding in the search for life on Mars, and making this scientist's boyhood dream a reality.

  5. An implicit centered finite-difference simulation for free surface flows in a rocking tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jobst, William Edward

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    include the liquid movement in closed containers such as tank trucks on highways and railroads, liquid fuel tanks in space vehicles' and contained liquid cargo in oceangoing vessels. Interest in this particular fluid phenomenon has grown consider...AN IMPLICIT CENTERED FINITE-DIFFERENCE SIMULATION FOR FREE SURFACE FLOWS IN A ROCKING TANK A Thesis by WILLIAM EDWARD JOBST Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  6. LOUIS C. BOGAR THE FERNALD DOSIMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Inc. Idaho Falls, Idaho 2 Keystone Scientific, Inc., Fort Collins, Colorado 3 Health Physics Corporation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 6 Eagle Rock Scientific, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho , Moore Technical Applications, Darnestown, Maryland 4 Environmental Perspectives, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho 5 Hendecagon

  7. Stimulation Techniques Used In Enhanced Geothermal Systems: Perspectives From Geomechanics and Rock Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen L. Karner; Joel Renner

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the processes that enhance fluid flow in crustal rocks is a key step towards extracting sustainable thermal energy from the Earth. To achieve this, geoscientists need to identify the fundamental parameters that govern how rocks respond to stimulation techniques, as well as the factors that control the evolution of permeability networks. These parameters must be assessed over variety of spatial scales: from microscopic rock properties (such as petrologic, mechanical, and diagenetic characteristics) to macroscopic crustal behavior (such as tectonic and hydro-dynamic properties). Furthermore, these factors must be suitably monitored and/or characterized over a range of temporal scales before the evolutionary behavior of geothermal fields can be properly assessed. I am reviewing the procedures currently employed for reservoir stimulation of geothermal fields. The techniques are analyzed in the context of the petrophysical characteristics of reservoir lithologies, studies of wellbore data, and research on regional crustal properties. I determine common features of geothermal fields that can be correlated to spatiotemporal evolution of reservoirs, with particular attention to geomechanics and petrophysical properties. The study of these correlations can then help guide procedures employed when targeting new prospective geothermal resources.

  8. Oil source rocks in the Romanian area of the Moesian platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltes, N.; Matracaru, C.; Petrom, R.A. [Institute for Research and Technology, Prahova (Romania)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Romanian area of the Moesian Platform (north of the Danube-Black Sea and east and South Carpathians Foredeep to north) represents a very important intra-plate with some new real oil prospects. With a thick sedimentary cover, especially in its northern, deepest area, the Moesian Platform offers favorable geological conditions of oil systems in the whole stratigraphic column, from Paleozoic to Upper Cenozoic (Pliocene). Having a few rich oil source rocks both in carbonatic facies (Devonian-Carboniferous, Middle Triassic, Neocomian) and argillitic ones (Silurian, early Carboniferous, Lias-Dogger, Mid-Upper Miocene), the Moesian Platform also contains very good oil reservoirs: Mid-Upper Paleozoic, Triassic, Lower Cretaceous, Upper Miocene and Pliocene. Geochemical studies on kerogen and bitumen have pointed out the most important oil source rocks, as well as the quality and quantity of expelled hydrocarbons and their relationships with oil reservoirs. Geochemical correlations between oils and source rocks have led to a better understanding of the oil pool formation with some interesting goals in the Romanian exploration strategy.

  9. Geochemical evaluation of oils and source rocks from the Western Siberian basin, U. S. S. R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, K.E.; Huizinga, B.J. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)); Moldowan, J.M. (Chevron Oil Field Research Co., Richmond, CA (United States)); Kontorovich, A.E.; Stasova, O. (Siberian Scientific Research Institute for Geology, Geophysics and Mineral Resources, Novobsibirsk (Russian Federation)); Demaison, G.J.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the Western Siberian basin is among the most prolific in the world, there has been disagreement among Soviet geoscientists on the origin of the petroleum within this basin. Screening geochemical analyses were used to select several oils and potential source rocks for a preliminary study using detailed biomarker and supporting geochemistry. Possible sources for this petroleum include rocks of Middle Jurassic, Upper Jurassic, and Lower Cretaceous age. Results indicate that most of the analyzed Western Siberian oils, occurring in reservoirs from Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous in age, are derived from the Upper Jurassic Bazhenov Formation. The locations of the samples in the study generally correspond to the distribution of the most effective oil-generative parts of the Bazhenov Formation. Analyses show that the Bazhenov rock samples contain abundant marine algal and bacterial organic matter, preserved under anoxic depositional conditions. Biomarkers show that thermal maturities of the samples range from the early to late oil-generative window and that some are biodegraded. For example, the Salym No. 114 oil, which flowed directly from the Bazhenov Formation, shows a maturity equivalent to the late oil window. The Van-Egan no. 110 oil shows maturity equivalent to the early oil window and is biodegraded. This oil shows preferential microbial conversion of lower homologs of the 17{alpha}, 21{beta}(H)-hopanes to 25-nor-17{alpha}(H)-hopanes.

  10. Mining earth's heat: development of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettitt, R.A.; Becker, N.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy-extraction concept of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Program, as initially developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is to mine this heat by creating a man-made reservoir in low-permeability, hot basement rock. This concept has been successfully proven at Fenton Hill in northern New Mexico by drilling two holes to a depth of approximately 3 km (10,000 ft) and a bottom temperature of 200/sup 0/C (392/sup 0/F), then connecting the boreholes with a large-diametervertical hydraulic fracture. Water is circulated down one borehole, heated by the hot rock, and rises up the second borehole to the surface where the heat is extracted and the cooled water is reinjected into the underground circulation loop. This system has operated for a cumulative 416 days during engineering and reservoir testing. An energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t) was produced without adverse environmental problems. During one test, a generator was installed in the circulation loop and produced 60 kW of electricity. A second-generation system, recently drilled to 4.5 km (15,000 ft) and temperatures of 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F), entails creating multiple, parallel fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. This system should produce 5 to 10 MW(e) for 20 years. Significant contributions to underground technology have been made through the development of the program.

  11. WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF CARBONATE ROCK MEDIATED BY BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCED FROM HIGH-STARCH AGRICULTURAL EFFLUENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehdi Salehi; Stephen Johnson; Gregory Bala; Jenn-Tai Liang

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfactants can be used to alter wettability of reservoir rock, increasing spontaneous imbibition and thus improving oil yields. Commercial synthetic surfactants are often prohibitively expensive and so a crude preparation of the anionic biosurfactant, surfactin, from Bacillus subtilis grown on high-starch industrial and agricultural effluents has been proposed as an economical alternative. To assess the effectiveness of the surfactin, it is compared to commercially available surfactants. In selecting a suitable benchmark surfactant, two metrics are examined: the ability of the surfactants to alter wettability at low concentrations, and the degree to which they are absorbed onto reservoir matrix. We review the literature to survey the adsorption models that have been developed to describe surfactant adsorption in porous media. These models are evaluated using the experimental data from this study. Crushed carbonate rock samples are cleaned and aged in crude oil. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of commercial anionic surfactants and surfactin is assessed using a two-phase separation; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption the rock is determined.

  12. A comparison of two heat transfer models for estimating thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Kruger, Paul

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock geothermal systems have been made with two different models of heat transfer from hydraulically fractured reservoir rock blocks to water circulated through the fracture permeability. One model is based on deconvolution of experimental tracer response curves into a network of flowpaths connected in parallel with heat transfer calculated individually in each flowpath. The second model is based on one-dimensional flow through the rock with a block size distribution described as a group of equivalent-radius spheres for which the heat transfer equations can be solved analytically. The two models were applied to the planned Phase II long-term thermal drawdown experiment at Fenton Hill, NM. The results show good agreement between the two models, with estimates of temperature cooldown from 240C to 150C in a few years depending on selected operation parameters, but with somewhat differing cooldown curve characteristic shapes. Data from the long-term experiment will be helpful in improving the two models.

  13. The effect of rock fragments on the hydraulic properties of soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many soils contain rock fragments the sizes of which are much larger than the average pore size of the sieved soil. Due to the fact that these fragments are often fairly large in relation to the soil testing apparatus, it is common to remove them before performing hydrologic tests on the soil. The question then arises as to whether or not there is a simple way to correct the laboratory-measured values to account for the fragments, so as to arrive at property values that can apply to the soil in situ. This question has arisen in the surface infiltration studies that are part of the site characterization program at Yucca Mountain, where accurate values of the hydraulic conductivities of near-surface soils are needed in order to accurately estimate infiltration rates. Although this problem has been recognized for some time, and numerous review articles have been written there are as yet no proven models to account for the effect of rock fragments on hydraulic conductivity and water retention. In this report we will develop some simple physically-based models to account for the effects of rock fragments on gross hydrological properties, and apply the resulting equations to experimental data taken from the literature. These models are intended for application to data that is currently being collected by scientists from the USGS on near-surface soils from Yucca Mountain.

  14. Soft-ratchet modeling of end-point memory in the nonlinear resonant response of sedimentary rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soft-ratchet modeling of end-point memory in the nonlinear resonant response of sedimentary rocks. The subsystem of ruptured bonds is shown to be of a soft-ratchet type, so that its response to an alternating

  15. A validation of ground penetrating radar for reconstructing the internal structure of a rock glacier: Mount Mestas, Colorado, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, William Revis

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock glaciers are dynamic landforms and, as such, exhibit interesting and welldeveloped structural features, which translate to surface morphology in the form of ridges and furrows. These distinguishing features have led researchers to study...

  16. Pyriproxyfen bait for control of plague vector fleas (Siphonaptera:Ceratophyllidae) on rock squirrels (Rodentia:Sciuridae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Erin Bess Gabrielle

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research was conducted in Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico, to investigate the efficacy of orally administered bait cubes containing pyriproxyfen for control of the plague vector flea, Oropsylla montana (Baker), on rock squirrels...

  17. 30 ENGINEERING & SCIENCE WI NTE R 2012 Whether processing radar signals in Norway or assessing rock properties in Nigeria, Calte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    30 ENGINEERING & SCIENCE WI NTE R 2012 Whether processing radar signals in Norway or assessing rock deeply into basic physics to solve problems. Oslo, Norway, José Navarro, PhD '94, Astronomy José Navarro

  18. Economic predictions for heat mining : a review and analysis of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tester, Jefferson W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this study were first, to review and analyze several economic assessments of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy systems, and second, to reformulate an economic model for HDR with revised cost components.

  19. An Active Rule Language for ROCK & ROLL Andrew Dinn, Norman W. Patony, M. Howard Williams and Alvaro A.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Alvaro A. A.

    An Active Rule Language for ROCK & ROLL Andrew Dinn, Norman W. Patony, M. Howard Williams, Riccarton, Edinburgh, UK email: !andrew,howard?@cee.hw.ac.uk Department of Computer Sciencey, University

  20. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weislogel, Amy

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  1. EUROCK 2006 Multiphysics Coupling and Long Term Behaviour in Rock Mechanics Van Cotthem, Charlier, Thimus & Tshibangu (eds)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    observations of stress-aligned shear- wave splitting (seismic birefringence) in hydro-carbon reservoirs-WAVE SPLITTING The key phenomenon for observing the internal micro- cracked structure of rocks is stress

  2. Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied in some detail - the Northeast and the Southeast. The investment cost for an LRC facility in the Northeast is approximately $182 million and $343 million for a 2.6-billion cubic foot (bcf) working gas facility and a 5.2-bcf working gas storage facility, respectively. The relatively high investment cost is a strong function of the cost of labor in the Northeast. The labor union-related rules and requirements in the Northeast result in much higher underground construction costs than might result in Sweden, for example. The LRC technology gas storage service is compared to other alternative technologies. The LRC technology gas storage service was found to be competitive with other alternative technologies for a variety of market scenarios.

  3. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave velocity of rock.

  4. Structure of the eastern Red Rocks and Wind Ridge thrust faults, Wyoming: how a thrust fault gains displacement along strike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huntsman, Brent Stanley

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STRUCTURE OF THE EASTERN RED ROCKS AND WIND RIDGE THRUST FAULTS, WYOMING: HOW A THRUST FAULT GAINS DISPLACEMENT ALONG STRIKE A Thesis by BRENT STANLEY HUNTSMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Geology STRUCTURE OF THE EASTERN RED ROCKS AND WIND RIDGE THRUST FAULTS, WYOMING: HOW A THRUST FAULT GAINS DISPLACEMENT ALONG STRIKE A Thesis by BRENT STANLEY HUNTSMAN...

  5. A theoretical approach for assessing the role of rock and fluid properties in the development of abnormal fluid pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Thomas Worcester

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A THEORETICAL APPROACH FOR ASSESSING THE ROLE OF ROCK AND FLUID PROPERTIES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ABNORMAL FLUID PRESSURES A Thesis by THOMAS WORCESTER HASTINGS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Geology A THEORETICAL APPROACH FOR ASSESSING THE ROLE OF ROCK AND FLUID PROPERTIES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ABNORMAL FLUID PRESSURES A Thesis by THOMAS MORCESTER HASTINGS...

  6. A quantitative evaluation of effective shale content and its influence on electrical resistivity and permeability of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Parayath Eravi Bhaskara

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVE SHALE CONTENT AND ITS INFLUENCE ON ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AND PERMEABILITY OF RESERVOIR ROCKS A Thesis By PARAYATH E. B. MENON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in Partial... fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, f965 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVE SHALE CONTENT AND ITS INFLUENCE ON ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AND PERMEABILITY OF RESERVOIR ROCKS...

  7. FINITE-ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF ROCK FALL ON UNCANISTERED FUEL WASTE PACKAGE DESIGNS (SCPB: N/A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z. Ceylan

    1996-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this analysis is to explore the Uncanistered Fuel (UCF) Tube Design waste package (WP) resistance to rock falls. This analysis will also be used to determine the size of rock that can strike the WP without causing failure in the containment barriers from a height based on the starter tunnel dimensions. The purpose of this analysis is to document the models and methods used in the calculations.

  8. Calc-alkaline mafic rocks of the Black Dyke Formation: Remnants of the final activity of a submerged Permian volcano

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blein, O.; Lapierre, H.; Pecher, A. (URA-CNRS, Grenoble (France)); Schweickert, R.A. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Geological Science)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Permian Black Dyke Fm., which occurs as large tectonic slices within the Luning allochthon in the Excelsior Mountains, NV, forms an E-W trending anticline at Black Dyke Mountain. The 800-m thick stratigraphic succession consists of volcanic and pyroclastic rocks overlain conformably by volcaniclastic sediments. Along the northern limb of the anticline, the rocks consist of mafic porphyritic lavas, breccias, and graded and ungraded pyroclastic beds. The sedimentary unit consists of thick volcaniclastic turbidites overlain by conglomerates, sandstones, and mudstones. Along the southern limb of the anticline, the sequence is replaced by reworked breccia, tuffs, and sandstones. Mafic plutonic rocks occur as xenoliths in the lavas and breccias, and as coeval plugs intruding the section. Gabbros show cumulate or porphyritic textures and are composed of amph, cpx, and zoned plag. Their Ti/V (14.5--15) and Nb/Y (0.25--0.3) ratios fall in the range commonly found in calc-alkaline rocks. Diorite porphyry shows high Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], ZrO[sub 2], and REE abundances indicating that this rock is more fractionated. Basalts and andesites are plag-cpx-opx phyric. They often include glomeroporphyritic clots of cpx with amph coronas. Some rocks exhibit fluidal textures. Both volcanic and plutonic rocks show homogeneous geochemical features and similar crystallization sequences: Fe-Ti oxides---->plag---->opx + cpx----> brown zoned hbl, suggesting that they are cogenetic. Thus, the lower part of the Black Dyke Fm. likely represents the final products formed in a calc-alkaline magma chamber because pyroclastic rocks prevail over lava flows and abundant early crystal cumulates occur as plugs or as inclusions in the lavas and breccias.

  9. Three-dimensional seismic stratigraphic study of Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Campbell County, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Donna Lynn

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    complexes (Fryberger, 1984). Eagle Rock field most likely consists of a preserved eolian sand dune, cemented and capped by a thin layer of marine carbonates, and trapped by the Opeche Shale which unconformably overlies the Minnelusa Formation... producing sandstone of Eagle Rock field can be detected seismically. The producing zone is only 10-12 feet thick, but the sharp contact of high-velocity marine carbonates over the low- velocity producing sandstones creates a high impedance contrast...

  10. Rock Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huyge, Dirk

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    boat representation. Wadi Abu Subeira. Photograph by thein the Eastern Desert. Wadi Barramiya. Probably Naqada II.hand stencils from Wadi el-Obeiyd Cave. Farafra Oasis.

  11. ROCK DEFORMATION 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 8-13, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Prior

    2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Creep in the crust and mantle is commonly considered a steady-state process. This view prevails despite the fact that earthquakes do not represent steady-state and at the base of the seismogenic zone, for example, the stresses that drive creep must vary with the earthquake cycle. The contribution of transient versus steady-state behavior is not easy to determine from naturally-deformed brittle or plastic rocks and our view of steady-state depends on whether we consider geological or shorter time-scales. Perhaps we avoid a non steady-state picture because we lack appropriate descriptive or quantitative tools. The aim of the 2010 Gordon Research Conference (GRC) in rock deformation is to explore what we know about non steady-state deformation and how we might advance our understanding through geological and geophysical field investigations, laboratory experiments and modeling. This will require an appraisal of the applicability of steady-state concepts as well as an exploration of transient behavior, in which processes and physical properties cycle between different states as might be the case during earthquake cycles, and transitions in behavior, where finite strain or changing environmental conditions lead to changes in processes and properties. Conference sessions will cover seven broad and interlinked topics. (1) What is steady state?; an appraisal of applicability of the steady-state concept in rock deformation. (2) Seismogenic Faulting and Brittle Fault Rocks; where transience in rates and conditions are accepted but not fully understood. (3) Episodic Creep During the Seismic Cycle; with a focus on processes in areas adjacent to the base of the seismogenic zone. (4) Creep in Zones of Stress and Temperature Cycling; considering deformation in real-world complex systems (5) Deformation, Metamorphism, and Fluids; exploring the interaction of diagenesis/metamorphism and thermal instabilities with deformation. (6) Mechanism and Microstructure Transitions During Deformation; quantifying evolution as a function of strain and associated with changes in deformation kinematics or conditions. (7) Mechanism and Microstructure Transitions Related to Mantle Geophysics; with a focus on the link between mechanisms affecting processes on geological time-scales on the time-scales associated with seismic wave propagation. The GRC on Rock Deformation aims to bring together researchers with diverse expertise, and to shape the scientific debate and provide inspiration for young researchers to fill the still extensive gaps in our knowledge of how the Earth deforms. The processes that will be discussed have wide applications in both basic and applied research. A key issue, of fundamental importance to our understanding of the Earth, for discussion at this meeting will be the transition from time-dependent (and distributed) rock deformation, including both high temperature creep and brittle creep, to episodic (and more localized) events. Such transitions have both a scientific and a socio-economic impact since they control the precursory phases of important geohazards such as earthquake rupture and volcanic eruptions, and also influence effective recovery of hydrocarbon and geothermal energy resources, and the integrity of long-term storage facilities for hazardous waste.

  12. Discrete element modeling of rock deformation, fracture network development and permeability evolution under hydraulic stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shouchun Deng; Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Key challenges associated with the EGS reservoir development include the ability to reliably predict hydraulic fracturing and the deformation of natural fractures as well as estimating permeability evolution of the fracture network with time. We have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a network flow model. In DEM model, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external and internal load is applied. The natural fractures are represented by a series of connected line segments. Mechanical bonds that intersect with such line segments are removed from the DEM model. A network flow model using conjugate lattice to the DEM network is developed and coupled with the DEM. The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms the mechanical bonds and breaks them if the deformation reaches a prescribed threshold value. Such deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability of the flow network, which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, intimately coupling the two processes. The intimate coupling between fracturing/deformation of fracture networks and fluid flow makes the meso-scale DEM- network flow simulations necessary in order to accurately evaluate the permeability evolution, as these methods have substantial advantages over conventional continuum mechanical models of elastic rock deformation. The challenges that must be overcome to simulate EGS reservoir stimulation, preliminary results, progress to date and near future research directions and opportunities will be discussed. Methodology for coupling the DEM model with continuum flow and heat transport models will also be discussed.

  13. Geochemistry of selected oils and rocks from the central portion of the West Siberian basin, Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, K.E.; Huizinga, B.J. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)); Kontorovich, A.Eh.; Andrusevich, V.E. (Inst. of Geology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)); Moldowan, J.M. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)); Demaison, G.J. (Petroscience Inc., Walnut Creek, CA (United States)); Stasova, O.F. (NPO SIBGEO, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six analyzed oils, produced from Middle jurassic to Upper Cretaceous strata in the Middle Ob region of the West Siberian basin, show biomarker and stable carbon isotope compositions indicating an origin from the Upper Jurassic Bazhenov Formation. The chemical compositions of these oils are representative of more than 85% of the reserves in West Siberia (Kontorovich et al., 1975). Bazhenov-sourced oil in Cenomanian strata in the Van-Egan field underwent biodegradation in the reservoir, resulting in a low API gravity, an altered homohopane distribution, and the appearance of 25-norhopanes without alteration of the steranes. High API gravity oil from the Salym field has surpassed the peak of the oil window, consistent with abnormally high temperatures and pressures in the Bazhenov source rock from which it is produced. The remaining oils are very similar, including samples from Valanginian and Bathonian-Callovian intervals in a sequence of stacked reservoirs in the Fedorov field. Bazhenov rock samples from the study area contain abundant oil-prone, marine organic matter preserved under anoxic conditions. While the Upper Jurassic Vasyugan Formation shows lower oil-regenerative potential than the Bazhenov Formation, it cannot be excluded as a source rock because insufficient sample was available for biomarker analysis. Core from the Lower to Middle Jurassic Tyumen Formation in the YemYegov 15 well was compared with the oils because it is thermally mature and shows TOC and HI values, indicating slightly more favorable oil-generative characteristics than the average for the formation (2.75 wt. % for 270 samples; 95 mg HC/g TOC for 25 samples). The core contains terrigenous, gas-prone organic matter that shows no relationship with the analyzed oils. 59 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K. [David K. Davies & Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Doublet, L.E. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

  15. Hydrogeologic factors affecting cavern morphology within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fanning, B.J. (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Geology); Brahana, J.V. (Univ. of Arkansas , Fayetteville, AR (United States). Geological Survey)

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cavern development within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas is associated with two Pleistocene erosional features, the Boston Mountains Plateau and the Springfield Plateau. Each plateau is characterized by a distinct stratigraphic sequence with unique lithologies. Cavern morphology (both cross-sectional and planimetric) in each plateau is the result of the complex interaction of numerous hydrogeologic factors. Four of the most dominant factors which affect cavern morphology appear to be: (1) composition and continuity of the confining units; (2) percentage of noncarbonate components in rocks of the cavern-forming interval; (3) nature and distribution of ground-water recharge to the cavern-forming interval; and (4) nature and distribution of fractures within the cavern-forming interval. Network maze patterns typically develop in the Pitkin Limestone, the formation in which most caverns form beneath the Boston Mountains Plateau. The Pitkin, a bioclastic limestone, is confined above by siltstones of the Cane Hill member of the Hale Formation and below by shales of the Fayetteville Formation. The maze pattern indicates that these caverns probably were formed by dissolution of the rock matrix by diffuse recharge moving vertically through leaky confining units. Single rooms are the dominant cavern morphology in the chert-dominated Boone Formation of the Springfield Plateau. Where the concentration of chert is greater than 50 percent, the Boone lacks structural integrity and fails to develop well-integrated conduit networks. Point recharge features in outcrop areas of the Boone Formation are not visible in most of the Springfield Plateau because the insoluble residuum masks the upper bedrock surface. Where the Boone Formation is less than 7 meters thick, surface karst features are more prevalent.

  16. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program. Annual report, fiscal year 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cremer, G.M.; Duffield, R.B.; Smith, M.C.; Wilson, M.G. (comps.)

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fenton Hill Project is still the principal center for developing methods, equipment, and instrumentation for creating and utilizing HDR geothermal reservoirs. The search for a second site for a similar experimental system in a different geological environment has been intensified, as have the identification and characterization of other HDR areas that may prove suitable for either experimental or commercial development. The Phase I fracture system was enlarged during FY79. Drilling of the injection well of the Phase II system began at Fenton Hill in April 1979. Environmental monitoring of the Fenton Hill area continued through FY79. The environmental studies indicate that the hot dry rock operations have caused no significant environmental impact. Other supporting activities included rock physics, rock mechanics, fracture mapping, and instrumentation development. Two closely related activities - evaluation of the potential HDR energy resource of the US and the selection of a site for development of a second experimental heat-extraction system generally similar to that at Fenton Hill - have resulted in the collection of geology, hydrology, and heat-flow data on some level of field activity in 30 states. The resource-evaluation activity included reconnaissance field studies and a listing and preliminary characterization of US geothermal areas in which HDR energy extraction methods may be applicable. The selection of Site 2 has taken into account such legal, institutional, and economic factors as land ownership and use, proximity to possible users, permitting and licensing requirements and procedures, environmental issues, areal extent of the geothermal area, and visibility to and apparent interest by potential industrial developers.

  17. THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability evolution.

  18. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  19. Observation of pressure stimulated voltages in rocks using an electric potential sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aydin, A.; Prance, R. J.; Prance, H.; Harland, C. J. [Centre for Physical Electronics and Quantum Technology, School of Engineering and Design, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QT (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent interest in the electrical activity in rock and the use of electric field transients as candidates for earthquake precursors has led to studies of pressure stimulated currents in laboratory samples. In this paper, an electric field sensor is used to measure directly the voltages associated with these currents. Stress was applied as uniaxial compression to marble and granite at an approximately constant rate. In contrast with the small pressure stimulated currents previously measured, large voltage signals are reported. Polarity reversal of the signal was observed immediately before fracture for the marble, in agreement with previous pressure stimulated current studies.

  20. Design of field test plots for a sloped waste rock surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Kane, M. [O`Kane Consultants, Inc., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Stoicescu, J.; Haug, M. [M.D. Haug and Associates Ltd., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Januszewski, S. [Westmin Resources Ltd., Campbell River, British Columbia (Canada). Myra Falls Operations; Mchaina, D.M. [Westmin Resources Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Westmin Resources Limited is a Western Canadian mining company with producing interests in base and precious metals and coals. Westmin`s Myra Falls Operations produce copper, zinc, and gold concentrates. The Myra Falls Operations are located in the central interior of Vancouver Island in a hanging glacial valley. Mean annual precipitation is approximately 3,000 mm with more than 75% occurring during the months of October to April. Historic surface deposition of waste rock has resulted in acid rock drainage (ARD). An applied research program was initiated to develop a cover system for the waste rock material at the Myra Falls site. The objective is to develop a cover system which controls the ingress of oxygen and infiltration of water, while providing a medium for sustainable vegetation that is consistent with the end land use of the area. Progress to date suggests that modified local till materials (amended with either fly ash or bentonite) can be used in soil cover construction. Four test plots were designed using two-dimensional saturated-unsaturated modelling tools to ensure that the performance of each test plot was representative of a full scale ARD cover system. This paper summarizes the design philosophy and principles of the cover system as well as the methodology for the two-dimensional numerical modelling program. Conclusions and results from the numerical modelling program are presented with a focus on implications for construction of the field test plots and installation of the performance monitoring instruments. The numerical modelling demonstrated that the hydraulic performance of a soil cover system placed on a sloped waste rock surface will be much different than that predicted by idealized one-dimensional numerical models, and in general current design methodologies. The modelling clearly demonstrated that the design of small scale field test plots was not a simple task. The physical dimensions of the field test plots had a significant impact on the ideal location for monitoring instruments and incorrect placement of instruments would lead to an erroneous measure of test plot performance.