Sample records for area year founded

  1. The year 2004 marked the 15th anniversary of the founding of the ecotourism company Rainforest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    Expeditions: Planning for the Future Ross School of Business student Kate Elliot and Research AssociateThe year 2004 marked the 15th anniversary of the founding of the ecotourism company Rainforest Expeditions (RFE). A decade and a half of experience led the company's cofounders, Eduardo Nycander and Kurt

  2. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  3. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

    2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  4. Summary of current research interests Over the years we have found many novel genes causing eye disease.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saunders, Mark

    Summary of current research interests Over the years we have found many novel genes causing eye of autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive loci through pedigree analysis, positional cloning of novel eye pedigrees are essential and Moorfields Eye Hospital along with a number of ophthalmic departments nationally

  5. Fermi Large Area Telescope Operations: Progress Over 4 Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched into orbit in June 2008, and is conducting a multi-year gamma-ray all-sky survey, using the main instrument on Fermi, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Fermi began its science mission in August 2008, and has now been operating for almost 4 years. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hosts the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC), which supports the operation of the LAT in conjunction with the Mission Operations Center (MOC) and the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), both at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The LAT has a continuous output data rate of about 1.5 Mbits per second, and data from the LAT are stored on Fermi and transmitted to the ground through TDRS and the MOC to the ISOC about 10 times per day. Several hundred computers at SLAC are used to process LAT data to perform event reconstruction, and gamma-ray photon data are subsequently delivered to the FSSC for public release with a few hours of being detected by the LAT. We summarize the current status of the LAT, and the evolution of the data processing and monitoring performed by the ISOC during the first 4 years of the Fermi mission, together with future plans for further changes to detected event data processing and instrument operations and monitoring.

  6. BFA IN STUDIO ART Area of Emphasis: Interior Design Suggested 4 Year Curriculum Internship Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    BFA IN STUDIO ART Area of Emphasis: Interior Design Suggested 4 Year Curriculum Internship Option Internship 3 hours FOURTH YEAR First semester Area Hours Must Second semester Area Hours ARID 3220 /3210

  7. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4, November 2002 Gary A Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The University of Denver #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 4 2 by 5 years

  8. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 6,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 6, January 2007 Gary A 80208 June 2007 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 6 1-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 6 2 INTRODUCTION Many cities

  9. Westinghouse Hanford Company effluent report for 300, 400, and 1100 Area operations for calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, M.J.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report tabulates both radioactive and nonradioactive liquid and airborne effluent data for 300, 400, and 1100 Area operations at the Hanford Site. The 300 Area is primarily a research and development area. The 400 Area houses the Fast Flux Test Facility. The 1100 Area contains central stores and vehicle maintenance facilities. Releases to the environment from Westinghouse Hanford Company operations within these areas during calendar year 1989 were both consistent with previous years and within regulatory limits. 2 refs., 10 tabs.

  10. area fiscal year: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review Board as an independent agency within 97 The Smithsonian Institution Libraries in 1999Fiscal Year October 1, 1998-September 30, 1999 Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  11. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2010 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skwarek, B. J.

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the deactiviation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2010.

  12. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 5,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 5, January 2005 Gary A, Suite 140 Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-9 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile campaigns.13 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 5 2 INTRODUCTION

  13. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 5,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 5, November 2004 Gary A, Suite 140 Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-9 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile campaigns.14 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 5 2 INTRODUCTION

  14. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 2 Peter J. Popp, Gary A from automobiles are at a maximum when the air/fuel ratio is rich of stoichiometric, and are caused

  15. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 1 Peter J. Popp, Sajal S to Heywood,2 carbon monoxide emissions from automobiles are at a maximum when the air/fuel ratio is rich

  16. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 1 Peter J. Popp, Gary A.1 Carbon monoxide emissions from automobiles are at a maximum when the air/fuel ratio is rich

  17. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 1 Gary A. Bishop, Sajal S to the national emission inventory.1 According to Heywood2 , carbon monoxide emissions from automobiles

  18. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 3 Sajal S. Pokharel, Gary Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-4 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions a slight negative dependence on #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area

  19. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Phoenix Area: Year 2 Sajal S. Pokharel, Gary Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-4 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions when the measurements were binned by model year. #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions

  20. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year 2011 annual review for Area G. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 and formally approved in 2009. These analyses are expected to provide reasonable estimates of the long-term performance of Area G and, hence, the disposal facility's ability to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) performance objectives. Annual disposal receipt reviews indicate that smaller volumes of waste will require disposal in the pits and shafts at Area G relative to what was projected for the performance assessment and composite analysis. The future inventories are projected to decrease modestly for the pits but increase substantially for the shafts due to an increase in the amount of tritium that is projected to require disposal. Overall, however, changes in the projected future inventories of waste are not expected to compromise the ability of Area G to satisfy DOE performance objectives. The Area G composite analysis addresses potential impacts from all waste disposed of at the facility, as well as other sources of radioactive material that may interact with releases from Area G. The level of knowledge about the other sources included in the composite analysis has not changed sufficiently to call into question the validity of that analysis. Ongoing environmental surveillance activities are conducted at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. However, the information generated by many of these activities cannot be used to evaluate the validity of the performance assessment and composite analysis models because the monitoring data collected are specific to operational releases or address receptors that are outside the domain of the performance assessment and composite analysis. In general, applicable monitoring data are supportive of some aspects of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Several research and development (R and D) efforts have been initiated under the performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. These investigations are designed to improve the current understanding of the disposal facility and site, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with the projections of the long-term performance of Area G. The status and results of R and D activities that were undertaken in fiscal year 2011 are discussed in this report. Special analyses have been conducted to determine the feasibility of disposing of specific waste streams, to address proposed changes in disposal operations, and to consider the impacts of changes to the models used to conduct the performance assessment and composite analysis. These analyses are described and the results of the evaluations are summarized in this report. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, all disposal operations at Area G have been confined to MDA G. Material Disposal Area G is scheduled to undergo final closure in 2015; disposal of waste in the pits and shafts is scheduled to end in 2013. In anticipation of the closure of MDA G, plans are being made to ship the majority of the waste generated at LANL to off-site locations for disposal. It is not clear at this time if waste that will be disposed of at LANL will be placed in Zone 4 or if disposal operations will move to a new location at the Laboratory. Separately, efforts to optimize the final cover used in the closure of MDA G are underway; a final cover design different than that adopted for the performance assessment and composite analy

  1. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2009 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. J. Skwarek

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of seven facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2009. The D4 of these facilities included characterization; engineering; removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials; equipment removal; utility disconnection; deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure; and stabilization or removal of slabs and foundations. This report also summarizes the nine below-grade slabs/foundations removed in FY09 of buildings demolished in previous fiscal years.

  2. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    of the internal combustion engine and causes of pollutants in the exhaust see Heywood2 . Properly operating modern for water and any excess oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel canOn-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 4 Sajal S. Pokharel, Gary

  3. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the LaBrea Area: Year 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the LaBrea Area: Year 2 Mitchell J. Williams 140 Alpharetta, Georgia 30022 Contract No. E-23-4 #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions compared to the standard error of the mean measurements. #12;On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions

  4. Summary of radioactive solid waste received in the 200 Areas during calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.D.; Hagel, D.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Hanford Company manages and operates the Hanford Site 200 Area radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities for the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office, under contract DE-AC06-87RL10930. These facilities include radioactive solid waste disposal sites and radioactive solid waste storage areas. This document summarizes the amount of radioactive material that has been buried and stored in the 200 Area radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities from startup in 1944 through calendar year 1994. This report does not include backlog waste: solid radioactive wastes in storage or disposed of in other areas or facilities such as the underground tank farms. Unless packaged within the scope of WHC-EP-0063, Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WHC 1988), liquid waste data are not included in this document.

  5. Summary of radioactive solid waste received in the 200 Areas during calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.D.; Hagel, D.L.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Hanford Company manages and operates the Hanford Site 200 Areas radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. These facilities include radioactive solid waste disposal sites and radioactive solid waste storage areas. This document summarizes the amount of radioactive materials that have been buried and stored in the 200 Areas radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities since startup in 1944 through calendar year 1993. This report does not include backlog waste, solid radioactive waste in storage or disposed of in other areas, or facilities such as the underground tank farms. Unless packaged within the scope of WHC-EP-0063, ``Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria,`` (WHC 1988), liquid waste data are not included in this document.

  6. Hanford Area 1990 population and 50-year projections. [Appendix contains computer programming for population projections and graphs showing them by grid areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.M.; Scott, M.J.; Shindle, S.F.; Napier, B.A.; Thurman, A.G.; Batishko, N.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Davis, M.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Pittenger, D.B. (Demographics Lab., Olympia, WA (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex and comprehensive safety analysis activities carried out at Hanford for nonreactor nuclear facilities require data from a number of scientific and engineering disciplines. The types of data that are required include data pertaining to current population and population projections. The types of data found in this document include 1990 census totals for residential population within a 50-mile radius of the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Area meteorological towers. This document also contains 50-year projections for residential populations within a 50-mile radius of these four meteorological towers. The analysis of population projections indicates that residential population within a 50-mile radius of the four meteorological towers in question will continue to grow through 2040, although at a slower rate each decade. In all cases, the highest growth is projected for the decade ending in the year 2000. The annual growth rate for this period is projected to be 0.646, 0.633, 0.543, and 0.570 in the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Areas, respectively. By 2040, these growth rates are projected to drop to 0.082, 0.068, 0.078, 0.078, respectively. 4 refs., 1 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2008 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Westberg

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of eighteen buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site that were demolished in Fiscal Year 2008. The D4 of these facilties included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate.

  8. Property:YearFounded | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:This propertyVolume Jump to:s) JumpProperty Edit

  9. Plutonium stabilization and disposition focus area, FY 1999 and FY 2000 multi-year program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consistent with the Environmental Management`s (EM`s) plan titled, ``Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure``, and ongoing efforts within the Executive Branch and Congress, this Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Plutonium Focus Area was written to ensure that technical gap projects are effectively managed and measured. The Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) defines and manages technology development programs that contribute to the effective stabilization of nuclear materials and their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of PFA activities includes the complete spectrum of plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA enables solutions to site-specific and complex-wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. The report describes the current technical activities, namely: Plutonium stabilization (9 studies); Highly enriched uranium stabilization (2 studies); Russian collaboration program (2 studies); Packaging and storage technologies (6 studies); and PFA management work package/product line (3 studies). Budget information for FY 1999 and FY 2000 is provided.

  10. Westinghouse Hanford Company effluent discharges and solid waste management report for calendar year 1989: 200/600 Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.; P'Pool, R.K.; Thomas, S.P.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents calendar year 1989 radiological and nonradiological effluent discharge data from facilities in the 200 Areas and the 600 Area of the Hanford Site. Both summary and detailed effluent data are presented. In addition, radioactive and nonradioactive solid waste storage and disposal data for calendar year 1989 are furnished. Where appropriate, comparisons to previous years are made. The intent of the report is to demonstrate compliance of Westinghouse Hanford Company-operated facilities with administrative control values for radioactive constituents and applicable guidelines and standards (including Federal permit limits) for nonradioactive constituents. 11 refs., 20 tabs.

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 27 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 15 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    96 YEAR 2013 Males 69 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 9 EN 04 27 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2014 Males 48 Females 33 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 10 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 29 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 10 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 9 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 61 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 22 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 YEAR 2013 Males 48 Females 32 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 7 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska...

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2013 Males 20 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,...

  18. Western Area Power Administration annual site environmental report for calendar year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines the accomplishments and status of the environmental program of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) for calendar year 2005. In 2005, Western submitted 190 reports to state and local emergency response personnel and had 60 California Hazardous Materials Business Plans in place as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. These reports identify the hazardous substances contained at these sites. At sites where potential oil spills could harm surrounding ecosystems and waterways, Western prepares Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) plans. These plans identify measures to prevent spills from harming the environment, such as identifying the need for secondary containment at facilities. Western currently has SPCC plans for 154 facilities in 13 states. In 2005, Western updated 19 SPCC plans and prepared one new plan. Western operated under 107 environmental permits in 2005. Western evaluates the impact of its planned actions on the environment by preparing National Environmental Policy Act documentation. In 2005, Western completed or was working on 60 categorical exclusions, 18 environmental assessments and eight environmental impact statements, issued six Findings of No Significant Impact, and prepared four Mitigation Action Plans. Western held several public workshops/meetings and consulted with 70 American Indian Tribes for various projects. In 2005, Western was working on or had completed 11 Section 7 consultations under the Endangered Species Act. In 2005, Western recycled more than 3,600 metric tons of electrical equipment, mineral oil dielectric fluid, asphalt, fluorescent and metal halide light bulbs, wood poles and crossarms, and other items as well as office waste. Western made $437,816 worth of purchases containing recovered content materials. Western met the requirement of Executive Order 13148, Greening the Government through Leadership in Environmental Management to have its Environmental Management System in place by December 31, 2005.

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJEK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 44 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian...

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2014 Males 59 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American...

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 62 Females 26 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 28 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2013 Males 58 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 21 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  4. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  5. Table 1. Annual estimates, uncertainty, and change Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of growing-stock trees (1,000,000 ft3 ) 14,104 2.0 3.1 Annual net growth of growing- stock trees (1,000 ft3 2000 2010 Area(1,000,000acres) Year Large Medium Small 0 1 2 3 4 Oak/hickory Maple/beech/birch Elm

  6. Table 1. Annual estimates, uncertainty, and change Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000,000 ft3 ) 15,552 1.8 3.9 Net volume of growing-stock trees (1,000,000 ft3 ) 13,903 2.0 1.6 Annual net Area(1,000,000acres) Year Forest Land Timberland 0 1 2 3 4 Oak/hickory Maple/beech/birch Elm

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 25 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native...

  8. 300 Area D4 Project 3rd Quarter Fiscal Year 2006 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Smith

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of five buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  9. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2007 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Westberg

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of twenty buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilties included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate.

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4 YEAR7

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43 YEAR

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144 YEAR

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 2013

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 20138

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR 201387

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR558

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8 YEAR558563

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR85573380 YEAR

  1. 300 Area D4 Project 1st Quarter Fiscal Year 2006 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Smith

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of the MO-052, 3225, 334, 334A, and 334-TF Buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  2. Table 1. Annual estimates and uncertainty Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4 23.5 16,486 3.6 19.0 All Species 26,915 1.3 100.0 86,707 2.0 100.0 Proportion of total sawtimber,000.000acres) Year Timberland Forest land 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Oak/hickory Maple/beech/birch Oak/pine Elm

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EN 05 0 1 100.00% EN 04 4 4 0.00% NN (Engineering) 13 12 -7.69% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 9 -30.77% NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 1...

  4. Evaluation of Low-Level Waste Disposal Receipt Data for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Robert [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Operational or institutional waste is generated from a wide variety of research and development activities including nuclear weapons development, energy production, and medical research. Environmental restoration (ER), and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) waste is generated as contaminated sites and facilities at LANL undergo cleanup or remediation. The majority of this waste is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and is disposed of at the Technical Area 54 (TA-54), Area G disposal facility. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety, and the environment. To comply with this order, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for LLW disposal facilities that accept waste after September 26, 1988. Furthermore, sites are required to conduct composite analyses that account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (or will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with the facilities. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 (LANL, 2008). These analyses estimate rates of radionuclide release from the waste disposed of at the facility, simulate the movement of radionuclides through the environment, and project potential radiation doses to humans for several on-site and off-site exposure scenarios. The assessments are based on existing site and disposal facility data and on assumptions about future rates and methods of waste disposal. The accuracy of the performance assessment and composite analysis depends upon the validity of the data used and assumptions made in conducting the analyses. If changes in these data and assumptions are significant, they may invalidate or call into question certain aspects of the analyses. For example, if the volumes and activities of waste disposed of during the remainder of the disposal facility's lifetime differ significantly from those projected, the doses projected by the analyses may no longer apply. DOE field sites are required to implement a performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. The purpose of this program is to ensure the continued applicability of the analyses through incremental improvement of the level of understanding of the disposal site and facility. Site personnel are required to conduct field and experimental work to reduce the uncertainty in the data and models used in the assessments. Furthermore, they are required to conduct periodic reviews of waste receipts, comparing them to projected waste disposal rates. The radiological inventory for Area G was updated in conjunction with Revision 4 of the performance assessment and composite analysis (Shuman, 2008). That effort used disposal records and other sources of information to estimate the quantities of radioactive waste that have been disposed of at Area G from 1959, the year the facility started receiving waste on a routine basis, through 2007. It also estimated the quantities of LLW that will require disposal from 2008 through 2044, the year in which it is assumed that disposal operations at Area G will cease. This report documents the fourth review of Area G disposal receipts since the inventory was updated and examines information for waste placed in the ground during fiscal years (FY) 2008 through 2011. The primary objective of the disposal receipt review is to ensure that the future waste inventory projections developed for the performance assessment and composite analysis are consistent with the actual types and quantities of waste being disposed of at Area G. Toward this end, the disposal data that are the subject of this review are used to update the future waste inventory projections for the disposal facility. These projections are compared to the future inventory projections that were develope

  5. Sixty years of change in tree numbers and basal area in central Utah Aspen stands. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueggler, W.F.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plots established in 1913-14 in three separate aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) stands on the Wasatch Plateau in central Utah were inventoried at irregular intervals over a 64-year period. The data indicate that (1) stem numbers declined continuously as the stands aged; (2) an inverse relationship existed between aspen site quality and stem numbers in middle age stands; (3) basal area peaked probably sometime around 80 years of age and declined appreciably by age 100; (4) greatest subsequent mortality in middle age stands was those stems in diameter size classes smaller than the mode; and (5) stands thinned between the ages of 40 and 70 contained more but smaller stems at maturity and greater total basal area than those not thinned.

  6. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, S.C.; Grossman, R.F.; Mullen, A.A.; Potter, G.D.; Smith, D.D.; Hopper, J.L. (comps.)

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, prepared in accordance with the guidelines in DOE/E-0023 (DOE 1981), covers the program activities conducted around Nevada Test Site (NTS) for calendar year 1981. It contains descriptions of pertinent features of the NTS and its environs, summaries of the dosimetry and sampling methods, analytical procedures, and the analytical results from environmental measurements. Where applicable, dosimetry and sampling data are compared to appropriate guides for external and internal exposures of humans to ionizing radiation. The monitoring networks detected no radioactivity in the various media which could be attributed to US nuclear testing. Small amounts of fission products were detected in air samples as a result of the People's Republic of China nuclear test and atmospheric krypton-85 increased, following the trend beginning in 1960, due to increased use of nuclear technology. Strontium-90 in milk and cesium-137 in meat samples continued the slow decline as observed for the last several years.

  7. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1989 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels, and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether the testing is in compliance with existing radiation protection standards, and to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of both animals and humans. To implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any release of radioactivity, personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each test. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to NTS activities. Trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas and Tritium, Milk Surveillance, TLD, and PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program. 35 refs., 68 figs., 32 tabs.

  8. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  9. Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Huff, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history.

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826 YEAR

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR 2014

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR 201434

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR4

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR43417

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874 YEAR434170

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR 2012

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR424

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR4247

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486 YEAR42478

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR40

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861 YEAR4096

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111 YEAR17

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196 YEAR

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014 Males16

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 2014

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 20144707

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR 201447072540

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 563

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 5637831

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557 56378318

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR8557

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 28

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 2801

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280192

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733

  9. Year

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444 U.S.Working and.

  10. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Hennessey, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods.

  11. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

  12. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 407) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 407, Roller Coaster RadSafe Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOEN-694, October 2001. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on April 24,2001. No issues with the post-closure monitoring plan, Section 5 .O, were raised. However, other concerns raised by stakeholders required that the CR be revised. Revision 1 of CR was issued in December of 2001 and was approved by NDEP on January 7,2002. Section 5.2 of the NDEP-approved CR calls for site inspections to be conducted within the first six months following completion of cover construction. Following the first six months, site inspection are to be conducted twice yearly for the next two years. This report provides the results of the six month post-construction site inspection. As stated in Section 5.2 of the CR, Post-closure site inspections at CAU 407 consists of the following: (1) Visual site inspections done twice a year to evaluate the condition of the cover and plant development. (2) Verification that the site is secure and condition of the fence and posted warning signs. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized excavation, etc., deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. To meet the fiscal year 2002 post-closure inspection schedule, the first post-closure site inspection was conducted on November 6,2001. The site inspection was conducted after completion of the revegetation activities (October 24,2000) and submittal of revision 0 of the CR (October 31,2001). All site inspections were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Inspection requirements stated in revision 0 of the CR. This report includes copies of inspection checklist, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklist is found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment By and copies of the inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  13. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is mandated by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2012. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2012. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, revising the QAPP, and publishing documents. In addition, processes and procedures were developed to address deficiencies identified in the FY 2011 QAPP gap analysis.

  14. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenzien, Susan; Marutzky, Sam

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is required by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2013. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2013. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, and publishing documents. In addition, integrated UGTA required reading and corrective action tracking was instituted.

  15. Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Annual Monitoring Status Report for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Forsythe

    2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status of Fiscal Year 2009 groundwater monitoring performed in Waste Area Group 10 at the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site, as identified in the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan for Operable Unit 10-08. Twelve of the fourteen required wells were sampled, and all ten required intervals from the Westbay wells were sampled. Two wells were not sampled because they were in the process of being converted into multiple-sample-interval Westbay wells by the U.S. Geological Survey. Groundwater samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds identified on the Contract Laboratory Program target analyte list as well as metals (filtered), anions, and radionuclides (i.e., I-129, tritium, Tc-99, gross alpha, gross beta, and Sr-90). No contaminant exceeded maximum contaminant levels in wells along the southern boundary of the Idaho National Laboratory Site or in guard wells. Iron was above its secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 ug/L in one well. The cause of the elevated iron concentration is uncertain. Lead was detected just below its action level. However, the zinc concentration was also elevated in these wells, and the source of the lead is probably galvanized riser pipe in the wells. Once the galvanized pipe is replaced, both lead and zinc concentrations should decline, as has been observed at other Waste Area Group 10 wells.

  16. Plutonium Equivalent Inventory for Belowground Radioactive Waste at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Many aspects of the management of this waste are conducted at Technical Area 54 (TA-54); Area G plays a key role in these management activities as the Laboratory's only disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Furthermore, Area G serves as a staging area for transuranic (TRU) waste that will be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. A portion of this TRU waste is retrievably stored in pits, trenches, and shafts. The radioactive waste disposed of or stored at Area G poses potential short- and long-term risks to workers at the disposal facility and to members of the public. These risks are directly proportional to the radionuclide inventories in the waste. The Area G performance assessment and composite analysis (LANL, 2008a) project long-term risks to members of the public; short-term risks to workers and members of the public, such as those posed by accidents, are addressed by the Area G Documented Safety Analysis (LANL, 2011a). The Documented Safety Analysis uses an inventory expressed in terms of plutonium-equivalent curies, referred to as the PE-Ci inventory, to estimate these risks. The Technical Safety Requirements for Technical Area 54, Area G (LANL, 2011b) establishes a belowground radioactive material limit that ensures the cumulative projected inventory authorized for the Area G site is not exceeded. The total belowground radioactive waste inventory limit established for Area G is 110,000 PE-Ci. The PE-Ci inventory is updated annually; this report presents the inventory prepared for 2011. The approach used to estimate the inventory is described in Section 2. The results of the analysis are presented in Section 3.

  17. Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dag Hammarskjlds vg B Uppsala S Marine and Hydrokinetic http http www currentpower se Sweden Current Power AB Dag Hammarskjlds vg B Uppsala S Marine and Hydrokinetic http http www...

  18. 100-D Area In Situ Redox Treatability Test for Chromate-Contaminated Groundwater: FY 1998 Year-End Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.D.; Vermeul, V.R.; Szecsody, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A treatability test was conducted for the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology at the US Department of Energy's Hanford, Washington 100D Area. The target contaminant was dissolved chromate [Cr(VI)] in groundwater. The ISRM technology involves creating a permeable subsurface treatment zone to reduce mobile chromate in groundwater to an insoluble form. The ISRM permeable treatment zone is created by reducing ferric iron [Fe(III)] to ferrous iron [Fe(II)] within the aquifer sediments. This is accomplished by injecting aqueous sodium dithionite into the aquifer and withdrawing the reaction products. The goal of the treatability test was to create a linear ISRM barrier by injecting sodium dithionite into five wells. Well installation and site characterization activities began in the spring of 1997. The first dithionite injection took place in September 1997. The results of this first injection were monitored through the spring of 1998; the remaining four dithionite injections were carried out in May through July of 1998. These five injections created a reduced zone in the Hanford unconfined aquifer 150 feet in length (perpendicular to groundwater flow) by 50 feet wide. The reduced zone extended over the thickness of the unconfined zone, which is approximately 15 feet. Analysis of recent groundwater sampling events shows that the concentrations of chromate [Cr(VI)] in groundwater in the reduced zone have been decreased from starting concentrations of approximately 900 ppb to below analytical detection limits (<7 ppb). Chromate concentrations are also declining in some downgradient monitoring wells. Laboratory analysis of iron in the soil indicates that the barrier should remain in place for approximately 20 to 25 years. These measurements will be confirmed by analysis of sediment cores in FY 1999.

  19. Bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the greater Yellowstone area during four postfire years. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, L.A.; Amman, G.D.; Vandygriff, J.C.; Oakes, R.D.; Munson, A.S.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys of bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the Greater Yellowstone Area were conducted from 1991 through 1993 to determine the effect of delayed tree mortality on mosaics of fire-killed and green tree stands, the relationship between fire injury and infestation, but both types of mortality greatly altered the mosaics immediately apparent after the 1988 fires. The high level of infestation suggests that insects built up in fire-injured trees and then caused increased infestation of uninjured trees.

  20. Figure 3. Area of timberland by stand-size class (based on small, medium, and large trees) and year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of growing- stock trees (1,000 ft3/year) 13,626 30.7 -51.6 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Maple/beech/birch Oak/hickory Aspen/birch Spruce/fir Elm/ash/cottonwood White/red/jack pine Oak/pine Forest Land

  1. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  2. ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE FINAL GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION, TEST AREA NORTH, OPERABLE UNIT 1-07B, FISCAL YEAR 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FORSYTHE, HOWARD S

    2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Report presents the data and evaluates the progress of the three-component remedy implemented for remediation of groundwater contamination at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Overall, each component is achieving progress toward the goal of total plume remediation. In situ bioremediation operations in the hot spot continue to operate as planned. Progress toward the remedy objectives is being made, as evidenced by continued reduction in the amount of accessible residual source and decreases in downgradient contaminant flux, with the exception of TAN-28. The injection strategy is maintaining effective anaerobic reductive dechlorination conditions, as evidenced by complete degradation of trichloroethene and ethene production in the biologically active wells. In the medial zone, the New Pump and Treat Facility operated in standby mode. Trichloroethene concentrations in the medial zone wells are significantly lower than the historically defined concentration range of 1,000 to 20,000 ?g/L. The trichloroethene concentrations in TAN-33, TAN-36, and TAN-44 continue to be below 200 ?g/L. Monitoring in the distal zone wells outside and downgradient of the plume boundary demonstrate that some plume expansion has occurred, but less than the amount allowed in the Record of Decision Amendment. Additional data need to be collected for wells in the monitored natural attenuation part of the plume to confirm that the monitored natural attenuation part of the remedy is proceeding as predicted in the modeling.

  3. Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Annual Status Report for Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Wells

    2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a status of the progress made in Fiscal Year 2006 on tasks identified in the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-08, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan. Major accomplishments include: (1) groundwater sampling and review of the groundwater monitoring data, (2) installation of a Sitewide groundwater-level monitoring network, (3) update of the Groundwater Monitoring and Field Sampling Plan of Operable Unit 10-08, (4) re-evaluation of the risk at Site TSF-08, (5) progress on the Operable Unit 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model.

  4. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA; NNSA NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This post-closure inspection and monitoring report has been prepared according to the stipulations laid out in the Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA)--Surface (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV], 2001), and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This report provides an analysis and summary of site inspections, subsidence surveys, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data for CAU 417, which is located in Hot Creek Valley, Nye County, Nevada. This report covers Calendar Year 2004. Inspections at CAU 417 are conducted quarterly to document the physical condition of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 soil covers, monuments, signs, fencing, and use restricted areas. The physical condition of fencing, monuments, and signs is noted, and any unusual conditions that could impact the integrity of the covers are reported. The objective of the soil moisture monitoring program is to monitor the stability of soil moisture conditions within the upper 1.2 meters (m) (4 feet [ft]) of the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) cover and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement exceeding the cover design performance expectations.

  5. Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once a year for a period of 2-3 months. By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once. Figure 1.g The wet area is flooded by damming up a small streamded by damming up a smded by damwet area Vegetation data are obtained from two ri- parian grassland sites with strong hydro- logical gradients

  6. Magnetic domains were not found in tetrataenite.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    collaboration with electrical engineers to produce the proper magnetic tape to view domains in. Observing and Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 Future Work While the magnetism· Magnetic domains were not found in tetrataenite. · Figure 4 shows magnetic domains found

  7. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON POND FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by the NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2005. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2005. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Five additional inspections were performed after precipitation events that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in) within a 24-hour period during 2005. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during these inspections, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A. Precipitation records for 2005 are included in Appendix C.

  8. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit and 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits 9, an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action. Quarterly post-closure inspections are performed at the CASs that were closed in place at UC-I, UC-3, and UC-4. During calendar year 2005, site inspections were performed on March 15, June 16, September 22, and December 7. The inspections conducted at the UC-1 CMP documented that the site was in good condition and continued to show integrity of the cover unit. No new cracks or fractures were observed until the December inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover showed evidence of lateral expansion; however, it is not at an actionable level. The crack will be sealed by filling with bentonite during the first quarter of 2006 and monitored during subsequent inspections. The cover vegetation was healthy and well established. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The inspections at UC-3 indicated that the sites are in excellent condition. All monuments and signs showed no displacement, damage, or removal. A small erosion gully from spring rain runoff was observed during the June inspection, but it did not grow to an actionable level during 2005. No other issues or concerns were identified. Inspections performed at UC-4 Mud Pit C cover revealed that erosion rills were formed during March and September exposing the geosynthetic clay liner. Both erosion rills were repaired within 90 days of reporting. Sparse vegetation is present on the cover. The overall condition of the monuments, fence, and gate are in good condition. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other four UC-4 locations. Subsidence surveys were conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in March and September of 2005. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. The June vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas indicated that the revegetation has been very successful. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action in order to maintain a viable vegetative cover on the site. Vegetation surveys should be conducted only as required. Precipitation during 2005 was above average, with an annual rainfall total of 21.79 centimeters (8.58 inches). Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 CMP cover is performing as designed, with evapotranspiration effectively removing water from the cover. It is recommended to continue quarterly site inspections and the collection of soil moisture data for the UC-1 CMP cove

  9. SciTech Connect: Item Not Found

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item you requested, OSTI ID 1018612, is not available

  10. SciTech Connect: Item Not Found

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item you requested, OSTI ID 1018612, is not

  11. SciTech Connect: Item Not Found

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item you requested, OSTI ID 1018612, is notItem Not

  12. SciTech Connect: Item Not Found

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item you requested, OSTI ID 1018612, is notItem Not

  13. SciTech Connect: Item Not Found

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item you requested, OSTI ID 1018612, is notItem Not

  14. SciTech Connect: Item Not Found

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item you requested, OSTI ID 1018612, is notItem NotItem

  15. Interim Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A J

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 in fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

  16. Basal area growth response to competition among improved families of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in a 20-year-old row plot progeny trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joel Talbot

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. Sprinz Or. Michael G. Messina In two plantations, over two tsme intervals, tne average basal area growth of individual loblolly pine trees in a row plot progeny trial was modeled as a function of the Area Potentially Available (APA...) competition index, a crown pos1tion 1ndex, and the tree's basal area at the start of the interval. Hypothesis tests for differences in individual tree basal area growth response to competit1on amon9 genetically-1mproved families were performed. When...

  17. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility. CAU 92 was closed according to the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP], 1995) and the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Closure activities were completed on February 16, 1999, and the Closure Report (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999) was approved and a Notice of Completion issued by NDEP on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02 requires post-closure inspections. Visual inspections of the cover and fencing at CAS 06-05-02 are performed quarterly. Additional inspections are conducted if precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in.]) in a 24-hour period. This report covers calendar year 2006. Quarterly site inspections were performed in March, June, September, and December of 2006. All observations indicated the continued integrity of the unit. No issues or concerns were noted, and no corrective actions were necessary. Copies of the inspection checklists and field notes completed during each inspection are included in Appendix A of this report, and photographs taken during the site inspections are included in Appendix B of this report. One additional inspection was performed after a precipitation event that exceeded 1.28 cm (0.50 in.) within a 24-hour period during 2006. No significant changes in site conditions were noted during this inspection, and no corrective actions were necessary. A copy of the inspection checklist and field notes completed during this additional inspection is included in Appendix A of this report. Precipitation records for 2006 are included in Appendix C of this report.

  18. Joint China-United States Report for Year 1 Insulation Materials and Systems Project Area Clean Energy Research Center Building Energy Efficiency (CERC-BEE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Song, Bo [China Academy of Building Research; Zhang, Sisi [China Academy of Building Research

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In November of 2009, the presidents of China and the U.S. announced the establishment of the Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). This broad research effort is co-funded by both countries and involves a large number of research centers and universities in both countries. One part of this program is focused on improving the energy efficiency of buildings. One portion of the CERC-BEE was focused on building insulation systems. The research objective of this effort was to Identify and investigate candidate high performance fire resistant building insulation technologies that meet the goal of building code compliance for exterior wall applications in green buildings in multiple climate zones. A Joint Work Plan was established between researchers at the China Academy of Building Research and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Efforts in the first year under this plan focused on information gathering. The objective of this research program is to reduce building energy use in China via improved building insulation technology. In cold regions in China, residents often use inefficient heating systems to provide a minimal comfort level within inefficient buildings. In warmer regions, air conditioning has not been commonly used. As living standards rise, energy consumption in these regions will increase dramatically unless significant improvements are made in building energy performance. Previous efforts that defined the current state of the built environment in China and in the U.S. will be used in this research. In countries around the world, building improvements have typically followed the implementation of more stringent building codes. There have been several changes in building codes in both the U.S. and China within the last few years. New U.S. building codes have increased the amount of wall insulation required in new buildings. New government statements from multiple agencies in China have recently changed the requirements for buildings in terms of energy efficiency and fire safety. A related issue is the degree to which new standards are adopted and enforced. In the U.S., standards are developed using a consensus process, and local government agencies are free to implement these standards or to ignore them. For example, some U.S. states are still using 2003 versions of the building efficiency standards. There is also a great variation in the degree to which the locally adopted standards are enforced in different U.S. cities and states. With a more central process in China, these issues are different, but possible impacts of variable enforcement efficacy may also exist. Therefore, current building codes in China will be compared to the current state of building fire-safety and energy-efficiency codes in the U.S. and areas for possible improvements in both countries will be explored. In particular, the focus of the applications in China will be on green buildings. The terminology of 'green buildings' has different meanings to different audiences. The U.S. research is interested in both new, green buildings, and on retrofitting existing inefficient buildings. An initial effort will be made to clarify the scope of the pertinent wall insulation systems for these applications.

  19. SciTech Connect: Item Not Found

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found ItemRomero-Redondo, C"Voth,Jaehoon"Zhu, Jian -longDocumentItem

  20. SciTech Connect: Item Not Found

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found ItemRomero-Redondo, C"Voth,Jaehoon"Zhu, Jian

  1. A 10-year content analysis to assess research theme areas in agricultural education: gap analysis of future research priorities in the discipline. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, Leslie Dawn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of agricultural education relies on multiple research journals to disseminate findings. This study focused on a 10-year content analysis of research published in premier journals in agricultural education. The ...

  2. Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada For Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites, CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit, and CAS 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill, and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits (5), an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action.

  3. Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded Number

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasoleTremor(Question)8/14/2007 Expire Date310N67Address Place

  4. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama -- Year 2. Annual report, March 1997--March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and has produced oil from fractured chalk of the Cretaceous Selma Group and glauconitic sandstone of the Eutaw Formation. Nearly all of Gilbertown Field is still in primary recovery, although waterflooding has been attempted locally. The objective of this project is to analyze the geologic structure and burial history of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas in order to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. Indeed, the decline of oil production to marginally economic levels in recent years has made this type of analysis timely and practical. Key technical advancements being sought include understanding the relationship of requisite strain to production in Gilbertown reservoirs, incorporation of synsedimentary growth factors into models of area balance, quantification of the relationship between requisite strain and bed curvature, determination of the timing of hydrocarbon generation, and identification of the avenues and mechanisms of fluid transport.

  5. York University was founded in March 1959, and is now Canada's 3rd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOUNDED York University was founded in March 1959, and is now Canada's 3rd largest university campuses located in the heart of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada's largest metropolis. STUDENTS · 55 and social life at York is one of the richest in Canada. In 2010, the York University Lions men's soccer team

  6. UMBC POLICY ON LOST AND FOUND PROPERTY I. POLICY STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC POLICY ON LOST AND FOUND PROPERTY I. POLICY STATEMENT The UMBC community will have access to a University Policy on Lost and Found Property. II. PURPOSE OF THE POLICY The purpose of the Lost and Found Property Policy is to provide procedures for the accountability and safekeeping of currency and tangible

  7. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    twelve years. The Mid-Atlantic Area National Corridor includes certain counties in Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland, Virginia, and all of New Jersey,...

  8. COLLOQUIUM: Spitzer's 100th: Founding PPPL & Pioneering Work...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Spitzer's 100th: Founding PPPL & Pioneering Work in Fusion Energy Dr. Greg Hammett Princeton University Professor Russell Kulsrud Princeton...

  9. Louis F. Fackler: Founding Campus Engineer, UC Sant Cruz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fackler, Louis F.; Reti, Irene; UCSC Library, Regional History Project, UC Santa Cruz

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    area. So that’s where cogeneration started. It’s not a newCruz all. I learned about cogeneration at UC Berkeley. Reti:get into the details of the cogeneration plant probably next

  10. Dragon Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Can you believe it? It's New Year again. It seems like only yesterday we were celebrating the advent of the year of the Rabbit and now, here it is, the year of the Dragon. January 22nd is New Year's ...

  11. Export of Canadian Meteorites Reporting of a meteorite found in Canada is not mandatory. Meteorites found in Canada can be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Export of Canadian Meteorites Reporting of a meteorite found in Canada is not mandatory. Meteorites found in Canada can be sold in Canada. The export Under the Cultural Property Export and Import Act (S.C. 1985, c.52), which came into force 1977 September 6, a Canadian find cannot be exported without

  12. A Modest, but Semantically Well Founded, Inheritance Reasoner Fahiem Bacchus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacchus, Fahiem

    A Modest, but Semantically Well Founded, Inheritance Reasoner Fahiem Bacchus Department of Computer Science University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L{3G1 Abstract A modest exception allowing

  13. aftercastle masted vessel with aftercastle is found on a Spanish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    masted vessel with aftercastle is found on a Spanish ations it would have any idea of crusader ships aces for the new tack as large as the crusader vessels (

  14. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California. Part of the third year report, 1980-81, of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngs, L.G.; Bezore, S.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs; South San Bernardino; and Harlem Hot Springs - in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the south San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142/sup 0/C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the south San Bernardino geothermal area was 56/sup 0/C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area was 49.5/sup 0/C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well. The geophysical and geological surveys delineated fault traces in association with all three of the designated geothermal areas.

  15. On the approximation of crack shapes found during inservice inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhate, S.R.; Chawla, D.S.; Kushwaha, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the characterization of axial internal flaw found during inservice inspection of a pipe. J-integral distribution for various flaw shapes is obtained using line spring finite, element method. The peak J-value and its distribution across the crack is found to be characteristic feature of each shape. The triangular shape yields peak J-value away from the center, the point of depth. The elliptic approximation results in large overestimate of J-value for unsymmetric flaws. Triangular approximation is recommended for such flaws so that further service can be obtained from the component.

  16. ESP/rotary gas separator duo found to optimize production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, G.H.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field test conducted on a low-volume waterflood well in West Texas equipped with an electric submersible pump (ESP) proved to rotary gas separator (RGS) to be more efficient than conventional reverse flow gas separators, achieving gas separation efficiencies close to 90%. Further, the RGS increased the run time of the ESP, thus lowering the wellbore fluid level and increasing oil production. The one drawback found is that RGSs can be susceptible to fluid erosion.

  17. FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

  18. PPPL Founded in 1951 | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and4/26/11:Tel.:162 PreparedExpert OrganizationFounded in

  19. San Diego Area San Diego was founded in 1769 as the first of 21 California missions. It is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Squire, Larry R.

    industries in the county are Defense, Manufacturing (high technology, electronics), and Tourism. San Diego is the site of one of the largest naval fleets in the world. In addition, San Diego's economy focuses, electronics manufacturing, defense-related manufacturing, financial and business services, ship

  20. The distribution and relative abundance of Nematopsis spp., as found in Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin) in the Galveston Bay area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Roger Dean

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first porosporid in America, ~Nt ' t, h'hh f d' tl, g'll d 1 t' fth ll yt . g 1 ~ii'd th d gt t't 'fth ' b, ~ph b. t' d~E ~d* . H p*tt*d' f t' f yt g gf M*bj k Bay, Virginia, to Lake Barre, Louisiana. After a variety of field and lb t*N P ' t, h gg... Further Stud of Nemato sis th gh ' p ' f~Nt ' k, th 1'f y 1 f* a number of species remains to be described. Two of the most recent species to be identified reveal only known decapod hosts. Ball (1951)d 'b dN. ~o-'* th*b ' fg gr' ' f tt ~p* 'd t 1' d P...

  1. Chewy Granola Bars Adapted from one I found on a Quaker Oats box years ago. This is very

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    in a zip loc bag. These freeze well. You can adapt the mix-ins (chips, fruit, nuts) according to what your products like tofu, mock refried beans, bean burger stew (with small amount of meat or preferably

  2. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Schechter

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area is one of the largest reservoirs in the domestic U.S. and is the largest reservoir in area extent in the world. Production from Spraberry sands is found over a 2,500 sq. mile area and Spraberry reservoirs can be found in an eight county area in west Texas. Over 150 operators produce 65,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) from the Spraberry Trend Area from more than 9,000 production wells. Recovery is poor, on the order of 7-10% due to the profoundly complicated nature of the reservoir, yet billions of barrels of hydrocarbons remain. We estimate over 15% of remaining reserves in domestic Class III reservoirs are in Spraberry Trend Area reservoirs. This tremendous domestic asset is a prime example of an endangered hydrocarbon resource in need of immediate technological advancements before thousands of wells are permanently abandoned. This report describes the final work of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area.'' The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. This objective has been accomplished through research in three areas: (1) detail historical review and extensive reservoir characterization, (2) production data management, and (3) field demonstration. This provides results of the final year of the three-year project for each of the three areas.

  3. Focus Area Tax Credits (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Focus Area Tax Credits for businesses in Baltimore City or Prince George’s County enterprise zones include: (1) Ten-year, 80% credit against local real property taxes on a portion of real property...

  4. 2009-10 Princeton Global Scholar Ge Zhaoguang. Professor Ge is the founding director of the National Institute for Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-10 Princeton Global Scholar Ge Zhaoguang. Professor Ge is the founding director, and emendation of all sorts of newly discovered texts (mostly found at archaeological sites). Professor Ge University, Professor Ge taught at Tsinghua University for a number of years. He is known for many important

  5. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by WebsitehomeResearch Areas

  6. Business Name Year Address City State Zip Phone Email Address Contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water heating systems in the Tri-cities and surrounding area 2382 Solar Heating equipment installationBusiness Name Year Founded Address City State Zip Phone Email Address Contact First Name Contact Last Name URL Products/Services NAICS Code NAICS Description Energy Northwest 1957 PO Box 968 Richland

  7. SOURCE AND PATHWAY DETERMINATION FOR BERYLLIUM FOUND IN BECHTEL NEVADA NORTH LAS VEGAS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the report ''Investigation of Beryllium Exposure Cases Discovered at the North Las Vegas Facility of the National Nuclear Security Administration'', published by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in August 2003, Bechtel Nevada (BN) President and General Manager Dr. F. A. Tarantino appointed the Beryllium Investigation & Assessment Team (BIAT) to identify both the source and pathway for the beryllium found in the North Las Vegas (NLV) B-Complex. From September 8 to December 18, 2003, the BIAT investigated the pathway for beryllium and determined that a number of locations existed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which could have contained sufficient quantities of beryllium to result in contamination if transported. Operations performed in the B-1 Building as a result of characterization activities at the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD); Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (RMAD); Test Cells A and C; and the Central Support Facility in Area 25 had the greatest opportunity for transport of beryllium. Investigative monitoring and sampling was performed at these sites with subsequent transport of sample materials, equipment, and personnel from the NTS to the B-1 Building. The timeline established by the BIAT for potential transport of the beryllium contamination into the B-1 Building was from September 1997 through November 2002. Based on results of recently completed swipe sampling, no evidence of transport of beryllium from test areas has been confirmed. Results less than the DOE beryllium action level of 0.2 ???g/100 cm2 were noted for work support facilities located in Area 25. All of the identified sites in Area 25 worked within the B-1 tenant's residency timeline have been remediated. Legacy contaminants have either been disposed of or capped with clean borrow material. As such, no current opportunity exists for release or spread of beryllium contamination. Historical records indicate that there are locations at the NTS which contain hazardous quantities of beryllium; however, because beryllium was not always considered a contaminant of concern, complete characterization was not performed prior to remediation efforts. Today, it is not practical to characterize Area 25 for beryllium due to the successful remediation. Analysis of sample data collected in B-1 for the BIAT was performed for the purpose of confirming past results and identifying a source of beryllium through the use of markers. The results confirmed the presence of man-made beryllium contamination in the B-1 High Bay at levels consistent with the NNSA Report. No source markers were found that would be associated with NTS historical nuclear rocket or weapons-related operations. Beryllium contamination was identified in the southwest area of the B-1 High Bay in characteristic association with materials handled during historic metal-working operations. Use of source marker analysis suggests a contributor of beryllium found in carpeted areas of the B-Complex may be naturally occurring. Naturally occurring beryllium is not regulated by Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 850 (10 CFR 850) (see Appendix A). No current uncontrolled beryllium source or transport pathways have been identified as available for spread of contamination to uncontrolled areas from the NTS.

  8. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  9. A comprehensive inventory of radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried in the subsurface disposal area of the INEL RWMC during the years 1984-2003, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a comprehensive inventory of the radiological and nonradiological contaminants in waste buried or projected to be buried from 1984 through 2003 in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The project to compile the inventory is referred to as the recent and projected data task. The inventory was compiled primarily for use in a baseline risk assessment under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. The compiled information may also be useful for environmental remediation activities that might be necessary at the RWMC. The information that was compiled has been entered into a database termed CIDRA-the Contaminant Inventory Database for Risk Assessment. The inventory information was organized according to waste generator and divided into waste streams for each generator. The inventory is based on waste information that was available in facility operating records, technical and programmatic reports, shipping records, and waste generator forecasts. Additional information was obtained by reviewing the plant operations that originally generated the waste, by interviewing personnel formerly employed as operators, and by performing nuclear physics and engineering calculations. In addition to contaminant inventories, information was compiled on the physical and chemical characteristics and the packaging of the 99 waste streams. The inventory information for waste projected to be buried at the SDA in the future was obtained from waste generator forecasts. The completeness of the contaminant inventories was confirmed by comparing them against inventories in previous reports and in other databases, and against the list of contaminants detected in environmental monitoring performed at the RWMC.

  10. Original article Photosynthesis, leaf area and productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Photosynthesis, leaf area and productivity of 5 poplar clones during; The stem volume and biomass (stem + branches) production, net photosynthesis of mature leaves and leaf area found in volume production, woody biomass production, total leaf area and net photosynthesis. Above

  11. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  12. Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

  13. areas calendar year: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering is one of only a few in Canada. Our program includes a modified common engineering core program Board. When you graduate from this program, you will meet the...

  14. areas water year: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of water, the legal toxicology and chemistry, the detection and control of environmental pollution, the biotechnology, the diagnosis and follow Groisman, Pablo 369 Water Current...

  15. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  16. Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Daly, K.S.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan (Development Plan) is to guide the physical development of the 200 Areas (which refers to the 200 East Area, 200 West Area, and 200 Area Corridor, located between the 200 East and 200 West Areas) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4320.lB (DOE 1991a) by performing the following: Establishing a land-use plan and setting land-use categories that meet the needs of existing and proposed activities. Coordinating existing, 5-year, and long-range development plans and guiding growth in accordance with those plans. Establishing development guidelines to encourage cost-effective development and minimize conflicts between adjacent activities. Identifying site development issues that need further analysis. Integrating program plans with development plans to ensure a logical progression of development. Coordinate DOE plans with other agencies [(i.e., Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)]. Being a support document to the Hanford Site Development Plan (DOE-RL 1990a) (parent document) and providing technical site information relative to the 200 Areas.

  17. Geothermal resource assessment of Canon City, Colorado Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979 a program was initiated to fully define the geothermal conditions of an area east of Canon City, bounded by the mountains on the north and west, the Arkansas River on the south and Colorado Highway 115 on the east. Within this area are a number of thermal springs and wells in two distinct groups. The eastern group consists of 5 thermal artesian wells located within one mile of Colorado Highway 115 from Penrose on the north to the Arkansas river on the south. The western group, located in and adjacent to Canon City, consists of one thermal spring on the south bank of the Arkansas River on the west side of Canon City, a thermal well in the northeast corner of Canon City, another well along the banks of Four Mile Creek east of Canon City and a well north of Canon City on Four Mile Creek. All the thermal waters in the Canon City Embayment, of which the study area is part of, are found in the study area. The thermal waters unlike the cold ground waters of the Canon City Embayment, are a calcium-bicarbonate type and range in temperature from 79 F (26 C) to a high of 108 F (42 C). The total combined surface discharge o fall the thermal water in the study area is in excess of 532 acre feet (A.F.) per year.

  18. Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development...

  19. Radionuclide Contaminant Analysis of Small Mammals at Area G, Technical Area 54, 1997 (with cumulative summary 1994-1997)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Biggs; Kathryn D. Bennett; P. R. Fresquez

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, small mammals were sampled at four locations at Area G, Technical Area 54, a control site within the proposed Area G expansion area, and a background site on Frijoles Mesa. The purpose of the sampling was to (1) identify radionuclides that are present within rodent tissues at waste burial sites, (2) compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and (3) identifi the primary mode of contamination to small mammals, either through surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of approximately five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for 241Am, 90Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, total U, 137Cs, and 3H. Higher levels of total U and 137CS were detected in pelts as compared to the carcasses of small mammals, and 90Sr was found to be higher in carcasses. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were not found to be statistically different (p< 0.05) from that measured in pelts. However, pelts generally had higher concentrations than carcasses, indicating surface contamination may be the primary contamination mode. Low sample sizes in total number of animals captured during 1997 prevented statistical analysis to compare site to site to all but four sites. Mean concentrations of 241Am, 238Pu, 239Pu, and 3H in small mammal carcasses were found to be statistically greater at the transuranic (TRU) waste pad #2. In addition, mean concentrations of total U, ~lAm, and 3H in pelts of small mammals were also statistically greater. The Control Site and Background Site consistently had the lowest mean concentrations of radionuclides. Year to year comparison of mean radionuclide concentrations was conducted where suftlcient sample size existed. We found 241Am, 238Pu, 239Pu, and 3H mean concentrations in carcasses to be statistically greater in 1997 than previous years at TRU waste pad #2. However, mean concentrations of 137CS in small mammal carcasses were higher at the TRU waste pad #2 and Pits 17 and 18 during 1996.

  20. 1992 five year battery forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amistadi, D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five-year trends for automotive and industrial batteries are projected. Topic covered include: SLI shipments; lead consumption; automotive batteries (5-year annual growth rates); industrial batteries (standby power and motive power); estimated average battery life by area/country for 1989; US motor vehicle registrations; replacement battery shipments; potential lead consumption in electric vehicles; BCI recycling rates for lead-acid batteries; US average car/light truck battery life; channels of distribution; replacement battery inventory end July; 2nd US battery shipment forecast.

  1. ARRA Proposed Award: Retrofit Bay Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARRA Proposed Award: Retrofit Bay Area Counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco per year Prime contractor: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) Sub contractors: Alameda County Waste Management Authority (StopWaste.org) County of Contra Costa County of Marin City

  2. Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

  3. AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE The Office of Housing and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University is seeking applicants for an Area Coordinator. The Area Coordinator is responsible for assisting in the management and operation of a residential area

  4. 100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

  5. Einstein's Miraculous Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasant Natarajan; V Balakrishnan; N Mukunda

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    With each passing year, the young Albert Einstein's achievements in physics in the year 1905 seem to be ever more miraculous. We describe why the centenary of this remarkable year is worthy of celebration.

  6. LNG to the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davenport, S.T.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By 2000, about 190 MM metric-tpy of LNG will be moving in world trade, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer By the year 2000, approximately 190 million metric tons per year of LNG will be moving in worldwide trade. Production of LNG will be spread throughout most of the world, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer. LNG will be delivered only to the heavily industrialized areas of North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. The success of any LNG project will be dependent on its individual economics, market needs, financial planning, and governmental permit processes. We hope industry will be able to put together the LNG projects required to meet the quanitities of production forecast here for the year 2000.

  7. Year of last Year of last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring 2003 2002 Transboundary Resource Assessment Committee Monkfish Northern Monkfish 2003 2003FMP Stock Year of last assessment Year of last data used in last stock assessment Source document for stock assessment Atlantic Sea Scallop Atlantic Sea Scallop 2000 2000 Stock Assessment Workshop (SAW

  8. Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

  9. Protected Areas Stacy Philpott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    · Convention of Biological Diversity, 1992 #12;IUCN Protected Area Management Categories Ia. Strict Nature. Protected Landscape/ Seascape VI. Managed Resource Protected Area #12;Ia. Strict Nature Preserves and Ib. Wilderness Areas · Natural preservation · Research · No · No #12;II. National Parks · Ecosystem protection

  10. Service Entry Delivery Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Catheter Lab Boiler House Main Entry Short Street ChapelStreet Vehicle Exit 23. Gray Street Car ParkingService Entry Waste Handling Area Delivery Area Admissions Entrance Inquiries Desk Cafeteria Coffee in July 2000 Vehicle Entry Emergency Main Entrance TOKOGARAHRAILWAYSTATION LEGEND Areas under construction

  11. ONGOING INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECT THAT DRUGSTORE BEETLES HAVE ON CELOTEX ASSEMBLIES FOUND WITHIN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftin, B.

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During normal operations at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Hanford, WA, drugstore beetles were found within the fiberboard subassemblies of two 9975 Shipping Packages. The Department of Energy's Packaging Certification Program (EM-60) directed a thorough investigation to determine if the drugstore beetles were causing damage that would be detrimental to the safety performance of the Celotex. The Savannah River National Laboratory is continuing to conduct the investigation with entomological expertise being provided by Clemson University. The outcome from the investigation conducted over the previous year was that no discernible damage had been caused by the drugstore beetles. One of the two packages has been essentially untouched over the past year and has only been opened to visually inspect for additional damage. This paper will provide details and results of the ongoing investigation of that package.

  12. Melyrid beetles (Choresine): A putative source for the batrachotoxin alkaloids found in poison-dart frogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melyrid beetles (Choresine): A putative source for the batrachotoxin alkaloids found in poison a Colombian poison-dart frog and later found in certain passerine birds of New Guinea. Neither vertebrate in the mid-1960s in skin extracts from a Colombian poison-dart frog (family Dendrobatidae) (1, 2). The name

  13. Green treefrogs are most commonly found in bushes and grasses near water (for instance the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Green treefrogs are most commonly found in bushes and grasses near water (for instance the NATL and are a common feature of any humid or rainy evening. Green treefrogs are most commonly found in bushes.5 inches Identification: Coloration may vary greatly, from dark brown to bright, vibrant green, with a long

  14. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

  15. History of 100-B Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlen, R.K.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial three production reactors and their support facilities were designated as the 100-B, 100-D, and 100-F areas. In subsequent years, six additional plutonium-producing reactors were constructed and operated at the Hanford Site. Among them was one dual-purpose reactor (100-N) designed to supply steam for the production of electricity as a by-product. Figure 1 pinpoints the location of each of the nine Hanford Site reactors along the Columbia River. This report documents a brief description of the 105-B reactor, support facilities, and significant events that are considered to be of historical interest. 21 figs.

  16. Groundwater Management Areas (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation,...

  17. Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    ..............................................................................................................19 Bruce Hoagland, Oklahoma Biological Survey and the University of Oklahoma Forest Management Riparian Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Handbook E-952 Oklahoma Cooperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oklahoma Conservation Commission Management Handbook #12

  18. Roberta Jaffe, Founding Director, Life Lab Science Program, Co-Founder of Community Agroecology Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into the dog food? The rat poison that got into the dog fooda chemical used in rat poison, was found in recalled pethundreds of others. The poison was added to wheat Robbie

  19. A Ship Incised on Slate Found Near Bodega, Sonoma County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner, Roger H

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    locally occurring light black slate, with sharp and crumblyREPORTS A Ship Incised on Slate Found Near Bodega, Sonomaa small, broken piece of slate (Fig. 1), incised with the

  20. KOI 1224: A FOURTH BLOATED HOT WHITE DWARF COMPANION FOUND WITH KEPLER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breton, R. P.

    We present an analysis and interpretation of the Kepler binary system KOI 1224. This is the fourth binary found with Kepler that consists of a thermally bloated, hot white dwarf in a close orbit with a more or less normal ...

  1. Secretary Moniz's First Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We're looking back at some of the biggest moments from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's first year in office.

  2. f the approximately 500 crayfishes (some times called crawdads or crawfish) found on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    plants, other inverte- brates, and fish. Crayfish are a primary food for fish (bass), water birds (herons,000 tons of cray- fish, with a value of $50 million, are farmed in ponds or trapped in wetlands each year

  3. Calendar Year 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (NNSA) stockpile stewardship activities; the Oiffice of Science in the areas of neutron scattering and nuclear physcis research; and, the Office of Nuclear Energy,...

  4. AREA-EFFICIENTHIGH-THROUGHPUTVLSI ARCHITECTUREFOR MAP-BASED TURBO EQUALIZER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Andrew C

    AREA-EFFICIENTHIGH-THROUGHPUTVLSI ARCHITECTUREFOR MAP-BASED TURBO EQUALIZER Seok-Jun Lee, Naresh R an area-efficient MAP-based turbo equalizer VLSI architecture by proposing a symbol-based soft-input soft-interleaved com- putation with an area savings of 25%. 1. INTRODUCTION The turbo decoding technique has found

  5. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Mesozoic granite granodiorite Aurora Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region MW Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot...

  6. The possible symbiotic role of proteolytic and cellulolytic bacteria found in the gut of Limnoria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traganza, Eugene Dewees

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE POSSIBLE SYMBIOTIC ROLE OF PROTEOLYTIC AND CELLVLOLYTIC BACTERIA FOUND IN TBE GV1' OF LIINORIA A Thesis By Eugene Dewees Traganza ~ ~ I Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1959 Ma)or Sub5ect: Biological Oceanography THE POSSIBLE SYMBIO1'IC ROLE OF PROTEOLYTIC AND CELLULOLYTIC BACTERIA FOUND IN THE GU1' OF Like(RIA A Thesis By Eugene Dewees...

  7. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year in Review.............................................................. 8 Academic Accomplishments

  8. Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards not found in most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards not found in most laboratory environments. The NMR facilities maintain superconducting magnets which have the units. Facility design and installation: Design and installation of a new NMR facility requires a number

  9. Message found in a gravity wave A blast from the past.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    FUTURES Message found in a gravity wave A blast from the past. 664 nature physics | VOL 4 | AUGUST to smack into us very soon -- which is why I'm out here in Maw's pasture spelling out my message with rocks than ever before. I'm taking apart a whole stone wall to write this message, this very narrative

  10. business.rutgers.edu Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey founded 1766 Rutgers Business School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    business.rutgers.edu Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey ­ founded 1766 Rutgers Business Business School Rutgers Business School­Newark and New Brunswick (RBS) is an integral part of one--the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business-- a distinction that represents the hallmark

  11. SUNY Technology Accelerator Fund PROGRAM: Complete Guidelines can be found at SUNY Technology Accelerator Fund 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    SUNY Technology Accelerator Fund PROGRAM: Complete Guidelines can be found at SUNY Technology Accelerator Fund 2014 OBJECTIVES: The SUNY Technology Accelerator Fund ("TAF") provides funding to support the advancement of SUNY technologies from the lab to the marketplace. In many cases, SUNY technology developed

  12. Companies founded by faculty, staff and alumni of The Institute of Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Companies founded by faculty, staff and alumni of The Institute of Optics LAST NAME FIRST NAME NAME OF COMPANY Savvy Optics Dema Bekz Corp. Amarel John Amarel Precision Anderson James Optics Technology In., Tropel Atkinson, III Leland G Gradient Lens Corp. Medox electro-optics MXR (Medox Research) Clark

  13. 45Fuel Level in a Spherical Tank Spherical tanks are found in many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    45Fuel Level in a Spherical Tank Spherical tanks are found in many different situations, from the storage of cryogenic liquids, to fuel tanks. Under the influence of gravity, or acceleration, the liquid then be designed to measure where the surface of the liquid is, and from this derive h. Problem 1 - Slice the fluid

  14. CITIZEN SCIENCE AT THE SMITHSONIAN Since its founding, the Smithsonian has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    CITIZEN SCIENCE AT THE SMITHSONIAN Since its founding, the Smithsonian has always been dependent of such efforts is known as "Citizen Science." The Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, for example, established a citizen science bird observation data collection program in 1966, with live data input since 1997

  15. The Founding of ALA's Map and Geography Round Table : Looking Back to See the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weimer, Katherine H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, a group of map librarians founded the American Library Association’s Map and Geography Round Table (MAGERT). An examination of the organization’s creation and early history offers a glimpse into the state of map librarianship at that time...

  16. INTRODUCTION In France, most digitized books in libraries, cannot be found online, except from the French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INTRODUCTION In France, most digitized books in libraries, cannot be found online, except from digital library, does not yet allow, other libraries to upload their electronic documents on this platform. These electronic documents will only appear in Gallica if libraries are able to build their own digital library

  17. TITANIUM--2002 79.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TITANIUM--2002 79.1 1 References that include a section mark (§) are found in the Internet References Cited section. TITANIUM By Joseph Gambogi Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Robin C, international data coordinator. International Corp., Monico Alloys, Inc., SMP Co., and Wogen Titanium Ltd

  18. TITANIUM--2003 78.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TITANIUM--2003 78.1 1 References that include a section mark (§) are found in the Internet References Cited section. TITANIUM By Joseph Gambogi Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Robin C status to imports of unwrought titanium from Russia and Kazakhstan. Kazakhstan's Ust-Kamenogorsk Titanium

  19. Complete information below if not found on receipt #2 National Drug Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Complete information below if not found on receipt #2 National Drug Code Drug Name___________________________Drug Supply 5. National Drug Code (NDC) 6. Name of drug and strength 7. DAW code (if applicable) 8. Amount paid Tape Prescription Receipt #1 Here ­ No Staples DRUG CLAIM FORM 1. Please type or print clearly

  20. Response of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine to Time Varying Wind Conditions found within the Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    Response of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine to Time Varying Wind Conditions found within the Urban, 2010 PP 389­401 389 ABSTRACT Experimental testing of a vertical axis wind turbine within the urban of the turbine. Temporal variation of the wind with respect to the direction and velocity fluctuations

  1. TUNGSTEN--2003 79.1 References that include a section mark () are found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockpile (NDS) and increases in stocks held by U.S. industry. No U.S. tungsten mine production was reported reported in 2001. Salient U.S. tungsten statistics and world tungsten concentrate production for 2003TUNGSTEN--2003 79.1 1 References that include a section mark (§) are found in the Internet

  2. Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Yucel

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a Composite Analysis (CA) for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The Area 5 RWMS is a US Department of Energy (DOE)-operated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management site located in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS has disposed of low-level radioactive waste in shallow unlined pits and trenches since 1960. Transuranic waste (TRU) and high-specific activity waste was disposed in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1983 to 1989. The purpose of this CA is to determine if continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS poses an acceptable or unacceptable risk to the public considering the total waste inventory and all other interacting sources of radioactive material in the vicinity. Continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS will be considered acceptable if the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is less than 100 mrem in a year. If the TEDE exceeds 30 mrem in a year, a cost-benefit options analysis must be performed to determine if cost-effective management options exist to reduce the dose further. If the TEDE is found to be less than 30 mrem in a year, an analysis may be performed if warranted to determine if doses are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

  3. Effects of Nutrient Additions on Three Coastal Salt Marsh Plants Found in Sunset Cove, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rulon, Leslie

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of S. alterniflora plots, green indicates B. maritima plots, blue indicates S. virginica plots and red indicates areas of competition plots. Figure 2.2. Examples of (a) S. alterniflora (b) S. virginica and (c) B. maritima at Sunset Cove...????????????????????.. 4 1.2 Competition 6 1.3 Objectives and Hypothesis?????????????... 8 2. MATERIALS AND METHODS?????????????? 10 2.1 Study Site????????????????????. 10 2.2 Plots and Nutrient Additions????????????? 12...

  4. Calendar Year 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    > Year1999NEFINA1.pdf" class"">Inspection Report: INS-O-00-02

  5. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growth in network traffic to storage over the years. Network Traffic Growth Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2009 Network Distribution...

  6. DIRECTOR'S MESSAGE The Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE), founded in 1946, is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -2010 academic year witnessed the creation of RLE's seventh research theme: Energy, Power, and Electromagnetics million dollar Energy Frontier Research Center sponsored by the Department of Energy and directed the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on Bose-Einstein condensation. Major space renovations have

  7. The Armagh Observatory was founded and endowed by Archbishop Richard Robinson, who wished to establish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , into public walk-ways (now the Mall). In 1789, at more than 80 years of age, he commenced the construction watched Comet Hale-Bopp with it. Calver Telescope The Calver telescope was originally made for an English research interests lie in solar system astronomy and the dynamics of bodies such as comets and asteroids

  8. Found: Life on Earth That Could Exist on Mars January 17, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    . Microbes like these have been the subject of speculation for 30 years. Finding them, however, was another depths of a geothermal hot spring in Idaho have discovered a unique community of microbes that thrive, home to 80 percent of the world's geysers and half of its geothermal features. They were looking

  9. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BORGHESE JV

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    {sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  10. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  11. Physics Thrust Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum ReservesThrust Areas Physics Thrust Areas

  12. Cod. Fisc. 90031700322 AREA Science Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cod. Fisc. 90031700322 AREA Science Park Padriciano 99 34149 Trieste, ITALY Tel: +39-040-37571 Fax Trieste and champion of the Trieste Science System Paolo Budinich, co-founder of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, passed away on 14 November 2013. For over 50 years one

  13. Postdoctoral Scholar position Area: Ethical Leadership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    Postdoctoral Scholar position Area: Ethical Leadership Duration: 2 Years Start date: Negotiable at the University of Calgary is accepting applications for a Postdoctoral Fellow in Ethical Leadership. Job Description: The Canadian Centre for Advanced Leadership in Business (CCAL), in the Haskayne School

  14. Turkish Trailblazer: Boosting Rural Areas through Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Çokgezen Reviewed by · Aline Kraemer Sector · Consumer Products Enterprise Class · Large Domestic Company her company and the economic and social welfare of rural areas of Turkey. To achieve success, Ms production units in impoverished parts of Turkey in six years. Hey Textile's investment has improved

  15. Final Year Projects Class of 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Engineering Page 10 Message from our Sponsor SAP Page 13 Project Areas/Technology Categories Page 15 Operating Systems/Programmes Page 16 Project Index Page 17-18 Projects 1-82 Page 20-101 Companies Sponsoring PrizesFinal Year Projects Class of 2012 schools of computing, electronic engineering and mechanical

  16. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubsch, Tristan [Howard University

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  17. Has a standard model solution to the solar neutrino problem been found?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, J N; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Clevelend, B T; Degl'Innocenti, S; Filippone, B W; Glasner, A; Kavanagh, R W; Koonin, S E; Lande, K; Kanganke, K; Parker, P D; Pinsonneault, M H; Proffitt, C R; Shoppa, T D; John N Bahcall et al

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The claim by Dar and Shaviv that they have found a standard model solution to the solar neutrino problem is based upon an incorrect assumption made in extrapolating nuclear cross sections and the selective use of a small fraction of the nuclear physics and of the neutrino data. In addition, five different solar model codes show that the rate obtained for the chlorine experiment using the Dar-Shaviv stated parameters differs by at least 14 .sigma. from the observed rate.

  18. Has a standard model solution to the solar neutrino problem been found?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahcall, J.N.; Barnes, C.A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Cleveland, B.T.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Filippone, B.W.; Glasner, A.; Kavanagh, R.W.; Koonin, S.E.; Lande, K.; Langanke, K.; Parker, P.D.; Pinsonneault, M.H.; Proffitt, C.R.; Shoppa, T.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The claim by Dar and Shaviv that they have found a standard model solution to the solar neutrino problem is base upon an incorrect assumption made in extrapolating nuclear cross sections and the selective use of a small fraction of the nuclear physics and of the neutrino data. In addition, five different solar model codes show that the rate obtained for the chlorine experiment using the Dar- Shaviv stated parameters differs by a least 14{sigma} from the observed rate.

  19. The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have a lower ash fall hazard. Information is based on data during the past 10,000 years. Bottom, from left

  20. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  1. Inner Area Principles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News linkThermalInner Area Principles The Inner Area

  2. 300 Area signal cable study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whattam, J.W.

    1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to discuss the alternatives available for removing the 300 Area overhead signal cable system. This system, installed in 1969, has been used for various monitoring and communication signaling needs throughout the 300 Area. Over the years this cabling system has deteriorated, has been continually reconfigured, and has been poorly documented to the point of nonreliability. The first step was to look at the systems utilizing the overhead signal cable that are still required for operation. Of the ten systems that once operated via the signal cable, only five are still required; the civil defense evacuation alarms, the public address (PA) system, the criticality alarms, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Facilities Management Control System (FMCS), and the 384 annunciator panel. Of these five, the criticality alarms and the FMCS have been dealt with under other proposals. Therefore, this study focused on the alternatives available for the remaining three systems (evacuation alarms, PA system, and 384 panel) plus the accountability aid phones. Once the systems to be discussed were determined, then three alternatives for providing the signaling pathway were examined for each system: (1) re-wire using underground communication ducts, (2) use the Integrated Voice/Data Telecommunications System (IVDTS) already installed and operated by US West, and (3) use radio control. Each alternative was developed with an estimated cost, advantages, and disadvantages. Finally, a recommendation was provided for the best alternative for each system.

  3. PROTECTED AREAS AMENDMENTS AND.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as critical fish and wildlife habitat. The "protected areas" amendment is a major step in the Council's efforts to rebuild fish and wildlife populations that have been damaged by hydroelectric development. Low also imposed significant costs. The Northwest's fish and wildlife have suffered extensive losses

  4. MSL ENTERANCE REFERENCE AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    MSL ENTERANCE LOBBY ELEV STAIRS SSL-019 REFERENCE AREA SSL-021 GROUP STUDY SSL-018 STUDY ROOM SSL-029 SSL-020 COPY ROOM SSL-022 GROUP STUDY SSL-026 STACKS SSL-023 GROUP STUDY SSL-024 GROUP STUDY SSL TBL-014 TBL-014A STAIRS SSL-007 GIS/ WORKROOM SSL-011 SSL-008 SSL-009 SSL-010 SSL-014 SSL-017 STAIRS

  5. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  6. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  8. Project Year Project Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    based on engineering concepts with historical and aesthetic descriptions. The information descriptions of the historical, structural, and architectural features of the structures; (2) photographic with a significant heritage of structural engineering. Notable structures in the area range from 19th century

  9. No corrosion caused by coal chlorine found in AFBC pilot scale tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, K.; Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Liu, K.; Smith, S.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of deposition and corrosion were made in the freeboard of a 3 m inner diameter pilot scale atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) during seven 1,000-hours tests using coals with chlorine (Cl) contents ranging from 0.026% up to 0.47% and sulfur contents ranging from 0.897{approximately}4.4%. Uncooled coupons of alloys 304, 309, 347 and a cooled tube of A210C medium carbon steel were exposed to the hot flue gases to investigate the effects of different coal compositions on deposition and corrosion behavior, if any. The uncooled coupons were installed at the tope of the freeboard to simulate the superheater tube conditions (1,020--1,100 F surface temperature), while the temperature of the cooled A210C test tube was controlled to match the conditions of the evaporator tubes. Specimens were removed for examination after 250, 500, 750, 1,000 hours of exposure and analyzed for deposit formation and corrosion. No chlorine was found in the corrosion scale or on the metal surfaces after any of the tests. High sulfur contents were found in the outer parts of the deposits, and appeared to be associated with calcium and magnesium suggesting that the fly ash may react further after being deposited on the surface of the metal. It was concluded that the limestone bed in the AFBC not only can capture the sulfur but also can effectively capture chlorine. This effect helps being the Cl in the AFBC flue gas down to a level of <50 ppm which is significantly lower than the 300{approximately}400 ppm expected from combustion of the coal in the absence of limestone. This reduction in chlorine species in the gas phase has possible implications for decreased corrosion problems not only in the freeboard, but also in the cold end of the boiler. No evidence was found in these tests that metal wastage or corrosion was accelerated, either directly or indirectly, by chlorine in the coal.

  10. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 11:12am Addthis...

  11. The Transportation Energy and Carbon Footprints of the 100 Largest U.S. Metropolitan Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Sonnenberg, Anthon [Georgia Institute of Technology; Brown, Marilyn A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present estimates of the automobile and truck travel based energy and carbon footprints of the largest 100 U.S. metropolitan areas. The footprints are based on the estimated vehicle miles traveled and the transportation fuels consumed. Results are presented on an annual basis and represent end use emissions only. Total carbon emissions, emissions per capita, and emissions per dollar of gross metropolitan product are reported. Two years of annual data were examined, 2000 and 2005, with most of the in-depth analysis focused on the 2005 results. In section 2 we provide background data on the national picture and derive some carbon and energy consumption figures for the nation as a whole. In section 3 of the paper we examine the metropolitan area-wide results based on the sums and averages across all 100 metro areas, and compare these with the national totals and averages. In section 4 we present metropolitan area specific footprints and examine the considerable variation that is found to exist across individual metro areas. In doing so we pay particular attention to the effects that urban form might have on these differences. Finally, section 5 provides a summary of major findings, and a list of caveats that need to be borne in mind when using the results due to known limitations in the data sources used.

  12. Identification And Characterization Of The Solids Found In Extraction Contactor SEP-401 In June 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) recently conducted an outage that included maintenance on the centrifugal contactors. Operations personnel observed solids or deposits in two contactors and attempted to collect samples for analyses by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The residues found in Extraction Contactor SEP-401 are a mixture of amorphous silica, aluminosilicate, titanium, and debris from low alloy steel. The solids contain low concentrations of plutonium and strontium. These isotopes are associated with the titanium that came from the monosodium titanate (MST) added in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) most likely as leached Ti from the MST that precipitated subsequently in MCU. An attempt was also made to obtain samples from the contents of Wash Contactor SEP-702. However, sampling provide ineffective.

  13. Assessing two-year-olds' knowledge of number agreement morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blossom, Megan Stratton

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous research in the area of children's knowledge of number agreement morphology has yielded mixed results. Some researchers have found evidence for sensitivity to agreement morphology at as early as 16 months, while ...

  14. 60 years of great science [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  15. Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain scientific and natural areas are established throughout the state for the purpose of preservation and protection. Construction and new development is prohibited in these areas.

  16. Figure 1. A result from a 14-year old subject with sleep related breathing disorder. (a,b) Axial MR image frames representing that there is (a) no apneic event and (b) central apnea. A marked reduction of the airway cross-sectional area is observed in (b)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Figure 1. A result from a 14-year old subject with sleep related breathing disorder. (a,b) Axial MR information of the nasal and pharyngeal airway [1]. MRI has the potential to visualize sites of airway are 1) simultaneous recording of relevant physiological signals (e.g., heart rate, oxygen saturation

  17. Project Year Project Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve-specialized, but practically useless skill. Solution One goal of this summer's Applied Geographic Information Systems in Public lessons about observational epidemiology. Technologies Used Geographic Info System (GIS), Blackboard

  18. Environmental releases for calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S.P.; Curn, B.L.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1993 from facilities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. As part of this executive summary, comprehensive data summaries of air emissions and liquid effluents in 1993 are displayed in tables. These tables represent the following: radionuclide air emissions data; data on radioactive liquid effluents discharged to the soil; radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River; nonradioactive air emissions data; total volumes and flow rates of 200/600 area liquid effluents. Both summary and detailed presentations of these data are given. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  19. Original article Estimating the foliage area of Maritime pine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) Abstract ­ Destructive measurements of architecture and biomass were performed on 63 trees from three Pinus pinaster stands (5, 21 and 26 year-old) in order to determine the quantity and distribution of foliage area that knowing tree age and diameter, it could be possible to fully describe the quantity of foliage area and its

  20. CRITICALITY SAFETY CONTROL OF LEGACY FUEL FOUND AT 105-K WEST FUEL STORAGE BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JENSEN, M.A.

    2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2004, two sealed canisters containing spent nuclear fuel were opened for processing at the Hanford Site's K West fuel storage basin. The fuel was to be processed through cleaning and sorting stations, repackaged into special baskets, placed into a cask, and removed from the basin for further processing and eventual dry storage. The canisters were expected to contain fuel from the old Hanford C Reactor, a graphite-moderated reactor fueled by very low-enriched uranium metal. The expected fuel type was an aluminum-clad slug about eight inches in length and with a weight of about eight pounds. Instead of the expected fuel, the two canisters contained several pieces of thin tubes, some with wire wraps. The material was placed into unsealed canisters for storage and to await further evaluation. Videotapes and still photographs of the items were examined in consultation with available retired Hanford employees. It was determined that the items had a fair probability of being cut-up pieces of fuel rods from the retired Hanford Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Because the items had been safely handled several times, it was apparent that a criticality safety hazard did not exist when handling the material by itself, but it was necessary to determine if a hazard existed when combining the material with other known types of spent nuclear fuel. Because the PRTR operated more than 40 years ago, investigators had to rely on a combination of researching archived documents, and utilizing common-sense estimates coupled with bounding assumptions, to determine that the fuel items could be handled safely with other spent nuclear fuel in the storage basin. As older DOE facilities across the nation are shut down and cleaned out, the potential for more discoveries of this nature is increasing. As in this case, it is likely that only incomplete records will exist and that it will be increasingly difficult to immediately characterize the nature of the suspect fissionable material and its criticality hazards.

  1. Large area bulk superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Field, Michael B. (Jersey City, NJ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  2. Strategic Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354Strategic Focus Areas Lockheed

  3. The application of a computerized storm surge model for hazard mapping within the Galveston Bay Area using an Automated Mapping and Facilities Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schornick, Lora Anne

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Kenneth L. White Each year between June and November, hurricanes pose a threat to the communities along the Texas Coast. Disaster Planners become faced with the potential hazard of the storm surge... that accompanies the hurricane. The study site choosen for this thesis is Galveston Island and the Bay Area, It is often found within the range of landfall of a hurricane. Three local sites were examined in more detail. These sites are found at the east end...

  4. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  5. 2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    2008 Year in Review 1 2008 Year in Review The Science of Communication Disorders Departmental Research Committee. #12;2 2008 Year in Review Billinghurst, M., Moran, C., Gostomski, P., Basu, A

  6. Geothermal Resource Area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.; Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two county area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this area development plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the geothermal sites considered are summarized.

  7. Geothermal resource area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two country area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 11 geothermal sites considered are summarized.

  8. First Year Sedimentological Characteristics and Morphological Evolution of an Artificial Berm at Fort Myers Beach, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    First Year Sedimentological Characteristics and Morphological Evolution of an Artificial Berm Methods and Data Analysis 29 Results and Discussion 34 Sedimentological Characteristics of the Artificial Project Area 45 Control Area Northwest of Berm 47 Discussion of Sedimentological Characteristics 49

  9. Geographic Area Month

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPrice Data59.2 58.9 53.9 49.8

  10. Geographic Area Month

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPrice Data59.2 58.9 53.9 49.877.3

  11. Geographic Area Month

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPrice Data59.2 58.9 53.9

  12. Geographic Area Month

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPrice Data59.2 58.9 53.948.6 46.5

  13. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  14. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  15. 70 Years of Innovations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are70 Years of Innovations

  16. 50 Years of Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th MeetingAllocation50 Years of

  17. Allocation Year Rollover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA,Portal Allocation Year

  18. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIV and evolution studiedHPSSHPSS Yearly

  19. Functional Area Assessments Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    with Huron on detailed project plan. Subject Experts Subject Expert Role Functional leadership Administrative1 of 2 Functional Area Assessments ­ Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments - Internal Budgeting - Human Resources These diagnostics will be performed using interviews, surveys, data

  20. Photovoltaic energy: Contract list, fiscal year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal government has conducted the National Photovoltaics Program since 1975. Its purpose is to provide focus, direction, and funding for the development of terrestrial photovoltaic technology as an energy option for the United States. In the past, a summary was prepared each year to provide an overview of the government-funded activities within the National Photovoltaics Program. Tasks conducted in-house by participating national laboratories or under contract by industrial, academic, and other research institutes were highlighted. This year's document is more concise than the summaries of previous years. The FY 1990 contract overview comprises a list of all subcontracts begun, ongoing, or completed by Sandia National Laboratory or the Solar Energy Research Institute during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990). Under each managing laboratory, projects are listed alphabetically by project area and then by subcontractor name.

  1. Nevada Test 1999 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 radioactive waste management sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yvonne Townsend

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels, whereas radon concentrations are not above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorology data indicate that 1999 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 3.9 inches at the Area 3 RWMS (61 percent of average) and 3.8 inches at the Area 5 RWMS (75 percent of average). Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 1999 rainfall infiltrated less than one foot before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium data indicate very slow migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were insignificant. All 1999 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing as expected at isolating buried waste.

  2. Geographic Area Month

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPrice Data59.2 58.9 53.9 49.8 50.5

  3. Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

  4. Boundary Waters Canoe Area (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Boundary Waters Canoe Area occupies a large section of northern Minnesota, and is preserved as a primitive wilderness area. Construction and new development is prohibited. A map of the...

  5. Compendium of Data for the Hanford Site (Fiscal Years 2004 to 2008) Applicable to Estimation of Recharge Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, William E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compendium of recharge data collected in Fiscal Years 2004 through 2008 at various soil and surface covers found and planned in the 200 West and 200 East Areas of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The addition of these new data to previously published recharge data will support improved estimates of recharge with respect to location and soil cover helpful to evaluations and risk assessments of radioactive and chemical wastes at this site. Also presented are evaluations of the associated uncertainties, limitations, and data gaps in the existing knowledge base for recharge at the Hanford Site.

  6. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

  7. NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    ;Nuclear Engineering Four Year Plan Starting Fall 2009 FALL Year 1 Credits WINTER Year 1 Credits SPRINGNUCLEAR ENGINEERING Four Year Plan Fall 2009 Nuclear Engineering (67 hrs) CH Grade Perspectives (15 I NE 452 3 Neutronic Analysis II NE 457 2 Nuclear Reactor Lab Western Culture (3): NE 467 4 Nucl

  8. 2002 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. E. Townsend

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental, subsidence, and meteorological monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)(refer to Figure 1). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater,meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada (BN) reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorological data indicate that 2002 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 26 mm (1.0 in) at the Area 3 RWMS and 38 mm (1.5 in) at the Area 5 RWMS. Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 2002 rainfall infiltrated less than 30 cm (1 ft) before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium monitoring data indicate slow subsurface migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were lower than in previous years. Special investigations conducted in 2002 included: a comparison between waste cover water contents measured by neutron probe and coring; and a comparison of four methods for measuring radon concentrations in air. All 2002 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility Performance Assessments (PAs).

  9. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, C.A.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  10. Projects of the year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

  11. PCBs found in PILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauterback, S.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of utilities have discovered polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in paper-insulated, lead-covered cable (PILIC) systems. The extent of this problem is of such concern that it is included in the regulatory revisions currently being proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The vast number of these systems, together with results form our studies virtually assures the widespread presence of PCBs in underground systems. The dual hazards associated with exposure of lead to humans and acceptance of the presence of PCBs in cable is forcing companies to develop sophisticated testing and new maintenance procedures. Age old disposal practices suspected of contaminating scarp yards and exposing workers to lead poisoning will be phased out in favor of controlled, indoor operations developed specifically for the safe disposal of this material.

  12. WINDExchange: Document Not Found

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAboutDeploymentAbout Printable VersionEERE

  13. Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

  14. Post-Closure Evaluation of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site in Support of the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The post-closure performance of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and Area 5 RWMS are evaluated for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement using current performance assessment and composite analysis methods and models. Two alternatives with different future waste volumes and inventories are evaluated. The No Action Alternative evaluates the inventory disposed through fiscal year (FY) 2010 plus an additional 4.5E5 cubic meters (m3) (1.59E7 cubic feet [ft3]) of waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS. The Expanded Operations Alternative evaluates the FY 2010 inventory plus an additional 1.42E6 m3 (5.03E7 ft3) of waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS and 4.93E4 m3 (1.74E6 ft3) disposed at the Area 3 RWMS. Both the No Action and Expanded Operations Alternatives have a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, “Radioactive Waste Management.” No significant difference between the two alternatives was found because the waste concentrations are similar. The performance assessment model assesses radiological risk for residents at the RWMS boundary where risk is more closely related to waste concentration than total waste inventory. Results for the composite analysis also indicate that the dose constraint and dose limit can be met for both alternatives.

  15. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark R. Cole

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

  16. Kirkland gets license in hot Philippines area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, A.S.

    1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that Kirkland As, Oslo, has received a geophysical survey and exploration contract (GSEC) in a sizzling exploration and development theater off the Philippines. The license covers about 6,000 sq miles of undisputed waters, with depths mostly less than 300 ft, and lies in the Reed Bank area off Northwest Palawan Island, where several major oil and gas strikes have been made recently. Kirkland has 1 year in which to carry out its seismic work commitment. The terms of the GSEC then give an option to drill one well in a 6 month period. Once the results have been analyzed, the company can either drill another well or enter into a service contract for the license. Kirkland has a 65% share in the license, with the remainder split between Philippine companies Philodrill Corp., Beguet Mining Corp. subsidiary Petrofields, and Seafront Resources Corp. The Philippines is one of Kirkland's main areas of activity, the Kirkland Commercial Manager Ralph Baxter.

  17. area spoil area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions Collins, Gary S. 25 tight environment high radiation area Physics Websites Summary: , no active electronics ...

  18. Share this: 5 Facebook StumbleUpon Email Report: Concerning levels of toxins found in sport fish along San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in several local species of sport fish, including various bass, perch, rockfish and shark, the UnionShare this: 5 Facebook StumbleUpon Email Report: Concerning levels of toxins found in sport fish along San Diego coastline By City News Service, on August 15, 2011, at 9:08 am Sport fish found along

  19. 2013 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, Gregory [NSTec] [NSTec

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2013. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2013 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2013 include the following: • Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2013 • Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis • Development of version 4.115 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2013 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. The conclusion of the annual review is that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates that no significant changes have occurred. The FY 2013 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.115 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2013. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter the CAs results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Yucca Flat Underground Test Area (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97) source term, is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2015. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (CAU 98) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 Closure Report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the PA, CA, and inventory models for the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS.

  20. Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

  1. 100-N Area underground storage tank closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, C.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the removal/characterization actions concerning underground storage tanks (UST) at the 100-N Area. Included are 105-N-LFT, 182-N-1-DT, 182-N-2-DT, 182-N-3-DT, 100-N-SS-27, and 100-N-SS-28. The text of this report gives a summary of remedial activities. In addition, correspondence relating to UST closures can be found in Appendix B. Appendix C contains copies of Unusual Occurrence Reports, and validated sampling data results comprise Appendix D.

  2. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have been recastEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1982-2012 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2012 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total Arts

  3. Endowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Harvard Management Company, based on reinvestment of all earnings on a monthly basis. (3) Values have beenEndowment Performance, Fiscal Years 1981-2011 Fiscal Year Year-end market value (in 000's) Return REPORTS Market Value of Endowment Funds as of June 30, 2011 Endowment Market Value Market Value % of Total

  4. Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Migration Year Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 1 #12;Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 NIDS NCCR North-South #12;Book Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Publishers Nepal Institute of Development Studies (NIDS) G.P.O. Box: 7647, Kathmandu, Nepal Email: nids@mail.com.np Web: www.nids.org.np National Centre of Competence in Research

  5. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and implementation of smart home energy management systemsStandard Technologies for Smart Home Area Networks EnablingInteroperability framework for smart home systems”, Consumer

  6. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2005-06 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2005-06 Year in Review 2 Message from the Acting Director

  7. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2004-05 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2004-05 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director This has

  8. Year in Review Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Year in Review 2006-07 Annual Report Center for Latin American Studies University Center for International Studies University of Pittsburgh #12;2006-07 Year in Review 2 Message from the Director Academic

  9. Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, S.P.; Ackerman, B.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. (Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work under a three-year phased subcontract to develop CdS/CdTe devices and modules and to further improve the technology base at Photon Energy, Inc. (PEI) to better address the commercialization issues and objectives of the PEI and the US Department of Energy. During this reporting period we (1) achieved efficiencies of 12.7% on small area devices, (2) achieved 1-ft{sup 2} modules with over 8% aperture-area efficiency (and active area efficiencies up to {approximately}10%), (3) tested 4-ft{sup 2} modules at NREL at 23.1 (21.3) watts, normalized (6.3% efficiency), and (4) found no inherent stability problems with CdTe technology during life testing, at both NREL and PEI. 7 refs.

  10. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

  11. Walters Gardens is a company rich in heritage, diverse in culture and founded on the core values of faith, honesty and integrity. Our primary mission is to exceed our customers'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to continuously empower our team members and improve our products, operations and service. We are committedWalters Gardens is a company rich in heritage, diverse in culture and founded on the core values in similar area 2. Proficiency in computers applications such as Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Excel 3. Ability

  12. ATNI Mid-year Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

  13. Averting biodiversity collapse in tropical forest protected areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurence, William F.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    protected areas; and what the principal predictors of reserve success or failure are, in terms of their intrinsic character- istics and drivers of change. To conduct our study we amassed expert knowledge from 262 detailed interviews, focusing on veteran... these areas. An important predictor of reserve health was improving reserve management. According to our experts, reserves in which actual, on-the-ground protection efforts (see Supplementary Information) had increased over the past 20 to 30 years generally...

  14. NIST 3-Year Programmatic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (cybersecurity and cloud computing). As new technologies develop and evolve,NIST's measurement research emerging technology areas through the NIST Center for Neutron Resea

  15. A STUDY OF THE HEMISPHERIC ASYMMETRY OF SUNSPOT AREA DURING SOLAR CYCLES 23 AND 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, Partha [University College of Science and Technology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Choudhary, D. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Mail Stop 8268, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Gosain, Sanjay, E-mail: partha240@yahoo.co.in, E-mail: parthares@gmail.com, E-mail: debiprasad.choudhary@csun.edu, E-mail: sgosain@nso.edu [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar activity indices vary over the Sun's disk, and various activity parameters are not considered to be symmetric between the northern and southern hemispheres of the Sun. The north-south asymmetry of different solar indices provides an important clue to understanding subphotospheric dynamics and solar dynamo action, especially with regard to nonlinear dynamo models. In the present work, we study the statistical significance of the north-south asymmetry of sunspot areas for the complete solar cycle 23 (1996-2008) and rising branch of cycle 24 (first 45 months). The preferred hemisphere in each year of cycles 23 and 24 has been identified by calculating the probability of hemispheric distribution of sunspot areas. The statistically significant intermediate-term periodicities of the north-south asymmetry of sunspot area data have also been investigated using Lomb-Scargle and wavelet techniques. A number of short- and mid-term periods including the best-known Rieger one (150-160 days) are detected in cycle 23 and near Rieger-type periods during cycle 24, and most of them are found to be time variable. We present our results and discuss their possible explanations with the help of theoretical models and observations.

  16. [Type the company name] Materials owned by the Binghamton Libraries can be found using the library catalog by going to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    [Type the company name] Materials owned by the Binghamton Libraries can be found using the library the Annex Request Form or log in to your account to request the item. For items held at the University

  17. "Embrace China" show in Houston will celebrate 65th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Embrace China" show in Houston will celebrate 65th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China "Embrace China," a multi-arts show of the People's Republic of China. The Sino Professionals Association will host

  18. Tech Area II: A history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich, R. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories` Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy`s compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission`s integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area`s primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on high-explosive components outside of the original Area II diamond-shaped parcel. Most of the buildings in the area are vacant and Sandia has no plans to use them. They are proposed for decontamination and demolition as funding becomes available.

  19. Heartwood production in a 35-year-old black walnut progeny test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their value as timber. Rink (1987) eval- uated 10-year old trees from an open-pollinated progeny test area from selection on diameter might be ac- companied by even larger increases in sapwood area. Esti of the variability of heartwood area in trees being harvested for timber led us to speculate

  20. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

    2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on characterization of Germania Unit using an analog field ET ODaniel unit and old cased hole neutron. Petrophysical Characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons--limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. In the absence or lack of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O'Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O'Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of Gamma Ray, Cased Hole Neutron, limited Resistivity and Neutron/Density/Sonic porosity logs over a considerable wide area. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period. We have seen positive response of water injection on new wells. We believe by proper data acquisition and precise reservoir engineering techniques, any lack of confidence in waterflooding can be overcome. Therefore, we develop field management software to control a vast data from the pilot and to perform precise reservoir engineering techniques such as decline curve analysis, gas and oil material balances, bubble map plot and PVT analysis. The manual for this software is listed in the Appendix-A.

  1. B-Mode contamination by synchrotron emission from 3-years WMAP data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Carretti; G. Bernardi; S. Cortiglioni

    2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the contamination of the B-mode of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) by Galactic synchrotron in the lowest emission regions of the sky. The 22.8-GHz polarization map of the 3-years WMAP data release is used to identify and analyse such regions. Two areas are selected with signal-to-noise ratio S/Ncontamination better than that of the whole high Galactic latitude sky found by the WMAP team (T/S>0.3). Such regions allow $T/S \\sim 10^{-3}$ to be measured directly which approximately corresponds to the limit imposed by using a sky coverage of 15%. This opens interesting perspectives to investigate the inflationary model space in lowest emission regions.

  2. PDF versions of previous colloquia and more information can be found in "events" at http://gcosmo.bao.ac.cn/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Weidong

    -materials and devices, and less well known microwave related research efforts for energy related applications. All://gcosmo.bao.ac.cn/ 2012 37 / Number 37,2012 TIME: Wednesday, 3:00 PM, June 27, 2012 LOCATION: A601 NAOC Microwave are in the area of microwave / millimeter wave / THz devices, circuits, antennas and their applications

  3. BCLDP site environmental report for calendar year 1997 on radiological and nonradiological parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fry, J.

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Memorial Institute currently maintains its retired nuclear research facilities in a surveillance and maintenance (S and M) mode and continues decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities. The activities are referred to as the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP). Operations reference in this report are performed in support of S and M and D and D activities. The majority of this report is devoted to discussion of the West Jefferson facility, because the source term at this facility is larger than the source term at Battelle`s King Avenue site. The contamination found at the King Avenue site consists of small amounts of residual radioactive material in solid form, which has become embedded or captured in nearby surfaces such as walls, floors, ceilings, drains, laboratory equipment, and soils. By the end of calendar year (CY) 1997, most remediation activities were completed at the King Avenue site. The contamination found at the West Jefferson site is the result of research and development activities with irradiated materials. During CY 1997, multiple tests at the West Jefferson Nuclear Sciences Area found no isotopes present above the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for air releases or for liquid discharges to Big Darby Creek. Data obtained from downstream sampling locations were statistically indistinguishable from background levels.

  4. PHAT STELLAR CLUSTER SURVEY. I. YEAR 1 CATALOG AND INTEGRATED PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Hodge, Paul W.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Beerman, Lori C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gouliermis, Dimitrios A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Larsen, Soren S. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Olsen, Knut A. G. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); San Roman, Izaskun; Sarajedini, Ata [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Girardi, Leo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Guhathakurta, Puragra [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kalirai, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lang, Dustin, E-mail: lcjohnso@astro.washington.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); and others

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey is an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope (HST) multi-cycle program to obtain high spatial resolution imaging of one-third of the M31 disk at ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths. In this paper, we present the first installment of the PHAT stellar cluster catalog. When completed, the PHAT cluster catalog will be among the largest and most comprehensive surveys of resolved star clusters in any galaxy. The exquisite spatial resolution achieved with HST has allowed us to identify hundreds of new clusters that were previously inaccessible with existing ground-based surveys. We identify 601 clusters in the Year 1 sample, representing more than a factor of four increase over previous catalogs within the current survey area (390 arcmin{sup 2}). This work presents results derived from the first {approx}25% of the survey data; we estimate that the final sample will include {approx}2500 clusters. For the Year 1 objects, we present a catalog with positions, radii, and six-band integrated photometry. Along with a general characterization of the cluster luminosities and colors, we discuss the cluster luminosity function, the cluster size distributions, and highlight a number of individually interesting clusters found in the Year 1 search.

  5. Microprocessors --10 Years Back, 10 Years Gurindar S. Sohi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohi, Guri S.

    Microprocessors -- 10 Years Back, 10 Years Ahead Gurindar S. Sohi Computer Sciences Department computer architects with an increasing number of faster transistors with which to build microprocessors. In the past decade, architects have seized these opportunities to build microprocessors that bear lit- tle

  6. Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure Filling and Maintaining Compost Georgia://ceps.georgiasouthern.edu/garden This brochure is funded in part by a grant from a Museums for America Grant. Types of Composting Bins To fill your compost bin, alternate brown and green materials. Keep in mind that the ideal ratio is three

  7. AREA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 of 5) ALARA TrainingANDREW W.categoricalHSS/UNIONAREA

  8. The Program Area Committee Chairperson.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Mary; Richardson, Burl B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    worksheets and others. Prepared by Mary G. Marshall and Burl B. RichardsQ Extension program development specialists, The Texas A&M University System. THE PROGRAM AREA COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSON You Hold an Important Position! Whenever people gather...

  9. Security Area Vouching and Piggybacking

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Security Area practice of "vouching" or "piggybacking" access by personnel. DOE N 251.40, dated 5-3-01, extends this directive until 12-31-01.

  10. Progress Update: M Area Closure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

  11. Protected Water Area System (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Resource Commission maintains a state plan for the design and establishment of a protected water area system and those adjacent lands needed to protect the integrity of that system. A...

  12. Wellhead Protection Area Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section regulates activities which can occur on or below the land surface of the area surrounding a wellhead. The purpose of these regulations is to limit well contamination and preserve...

  13. The Evolution Towards Grids: Ten Years of High-Speed, Wide Area, Data Intensive Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uses this data to index into detailed design databases, and returns 3D internal aircraft geometry space shuttle in its many operating regimes (from Mach 27 entry into the atmosphere to landing); · Use

  14. 100/300 Area Aquifer Tube Task: Annual Sampling for Fiscal Year 2006, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Hartman, Mary J.; Raidl, Robert F.; Borghese, Jane V.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter report has been prepared to provide the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, and Hanford Site contractors with logistical information pertaining to the use of certain environmental monitoring sites. Although the distribution is not limited, It is not intended for general distribution beyond that audience.

  15. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the La Brea Area: Year 3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    for water and any excess oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can of CO, HC, and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2, HC and NO in the exhaust that would be observed by a tailpipe probe, corrected

  16. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    for water and any excess oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can, HC, and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2, HC and NO in the exhaust that would be observed by a tailpipe probe, corrected

  17. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 6,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can also be determined. The system used in this study and 2004. The remote sensor used in this study is capable of measuring the ratios of CO, HC, and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2, HC

  18. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can also be determined and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2 valid measurements for at least CO and CO2, and 22,867 records contained valid measurements for HC

  19. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can also be determined and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2 measurements for CO and CO2, and 20,361 records contained valid measurements for HC and NO as well

  20. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Chicago Area: Year 5,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    for water and any excess oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass or volume of fuel can of CO, HC, and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2, HC and NO in the exhaust that would be observed by a tailpipe probe, corrected

  1. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Denver Area: Year 4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    is capable of measuring the ratios of CO, HC and NO to CO2 in motor vehicle exhaust. From these ratios, we calculate the percent concentrations of CO, CO2, HC and NO in the exhaust that would be observed by a tailpipe probe, corrected for water and excess oxygen not involved in combustion. Mass emissions per mass

  2. A Good Year for Solar in Phoenix Area | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy This documentFormerBerkeleySource:WorldA

  3. A Good Year for Solar in Phoenix Area | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2UraniumEnergyDepartment54th Lessons LearnedGross Gamma-Ray LogEnergyAAA

  4. Variable area fuel cell cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Borough, PA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell arrangement having cooling fluid flow passages which vary in surface area from the inlet to the outlet of the passages. A smaller surface area is provided at the passage inlet, which increases toward the passage outlet, so as to provide more uniform cooling of the entire fuel cell. The cooling passages can also be spaced from one another in an uneven fashion.

  5. Training Manuals All up to date training manuals can be found at the Student Information Users Group in PAWS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Training Manuals All up to date training manuals can be found at the Student Information Users on Files (left side) d. Click on Training Manuals e. Click on the Class Maintenance file f. Building New a member.) c. Click on Files (left side) d. Click on Training Manuals e. Click on the Registration file f

  6. After our book was published, we found a couple of examples of connections between Stravinsky's music and the Tonnetz.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, James S.

    in The Rite of Spring. Right: Connected chords in L'Histoire du Soldat. Example 2. L'Histoire du Soldat. In his book, Bernstein also discusses the opening of Stravinsky's L'Histoire du Soldat. Here is how and L'Histoire du Soldat, relating to Examples 1 and 2. They can be found under the link What's New

  7. We collected mosquitoes from six caves and found Cx. pipiens, Cx. erraticus, Cx. territans, A. punctipennis, A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Steven J.

    Discussion We collected mosquitoes from six caves and found Cx. pipiens, Cx. erraticus, Cx, not in the pipiens complex, could not be identified to species level, and on specimen is intermediate between Cx. pipiens and Cx. quinquefasciatus based on molecular analysis. Individual caves harbored from one to five

  8. Patterns of antimicrobial resistance among enteric bacteria found in multi-site group-level cohorts of humans and swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Linda Diane

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    resistance. There were also differences in resistance based on unit location, unit-type, and housing cohort within both humans and swine. Our study found no significant differences (p>0.05) in resistance between swine workers and non-swine workers...

  9. General Laser Control Measures Operating instructions for a specific laser are found in the manual for that laser.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huennekens, John

    General Laser Control Measures Operating instructions for a specific laser are found in the manual for that laser. There are several procedures that will reduce the potential for exposure to laser beams. 1. The beam from Class IIIB and Class IV lasers should be terminated in highly absorbent, non specular

  10. Plasma Basics Plasma is often called the "Fourth State of Matter". Although found in virtually every home and business,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma Basics Plasma is often called the "Fourth State of Matter". Although found in virtually every home and business, gas plasma is not well known. In fact, plasma is quite common - it is estimated that 99% of the visible universe consists of plasma. Earthbound plasmas include lightning, fluorescent

  11. INTRODUCTION The Federal Highway Administration's 1995-1997 National Pavement Design Review found that nearly 80 percent of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jacqueline

    INTRODUCTION The Federal Highway Administration's 1995-1997 National Pavement Design Review found of pavement layers developed mainly based on the AASHO RoadTest data (1956-1962). In recognition of the limitations of these older AASHTO Design Guides, the Joint Task Force on Pavements (JTFP) initiated an effort

  12. The light-emitting diode (LED) is an fairly new kind of light source found currently in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The light-emitting diode (LED) is an fairly new kind of light source found currently in only a few applications, such as traffic lights and exit signs. As a relatively untested technology, luminaire this technology an ideal replacement for less efficient incandescent light sources, particularly in applications

  13. ISU Policy Library All of this information can be found Under the ISU Policy Library --File retention.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsing-Chang "Mike"

    ISU Policy Library All of this information can be found Under the ISU Policy Library -- File retention. http://records.policy.iastate.edu/ Here are a few links we pulled out for you to get you started: · Personnel Files -- http://records.policy.iastate.edu/view.php?id=151 · Accounting Transactions

  14. ALUMINUM--2002 5.1 A reference that includes a section mark () is found in the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALUMINUM--2002 5.1 1 A reference that includes a section mark (§) is found in the Internet Reference Cited section. ALUMINUM By Patricia A. Plunkert Domestic survey data and tables were prepared, international data coordinator. In 2002, 7 domestic companies operated 16 primary aluminum reduction plants

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EJEK 10 9 -10.00% EN 04 27 24 -11.11% NN (Engineering) 28 24 -14.29% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 29 -6.45% NU (TechAdmin Support) 4...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948 27069

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A79482693

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A7948269300

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826930002

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008 A794826930002

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111969

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 20087486111969

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119695

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 2008748611196957

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S. 200874861119695789

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.

  16. Postdoctoral Scholar position Area: Dietary Fiber and Obesity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    Postdoctoral Scholar position Area: Dietary Fiber and Obesity Management Duration: 2 years Start applications for a post-doctoral position in Fiber and Obesity. This position is a joint appointment microbiota in the context of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Dr. Reimer has developed animal models to study how

  17. Biological Inventory Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Inventory of the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area Prepared by: Joe Stevens .............................. 12 Identify Targeted Inventory Areas

  18. NIST 3-Year Programmatic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (vehicles and buildings),and from the physical (renewable energy sources) to the virtual (cybersecurity science,nanotechnol- ogy discovery and fabrication,and other emerging technology areas through the NIST

  19. FIVE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE OBSERVATIONS: SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, E. L.; Chen, X. [UCLA Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Odegard, N.; Hill, R. S.; Weiland, J. L. [Adnet Systems, Inc., 7515 Mission Dr., Suite A100, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Bennett, C. L.; Gold, B.; Larson, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Hinshaw, G.; Wollack, E.; Kogut, A. [Code 665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jarosik, N.; Page, L.; Dunkley, J. [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Komatsu, E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, 2511 Speedway, RLM 15.306, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Nolta, M. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Spergel, D. N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Halpern, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 W. 120th St., Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Meyer, S. S. [Departments of Astrophysics and Physics, KICP and EFI, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: wright@astro.ucla.edu (and others)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the list of point sources found in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) five-year maps. The technique used in the first-year and three-year analyses now finds 390 point sources, and the five-year source catalog is complete for regions of the sky away from the Galactic plane to a 2 Jy limit, with SNR >4.7 in all bands in the least covered parts of the sky. The noise at high frequencies is still mainly radiometer noise, but at low frequencies the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy is the largest uncertainty. A separate search of CMB-free V-W maps finds 99 sources of which all but one can be identified with known radio sources. The sources seen by WMAP are not strongly polarized. Many of the WMAP sources show significant variability from year to year, with more than a 2:1 range between the minimum and maximum fluxes.

  20. The arguments found here have been gestating for a long time, as I wrote about peasants, class conflict, resistance, develop-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    and dashed hopes in revolutionary change. This was a common enough experience for those who came to political elections in Burma, where I had spent a year, and, of course, the land reforms in revolutionary China for similarly melancholy reading. The popular aspirations that provided the energy and courage

  1. HOUSING: Senior year offers the broadest range of housing options.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    SENIOR HOUSING: Senior year offers the broadest range of housing options. Most seniors live in an apartment or wood frame house with a group of friends, although some choose to live in a residence hall or program house. STUDENT STAFF: Senior areas are staffed by Community Advisors. See previous box

  2. Solar Program Overview: Fiscal Years 2002& 2003 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the research activities and accomplishments of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program for fiscal years 2002 and 2003. It includes detailed accounts, charts, and photos of R&D activities in the areas of photovoltaics, concentrating solar power, and solar heating and lighting

  3. University Housing! First Year Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    community -Committed faculty member for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant (LCA) Living Learning Communities (LLCs) + + The choice is yours! First Year Experience Thematic First Year Student Housing focused around development

  4. Outlook: The Next Twenty Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the bigquestions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

  5. Assessment of the Geothermal Potential Within the BPA Marketing Area.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, John W.; Allen, Eliot D.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of geothermal energy is estimated that can be used for direct heat applications and electrical power generation within the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) marketing area. The BPA marketing area includes three principal states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho and portions of California, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, and Utah bordering on these three states. This area covers approximately 384,000 square miles and has an estimated population of 6,760,000. The total electrical geothermal potential within this marketing area is 4077 MW/sub e/ from hydrothermal resources and 16,000 MW/sub e/ from igneous systems, whereas the total thermal (wellhead) potential is 16.15 x 10/sup 15/ Btu/y. Approximately 200 geothermal resource sites were initially identified within the BPA marketing area. This number was then reduced to about 100 sites thought to be the most promising for development by the year 2000. These 100 sites, due to load area overlap, were grouped into 53 composite sites; 21-3/4 within BPA preference customer areas and 31-1/4 within nonpreference customer areas. The geothermal resource potential was then estimated for high-temperature (> 302/sup 0/F = 150/sup 0/C), intermediate-temperature (194 to 302/sup 0/F = 90 to 150/sup 0/C), and low-temperature (< 194/sup 0/F = 90/sup 0/C) resources.

  6. Safety analysis -- 200 Area Savannah River Plant, F-Canyon Operations. Supplement 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beary, M.M.; Collier, C.D.; Fairobent, L.A.; Graham, R.F.; Mason, C.L.; McDuffee, W.T.; Owen, T.L.; Walker, D.H.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The F-Canyon facility is located in the 200 Separations Area and uses the Purex process to recover plutonium from reactor-irradiated uranium. The irradiated uranium is normally in the form of solid or hollow cylinders called slugs. These slugs are encased in aluminum cladding and are sent to the F-Canyon from the Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor areas or from the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF). This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the F-Canyon operations and is an update to a section of a previous SAR. The previous SAR documented an analysis of the entire 200 Separations Area operations. This SAR documents an analysis of the F-Canyon and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the Savannah River Implementation Plans. A substantial amount of the information supporting the conclusions of this SAR is found in the Systems Analysis. Some F-Canyon equipment has been updated during the time between the Systems Analysis and this SAR and a complete description of this equipment is included in this report. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the F-Canyon can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations and to the environment. In this report, risk is defined as the expected frequency of an accident, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequence in person-rem. The units of risk for radiological dose are person-rem/year. Maximum individual exposure values have also been calculated and reported.

  7. Visualizing Twenty Years of Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potel, Mike; Wong, Pak C.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications marks the 20th anniversary of the Applications department as a regular feature of the magazine. We thought it might be interesting to look back at the 20 years of Applications department articles to assess its evolution over that time. By aggregating all twenty years of articles and applying a little statistical and visual analytics, we’ve uncovered some interesting characteristics and trends we thought we’d share to mark this 20 year milestone.

  8. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  9. Chapeau! First-Year French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinneen, David A.; Kernen, Madeleine

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapeau! is a first-year college text. Although it may appear, at first glance, o move very fast and introduce a large amount of material early, the vocabulary and grammatical structures that we expect students to control ...

  10. Accountability report - fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the US NRC`s accountability report for fiscal year 1997. Topics include uses of funds, financial condition, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement.

  11. Environmental report for calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, J.R.; Turrin, R.P.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for Calendar Year 1989 (CY89). The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations. The objective of the environmental report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. During CY89, there were no accidents, incidents, or occurrences that had a significant impact on PPPL facilities or program operations. The accidental overfilling of an underground storage tank (UST) during 1988, along with the discovery of residual hydrocarbons in the soil of an area used for unloading fuel oil trucks over the last 30 years, has the potential for a minor environmental impact and has resulted in a costly clean up in this area. Surface water analyses for both radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants have shown nothing above normally expected background values. Ambient tritium levels at less than 100 pCi/liter (3.7 Bq/liter) were measured in D-site well water. New groundwater monitoring wells were added in 1989 as a requirement for the groundwater part of our New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NJPDES) permit. Initial sampling of these wells indicated the presence of lead in two shallow wells next to the detention basin. Radiation exposure via airborne effluents into the environment is still at insignificant levels; however, a stack monitor for tritium is planned for 1990 to ensure compliance with new EPA regulations. Off-site surface water, soils, and biota continued to be analyzed for radioactive baselines in CY89. 51 refs., 27 figs., 40 tabs.

  12. EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

  13. Hydrogeology and structure of the Bluewater Springs area south central Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla, C.E. [AGES, Billings, MT (United States); Osborne, T.J. [Braun Intertec, Billings, MT (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bluewater springs area in south central Montana was the site of oil and gas exploration in the first half of this century. Though no significant oil was found, artesian water wells produced over 3,000 gallons per minute. Artesian springs in the area produce tufa deposits over faulted, northwest dipping Mesozoic and upper Paleozoic sediments. Two new faults were mapped in the vicinity, one of these a high angle vertical fault dissects an anticline. The Tensleep and Madison aquifers (700-1,000 feet deep) leak water to the surface through faults and fractures, producing variable water quality depending on the minerals dissolved from overlying rock formations. Evaluation of limited aquifer data reveals the following: (1) hydraulic conductivity of 40,000 to 300,000 gpd/ft, (2) hydrostatic head greater than 400 feet above land surface. (3) Total dissolved solids concentrations were 2,370 ppm in Big Bluewater Springs, but only 1,200 ppm in a Tensleep well in the vicinity. Flowing wells 45 to 70 years old have failed leading to major yield reductions, and cessation of flow. Potentially corrosive groundwater coupled with excessive flow velocities and inadequate well construction has likely led to well failures. In response, major uncontrolled alterations of groundwater flow systems have occurred with outbreaks of new springs and sinkholes near failed wells. New wells must be carefully planned, constructed and tested to avoid excessive interference, depressurization and failure.

  14. Partner Information Sheet, Academic year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    and high- energy particle physics. Our research and education are car- ried out within all major research are particularly well trained in scientific method. If you want to contribute to a sound and sustainable future within these areas. The Faculty of Science is highly ranked both in Sweden and internationally for its

  15. Crop-tree release thinning in 65-year-old commercial cherry-maple stands (5-year results). Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.C.; Miller, G.W.; Lamson, N.I.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes a crop-tree release plan which was applied to a 65-year-old cherry-maple stand in north central West Virginia. Criteria were developed for selecting crop trees for high quality sawtimber and veneer products. Five-year stand growth, mortality, and ingrowth using basal areas, volume, relative density, and number of trees were discussed for the treatments.

  16. Surface tension in bilayer membranes with fixed projected area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Imparato

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the elastic response of bilayer membranes with fixed projected area to both stretching and shape deformations. A surface tension is associated to each of these deformations. By using model amphiphilic membranes and computer simulations, we are able to observe both the types of deformation, and thus, both the surface tensions, related to each type of deformation, are measured for the same system. These surface tensions are found to assume different values in the same bilayer membrane: in particular they vanish for different values of the projected area. We introduce a simple theory which relates the two quantities and successfully apply it to the data obtained with computer simulations.

  17. Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 provides for the designation and establishment of a system of natural areas in order to preserve the natural ecosystems of these areas. Designated natural...

  18. 200 Years of Arc Discharges

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item youTheWSRC-TR-97-0100WHITE. ., .10MW ClassTracking

  19. Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production: Commercial Facilities · Applicant's Legal Name: Yokayo Biofuels, Inc. · Name of project: A Catalyst for Success · Project Description: Yokayo Biofuels, an industry veteran with over 10 years experience

  20. On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Los Angeles Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    On-Road Remote Sensing of Automobile Emissions in the Los Angeles Area: Year 1 Gary A. Bishop.1 According to Heywood2 , carbon monoxide emissions from automobiles are at a maximum when the air

  1. Ten Thousand Years of Solitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benford, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) California Univ., Irvine, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kirkwood, C.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA). Coll. of Business Administration); Harry, O. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Pasqualetti, M.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the authors work as an expert team advising the US Department of Energy on modes of inadvertent intrusion over the next 10,000 years into the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) nuclear waste repository. Credible types of potential future accidental intrusion into the WIPP are estimated as a basis for creating warning markers to prevent inadvertent intrusion. A six-step process is used to structure possible scenarios for such intrusion, and it is concluded that the probability of inadvertent intrusion into the WIPP repository over the next ten thousand years lies between one and twenty-five percent. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  3. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  4. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

  5. For publication 20th November WOMAN WHO FEEDS POISON TO PLANTS WINS `DISCOVERY OF THE YEAR'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    For publication 20th November WOMAN WHO FEEDS POISON TO PLANTS WINS `DISCOVERY OF THE YEAR, in effect, absorbed the poison from the surrounding area. By simply planting the fern in polluted soil

  6. Annual Benefits Enrollment Form 2012 Plan Year Select Campus Location: Norman Oklahoma City Tulsa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Annual Benefits Enrollment Form 2012 Plan Year Select Campus Location: Norman Oklahoma City Tulsa BlueLincs HMO HMO Primary Care Physician #: Community Care HMO (Tulsa Area Only) HMO Primary Care

  7. Innovation investment area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

  8. Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production. Annual subcontract report, 1 July 1990--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, S.P.; Ackerman, B.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. [Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work under a three-year phased subcontract to develop CdS/CdTe devices and modules and to further improve the technology base at Photon Energy, Inc. (PEI) to better address the commercialization issues and objectives of the PEI and the US Department of Energy. During this reporting period we (1) achieved efficiencies of 12.7% on small area devices, (2) achieved 1-ft{sup 2} modules with over 8% aperture-area efficiency (and active area efficiencies up to {approximately}10%), (3) tested 4-ft{sup 2} modules at NREL at 23.1 (21.3) watts, normalized (6.3% efficiency), and (4) found no inherent stability problems with CdTe technology during life testing, at both NREL and PEI. 7 refs.

  9. Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma Photo of Comfort Station at the Chickasaw National Recreation...

  10. Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard - DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    50-2013, Quality Assurance Functional Area Qualification Standard by Administrator The Quality Assurance (QA) Functional Area Qualification Standard (FAQS) establishes common...

  11. Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

  12. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

  13. Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Latera area, Tuscany, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

  14. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Kristen L.

    funding to Washington University in FY08 was $548.4M, up 2% from the previous year. Both the dollar amount funding. Funding from the NIH, consistently the University's main contributor of research funding, increased by $1.5M (0.4%) in FY08. Funding from private sources to Washington University actually increased

  15. Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Annual report, September 1, 1996--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, D.S.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the second year of the five-year project for each of the four areas. In the first area, the author has completed the reservoir characterization, which includes matrix description and detection (from core-log integration) and fracture characterization. This information is found in Section 1. In the second area, the author has completed extensive inhibition experiments that strongly indicate that the weakly water-wet behavior of the reservoir rock may be responsible for poor waterflood response observed in many Spraberry fields. In the third area, the author has made significant progress in analytical and numerical simulation of performance in Spraberry reservoirs as seen in Section 3. In the fourth area, the author has completed several suites of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry and Berea whole cores at reservoir conditions and reported in Section 4. The results of these experiments have been useful in developing a model for free-fall gravity drainage and have validated the premise that CO{sub 2} will recover oil from tight, unconfined Spraberry matrix. The final three years of this project involves implementation of the CO{sub 2} pilot. Up to twelve new wells are planned in the pilot area; water injection wells to contain the CO{sub 2}, three production wells to monitor performance of CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} injection wells including one horizontal injection well and logging observation wells to monitor CO{sub 2} flood fronts. Results of drilling these wells will be forthcoming.

  16. WEED INFESTATIONS ARE GENERALLY MORE frequent along roadsides and other disturbed areas than

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    in adjacent land, possibly because vehicles spread seeds into these areas and such areas provide suitable habitats for weed growth. Many types of vehicles, including passenger cars, 4-wheel drive (4WD) trucks, agricultural implements, tracked vehicles and all- terrain vehicles (ATVs) have been found to pick up seeds

  17. Geology of the Shiloh School-Liberty Church area, West Burleson County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Raymond Leon

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by sroaion and area thereforea frequently hard to recognisea but they form the maJor tope Crapjcic features in the area The cuesta fronts are gentle due to ths so t, beds formica& them ?nd are found at. ths Crockot~tons Gity contacts at tjjs S~~ City...

  18. Geochemistry of peat over kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area, James Bay Lowlands, northern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geochemistry of peat over kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area, James Bay Lowlands, northern Canada by peatlands. Peat samples were examined in the Attawapiskat area, a region of discontinuous permafrost, where more than 19 kimberlite pipes have been found beneath a cover of peat (2­4 m thick) and Quaternary

  19. COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CSMRI) SITE FLOOD PLAIN AREA CLEANUP FACT SHEET & PROJECT SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In 1992 a water main break at the Site flooded a tailings pond that overflowed into Clear Creek. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency excavated and stockpiled soil from the tailings pond and surrounding area at the west end of the former tailings pond area previously cleaned up by EPA was found to contain

  20. Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response Instructions Technical Area (TA)-54 Area G Nitrate-Salt Waste Container Response Instructions This document was...

  1. Solar thermal energy contract list, fiscal year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal government has conducted the national Solar Thermal Technology Program since 1975. Its purpose is to provide focus, direction, and funding for the development of solar thermal technology as an energy option for the United States. This year's document is more concise than the summaries of previous years. The FY 1990 contract overview comprises a list of all subcontracts begun, ongoing, or completed during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990). Under each managing laboratory projects are listed alphabetically by project area and then by subcontractor name. Amount of funding milestones are listed.

  2. MODELING THE DIFFUSION OF MICRO-CHP IN A RESIDENTIAL AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i MODELING THE DIFFUSION OF MICRO-CHP IN A RESIDENTIAL AREA by Christian Chemaly A thesis submitted OF MICRO-CHP IN A RESIDENTIAL AREA by Christian Chemaly A thesis presented on the diffusion of micro-CHP shows that micro-CHP will not reach 50% of the market in less than 20 years. Furthermore it analyses

  3. 2005 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2005 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. In additon to providing groundwater monitoring results, this report also includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Ny County, Nevada.

  4. (Draft) Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and ``excess`` human mortality. The regression model proposed by Ozkaynak and Thurston (1987), which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for migration, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all ``non-external`` causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. Air quality data were obtained from the EPA AIRS database (TSP, SO{sub 4}{sup =}, Mn, and ozone) and from the inhalable particulate network (PM{sub 15}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub 4}{sup =}, for 63{sup 4} locations). The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included in the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found as follows: between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model betweenestimated 10-year average (1980--90) ozone levels and 1980 non-external and cardiovascular deaths; and between TSP and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened.

  5. (Draft) Community air pollution and mortality: Analysis of 1980 data from US metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 data from up to 149 metropolitan areas were used to define cross-sectional associations between community air pollution and excess'' human mortality. The regression model proposed by Ozkaynak and Thurston (1987), which accounted for age, race, education, poverty, and population density, was evaluated and several new models were developed. The new models also accounted for migration, drinking water hardness, and smoking, and included a more detailed description of race. Cause-of-death categories analyzed include all causes, all non-external'' causes, major cardiovascular diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Both annual mortality rates and their logarithms were analyzed. Air quality data were obtained from the EPA AIRS database (TSP, SO[sub 4][sup =], Mn, and ozone) and from the inhalable particulate network (PM[sub 15], PM[sub 2.5] and SO[sub 4][sup =], for 63[sup 4] locations). The data on particulates were averaged across all monitoring stations available for each SMSA and the TSP data were restricted to the year 1980. The associations between mortality and air pollution were found to be dependent on the socioeconomic factors included in the models, the specific locations included in the data set, and the type of statistical model used. Statistically significant associations were found as follows: between TSP and mortality due to non-external causes with log-linear models, but not with a linear model betweenestimated 10-year average (1980--90) ozone levels and 1980 non-external and cardiovascular deaths; and between TSP and COPD mortality for both linear and log-linear models. When the sulfate contribution to TSP was subtracted, the relationship with COPD mortality was strengthened.

  6. Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

  7. Personal Background andPersonal Background and AreasAreas ofof InterestInterest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boehning, Dankmar

    General Topics CurrentCurrent AreasAreas ofof InterestInterest ResearchResearch AreasAreas inin Preperation InterestInterest ResearchResearch AreasAreas inin PreperationPreperation #12;Personal BackgroundHistory BesidesBesides cooperatingcooperating inin severalseveral projectsprojects in SEin SE AsiaAsia oneone

  8. Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.

  9. Tanks focus area. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is tasked with a major remediation project to treat and dispose of radioactive waste in hundreds of underground storage tanks. These tanks contain about 90,000,000 gallons of high-level and transuranic wastes. We have 68 known or assumed leaking tanks, that have allowed waste to migrate into the soil surrounding the tank. In some cases, the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in the safest possible condition until their eventual remediation to reduce the risk of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. Science and technology development for safer, more efficient, and cost-effective waste treatment methods will speed up progress toward the final remediation of these tanks. The DOE Office of Environmental Management established the Tanks Focus Area to serve as the DOE-EM`s technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation in partnership with the Offices of Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. The Tanks Focus Area is responsible for leading, coordinating, and facilitating science and technology development to support remediation at DOE`s four major tank sites: the Hanford Site in Washington State, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in Idaho, Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank. Safety is integrated across all the functions and is a key component of the Tanks Focus Area program.

  10. Resource Areas of Texas: Land.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Curtis L.; Carter, Clarence R.; McKee, Gordon S.

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prairie (Coastal ~~~(l), soils are less acid and some are calcareous. Main series: lrictoria, Orelia, Clareville. ~ight, acid sands and darker, loamy to clayey soils-some $;dine and sodic-lie in a narrow band along the coast. Main aeries: Harris...). Mai series: Truce, Waurika, Brown, moderately deep 11 shallow, calcareous, clay1 a1 oils are alg common. Main series: (: 1 to alk nts; somt Bonti. ey soils >wens. over sh Bottomlands-minor areas or brown to clam gray, loam1 1 Main senes 3...

  11. Texas Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shrenik IndustriesStateTagsTexas Area Jump to:

  12. Focus Areas | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37 OPAM DOE O 413.2B Admin ChgFocus Areas Focus

  13. Surrounding Area Restaurants...Hungry

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - January 16, 2015 Summary ofAboutDepartmentControlSurrounding Area

  14. 2011 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs), with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 1999a; 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2011. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2011 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2011 include the following: (1) Operation of a new shallow land disposal unit and a new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant lined disposal unit at the Area 5 RWMS; (2) Development of new closure inventory estimates based on disposals through FY 2011; (3) Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis; (4) Development of version 2.102 of the Area 3 RWMS GoldSim PA model; and (5) Development of version 4.113 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model. Analysis of the latest available data using the Area 5 RWMS v4.113 GoldSim PA model indicates that all performance objectives can be met. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. In FY 2011, there were no operational changes, monitoring results, or R and D results for the Area 3 RWMS that would impact PA validity. Despite the increase in waste volume and inventory at the Area 3 RWMS since 1996 when the PA was approved, the facility performance evaluated with the Area 3 RWMS PA GoldSim model, version 2.0 (with the final closure inventory), remains well below the performance objectives set forth in U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management' (DOE, 2001). The conclusions of the Area 3 RWMS PA remain valid. A special analysis was prepared to update the PA and CA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2011. Release of the special analysis is planned for FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (UGTA) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the closure report for the Frenchman Flat UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) in FY 2015. An industrial site, CAU 547, with corrective action sites near the Area 3 RWMS was found to have a significant plutonium inventory in 2009. CAU 547 will be evaluated for inclusion of future revisions or updates of the Area 3 RWMS CA. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the UGTA source terms, is expected in FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU Corrective Action Decision Document, scheduled for FY 2023. Near-term R and D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Are

  15. Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

    1985-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

  16. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Dan

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2010. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. In 2010, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local regulations and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2010. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2010. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2010. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, miscellaneous electronic office equipment, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling and corrugated cardboard recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, foamed polystyrene peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Performance Evaluation Measurement Plan, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A-' was achieved in 2010 for Integrated Safety, Health and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System (EMS) has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts. The Laboratory's EMS was audited in April 2009 by DOE-CH. There were four 'Sufficiently in Conformity' findings as a result of the audit. All four findings were tracked in the Laboratory's corrective action database for completion. Beryllium was used routinely at Ames Laboratory in the 1940's and 1950's in processes developed for the production of highly pure uranium and thorium in support of the historic Manhattan Project. Laboratory metallurgists also worked on a process to produce pure beryllium metal from beryllium fluoride. In the early 1950's, beryllium oxide powder was used to produce shaped beryllium and crucibles. As a result of that work, beryllium contamination now exists in many interstitial spaces (e.g., utility chases) and ventilation systems in Wilhelm, Spedding and Metals Development buildings. Extensive characterization and remediation efforts have occurred in 2009 and 2010 in order to better understand the extent of the contamination. Analysis of extensive sampling data suggests that a fairly wide dispersion of beryllium occurred (most likely in the 1950's and 60's) in Wilhelm Hall and in certain areas of Spedding Hall and Metals Development. Area air-sampling results and work-area surface characterizations indicate the exposure potential to current workers, building visitors and the public remains extremely low. This information is now used to guide cleaning efforts and to provide worker protection during remodeling and maintenance activities. Results were shared with the DOE's Former Worker Program to support former worker medical test

  17. Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Actions and Resolutions for each site. Ten disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. Six have achieved final stabilization. The remaining four sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  18. Mid-year market review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite a tumultuous beginning marked by considerable excitement over the amendment to the US/Russian suspension agreement, 1994`s marketplace has been fairly quite so far. During the first half of the year, only thirty-two near-term uranium transactions, involving 10.1 million pounds equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, have been reported. Compared to the same period in 1993, which saw 16.5 million pounds transacted in fifty deals, 1994`s volume represents a drop of 39 percent. With the amendment initialed in the last days of 1993, many market participants expected the first part of 1994 to be very active, with buyers and sellers rushing to conclude {open_quotes}matched sales.{close_quotes} No such surge materialized, however, and market volume remained below the average of 17.3 million pounds equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in fifty transactions recorded over the past five years.

  19. Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: Summary of each site Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location Actions and Resolutions for each site. Six disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. One has achieved final stabilization. The remaining five sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  20. Welcome'to'St'Andrews' First'Year'Computer'Science'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    ,'is'a'slang'term'used'to'reference' a'scenario'in'which'a'company'(usually,'a' computer'soQware'company)'uses'its'own' product'since'not'much'changed'each'year '' ­Though%we%did%listen%to%feedback% ­And%improved%in%certain%areas% · We'deduce'that'...' · Computer'to'demonstrate'the'quality'and' capabiliDes'of'the'product."' ­Wikipedia' #12;Dogfood...'' · Graham'Kirby' · BSc'St'Andrews' · Ph

  1. 1991 - The year in review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, P.S.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A look at the last year shows that utility regulators devoted a large part of their 1991 resources to the task of refining programs put in place over the last decade to push electric, gas and telephone regulation toward a more market-oriented approach. Heightened competition in electric generation, natural gas supply and transmission, and telecommunications markets kept regulators busy running competitive bidding programs, sorting competitive from noncompetitive services, and ensuring access to utility delivery networks.

  2. Change of caged dynamics at Tg in hydrated proteins found after suppressing the methyl-group rotation contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. L. Ngai; S. Capaccioli; A. Paciaroni

    2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In conventional glassformers at sufficiently short times and low enough temperatures, molecules are mutually caged by the intermolecular potential. The fluctuation and dissipation from motion of caged molecules when observed by elastic incoherent neutron scattering exhibit a change in temperature dependence of the mean square displacement (MSD) at the glass transition temperature Tg. This is a general and fundamental property of caged dynamics in glassformers, which is observed always near Tg independent of the energy resolution of the spectrometer. Recently we showed the same change of T-dependence at Tg is present in proteins solvated with bioprotectants, coexisting with the dynamic transition at a higher temperature Td. In these solvated proteins, all having Tg and Td higher than the proteins hydrated by water alone, the observation of the change of T-dependence of the MSD at Tg is unobstructed by the methyl-group rotation contribution at lower temperatures. On the other hand, proteins hydrated by water alone have lower Tg and Td, and hence unambiguous evidence of the transition of MSD at Tg is hard to find. Notwithstanding, evidence on the break of the MSD at Tg can be found by deuterating the protein to suppress the methyl-group contribution. An alternative strategy is the use of a spectrometer that senses motions faster than 15 ps, which confers the benefit of shifting both the onset of methyl-group rotation contribution as well as the dynamic transition to higher temperatures, and again the change of MSD at Tg becomes evident. The break of the elastic intensity or the MSD at Tg coexists with the dynamics transition at Td in hydrated and solvated proteins. Recognition of this fact helps to remove inconsistency and conundrum encountered in interpreting the data that thwart progress in understanding the origin of the dynamic transition and its connection to biological function.

  3. Earth: 15 Million Years Ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masataka Mizushima

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In Einstein's general relativity theory the metric component gxx in the direction of motion (x-direction) of the sun deviates from unity due to a tensor potential caused by the black hole existing around the center of the galaxy. Because the solar system is orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s, the theory shows that the Newtonian gravitational potential due to the sun is not quite radial. At the present time, the ecliptic plane is almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, consistent with this modification of the Newtonian gravitational force. The ecliptic plane is assumed to maintain this orientation in the galactic space as it orbits around the galactic center, but the rotational angular momentum of the earth around its own axis can be assumed to be conserved. The earth is between the sun and the galactic center at the summer solstice all the time. As a consequence, the rotational axis of the earth would be parallel to the axis of the orbital rotation of the earth 15 million years ago, if the solar system has been orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s. The present theory concludes that the earth did not have seasons 15 million years ago. Therefore, the water on the earth was accumulated near the poles as ice and the sea level was very low. Geological evidence exists that confirms this effect. The resulting global ice-melting started 15 million years ago and is ending now.

  4. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

  5. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, S.M.

    1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) and the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) a schedule in accordance with the HNF-PRO-454, Inactive Waste Sites` HNF-PRO-455, Solid Waste 3 Management4 and BHI-EE-02, Environmental Requirements, of monitoring and sampling, routines for the near-facility environmental monitoring program during calendar year (CY) 1998. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Environmental Monitoring and investigations and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1999. The outside perimeter road surveys of 200 East and West Area and the rail survey from the 300 Area to Columbia Center will be performed in the year 2000 per agreement with Department of Energy, Richland Field Office. This schedule does not discuss staffing needs, nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines. Personnel performing routines to meet this schedule shall communicate any need for 1332 assistance in completing these routines to Radiological Control management and Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. After each routine survey is completed, a copy of the survey record, maps, and data sheets will be forwarded to Environmental Monitoring and Investigations. These routine surveys will not be considered complete until this documentation is received. At the end of each month, the ERC and PHMC radiological control organizations shall forward a copy of the Routine Signoff Sheet and a DSI validating the completion of the scheduled routine surveys for that month.

  6. Tank Waste Remediation System fiscal year 1996 multi-year program plan WBS 1.1. Revision 1, Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a compilation of data relating to the Tank Waste Remediation System Multi-Year Program. Topics discussed include: management systems; waste volume, transfer and evaporation management; transition of 200 East and West areas; ferricyanide, volatile organic vapor, and flammable gas management; waste characterization; retrieval from SSTs and DSTs; heat management; interim storage; low-level and high-level radioactive waste management; and tank farm closure.

  7. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

  8. THE 10,000 YEAR PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Srisuro

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pharkya, a Ph.D. candidate in materials science and engineering, works in the area of corrosion science, predicting how materials will perform over extended periods of time. Her particular focus is a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy called C-22, a highly corrosion-resistant metal. Pharkya's aim is to help determine whether containers made from C-22 can be used to store high-energy nuclear waste--for 10,000 years and longer. Pharkya's work is part of a plan by the U.S. Department of Energy to consolidate the country's nuclear waste in a single proposed repository. The proposed repository is in Yucca Mountain located in a remote Nevada desert. Currently about 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are divided between approximately 100 sites around the country. The undertaking, Pharkya emphasizes, is massive. To study just the corrosion aspects of the packaging, Case is collaborating with eight other universities, five national labs and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Even with so many players, the study will likely take several years to complete. Heading the entire group is Joe Payer, a professor of materials science and engineering at Case and Pharkya's mentor. ''I came here to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Payer, an expert in corrosion, but I didn't know specifically what I would be working on'', Pharkya recalls. ''I was pretty thrilled when I learned about the vastness of the project--my research would be just a small part of this huge topic--and the impact of the research we would be doing''.

  9. The 10,000 Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.Srisaro

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pallavi Pharkya thinks a lot about the future. Pharkya, a Ph.D. candidate in materials science and engineering, works in the area of corrosion science, predicting how materials will perform over extended periods of time. Her particular focus is a nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy called C-22, a highly corrosion-resistant metal. Pharkya's aim is to help determine whether containers made from C-22 can be used to store high-energy nuclear waste--for 10,000 years and longer. Pharkya's work is part of a plan by the U.S. Department of Energy to consolidate the country's nuclear waste in a single proposed repository. The proposed repository is in Yucca Mountain located in a remote Nevada desert. Currently about 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are divided between approximately 100 sites around the country. The undertaking, Pharkya emphasizes, is massive. To study just the corrosion aspects of the packaging, Case is collaborating with eight other universities, five national labs and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Even with so many players, the study will likely take several years to complete. Heading the entire group is Joe Payer, a professor of materials science and engineering at Case and Pharkya's mentor. ''I came here to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Payer, an expert in corrosion, but I didn't know specifically what I would be working on'', Pharkya recalls. ''I was pretty thrilled when I learned about the vastness of the project--my research would be just a small part of this huge topic--and the impact of the research we would be doing''.

  10. FY 2013 Major Capital Outlay Project Request and Five-Year Comprehensive Master Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the following specific areas: Transmission & Distribution (smart grids technology, cyber-security) GenerationFY 2013 Major Capital Outlay Project Request and Five-Year Comprehensive Master Plan September 2011 ____ No _X__ Is There a Five-Year Capital Outlay Plan Available? Yes _X__ No ____ Are Professionally

  11. Large Area Vacuum Deposited Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It's easy to make the myriad of types of large area and decorative coatings for granted. We probably don't even think about most of them; the low-e and heat mirror coatings on our windows and car windows, the mirrors in displays, antireflection coatings on windows and displays, protective coatings on aircraft windows, heater coatings on windshields and aircraft windows, solar reflectors, thin film solar cells, telescope mirrors, Hubble mirrors, transparent conductive coatings, and the list goes on. All these products require large deposition systems and chambers. Also, don't forget that large batches of small substrates or parts are coated in large chambers. In order to be cost effective hundreds of ophthalmic lenses, automobile reflectors, display screens, lamp reflectors, cell phone windows, laser reflectors, DWDM filters, are coated in batches.

  12. Ashland Area Support Substation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power Light Company's (PP L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP L's Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW's) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

  13. Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Lewis

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  14. Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom; Mike Lewis

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  15. 2014 Year-in-Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE)Department ofNow4 Year-in-Review i 2014 YIR May

  16. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  17. Archaeological investigations at a toolstone source area and temporary camp: Sample Unit 19-25, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Technical report No. 77

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.C.; DuBarton, A.; Edwards, S.; Pippin, L.C.; Beck, C.M.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Archaeological investigations were initiated at Sample Unit 19--25 to retrieve information concerning settlement and subsistence data on the aboriginal hunter and gatherers in the area. Studies included collection and mapping of 35.4 acres at site 26NY1408 and excavation and mapping of 0.02 acres at site 26NY7847. Cultural resources include two rock and brush structures and associated caches and a large lithic toolstone source area and lithic artifact scatter. Temporally diagnostic artifacts indicate periodic use throughout the last 12,000 years; however dates associated with projectile points indicate most use was in the Middle and Late Archaic. Radiocarbon dates from the rock and brush structures at site 26NY7847 indicate a construction date of A.D. 1640 and repair between A.D. 1800 and 1950 for feature 1 and between A.D. 1330 and 1390 and repair at A.D. 1410 for feature 2. The dates associated with feature 2 place its construction significantly earlier than similar structures found elsewhere on Pahute Mesa. Activity areas appear to reflect temporary use of the area for procurement of available lithic and faunal resources and the manufacture of tools.

  18. Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

  19. Thirty Years of Turnstiles and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Meiss

    2015-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    To characterize transport in a deterministic dynamical system is to compute exit time distributions from regions or transition time distributions between regions in phase space. This paper surveys the considerable progress on this problem over the past thirty years. Primary measures of transport for volume-preserving maps include the exiting and incoming fluxes to a region. For area-preserving maps, transport is impeded by curves formed from invariant manifolds that form partial barriers, e.g., stable and unstable manifolds bounding a resonance zone or cantori, the remnants of destroyed invariant tori. When the map is exact volume preserving, a Lagrangian differential form can be used to reduce the computation of fluxes to finding a difference between the action of certain key orbits, such as homoclinic orbits to a saddle or to a cantorus. Given a partition of phase space into regions bounded by partial barriers, a Markov tree model of transport explains key observations, such as the algebraic decay of exit and recurrence distributions.

  20. FY 1987 current fiscal year work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Current Year Work Plan presents a detailed description of the activities to be performed by the Joint Integration Office during FY87. It breaks down the activities into two major work areas: Program Management and Program Analysis. Program Management is performed by the JIO by providing technical planning and guidance for the development of advanced TRU waste management capabilities. This includes equipment/facility design, engineering, construction, and operations. These functions are integrated to allow transition from interim storage to final disposition. JIO tasks include program requirements identification, long-range technical planning, budget development, program planning document preparation, task guidance, task monitoring, information gathering and task reporting to DOE, interfacing with other agencies and DOE lead programs, integrating public involvement with program efforts, and preparation of program status reports for DOE. Program Analysis is performed by the JIO to support identification and assessment of alternatives, and development of long-term TRU waste program capabilities. This work plan includes: system analyses, requirements analyses, interim and procedure development, legislative and regulatory analyses, dispatch and traffic analyses, and data bases.

  1. Site Environmental Report-Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Kayser

    2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laboratory's mission is to conduct fundamental research in the physical, chemical, materials, mathematical sciences and engineering which underlie energy generating, conversion, transmission and storage technologies, environmental improvement, and other technical areas essential to national needs. These efforts will be maintained so as to contribute to the achievement of the Department of Energy's Missions and Goals; more specifically, to increase the general levels of scientific knowledge and capabilities, to prepare engineering and physical sciences students for future scientific endeavors, and to initiate nascent technologies and practical applications arising from our basic scientific programs. The Laboratory will approach all its operations with the safety and health of all workers as a constant objective and with genuine concern for the environment. Ames Laboratory does not conduct classified research. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the performance of Ames Laboratory's environmental programs, present highlights of significant environmental activities, and confirm compliance with environmental regulations and requirements for calendar year 2001. This report is a working requirement of Department of Energy Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''.

  2. 60 Years of duplex stainless steel applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsson, J.; Liljas, M. [Avesta Sheffield AB, Avesta (Sweden)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the history of wrought duplex stainless steel development and applications is described. Ferritic-austenitic stainless steels were introduced only a few decades after stainless steels were developed. The paper gives details from the first duplex stainless steels in the 1930`s to the super duplex stainless steel development during the 1980`s. During the years much effort has been devoted to production and welding metallurgy as well as corrosion research of the duplex stainless steels. Therefore, duplex stainless steels are to-day established in a wide product range. Numerous important applications are exemplified. In most cases the selection of a duplex steel has been a result of the combination high strength excellent corrosion resistance. In the pulp and paper industry the most interesting use is as vessel material in digesters. For chemical process industry, the duplex steels are currently used in heat exchangers. The largest application of duplex steels exists in the oil and gas/offshore industry. Hundreds of kms of pipelines are installed and are still being installed. An increased use of duplex steels is foreseen in areas where the strength is of prime importance.

  3. Natural Gas Year-in-Review

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    December 9, 2011 | Next Release Date: December 2012 Previous editions of Natural Gas Year-in-Review Year: 2009 2008 2007 2006 Go Highlights Growing domestic production, rising...

  4. The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's GEA Honors Awardees The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's GEA Honors Awardees December 11, 2013...

  5. 2012 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, G. [National Security Technologies, LLC

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2012. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2012 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2012 include the following: ? Release of a special analysis for the Area 3 RWMS assessing the continuing validity of the PA and CA ? Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2012 ? Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis ? Development of version 4.114 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2012 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. A special analysis using the Area 3 RWMS v2.102 GoldSim PA model was prepared to update the PA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2012. The special analysis concludes that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates no significant changes other than an increase in the inventory disposed. The FY 2012 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.114 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Underground Test Area source term (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97), is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU 97 Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2016. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat CAU 98 results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 closure report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA and inventory models.

  6. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  7. Puget Sound area electric reliability plan. Draft environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power & Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound`s power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  8. Game Preserves and Closed Areas (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Game preserves and closed areas exist within the state of Montana for the protection of all the game animals and birds. Construction and development is limited in these areas. Currently, only three...

  9. Critical Areas of State Concern (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation designates the Chesapeake Bay, other Atlantic Coastal Bays, and their tributaries and adjacent lands as critical areas of state concern. It is state policy to protect these areas...

  10. Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To promote efficiency and avoid waste and duplication, rural and unincorporated areas of Indiana are divided into geographic areas, to be assigned to an electricity provider that will have the sole...

  11. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay C. Theilacker

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

  12. Plutonium focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA {open_quotes}...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...{close_quotes} In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or {open_quotes}white papers.{close_quotes} In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE.

  13. Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - January 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    All Areas Submissions - January 2011. Linear, Cone and ... Anders Skajaa, John Bagterp Jřrgensen, Per Christian Hansen. Convex and Nonsmooth ...

  14. D-Area Preliminary Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Paik, I.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, , ()

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive review of hazards associated with the D-Area was performed to identify postulated event scenarios.

  15. Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration...

  16. Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - February 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stochastic Optimization for Power System Configuration with Renewable Energy in Remote Areas Ludwig Kuznia, Bo Zeng, Grisselle Centeno, Zhixin Miao.

  17. Considering LEDs for Street and Area Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View Jim Brodrick's keynote video from the September 2009 IES Street and Area Lighting Conference in Philadelphia.

  18. Local control of area-preserving maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristel Chandre; Michel Vittot; Guido Ciraolo

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method of control of chaos in area-preserving maps. This method gives an explicit expression of a control term which is added to a given area-preserving map. The resulting controlled map which is a small and suitable modification of the original map, is again area-preserving and has an invariant curve whose equation is explicitly known.

  19. Introduction Marine protected areas (MPA's) are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    67(1) 1 Introduction Marine protected areas (MPA's) are an important tool for managing fisheries protected area is "any area of the marine environ- ment that has been reserved by Federal, State, tribal, territorial, or local laws or regulations to provide lasting protection for part or all of the natural

  20. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric...

  1. Commission for Women Year-End Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Commission for Women Year-End Report Academic Year 2009-2010 The Commission for Women ­ Knoxville. This year's Commission has been busy. We have accomplished our goals this year, thanks in great measure will be described later in this report. Campus and Community Programs In November the Commission for Women and Women

  2. Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jim [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

  3. Lower paleozoic of Baltic Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselton, T.M.; Surlyk, F.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Baltic Sea offers a new and exciting petroleum play in northwestern Europe. The Kaliningrad province in the Soviet Union, which borders the Baltic Sea to the east, contains an estimated 3.5 billion bbl of recoverable oil from lower Paleozoic sandstones. To the south, in Poland, oil and gas fields are present along a trend that projects offshore into the Baltic. Two recent Petrobaltic wells in the southern Baltic have tested hydrocarbons from lower Paleozoic sandstone. Minor production comes from Ordovician reefs on the Swedish island of Gotland in the western Baltic. The Baltic synclise, which began subsiding in the late Precambrian, is a depression in the East European platform. Strate dip gently to the south where the Baltic Synclise terminates against a structurally complex border zone. Depth to the metamorphosed Precambrian basement is up to 4,000 m. Overlying basement is 200-300 m of upper Precambrian arkosic sandstone. The Lower Cambrian consists of shallow marine quartzites. During Middle and Late Camnbrian, restricted circulation resulted in anoxic conditions and the deposition of Alum shale. The Lower Ordovician consists of quartzites and shale. The Upper Ordovician includes sandstones and algal reefs. The Silurian contains marginal carbonates and shales. For the last 25 years, exploration in northwest Europe has concentrated on well-known Permian sandstone, Jurassic sandstone, and Cretaceous chalk plays. Extrapolation of trends known and exploited in eastern Europe could open an entirely new oil province in the lower Paleozoic in the Baltic.

  4. Interactions between rainfall, deforestation and fires during recent years in the Brazilian Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Interactions between rainfall, deforestation and fires during recent years in the Brazilian and deforestation to explicitly quantify the seasonal patterns and relationships between these three variables per year for all variables analysed, except deforestation. For the annual cycle, we found correlations

  5. Environmental support FY 1995 multi-year program plan/fiscal year work plan WBS 1.5.2/7.4.11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D.A.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) is the programmatic planning baseline document for technical, schedule, and cost data. The MYPP contains data by which all work is managed, performed and controlled. The integrated planning process, defined by RL, is redicted on establishment of detailed data in the MYPP. The MYPP includes detailed information for the data elements including Level II critical path schedules, cost estimate detail, and updated technical data to be done annually. There will be baseline execution year and out year approval with work authorization for execution. The MYPP will concentrate on definition of the scope, schedule, cost and program element level critical path schedules that show the relationship of planned activities. The Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) is prepared for each program to provide the basis for authorizing fiscal year work. The MYPP/FYWP will be structured into three main areas: (1) Program Overview; (2) Program Baselines; (3) Fiscal Year Work Plan.

  6. Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

  7. Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

  8. Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langland, R. T.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

  9. Small business report to Congress for fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the various programs of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization designed to ensure small businesses have an equitable opportunity to do business with the Department of Energy. In addition, this report covers 33 organizational components of the Department and details the extent to which small business firms are participating in the procurement process as well as efforts taken to ensure continued involvement. During fiscal year 1992, the Department met or exceeded its percentage and dollar goals for 8(a) concerns, labor surplus area set-asides, and for-subcontracting to small businesses. The Department`s contract awards to small businesses totaled $3.1 billion (17.3 percent of the 18.1 billion the Department spent on contracts), which consisted of Departmental prime contracts and management and operating contracts. During fiscal year 1992, the Department awarded contracts totaling $307 million to small disadvantaged businesses under Section 8(a) of the U.S. Small Business Act. This total represents 1.7 percent of all prime contracts over $25,000 awarded by the Department during that period. The Department and its management and operating contractors awards to women-owned businesses and labor surplus area set-asides totaled $327 million and $596 million, respectively. The achievements in small business subcontracting for fiscal year 1992 was $234 million, including $23 million to small disadvantaged firms.

  10. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milnes, J. S., E-mail: james.milnes@photek.co.uk; Conneely, T. M.; Howorth, J. [Photek Ltd, 26 Castleham Road, St Leonards on Sea, East Sussex, TN38 9NS (United Kingdom); Horsfield, C. J. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  11. Self-stabilized nonlinear lateral modes of broad area lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehuys, D.; Lang, R.J.; Mittelstein, M.; Salzman, J.; Yariv, A.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lateral modes of broad area lasers are investigated theoretically. The nonlinear interaction between optical field and effective refractive index lead to a saturable nonlinearity in the governing field equation, so that self-modulated solutions are found to be stable with increased current injection above saturation intensity. The authors derive approximate analytical solutions for traveling wave fields within the broad area laser. The field amplitude consists of a small ripple superimposed on a large dc value. Matching fields at the boundary determines the modulation depth and imparts an overall phase curvature to the traveling wave mode. There are multiple lateral modes for a given set of operating conditions, and modes with successively more lobes in the ripple have greater overall phase curvature. In contrast to the linear problem, several lateral modes can achieve the same modal gain, for a given injected current density, by saturating the gain to different extent. Thus, these modes would exhibit slightly different optical powers.

  12. Reference-area performance standards for Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical and biological conditions in the sediments at sites in three areas of Puget Sound were analyzed as part of the study. Analysis of sediments from Samish Bay, Holmes Harbor, and Carr Inlet included chemical concentrations, total organic carbon, acid-volatile sulfides, total solids, grain size distribution, and sediment toxicity as measured by amphipod mortality, bivalve larvae mortality and abnormality, echinoderm embryo mortality and abnormality, juvenile polychaete mortality and biomass, and saline Microtox bacterial luminescence bioassays. The performance standards developed for Puget Sound sediment reference sites will provide a consistent basis for comparison and use of sediment data collected by various programs. Based on the performance standards developed, the report found specific stations in Carr Inlet, Holmes Harbor, and Samish Bay to be suitable as sediment reference areas.

  13. TEMPERATURE PREDICTION IN 3013 CONTAINERS IN K AREA MATERIAL STORAGE (KAMS) FACILITY USING REGRESSION METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, N

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    3013 containers are designed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3013-2004. These containers are qualified to store plutonium (Pu) bearing materials such as PuO2 for 50 years. DOT shipping packages such as the 9975 are used to store the 3013 containers in the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). DOE-STD-3013-2004 requires that a comprehensive surveillance program be set up to ensure that the 3013 container design parameters are not violated during the long term storage. To ensure structural integrity of the 3013 containers, thermal analyses using finite element models were performed to predict the contents and component temperatures for different but well defined parameters such as storage ambient temperature, PuO{sub 2} density, fill heights, weights, and thermal loading. Interpolation is normally used to calculate temperatures if the actual parameter values are different from the analyzed values. A statistical analysis technique using regression methods is proposed to develop simple polynomial relations to predict temperatures for the actual parameter values found in the containers. The analysis shows that regression analysis is a powerful tool to develop simple relations to assess component temperatures.

  14. Not Found | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxideDocumentationThreeNewsfuel

  15. Error 404 - Document not found

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13 DE@EnergyErnest D. Courant, 1986

  16. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, and during certain conditions, there is more demand for power in the Puget Sound area than the transmission system and existing generation can reliably supply. This high demand, called peak demand occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both.

  17. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

    2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

  18. Six-year beechnut production in New Hampshire. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leak, W.B.; Graber, R.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Beechnut production and losses were studied over a 6-year period in 41 northern hardwood stands ranging in age from 10 to 140 years in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Beechnut production increased consistently with stand age or diameter at base height of dominant trees and percentage of basal area composed of beech. Losses to insects, rodents, and birds before the seed reached the ground ranged from 24 to 100 percent; insects caused the greatest losses. Good seed years occurred about every third year.

  19. Domestic conventional natural-gas reserves - can they be increased by the year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Taylor, D.J. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of recent natural-gas studies and supporting data bases suggests that natural-gas reserves and excess productive capacity are declining and remedial action to ensure adequate supplies will require increased drilling of high-quality prospects. Conventional gas resources will remain the dominant source of natural gas through the year 2010, although nonconventional gas sources will increase and competition from coal in the utility sector will remain strong. More than two-thirds of current domestic gas production is coming from wells 11 or fewer years old. There is a need for increased conventional resources to fulfill anticipated increased demand for natural gas, and new concepts, be they new geophysical techniques or looking in lightly explored, deep, or remote areas particularly on Federal lands where most undiscovered conventional gas resources presumably are present, are required to find these resources. Conventional resources discovered during the past decade have initial production rates nearly three times that of unconventional resources developed under tax credit incentives for wells drilled before December 31, 1993. The industry has nearly doubled its efficiency, as measured by reserves found per well, from 1988 to 1991 at a low level of drilling relative to the high level drilling during the early 1980's. Significant reserve growth of old, large gas fields has helped to reduce the rate of decline of gas reserves. However, a developing hypothesis related to the field-growth phenomenon is that younger, smaller fields may grow at a lower rate and for a shorter time span than older, larger fields. This hypothesis may reflect, in part, the important role of new seismic techniques to better define the field size and reserves earlier in the process of gas-field development and thereby result in more accurate estimates of ultimate reserves. 39 refs., 15 figs.

  20. Tanks Focus Area site needs assessment FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RW Allen

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by five major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). During the past year, the TFA established a link with DOE's Fernald site to exchange, on a continuing basis, mutually beneficial technical information and assistance.