Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Extreme Wind Speeds: Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... "Algorithms for Generating Large Sets of Synthetic Directional Wind Speed Data for Hurricane, Thunderstorm, and Synoptic Winds," NIST Technical ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

2

On Sudbury-Area Wind Speeds—A Tale of Forest Regeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 34% reduction in 10-m wind speeds at Sudbury Airport in Ontario, Canada, over the period 1975–95 appears to be a result of significant changes in the surface roughness of the surrounding area that are due to land restoration and reforestation ...

Andrew J. Tanentzap; Peter A. Taylor; Norman D. Yan; James R. Salmon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Forecasting Solar Wind Speeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By explicitly taking into account effects of Alfven waves, I derive from a simple energetics argument a fundamental relation which predicts solar wind (SW) speeds in the vicinity of the earth from physical properties on the sun. Kojima et al. recently found from their observations that a ratio of surface magnetic field strength to an expansion factor of open magnetic flux tubes is a good indicator of the SW speed. I show by using the derived relation that this nice correlation is an evidence of the Alfven wave which accelerates SW in expanding flux tubes. The observations further require that fluctuation amplitudes of magnetic field lines at the surface should be almost universal in different coronal holes, which needs to be tested by future observations.

Takeru K. Suzuki

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

4

wind speed | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

speed speed Dataset Summary Description GIS data for offshore wind speed (meters/second). Specified to Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ).Wind resource based on NOAA blended sea winds and monthly wind speed at 30km resolution, using a 0.11 wind sheer to extrapolate 10m - 90m. Annual average >= 10 months of data, no nulls. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords GIS global NOAA NREL offshore wind wind speed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 18.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Please cite NREL and NOAA Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

5

OpenEI - wind speed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL GIS Data: Global NREL GIS Data: Global Offshore Wind http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/869 GIS data for offshore wind speed (meters/second).  Specified to Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ).Wind resource based on NOAA blended sea winds and monthly wind speed at 30km resolution, using a 0.11 wind sheer to extrapolate 10m - 90m.  Annual average  >= 10 months of data, no nulls. License

Type of License:  Other (please specify below)

6

Virtual Wind Speed Sensor for Wind Turbines Andrew Kusiak1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Virtual Wind Speed Sensor for Wind Turbines Andrew Kusiak1 ; Haiyang Zheng2 ; and Zijun Zhang3 Abstract: A data-driven approach for development of a virtual wind-speed sensor for wind turbines is presented. The virtual wind-speed sensor is built from historical wind-farm data by data-mining algorithms

Kusiak, Andrew

7

Numerical wind speed simulation model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A relatively simple stochastic model for simulating wind speed time series that can be used as an alternative to time series from representative locations is described in this report. The model incorporates systematic seasonal variation of the mean wind, its standard deviation, and the correlation speeds. It also incorporates systematic diurnal variation of the mean speed and standard deviation. To demonstrate the model capabilities, simulations were made using model parameters derived from data collected at the Hanford Meteorology Station, and results of analysis of simulated and actual data were compared.

Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Discussion of “Ultimate Wind Load Design Gust Wind Speeds ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ind. Aerodyn., 97(3–4), 120–131. Peterka, JA (2001). “Database of peak gust wind speeds, Texas Tech/ CSU.” Extreme winds and wind effects on ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

9

Surface wind speed distributions| Implications for climate and wind power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Surface constituent and energy fluxes, and wind power depend non-linearly on wind speed and are sensitive to the tails of the wind distribution. Until… (more)

Capps, Scott Blair

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

United States Wind Resource Map: Annual Average Wind Speed at...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

and atmospheric effects may cause the wind speed to depart from the map estimates. Expert advice should be sought in placing wind turbines and estimating their energy production....

11

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems that are designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed the validity of physicist G.I. Taylor's 1938 frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) 5-megawatt turbine model to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution was applied to a frozen wind field that was used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements were also evaluated using a large eddy simulation (LES) of a stable boundary layer that was provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The LIDAR measurement scenario investigated consists of a hub-mounted LIDAR that scans a circle of points upwind of the turbine in order to estimate the wind speed component in the mean wind direction. Different combinations of the preview distance that is located upwind of the rotor and the radius of the scan circle were analyzed. It was found that the dominant source of measurement error for short preview distances is the detection of transverse and vertical wind speeds from the line-of-sight LIDAR measurement. It was discovered in previous studies that, in the absence of wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances is the spatial averaging caused by the LIDAR's sampling volume. However, by introducing wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances was found to be the coherence loss caused by evolving turbulence. Different measurement geometries were compared using the bandwidth for which the measurement coherence remained above 0.5 and also the area under the measurement coherence curve. Results showed that, by increasing the intensity of wind evolution, the measurement coherence decreases. Using the coherence bandwidth metric, the optimal preview distance for a fixed-scan radius remained almost constant for low and moderate amounts of wind evolution. For the wind field with the simple wind evolution model introduced, the optimal preview distance for a scan radius of 75% blade span (47.25 meters) was found to be 80 meters. Using the LES wind field, the optimal preview distance was 65 meters. When comparing scan geometries using the area under the coherence curve, results showed that, as the intensity of wind evolution increases, the optimal preview distance decreases.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.; Kelley, N.; Jonkman, B.; Frehlich, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Dual-speed wind turbine generation  

SciTech Connect

Induction generator has been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using a dual output drive train to drive two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single-speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. Operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed.varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative which captures more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine is investigated. Annual energy production is compared between single-speed and dual-speed operation. One type of control algorithm for dual-speed operation is proposed. Some results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Handman, D. [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase I: Prototype Multi-Megawatt Low Wind Speed Turbine; General Electric Wind Energy, LLC  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with GE Wind Energy to develop an advanced prototype turbine to significantly reduce energy costs (COE) in low wind speed environments.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 10m and 50m...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikScat SeaWinds scatterometer.

...

15

Wind: wind speed and wind power density maps at 10m and 50m above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikSCAT SeaWinds scatterometer.

...

16

Modelling and forecasting wind speed intensity for weather risk management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main interest of the wind speed modelling is on the short-term forecast of wind speed intensity and direction. Recently, its relationship with electricity production by wind farms has been studied. In fact, electricity producers are interested in ... Keywords: ARFIMA-FIGARCH, Auto Regressive Gamma, Gamma Auto Regressive, Weather risk management, Wind speed modelling, Wind speed simulation

Massimiliano Caporin; Juliusz Pre

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

LIDAR wind speed measurements of evolving wind fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor’s frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor’s hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios. Nomenclature a decay parameter for exponential coherence al decrement parameter for transverse coherence (l ? {u, v, w}) bl offset parameter for transverse coherence (l ? {u, v, w}) D longitudinal distance between two points or measurement preview distance F focal distance f frequency (Hz) ? LIDAR measurement angle off of longitudinal direction k wind velocity wavenumber (m?1) ? wavelength (m) R range along LIDAR beam r scan radius for spinning LIDAR scenario ri,j distance between two points in the yz plane U mean wind speed (m/s) ?i,j average mean wind speed between two points in the yz plane ? azimuth angle in the rotor plane ?2 xy(f) Coherence between signals x and y

Eric Simley; Lucy Y. Pao; Neil Kelley; Bonnie Jonkman; Rod Frehlich

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 10m and 50m above  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10m and 50m above 10m and 50m above surface and 0.25 degree resolution for global oceans from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Raster GIS ASCII data files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikScat SeaWinds scatterometer. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential of offshore areas. Source NREL Date Released December 31st, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GEF GIS NASA NREL ocean offshore QuikScat SWERA UNEP wind Data application/msword icon Download Documentation (doc, 53.8 KiB) application/zip icon Download Data (zip, 41 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 01/01/2000 - 12/31/2004

19

Wind: wind speed and wind power density maps at 10m and 50m above surface  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

maps at 10m and 50m above surface maps at 10m and 50m above surface and 0.25 degree resolution for global oceans from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Raster GIS ASCII data files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikSCAT SeaWinds scatterometer. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential of offshore areas. Source NREL Date Released December 31st, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GEF GIS NASA NREL SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Maps (zip, 36.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2000 - 2004 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

20

Quantifying hurricane wind speed with undersea sound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hurricanes, powerful storms with wind speeds that can exceed 80 m/s, are one of the most destructive natural disasters known to man. While current satellite technology has made it possible to effectively detect and track ...

Wilson, Joshua David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Autocorrelation of Hourly Wind Speed Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The autocorrelation of hourly wind speed observations is estimated for seven stations on the west coast of Canada at selected lags ranging from one hour to two months. The estimated autocorrelation function is fitted by a model that includes a ...

Arthur C. Brett; Stanton E. Tuller

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Wind Speed Forecasting for Power System Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to support large-scale integration of wind power into current electric energy system, accurate wind speed forecasting is essential, because the high variation and limited predictability of wind pose profound challenges to the power system operation in terms of the efficiency of the system. The goal of this dissertation is to develop advanced statistical wind speed predictive models to reduce the uncertainties in wind, especially the short-term future wind speed. Moreover, a criterion is proposed to evaluate the performance of models. Cost reduction in power system operation, as proposed, is more realistic than prevalent criteria, such as, root mean square error (RMSE) and absolute mean error (MAE). Two advanced space-time statistical models are introduced for short-term wind speed forecasting. One is a modified regime-switching, space-time wind speed fore- casting model, which allows the forecast regimes to vary according to the dominant wind direction and seasons. Thus, it avoids a subjective choice of regimes. The other one is a novel model that incorporates a new variable, geostrophic wind, which has strong influence on the surface wind, into one of the advanced space-time statistical forecasting models. This model is motivated by the lack of improvement in forecast accuracy when using air pressure and temperature directly. Using geostrophic wind in the model is not only critical, it also has a meaningful geophysical interpretation. The importance of model evaluation is emphasized in the dissertation as well. Rather than using RMSE or MAE, the performance of both wind forecasting models mentioned above are assessed by economic benefits with real wind farm data from Pacific Northwest of the U.S and West Texas. Wind forecasts are incorporated into power system economic dispatch models, and the power system operation cost is used as a loss measure for the performance of the forecasting models. From another perspective, the new criterion leads to cost-effective scheduling of system-wide wind generation with potential economic benefits arising from the system-wide generation of cost savings and ancillary services cost savings. As an illustration, the integrated forecasts and economic dispatch framework are applied to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) equivalent 24- bus system. Compared with persistence and autoregressive models, the first model suggests that cost savings from integration of wind power could be on the scale of tens of millions of dollars. For the second model, numerical simulations suggest that the overall generation cost can be reduced by up to 6.6% using look-ahead dispatch coupled with spatio-temporal wind forecast as compared with dispatch with persistent wind forecast model.

Zhu, Xinxin

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

SciTech Connect

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Pitch Angle Control of Variable Low Rated Speed Wind Turbine Using Fuzzy Logic Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Pitch angle control of wind turbine has been used widely to reduce torque and output power variation in high rated wind speed areas. It is a challenge to maximize available energy in the low rated wind speed areas. In this paper, a wind turbine prototype with a pitch angle control based on fuzzy logic to maximize the output power is built and demonstrated. In the varying low rated wind speed of 4-6 m/s, the use of fuzzy logic controller can maximize the average output power of 14.5 watt compared to 14.0 watt at a fixed pitch angle of the blade. Implementation of pitch angle fuzzy logic-based control to the wind turbine is suitable for the low rated wind speed areas. Index Terms — low rated wind speed areas, pitch angle control, fuzzy logic, wind turbine. T I.

A. Musyafa; A. Harika; I. M. Y. Negara; I. Rob

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Wind Speed Profile At Offshore Wind Farm Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Monin-Obukhov theory the vertical wind speed profile can be predicted from the wind speed at one height, when the two parameters Monin-Obukhov length and sea surface roughness are known. The applicability of this theory for wind power prediction at offshore sites is investigated using data from the measurement program Rdsand in the Danish Baltic Sea. Different methods to estimate the two parameters are discussed and compared. Significant deviations to the theory are found for near-neutral and stable conditions, where the measured wind shear is larger than predicted. A simple correction method to account for this effect has been developed and tested.

Bernhard Lange Sren; Bernhard Lange; Søren E. Larsen; Jørgen Højstrup; Rebecca Barthelmie

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Laurel, Nebraska (2001 - 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laurel, Nebraska (2001 - 2002) Laurel, Nebraska (2001 - 2002) Dataset Summary Description Wind data collected from Laurel, Nebraska from a 20-meter anemometer as part of the Western Area Power Administration anemometer loan program. Ten-minute average wind speed and direction is available for 2001 - 2002. The data was originally made available by Wind Powering America, a DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) program. A dynamic map displaying all available data from DOE anemometer loan programs is available http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/anemometerloans/projects.asp. Source EERE Date Released November 09th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated November 09th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords wind wind direction wind speed Data text/csv icon Jun 11, 2001 - Jul 1, 2001 (csv, 144 KiB)

28

Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications  

SciTech Connect

The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy we analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. in extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Unsafe at Any (Wind) Speed?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to examine the relative safety and stability of stationary motor vehicles exposed to severe winds. The focus was on private passenger vehicles. 1) The behavior of two instrumented storm-chase vehicles that were ...

Thomas Schmidlin; Barbara Hammer; Paul King; Yuichi Ono; L. Scott Miller; Gregory Thumann

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Sampling Wind Data for Mean Wind Speed Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sampling techniques are applied to wind data at 3 h intervals for six stations in the Great Plains region in the United States in order to investigate the reduction in the number of data needed to estimate the mean wind speed. One-in-k ...

Mark Jong; Gary Thomann

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Probability Distribution of Land Surface Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The probability density function (pdf) of land surface wind speeds is characterized using a global network of observations. Daytime surface wind speeds are shown to be broadly consistent with the Weibull distribution, while nighttime surface wind ...

Adam H. Monahan; Yanping He; Norman McFarlane; Aiguo Dai

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Extreme learning machine based wind speed estimation and sensorless control for wind turbine power generation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a precise real-time wind speed estimation method and sensorless control for variable-speed variable-pitch wind turbine power generation system (WTPGS). The wind speed estimation is realized by a nonlinear input-output mapping extreme ... Keywords: Extreme learning machine, Sensorless control, Wind speed estimation, Wind turbine power generation system

Si Wu; Youyi Wang; Shijie Cheng

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Time Series Models to Simulate and Forecast Wind Speed and Wind Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general approach for modeling wind speed and wind power is described. Because wind power is a function of wind speed, the methodology is based on the development of a model of wind speed. Values of wind power are estimated by applying the ...

Barbara G. Brown; Richard W. Katz; Allan H. Murphy

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Wind speed PDF classification using Dirichlet mixtures Rudy CALIF1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind speed PDF classification using Dirichlet mixtures Rudy CALIF1 , Richard EMILION2 , Ted'Orléans), UMR CNRS 6628 Université d'Orléans, France. Abstract: Wind energy production is very sensitive to instantaneous wind speed fluctuations. Thus rapid variation of wind speed due to changes in the local

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

35

Dynamic simulation of dual-speed wind turbine generation  

SciTech Connect

Induction generators have been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness, and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single- speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. The operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind-speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative to capture more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine will be investigated. One type of control algorithm for dual- speed operation is proposed. Results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works and how power, current and torque of the system vary as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus’ experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energy’s (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

United States Wind Resource Map: Annual Average Wind Speed at...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

80 m 01-APR-2011 2.1.1 Wind Speed ms >10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.5 8.0 7.5 7.0 6.5 6.0 5.5 5.0 4.5 4.0 < 4.0 Source: Wind resource estimates developed by AWS Truepower, LLC for...

38

Extreme Wind Speed Data Sets: Texas Tech/CSU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... B-indicates a beacon tower exposure. ... 93839 Memphis TN 4 3 1968 123 107 WIND SPEEDS GREATER ... [ SED Home | Extreme Winds Home | Data ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Can Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds Realistically Represent Wind Speed Distributions?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speeds over the oceans are required for a range of applications but are difficult to obtain through in situ methods. Hence, remote sensing tools, which also offer the possibility of describing spatial variability, represent an attractive ...

R. J. Barthelmie; S. C. Pryor

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sliding mode control law for a variable speed wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern wind turbines are designed in order to work in variable speed operations. To perform this task, wind turbines are provided with adjustable speed generators, like the double feed induction generator. One of the main advantage of adjustable speed ... Keywords: modeling and simulation, variable structure control, wind turbine control

Oscar Barambones; Jose Maria Gonzalez De Durana; Patxi Alkorta; Jose Antonio Ramos; Manuel De La Sen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Short-Term Wind Speed Forecasting for Power System Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global large scale penetration of wind energy is accompanied by significant challenges due to the intermittent and unstable nature of wind. High quality short-term wind speed forecasting is critical to reliable and secure power system operations. This paper gives an overview of the current status of worldwide wind power developments and future trends, and reviews some statistical short-term wind speed forecasting models, including traditional time series models and advanced space-time statistical models. It also discusses the evaluation of forecast accuracy, in particular the need for realistic loss functions. New challenges in wind speed forecasting regarding ramp events and offshore wind farms are also presented.

Xinxin Zhu; Marc G. Genton

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Wind speed modeling and prediction in wind farms using fuzzy logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the upcoming wind speed is forecasted using the stochastic characteristics of wind speed of previous years. The wind speed is estimated in the fuzzy inference system and simulated with the fuzzy logic. The simulation results illustrate ... Keywords: fuzzy, prediction, wind farm

Shahram Javadi; Zeinab Hojjatinia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Low Wind Speed Turbine Developments in Convoloid Gearing: Final Technical Report, June 2005 - October 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study conducted by Genesis Partners LP as part of the United States Department of Energy Wind Energy Research Program to develop wind technology that will enable wind systems to compete in regions having low wind speeds. The purpose of the program is to reduce the cost of electricity from large wind systems in areas having Class 4 winds to 3 cents per kWh for onshore systems or 5 cents per kWh for offshore systems. This work builds upon previous activities under the WindPACT project, the Next Generation Turbine project, and Phase I of the Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) project. This project is concerned with the development of more cost-effective gearing for speed increasers for wind turbines.

Genesis Partners LP

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Power quality analysis of wind generator connected to the weak grid during low wind speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power quality analysis based on measurements performed on wind generator during low wind speed is presented in the paper. Wind generator is connected via 10 kV cable to the distribution network, where grid is weak with low value of short-circuit power. ... Keywords: distribution network, harmonics, power quality, wind speed, wind turbine

Aleksandar Nikolic; Branka Kostic; Maja Markovic; Sasa Minic; Srdjan Milosavljevic

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics Economics of wind power depends mainly on the wind speeds and the turbine make and model. Definition: Simple Payback The "Simple period of a small wind power project. All the figures are per turbine, so it can be used for a one, two

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

46

LQG Controller for a Variable Speed Pitch Regulated Wind Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the design of LQG controllers for pitch regulated, variable speed wind turbines where the controller is used primarily for controlling the pitch angle through a collective pitch angle in the high wind speed in order to guarantee ... Keywords: LQG controller, Pitch control, Wind Trubine

Xingjia Yao; Shu Liu; Guangkun Shan; Zuoxia Xing; Changchun Guo; Chuanbao Yi

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hi-Q Rotor - Low Wind Speed Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objective was to optimize the performance of the Hi-Q Rotor. Early research funded by the California Energy Commission indicated the design might be advantageous over state-of-the-art turbines for collecting wind energy in low wind conditions. The Hi-Q Rotor is a new kind of rotor targeted for harvesting wind in Class 2, 3, and 4 sites, and has application in areas that are closer to cities, or 'load centers.' An advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor is that the rotor has non-conventional blade tips, producing less turbulence, and is quieter than standard wind turbine blades which is critical to the low-wind populated urban sites. Unlike state-of-the-art propeller type blades, the Hi-Q Rotor has six blades connected by end caps. In this phase of the research funded by DOE's Inventions and Innovation Program, the goal was to improve the current design by building a series of theoretical and numeric models, and composite prototypes to determine a best of class device. Development of the rotor was performed by aeronautical engineering and design firm, DARcorporation. From this investigation, an optimized design was determined and an 8-foot diameter, full-scale rotor was built and mounted using a Bergey LX-1 generator and furling system which were adapted to support the rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor was then tested side-by-side against the state-of-the-art Bergey XL-1 at the Alternative Energy Institute's Wind Test Center at West Texas State University for six weeks, and real time measurements of power generated were collected and compared. Early wind tunnel testing showed that the cut-in-speed of the Hi-Q rotor is much lower than a conventional tested HAWT enabling the Hi-Q Wind Turbine to begin collecting energy before a conventional HAWT has started spinning. Also, torque at low wind speeds for the Hi-Q Wind Turbine is higher than the tested conventional HAWT and enabled the wind turbine to generate power at lower wind speeds. Based on the data collected, the results of our first full-scale prototype wind turbine proved that higher energy can be captured at lower wind speeds with the new Hi-Q Rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor is almost 15% more productive than the Bergey from 6 m/s to 8 m/s, making it ideal in Class 3, 4, and 5 wind sites and has application in the critical and heretofore untapped areas that are closer to cities, 'load centers,' and may even be used directly in urban areas. The additional advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor's non-conventional blade tips, which eliminates most air turbulence, is noise reduction which makes it doubly ideal for populated urban areas. Hi-Q Products recommends one final stage of development to take the Hi-Q Rotor through Technology Readiness Levels 8-9. During this stage of development, the rotor will be redesigned to further increase efficiency, match the rotor to a more suitable generator, and lower the cost of manufacturing by redesigning the structure to allow for production in larger quantities at lower cost. Before taking the rotor to market and commercialization, it is necessary to further optimize the performance by finding a better generator and autofurling system, ones more suitable for lower wind speeds and rpms should be used in all future testing. The potential impact of this fully developed technology will be the expansion and proliferation of energy renewal into the heretofore untapped Class 2, 3, 4, and 5 Wind Sites, or the large underutilized sites where the wind speed is broken by physical features such as mountains, buildings, and trees. Market estimates by 2011, if low wind speed technology can be developed are well above: 13 million homes, 675,000 commercial buildings, 250,000 public facilities. Estimated commercial exploitation of the Hi-Q Rotor show potential increase in U.S. energy gained through the clean, renewable wind energy found in low and very low wind speed sites. This new energy source would greatly impact greenhouse emissions as well as the public sector's growing energy demands.

Todd E. Mills; Judy Tatum

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Global Onshore Wind Speed Distribution  

SciTech Connect

Wind power, a renewable energy source, can play an important role in electrical energy generation. Information regarding wind energy potential is important both for energy related modeling and for decision-making in the policy community. While wind speed datasets with high spatial and temporal resolution are often ultimately used for detailed planning, simpler assumptions are often used in analysis work. An accurate representation of the wind speed frequency distribution is needed in order to properly characterize wind energy potential. Using a power density method, this study estimated global variation in wind parameters as fitted to a Weibull density function using NCEP/CFSR reanalysis data. The estimated Weibull distribution performs well in fitting the time series wind speed data at the global level according to R2, root mean square error, and power density error. The spatial, decadal, and seasonal patterns of wind speed distribution were then evaluated. We also analyzed the potential error in wind power estimation when a commonly assumed Rayleigh distribution (Weibull k = 2) is used. We find that the assumption of the same Weibull parameter across large regions can result in substantial errors. While large-scale wind speed data is often presented in the form of average wind speeds, these results highlight the need to also provide information on the wind speed distribution.

Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Using ADCP Background Sound Levels to Estimate Wind Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that ambient sound is generated by wind through the process of wave breaking and bubble injection. The resulting sound levels are highly correlated with wind speed and, even though the physical process is not fully understood, ...

Len Zedel

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Simulated Atmospheric Rime Icing of Some Wind Speed Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four commercially available wind speed sensors have been tested in an icing wind tunnel to determine the relative susceptibility of each to atmospheric icing and to determine the influence of ire accumulations upon the operation and accuracy of ...

E. M. Gates; W. C. Thompson

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Sliding mode control strategy for variable speed wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of the wind power conversions systems can be greatly improved using an appropriate control algorithm. In this work, a robust control for variable speed wind power generation that incorporates a doubly feed induction generator is described. ...

Oscar Barambones; Jose Maria Gonzalez De Durana

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Atmospheric Circulation Effects on Wind Speed Variability at Turbine Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean monthly wind speed at 70 m above ground level is investigated for 11 sites in Minnesota for the period 1995–2003. Wind speeds at these sites show significant spatial and temporal coherence, with prolonged periods of above- and below-normal ...

Katherine Klink

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ocean Wind Speed Climatology from Spaceborne SAR Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery can make high-resolution (? 500 m) ocean wind speed measurements. We anticipate re-processing the full decade and a half of Radarsat-1 SAR imagery and generating a SAR wind speed archive. These data will ...

Frank M. Monaldo; Xiaofeng Li; William G. Pichel; Christopher R. Jackson

54

Trends and Interannual Variability of Wind Speed Distributions in Minnesota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-surface wind speed variability is investigated at seven stations in and surrounding Minnesota for recent climate records of 22–35 yr in length. Analyses focus on mean annual wind speeds and on the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles ...

Katherine Klink

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Estimation of Extreme Wind Speeds with Very Long Return Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long series of hourly mean wind speeds and the maximum hourly 3-s gust are simulated for four sites in the British Isles in order to investigate methods for the determination of extreme wind speed events. The simulation is performed using a one-...

M. D. G. Dukes; J. P. Palutikof

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Long-Term Wind Speed Trends over Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate estimates of long-term linear trends of wind speed provide a useful indicator for circulation changes in the atmosphere and are invaluable for the planning and financing of sectors such as wind energy. Here a large number of wind ...

Alberto Troccoli; Karl Muller; Peter Coppin; Robert Davy; Chris Russell; Annette L. Hirsch

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Optimal evolutionary wind turbine placement in wind farms considering new models of shape, orography and wind speed simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a novel evolutionary algorithm for optimal positioning of wind turbines in wind farms. We consider a realistic model for the wind farm, which includes orography, shape of the wind farm, simulation of the wind speed and direction, ...

B. Saavedra-Moreno; S. Salcedo-Sanz; A. Paniagua-Tineo; J. Gascón-Moreno; J. A. Portilla-Figueras

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Controlled operation of variable speed driven permanent magnet synchronous generator for wind energy conversion systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The introduction of distributed generation through renewable sources of energy has opened a challenging area for power engineers. As these sources are intermittent in nature, variable speed electric generators are employed for harnessing electrical energy ... Keywords: permanent magnet synchronous generator, power conditioners, power quality, variable speed generators, wind energy

Rajveer Mittal; K. S. Sandhu; D. K. Jain

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Scatterometer Observations at High Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite scatterometer winds are commonly validated by comparing them to buoy observations and/or numerical model surface wind analyses. However, the empirical scatterometer algorithm (geophysical model function) has been calibrated against a ...

Lixin Zeng; Robert A. Brown

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A Short-Term Ensemble Wind Speed Forecasting System for Wind Power Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study develops an adaptive, blended forecasting system to provide accurate wind speed forecasts 1 h ahead of time for wind power applications. The system consists of an ensemble of 21 forecasts with different configurations of the Weather ...

Justin J. Traiteur; David J. Callicutt; Maxwell Smith; Somnath Baidya Roy

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Echo-state-network-based real-time wind speed estimation for wind power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbine generators (WTGs) are usually equipped with one or more well-calibrated anemometers to measure wind speed for system monitoring, control, and protection. The use of these mechanical sensors increases the cost and hardware complexity and ...

Wei Qiao

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Wind Speeds at Heights Crucial for Wind Energy: Measurements and Verification of Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speed measurements from one year from meteorological towers and wind turbines at heights between 20 and 250 m for various European sites are analyzed and are compared with operational short-term forecasts of the global ECMWF model. The ...

Susanne Drechsel; Georg J. Mayr; Jakob W. Messner; Reto Stauffer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Technique for Deducing Wind Direction from Satellite Microwave Measurements of Wind Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is presented to deduce wind direction from satellite microwave measurements of wind speed information. The technique, based on simple Ekman boundary layer dynamics, makes use of surface pressure fields routinely analyzed at the ...

Tsann-wang Yu

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Development of Wind Speed Forecasting Model Based on the Weibull Probability Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind is a variable energy source. The power output of a wind turbine generator (WTG) unit, therefore, fluctuates with wind speed variations. Accurate models reflecting the variability of wind speed is hence required in both reliability evaluation of ... Keywords: Wind Energy, Wind Speed Forecasting Model, Weibull Distribution, Maximum Likelihood Method, Time Series Model

Ruigang Wang; Wenyi Li; B. Bagen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at larger heights above ground level? The wind resource at a wind farm can be estimated in two ways: by measurement or by modeling

66

Review of Weibull Statistics for Estimation of Wind Speed Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical distribution commonly used for describing measured wind speed data is the Weibull distribution. A review of the methods found in the statistical literature for the purpose of estimation of the parameters in Weibull distributions is ...

K. Conradsen; L. B. Nielsen; L. P. Prahm

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Weibull Statistics of Wind Speed over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The probability distribution of wind speed data over the world's oceans is studied using a two-parameter Weibull distribution. The parameters are estimated following a linearized least-squares approach. The seasonal and latitudinal variation are ...

Edgar G. Pavia; James J. O'Brien

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Global Estimates of Extreme Wind Speed and Wave Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-term dataset of satellite altimeter measurements of significant wave height and wind speed, spanning 23 years, is analyzed to determine extreme values corresponding to a 100-yr return period. The analysis considers the suitability of both ...

J. Vinoth; I. R. Young

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

File:CV WindSpeed.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WindSpeed.pdf WindSpeed.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Cape Verde-Map Summarizing Average Wind Speed (m/s) Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 246 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Cape Verde-Map Summarizing Average Wind Speed (m/s) Sources ECOWAS Creation Date 2011/11/14 Coordinates 16.002082°, -24.013197° File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 11:43, 14 November 2011 Thumbnail for version as of 11:43, 14 November 2011 1,650 × 1,275 (246 KB) STobin (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information)

70

Modelling the Vertical Wind Speed and Turbulence Intensity Profiles at Prospective Offshore Wind Farm Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monin-Obukhov theory predicts the well-known log-linear form of the vertical wind speed profile. A turbulence intensity profile can be estimated from this by assuming that the standard deviation of the wind speed is proportional to the friction velocity. Two parameters, namely the aerodynamic surface roughness length and the MoninObukhov length, are than needed to predict the vertical wind speed and turbulence intensity profiles from a measurement at one height. Different models to estimate these parameters for conditions important for offshore wind energy utilisation are compared and tested: Four models for the surface roughness and three methods to derive the Monin-Obukov-length from measurements. They have been tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rdsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind speed to 50 m height and comparing it with the measured 50 m wind speed.

Bernhard Lange; Søren Larsen; Jørgen Højstrup; Rebecca Barthelmie; Ulrich Focken

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Wind Monitoring Report for Fort Wainwright's Donnelly Training Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the wind data collected at a location in Fort Wainwright’s Donnelly Training Area (DTA) near the Cold Regions Test Center (CRTC) test track, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the gross and net energy productions that proposed turbine models would have produced exposed to the wind resource measured at the meteorological tower (met tower) location during the year of measurement. Calculations are based on the proposed turbine models’ standard atmospheric conditions power curves, the annual average wind speeds, wind shear estimates, and standard industry assumptions.

Orrell, Alice C.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

72

The amount of power in the wind is very dependent on the speed of the wind. Because the power in the wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of power in the wind is very dependent on the speed of the wind. Because the power in the wind is proportional to the cube of the wind speed, small differences in the wind speed make a big. This gives rise to the primary reason for wind re- source assessment. In order to more accurately predict

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

73

Reference wind speed distributions and height profiles for wind turbine design and performance evaluation applications. [USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a set of reference or standard values of wind profiles, wind speed distributions and their effects on wind turbine performance for engineering design applications. Based on measured Weibull distribution parameters, representative average, low, and high variance data are given for height profiles of mean, 25 percentile, and 75 percentile wind speeds; and for wind speed probability density (velocity frequency) functions and cumulative probability (velocity duration) functions at selected heights. Results of a sensitivity analysis of the dependence of wind turbine performance parameters on cut-in speed, and rated speed for various mean wind and wind variance regimes are also presented. Wind turbine performance is expressed in terms of capacity factor (ratio of mean power output to rated power) and recovery factor (ratio of mean energy output to energy theoretically available in the wind). The representative high, mean, and low variance cases were determined from calculated Weibull distributions at 140 sites across the Continental U.S., and all of the representative functions are evaluated at mean wind speeds of 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 m/s at standard 10 m level.

Justus, C.G.; Hargraves, W.R.; Mikhail, A.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

System and method for upwind speed based control of a wind turbine ...  

A method for controlling power output of a wind turbine generator in response to an anticipated change in wind speed is provided. The method includes sensing wind ...

75

The Influence of Wind Speed on Shallow Marine Cumulus Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of wind speed on shallow marine cumulus convection is explored using large-eddy simulations and concepts from bulk theory. Focusing on cases characteristic of the trades, the equilibrium trade wind layer is found to be deeper at stronger ...

Louise Nuijens; Bjorn Stevens

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Correlation of Real and Model Wind Speeds in Different Terrains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speeds over a 6-month period from 21 surface stations, 3 upper-wind stations, and 2 different models are compared. Similar data are used for three different topographic regions of New Zealand broadly classed as having low, moderate, and high ...

Steve J. Reid; Richard Turner

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Short term wind speed forecasting with evolved neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about climate change, energy security and the volatility of the price of fossil fuels has led to an increased demand for renewable energy. With wind turbines being one of the most mature renewable energy technologies available, the global use ... Keywords: forecasting, renewable energy, wind-speed

David Corne; Alan Reynolds; Stuart Galloway; Edward Owens; Andrew Peacock

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Comparison of Synthetic Aperture Radar–Derived Wind Speeds with Buoy Wind Speeds along the Mountainous Alaskan Coast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) offers the potential for remotely sensing surface wind speed both over the open sea and in close proximity to the coast. The resolution improvement of SAR over scatterometers is of particular ...

C. M. Fisher; G. S. Young; N. S. Winstead; J. D. Haqq-Misra

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Solar Wind Helium Abundance: Variation with Wind Speed and the Solar Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Wind Helium Abundance: Variation with Wind Speed and the Solar Cycle Matthias R. Aellig Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM 87545 Abstract We investigate the helium abundance in the solar wind of 1994 and early 2000 are analyzed. In agreement with similar work for previous solar cycles, we find

Richardson, John

80

Short-term wind speed forecasting based on a hybrid model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind power is currently one of the types of renewable energy with a large generation capacity. However, operation of wind power generation is very challenging because of the intermittent and stochastic nature of the wind speed. Wind speed forecasting ... Keywords: Forecasting, RBF neural networks, Seasonal adjustment, Wavelet transform, Wind speed

Wenyu Zhang, Jujie Wang, Jianzhou Wang, Zengbao Zhao, Meng Tian

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Ugashik, AK (2001 - 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278290 Varnish cache server Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Ugashik, AK (2001 - 2002) Dataset Summary Description Wind data collected from Ugashik Traditional Village in Alaska from an anemometer as part of the Native American anemometer loan program. Monthly mean wind speed is available for 2001 through 2002, as is wind direction and turbulence data. Data is reported from a height of 20 m. The data was originally made available by Wind Powering America, a DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) program. A dynamic map displaying all available data from DOE anemometer loan programs is available http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/anemometerloans/projects.asp.

82

Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Tanana, AK (2001 - 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 40 Varnish cache server Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Tanana, AK (2001 - 2002) Dataset Summary Description Wind data collected from Tanana Village in Alaska from an anemometer as part of the Native American anemometer loan program. Monthly mean wind speed is available for 2001 through 2002, as is wind direction and turbulence data. Data is reported from a height of 20 m. The data was originally made available by Wind Powering America, a DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) program. A dynamic map displaying all available data from DOE anemometer loan programs is available http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/anemometerloans/projects.asp. Source EERE Date Released November 09th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated November 09th, 2010 (4 years ago)

83

Empirical-Statistical Method to Estimate the Surface Wind Speed over Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An empirical-statistical method to estimate surface wind speed over complex terrain under strong wind condition is proposed. This method is based on the postulation that the surface wind speed depends on a surface roughness parameter and a ...

Hiromi Yamazawa; Junsei Kondo

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Empirical Models of the Probability Distribution of Sea Surface Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study considers the probability distribution of sea surface wind speeds, which have historically been modeled using the Weibull distribution. First, non-Weibull structure in the observed sea surface wind speeds (from SeaWinds observations) ...

Adam Hugh Monahan

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Variable-Speed Wind System Design : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Almost from the onset of the development of wind energy conversion systems (WECS), it was known that variable-speed operation of the turbine would maximize energy capture. This study was commissioned to assess the cost, efficiency gain, reduction of the cost of energy (COE), and other operating implications of converting the existing hardware of a modern fixed-speed wind energy conversion system to variable-speed operation. The purpose of this study was to develop a preliminary design for the hardware required to allow variable-speed operation using a doubly-fed generator with an existing fixed-speed wind turbine design. The turbine selected for this study is the AWT-26 designed and built by Advanced Wind Turbines Inc. of Redmond, Washington. The lowest projected COE using this variable-speed generation system is projected to be $0.0499/kWh, compared to the lowest possible COE with fixed-speed generation which is projected to be $0.0546/kWh. This translates into a 8.6% reduction of the COE using this variable-speed generation option. The preliminary system design has advanced to where the printed circuit boards can be physically laid out based on the schematics and the system software can be written based on the control flow-charts. The core of hardware and software has been proven to be successful in earlier versions of VSG systems. The body of this report presents the results of the VSWG system development. Operation under normal and fault conditions is described in detail, the system performance for variable-speed operation is estimated and compared to the original fixed-speed system performance, and specifications for all system components (generator, power electronic converter, and system controller) are given. Costs for all components are estimated, and incremental system cost is compared to incremental energy production. Finally, operational features of the VSWG which are not available in the existing FSWG system are outlined.

Lauw, Hinan K.; Weigand, Claus H.; Marckx, Dallas A.; Electronic Power Conditioning, Inc.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

1. Wind-splash erosion 4. Relationships between rainfall intensity, wind-speed, wind direction and erosion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Wind-splash erosion 4. Relationships between rainfall intensity, wind-speed, wind direction and erosion 5. Longer term influence of wind-direction on landscape evolution 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1 of tubes at approximately two week intervals. Contour plots of rainfall intensity (mm/hr) against wind

87

Simulation of wind-speed time series for wind-energy conversion analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to investigate operating characteristics of a wind energy conversion system it is often desirable to have a sequential record of wind speeds. Sometimes a long enough actual data record is not available at the time an analysis is needed. This may be the case if, e.g., data are recorded three times a day at a candidate wind turbine site, and then the hourly performance of generated power is desired. In such cases it is often possible to use statistical characteristics of the wind speed data to calibrate a stochastic model and then generate a simulated wind speed time series. Any length of record may be simulated by this method, and desired system characteristics may be studied. A simple wind speed simulation model, WEISIM, is developed based on the Weibull probability distribution for wind speeds with a correction based on the lag-one autocorrelation value. The model can simulate at rates from one a second to one an hour, and wind speeds can represent short-term averages (e.g., 1-sec averages) or longer-term averages (e.g., 1-min or 1 hr averages). The validity of the model is verified with PNL data for both histogram characteristics and persistance characteristics.

Corotis, R.B.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Wisconsin Low Wind Speed Turbine Project First- and Second-Year Operating Experience: 1998-2000: U.S. Department of Energy-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1.2 MW Low Wind Speed Turbine Project (LWSTP) -- installed in Glenmore, Wisconsin, in early 1998 -- was the first commercial-scale wind project in Wisconsin. This report describes the first- and second-year operating experience at the LWSTP. The lessons learned in the project will be valuable to other utilities planning similar wind power projects, particularly in cold-weather, moderate wind resource areas.

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Trimont Area Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trimont Area Wind Farm Trimont Area Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Trimont Area Wind Farm Facility Trimont Area Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser Great River Energy Location Southwest MN MN Coordinates 43.779594°, -94.852874° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.779594,"lon":-94.852874,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Manual and Semiautomated Wind Direction Editing for Use in the Generation of Synthetic Aperture Radar Wind Speed Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies have demonstrated that satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be used as an accurate scatterometer, yielding wind speed fields with subkilometer resolution. This wind speed generation is only possible, however, if a ...

George S. Young; Todd D. Sikora; Nathaniel S. Winstead

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

An Optical Disdrometer for Use in High Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new optical disdrometer has been developed that is optimized for use in high wind speeds, for example, on board ships. The minimal detectable size of droplets is 0.35 mm. Each drop is measured separately with regard to its size and residence ...

Martin Grossklaus; Klaus Uhlig; Lutz Hasse

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Mechanism for the Increase of Wind Stress (Drag) Coefficient with Wind Speed over Water Surfaces: A Parametric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mechanism is proposed for a physical explanation of the increase in wind stress (drag) coefficient with wind speed over water surfaces. The formula explicitly incorporates the contribution of both winds and waves through the parameterizations ...

S. A. Hsu

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE GENERATORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind energy is considered as the most viable renewable energy options. In a renewable energy system more energy from the wind. One of the options is to use the variable speed wind turbine-speed wind turbine system for transient studies are discussed in this paper. The performance of wind energy

94

Analysis of Wind Speed Measurements using Continuous Wave LIDAR for Wind Turbine Control ?†  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurate the incoming wind field can be measured. This study examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuouswave Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feedforward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth, with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Nomenclature d measurement preview distance F focal distance k wind velocity wavenumber (m?1) r scan radius for spinning LIDAR RMS root mean square ?u standard deviation of u component of wind velocity TI turbulence intensity ? LIDAR measurement angle ? mean u wind speed u ? friction velocity U ? D average friction velocity over rotor disk ? angle between laser and wind velocity vector ? angle in the rotor plane ? rotational rate of spinning LIDAR

Eric Simley; Lucy Y. Pao; Rod Frehlich; Bonnie Jonkman; Neil Kelley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Influence of Bubbles on Ambient Noise in the Ocean at High Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of ambient noise in the ocean at high wind speeds reveal significant departures in spectral shape from previously reported values at lower wind speeds. The observations were made in open ocean conditions in Queen Charlotte Sound, ...

David M. Farmer; David D. Lemon

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Modeling and design of control system for variable speed wind turbine in all operating region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to get the maximum power from the wind, the variable-speed wind turbine should run at different speed when wind speed changes. In this paper a control system is introduced to get this purpose base on establishing the three-mass model of the ... Keywords: doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG), feed-forward compensator, loop-shaping, pitch controller, speed controller, three-mass model, wind turbine

Wu Dingguo; Wang Zhixin

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A neural network control strategy for improved energy capture on a variable-speed wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pitch control has so far been the dominating method for power control in modern variable speed wind turbines. This paper proposes an improved control technique for pitching the blades of a variable speed wind turbine, using Artificial Neural Networks ... Keywords: artificial neural networks, control trajectories, pitch control, variable-speed wind turbines

António F. Silva; Fernando A. Castro; José N. Fidalgo

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Systematic Controller Design Methodology for Variable-Speed Wind Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three operational regions. This paper provides a guide for controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship between the two opposing metrics is easily visualized.

Hand, M. M.; Balas, M. J.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

One-Month Ahead Prediction of Wind Speed and Output Power Based on EMD and LSSVM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speed is a kind of non-stationary time series, it is difficult to construct the model for accurate forecast. The way improving accuracy of the model for predicting wind speed up to one-month ahead has been investigated using measured data recorded ... Keywords: wind speed forecasting, empirical mode decomposition(EMD), least square support vector machine (LSSVM), intrinsic mode function(IFM), wind power

Wang Xiaolan; Li Hui

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Model Simulations Examining the Relationship of Lake-Effect Morphology to Lake Shape, Wind Direction, and Wind Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Idealized model simulations with an isolated elliptical lake and prescribed winter lake-effect environmental conditions were used to examine the influences of lake shape, wind speed, and wind direction on the mesoscale morphology. This study ...

Neil F. Laird; John E. Walsh; David A. R. Kristovich

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Error Estimates for Ocean Surface Winds: Applying Desroziers Diagnostics to the Cross-Calibrated, Multiplatform Analysis of Wind Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desroziers diagnostics (DD) are applied to the cross-calibrated, multi-platform (CCMP) ocean surface wind data sets to estimate wind speed errors of the ECMWF background, the microwave satellite observations and the resulting CCMP analysis. ...

Ross N. Hoffman; Joseph V. Ardizzone; S. Mark Leidner; Deborah K. Smith; Robert Atlas

102

Neuroadaptive speed assistance control of wind turbine with variable ratio gearbox (VRG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind power as a renewable energy source is irregular in occurrence. It is interesting yet challenging to maximize the energy capture from wind. Most existing control methods for wind power generation are traditionally based on wind turbine with fixed ... Keywords: PMSM, neuroadaptive control, speed regulation, wind turbine

Xue-fei Wang; Yong-duan Song; Dan-yong Li; Kai Zhang; Shan Xue; Ming Qin

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Pitch-Controlled Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pitch-Controlled Variable-Speed Pitch-Controlled Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Generation February 2000 * NREL/CP-500-27143 E. Muljadi and C.P. Butterfield Presented at the 1999 IEEE Industry Applications Society Annual Meeting Phoenix, Arizona October 3-7, 1999 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

104

Measurement strategies for estimating long-term average wind speeds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The uncertainty and bias in estimates of long-term average wind speeds inherent in continuous and intermittent measurement strategies are examined by simulating the application of the strategies to 40 data sets. Continuous strategies have smaller uncertainties for fixed duration measurement programs, but intermittent strategies make more efficient use of instruments and have smaller uncertainties for a fixed amount of instrument use. Continuous strategies tend to give biased estimates of the long-term annual mean speed unless an integral number of years' data is collected or the measurement program exceeds 3 years in duration. Intermittent strategies with three or more month-long measurement periods per year do not show any tendency toward bias.

Ramsdell, J.V.; Houston, S.; Wegley, H.L.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Stability analysis of a variable-speed wind turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the elastomechanical stability of a four-bladed wind turbine over a specific rotor speed range. Stability modes, frequencies, and dampings are extracted using a specialized modal processor developed at NREL that post-processes the response data generated by the ADAMS simulation code. The processor can analyze a turbine with an arbitrary number of rotor blades and offers a novel capability of isolating stability modes that become locked at a single frequency. Results indicate that over a certain rotor speed range, the tower lateral mode and the rotor regressive in-plane mode coalesce, resulting in a self-excited instability. Additional results show the effect of tower and nacelle parameters on the stability boundaries.

Bir, G.S.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Homogenization and Trend Analysis of Canadian Near-Surface Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-surface wind speeds recorded at 117 stations in Canada for the period from 1953 to 2006 were analyzed in this study. First, metadata and a logarithmic wind profile were used to adjust hourly wind speeds measured at nonstandard anemometer ...

Hui Wan; Xiaolan L. Wang; Val R. Swail

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Sliding Mode Power Control of Variable Speed Wind Energy Conversion Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sliding Mode Power Control of Variable Speed Wind Energy Conversion Systems B. Beltran, T. Ahmed power generation in variable speed wind energy conversion systems (VS-WECS). These systems have two (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) wind turbine simulator FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures

Brest, Université de

108

Pitch angle control in wind turbines above the rated wind speed by multi-layer perceptron and radial basis function neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In wind energy conversion systems, one of the operational problems is the changeability and discontinuity of wind. In most cases, wind speed can fluctuate rapidly. Hence, quality of produced energy becomes an important problem in wind energy conversion ... Keywords: Neural network-based controller, Pitch control, Variable-speed wind turbine, Wind energy conversion systems

Ahmet Serdar Yilmaz; Zafer Özer

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Wind-hydrogen energy systems for remote area power supply.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind-hydrogen systems for remote area power supply are an early niche application of sustainable hydrogen energy. Optimal direct coupling between a wind turbine and an… (more)

Janon, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Solar wind acceleration in coronal holes. [High speed solar wind streams  

SciTech Connect

Past attempts to explain the large solar wind velocities in high speed streams by theoretical models of the expansion have invoked either extended nonthermal heating of the corona, heat flux inhibition, or direct addition of momentum to the expanding coronal plasma. Several workers have shown that inhibiting the heat flux at low coronal densities is probably not adequate to explain quantitatively the observed plasma velocities in high speed streams. It stressed that, in order to account for both these large plasma velocities and the low densities found in coronal holes (from which most high speed streams are believed to emanate), extended heating by itself will not suffice. One needs a nonthermal mechanism to provide the bulk acceleration of the high wind plasma close to the sun, and the most likely candidate at present is direct addition of the momentum carried by outward-propagating waves to the expanding corona. Some form of momentum addition appears to be absolutely necessary if one hopes to build quantitatively self-consistent models of coronal holes and high speed solar wind streams.

Kopp, R.A.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from the KAMMWASP studies for Kenya.

The KAMMWAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for...

112

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Nepal.

The KAMMWAsP methodology uses a set of windclasses to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for each wind class, using...

113

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the KAMMWASP studies for Ethiopia.

The KAMMWAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for...

114

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

See supplemental information.

The KAMMWAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for...

115

Effects of turbulence on power generation for variable-speed wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the primary advantages of variable-speed wind turbines over fixed-speed turbines should be improved aerodynamic efficiency. With variable-speed generation, in order to maintain a constant ratio of wind speed to tip speed, the wind turbine changes rotor speed as the wind speed changes. In this paper we compare a stall-controlled, variable-speed wind turbine to a fixed-speed turbine. The focus of this paper is to investigate the effects of variable speed on energy capture and its ability to control peak power. We also show the impact of turbulence on energy capture in moderate winds. In this report, we use a dynamic simulator to apply different winds to a wind turbine model. This model incorporates typical inertial and aerodynamic performance characteristics. From this study we found a control strategy that makes it possible to operate a stall-controlled turbine using variable speed to optimize energy capture and to control peak power. We also found that turbulence does not have a significant impact on energy capture.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Buhl, M.L. Jr.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Variable speed wind turbine generator with zero-sequence filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable speed wind turbine generator system to convert mechanical power into electrical power or energy and to recover the electrical power or energy in the form of three phase alternating current and return the power or energy to a utility or other load with single phase sinusoidal waveform at sixty (60) hertz and unity power factor includes an excitation controller for generating three phase commanded current, a generator, and a zero sequence filter. Each commanded current signal includes two components: a positive sequence variable frequency current signal to provide the balanced three phase excitation currents required in the stator windings of the generator to generate the rotating magnetic field needed to recover an optimum level of real power from the generator; and a zero frequency sixty (60) hertz current signal to allow the real power generated by the generator to be supplied to the utility. The positive sequence current signals are balanced three phase signals and are prevented from entering the utility by the zero sequence filter. The zero sequence current signals have zero phase displacement from each other and are prevented from entering the generator by the star connected stator windings. The zero sequence filter allows the zero sequence current signals to pass through to deliver power to the utility. 14 figs.

Muljadi, E.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

Variable Speed Wind Turbine Generator with Zero-sequence Filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable speed wind turbine generator system to convert mechanical power into electrical power or energy and to recover the electrical power or energy in the form of three phase alternating current and return the power or energy to a utility or other load with single phase sinusoidal waveform at sixty (60) hertz and unity power factor includes an excitation controller for generating three phase commanded current, a generator, and a zero sequence filter. Each commanded current signal includes two components: a positive sequence variable frequency current signal to provide the balanced three phase excitation currents required in the stator windings of the generator to generate the rotating magnetic field needed to recover an optimum level of real power from the generator; and a zero frequency sixty (60) hertz current signal to allow the real power generated by the generator to be supplied to the utility. The positive sequence current signals are balanced three phase signals and are prevented from entering the utility by the zero sequence filter. The zero sequence current signals have zero phase displacement from each other and are prevented from entering the generator by the star connected stator windings. The zero sequence filter allows the zero sequence current signals to pass through to deliver power to the utility.

Muljadi, Eduard (Golden, CO)

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

Variable speed wind turbine generator with zero-sequence filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable speed wind turbine generator system to convert mechanical power into electrical power or energy and to recover the electrical power or energy in the form of three phase alternating current and return the power or energy to a utility or other load with single phase sinusoidal waveform at sixty (60) hertz and unity power factor includes an excitation controller for generating three phase commanded current, a generator, and a zero sequence filter. Each commanded current signal includes two components: a positive sequence variable frequency current signal to provide the balanced three phase excitation currents required in the stator windings of the generator to generate the rotating magnetic field needed to recover an optimum level of real power from the generator; and a zero frequency sixty (60) hertz current signal to allow the real power generated by the generator to be supplied to the utility. The positive sequence current signals are balanced three phase signals and are prevented from entering the utility by the zero sequence filter. The zero sequence current signals have zero phase displacement from each other and are prevented from entering the generator by the star connected stator windings. The zero sequence filter allows the zero sequence current signals to pass through to deliver power to the utility.

Muljadi, Eduard (Golden, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

File:QuikSCAT - Annual Wind Speed at 10 m.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

QuikSCAT - Annual Wind Speed at 10 m.pdf QuikSCAT - Annual Wind Speed at 10 m.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage QuikSCAT - Annual Wind Speed at 10 m Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 1.19 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Title Annual Wind Speed at 10 m Description QuikSCAT - Annual Wind Speed at 10 m Sources NREL, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Extent International Coordinates 0°, 0° Scatterometer measurements of the state of the ocean surface are used to estimate 10-m ocean winds in the QuikSCAT satellite data set. The QuikSCAT data are produced by Remote Sensing Systems and sponsored by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ocean Vector Winds Science

120

A WRF Ensemble for Improved Wind Speed Forecasts at Turbine Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) with 10-km horizontal grid spacing was used to explore improvements in wind speed forecasts at a typical wind turbine hub height (80 m). An ensemble consisting of WRF model simulations with ...

Adam J. Deppe; William A. Gallus Jr.; Eugene S. Takle

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Comparison of Mean Wind Speeds and Turbulence at a Coastal Site and Offshore Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of mean wind speed and longitudinal turbulence at a height of 8 m over the Atlantic ocean, 5 km off Long Island, New York, were compared with simultaneous observations at the beach. Results were grouped into wind direction classes ...

S. SethuRaman; G. S. Raynor

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

An Isofactorial Change-of-Scale Model for the Wind Speed Probability Density Function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind speed probability density function (PDF) is used in a variety of applications in meteorology, oceanography, and climatology usually as a dataset comparison tool of a function of a quantity such as momentum flux or wind power density. The ...

Mark L. Morrissey; Angie Albers; J. Scott Greene; Susan Postawko

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Spatial Predictions of Extreme Wind Speeds over Switzerland Using Generalized Additive Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to present a methodology aimed at predicting extreme wind speeds over Switzerland. Generalized additive models are used to regionalize wind statistics for Swiss weather stations using a number of variables that ...

Christophe Etienne; Anthony Lehmann; Stéphane Goyette; Juan-Ignacio Lopez-Moreno; Martin Beniston

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Low Wind Speed Turbine Development Project Report: November 4, 2002 - December 31, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work conducted by Clipper Windpower under the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine project. The objective of this project was to produce a wind turbine that can lower the cost of energy.

Mikhail, A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh from RisoeDTU Bangladesh from RisoeDTU Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): These data are results from the KAMM/WASP studies for Bangladesh. Version 2 is an updated version of the earlier release and includes an adjustment to Weibull A and k to bring the Atlas values into better agreement with observations. See supplemental information.The KAMM/WAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for each wind class, using KAMM (Karlsruhe Mesoscale Model), is performed and statistics performed on the model output. The result is i. a wind resource map, a summary of the simulated wind climate, and ii. a wind atlas, a summary of the wind climate standardized to flat, uniform roughness terrain. (Purpose): The product is intended to be used to

126

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya from RisoeDTU Kenya from RisoeDTU Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): These data are results from the KAMM/WASP studies for Kenya. The KAMM/WAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for each wind class, using KAMM (Karlsruhe Mesoscale Model), is performed and statistics performed on the model output. The results are a summary of the simulated wind climate, and ii. a wind atlas, a summary of the wind climate standardized to flat, uniform roughness terrain. (Purpose): The product is intended to be used to estimate the wind resource potential in the country including the the spatial variability. This map covers regions where long term measurements are not available. In a sense this is the point of the

127

A variable speed wind generator maximum power tracking based on adaptative neuro-fuzzy inference system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power from wind varies depending on the environmental factors. Many methods have been proposed to locate and track the maximum power point (MPPT) of the wind, such as the fuzzy logic (FL), artificial neural network (ANN) and neuro-fuzzy. In this ... Keywords: ANFIS, MPPT, Power generation, Variable speed wind generator, Wind energy

A. Meharrar; M. Tioursi; M. Hatti; A. Boudghène Stambouli

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The study of multimode power control system for MW variable-speed wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind energy is a viable option to complement other types of pollution-free generation. In the past constant-speed wind turbine is used for the limitation of the control technology and manufacturing technology. But this kind wind turbine has low efficiency ... Keywords: feed-forward compensator, loop-shaping, multimode power control system, pitch controller, speed controller, the shaft system model, wind turbine

Dingguo Wu; Zhixin Wang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Numerical Analysis on the Contribution of Urbanization to Wind Stilling: An Example over the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decline of surface wind speed (wind stilling) has been observed in many regions of the world. The greater Beijing metropolitan area in China is taken as an example for analyzing the urbanization impact on wind stilling. This study set up five ...

Aizhong Hou; Guangheng Ni; Hanbo Yang; Zhidong Lei

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Investigation of the Application of Medium-Voltage Variable-Speed Drive Technology to Improve the Cost of Energy from Low Wind Speed Turbines; Behnke, Erdman and Whitaker Engineering, Inc.  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Behnke, Erdman & Whitaker Engineering, Inc. to test the feasibility of applying medium-voltage variable-speed drive technology to low wind speed turbines.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Can Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds Realistically Represent Wind Speed Distributions? Part II: Quantifying Uncertainties Associated with Distribution Fitting Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing tools represent an attractive proposition for measuring wind speeds over the oceans because, in principle, they also offer a mechanism for determining the spatial variability of flow. Presented here is the continuation of research ...

S. C. Pryor; M. Nielsen; R. J. Barthelmie; J. Mann

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM New Jersey Wind Energy Area W. Musial, D. Elliott, J. Fields, Z. Parker, G. Scott, and C. Draxl National Renewable...

133

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Maryland Wind Energy Area W. Musial, D. Elliott, J. Fields, Z. Parker, G. Scott, and C. Draxl Produced under direction...

134

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia from RisoeDTU Ethiopia from RisoeDTU Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): These data are results from the KAMM/WASP studies for Ethiopia. The KAMM/WAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for each wind class, using KAMM (Karlsruhe Mesoscale Model), is performed and statistics performed on the model output. The results are a summary of the simulated wind climate, and ii.a wind atlas, a summary of the wind climate standardized to flat, uniform roughness terrain. (Purpose): The product is intended to be used to estimate the wind resource potential in the country including the spatial variability. This map covers regions where long term measurements are not available. In a sense this is the point of the mapping exercise, but it also means that verification of results has not been as complete would be ideal. There is some concern that the results may underestimate the resource. However, new measurement data is coming and revisions to the map may be made if necessary as verification is carried out.

135

Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Offshore Wind Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area W. Musial, D. Elliott, J. Fields, Z. Parker, and G. Scott Produced under direction of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement M13PG00002 and Task No WFS3.1000. Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-58091 April 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Analysis of Offshore Wind

136

Standard Deviations of Wind Speed and Direction from Observations over a Smooth Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of wind speed and direction made every minute on a 15 m mast sited on a large expanse of sea ice were analyzed to study the behavior of their standard deviation. The large scatter normally observed under low wind speed and/or non-...

Sylvain M. Joffre; Tuomas Laurila

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Estimating Probabilities of Hurricane Wind Speeds Using a Large-Scale Empirical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method is presented for estimating the probability of exceeding a given wind speed in 1 year at any given location in the Atlantic tropical cyclone basin. The method is especially appropriate for wind speeds with return periods of 100 years ...

R. W. R. Darling

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Hydrogen Sulfide Dispersion Consequences Analysis in Different Wind Speeds: A CFD Based Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen sulfide (h2s) leakage and dispersion from a sulfide recycle installation in different wind speeds are simulated by implementing a 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. H2s concentrations of monitor points which represent dispersion contours ... Keywords: CFD, hydrogen Sulfide, dispersion, concenquences analysis, different wind speeds

Bo Zhang; Guo-ming Chen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Utilization of Automatic Weather Station Data for Forecasting High Wind Speeds at Pegasus Runway, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduced visibility due to blowing snow can severely hinder aircraft operations in the Antarctic. Wind speeds in excess of approximately 7–13 m s?1 can result in blowing snow. The ability to forecast high wind speed events can improve the safety ...

R. E. Holmes; C. R. Stearns; G. A. Weidner; L. M. Keller

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Observed Coherent Trends of Surface and Upper-Air Wind Speed over China since 1960  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies indicated that surface wind speed over China declined during past decades, and several explanations exist in the literature. This study presents long-term (1960–2009) changes of both surface and upper-air wind speeds over China ...

Changgui Lin; Kun Yang; Jun Qin; Rong Fu

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal from RisoeDTU Nepal from RisoeDTU Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): These data are results from the KAMM/WASP studies for Nepal. The KAMM/WAsP methodology uses a set of windclasses to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for each wind class, using KAMM (Karlsruhe Mesoscale Model), is performed and statistics performed on the model output. The results are a summary of the simulated wind climate, and a wind atlas, a summary of the wind climate standardized to flat, uniform roughness terrain. (Purpose): The product is intended to be used to estimate the wind resource potential in the country including the the spatial variability. This map covers regions where long term measurements are not available. In a sense this is the point of the mapping exercise, but it also means that verification of results has not been as complete would be ideal. There is some concern that the results may underestimate the resource. However, new measurement data is coming and revisions to the map may be made if necessary as verification is carried out.

142

An examination of loads and responses of a wind turbine undergoing variable-speed operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has recently developed the ability to predict turbine loads and responses for machines undergoing variable-speed operation. The wind industry has debated the potential benefits of operating wind turbine sat variable speeds for some time. Turbine system dynamic responses (structural response, resonance, and component interactions) are an important consideration for variable-speed operation of wind turbines. The authors have implemented simple, variable-speed control algorithms for both the FAST and ADAMS dynamics codes. The control algorithm is a simple one, allowing the turbine to track the optimum power coefficient (C{sub p}). The objective of this paper is to show turbine loads and responses for a particular two-bladed, teetering-hub, downwind turbine undergoing variable-speed operation. The authors examined the response of the machine to various turbulent wind inflow conditions. In addition, they compare the structural responses under fixed-speed and variable-speed operation. For this paper, they restrict their comparisons to those wind-speed ranges for which limiting power by some additional control strategy (blade pitch or aileron control, for example) is not necessary. The objective here is to develop a basic understanding of the differences in loads and responses between the fixed-speed and variable-speed operation of this wind turbine configuration.

Wright, A.D.; Buhl, M.L. Jr.; Bir, G.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Wind Speeds in ASCE 7 Standard Peak-Gust Map ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The second zone comprises these three states, for which ... implies that the extreme wind climate in Central ... 6 is similar to the wind climates in Central ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

144

Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid Fault Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid Fault by Sigrid M. Bolik Institute of Energy turbine technology has undergone rapid developments. Growth in size and the optimization of wind turbines

Hansen, René Rydhof

145

Adaptive variable structure control law for a variable speed wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of the wind power conversions systems can be greatly improved using an appropriate control algorithm. In this work, an adaptive robust control for a doubly feed induction generator drive for variable speed wind power generation is described. ... Keywords: modeling and simulation, variable structure control, wind turbine control

Oscar Barambones; Jose Maria Gonzalez De Durana; Patxi Alkorta; Jose Antonio Ramos; Manuel De La Sen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

An Examination of Tropical and Extratropical Gust Factors and the Associated Wind Speed Histograms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gust factor, defined as the ratio between a peak wind gust and mean wind speed over a period of time, can be used along with other statistics to examine the structure of the wind. Gust factors are heavily dependent on upstream terrain ...

B. M. Paulsen; J. L. Schroeder

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Control algorithms for effective operation of variable-speed wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a computer code, called ASYM and provides results from its application in simulating the control of the 34-m Test Bed vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) in Bushland, Texas. The code synthesizes dynamic wind speeds on a second-by-second basis in the time domain. The wind speeds conform to a predetermined spectral content governed by the hourly average wind speed that prevails at each hour of the simulation. The hourly average values are selected in a probabilistic sense through the application of Markov chains, but their cumulative frequency of occurrence conforms to a Rayleigh distribution that is governed by the mean annual wind speed of the site selected. The simulated wind speeds then drive a series of control algorithms that enable the code to predict key operational parameters such as number of annual starts and stops, annual energy production, and annual fatigue damage at a critically stressed joint on the wind turbine. This report also presents results from the application of ASYM that pertain to low wind speed cut-in and cut-out conditions and controlled operation near critical speed ranges that excite structural vibrations that can lead to accelerated fatigue damage.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wind Conditions in a Fjord-like Bay and Predictions of Wind Speed Using Neighboring Stations Employing Neural Network Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the applicability of neural networks to estimate wind speeds at various target locations using neighboring reference locations on the South coast of Newfoundland Canada. The stations were chosen to cover a variety of ...

Jens J. Currie; Pierre J. Goulet; Andry W. Ratsimandresy

149

The Characteristics of Wind Velocity that Favor the Fitting of a Weibull Distribution in Wind Speed Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The derivation of the Weibull distribution from the bivariate normal distribution provides theoretical justification for its use in wind speed analysis if four conditions are met. These conditions are that the orthogonal components of horizontal ...

Stanton E. Tuller; Arthur C. Brett

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Maximizing Energy Capture of Fixed-Pitch Variable-Speed Wind Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field tests of a variable-speed, stall-regulated wind turbine were conducted at a US Department of Energy Laboratory. A variable-speed generating system, comprising a doubly-fed generator and series-resonant power converter, was installed on a 275-kW, downwind, two-blade wind turbine. Gearbox, generator, and converter efficiency were measured in the laboratory so that rotor aerodynamic efficiency could be determined from field measurement of generator power. The turbine was operated at several discrete rotational speeds to develop power curves for use in formulating variable-speed control strategies. Test results for fixed-speed and variable-speed operation are presented along with discussion and comparison of the variable-speed control methodologies. Where possible, comparisons between fixed-speed and variable-speed operation are shown.

Pierce, K.; Migliore, P.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Maryland Wind Energy Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of the delineation proposed by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) for the Maryland (MD) WEA and two alternative delineations. The objectives of the NREL evaluation were to assess MEA's proposed delineation of the MD WEA, perform independent analysis, and recommend how the MD WEA should be delineated.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Maryland Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of the delineation proposed by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) for the Maryland (MD) WEA and two alternative delineations. The objectives of the NREL evaluation were to assess MEA's proposed delineation of the MD WEA, perform independent analysis, and recommend how the MD WEA should be delineated.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM New Jersey Wind Energy Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development and evaluation of the delineations for the New Jersey (NJ) WEA. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the New Jersey WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL identified a selection of leasing areas and proposed delineation boundaries within the established NJ WEA. The primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Evaluation Of Models For The Vertical Extrapolation Of Wind Speed Measurements At Offshore Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monin-Obukhov theory predicts the well-known log-linear form of the vertical wind speed profile. Two parameters, namely the aerodynamic surface roughness length and the Monin-Obukhov-length, are needed to predict the vertical wind speed profile from a measurement at one height. Different models to estimate these parameters for conditions important for offshore wind energy utilisation are discussed and tested: Four models for the surface roughness and three methods to derive the Monin-Obukov-length from measurements are compared. They have been tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rdsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind speed to 50 m height and comparing it with the measured 50 m wind speed. The mean

Bernhard Lange; Jørgen Højstrup; Søren Larsen; Rebecca Barthelmie

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Space-Time Wind Speed Forecasting for Improved Power System Dispatch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to support large scale integration of wind power, state-of-the-art wind speed forecasting methods should provide accurate and adequate information to enable efficient scheduling of wind power in electric energy systems. In this article, space-time wind forecasts are incorporated into power system economic dispatch models. First, we proposed a new space-time wind forecasting model, which generalizes and improves upon a so-called regime-switching space-time model by allowing the forecast regimes to vary with the dominant wind direction and with the seasons. Then, results from the new wind forecasting model are implemented into a power system economic dispatch model, which takes into account both spatial and temporal wind speed correlations. This, in turn, leads to an overall more cost-effective scheduling of system-wide wind generation portfolio. The potential economic benefits arise in the system-wide generation cost savings and in the ancillary service cost savings. This is illustrated in a test system in the northwest region of the U.S. Compared with persistent and autoregressive models, our proposed method could lead to annual integration cost savings on the scale of tens of millions of dollars in regions with high wind penetration, such as Texas and the Northwest. Key words: Power system economic dispatch; Power system operation; Space-time statistical model; Wind data; Wind speed forecasting.

Xinxin Zhu; Marc G. Genton; Yingzhong Gu; Le Xie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Toward Objective, Standardized Intensity Estimates from Surface Wind Speed Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme wind climatology and event-specific intensity assessments rely heavily on surface wind field observations. The most widely used platforms sited at airports are the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) and its predecessor, the ...

Forrest J. Masters; Peter J. Vickery; Phuong Bacon; Edward N. Rappaport

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: LIDAR for Turbine Control  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes NREL's subcontract with QinetiQ to conduct a study on LIDAR systems for wind turbines.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for YKHC-Bethel, AK (2003 - 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

YKHC-Bethel, AK (2003 - 2004) YKHC-Bethel, AK (2003 - 2004) Dataset Summary Description Wind data collected from YKHC - Bethel in Alaska from an anemometer as part of the Native American anemometer loan program. Monthly mean wind speed is available for 2003 through 2004, as is wind direction and turbulence data. Data is reported from a height of 20 m. The data was originally made available by Wind Powering America, a DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) program. A dynamic map displaying all available data from DOE anemometer loan programs is available http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/anemometerloans/projects.asp. Source EERE Date Released November 09th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated November 09th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords wind wind direction wind speed

159

Air–Sea Enthalpy and Momentum Exchange at Major Hurricane Wind Speeds Observed during CBLAST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantifying air–sea exchanges of enthalpy and momentum is important for understanding and skillfully predicting tropical cyclone intensity, but the magnitude of the corresponding wind speed–dependent bulk exchange coefficients is largely unknown ...

Michael M. Bell; Michael T. Montgomery; Kerry A. Emanuel

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Air–Sea Enthalpy and Momentum Exchange at Major Hurricane Wind Speeds Observed during CBLAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying air–sea exchanges of enthalpy and momentum is important for understanding and skillfully predicting tropical cyclone intensity, but the magnitude of the corresponding wind speed–dependent bulk exchange coefficients ...

Bell, Michael M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Tests of the Generalized Pareto Distribution for Predicting Extreme Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme wind speed predictions are often based on statistical analysis of site measurements of annual maxima, using one of the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distributions. An alternative method applies one of the Generalized Pareto ...

B. B. Brabson; J. P. Palutikof

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Wind speed forecasting at different time scales: a non parametric approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prediction of wind speed is one of the most important aspects when dealing with renewable energy. In this paper we show a new nonparametric model, based on semi-Markov chains, to predict wind speed. Particularly we use an indexed semi-Markov model, that reproduces accurately the statistical behavior of wind speed, to forecast wind speed one step ahead for different time scales and for very long time horizon maintaining the goodness of prediction. In order to check the main features of the model we show, as indicator of goodness, the root mean square error between real data and predicted ones and we compare our forecasting results with those of a persistence model.

D'Amico, Guglielmo; Prattico, Flavio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Observed Hurricane Wind Speed Asymmetries and Relationships to Motion and Environmental Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wavenumber-1 wind speed asymmetries in 35 hurricanes are quantified in terms of amplitude and phase, based on aircraft observations from 128 individual flights between 1998 and 2011. The impacts of motion and 850-200 mb environmental vertical ...

Eric W. Uhlhorn; Bradley W. Klotz; Tomislava Vukicevic; Paul D. Reasor; Robert F. Rogers

164

A Phenomenological Model for Wind Speed and Shear Stress Profiles in Vegetation Cover Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A phenomenological model for the mean wind speed and Reynolds shear stress profiles with height in a vegetation cover layer is derived from forms suggested by truncation of the equations of turbulent fluid motion at second order in fluctuating ...

F. A. Albini

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A fuzzy logic controller to increase fault ride-through capability of variable speed wind turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuzzy controller for improving Fault Ride-Through (FRT) capability of Variable Speed Wind Turbines (WTs) equipped with Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) is presented. The controller is designed in order to compensate the voltage at the Point of ...

Geev Mokryani, Pierluigi Siano, Antonio Piccolo, Vito Calderaro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Method for Estimation of Surface Roughness and Similarity Function of Wind Speed Vertical Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is aimed at identifying and refining a method suitable to estimate the surface roughness length (z0) and the universal similarity function of the wind speed profile (?M) based on ultrasonic anemometer measurements carried out at only ...

Roberto Sozzi; Maurizio Favaron; Teodoro Georgiadis

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Evaluation of the National Hurricane Center’s Tropical Cyclone Wind Speed Probability Forecast Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tropical cyclone (TC) wind speed probability forecast product developed at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) and adopted by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) is evaluated for U.S. land-threatening and landfalling ...

Michael E. Splitt; Jaclyn A. Shafer; Steven M. Lazarus; William P. Roeder

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Estimation of Wind Speed Distribution Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weibull distribution is the most commonly used statistical distribution for describing wind speed data. Maximum likelihood has traditionally been the main method of estimation for Weibull parameters. In this paper, Markov chain Monte Carlo ...

Wan-Kai Pang; Jonathan J. Forster; Marvin D. Troutt

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wide Area Wind Field Monitoring Status & Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume-scanning elastic has been investigated as a means to derive 3D dynamic wind fields for characterization and monitoring of wind energy sites. An eye-safe volume-scanning lidar system was adapted for volume imaging of aerosol concentrations out to a range of 300m. Reformatting of the lidar data as dynamic volume images was successfully demonstrated. A practical method for deriving 3D wind fields from dynamic volume imagery was identified and demonstrated. However, the natural phenomenology was found to provide insufficient aerosol features for reliable wind sensing. The results of this study may be applicable to wind field measurement using injected aerosol tracers.

Alan Marchant; Jed Simmons

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

On the Accuracy of Monthly Mean Wind Speeds over the Equatorial Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yearlong in situ surface wind measurements at three sites along the Pacific equator (95°, 110°, 152°W) are used to estimate the required number of random observations per month for monthly mean wind speed components accurate to 1.0 and 0.5 m s?. ...

David Halpern

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Tractable Analytic Expressions for the Wind Speed Probability Density Functions Using Expansions of Orthogonal Polynomials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of the two-parameter Weibull function as an estimator of the wind speed probability density function (PDF) is known to be problematic when a high accuracy of fit is required, such as in the computation of the wind power density function. ...

Mark L. Morrissey; J. Scott Greene

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Dynamical Downscaling of Wind Speed in Complex Terrain Prone To Bora-Type Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of numerically modeled wind speed climate, a primary component of wind energy resource assessment in the complex terrain of Croatia, are given. For that purpose, dynamical downscaling of 10 yr (1992–2001) of the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis ...

Kristian Horvath; Alica Baji?; Stjepan Ivatek-Šahdan

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in the Langley 12-Foot Low-Speed Tunnel to study the low-speed stability and control characteristics of a series of four flying wings over an extended range of angle of attack (-8\\deg to 48\\deg). Because of the ...

Fears Scott P.; Ross Holly M.; Moul Thomas M.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Distribution of Extreme Winds in the Bonneville Power Administration Service Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual extreme 1 min wind speeds at 78 Pacific Northwest locations were analyzed using the Fisher-Tippet type II extreme value function. From computed mean recurrence intervals, we could easily determine the wind speed likely to recur in a ...

J. William Wantz; Robert E. Sinclair

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Comparison of Geophysical Model Functions for SAR Wind Speed Retrieval in Japanese Coastal Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This work discusses the accuracies of geophysical model functions (GMFs) for retrieval of sea surface wind speed from satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images in Japanese coastal waters characterized by short fetches and variable atmospheric stability conditions. In situ observations from two validation sites, Hiratsuka and Shirahama, are used for comparison of the retrieved sea surface wind speeds using CMOD (C-band model)4, CMOD_IFR2, CMOD5 and CMOD5.N. Of all the geophysical model functions (GMFs), the latest C-band GMF, CMOD5.N, has the smallest bias and root mean square error at both sites. All of the GMFs exhibit a negative bias in the retrieved wind speed. In order to understand the reason for this bias, all SAR-retrieved wind speeds are separated into two categories: onshore wind (blowing from sea to land) and offshore wind (blowing from land to sea). Only offshore winds were found to exhibit the large negative bias, and short fetches from the coastline may be a possible reason for this. Moreover, it is clarified that in both the unstable and stable conditions, CMOD5.N has atmospheric stability effectiveness, and can keep the same accuracy with CMOD5 in the neutral condition. In short, at the moment, CMOD5.N is thought to be the most promising GMF

Yuko Takeyama; Teruo Ohsawa; Katsutoshi Kozai; Charlotte Bay Hasager; Merete Badger

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The effects of variable speed and drive train component efficiencies on wind turbine energy capture  

SciTech Connect

A wind turbine rotor achieves optimal aerodynamic efficiency at a single tip-speed ratio (TSR). To maintain that optimal TSR and maximize energy capture in the stochastic wind environment, it is necessary to employ variable-speed operation. Conventional constant-speed wind turbines have, in the past, been converted into variable-speed turbines by attaching power electronics to the conventional induction generator and gearbox drive train. Such turbines have shown marginal, if any, improvement in energy capture over their constant-speed counterparts. These discrepancies have been shown to be the result of drive train components that are not optimized for variable-speed operation. Traditional drive trains and power electronic converters are designed to achieve maximum efficiency at full load and speed. However, the main energy producing winds operate the turbine at light load for long periods of time. Because of this, significant losses to efficiency occur. This investigation employs a quasi-static model to demonstrate the dramatic effect that component efficiency curves can have on overall annual energy capture.

Fingersh, L.J.; Robinson, M.C.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Wind flow modeling for wind energy analysis of the Nellis Dunes area in Nevada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A wind energy analysis of the Nellis Dunes area in Nevada was conducted. A DEM file which contains the elevation data was used to generate… (more)

Rangegowda, Upendra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Fixed-Speed and Variable-Slip Wind Turbines Providing Spinning Reserves to the Grid: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the level of wind penetration increases, wind turbine technology must move from merely generating power from wind to taking a role in supporting the bulk power system. Wind turbines should have the capability to provide inertial response and primary frequency (governor) response so they can support the frequency stability of the grid. To provide governor response, wind turbines should be able to generate less power than the available wind power and hold the rest in reserve, ready to be accessed as needed. This paper explores several ways to control wind turbine output to enable reserve-holding capability. This paper focuses on fixed-speed (also known as Type 1) and variable-slip (also known as Type 2) turbines.

Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CONSTRAINING HIGH-SPEED WINDS IN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES THROUGH OBSERVATIONS OF ANOMALOUS DOPPLER SHIFTS DURING TRANSIT  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional (3D) dynamical models of hot Jupiter atmospheres predict very strong wind speeds. For tidally locked hot Jupiters, winds at high altitude in the planet's atmosphere advect heat from the day side to the cooler night side of the planet. Net wind speeds on the order of 1-10 km s{sup -1} directed towards the night side of the planet are predicted at mbar pressures, which is the approximate pressure level probed by transmission spectroscopy. These winds should result in an observed blueshift of spectral lines in transmission on the order of the wind speed. Indeed, Snellen et al. recently observed a 2 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1} blueshift of CO transmission features for HD 209458b, which has been interpreted as a detection of the day-to-night (substellar to anti-stellar) winds that have been predicted by 3D atmospheric dynamics modeling. Here, we present the results of a coupled 3D atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model, which predicts the Doppler-shifted spectrum of a hot Jupiter during transit resulting from winds in the planet's atmosphere. We explore four different models for the hot Jupiter atmosphere using different prescriptions for atmospheric drag via interaction with planetary magnetic fields. We find that models with no magnetic drag produce net Doppler blueshifts in the transmission spectrum of {approx}2 km s{sup -1} and that lower Doppler shifts of {approx}1 km s{sup -1} are found for the higher drag cases, results consistent with-but not yet strongly constrained by-the Snellen et al. measurement. We additionally explore the possibility of recovering the average terminator wind speed as a function of altitude by measuring Doppler shifts of individual spectral lines and spatially resolving wind speeds across the leading and trailing terminators during ingress and egress.

Miller-Ricci Kempton, Eliza [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rauscher, Emily, E-mail: ekempton@ucolick.org [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

High speed air pneumatic wind shield wiping design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this creative design process a number of designs were constructed, implemented and tested in order to assess the feasibility of using high speed to create a curtain to repel the rain from the automobile windshield instead ...

Heyward, Moses A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Session: What can we learn from developed wind resource areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was composed of two parts intended to examine what existing science tells us about wind turbine impacts at existing wind project sites. Part one dealt with the Altamont Wind Resource area, one of the older wind projects in the US, with a paper presented by Carl Thelander titled ''Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part 1''. Questions addressed by the presenter included: how is avian habitat affected at Altamont and do birds avoid turbine sites; are birds being attracted to turbine strings; what factors contribute to direct impacts on birds by wind turbines at Altamont; how do use, behavior, avoidance and other factors affect risk to avian species, and particularly impacts those species listed as threatened, endangered, or of conservation concern, and other state listed species. The second part dealt with direct impacts to birds at new generation wind plants outside of California, examining such is sues as mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts from terrestrial wind projects, species and numbers killed per turbine rates/MW generated, impacts to listed threatened and endangered species, to USFWS Birds of Conservation Concern, and to state listed species. This session focused on newer wind project sites with a paper titled ''Bird Fatality and Risk at New Generation Wind Projects'' by Wally Erickson. Each paper was followed by a discussion/question and answer period.

Thelander, Carl; Erickson, Wally

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Influence of Boundary Layer Processes on the Diurnal Variation of the Climatological Near-Surface Wind Speed Probability Distribution over Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the diurnally varying land surface wind speed probability distribution is essential for surface flux estimation and wind power management. Global observations indicate that the surface wind speed probability density function (PDF) is ...

Yanping He; Norman A. McFarlane; Adam H. Monahan

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Adaptive pitch control for variable speed wind turbines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An adaptive method for adjusting blade pitch angle, and controllers implementing such a method, for achieving higher power coefficients. Average power coefficients are determined for first and second periods of operation for the wind turbine. When the average power coefficient for the second time period is larger than for the first, a pitch increment, which may be generated based on the power coefficients, is added (or the sign is retained) to the nominal pitch angle value for the wind turbine. When the average power coefficient for the second time period is less than for the first, the pitch increment is subtracted (or the sign is changed). A control signal is generated based on the adapted pitch angle value and sent to blade pitch actuators that act to change the pitch angle of the wind turbine to the new or modified pitch angle setting, and this process is iteratively performed.

Johnson, Kathryn E. (Boulder, CO); Fingersh, Lee Jay (Westminster, CO)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

186

Secular Change in Reported Surface Wind Speeds over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set reveals that mean scalar winds decreased between 1854 and 1920 and increased since World War II. The latter increase is due to a change in estimating procedure and to the growing proportion of ships ...

C. S. Ramage

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Extrapolation of Vertical Profiles of Wind Speed within the Marine Atmospheric Surface layer Using the p Formula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Values of p for the exponent-type wind profile formulation, used in vertical extrapolations of wind speed, were derived for the marine atmospheric surface layer. Nomograms were constructed providing p values as dependent on a single elevation ...

M. Segal; R. A. Pielke

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Wind Plant Capacity Credit Variations: A Comparison of Results Using Multiyear Actual and Simulated Wind-Speed Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although it is widely recognized that variations in annual wind energy capture can be significant, it is not clear how significant this effect is on accurately calculating the capacity credit of a wind plant. An important question is raised concerning whether one year of wind data is representative of long-term patterns. This paper calculates the range of capacity credit measures based on 13 years of actual wind-speed data. The results are compared to those obtained with synthetic data sets that are based on one year of data. Although the use of synthetic data sets is a considerable improvement over single-estimate techniques, this paper finds that the actual inter- annual variation in capacity credit is still understated by the synthetic data technique.

Milligan, Michael

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Power-Electronic, Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Development: 1988-1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A five-year development program culminated in the 33M-VS power-electronic, variable-speed turbine, used in a number of wind power plants to offer competitively priced electricity. This report describes turbine development activities from conception through field testing, highlights design decisions that led to the new technology, and provides an overview of the turbine's electrical and mechanical design. An appendix describes technical issues relevant to building a wind power plant using 33M-VS turbines.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

190

Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Pascua Yaqui, AZ (2003 - 2004)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pascua Yaqui, AZ (2003 - 2004) Pascua Yaqui, AZ (2003 - 2004) Dataset Summary Description Wind data collected from Pascua Yaqui Indian Reservation in Arizona from an anemometer as part of the Native American anemometer loan program. Monthly mean wind speed is available for 2003 through 2004, as is wind direction and turbulence data. Data is reported from a height of 20 m. The data was originally made available by Wind Powering America, a DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) program. A dynamic map displaying all available data from DOE anemometer loan programs is available http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/anemometerloans/projects.asp. Source EERE Date Released December 02nd, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated December 02nd, 2010 (3 years ago) Keywords wind

191

Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Quinault #3, WA (2004 - 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quinault #3, WA (2004 - 2005) Quinault #3, WA (2004 - 2005) Dataset Summary Description Wind data collected from Quinault Indian Reservation in Washington from an anemometer as part of the Native American anemometer loan program. Monthly mean wind speed is available for 2004 through 2005, as is wind direction and turbulence data. Data is reported from a height of 20 m. The data was originally made available by Wind Powering America, a DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) program. A dynamic map displaying all available data from DOE anemometer loan programs is available http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/anemometerloans/projects.asp. Source EERE Date Released December 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated December 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords wind

192

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Integrated Wind Energy/Desalination System; General Electric Global Research  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with General Electric Global Research to explore wind power as a desirable option for integration with desalination technologies.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

On the Maximum Observed Wind Speed in a Randomly Sampled Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in detecting a long-term trend in hurricane intensity possibly related to large-scale ocean warming. This effort is complicated by the paucity of wind speed measurements for hurricanes occurring in the early part of ...

Andrew R. Solow

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Optimal Power-Law Description of Oceanic Whitecap Coverage Dependence on Wind Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optimal power-law expression for the dependence of oceanic whitecap coverage fraction W on 10 m elevation wind speed U as determined by ordinary least squares fitting applied to the combined whitecap data sets of Monahan (1971) and Toba and ...

Edward C. Monahan; IognáidÓ Muircheartaigh

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Trends in Wind Speed at Wind Turbine Height of 80 m over the Contiguous United States Using the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trends in wind speed at a typical wind turbine hub height (80 m) are analyzed using the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) dataset for 1979–2009. A method, assuming the wind profile in the lower boundary layer as power-law functions of ...

Eric Holt; Jun Wang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Model of variable speed constant frequency double fed wind power generation system and analysis of its operating performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structure of variable speed constant frequency double fed wind power generation system (WPGS) was analyzed, and its model was established. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control, constant power control and vector control for WPGS were discussed. ... Keywords: operating performance, variable speed constant frequency, vector control, wind power generation system

Pan Tinglong; Ji Zhicheng

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Using a new characterization of turbulent wind for accurate correlation of wind turbine response with wind speed  

SciTech Connect

The turbulence encountered by a point on a rotating wind turbine blade has characteristics that in some important respects are different from those measured by a stationary anemometer. The conventional one-peaked continuous spectrum becomes, broadly, a two-peaked spectrum that in addition contains a set of narrow-band spikes of turbulence energy, one centered on the frequency of rotor rotation and the others centered on multiples of that frequency. The rotational sampling effect on wind spectra is quantified using measurements of wind velocity by anemometers on stationary crosswind circular arrays. Characteristics of fluctuating wind are compared to measured fluctuations of bending moments of the rotor blades and power output fluctuations of a horizontal-axis wind turbine at the same site. The wind characteristics and the correlations between wind fluctuations and wind turbine fluctuations provide a basis for improving turbine design, siting, and control. 6 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Connell, J.R.; George, R.L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Creating Synthetic Wind Speed Time Series for 15 New Zealand Wind Farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind data at time scales from 10 min to 1 h are an important input for modeling the performance of wind farms and their impact on many countries’ national electricity systems. Planners need long-term realistic (i.e., meteorologically spatially and ...

Richard Turner; Xiaogu Zheng; Neil Gordon; Michael Uddstrom; Greg Pearson; Rilke de Vos; Stuart Moore

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Solar wind suprathermal electron Stahl widths across high-speed stream structures  

SciTech Connect

Suprathermal electrons (100-1500 eV) observed in the solar wind typically show a strahl distribution, that is, a beam directed away from the Sun along the magnetic field direction. The strahl width observed at 1 AU is highly variable, ranging from 10-70 degrees. The obsenred finite width of the strahl results from the competition between beam focusing as the interplanetary magnetic field strength drops with distance from the Sun, and pitch-angle scattering as the beam interacts with the solar wind plasma in transit from the sun. Here we examine strahl width, observed with ACE SWEPAM across high-speed stream structures to investigate variations in electron scattering as a function of local plasma characteristics. We find that narrow strahls (less than 20 degrees wide), indicating reduced scattering, are observed within high-speed streams. Narrow strahls are also observed in both very low temperature solar wind, in association with ICMEs. Case studies of high-speed streams typically show the strahl narrowing at the leading edge of the stream. In some cases, the strahl narrows at the reverse shock or pressure wave, in other cases at the stream interface. The narrowing can either occur discontinuously or gradually over a period of hours. Within the high-speed wind, the strahl remains narrow for a period of hours to days, and then gradually broadens. The strahl width is roughly constant at all energies across these structures. For some fraction of high-speed streams, counterstreaming is associated with passage of the corotating interaction region. In these cases, we find the widths of the two counterstreaming beams frequently differ by more than 40 degrees. This dramatic difference in strahl width contrasts with observations in the solar wind as a whole, in which counterstreaming strahls typically differ in width by less than 20 degrees.

Skoug, Ruth M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steinberg, John T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goodrich, Katherine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Brett R [DARTMUTH UNIV.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

SOLAR WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE AS A FUNCTION OF SPEED AND HELIOGRAPHIC LATITUDE: VARIATION THROUGH A SOLAR CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE AS A FUNCTION OF SPEED AND HELIOGRAPHIC LATITUDE: VARIATION THROUGH A SOLAR CYCLE Justin C. Kasper,1 Michael L. Stevens, and Alan J. Lazarus Kavli Institute for Astrophysics of the variation of the relative abundance of helium to hydrogen in the solar wind as a function of solar wind

Richardson, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Correlated solar wind speed, density, and magnetic field changes at J. D. Richardson and C. Wang1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., in press, 2003. Wang, C., and J. D. Richardson, Energy partition between solar wind protons and pickup ionsCorrelated solar wind speed, density, and magnetic field changes at Voyager 2 J. D. Richardson December 2003. [1] The character of the solar wind plasma data observed by Voyager 2 recently changed

Richardson, John

202

Documenting Wind Speed and Power Deficits behind a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-spatial-and-temporal-resolution radial velocity measurements surrounding a single utility-scale wind turbine were collected using the Texas Tech University Ka-band mobile research radars. The measurements were synthesized to construct the ...

Brian D. Hirth; John L. Schroeder

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Profiles of Wind Speed Variances within Nocturnal Low-Level Jets Observed with a Sodar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous sodar measurements of wind profiles have been carried out at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station of the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics since 2008. The station is located in a slightly inhomogeneous rural area about 45 km west of ...

Margarita A. Kallistratova; Rostislav D. Kouznetsov; Valerii F. Kramar; Dmitrii D. Kuznetsov

204

Comparison of Observed 10-m Wind Speeds to Those Based on Monin–Obukhov Similarity Theory Using IHOP_2002 Aircraft and Surface Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons of 10-m above ground level (AGL) wind speeds from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models to point observations consistently show that model daytime wind speeds are slow compared to observations, even after improving model physics ...

Diane Strassberg; Margaret A. LeMone; Thomas T. Warner; Joseph G. Alfieri

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Novel sensorless generator control and grid fault ride-through strategies for variable-speed wind turbines and implementation on a new real-time simulation platform.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The usage of MW-size variable-speed wind turbines as sources of energy has increased significantly during the last decade. Advantages over fixed-speed wind turbines include more… (more)

Yang, Sheng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Temporal trend analyses of alpine data using North American Regional Reanalysis and in situ data: temperature, wind speed, precipitation, and derived blowing snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Across the globe wind speed trends have shown a slight decline for in situ meteorological datasets. Yet few studies have assessed long-term wind speed trends for alpine regions or how such trends could influence snow transport and distribution. ...

Jamie D. Fuller; Nolan Doesken; Kelly Elder; Melinda Laituri; Glen E. Liston

207

A Nonstationary Extreme Value Analysis for the Assessment of Changes in Extreme Annual Wind Speed over the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the extreme annual wind speed in and around the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada) were investigated through a nonstationary extreme value analysis of the annual maximum 10-m wind speed obtained from the North American Regional Reanalysis (...

Y. Hundecha; A. St-Hilaire; T. B. M. J. Ouarda; S. El Adlouni; P. Gachon

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Avian use of Norris Hill Wind Resource Area, Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents results of a study of avian use and mortality in and near a proposed wind resource area in southwestern Montana. Data collected in autumn 1995 through summer 1996 represented preconstruction condition; it was compiled, analyzed, and presented in a format such that comparison with post-construction data would be possible. The primary emphasis of the study was recording avian migration in and near the wind resource area using state-of-the-art marine surveillance radar. Avian use and mortality were investigated during the breeding season by employing traditional avian sampling methods, radiotelemetry, radar, and direct visual observation. 61 figs., 34 tabs.

Harmata, A.; Podruzny, K.; Zelenak, J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Biology Dept.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Property:PotentialOffshoreWindArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialOffshoreWindArea PotentialOffshoreWindArea Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialOffshoreWindArea Property Type Quantity Description The area of potential offshore wind in a place. Use this type to express a quantity of two-dimensional space. The default unit is the square meter (m²). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Square Meters - 1 m²,m2,m^2,square meter,square meters,Square Meter,Square Meters,Sq. Meters,SQUARE METERS Square Kilometers - 0.000001 km²,km2,km^2,square kilometer,square kilometers,square km,square Kilometers,SQUARE KILOMETERS Square Miles - 0.000000386 mi²,mi2,mi^2,mile²,square mile,square miles,square mi,Square Miles,SQUARE MILES Square Feet - 10.7639 ft²,ft2,ft^2,square feet,square foot,FT²,FT2,FT^2,Square Feet, Square Foot

210

Property:PotentialOnshoreWindArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialOnshoreWindArea PotentialOnshoreWindArea Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialOnshoreWindArea Property Type Quantity Description The area of potential onshore wind in a place. Use this type to express a quantity of two-dimensional space. The default unit is the square meter (m²). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Square Meters - 1 m²,m2,m^2,square meter,square meters,Square Meter,Square Meters,Sq. Meters,SQUARE METERS Square Kilometers - 0.000001 km²,km2,km^2,square kilometer,square kilometers,square km,square Kilometers,SQUARE KILOMETERS Square Miles - 0.000000386 mi²,mi2,mi^2,mile²,square mile,square miles,square mi,Square Miles,SQUARE MILES Square Feet - 10.7639 ft²,ft2,ft^2,square feet,square foot,FT²,FT2,FT^2,Square Feet, Square Foot

211

Nonlinear Dual-Mode Control of Variable-Speed Wind Turbines with Doubly Fed Induction Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a feedback/feedforward nonlinear controller for variable-speed wind turbines with doubly fed induction generators. By appropriately adjusting the rotor voltages and the blade pitch angle, the controller simultaneously enables: (a) control of the active power in both the maximum power tracking and power regulation modes, (b) seamless switching between the two modes, and (c) control of the reactive power so that a desirable power factor is maintained. Unlike many existing designs, the controller is developed based on original, nonlinear, electromechanically-coupled models of wind turbines, without attempting approximate linearization. Its development consists of three steps: (i) employ feedback linearization to exactly cancel some of the nonlinearities and perform arbitrary pole placement, (ii) design a speed controller that makes the rotor angular velocity track a desired reference whenever possible, and (iii) introduce a Lyapunov-like function and present a gradient-based approach for mini...

Tang, Choon Yik; Jiang, John N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Development of a 2-MW Direct-Drive Wind Turbine for Low Wind Speed Sites; Northern Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Northern Power Systems (NPS) to develop and evaluate a 2-MW wind turbine that could offer significant opportunities for reducing the cost of energy (COE).

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Solar Wind Sources in the Late Declining Phase of Cycle 23: Effects of the Weak Solar Polar Field on High Speed Streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isenberg, P.A. (eds. ) Solar Wind Nine, AIP Conf. Proc. 471,AT SOLAR MINIMUM Solar Wind Sources in the Late Decliningfor their high speed solar wind streams that dominate the

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Steady decline of east Asian monsoon winds, 19692000: Evidence from direct ground measurements of wind speed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steady decline of east Asian monsoon winds, 1969­2000: Evidence from direct ground measurements winter monsoon but strengthen the summer monsoon, because of stronger warming over high-latitude land with the east Asian monsoon has significantly weakened in both winter and summer in the recent three decades

Chang, Chih-Pei

215

Solar wind iron abundance variations at solar wind speeds > 600 km s/sup -1/, 1972 to 1976  

SciTech Connect

We have analyzed the Fe/H ratios in the peaks of high speed streams (HSS) during the decline of Solar Cycle 20 and the following minimum (October 1972 to December 1976). We utilized the response of the 50 to 200 keV ion channel of the APL/JHU energetic particle experiment (EPE) onIMP-7 and 8 to solar wind iron ions at high solar wind speeds (V greater than or equal to 600 km sec/sup -1/), and compared our Fe measurements with solar wind H and He parameters from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) instruments on the same spacecraft. In general, the Fe distribution parameters (bulk velocity, flow direction, temperature) are found to be similar to the LANL He parameters. Although the average Fe/H ration in many steady HSS peaks agrees within observational uncertainties with the nominal coronal ratio of 4.7 x 10/sup -5/, abundance variations of a factor of up to 6 are obtained across a given coronal-hole associated HSS. There are, as well, factor of 2 variations between stream-averaged abundances for recurent HSS emanating from different coronal holes occurring on the sun on the same solar rotation. flare-related solar wind streams sometimes show Fe/H ratios enhanced by factors of 4 to 5 over coronal-hole associated, quite time streams. Over the period 1973 to 1976, a steady decrease in the average quitetime Fe/H ratio by a ractor approx. 4 is measured on both IMP-7 and 8.

Mitchell, D.G.; Roelof, E.C.; Bame, S.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Design of State-Space-Based Control Algorithms for Wind Turbine Speed Regulation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Control can improve the performance of wind turbines by enhancing energy capture and reducing dynamic loads.At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, we are beginning to design control algorithms for regulation of turbine speed and power using state-space control designs. In this paper, we describe the design of such a control algorithm for regulation of rotor speed in full-load operation (region 3) for a two-bladed wind turbine. We base our control design on simple linear models of a turbine, which contain rotor and generator rotation, drivetrain torsion, and rotor flap degrees of freedom (first mode only). We account for wind-speed fluctuations using disturbance-accommodating control. We show the capability of these control schemes to stabilize the modeled turbine modes via pole placement while using state estimation to reduce the number of turbine measurements that are needed for these control algorithms. We incorporate these controllers into the FAST-AD code and show simulation results for various conditions. Finally, we report conclusions to this work and outline future studies.

Wright, A.; Balas, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Low Wind Speed Technologies Annual Turbine Technology Update (ATTU) Process for Land-Based, Utility-Class Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The Low Wind Speed Technologies (LWST) Project comprises a diverse, balanced portfolio of industry-government partnerships structured to achieve ambitious cost of energy reductions. The LWST Project goal is: ''By 2012, reduce the cost of energy (COE) for large wind systems in Class 4 winds (average wind speed of 5.8 m/s at 10 m height) to 3 cents/kWh (in levelized 2002 dollars) for onshore systems.'' The Annual Turbine Technology Update (ATTU) has been developed to quantify performance-based progress toward these goals, in response to OMB reporting requirements and to meet internal DOE program needs for advisory data.

Schreck, S.; Laxson, A.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Impact of Balancing Areas Size, Obligation Sharing, and Ramping Capability on Wind Integration: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines wind integration costs as a function of balancing area size to determine if the larger system size helps mitigate wind integration cost increases.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Systematic approach for PID controller design for pitch-regulated, variable-speed wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three regions of operation. This paper focuses on controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship of the two opposing metrics is easily visualized. 2 refs., 9 figs.

Hand, M.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Balas, M.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Sciences

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Proposed Flyers Creek Wind Farm, Blayney Local Government Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application reference: MP 08_0252 The Flyers Creek Wind Turbine Awareness Group Inc. (FCWTAG) is comprised of a large group of concerned residents of the Blayney Local Government Area. We object to the Proposed Flyers Creek Wind Farm (“the proposal”) in the strongest possible terms. We believe this development is totally inappropriate. This submission details our objections. The FCWTAG requests that representatives of the group be given the opportunity to speak at the Planning Assessment Commission hearing related to this proposal. Yours faithfully,

Major Development Assessment; Sydney Nsw; Dr. Colleen; J Watts Oam

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Wisconsin Low Wind Speed Turbine Project Third-Year Operating Experience: 2000-2001: U.S. Department of Energy - EPRI Wind Turbine V erification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the third-year operating experience at the 1.2-MW Low Wind Speed Turbine Project (LWSTP) in Glenmore, Wisconsin. The lessons learned in the project will be valuable to other utilities planning similar wind power projects.

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

222

The Impact of Radar Data on Short-Term Forecasts of Surface Temperature, Dewpoint Depression, and Wind Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical system that uses surface observations and radar data to provide 1-, 3-, and 6-h forecasts of temperature, dewpoint depression, and wind speed is developed. Application of the system to independent data demonstrates that the radar ...

Emily K. Grover-Kopec; J. Michael Fritsch

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Retrieval of Surface Wind Speed and Aerosol Optical Depth over the Oceans from AVHRR Images of Sun Glint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of recovering both the tropospheric aerosol loading and the surface wind speed from satellite measurements of the radiance within cloud free regions of sun glint over the ocean surface. The method relies on ...

D. M. O'Brien; R. M. Mitchell

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

An Empirical Model for Predicting the Decay of Tropical Cyclone Wind Speed after Landfall over the Indian Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An empirical model for predicting the maximum surface wind speed associated with a tropical cyclone after crossing the east coast of India is described. The model parameters are determined from the database of 19 recent cyclones. The model is ...

S. K. Roy Bhowmik; S. D. Kotal; S. R. Kalsi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Determination of Surface-Layer Stability and Eddy Fluxes Using Wind Speed and Vertical Temperature Gradient Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical relations are developed that relate the Monin-Obukhov parameter to a modified bulk Richardson number expressed in terms of measured wind speed and vertical temperature difference. Measured Monin-Obukhov parameters and Richardson ...

I. T. Wang

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Development of an Operations and Maintenance Cost Model for LWST; Global Energy Concepts  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Global Energy Concepts to evaluate real-world data on O&M costs and to develop a working model to describe these costs for low wind speed sites.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Low Wind Speed Turbine Project Phase II: The Application of Medium-Voltage Electrical Apparatus to the Class of Variable Speed Multi-Megawatt Low Wind Speed Turbines; 15 June 2004--30 April 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kilowatt ratings of modern wind turbines have progressed rapidly from 50 kW to 1,800 kW over the past 25 years, with 3.0- to 7.5-MW turbines expected in the next 5 years. The premise of this study is simple: The rapid growth of wind turbine power ratings and the corresponding growth in turbine electrical generation systems and associated controls are quickly making low-voltage (LV) electrical design approaches cost-ineffective. This report provides design detail and compares the cost of energy (COE) between commercial LV-class wind power machines and emerging medium-voltage (MV)-class multi-megawatt wind technology. The key finding is that a 2.5% reduction in the COE can be achieved by moving from LV to MV systems. This is a conservative estimate, with a 3% to 3.5% reduction believed to be attainable once purchase orders to support a 250-turbine/year production level are placed. This evaluation considers capital costs as well as installation, maintenance, and training requirements for wind turbine maintenance personnel. Subsystems investigated include the generator, pendant cables, variable-speed converter, and padmount transformer with switchgear. Both current-source and voltage-source converter/inverter MV topologies are compared against their low-voltage, voltage-source counterparts at the 3.0-, 5.0-, and 7.5-MW levels.

Erdman, W.; Behnke, M.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Analysis of SWADE Discus N Wind Speed and Wave Height Time Series. Part I: Discrete Wavelet Packet Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discus N denotes a single buoy employed during the SWADE experiment, equipped to record wave amplitude and wind speed time series at a rate of 1 Hz. Over the course of approximately 4.5 days, two clear-cut examples of sea response to wind ...

Jorge E. Willemsen

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Spatial variation of iron abundance in the high speed solar wind, 1972 to 1976  

SciTech Connect

The Fe/H ratios in the peaks of high speed streams (HSS) during the decline of Solar Cycle 20 and the following minimum (October 1972-December 1976) were analyzed. The response of the 50-200 keV ion channel of the APL/JHU energetic particle experiment (EPE) on IMP-7 and 8 to solar wind iron ions at high solar wind speeds and Fe measurements were compared with solar wind H and He parameters from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) instrments on the same spacecraft. In general, the Fe distribution parameters (bulk velocity, flow direction, temperature) are found to be similar to the LANL He parameters. Although the average Fe/H ratio in many steady HSS peaks agrees within observational uncertainties with the nominal coronal ratio of 4.7 x 10(-5), abundance variations of a factor of up to 6 are obtained across a given coronal-hole associated HSS. Over the period 1973-1976, a steady decrease in the average quiet-time Fe/H ratio by a factor of about 4 is measured on both IMP-7 and 8.

Mitchell, D.G.; Roelof, E.C.; Bame, S.J.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Preliminary evaluation of wind energy potential: Cook Inlet area, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work on a project performed under contract to the Alaska Power Administration (APA). The objective of this research was to make a preliminary assessment of the wind energy potential for interconnection with the Cook Inlet area electric power transmission and distribution systems, to identify the most likely candidate regions (25 to 100 square miles each) for energy potential, and to recommend a monitoring program sufficient to quantify the potential.

Hiester, T.R.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Distrubance Tracking and Blade Load Control of Wind Turbines in Variable-Speed Operation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A composite state-space controller was developed for a multi-objective problem in the variable-speed operation of wind turbines. Disturbance Tracking Control theory was applied to the design of a torque controller to optimize energy capture under the influence of persistent wind disturbances. A limitation in the theory for common multi-state models is described, which led to the design of a complementary pitch controller. The goal of the independent blade pitch design was to minimize blade root fatigue loads. Simulation results indicate an 11% reduction in fatigue damage using the proposed controllers, compared to a conventional torque-only design. Meanwhile, energy capture is almost identical, partly because of nonlinear effects.

Stol, K. A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Coronal Heating and Acceleration of the High/Low-Speed Solar Wind by Fast/Slow MHD Shock Trains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate coronal heating and acceleration of the high- and low-speed solar wind in the open field region by dissipation of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) waves through MHD shocks. Linearly polarized \\Alfven (fast MHD) waves and acoustic (slow MHD) waves travelling upwardly along with a magnetic field line eventually form fast switch-on shock trains and hydrodynamical shock trains (N-waves) respectively to heat and accelerate the plasma. We determine one dimensional structure of the corona from the bottom of the transition region (TR) to 1AU under the steady-state condition by solving evolutionary equations for the shock amplitudes simultaneously with the momentum and proton/electron energy equations. Our model reproduces the overall trend of the high-speed wind from the polar holes and the low-speed wind from the mid- to low-latitude streamer except the observed hot corona in the streamer. The heating from the slow waves is effective in the low corona to increase the density there, and plays an important role in the formation of the dense low-speed wind. On the other hand, the fast waves can carry a sizable energy to the upper level to heat the outer corona and accelerate the high-speed wind effectively. We also study dependency on field strength, $B_0$, at the bottom of the TR and non-radial expansion of a flow tube, $f_{\\rm max}$, to find that large $B_0/f_{\\rm max}\\gtrsim 2$ but small $B_0\\simeq 2$G are favorable for the high-speed wind and that small $B_0/f_{\\rm max}\\simeq 1$ is required for the low-speed wind.

Takeru K. Suzuki

2003-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

UDT: UDP-based data transfer for high-speed wide area networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we summarize our work on the UDT high performance data transport protocol over the past four years. UDT was designed to effectively utilize the rapidly emerging high-speed wide area optical networks. It is built on top of UDP with reliability ... Keywords: Congestion control, Design and implementation, High-speed networks, Transport protocol

Yunhong Gu; Robert L. Grossman

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Analysis of Temporal and Spatial Characteristics on Output of Wind Farms with Doubly Fed Induction Generator Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the large number of wind turbines and covering too large area in a large wind farm, wake effects among wind turbines and wind speed time delays will have a greater impact of wind farms models. Taking wind farms with doubly fed induction generator(DFIG) ... Keywords: wind farm, modeling, temporal and spatial characteristics, DFIG, output characteristics

Shupo Bu, Xunwen Su

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

CFD simulation for pedestrian wind comfort and wind safety in urban areas: General decision framework and case study for the Eindhoven University campus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind comfort and wind safety for pedestrians are important requirements in urban areas. Many city authorities request studies of pedestrian wind comfort and wind safety for new buildings and new urban areas. These studies involve combining statistical ... Keywords: Building aerodynamics, Built environment, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Discomfort and danger, Experimental validation, Guidelines, Wind flow

B. Blocken; W. D. Janssen; T. van Hooff

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Definition: Wind power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind power Wind power Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Wind power The amount of power available to a wind turbine depends on: air density, wind speed and the swept area of the rotor. While the power is proportional to air density and swept area, it varies with the cube of wind speed, so small changes in wind speed can have a relatively large impact on wind power.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Wind power is the conversion of wind energy into a useful form of energy, such as using wind turbines to make electrical power, windmills for mechanical power, windpumps for water pumping or drainage, or sails to propel ships. Large wind farms consist of hundreds of individual wind turbines which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land, and offshore farms

237

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Analysis of Sub-Hourly Ramping Impacts of Wind Energy and Balancing Area Size (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

WindPower 2008 conference sponsored by AWEA held in Houston, TX on June 1-4 2008. This poster illustrates the data collected for an analysis of sub-hourly ramping impacts of wind energy and balancing area size.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Testing requirements for variable-speed generating technology for wind turbine applications. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidelines for evaluating the impacts of integrating variable-speed, constant-frequency (VSCF) wind turbines into electric utility systems have been proposed based upon prior test experiences with the NASA VSCF system and the expected performance of the Westinghouse and OMNION VSCF systems. The NASA and Westinghouse VSCF generating systems use a wound rotor induction generator and a cycloconverter, while the OMNION system uses a wound rotor induction generator and a dc-current link converter. The design of VSCF/utility system interface requirements and test plans is based on utility system electrical issues such as utility system control and operation, protection, voltage/reactive power management, power quality, and reliability. A framework for testing VSCF concepts is proposed which includes a three stage process: modeling of the system to analyze design alternatives and simulate disturbances that could be harmful to the actual system; laboratory testing which involves the use of the system under controlled conditions; and field testing to collect data under actual conditions to validate models and analyze the wind turbine behavior.

Herrera, J.I.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Space-time forecasting and evaluation of wind speed with statistical tests for comparing accuracy of spatial predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-quality short-term forecasts of wind speed are vital to making wind power a more reliable energy source. Gneiting et al. (2006) have introduced a model for the average wind speed two hours ahead based on both spatial and temporal information. The forecasts produced by this model are accurate, and subject to accuracy, the predictive distribution is sharp, i.e., highly concentrated around its center. However, this model is split into nonunique regimes based on the wind direction at an off-site location. This work both generalizes and improves upon this model by treating wind direction as a circular variable and including it in the model. It is robust in many experiments, such as predicting at new locations. This is compared with the more common approach of modeling wind speeds and directions in the Cartesian space and use a skew-t distribution for the errors. The quality of the predictions from all of these models can be more realistically assessed with a loss measure that depends upon the power curve relating wind speed to power output. This proposed loss measure yields more insight into the true value of each model's predictions. One method of evaluating time series forecasts, such as wind speed forecasts, is to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the accuracy of two competing sets of forecasts. Diebold and Mariano (1995) proposed a test in this setting that has been extended and widely applied. It allows the researcher to specify a wide variety of loss functions, and the forecast errors can be non-Gaussian, nonzero mean, serially correlated, and contemporaneously correlated. In this work, a similar unconditional test of forecast accuracy for spatial data is proposed. The forecast errors are no longer potentially serially correlated but spatially correlated. Simulations will illustrate the properties of this test, and an example with daily average wind speeds measured at over 100 locations in Oklahoma will demonstrate its use. This test is compared with a wavelet-based method introduced by Shen et al. (2002) in which the presence of a spatial signal at each location in the dataset is tested.

Hering, Amanda S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Comparison of 10-m Wind Forecasts from a Regional Area Model and QuikSCAT Scatterometer Wind Observations over the Mediterranean Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface wind forecasts from a limited-area model [the Quadrics Bologna Limited-Area Model (QBOLAM)] covering the entire Mediterranean area at 0.1° grid spacing are verified against Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) wind observations. Only forecasts ...

Christophe Accadia; Stefano Zecchetto; Alfredo Lavagnini; Antonio Speranza

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Area wind farm energy production BACKGROUND -In Central New York State, home of the New York State Fair, wind turbine construction has had a noticeable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Area wind farm energy production ­ BACKGROUND - In Central New York State, home of the New York State Fair, wind turbine construction has they are then trucked to their destinations, and quite a few wind farms dot the hills. One

Keinan, Alon

243

A Test of a Lapse Rate/Wind Speed Model for Estimating Heat Island Magnitude in an Urban Airshed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the winter of 1975/76 a helicopter was used to obtain temperature profiles across the city of Calgary. This operation was supported by airborne measurements of wind speed and lapse rate at the edge of the city, upwind. Regression analysis ...

Lawrence C. Nkemdirim

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Analysis of SWADE Discus N Wind Speed and Wave Height Time Series. Part II: Quantitative Growth Rates during a Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, wind speed and wave height time series obtained from the Discus N buoy during two storm events recorded in the SWADE experiment were analyzed using discrete wavelet packet transforms. One result of the analysis is that distinct tightly ...

Jorge F. Willemsen

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Joint Calibration of Multiplatform Altimeter Measurements of Wind Speed and Wave Height over the Past 20 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1985, for a period of more than 23 yr, seven altimeter missions have provided global coverage of significant wave height and wind speed. This study undertakes a long-term analysis of the accuracy and stability of altimeter-derived values of ...

S. Zieger; J. Vinoth; I. R. Young

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Consistency of Geosat, SSM/I, and ERS-1 Global Surface Wind Speeds—Comparison with In Situ Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors compare wind speed retrieved from the Geosat altimeter, from two Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) microwave radiometers. The SSM/I F08 and SSM/I F10, and from the European Space Agency ERS-1 scatterometer. As ground truth, ship ...

J. Boutin; J. Etcheto

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A study on nocturnal surface wind speed over-prediction by the WRF-ARW model in Southeastern Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The over-prediction of surface wind speed during nighttime by the WRF-ARW model was investigated for a period of the Second Texas Air Quality Study (May 28 – July 3, 2006). In coastal regions of southeastern Texas, the model had significant ...

Fong Ngan; Hyuncheol Kim; Pius Lee; Khalid Al-Wali; Bright Dornblaser

248

Analysis of the electrical harmonic characteristics of a slip recovery variable speed generating system for wind turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

Variable speed electric generating technology can enhance the general use of wind energy in electric utility applications. This enhancement results from two characteristic properties of variable speed wind turbine generators: an improvement in drive train damping characteristics, which results in reduced structural loading on the entire wind turbine system, and an improvement in the overall efficiency by using a more sophisticated electrical generator. Electronic converter systems are the focus of this investigation -- in particular, the properties of a wound-rotor induction generator with the slip recovery system and direct-current link converter. Experience with solid-state converter systems in large wind turbines is extremely limited. This report presents measurements of electrical performances of the slip recovery system and is limited to the terminal characteristics of the system. Variable speed generating systems working effectively in utility applications will require a satisfactory interface between the turbine/generator pair and the utility network. The electrical testing described herein focuses largely on the interface characteristics of the generating system. A MOD-O wind turbine was connected to a very strong system; thus, the voltage distortion was low and the total harmonic distortion in the utility voltage was less than 3% (within the 5% limit required by most utilities). The largest voltage component of a frequency below 60 Hz was 40 dB down from the 60-Hz< component. 8 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs.

Herrera, J.I.; Reddoch, T.W.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Effects of the Variations In Sea Surface Temperature and Atmospheric Stability in the Estimation of Average Wind Speed by SEASAT-SASS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speeds from the scatterometer (SASS) on the ocean observing satellite SEASAT averaged over 2° latitude by 2° longitude and a 92-day period are compared with wind speeds from ship reports in the western North Atlantic and the eastern North ...

W. Timothy Liu

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Capacity Requirements to Support Inter-Balancing Area Wind Delivery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Paper examines the capacity requirements that arise as wind generation is integrated into the power system and how those requirements change depending on where the wind energy is delivered.

Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Wind Resource Mapping for United States Offshore Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A poster for the WindPower 2006 conference showing offshore resource mapping efforts in the United States.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Factors Affecting Surface Wind Speeds in Gravity Waves and Wake Lows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ducted gravity waves and wake lows have been associated with numerous documented cases of “severe” winds (>25 m s?1) and wind damage. These winds are associated with the pressure perturbations and transient mesoscale pressure gradients occurring ...

Timothy A. Coleman; Kevin R. Knupp

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development and Validation of WECC Variable Speed Wind Turbine Dynamic Models for Grid Integration Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes reduced-order, simplified wind turbine models for analyzing the stability impact of large arrays of wind turbines with a single point of network interconnection.

Behnke, M.; Ellis, A.; Kazachkov, Y.; McCoy, T.; Muljadi, E.; Price, W.; Sanchez-Gasca, J.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Multi-Area Stochastic Unit Commitment for High Wind Penetration in a Transmission Constrained  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-Area Stochastic Unit Commitment for High Wind Penetration in a Transmission Constrained@ieor.berkeley.edu In this paper we present a unit commitment model for studying the impact of large-scale wind integration of renewable energy integration. Key words : unit commitment; stochastic programming; wind power; transmission

Oren, Shmuel S.

255

Application of Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis to Observation Targeting for Short-term Wind Speed Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operators of electrical grids, sometimes referred to as Balancing Authorities (BA), typically make critical decisions on how to most reliably and economically balance electrical load and generation in time frames ranging from a few minutes to six hours ahead. At higher levels of wind power generation, there is an increasing need to improve the accuracy of 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts. Forecasts on this time scale have typically been strongly dependent on short-term trends indicated by the time series of power production and meteorological data from a wind farm. Additional input information is often available from the output of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models and occasionally from off-site meteorological towers in the region surrounding the wind generation facility. A widely proposed approach to improve short-term forecasts is the deployment of off-site meteorological towers at locations upstream from the wind generation facility in order to sense approaching wind perturbations. While conceptually appealing, it turns out that, in practice, it is often very difficult to derive significant benefit in forecast performance from this approach. The difficulty is rooted in the fact that the type, scale, and amplitude of the processes controlling wind variability at a site change from day to day if not from hour to hour. Thus, a location that provides some useful forecast information for one time may not be a useful predictor a few hours later. Indeed, some processes that cause significant changes in wind power production operate predominantly in the vertical direction and thus cannot be monitored by employing a network of sensors at off-site locations. Hence, it is very challenging to determine the type of sensors and deployment locations to get the most benefit for a specific short-term forecast application. Two tools recently developed in the meteorological research community have the potential to help determine the locations and parameters to measure in order to get the maximum positive impact on forecast performance for a particular site and short-term look-ahead period. Both tools rely on the use of NWP models to assess the sensitivity of a forecast for a particular location to measurements made at a prior time (i.e. the look-ahead period) at points surrounding the target location. The fundamental hypothesis is that points and variables with high sensitivity are good candidates for measurements since information at those points are likely to have the most impact on the forecast for the desired parameter, location and look-ahead period. One approach is called the adjoint method (Errico and Vukicevic, 1992; Errico, 1997) and the other newer approach is known as Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA; Ancell and Hakim 2007; Torn and Hakim 2008). Both approaches have been tested on large-scale atmospheric prediction problems (e.g. forecasting pressure or precipitation over a relatively large region 24 hours ahead) but neither has been applied to mesoscale space-time scales of winds or any other variables near the surface of the earth. A number of factors suggest that ESA is better suited for short-term wind forecasting applications. One of the most significant advantages of this approach is that it is not necessary to linearize the mathematical representation of the processes in the underlying atmospheric model as required by the adjoint approach. Such a linearization may be especially problematic for the application of short-term forecasting of boundary layer winds in complex terrain since non-linear shifts in the structure of boundary layer due to atmospheric stability changes are a critical part of the wind power production forecast problem. The specific objective of work described in this paper is to test the ESA as a tool to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the wind generation area of California's Tehachapi Pass during the warm (high generation) season. The paper is organized

Zack, J; Natenberg, E; Young, S; Manobianco, J; Kamath, C

2010-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

256

Application of Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis to Observation Targeting for Short-term Wind Speed Forecasting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The operators of electrical grids, sometimes referred to as Balancing Authorities (BA), typically make critical decisions on how to most reliably and economically balance electrical load and generation in time frames ranging from a few minutes to six hours ahead. At higher levels of wind power generation, there is an increasing need to improve the accuracy of 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts. Forecasts on this time scale have typically been strongly dependent on short-term trends indicated by the time series of power production and meteorological data from a wind farm. Additional input information is often available from the output of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models and occasionally from off-site meteorological towers in the region surrounding the wind generation facility. A widely proposed approach to improve short-term forecasts is the deployment of off-site meteorological towers at locations upstream from the wind generation facility in order to sense approaching wind perturbations. While conceptually appealing, it turns out that, in practice, it is often very difficult to derive significant benefit in forecast performance from this approach. The difficulty is rooted in the fact that the type, scale, and amplitude of the processes controlling wind variability at a site change from day to day if not from hour to hour. Thus, a location that provides some useful forecast information for one time may not be a useful predictor a few hours later. Indeed, some processes that cause significant changes in wind power production operate predominantly in the vertical direction and thus cannot be monitored by employing a network of sensors at off-site locations. Hence, it is very challenging to determine the type of sensors and deployment locations to get the most benefit for a specific short-term forecast application. Two tools recently developed in the meteorological research community have the potential to help determine the locations and parameters to measure in order to get the maximum positive impact on forecast performance for a particular site and short-term look-ahead period. Both tools rely on the use of NWP models to assess the sensitivity of a forecast for a particular location to measurements made at a prior time (i.e. the look-ahead period) at points surrounding the target location. The fundamental hypothesis is that points and variables with high sensitivity are good candidates for measurements since information at those points are likely to have the most impact on the forecast for the desired parameter, location and look-ahead period. One approach is called the adjoint method (Errico and Vukicevic, 1992; Errico, 1997) and the other newer approach is known as Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA; Ancell and Hakim 2007; Torn and Hakim 2008). Both approaches have been tested on large-scale atmospheric prediction problems (e.g. forecasting pressure or precipitation over a relatively large region 24 hours ahead) but neither has been applied to mesoscale space-time scales of winds or any other variables near the surface of the earth. A number of factors suggest that ESA is better suited for short-term wind forecasting applications. One of the most significant advantages of this approach is that it is not necessary to linearize the mathematical representation of the processes in the underlying atmospheric model as required by the adjoint approach. Such a linearization may be especially problematic for the application of short-term forecasting of boundary layer winds in complex terrain since non-linear shifts in the structure of boundary layer due to atmospheric stability changes are a critical part of the wind power production forecast problem. The specific objective of work described in this paper is to test the ESA as a tool to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the wind generation area of California's Tehachapi Pass during the warm (high generation) season. The paper is organized

Zack, J; Natenberg, E; Young, S; Manobianco, J; Kamath, C

2010-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Evolution Towards Grids: Ten Years of High-Speed, Wide Area, Data Intensive Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Evolution Towards Grids: Ten Years of High-Speed, Wide Area, Data Intensive Computing William aggregating and scheduling many resources. Data must be located and staged, cache and network capacity must and non-destructive imaging to supply real-time data to a remote, on-line, airframe structures expert who

258

A Climatological Study of Boundary Layer Wind Speed Using a Meso-?-Scale Higher-Order Closure Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoscale higher-order closure atmospheric boundary layer model has been used to get more detailed information than is possible from observations regarding horizontal and vertical variations of the wind in an area in southeastern Sweden. To ...

Hans Bergström

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Concepts: Fully Coupled Dynamic Response Simulations; Massachusetts Institute of Technology  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Massachusetts Institute of Technology to study dynamic response simulations to evaluate floating platform concepts for offshore wind turbines.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Choosing wind power plant locations and sizes based on electric reliability measures using multiple-year wind speed measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To project the US potential to meet future electricity demands with wind energy, estimates of available wind resource and costs to access that resource are critical. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) annually estimates the US market penetration of wind in its Annual Energy Outlook series. For these estimates, the EIA uses wind resource data developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for each region of the country. However, the EIA multiplies the cost of windpower by several factors, some as large as 3, to account for resource quality, market factors associated with accessing the resource, electric grid impacts, and rapid growth in the wind industry. This paper examines the rationale behind these additional costs and suggests alternatives.

Milligan, M.R.; Artig, R.

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Avian Monitoring and Risk Assessment at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area was to estimate and compare bird utilization, fatality rates, and the risk index among factors including bird taxonomic groups, wind turbine and reference areas, wind turbine sizes and types, and geographic locations. The key questions addressed to meet this objective include: (1) Are there any differences in the level of bird activity, called ''utilization rate'' or ''use'', with the operating wind plant and within the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (2) Are there any differences in the rate of bird fatalities (or avian fatality) within the operating wind plant or the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (3) Does bird use, fatality rates, or bird risk index vary according to the geographic location, type and size of wind turbine, and/or type of bird within the operating wind plant and surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; and (4) How do raptor fatality rates at San Gorgonio compare to other wind projects with comparable data?

Anderson, R.; Tom, J.; Neumann, N.; Erickson, W. P.; Strickland, M. D.; Bourassa, M.; Bay, K. J.; Sernka, K. J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Wind Resource Mapping for United States Offshore Areas: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is producing validated wind resource maps for priority offshore regions of the United States. This report describes the methodology used to validate the maps and to build a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database to classify the offshore wind resource by state, water depth, distance from shore, and administrative unit.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

An Intercomparison of TOPEX, NSCAT, and ECMWF Wind Speeds: Illustrating and Understanding Systematic Discrepancies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of multiple satellite missions with wind measuring capacity has made it more desirable than ever before to integrate wind data from various sources in order to achieve an improved accuracy, resolution, and duration. A clear ...

Ge Chen

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Power Decoupling Control for Wind Power Converter Based on a Novel Speed Sensor-Less  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doubly fed induction generators based wind turbines are today one of the most widely used generation systems in wind farms. The stator is directly connected to the constant frequency three phase grid and the rotor currents are appropriately controlled ...

Zhang Jia-ming; Fu Yang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Resolving Nonstationary Spectral Information in Wind Speed Time Series Using the Hilbert–Huang Transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is motivated by the observation that large-amplitude wind fluctuations on temporal scales of 1–10 h present challenges for the power management of large offshore wind farms. Wind fluctuations on these scales are analyzed at a ...

Claire Vincent; Gregor Giebel; Pierre Pinson; Henrik Madsen

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Semisubmersible Platform and Anchor Foundation Systems for Wind Turbine Support; Concept Marine Associates, Inc.  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Concept Marine Associates, Inc. to evaluate and optimize a semisubmersible platform and anchor foundation system that can support a 5-MW wind turbine.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Wind Resource Mapping for United States Offshore Areas: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is producing validated wind resource maps for priority offshore regions of the United States. This report describes the methodology used to validate the maps and to build a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database to classify the offshore wind resource by state, water depth, distance from shore, and administrative unit.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

An Experimental Field Dataset with Buoyant, Neutral, and Dense Gas Atmospheric Releases and Model Comparisons in Low–Wind Speed (Diffusion) Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique field dataset from a series of low–wind speed experiments, modeling efforts using three commonly used models to replicate these releases, and statistical analysis of how well these models were able to predict the plume concentrations is ...

Veronica E. Wannberg; Gustavious Williams; Patrick Sawyer; Richard Venedam

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A Comparative Assessment of Surface Wind Speed and Sea Surface Temperature over the Indian Ocean by TMI, MSMR, and ERA-40  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2-yr (June 1999–June 2001) observation of ocean surface wind speed (SWS) and sea surface temperature (SST) derived from microwave radiometer measurements made by a multifrequency scanning microwave radiometer (MSMR) and the Tropical Rainfall ...

Anant Parekh; Rashmi Sharma; Abhijit Sarkar

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Determination of the Mean Wind Speed and Momentum Diffusivity Profiles above Tall Vegetation and Forest Canopies Using a Mass Conservation Assumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A semianalytical method based on a mass conservation principle is presented for describing the transition- layer profiles of mean wind speed and momentum diffusivity and for estimating the aerodynamic characteristics of forest and tall vegetation ...

N. M. Zoumakis

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Bat Interactions with Wind Turbines at the Buffalo Ridge, Minnesota Wind Resource Area: An Assessment of Bat Activity, Species Compo sition and Collision Mortality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During avian monitoring studies conducted from 1994-1999, several bat collision victims were found at wind turbines in the Buffalo Ridge Resource Area (WRA) in southwest Minnesota. This study further examined bat interactions with wind turbines at this site.

2003-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

272

Wind and Temperature Structure over a Land-Water-Land Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind and temperature data obtained on 5 June 1984 during the Øresund experiment are analyzed. The day was characterized by moderately strong winds blowing from a heated land area over a colder water surface and then over a second heated land ...

J. C. Doran; Sven-Erik Gryning

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Model for Objective Simulation of Boundary-Layer Winds in an Area of Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective analysis model is formulated to simulate the boundary-layer wind field in an area of complex terrain on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. The model is designed to reproduce the effects of the terrain on the undisturbed trade wind flow in ...

D. André Erasmus

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Comparison on control strategies of the grid-side converter of variable speed constant frequency doubly-fed wind power generation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct power control, vector control based on d-q synchronous rotating reference frame and ?-? static reference frame for the grid-side converter of variable speed constant frequency doubly-fed wind turbines are analyzed. System simulation ... Keywords: ?-? static reference frame, d-q rotating reference frame, direct power control, doubly-fed wind power generation system, grid-side converter

Xian-Ming Zhou; Ting-Long Pan; Zhi-Cheng Ji

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

HEXOS—Humidity Exchange Over the Sea A Program for Research on Water-Vapor and Droplet Fluxes from Sea of Air at Moderate to High Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEXOS is an international program for the study of evaporation and spray-droplet flux from sea to air. The program includes measurements in the field at moderate-to-high wind speeds, wind-tunnel studies, instrument development, boundary-layer ...

Kristina B. Katsaros; Stuart D. Smith; Wiebe A. Oost

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Relationship Between the Surface Wind Field and Convective Precipitation over the St. Louis Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall, wind and temperature data at the surface for a mesoscale area surrounding St. Louis, Missouri for seven summer days in 1975 were used to determine qualitative and quantitative relationships between divergence, and the location, timing ...

Gary L. Achtemeier

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hazards to Electrical Distribution in Coastal Areas Subject to Flooding and High Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI, Dewberry and Davis, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) have jointly prepared this study on hazards to electrical distribution in coastal areas that experience coastal and river flooding and high wind.

2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

Low-Level Winds in Tornadoes and Potential Catastrophic Tornado Impacts in Urban Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an axisymmetric model of tornado structure tightly constrained by high-resolution wind field measurements collected by Doppler on Wheels (DOW) mobile radars, the potential impacts of intense tornadoes crossing densely populated urban areas ...

Joshua Wurman; Paul Robinson; Curtis Alexander; Yvette Richardson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Wind Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Power Wind Power Jump to: navigation, search Wind Power WIndfarm.Sunset.jpg Wind power is a form of solar energy.[1] Wind is caused by the uneven heating of the atmosphere by the sun, variations in the earth's surface, and rotation of the earth. Mountains, bodies of water, and vegetation all influence wind flow patterns[2], [3]. Wind energy (or wind power) describes the process by which wind is used to generate electricity. Wind turbines convert the energy in wind to electricity by rotating propeller-like blades around a rotor. The rotor turns the drive shaft, which turns an electric generator.[2] Three key factors affect the amount of energy a turbine can harness from the wind: wind speed, air density, and swept area.[4] Mechanical power can also be utilized directly for specific tasks such as

280

Modeling Coastally Trapped Wind Surges over Southeastern Australia. Part I: Timing and Speed of Propagation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the spring and summer months, the southeast coast of Australia often experiences abrupt southerly wind changes, the leading edge being known locally as a “southerly buster.” The main characteristic of this phenomenon is the sudden shift in ...

Helen J. Reid; Lance M. Leslie

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Rotor Speed Dependent Yaw Control of Wind Turbines Based on Empirical Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When extracting energy from the wind using horizontal-axis upwind wind turbines, a primary condition for maximum power yield is the ability to align the rotor axis with the dominating wind direction. Attempts have been made to improve yaw alignment by applying advanced measurement techniques such as LIDARs. This study is focused at assessing the current performance of an operating turbine and exploring how the yaw alignment can be improved using existing measurements. By analyzing available turbine and met mast data a correction scheme for the original yaw alignment system is synthesized. The correction scheme is applied and it is seen that with the correction scheme in place, the power yield below rated is raised 1-5 percent. Furthermore, results indicate that blade load variations are decreased when the correction scheme is applied. The results are associated with uncertainties due to the amount of available data and the wind site climate. Further work should be focused at gathering more experimental data.

Kragh, K. A.; Fleming, P. A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Prediction of Wind Speed, Direction and Diffusivity under Neutral Conditions for Tall Stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one dimensional model of the neutral planetary boundary layer is used to predict the wind velocity and coefficient of eddy diffusivity throughout the 2-km planetary boundary layer. Comparison with routine radiosonde observations show that at ...

Nirupama Raghavan; Swati Basu

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2012) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary since energy production depends non-linearly on wind speed (U ), and wind speed observa- tions for the assessment of future long-term wind supply A. M. R. Bakker1 , B. J. J. M. Van den Hurk1 and J. P. Coelingh2 1

Haak, Hein

284

MSU-Wind Applications Center: Wind Resource Worksheet Theoretical Power Calculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSU-Wind Applications Center: Wind Resource Worksheet Theoretical Power Calculation Equations: A= swept area = air density v= velocity R= universal gas constant Steps: 1. Measure wind speed from fan. = ___________/(________*________)= _________kg/m3 5. Theoretical Power a. Low Setting Theoretical Wind Power i. Power= ½*______*______*______*.59

Dyer, Bill

285

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ December 1, 2005 Prepared for United States ......................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

286

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

287

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

288

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

289

WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June1, 2004 to August 31, 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

290

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

291

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

292

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for United States.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

293

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

294

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle June 1, 2005 ­ August 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

295

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

296

An area-dependent wind function for estimating open water evaporation using land-based meteorological data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a generally applicable formula for estimating evaporation rate from open water bodies which utilizes readily available land-based meteorological data. We follow the well-known aerodynamic approach in which evaporation rate is modelled as the ... Keywords: Evaporation, Lake, Open water, Pond, Uncertainty, Water body, Wind function, Wind speed

D. L. McJannet; I. T. Webster; F. J. Cook

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Wind Resources in Alaska | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources in Alaska Resources in Alaska Dataset Summary Description Wind resource data for Alaska and southeast Alaska, both high resolution wind resource maps and gridded wind parameters. The two high resolution wind maps are comprised of a grid of cells each containing a single value of average wind speed (m/s) at a hub height of 30, 50, 70, and 100 meters and wind power density (W/m^2) at a hub height of 50 meters for a 40,000 square meter area. The additional gridded wind parameter data includes data for points spaced 2 kilometers apart, and include: predicted wind speed frequency distribution as well as speed and energy in 16 directions (the information needed to produce a wind rose image at a given point). Data included here as .kml files (for viewing in Google Earth). GIS shape files available for the gridded wind parameters datasets from AEDI (http://akenergyinventory.org/data.shtml).

298

Climatic Comparisons of Estimated and Measured Winds from Ships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speed records from twelve Ocean Weather Stations (OWS's) are compared to estimates from transient ships in the general vicinity of the on-station OWS position. Measured and estimated winds from transient ships within specified areas are also ...

Robert G. Quayle

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Statistical analysis of summer winds in Geysers area prior to ASCOT 1979 experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Statistical analytical techniques were tested on 73 days and 16 stations of hourly data for the summer of 1977. These stations were located in the region surrounding the Geysers geothermal area. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to define typical wind patterns in the region and to determine typical days for each station. Power spectral analysis was used to quantify the temporal variation of winds at Anderson Ridge and Anderson Springs (two stations included in the ASCOT 1979 study in the local region of Anderson Creek with very different terrain exposures). These results will help determine year to year difference in the wind fields in the ASCOT study region of complex terrain.

Porch, W.M.; Walton, J.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A Similarity Hypothesis for Air–Sea Exchange at Extreme Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane intensity is sensitive to fluxes of enthalpy and momentum between the ocean and atmosphere in the high wind core of the storm. It has come to be recognized that much of this exchange is likely mediated by sea spray. A number of ...

Kerry Emanuel

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Individual Pitch Control for Mitigation of Power Fluctuation of Variable Speed Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, China mcheng@seu.edu.cn Abstract-- Grid connected wind turbines are the sources of power fluctuations and the individual pitch controller is designed. The simulations are performed on the NREL (National Renewable Energy shortage, great efforts have been taken around the world to implement renewable energy projects

Chen, Zhe

302

Stability Dependence of the Ratio of Wind Speeds at Two Levels over Agriculture Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly averaged winds are computed from a one-year record taken atop five 10 m towers and four 30 m towers distributed over 4000 km2 of typical agricultural land. Vertical temperature differences are available from three of the 30 m towers. The ...

Jack H. Shreffler

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Wind Resource Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Offshore Wind Resource Characterization Offshore Wind Resource Characterization Map of the United States, showing the wind potential of offshore areas across the country. Enlarge image US offshore wind speed estimates at 90-m height NREL scientists and engineers are leading efforts in resource mapping, remote sensor measurement and development, and forecasting that are essential for the development of offshore wind. Resource Mapping For more than 15 years, NREL's meteorologists, engineers, and Geographic Information System experts have led the production of wind resource characterization maps and reports used by policy makers, private industry, and other government organizations to inform and accelerate the development of wind energy in the United States. Offshore wind resource data and mapping has strategic uses. As with terrestrial developments, traditional

304

An assessment of the available windy land area and wind energy potential in the contiguous United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimates of land areas with various levels of wind energy resource and resultant wind energy potential have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some windy lands as a result of environmental and land-use considerations. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource estimated over the contiguous United States is surprisingly large and has the potential to supply a substantial fraction of the nation's energy needs, even with the use of today's wind turbine technology. Although this study shows that, after exclusions, only about 0.6% of the land area in the contiguous United States is characterized by high wind resource (comparable to that found in windy areas of California where wind energy is being cost-effectively developed), the wind electric potential that could be extracted with today's technology from these areas across the United States is equivalent to about 20% of the current US electric consumption. Future advances in wind turbine technology will further enhance the potential of wind energy. As advances in turbine technology allow areas of moderate wind resource to be developed, more than a tenfold increase in the wind energy potential is possible. These areas, which cover large sections of the Great Plains and are widely distributed throughout many other sections of the country, have the potential of producing more than three times the nation's current electric consumption. 9 refs., 12 figs., 13 tabs.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Processing of turbulence-layer wind speed with Generalized SCIDAR through wavelet analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a new method involving wavelet transforms for deriving the wind velocity associated with atmospheric turbulence layers from Generalized SCIDAR measurements. The algorithm analyses the cross-correlation of a series of scintillation patterns separated by lapses of Dt, 2Dt, 3Dt, 4Dt and 5Dt using wavelet transforms. Wavelet analysis provides the position, direction and altitude of the different turbulence layers detected in each cross-correlation. The comparison and consistency of the turbulent layer displacements in consecutive cross-correlations allow the determination of their velocities and avoid misidentifications associated with noise and/or overlapping layers. To validate the algorithm, we have compared the velocity of turbulence layers derived on four nights with the wind vertical profile provided by balloon measurements. The software is fully automated and is able to analyse huge amounts of Generalized SCIDAR measurements.

B. Garcia-Lorenzo; J. J. Fuensalida

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

306

Bird Mortaility at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: March 1998--September 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 15 years, research has shown that wind turbines in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) kill many birds, including raptors, which are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and/or state and federal Endangered Species Acts. Early research in the APWRA on avian mortality mainly attempted to identify the extent of the problem. In 1998, however, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated research to address the causal relationships between wind turbines and bird mortality. NREL funded a project by BioResource Consultants to perform this research directed at identifying and addressing the causes of mortality of various bird species from wind turbines in the APWRA.With 580 megawatts (MW) of installed wind turbine generating capacity in the APWRA, wind turbines there provide up to 1 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of emissions-free electricity annually. By identifying and implementing new methods and technologies to reduce or resolve bird mortality in the APWRA, power producers may be able to increase wind turbine electricity production at the site and apply similar mortality-reduction methods at other sites around the state and country.

Smallwood, K. S.; Thelander, C. G.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Wind News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind News Wind News Wind News RSS February 7, 2011 Salazar, Chu Announce Major Offshore Wind Initiatives Strategic plan, $50 million in R&D funding, identified Wind Energy Areas will speed offshore wind energy development December 16, 2010 Department of Energy Finalizes Loan Guarantee to Support World's Largest Wind Project 845-Megawatt Wind Facility Will Create Hundreds of Jobs and Avoid Over 1.2 Million Tons of Carbon Dioxide Annually October 29, 2010 Statement by Energy Secretary Steven Chu on Today's Grand Opening of the Nordex Manufacturing Facility in Jonesboro, Arkansas Recovery Act investment creates jobs, helps lay the foundation for a clean energy economy September 13, 2010 DOE Announces More than $5 Million to Support Wind Energy Development Funds to Enhance Short-Term Wind Forecasting and Accelerate Midsize Wind

308

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 2: Turbine, Rotor and Blade Logistics  

SciTech Connect

Through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) implemented the Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program. This program will explore advanced technologies that may reduce the cost of energy (COE) from wind turbines. The initial step in the WindPACT program is a series of preliminary scaling studies intended to determine the optimum sizes for future turbines, help define sizing limits for certain critical technologies, and explore the potential for advanced technologies to contribute to reduced COE as turbine scales increase. This report documents the results of Technical Area 2-Turbine Rotor and Blade Logistics. For this report, we investigated the transportation, assembly, and crane logistics and costs associated with installation of a range of multi-megawatt-scale wind turbines. We focused on using currently available equipment, assembly techniques, and transportation system capabilities and limitations to hypothetically transport and install 50 wind turbines at a facility in south-central South Dakota.

Smith, K.

2001-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Remote area wind energy harvesting for low-power autonomous sensors Abstract--A growing demand for deployment of autonomous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote area wind energy harvesting for low-power autonomous sensors Abstract--A growing demand wind energy harvesting is presented, with a focus on an anemometer-based solution. By utilizing for localized, independent energy harvesting capabilities for each node. In this paper, a method of remote area

310

Radar Rainshower Growth Histories and Variations with Wind Speed, Echo Motion, Location and Merger Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from rainshowers observed by the WSR-57 radar at the NOAA National Hurricane Center in Miami were tape-recorded during three recent summers as part of the Florida Area Cumulus Experiment (FACE). Past studies of convective clouds in the 13 × ...

Victor Wiggert; Gloria J. Lockett; Stellan S. Ostlund

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

WIND DATA REPORT January -March, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Vinalhaven January - March, 2004 Prepared for Fox Islands Electric Cooperative...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

312

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall August 18, 2003 ­ December 4, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

313

ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2002 ­ February 28, 2003 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

314

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot May 1, 2003 ­ July 15, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

315

WIND DATA REPORT January -December, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Vinalhaven January - December, 2003 Prepared for Fox Islands Electric Cooperative...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

316

Integrating Wind into Transmission Planning: The Rocky Mountain Area Transmission Study (RMATS): Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans to expand the western grid are now underway. Bringing power from low-cost remote resources--including wind--to load centers could reduce costs for all consumers. But many paths appear to be already congested. Locational marginal price-based modeling is designed to identify the most cost-effective paths to be upgraded. The ranking of such paths is intended as the start of a process of political and regulatory approvals that are expected to result in the eventual construction of new and upgraded lines. This paper reviews the necessary data and analytical tasks to accurately represent wind in such modeling, and addresses some policy and regulatory issues that can help with wind integration into the grid. Providing wind fair access to the grid also (and more immediately) depends on tariff and regulatory changes. Expansion of the Rocky Mountain Area Transmission Study (RMATS) study scope to address operational issues supports the development of transmission solutions that enable wind to connect and deliver power in the next few years--much sooner than upgrades can be completed.

Hamilton, R.; Lehr, R.; Olsen, D.; Nielsen, J.; Acker, T.; Milligan, M.; Geller, H.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Where Is Wind Power?  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Where Is Wind Power? Where Is Wind Power? Wind Powering America offers maps to help you visualize the wind resource at a local level and to show how much wind power has been installed in the United States. How much wind power is on my land? Go to the wind resource maps. Go to the wind resource maps. Go to the wind resource maps. If you want to know how much wind power is in a particular area, these wind resource maps can give you a visual indication of the average wind speeds to a local level such as a neighborhood. These maps have been developed using the same mathematical models that are used by weather forecasters and are even used to estimate the wind energy potential-or how much wind energy could potentially be produced at the state level, if wind power were developed there.

318

The Effect of Clouds and Wind on the Difference in Nocturnal Cooling Rates between Urban and Rural Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The urban warming effect is interesting in its own right and is important for understanding global warming. The aim of this study is to determine how the urban warming effect changes with cloud conditions and with wind speed. Studies of the urban ...

Stanley Q. Kidder; Oskar M. Essenwanger

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Avian risk behavior and fatalities at the Altamont Wind Resource Area: March 1998 - February 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1981, more than 7,000 wind turbines have been installed in the Altamont Wind Resource Area in north-central California. Currently, about 5,000 turbines are operating. Past research efforts demonstrated that wind turbines frequently kill birds, especially raptors. Little is known about the specific flight and perching behaviors by birds near wind turbines. A better understanding of these interactions may one day yield insights on how to minimize bird fatalities. This Phase 1 progress report summarizes research findings obtained at 20 study plots totaling 785 turbines of various configurations and conducted between March 1998 and February 1999. The authors examined bird use and behaviors and collected data on fatalities at the same turbines throughout the course of the surveys. They completed 745 30-minute point counts (1,702 bird observations) that quantified bird risk behaviors and bird use of the study plots. The four most frequently observed bird species were red-tailed hawks, common ravens, turkey vultures, and golden eagles. During the same period, the authors recorded 95 bird fatalities. Raptors represent 51% (n=49) of the kills found. The data indicate that the relative abundance of species observed does not predict the relative frequency of fatalities per species. Phase II of the research is underway.

Thelander, C.; Rugge, L.

2000-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

320

A Six-Beam-Switched Array Antenna for 5.2 GHz High-Speed Wireless Local Area Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-beam-switched array antenna with a flat profile was designed for the application of high-speed wireless local-area networks in the range of 5–6 GHz. This six-beam-switched array antenna is composed of an analog beamformer and a microstrip-slot ... Keywords: beamformer, single-pole double-throw switch, slot antenna, switched-beam antenna

Sheng-Fuh Chang; Jia-Liang Chen; Chin-San Lin; Jing-Jang Luo

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Analysis of Long Time Series of Coastal Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of a 14-yr time series of wind speed recorded on the coast outside the city of Trondheim in middle Norway is presented. Analysis of the time series shows that in this area there is, in general, no gap in the wind speed power spectrum in ...

Tore Heggem; Rune Lende; Jørgen Løvseth

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Estimating Downburst-Related Maximum Surface Wind Speeds by Means of Proximity Soundings in New South Wales, Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional climatology of strong wind gusts associated with thunderstorms is presented, and the ability to estimate gust strength from ambient conditions is tested. Strong wind events were selected for 10 stations in New South Wales, Australia, ...

Bart Geerts

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Wind Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options Site Map Printable Version Offshore Standards and Testing NREL's Offshore Wind Testing Capabilities 35 years of wind turbine testing experience Custom high speed data...

324

Very short-term wind speed forecasting with Bayesian structural break model , Zhe Song a,*, Andrew Kusiak b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reserved. 1. Introduction Wind is one of the most promising green energy sources. The world's installed-1527, Iowa City, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 27 November 2011 Accepted 31 wind power capacity is exponentially increasing in recent years and wind industry is expanding

Kusiak, Andrew

325

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase I: Evaluation of Design and Construction Approaches for Economical Hybrid Steel/Concrete Wind Turbine Towers; BERGER/ABAM Engineers Inc.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with BERGER/ABAM Engineers Inc. to study the economic feasibility of concrete and hybrid concrete/steel wind turbine towers.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Measurement of Wind Waves and Wave-Coherent Air Pressures on the Open Sea from a Moving SWATH Vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and implementation on a Small Waterline Area Twin Hull (SWATH) vessel of a complete system for measuring the directional distribution of wind waves and the concomitant fluctuations of air pressure and wind speed immediately above them ...

Mark A. Donelan; Fred W. Dobson; Hans C. Graber; Niels Madsen; Cyril McCormick

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Extending PVSCAN to meet the market needs for high-speed, large-area scanning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PVSCAN is a versatile instrument that has many applications in the PV industry, including high-speed mapping of material and cell parameters such as defect density, reflectance, and LBIC response. Recently, the PV community has been interested in acquiring this instrument for material and cell analyses and for process monitoring. This paper explores various issues that arise in developing a commercial instrument such as PVSCAN. Emphasis is on the technical details of the ability to scan fast and the detrimental effects this fast scan can have on the image quality of various material/cell parameters.

Sopori, B.; Chen, W.; Zhang, Y.; Hemschoot, T.; Madjdpour, J.

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

A simple method to downscale daily wind statistics to hourly wind data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind is the principal driver in the wind erosion models. The hourly wind speed data were generally required for precisely wind erosion modeling. In this study, a simple method to generate hourly wind speed data from daily wind statistics (daily average and maximum wind speeds together or daily average wind speed only) was established. A typical windy location with 3285 days (9 years) measured hourly wind speed data were used to validate the downscaling method. The results showed that the overall agreement between observed and simulated cumulative wind speed probability distributions appears excellent, especially for the wind speeds greater than 5 m s-1 range (erosive wind speed). The results further revealed that the values of daily average erosive wind power density (AWPD) calculated from generated wind speeds fit the counterparts computed from measured wind speeds well with high models' efficiency (Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient). So that the hourly wind speed data can be predicted from daily average and maximu...

Guo, Zhongling

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Reducing Cost of Energy Through Rotor Aerodynamics Control; Global Energy Concepts, LLC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Global Energy Concepts to evaluate a wide range of wind turbine configurations and their impact on overall cost of energy (COE).

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

NREL GIS Data: Global Offshore Wind GIS data for offshore wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Offshore Wind GIS data for offshore wind speed (meterssecond).  Specified to Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ).

Wind resource based on NOAA blended sea winds and...

331

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies: Technical Area 4ƒBalance-of-Station Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 * NREL/SR-500-29950 1 * NREL/SR-500-29950 D.A. Shafer, K.R. Strawmyer, R.M. Conley, J.H. Guidinger, D.C. Wilkie, and T.F. Zellman With assistance from D.W. Bernadett Commonwealth Associates, Inc. Jackson, Michigan WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies: Technical Area 4- Balance-of-Station Cost 21 March 2000-15 March 2001 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 July 2001 * NREL/SR-500-29950 WindPACT Turbine Desing Scaling Studies: Technical Area 4- Balance-of-Station Cost 21 March 2000-15 March 2001 D.A. Shafer, K.R. Strawmyer, R.M. Conley, J.H. Guidinger, D.C. Wilkie, and T.F. Zellman

332

Wind Resource Map: Mexico | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resource Map: Mexico Wind Resource Map: Mexico Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wind Resource Map: Mexico Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.altestore.com/howto/Reference-Materials/Wind-Resource-Map-Mexico/a Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/wind-resource-map-mexico,http://clean Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This is on-shore wind resource map for rural power applications in Mexico. The map can be used to aid in appropriate siting of wind power installations. Please note that the wind speed classes are taken at 30 m (100 feet [ft]), instead of the usual 10 m (33 ft). Each wind power class should span two power densities. For example, Wind Power Class = 3

333

WIND DATA REPORT December 1 2003 February 29 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Paxton, MA December 1 2003 ­ February 29 2004 Prepared for Diane Dillman, Paxton.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

334

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

335

WIND DATA REPORT September 1 2003 November 30 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Paxton, MA September 1 2003 ­ November 30 2003 by James F. Manwell Anthony F.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

336

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME December 1, 2006 ­ February 28, 2007...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

337

WIND DATA REPORT March 1, 2004 May 31, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Eastham March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

338

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME June 1st 2006 to August 31th 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

339

WIND DATA REPORT December 1, 2003 February 29, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Mt. Tom December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

340

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Validation of HRDI MLT winds with meteor radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

applied to determine whether the wind speed has been overestimated by HRDI ... wind vector components as well as wind speeds, and two nonparametric tests ...

342

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME September 1st 2006 to November 30th 2006.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

343

WIND DATA REPORT December, 2003 February 29, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Orleans December, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

344

WIND DATA REPORT October 27, 2003 November 31, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Orleans October 27, 2003 ­ November 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

345

WIND DATA REPORT January 1, 2004 December 31, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Vinalhaven January 1, 2004 ­ December 31, 2004 Prepared for Fox Islands Electric...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

346

WIND DATA REPORT September 1, 2003 November 31, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Mt. Tom September 1, 2003 ­ November 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

347

WIND DATA REPORT August 28 -December 31, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Vinalhaven August 28 - December 31, 2002 Prepared for Fox Islands Electric...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

348

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1-Composite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) implemented the Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program. As part of the WindPACT program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC), was awarded contract number YAM-0-30203-01 to examine Technical Area 1-Blade Scaling, Technical Area 2-Turbine Rotor and Blade Logistics, and Technical Area 3-Self-Erecting Towers. This report documents the results of GEC's Technical Area 1-Blade Scaling. The primary objectives of the Blade-Scaling Study are to assess the scaling of current materials and manufacturing technologies for blades of 40 to 60 meters in length, and to develop scaling curves of estimated cost and mass for rotor blades in that size range.

Griffin, D.A.

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluation of WRF-predicted near-hub-height winds and ramp events over a Pacific Northwest site with complex terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One challenge with wind power forecasts is the accurate prediction of rapid changes in wind speed (ramps). To evaluate the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model’s ability to predict such events, model simulations, conducted over an area of ...

Qing Yang; Larry K. Berg; Mikhail Pekour; Jerome D. Fast; Rob K. Newsom; Mark Stoelinga; Catherine Finley

350

Evaluation of WRF-Predicted Near-Hub-Height Winds and Ramp Events over a Pacific Northwest Site with Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One challenge with wind-power forecasts is the accurate prediction of rapid changes in wind speed (ramps). To evaluate the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model's ability to predict such events, model simulations, conducted over an area of ...

Qing Yang; Larry K. Berg; Mikhail Pekour; Jerome D. Fast; Rob K. Newsom; Mark Stoelinga; Catherine Finley

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Probability Distribution of Sea Surface Wind Speeds: Effects of Variable Surface Stratification and Boundary Layer Thickness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air–sea exchanges of momentum, energy, and material substances of fundamental importance to the variability of the climate system are mediated by the character of the turbulence in the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers. Sea surface winds ...

Adam Hugh Monahan

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A First-Guess Feature-Based Algorithm for Estimating Wind Speed in Clear-Air Doppler Radar Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algorithms for deriving winds from profiler range-gated spectra currently rely on consensus averaging to remove outliers from the subhourly velocity estimates. For persistent ground clutter in the echo return that is stronger than the atmospheric ...

E. E. Clothiaux; R. S. Penc; D. W. Thomson; T. P. Ackerman; S. R. Williams

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Sun, wind, and pedestrian comfort: a study of Toronto's Central Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ST10,1978, pp. 1585-1593. Sun, Wind and Comfort Appendixshadow for both spaces. Sun, Wind and Comfort Discretionaryfor the obvious reason that the sun does not shine from the

Bosselmann, P.; Arens, Edward A; Dunker, K.; Wright, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Sun, Wind, and Comfort A Study of Open Spaces and Sidewalks in Four Downtown Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plan as o f Bibliography Sun, Wind, and Comfort Arens,Flores, and Terence O'Hare, Sun and Light for Downtown SanSUN, WIND, AND COMFORT A Study of Open Spaces and Sidewalks

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Low Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development Reaction Injection Molded 7.5 Meter Wind Turbine Blade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optimized small turbine blade (7.5m radius) was designed and a partial section molded with the RIM (reaction-injection molded polymer) process for mass production. The intended market is for generic three-bladed wind turbines, 100 kilowatts or less, for grid-assist end users with rural and semi-rural sites, such as the farm/ranch market, having low to moderate IEC Class 3-4 wind regimes. This blade will have substantial performance improvements over, and be cheaper than, present-day 7.5m blades. This is made possible by the injection-molding process, which yields high repeatability, accurate geometry and weights, and low cost in production quantities. No wind turbine blade in the 7.5m or greater size has used this process. The blade design chosen uses a RIM skin bonded to a braided infused carbon fiber/epoxy spar. This approach is attractive to present users of wind turbine blades in the 5-10m sizes. These include rebladeing California wind farms, refurbishing used turbines for the Midwest farm market, and other manufacturers introducing new turbines in this size range.

David M. Wright; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Offshore Wind Potential Tables  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Offshore wind resource by state and wind speed interval within 50 nm of shore. Offshore wind resource by state and wind speed interval within 50 nm of shore. Wind Speed at 90 m (m/s) 7.0 - 7.5 7.5 - 8.0 8.0 - 8.5 8.5 - 9.0 9.0 - 9.5 9.5 - 10.0 >10.0 Total >7.0 State Area km 2 (MW) Area km 2 (MW) Area km 2 (MW) Area km 2 (MW) Area km 2 (MW) Area km 2 (MW) Area km 2 (MW) Area km 2 (MW) California 11,439 (57,195) 24,864 (124,318) 23,059 (115,296) 22,852 (114,258) 13,185 (65,924) 15,231 (76,153) 6,926 (34,629) 117,555 (587,773) Connecticut 530 (2,652) 702 (3,508) 40 (201) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 1,272 (6,360) Delaware 223 (1,116) 724 (3,618) 1,062 (5,310) 931 (4,657) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 2,940 (14,701) Georgia 3,820 (19,102) 7,741 (38,706) 523 (2,617) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 12,085 (60,425) Hawaii 18,873 (94,363) 42,298 (211,492)

357

United States areal wind resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of the electricity that could potentially be generated by wind power and of the land area available for wind energy development have been calculated for the contiguous United States, in support of the US Department of Energy`s National Energy Strategy. These estimates were based on the wind resource data published in a national resource atlas. Estimates of the wind resource in this atlas are expressed in wind power classes ranging from class 1 to class 7, with each class representing a range of mean wind power density or equivalent mean speed at specified heights above the ground (Table 1) . Areas designatedclass 4 or greater are suitable for most wind turbine applications. Power class 3 areas are suitable for wind energy development using tall (50-m hub height) turbines. Class 2 areas are marginal and class 1 areas unsuitable for wind energy development. A map of the areal (percentage of land area) distribution of the wind resource digitized in grid cells (1/4{degrees} latitude by 1/3{degrees} longitude) shows that exposed areas with moderate to high wind resource (class 3 and greater) are dispersed throughout much of the contiguous United States.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

United States areal wind resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of the electricity that could potentially be generated by wind power and of the land area available for wind energy development have been calculated for the contiguous United States, in support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy. These estimates were based on the wind resource data published in a national resource atlas. Estimates of the wind resource in this atlas are expressed in wind power classes ranging from class 1 to class 7, with each class representing a range of mean wind power density or equivalent mean speed at specified heights above the ground (Table 1) . Areas designatedclass 4 or greater are suitable for most wind turbine applications. Power class 3 areas are suitable for wind energy development using tall (50-m hub height) turbines. Class 2 areas are marginal and class 1 areas unsuitable for wind energy development. A map of the areal (percentage of land area) distribution of the wind resource digitized in grid cells (1/4[degrees] latitude by 1/3[degrees] longitude) shows that exposed areas with moderate to high wind resource (class 3 and greater) are dispersed throughout much of the contiguous United States.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

On the Heating of the Solar Corona and the Acceleration of the Low-Speed Solar Wind by Acoustic Waves Generated in Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate possibilities of solar coronal heating by acoustic waves generated not at the photosphere but in the corona, aiming at heating in the mid- to low-latitude corona where the low-speed wind is expected to come from. Acoustic waves of period tau ~ 100s are triggered by chromospheric reconnection, one model of small scale magnetic reconnection events recently proposed by Sturrock. These waves having a finite amplitude eventually form shocks to shape sawtooth waves (N-waves), and directly heat the surrounding corona by dissipation of their wave energy. Outward propagation of the N-waves is treated based on the weak shock theory, so that the heating rate can be evaluated consistently with physical properties of the background coronal plasma without setting a dissipation length in an ad hoc manner. We construct coronal structures from the upper chromosphere to the outside of 1AU for various inputs of the acoustic waves having a range of energy flux of F_{w,0} = (1-20) times 10^5 erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} and a period of tau = 60-300s. The heating by the N-wave dissipation effectively works in the inner corona and we find that the waves of F_{w,0} >= 2 times 10^5 erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} and tau >= 60s could maintain peak coronal temperature, T_{max} > 10^6 K. The model could also reproduce the density profile observed in the streamer region. However, due to its short dissipation length, the location of T_{max} is closer to the surface than the observation, and the resultant flow velocity of the solar wind is lower than the observed profile of the low-speed wind. The cooperations with other heating and acceleration sources with the larger dissipation length are inevitable to reproduce the real solar corona.

Takeru Ken Suzuki

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

The InterHourly-Variability (IHV) Index of Geomagnetic Activity and its Use in Deriving the Long-term Variation of Solar Wind Speed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the derivation of the InterHourly Variability (IHV) index of geomagnetic activity. The IHV-index for a geomagnetic element is mechanically derived from hourly values as the sum of the unsigned differences between adjacent hours over a seven-hour interval centered on local midnight. The index is derived separately for stations in both hemispheres within six longitude sectors using only local night hours. It is intended as a long-term index. Available data allows derivation of the index back well into the 19th century. On a time scale of a 27-day Bartels rotation, IHV averages for stations with corrected geomagnetic latitude less than 55 degrees are strongly correlated with midlatitude range indices. Assuming a constant calibration of the aa-index we find that observed yearly values of aa before the year 1957 are 2.9 nT too small compared to values calculated from IHV using the regression constants based on 1980-2004. We interpret this discrepancy as an indication that the calibration of the aa index is in error before 1957. There is no such problem with the ap index. Rotation averages of IHV are also strongly correlated with solar wind parameters (BV^2). On a time scale of a year combining the IHV-index and the recently-developed Inter-Diurnal Variability (IDV) index (giving B) allows determination of solar wind speed, V, from 1890-present. Over the ~120-year series, the yearly mean solar wind speed varied from a low of 303 km/s in 1902 to a high value of 545 km/s in 2003. The calculated yearly values of the product BV using B and V separately derived from IDV and IHV agree quantitatively with (completely independent) BV derived from the amplitude of the diurnal variation of the H component in the polar caps since 1926 and sporadically beyond.

Leif Svalgaard; Edward W. Cliver

2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A pilot golden eagle population study in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orloff and Flannery (1992) estimated that several hundred reports are annually killed by turbine collisions, wire strikes, and electrocutions at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (WRA). The most common fatalities were those of red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), American kestrels (Falco sparvatius), and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), with lesser numbers of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), common ravens (Corvus corax), bam owls (Tyto alba), and others. Among the species of raptors killed at Altamont Pass, the one whose local population is most likely to be impacted is the golden eagle. Besides its being less abundant than the others, the breeding and recruitment rates of golden eagles are naturally slow, increasing their susceptibility to decline as a result of mortality influences. The golden eagle is a species afforded special federal protection because of its inclusion within the Bald Eagle Protection Act as amended in 1963. There are no provisions within the Act which would allow the killing ``taking`` of golden eagles by WRA structures. This report details the results of field studies conducted during 19941. The primary purpose of the investigation is to lay the groundwork for determining whether or not turbine strikes and other hazards related to energy at Altamont Pass may be expected to affect golden eagles on a population basis. We also seek an understanding of the physical and biotic circumstances which attract golden eagles to the WRA within the context of the surrounding landscape and the conditions under which they are killed by wind turbines. Such knowledge may suggest turbine-related or habitat modifications that would result in a lower incidence of eagle mortality.

Hunt, G. [California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Predatory Bird Research Group

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Wind Stress Curl and Coastal Upwelling in the Area of Monterey Bay Observed during AOSN-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft measurements obtained during the 2003–04 Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network (AOSN-II) project were used to study the effect of small-scale variations of near-surface wind stress on coastal upwelling in the area of Monterey Bay. Using 5-km-...

Q. Wang; J. A. Kalogiros; S. R. Ramp; J. D. Paduan; G. Buzorius; H. Jonsson

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Strong wind forcing of the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of mesoscale and steady wind driven 1. Introduction 2. Modelparameterization at high wind speeds 1. Introduction 2. DataSupplementary Formulae 1. Wind Stress 2. Rankine Vortex A .

Zedler, Sarah E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Analysis of Sub-Hourly Ramping Impacts of Wind Energy and Balancing Area Size: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze sub-hourly ramping requirements and the benefit of combining Balancing Authority operations with significant wind penetrations.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Short Term Hydro Power Planning Coordinated with Wind Power in Areas with Congestion Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper a day-ahead planning algorithm for a multi-reservoir hydropower system coordinated with wind power is developed. Coordination applies to real situations, where wind power and hydropower are owned by different utilities, sharing the same transmission lines, though hydropower has priority for transmission capacity. Coordination is thus necessary to minimize wind energy curtailments during congestion situations. The planning algorithm accounts for the uncertainty of wind power forecasts and power market price uncertainty. Planning for the spot market and the regulating market is considered in the algorithm. The planning algorithm is applied to a case study and the results are summarized in the paper.

J. Matevosyan; et al.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Wind Energy Resource Assessment of the Caribbean and Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wind energy resource assessment of the Caribbean and Central America has identified many areas with good to outstanding wind resource potential for wind turbine applications. Annual average wind resource maps and summary tables have been developed for 35 island/country areas throughout the Caribbean and Central America region. The wind resource maps highlight the locations of major resource areas and provide estimates of the wind energy resource potential for typical well-exposed sites in these areas. The average energy in the wind flowing in the layer near the ground is expressed as a wind power class: the greater the average wind energy, the higher the wind power class. The summary tables that are included with each of the 35 island/country wind energy maps provide information on the frequency distribution of the wind speeds (expressed as estimates of the Weibull shape factor, k) and seasonal variations in the wind resource for the major wind resource areas identified on the maps. A new wind power class legend has been developed for relating the wind power classes to values of mean wind power density, mean wind speed, and Weibull k. Guidelines are presented on how to adjust these values to various heights above ground for different roughness and terrain characteristics. Information evaluated in preparing the assessment included existing meteorological data from airports and other weather stations, and from ships and buoys in offshore and coastal areas. In addition, new data from recent measurement sites established for wind energy siting studies were obtained for a few areas of the Caribbean. Other types of information evaluated in the assessment were climatological data and maps on winds aloft, surface pressure, air flow, and topography. The various data were screened and evaluated for their usefulness in preparing the wind resource assessment. Much of the surface data from airports and other land-based weather stations were determined to be from sheltered sites and were thus not very useful in assessing the wind resource at locations that are well exposed to the winds. Ship data were determined to be the most useful for estimating the large-scale wind flow and assessing the spatial distribution of the wind resource throughout the region. Techniques were developed for analyzing and correcting ship wind data and extrapolating these data to coastal and inland areas by considering terrain influences on the large-scale wind flow. In areas where extrapolation of ship wind data was not entirely feasible, such as interior areas of Central America, other techniques were developed for estimating the wind flow and distribution of the wind resource. Through the application of the various innovative techniques developed for assessing the wind resource throughout the Caribbean and Central America region, many areas with potentially good to outstanding wind resource were identified that had not been previously recognized. In areas where existing site data were available from exposed locations, the measured wind resource was compared with the estimated wind resource that was derived using the assessment techniques. In most cases, there was good agreement between the measured wind resource and the estimated wind resource. This assessment project supported activities being pursued by the U.S. Committee for Renewable Energy Commerce and Trade (CORECT), the U.S. government's interagency program to assist in overseas marketing and promote renewable energy exports. An overall goal of the program is to improve U.S. competitiveness in the world renewable energy market. The Caribbean and Central America assessment, which is the first of several possible follow-on international wind energy resource assessments, provides valuable information needed by the U.S. wind energy industry to identify suitable wind resource areas and concentrate their efforts on these areas.

DL Elliott; CI Aspliden; GL Gower; CG Holladay, MN Schwartz

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Low Wind Speed Turbine Project Conceptual Design Study: Advanced Independent Pitch Control; July 30, 2002--July 31, 2004 (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

AES conducted a conceptual study of independent pitch control using inflow angle sensors. The control strategy combined input from turbine states (rotor speed, rotor azimuth, each blade pitch) with inflow angle measurements (each blade angle of attack at station 11 of 15) to derive blade pitch demand signals. The controller reduced loads sufficiently to allow a 10% rotor extension and reduce COE by 6.3%.

Olsen, T.; Lang, E.; Hansen, A.C.; Cheney, M. C.; Quandt, G.; VandenBosche, J.; Meyer, T.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Improvement Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006 J. Cohen and T. Schweizer Princeton Energy Resources International (PERI) Rockville, Maryland A. Laxson, S. Butterfield, S. Schreck, and L. Fingersh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P. Veers and T. Ashwill Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Technical Report NREL/TP-500-41036 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

369

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies: Technical Area 4 -- Balance-of-Station Cost  

SciTech Connect

DOE's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program explores the most advanced wind-generating technologies for improving reliability and decreasing energy costs. The first step in the WindPact program is a scaling study to bound the optimum sizes for wind turbines, to define size limits for certain technologies, and to scale new technologies. The program is divided into four projects: Composite Blades for 80-120-meter Rotors; Turbine, Rotor, and Blade Logistics; Self-Erecting Tower and Nacelle Feasibility; and Balance-of-Station Cost. This report discusses balance-of-station costs, which includes the electrical power collector system, wind turbine foundations, communications and controls, meteorological equipment, access roadways, crane pads, and the maintenance building. The report is based on a conceptual 50-megawatt (MW) wind farm site near Mission, South Dakota. Cost comparisons are provided for four sizes of wind turbines: 750 kilowatt (kW), 2.5 MW, 5.0 MW, and 10.0 MW.

Shafer, D. A.; Strawmyer, K. R.; Conley, R. M.; Guidinger J. H.; Wilkie, D. C.; Zellman, T. F.

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

370

Grid Operation and Coordination with Wind -2 1.0 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(DFIGs) also produce power that varies with wind speed, although the torque- speed controller provides

McCalley, James D.

371

Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

372

ISET-Wind-Index Assessment of the Annual Available Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particularly in years with wind speeds that are clearly below average, dissatisfaction of operators and even liquidity problems are sparked through the unexpected low annual power production. An objective standard for the evaluation of the respective “wind year ” is required for the internal estimation of the performance of wind farms, and for justification to share owners and banks. The annual wind conditions are composed from such a multitude of meteorological situations, differing from location to location, that the available wind energy at every individual location develops totally differently. A single code is therefore not sufficient to describe the “wind year ” in Germany and, moreover, the evaluation of annual available wind energy must be carried out separately for the smallest areas possible. With the support of the Gothaer Rückversicherungen AG, a procedure has been developed at ISET which provides the proportion of the respective annual available wind energy, in relation to the long-term average available wind energy, for each 10 km x 10 km sized plan area in Germany. This amount, the ISET-Wind-Index, is founded on wind measurements at locations that are typical for wind energy use and therefore presents an objective standard. The measurement grid is part of the “Scientific Measurement and Evaluation Programme ” (WMEP), which accompanies the “250 MW Wind ” project of the German Federal Ministry for Economy and Labour. The ISET-Wind-Index, which will be regularly updated, provides an objective standard for the estimation of annual available

Berthold Hahn; Kurt Rohrig

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Challenges and strategies for increasing adoption of small wind turbines in urban areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A student group at MIT in cooperation with the MIT Department of Facilities is currently working to install a Skystream 3.7 wind turbine on MIT's campus. This has raised several questions about how to best develop small ...

Ferrigno, Kevin J. (Kevin James)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 23, NO. 2, JUNE 2008 551 Sliding Mode Power Control of Variable-Speed Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the wind farm single phase equivalent circuit. The stability analysis is carried out, phase margin, and vector gain margin calculated for different number of wind turbines in operation. The interaction between the wind turbine control system and the wind farm structure in wind farms is deeply

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

375

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1ŒComposite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 * NREL/SR-500-29492 1 * NREL/SR-500-29492 Dayton A. Griffin Global Energy Concepts Kirkland, Washington WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1-Composite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor March 21, 2000 - March 15, 2001 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 April 2001 * NREL/SR-500-29492 WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1-Composite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor March 21, 2000 - March 15, 2001 Dayton A. Griffin Global Energy Concepts Kirkland, Washington NREL Technical Monitor: Alan Laxson Prepared under Subcontract No. YAM-0-30203-01 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

376

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 3ŒSelf-Erecting Tower and Nacelle Feasibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 * NREL/SR-500-29493 1 * NREL/SR-500-29493 Global Energy Concepts, LLC Kirkland, Washington WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 3-Self-Erecting Tower and Nacelle Feasibility March 2000-March 2001 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 May 2001 * NREL/SR-500-29493 WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 3-Self-Erecting Tower and Nacelle Feasibility March 2000-March 2001 Global Energy Concepts, LLC Kirkland, Washington NREL Technical Monitor: Alan Laxson Prepared under Subcontract No. YAM-0-30203-01 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard

377

High Resolution Atmospheric Modeling for Wind Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

The ability of the WRF atmospheric model to forecast wind speed over the Nysted wind park was investigated as a function of time. It was found that in the time period we considered (August 1-19, 2008), the model is able to predict wind speeds reasonably accurately for 48 hours ahead, but that its forecast skill deteriorates rapidly after 48 hours. In addition, a preliminary analysis was carried out to investigate the impact of vertical grid resolution on the forecast skill. Our preliminary finding is that increasing vertical grid resolution does not have a significant impact on the forecast skill of the WRF model over Nysted wind park during the period we considered. Additional simulations during this period, as well as during other time periods, will be run in order to validate the results presented here. Wind speed is a difficult parameter to forecast due the interaction of large and small length scale forcing. To accurately forecast the wind speed at a given location, the model must correctly forecast the movement and strength of synoptic systems, as well as the local influence of topography / land use on the wind speed. For example, small deviations in the forecast track or strength of a large-scale low pressure system can result in significant forecast errors for local wind speeds. The purpose of this study is to provide a preliminary baseline of a high-resolution limited area model forecast performance against observations from the Nysted wind park. Validating the numerical weather prediction model performance for past forecasts will give a reasonable measure of expected forecast skill over the Nysted wind park. Also, since the Nysted Wind Park is over water and some distance from the influence of terrain, the impact of high vertical grid spacing for wind speed forecast skill will also be investigated.

Simpson, M; Bulaevskaya, V; Glascoe, L; Singer, M

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

378

A population study of golden eagles in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource area. Second-year progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since January 1994, the Predatory Bird Research Group, University of California, Santa Cruz, has been conducting a field investigation of the ecology of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the vicinity of the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (WRA). The 190 km{sup 2} facility lies just east of San Francisco Bay in California and contains about 6,500 wind turbines. Grassland and oak savanna habitats surrounding the WRA support a substantial resident population of golden eagles. Each year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service receivers reports from the wind industry of about 30 golden eagle casualties occurring at the WRA, and it is probable that many more carcasses go unnoticed. Over 90 percent of the casualties are attributed to collisions with wind turbines. The main purpose of this study is to estimate the effect of turbine-related mortality on the golden eagle population of the area. Assessing the impact of the WRA kills on the population requires quantification of both survival and reproduction. To estimate survival rates of both territorial and non-territorial golden eagles, we tagged 179 individuals with radio-telemetry transmitters expected to function for about four years and equipped with mortality sensors. Population segments represented in the tagged sample include 79 juveniles, 45 subadults, 17n floaters (non-territorial adults), and 38 breeders. Effective sample sizes in the older segments increase as younger eagles mature or become territorial. Since the beginning of the study, we have conducted weekly roll-call surveys by airplane to locate the tagged eagles in relation to the WRA and to monitor their survival. The surveyed area extends from the Oakland Hills southeast through the Diablo Mountain Range to San Luis Reservoir about 75 km southeast of the WRA. The surveys show that breeding eagles rarely enter the WRA while the non-territorial eagles tend to move about freely throughout the study area and often visit the WRA.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Coastal zone wind energy. Part I. Potential wind power density fields based on 3-D model simulations of the dominant wind regimes for three east and Gulf coast areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of applying a numerical model of the atmosphere to the problem of locating areas of maximum wind power are presented. Three US coastal regions, of approximately 10/sup 5/ km/sup 2/ area each, are investigated. For each region the spatial distribution of daily average power density (W m/sup -2/) for the lowest 100 m of the atmosphere is given for the three most prevalent weather regimes. These distributions are then combined to form an estimate of the annual average power density for each region. Comparisons with long-term climatological data at stations within each region show good agreement between model estimated and observed wind power density for two of the three regions studied.

Garstang, M.; Pielke, R.A.; Snow, J.W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

2008 Special Issue: Optimal wide-area monitoring and nonlinear adaptive coordinating neurocontrol of a power system with wind power integration and multiple FACTS devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wide-area coordinating control is becoming an important issue and a challenging problem in the power industry. This paper proposes a novel optimal wide-area coordinating neurocontrol (WACNC), based on wide-area measurements, for a power system with power ... Keywords: Adaptive critic designs, FACTS devices, Particle swarm optimization, Radial basis function network, Wide-area control, Wind power

Wei Qiao; Ganesh K. Venayagamoorthy; Ronald G. Harley

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hurricane Katrina Wind Investigation Report  

SciTech Connect

This investigation of roof damage caused by Hurricane Katrina is a joint effort of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, Inc. (RICOWI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy (ORNL/DOE). The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) was initiated in 1996. Hurricane damage that met the criteria of a major windstorm event did not materialize until Hurricanes Charley and Ivan occurred in August 2004. Hurricane Katrina presented a third opportunity for a wind damage investigation in August 29, 2005. The major objectives of the WIP are as follows: (1) to investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind events; (2) to factually describe roofing assembly performance and modes of failure; and (3) to formally report results of the investigations and damage modes for substantial wind speeds The goal of the WIP is to perform unbiased, detailed investigations by credible personnel from the roofing industry, the insurance industry, and academia. Data from these investigations will, it is hoped, lead to overall improvement in roofing products, systems, roofing application, and durability and a reduction in losses, which may lead to lower overall costs to the public. This report documents the results of an extensive and well-planned investigative effort. The following program changes were implemented as a result of the lessons learned during the Hurricane Charley and Ivan investigations: (1) A logistics team was deployed to damage areas immediately following landfall; (2) Aerial surveillance--imperative to target wind damage areas--was conducted; (3) Investigation teams were in place within 8 days; (4) Teams collected more detailed data; and (5) Teams took improved photographs and completed more detailed photo logs. Participating associations reviewed the results and lessons learned from the previous investigations and many have taken the following actions: (1) Moved forward with recommendations for new installation procedures; (2) Updated and improved application guidelines and manuals from associations and manufacturers; (3) Launched certified product installer programs; and (4) Submitted building code changes to improve product installation. Estimated wind speeds at the damage locations came from simulated hurricane models prepared by Applied Research Associates of Raleigh, North Carolina. A dynamic hurricane wind field model was calibrated to actual wind speeds measured at 12 inland and offshore stations. The maximum estimated peak gust wind speeds in Katrina were in the 120-130 mph range. Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Grand Isle, Louisiana, and traveled almost due north across the city of New Orleans. Hurricane winds hammered the coastline from Houma, Louisiana, to Pensacola, Florida. The severe flooding problems in New Orleans made it almost impossible for the investigating teams to function inside the city. Thus the WIP investigations were all conducted in areas east of the city. The six teams covered the coastal areas from Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, on the west to Pascagoula, Mississippi, on the east. Six teams involving a total of 25 persons documented damage to both low slope and steep slope roofing systems. The teams collected specific information on each building examined, including type of structure (use or occupancy), wall construction, roof type, roof slope, building dimensions, roof deck, insulation, construction, and method of roof attachment. In addition, the teams noted terrain exposure and the estimated wind speeds at the building site from the Katrina wind speed map. With each team member assigned a specific duty, they described the damage in detail and illustrated important features with numerous color photos. Where possible, the points of damage initiation were identified and damage propagation described. Because the wind speeds in Katrina at landfall, where the investigations took place, were less than code-specified design speeds, one would expect roof damage to be minimal. One team speculated that damage to all roofs in the area they examined was les

Desjarlais, A. O.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

On the measurement of wind speeds in tornadoes with a portable CW/FM-CW Doppler radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both the formation mechanism and structure of tornadoes are not yet well understood. The Doppler radar is probably the best remote-sensing instrument at present for determining the wind field in tornadoes. Although much has been learned about the non-supercell tornado from relatively close range using Doppler radars at fixed sites, close-range measurements in supercell tornadoes are relatively few. Doppler radar can increase significantly the number of high-resolution, sub-cloud base measurements of both the tornado vortex and its parent vortex in supercells, with simultaneous visual documentation. The design details and operation of the CW/FM-CW Doppler radar developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and used by storm-intercept teams at the Univ. of Oklahoma are described elsewhere. The radar transmits 1 W at 3 cm, and can be switched back and forth between CW and FM-CW modes. In the FM-CW mode the sweep repetition frequency is 15.575 kHz and the sweep width 1.9 MHz; the corresponding maximum unambiguous range and velocity, and range resolution are 5 km, {plus minus} 115 m s{sup {minus}1}, and 78 m respectively. The bistatic antennas, which have half-power beamwidths of 5{degree}, are easily pointed wit the aid of a boresighted VCR. FM-CW Data are recorded on the VCR, while voice documentation is recorded on the audio tape; video is recorded on another VCR. The radar and antennas are easily mounted on a tripod, and can be set up by three people in a minute or two. The purpose of this paper is to describe the signal processing techniques used to determine the Doppler spectrum in the FM-CW mode and a method of its interpretation in real time, and to present data gathered in a tornadic storm in 1990. 15 refs., 7 figs.

Bluestein, H.B. (Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (USA). School of Meteorology); Unruh, W.P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Particle Swarm Optimization and Gradient Descent Methods for Optimization of PI Controller for AGC of Multi-area Thermal-Wind-Hydro Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automatic generation control (AGC) of three unequal interconnected Thermal, Wind and Hydro power plant has been designed with PI controller. Further computational intelligent technique Particle Swarm Optimization and conventional Gradient Descent ... Keywords: Automatic generation control, Particle swarm optimization, Gradient Descent method, Generation rate constraint, Area control error, Wind energy conversion system

Naresh Kumari, A N. Jha

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Population Study of Golden Eagles in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: Population Trend Analysis, 1994-1997  

SciTech Connect

The wind industry has annually reported 28-43 turbine blade strike casualties of golden eagles in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, and many more carcasses have doubtless gone unnoticed. Because this species is especially sensitive to adult survival rate changes, we focused upon estimating the demographic trend of the population. In aerial surveys, we monitored survival within a sample of 179 radio-tagged eagles over a four-year period. We also obtained data on territory occupancy and reproduction of about 65 eagle pairs residing in the area. Of 61 recorded deaths of radio-tagged eagles during the four-year investigation, 23 (38%) were caused by wind turbine blade strikes. Additional fatalities were unrecorded because blade strikes sometimes destroy radio transmitters. Annual survival was estimated at 0.7867 (SE=0.0263) for non-territorial eagles and 0.8964 (SE=0.0371) for territorial ones. Annual reproduction was 0.64 (SE=0.08) young per territorial pair (0.25 per female). These parameters were used to estimate population growth rates under different modeling frameworks. At present, there are indications that a reserve of non-breeding adults still exists, i.e., there is an annual territorial reoccupancy rate of 100% and a low incidence (3%) of subadults as members of breeding pairs.

Predatory Bird Research Group, Long Marine Laboratory

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

385

Bird Risk Behaviors and Fatalities at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: Period of Performance, March 1998--December 2000  

SciTech Connect

It has been documented that wind turbine operations at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area kill large numbers of birds of multiple species, including raptors. We initiated a study that integrates research on bird behaviors, raptor prey availability, turbine design, inter-turbine distribution, landscape attributes, and range management practices to explain the variation in avian mortality at two levels of analysis: the turbine and the string of turbines. We found that inter-specific differences in intensities of use of airspace within close proximity did not explain the variation in mortality among species. Unique suites of attributes relate to mortality of each species, so species-specific analyses are required to understand the factors that underlie turbine-caused fatalities. We found that golden eagles are killed by turbines located in the canyons and that rock piles produced during preparation of the wind tower laydown areas related positively to eagle mortality, perhaps due to the use of these rock piles as cover by desert cottontails. Other similar relationships between fatalities and environmental factors are identified and discussed. The tasks remaining to complete the project are summarized.

Thelander, C. G.; Smallwood, K. S.; Rugge, L.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Wind Derivatives: Modeling and Pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind is considered to be a free, renewable and environmentally friendly source of energy. However, wind farms are exposed to excessive weather risk since the power production depends on the wind speed, the wind direction and the wind duration. This risk ... Keywords: Forecasting, Pricing, Wavelet networks, Weather derivatives, Wind derivatives

A. Alexandridis; A. Zapranis

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Operational Impacts of Wind Energy Resources in the Bonneville Power Administration Control Area - Phase I Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a methodology developed to study the future impact of wind on BPA power system load following and regulation requirements. The methodology uses historical data and stochastic processes to simulate the load balancing processes in the BPA power system, by mimicking the actual power system operations. Therefore, the results are close to reality, yet the study based on this methodology is convenient to conduct. Compared with the proposed methodology, existing methodologies for doing similar analysis include dispatch model simulation and standard deviation evaluation on load and wind data. Dispatch model simulation is constrained by the design of the dispatch program, and standard deviation evaluation is artificial in separating the load following and regulation requirements, both of which usually do not reflect actual operational practice. The methodology used in this study provides not only capacity requirement information, it also analyzes the ramp rate requirements for system load following and regulation processes. The ramp rate data can be used to evaluate generator response/maneuverability requirements, which is another necessary capability of the generation fleet for the smooth integration of wind energy. The study results are presented in an innovative way such that the increased generation capacity or ramp requirements are compared for two different years, across 24 hours a day. Therefore, the impact of different levels of wind energy on generation requirements at different times can be easily visualized.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Lu, Shuai

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN BRAZIL- ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL LICENSING OF WIND POWER PLANTS IN PERMANENT PRESERVATION AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brazilian electric energy matrix is mostly renewable. According to the Generation Information Base (BIG) of the Brazilian Electricity Regulatory Agency (ANEEL), hydroelectricity is responsible for 67.31 % of the country's energy. The additional generation comes mostly from fossil fuels, which’s use is questioned when it comes to environmental quality and climate change. Despite its abundance, hydroelectric power generation has physical, socioeconomic and environmental limitations. Thus, it is essential to develop alternative technologies, providing security in the supply of electric energy and the maintenance of a clean matrix. Among the alternative technologies available, wind power is the one that has been gaining prominence, domestically and internationally speaking. In the last auction of renewable sources held in August 2010 in Brazil, the energy produced by the plants of sugarcane bagasse (biomass) was traded at an average of R $ 144.20 MWh; wind energy, which was the cheapest, was traded at R $ 130.86, and the energy from small hydropower plants (PCH), at R $ 141.93 MWh. The wind power plants accounted for 70 % of the auction, which resulted in a plan for increasing its installed capacity by fivefold, by the year 2013. Brazil has great potential to be explored (estimated 143,000 MW), yet despite being appealing, wind energy still

Cristiano Abijaode Amaral; Adriana Coli Pedreira

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Dependence of Wind Turbine Curves on Atmospheric Stability Regimes - An Analysis of a West Coast North American Tall Wind Farm  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tall wind turbines, with hub heights at 80 m or above, can extract large amounts of energy from the atmosphere because they are likely to encounter higher wind speeds, but they face challenges given the complex nature of wind flow in the boundary layer. Depending on whether the boundary layer is stable, convective or neutral, mean wind speed (U) and turbulence ({sigma}{sub U}) may vary greatly across the tall turbine swept area (40 m to 120 m). This variation can cause a single turbine to produce difference amounts of power during time periods of identical hub height wind speeds. The study examines the influence that atmospheric mixing or stability has on power output at a West Coast North American wind farm. They first examine the accuracy and applicability of two, relatively simple stability parameters, the wind shear-exponent, {alpha}, and the turbulence intensity, I{sub u}, against the physically-based, Obukhov length, L, to describe the wind speed and turbulence profiles in the rotor area. In general, the on-site stability parameters {alpha} and I{sub u} are in high agreement with the off-site, L stability scale parameter. Next, they divide the measurement period into five stability classes (strongly stable, stable, neutral, convective, and strongly convective) to discern stability-effects on power output. When only the mean wind speed profile is taken into account, the dependency of power output on boundary layer stability is only subtly apparent. When turbulence intensity I{sub u} is considered, the power generated for a given wind speed is twenty percent higher during strongly stable conditions than during strongly convective conditions as observed in the spring and summer seasons at this North American wind farm.

Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Sharp, J; Zulauf, M

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

390

An Improved Method for Estimating the Wind Power Density Distribution Function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind power density (WPD) distribution curve is essential for wind power assessment and wind turbine engineering. The usual practice of estimating this curve from wind speed data is to first estimate the wind speed probability density function ...

Mark L. Morrissey; Werner E. Cook; J. Scott Greene

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ polarization difference is used to restrict the application of the geophysical retrieval algorithms which are developed to handle specific atmospheric absorptive situations. An improved semi-empirical sea surface emissivity model is integrated into this refined D-matrix procedure that is being developed for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Radiometer (AMSR). The purpose of this work is to test the refined geophysical parameter retrieval methods using data from the Special Sensor Microwave / Imager (SSM/I). When comparing the statistical performance of the TIWV, WS, and CLW retrieval methods presented to the statistical performance of published retrieval methods for each geophysical parameter, the retrieval methods developed for this study perform only slightly better. However, it is demonstrated that the new retrieval methods are more physically valid than the comparison retrieval methods. The utilization of the polarization difference of the 85 GHZ channels to restrict the application of specifically-derived retrieval algorithms proves to be a valuable and reliable geophysical parameter retrieval tool.

Manning, Norman Willis William

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Development of a Three-Dimensional Meso-? Primitive Equation Model: Katabatic Winds Simulation in the Area of Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial evolution of Antarctic katabatic winds in the area of Terra Nova Bay is examined using the three-dimensional version of the Université Catholique de Louvain-Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (UCL-MAR) mesoscale primitive equation models. ...

Hubert Gallée; Guy Schayes

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Analysis of the Impact of Balancing Area Cooperation on the Operation of the Western Interconnection with Wind and Solar Generation (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes the analysis of the impact of balancing area cooperation on the operation of the Western Interconnection with wind and solar generation, including a discussion of operating reserves, ramping, production simulation, and conclusions.

Milligan, M.; Lew, D.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Wind Energy Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Avg Wind Speed 7.5 m/s 8.74 m/s GE 2.x turbine family ... 1 to 48 Hour Wind Forecasting ... Danish Transmission Grid w/ Interconnects & Offshore Sites ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Economics  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Cost Components Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England How does wind compare to the cost of other electricity options? Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Wind Power Economics Long-Term Cost Trends Since the first major installations of commercial-scale wind turbines in the 1980s, the cost of energy from wind power projects has decreased substantially due to larger turbine generators, towers, and rotor lengths; scale economies associated with larger projects; improvements in manufacturing efficiency, and technological advances in turbine generator and blade design. These technological advances have allowed for higher generating capacities per turbine and more efficient capture of wind, especially at lower wind speeds.

396

High Horizontal and Vertical Resolution Limited-Area Model: Near-Surface and Wind Energy Forecast Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As harvesting of wind energy grows, so does the need for improved forecasts from the surface to the top of wind turbines. To improve mesoscale forecasts of wind, temperature, and dewpoint temperature in this layer, two different approaches are ...

Natacha B. Bernier; Stéphane Bélair

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

DOE provides detailed offshore wind resource maps - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. ... Wind energy potential is broken down by wind speed, water depth, and distance from shore.

398

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005), Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. ,Pryor (2003), Can satellite sampling of offshore wind speedsrealistically represent wind speed distributions? , J. Appl.

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Methods and apparatus for reducing peak wind turbine loads ...  

A method for reducing peak loads of wind turbines in a changing wind environment includes measuring or estimating an instantaneous wind speed and direction at the ...

400

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the status of wind energy technology in 2002 and describes the potential for technology advancements to reduce the cost and increase the performance of wind turbines.

Cohen, J.; Schweizer, T.; Laxson, A.; Butterfield, S.; Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Veers, P.; Ashwill, T.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Studies on Spatial Structure of Wind Gust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The peak gust speed is often used to evaluate the maximum wind tome acting on the structure in wind engineering. To evaluate this peak gust speed, the ratio of the peak gust speed over the mean wind speed (called gust factor) is defined. The peak ...

Yasushi Mitsuta; Osamu Tsukamoto

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Zoning for Small Wind: The Importance of Tower Height  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

1 1 Zoning for Small Wind: The Importance of Tower Height An ASES Small Wind Webinar Mick Sagrillo-Wisconsin's Focus on Energy © 2008 by Mick Sagrillo 2 Definitions: rotor L&S Tech. Assoc., Inc. Rotor = "collector" for a wind system 3 Definitions: wind * Wind = the 'fuel' * Wind has two 'components' - Quantity = wind speed (velocity or V) - Quality = 'clean' flowing wind 4 Quantity * = average annual wind speed * Climate, not weather * Akin to annual average sun hours for PV or head and flow for hydro * Wind speed increases with height above ground... * ...Due to diminished ground drag (friction) 5 Power in the wind V³ * Wind speed = V * Power available is proportional to wind speed x wind speed x wind speed - or P ~ V x V x V - or P ~ V ³ * Therefore, 10% V = 33% P * Lesson !

403

The Temporal Autocorrelation Structure of Sea Surface Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The temporal autocorrelation structures of sea surface vector winds and wind speeds are considered. Analyses of scatterometer and reanalysis wind data demonstrate that the autocorrelation functions (acf) of surface zonal wind, meridional wind, and ...

Adam H. Monahan

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Combining Balancing Areas' Variability: Impacts on Wind Integration in the Western Interconnection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper investigates the potential impact of balancing area cooperation on a large-scale in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC).

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Beuning, S.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Wind energy conversion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Developing Techniques to Evaluate the Designs and Operating Environments of Offshore Wind Turbines in the Mid-Atlantic and Lower Great Lakes Region; AWS Truewind, LLC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with AWS Truewind, LLC to study offshore wind and wave environments of the Atlantic and lower Great Lakes regions by estimating available wind power resource.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Feasibility of utilizing wind energy in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the feasibility of utilizing wind energy to meet part of the energy demands related to pumping water and to generating electricity for the rural households in Thailand. The data for this study were divided into three different areas: (1) wind speed data, (2) the wind machine performance data, and (3) the rural energy demand data. The wind machine were divided into two categories of water-pumping windmills and electricity-generating wind machines. Three types of water pumping windmills and one type of electricity-generating wind machine were matched with the wind condition in Thailand. They were the multi-blade rotor, the sailwing rotor model (WE 002), the slow-speed sailwing rotor, and the Aerowatt model (1100 FP5G) respectively. It was concluded that, in Thailand: (1) the multiblade rotor and the sail-wing rotor (WE 002) windmill is suitable for pumping water for domestic use at 43 specified locations; (2) the slow-speed sailwing rotor windmill is suitable for pumping water for small irrigation at 32 specified locations; and (3) the Aerowatt model (1100 GP5G) is suitable for generating electricity for household use at 29 specified locations.

Jamkrajang, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Application of Radar Wind Observations for Low-Level NWP Wind Forecast Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Finnish Meteorological Institute has produced a new numerical weather prediction model–based wind atlas of Finland. The wind atlas provides information on local wind conditions in terms of annual and monthly wind speed and direction averages. ...

Kirsti Salonen; Sami Niemelä; Carl Fortelius

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Method and Case Study for Estimating the Ramping Capability of a Control Area or Balancing Authority and Implications for Moderate or High Wind Penetration: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In several regions of the United States there has been a significant increase in wind generation capability over the past several years. As the penetration rate of wind capacity increases, grid operators and planners are increasingly concerned about accommodating the increased variability that wind contributes to the system. In this paper we examine the distinction between regulation, load following, hourly energy, and energy imbalance to understand how restructured power systems accommodate and value inter-hour ramps. We use data from two restructured markets, California and PJM, and from Western Area Power Administration's (WAPA's) Rocky Mountain control area to determine expected load-following capability in each region. Our approach is to examine the load-following capability that currently exists using data from existing generators in the region. We then examine the levels of wind penetration that can be accommodated with this capability using recently collected wind farm data. We discuss how load-following costs are captured in restructured markets, what resources are available to meet these requirements, why there are no explicit load-following tariffs, and the societal importance of being able to access generator ramping capability. Finally, the implications for wind plants and wind integration costs are examined.

Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Atmospheric Stability Impacts on Power Curves of Tall Wind Turbines - An Analysis of a West Coast North American Wind Farm  

SciTech Connect

Tall wind turbines, with hub heights at 80 m or above, can extract large amounts of energy from the atmosphere because they are likely to encounter higher wind speeds, but they face challenges given the complex nature of wind flow and turbulence at these heights in the boundary layer. Depending on whether the boundary layer is stable, neutral, or convective, the mean wind speed, direction, and turbulence properties may vary greatly across the tall turbine swept area (40 to 120 m AGL). This variability can cause tall turbines to produce difference amounts of power during time periods with identical hub height wind speeds. Using meteorological and power generation data from a West Coast North American wind farm over a one-year period, our study synthesizes standard wind park observations, such as wind speed from turbine nacelles and sparse meteorological tower observations, with high-resolution profiles of wind speed and turbulence from a remote sensing platform, to quantify the impact of atmospheric stability on power output. We first compare approaches to defining atmospheric stability. The standard, limited, wind farm operations enable the calculation only of a wind shear exponent ({alpha}) or turbulence intensity (I{sub U}) from cup anemometers, while the presence at this wind farm of a SODAR enables the direct observation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) throughout the turbine rotor disk. Additionally, a nearby research meteorological station provided observations of the Obukhov length, L, a direct measure of atmospheric stability. In general, the stability parameters {alpha}, I{sub U}, and TKE are in high agreement with the more physically-robust L, with TKE exhibiting the best agreement with L. Using these metrics, data periods are segregated by stability class to investigate power performance dependencies. Power output at this wind farm is highly correlated with atmospheric stability during the spring and summer months, while atmospheric stability exerts little impact on power output during the winter and autumn periods. During the spring and summer seasons, power output for a given wind speed was significantly higher during stable conditions and significantly lower during strongly convective conditions: power output differences approached 20% between stable and convective regimes. The dependency of stability on power output was apparent only when both turbulence and the shape of the wind speed profile were considered. Turbulence is one of the mechanisms by which atmospheric stability affects a turbine's power curve at this particular site, and measurements of turbulence can yield actionable insights into wind turbine behavior.

Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

412

Atmospheric Stability Impacts on Power Curves of Tall Wind Turbines - An Analysis of a West Coast North American Wind Farm  

SciTech Connect

Tall wind turbines, with hub heights at 80 m or above, can extract large amounts of energy from the atmosphere because they are likely to encounter higher wind speeds, but they face challenges given the complex nature of wind flow and turbulence at these heights in the boundary layer. Depending on whether the boundary layer is stable, neutral, or convective, the mean wind speed, direction, and turbulence properties may vary greatly across the tall turbine swept area (40 to 120 m AGL). This variability can cause tall turbines to produce difference amounts of power during time periods with identical hub height wind speeds. Using meteorological and power generation data from a West Coast North American wind farm over a one-year period, our study synthesizes standard wind park observations, such as wind speed from turbine nacelles and sparse meteorological tower observations, with high-resolution profiles of wind speed and turbulence from a remote sensing platform, to quantify the impact of atmospheric stability on power output. We first compare approaches to defining atmospheric stability. The standard, limited, wind farm operations enable the calculation only of a wind shear exponent ({alpha}) or turbulence intensity (I{sub U}) from cup anemometers, while the presence at this wind farm of a SODAR enables the direct observation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) throughout the turbine rotor disk. Additionally, a nearby research meteorological station provided observations of the Obukhov length, L, a direct measure of atmospheric stability. In general, the stability parameters {alpha}, I{sub U}, and TKE are in high agreement with the more physically-robust L, with TKE exhibiting the best agreement with L. Using these metrics, data periods are segregated by stability class to investigate power performance dependencies. Power output at this wind farm is highly correlated with atmospheric stability during the spring and summer months, while atmospheric stability exerts little impact on power output during the winter and autumn periods. During the spring and summer seasons, power output for a given wind speed was significantly higher during stable conditions and significantly lower during strongly convective conditions: power output differences approached 20% between stable and convective regimes. The dependency of stability on power output was apparent only when both turbulence and the shape of the wind speed profile were considered. Turbulence is one of the mechanisms by which atmospheric stability affects a turbine's power curve at this particular site, and measurements of turbulence can yield actionable insights into wind turbine behavior.

Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

413

Wind characteristics for agricultural wind energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy utilization in agriculture can provide a potentially significant savings in fuel oil consumption and ultimately a cost savings to the farmer. A knowledge of the wind characteristics within a region and at a location can contribute greatly to a more efficient and cost-effective use of this resource. Current research indicates that the important wind characteristics include mean annual wind speed and the frequency distribution of the wind, seasonal and diurnal variations in wind speed and direction, and the turbulent and gustiness characteristics of the wind. Further research is underway to provide a better definition of the total wind resource available, improved methods for siting WECS and an improved understanding of the environment to which the WECS respond.

Renne, D. S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Design and Demonstration of On-Site Fabrication of Fluted-Steel Towers Using LITS-Form(TM) Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's subcontract with Native American Technologies to develop a new method of metal plate forming to produce wind turbine towers.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Voltage quality behaviour of a wind turbine based Remote Area Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power quality behaviour of a Remote Area Power System (RAPS) consisting of a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG), its main loads and a dummy load is presented in this paper. The dummy load is used to maintain the power balance of the system under ...

Nishad Mendis; Kashem M. Muttaqi; Sarath Perera

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Variability of wind power near Oklahoma City and implications for siting of wind turbines  

SciTech Connect

Data from five sites near Oklahoma City were examined to assess wind power availability. Wind turbines of identical manufacture were operated at three of the sites, one of which was also equipped with anemometers on a 100-ft tower. Comprehensive anemometric data were available from the other two sites. The study indicates that the average wind speed varies substantially over Oklahoma's rolling plains, which have often been nominally regarded as flat for purposes of wind power generation. Average wind differences may be as much as 5 mph at 20 ft above ground level, and 7 mph at 100 ft above ground level for elevation differences of about 200 ft above mean sea level, even in the absence of substantial features of local terrain. Local altitude above mean sea level seems to be as influential as the shape of local terrain in determining the average wind speed. The wind turbine used at a meteorologically instrumented site in the study produced the power expected from it for the wind regime in which it was situated. The observed variations of local wind imply variations in annual kWh of as much as a factor of four between identical turbines located at similar heights above ground level in shallow valleys and on hilltops or elevated extended flat areas. 17 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

Kessler, E.; Eyster, R.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Doppler Lidar–Based Wind-Profile Measurement System for Offshore Wind-Energy and Other Marine Boundary Layer Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate measurement of wind speed profiles aloft in the marine boundary layer is a difficult challenge. The development of offshore wind energy requires accurate information on wind speeds above the surface at least at the levels occupied by ...

Yelena L. Pichugina; Robert M. Banta; W. Alan Brewer; Scott P. Sandberg; R. Michael Hardesty

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

NREL: Wind Research - NREL's Wind Technology Patents Boost Efficiency and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's Wind Technology Patents Boost Efficiency and Lower Costs NREL's Wind Technology Patents Boost Efficiency and Lower Costs March 22, 2013 Wind energy research conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) during the last decade has earned the lab two patents, one for adaptive pitch control and one for a resonance blade test system that will ultimately help its industry partners increase the efficiency of wind technologies and reduce the cost of wind energy. The most recent patent for adaptive pitch control for variable-speed wind turbines was granted in May 2012. Variable-speed wind turbines use rotor blade pitch control to regulate rotor speed at the high wind speed limit. Although manufacturers and operators have been interested in developing a nominal pitch to improve

419

Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value ofWind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and theNorthwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this report, we use wind speed data modeled by TrueWind Solutions, LLC (now AWS Truewind) to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwest. (Data from this dataset are referred to as ''TrueWind data'' throughout this report.) The intra-annual wind speed variations reported in the TrueWind datasets have not previously been used in published work, however, so we also compare them to a collection of anemometer wind speed measurements and to a limited set of actual wind farm production data. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in the Northwest and California with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. Based on our research, we reach three key conclusions. (1) Temporal patterns have a moderate impact on the wholesale market value of wind power and a larger impact on the capacity factor during peak hours. The best-timed wind power sites have a wholesale market value that is up to 4 percent higher than the average market price, while the worst-timed sites have a market value that is up to 11 percent below the average market price. The best-timed wind sites could produce as much as 30-40 percent more power during peak hours than they do on average during the year, while the worst timed sites may produce 30-60 percent less power during peak hours. (2) Northwestern markets appear to be well served by Northwestern wind and poorly served by California wind; results are less clear for California markets. Both the modeled TrueWind data and the anemometer data indicate that many Northwestern wind sites are reasonably well-matched to the Northwest's historically winter-peaking wholesale electricity prices and loads, while most California sites are poorly matched to these prices and loads. However, the TrueWind data indicate that most California and Northwestern wind sites are poorly matched to California's summer-afternoon-peaking prices and loads, while the anemometer data suggest that many of these same sites are well matched to California's wholesale prices and loads. (3) TrueWind and anemometer data agree about wind speeds in most times and places, but disagree about California's summer afternoon wind speeds: The TrueWind data indicate that wind speeds at sites in California's coastal mountains and some Northwestern locations dip deeply during summer days and stay low through much of the afternoon. In contrast, the anemometer data indicate that winds at these sites begin to rise during the afternoon and are relatively strong when power is needed most. At other times and locations, the two datasets show good agreement. This disagreement may be due in part to time-varying wind shear between the anemometer heights (20-25m) and the TrueWind reference height (50m or 70m), but may also be due to modeling errors or data collection inconsistencies.

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/RERL_Fact_Sheet_6_Wind_resource_interpretation.pdf * 1 m/s = 2.237 mph. July 10, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Distributions Figure 3 - Wind Speed Distribution, March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 July 10, 2007 Renewable Energy Figure 5 - Diurnal Average Wind Speed, March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 July 10, 2007 Renewable Energy

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a given direction and the average wind speed in that May 2, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Wind Speed, December 1, 2006 ­ February 28, 2007 May 2, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory PageWIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA December 1st , 2006 ­ February 28th , 2007 Prepared

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

422

Demonstration of wind turbine. Final technical report at grant program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposal F-602 is a demonstration of a commercially available wind-electric device - an Enertech Corp. Series 1800 model wind turbine. The demonstration site selected was the New Directions school campus, a public school facility, in Sarasota, Florida. During testing, an investigation of the wind power potential for the area was undertaken. In addition, negotiations with the Florida Power and Light Company for parallel operation of the wind system (utility interface), were initiated. An Operating Agreement contract is now pending approval by the Sarasota County School Board. The results to date, of this site's wind power potential, have been well below computational expectancies based upon wind speed data for the area. Analysis will continue, to determine the cause of the windplant's low net output.

Pendola, W. Jr.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Energy Analysis Department Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Analysis Department Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind;Methods Summary Energy Analysis Department Wind Speed Data ­ TrueWind modeled wind-speed estimates (main;Summary of Key Findings (1) Energy Analysis Department Temporal patterns of wind production have

424

Limits to the power density of very large wind farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple analysis is presented concerning an upper limit of the power density (power per unit land area) of a very large wind farm located at the bottom of a fully developed boundary layer. The analysis suggests that the limit of the power density is about 0.38 times $\\tau_{w0}U_{F0}$, where $\\tau_{w0}$ is the natural shear stress on the ground (that is observed before constructing the wind farm) and $U_{F0}$ is the natural or undisturbed wind speed averaged across the height of the farm to be constructed. Importantly, this implies that the maximum extractable power from such a very large wind farm will not be proportional to the cubic of the wind speed at the farm height, or even the farm height itself, but be proportional to $U_{F0}$.

Nishino, Takafumi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Development of an Operations and Maintenance Cost Model to Identify Cost of Energy Savings for Low Wind Speed Turbines: July 2, 2004 -- June 30, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the operatons and maintenance cost model developed by Global Energy Concepts under contract to NREL to estimate the O&M costs for commercial wind turbine generator facilities.

Poore, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Design and Test of DC Voltage Link Conversion System and Brushless Doubly-Fed Induction Generator for Variable-Speed Wind Energy Applications: August 1999--May 2003  

SciTech Connect

This report describes four low-cost alternative power converters for processing the power developed by a doubly fed wound-rotor induction generator for wind energy conversion systems.

Lipo, T.A.; Panda, D.; Zarko, D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Design and Test of a Variable Speed Wind Turbine System Employing a Direct Drive Axial Flux Synchronization Generator: 29 October 2002 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this funded research project is the definition, analytical investigation, modeling, and prototype realization of a current-source conversion topology tailored to high-power wind turbines.

Lipo, T. A.; Tenca, P.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

8, 27712793, 2008 Sea surface wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 8, 2771­2793, 2008 Sea surface wind speed estimation from space-based lidar Y. Hu et al. Title.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Sea surface wind speed estimation from space;ACPD 8, 2771­2793, 2008 Sea surface wind speed estimation from space-based lidar Y. Hu et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

429

Missing wind data forecasting with adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In any region, to begin generating electricity from wind energy, it is necessary to determine the 1-year distribution characteristics of wind speed. For this aim, a wind observation station must be constructed and 1-year wind speed and direction data ... Keywords: ANFIS, Back-propagation, Forecasting, Missing data, Wind energy, Wind speed

Fatih O. Hocaoglu; Yusuf Oysal; Mehmet Kurban

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Statistics on Vertical Wind Shear over Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistics on boundary layer vertical wind shear were gathered from rawinsonde soundings taken from three small islands and one weather ship. These soundings show a high correlation between surface and 1829 m altitude wind directions. Wind speeds ...

Donald P. Wylie; Barry B. Hinton; Kellie M. Millett

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.4.2 Wind roses . . . . . . . .Figure 5.5: Downscaled wind speed changes and componentin?uences on California’s wind energy resource. Part 1:

Mansbach, David K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Wind Energy Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

determine whether the wind resource in a particular area is adequate for wind power. Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy Related Terms Hydropower Technologies Wind Turbines...

434

Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

435

Wind Prediction Based on Improved BP Artificial Neural Network in Wind Farm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind power prediction is important to the operation of power system with comparatively large mount of wind power. It can relieve or avoid the disadvantageous impact of wind farm on power systems. Because the traditional neural network may fall into local ... Keywords: wind farm, wind power generation, wind speed prediction, BP neural networks

Keyuan Huang; Lang Dai; Shoudao Huang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Wind Resource Maps (Postcard)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the wind resource potential that would be possible from development of the available windy land areas after excluding areas unlikely to be developed. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to Wind Powering America's online wind energy resource maps.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

High Range Resolution Radar Measurements of the Speed Distribution of Breaking Events in Wind-Generated Ocean Waves: Surface Impulse and Wave Energy Dissipation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of X-band radar measurements, backscattered from the sea surface at near grazing incidence with very high spatial and temporal resolution (30 cm in range and 2000-Hz pulse repetition frequency) in moderate wind conditions, are dominated by ...

O. M. Phillips; F. L. Posner; J. P. Hansen

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

The Probability Distribution of Wind Power From a Dispersed Array of Wind Turbine Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for estimating the probability distribution of wind power from a dispersed array of wind turbine sites where the correlation between wind speeds at distinct sites is less than unity. The distribution is obtained from a model ...

John Carlin; John Haslett

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Nonlinear Control of a Wind Turbine Sven Creutz Thomsen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This quantity is denoted the point wind. However, the turbine is not subject to a single wind speed, but ratherNonlinear Control of a Wind Turbine Sven Creutz Thomsen Kongens Lyngby 2006 #12;Technical describes analysis of various nonlinear control methods for controlling a wind turbine. High speed wind

440

Wind system interconnected with the Public Service Company at Deming, New Mexico. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In cooperation with the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM), the New Mexico Solar Energy Institute fieldtested a 25-kilowatt wind generator in Deming, New Mexico. The wind generator, manufactured by Carter Wind Systems, helped power an irrigation load. Wind speed, pump load, wind-generator power output, power fed into the PNM line, and reactive power requirements of pump and wind generator were monitored and recorded on magnetic tape. The wind generator produced a total of 28,997 kilowatt hours between August 1981 and December 1983. The capacity factor for that period was 6.6%. The average wind speed was lower than anticipated - 6.18 miles per hour versus 10 miles per hour recorded during five previous years. Total downtime of the wind generator was 13.5%. Power curves were measured and show a cut-in speed of between seven and eight miles per hour (manufacturer's specification: 7.5 mph) and a maximum 15-minute average power output of 21.5 kilowatts. The wind generator produced power 54.7% of the time. It supplied 4.2% of the irrigation load at the site. There is no good match between the irrigation load peak in June and July and the wind resource, which peaks in March and April. Wind-assisted irrigation may, therefore, not be feasible for the Deming area. Considering the low wind resource during the project period, the wind generator performed well and reliably. No problems were encountered in operating the wind system parallel to the utility line.

Schoenmackers, R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 2: Turbine, Rotor, and Blade Logistics; March 27, 2000 to December 31, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 * NREL/SR-500-29439 1 * NREL/SR-500-29439 Kevin Smith Global Energy Concepts LLC Kirkland, Washington WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 2: Turbine, Rotor, and Blade Logistics March 27, 2000 to December 31, 2000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 June 2001 * NREL/SR-500-29439 WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 2: Turbine, Rotor, and Blade Logistics March 27, 2000 to December 31, 2000 Kevin Smith Global Energy Concepts LLC Kirkland, Washington NREL Technical Monitor: Alan Laxson Prepared under Subcontract No. YAM-0-30203-01 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

442

Multi-winding Homopolar Electric Machine Offers Variable Voltage ...  

Wind Energy Industrial Technologies Multi-winding Homopolar Electric Machine Offers Variable Voltage at Low Rotational Speed Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Contact ...

443

Relation between Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale Wind ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... verifying the results based on the power law as ... of the open-sea roughness in winds greater than ... continue to increase at mean wind speeds beyond ...

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Simulation of doubly-fed machine with improved wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of wind turbines use induction generators that are very reliable with low costs [2], but when it is straightly connected to the grid, maximum power is not accessible [1] and only a few change of speed between maximum speed and synchronous speed ... Keywords: doubly-fed machine, gearbox ratio, high speed shaft, low speed shaft, wind turbine

Hengameh Kojooyan Jafari

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Wind Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Offshore Wind Research Offshore Wind Research Photo of a European offshore wind farm. Early progress in European Offshore Wind Energy over the last decade provides a glimpse into the vast potential of the global offshore resource. For more than eight years, NREL has worked with the Department of Energy to become an international leader in offshore wind energy research. Capabilities NREL's offshore wind capabilities focus on critical areas that reflect the long-term needs of the offshore wind energy industry and the U.S. Department of Energy including: Offshore Design Tools and Methods Offshore Standards and Testing Energy Analysis of Offshore Systems Offshore Wind Resource Characterization Grid Integration of Offshore Wind Key Research NREL documented the status of offshore wind energy in the United States in

446

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind Resource Potential Offshore 90-Meter Wind Maps and Wind Resource Potential The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative provides 90-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the total offshore wind potential that would be possible from developing the available offshore areas. The offshore wind resource maps can be used as a guide to identify regions for commercial wind development. A map of the United States showing offshore wind resource. Washington offshore wind map. Oregon offshore wind map. California offshore wind map. Texas offshore wind map. Minnesota offshore wind map. Lousiana offshore wind map. Wisconsin offshore wind map. Michigan offshore wind map. Michigan offshore wind map. Illinois offshore wind map. Indiana offshore wind map. Ohio offshore wind map. Georgia offshore wind map. South Carolina offshore wind map. North Carolina offshore wind map. Virginia offshore wind map. Maryland offshore wind map. Pennsylvania offshore wind map. Delaware offshore wind map. New Jersey offshore wind map. New York offshore wind map. Maine offshore wind map. Massachusetts offshore wind map. Rhode Island offshore wind map. Connecticut offshore wind map. Hawaii offshore wind map. Delaware offshore wind map. New Hampshire offshore wind map.

447

Wind Energy Forecasting Technology Update: 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the status of wind energy forecasting technology for predicting wind speed and energy generation of wind energy facilities short-term (minutes to hours), intermediate-term (hours to days), and long-term (months to years) average wind speed and energy generation. The information should be useful to companies that are evaluating or planning to incorporate wind energy forecasting into their operations.

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

448

Operational behavior of a double-fed permanent magnet generator for wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greater efficiency in wind turbine systems is achieved by allowing the rotor to change its rate of rotation as the wind speed changes. The wind turbine system is decoupled from the utility grid and a variable speed operation ...

Reddy, Sivananda Kumjula

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

A Simple Empirical Model for Predicting the Decay of Tropical Cyclone Winds after Landfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An empirical model for predicting the maximum wind of landfalling tropical cyclones is developed. The model is based upon the observation that the wind speed decay rate after landfall is proportional to the wind speed. Observations also indicate ...

John Kaplan; Mark DeMaria

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Evaluation of Optimal Distribution of Wind Power Facilities in Iowa for 2015  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By the end of June 1999, about 250 megawatts of wind generation will have been dedicated in the state of Iowa. This represents the beginning of what is likely to be significant wind capacity development during the next 20 years in the state, as a result of possible public and governmental mandates and consumers' desire for sustainable sources of energy. As the utility industry in the United States moves towards a new structure, renewable energy sources continue to be an important part of new resource development. In this paper, we consider the predicted trends in load growth in Iowa. After accounting for the retirement of nuclear and older fossil fuel facilities over the next 15 years, we estimate Iowa's potential renewable generating capacity through the year 2015 and anticipate the contribution of wind energy to Iowa's portfolio. The Iowa Wind Energy Institute (IWEI) has been monitoring the wind resource in Iowa since June 1994 to obtain wind speed averages at 10, 33 and 50 meters above ground at fourteen geographically dispersed potential wind farm sites. Winds in the Midwest are primarily generated by fronts moving through the region. The Northwest Buffalo Ridge area of Iowa typically has wind speed averages of 7-8 m/s. Central Iowa may have typical winds slightly below this mean value. However, as a front passes through the state, there will be times when a wind farm in Central Iowa will produce more energy than one on Buffalo Ridge.

Factor, T. (Iowa Wind Energy Institute); Milligan, M. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

1999-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

451

Analytical expressions for maximum wind turbine average power in a Rayleigh wind regime  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Average or expectation values for annual power of a wind turbine in a Rayleigh wind regime are calculated and plotted as a function of cut-out wind speed. This wind speed is expressed in multiples of the annual average wind speed at the turbine installation site. To provide a common basis for comparison of all real and imagined turbines, the Rayleigh-Betz wind machine is postulated. This machine is an ideal wind machine operating with the ideal Betz power coefficient of 0.593 in a Rayleigh probability wind regime. All other average annual powers are expressed in fractions of that power. Cases considered include: (1) an ideal machine with finite power and finite cutout speed, (2) real machines operating in variable speed mode at their maximum power coefficient, and (3) real machines operating at constant speed.

Carlin, P.W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

453

A doubly-fed permanent magnet generator for wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum extraction of energy from a wind turbine requires that turbine speed vary with wind speed. Existing solutions to produce constant-frequency electrical output under windspeed variations are undesirable due to ...

Thomas, Andrew J. (Andrew Joseph), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Wind resource assessment: San Nicolas Island, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

San Nicolas Island (SNI) is the site of the Navy Range Instrumentation Test Site which relies on an isolated diesel-powered grid for its energy needs. The island is located in the Pacific Ocean 85 miles southwest of Los Angeles, California and 65 miles south of the Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS), Point Mugu, California. SNI is situated on the continental shelf at latitude N33{degree}14` and longitude W119{degree}27`. It is approximately 9 miles long and 3.6 miles wide and encompasses an area of 13,370 acres of land owned by the Navy in fee title. Winds on San Nicolas are prevailingly northwest and are strong most of the year. The average wind speed is 7.2 m/s (14 knots) and seasonal variation is small. The windiest months, March through July, have wind speeds averaging 8.2 m/s (16 knots). The least windy months, August through February, have wind speeds averaging 6.2 m/s (12 knots).

McKenna, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Olsen, T.L. [Timothy L. Olsen Consulting, (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Simulations of the Climatological Wind Field in the Baltic Sea Area Using a Mesoscale Higher-Order Closure Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional mesoscale numerical model is utilized to investigate the climatological wind field over the Baltic Sea. To cover all synoptic and boundary layer conditions, a large number of model runs have to be made. Since this type of ...

Stefan Sandström

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A Preliminary Survey of C-Band RFI in the SMEX04 Area of Operations using WindSat Radiometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spacing is set equal to four times the mean spacing of the swath data obtained from WindSat. This grid. of Electrical & Computer Engineering, 340 Whittemore Hall, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University distribution can be obtained from an analysis of radiometry from exisiting systems in Earth orbit, as described

Ellingson, Steven W.

457

WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

speed. Figure 4 shows that the wind speeds ranged January 4, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 12 University of Massachusetts, Amherst Amherst, MA 01003 #12;Wind ­ Wind Rose, November 1, 2006 through November 30, 2006 January 4, 2007 Renewable Energy Research

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

458

WIND DATA REPORT Ragged Mt Maine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. This report covers wind Average Wind Speeds, September 1, 2007 ­ November 30, 2007. January 22, 2008 Renewable Energy Research ­ Turbulence Intensity vs. Wind Speed, September 1, 2007 ­ November 30, 2007. January 22, 2008 Renewable Energy

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

459

Dynamic valuation model For wind development in regard to land value, proximity to transmission lines, and capacity factor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing a wind farm involves many variables that can make or break the success of a potential wind farm project. Some variables such as wind data (capacity factor, wind rose, wind speed, etc.) are readily available in ...

Nikandrou, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Small Packages, Big Benefits: Economic Advantages of Local Wind Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sun heats the earth’s surface unevenly creating areas of high and low pressure. Air molecules flow away from areas of high pressure towards areas of low pressure. We know this phenomenon by sight, sound and touch as wind. The speed and duration of wind are unpredictable, but what is predictable is that in many places the wind will eventually blow with enough force to be a significant power source. This fact has been relied on and wind’s kinetic energy has been harnessed for centuries to do things such as pump water and grind grain. Windmills that helped Americans from settlement times until the 1930s are still visible on much of the nation’s rural landscape – including Iowa’syet they are now found in various states of disrepair. Today the relic sentinels of the countryside are being joined in their towering positions by sleek new wind turbines. These modern machines and the clean power they generate are a sign of the prosperity they can bring to their landowners and communities. Although wind power only accounted for one-tenth of 1 percent of the nation’s total electric power generation capacity in 2003, this is four times the capacity that was in place in 1990. From 1999 to 2003, wind power capacity had an average annual growth rate of 28 percent, a

Teresa Welsh; Teresa Welsh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area wind speeds" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Description of the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Technical Report is to provide background information about the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES). This study, which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program, was conducted from 16 November 2010 through 21 March 2012 at a field site in northeastern Oregon. The primary goal of the study was to provide profiles of wind speed and wind direction over the depth of the boundary layer in an operating wind farm located in an area of complex terrain. Measurements from propeller and vane anemometers mounted on a 62 m tall tower, Doppler Sodar, and Radar Wind Profiler were combined into a single data product to provide the best estimate of the winds above the site during the first part of CBWES. An additional goal of the study was to provide measurements of Turbulence Kinetic Energy (TKE) near the surface. To address this specific goal, sonic anemometers were mounted at two heights on the 62 m tower on 23 April 2011. Prior to the deployment of the sonic anemometers on the tall tower, a single sonic anemometer was deployed on a short tower 3.1 m tall that was located just to the south of the radar wind profiler. Data from the radar wind profiler, as well as the wind profile data product are available from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Data Archive (http://www.arm.gov/data/campaigns). Data from the sonic anemometers are available from the authors.

Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Nelson, Danny A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Fitting of Weibull distribution to study wind energy potential in Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility study on the wind energy potential of Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia was carried out. The most commonly used distribution to fit wind speed data is the Weibull distribution. This distribution was applied to wind speed data for the year 2008. ... Keywords: beaufort scale, weibull distribution, wind data, wind distribution pattern, wind energy potential

A. M. Razali; M. S. Sapuan; K. Ibrahim; A. R. Ismail; A. Zaharim; K. Sopian

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Research Small Wind Turbine Research The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Small Wind Project's objectives are to reduce barriers to wind energy expansion, stabilize the market, and expand the number of small wind turbine systems installed in the United States. "Small wind turbine" refers to a turbine smaller than or equal to 100 kilowatts (kW). "Distributed wind" includes small and midsize turbines (100 kW through 1 megawatt [MW]). Since 1996, NREL's small wind turbine research has provided turbine testing, turbine development, and prototype refinement leading to more commercially available small wind turbines. Work is conducted under the following areas. You can also learn more about state and federal policies

464

Secretary Chu, Governor Patrick Announce $25 Million for Massachusetts Wind  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu, Governor Patrick Announce $25 Million for Chu, Governor Patrick Announce $25 Million for Massachusetts Wind Technology Testing Center Secretary Chu, Governor Patrick Announce $25 Million for Massachusetts Wind Technology Testing Center May 12, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Governor Deval Patrick today announced the Department of Energy's intent to award Massachusetts $25 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to accelerate development of the state's Wind Technology Testing Center and create hundreds of new jobs in the area. The new center will test commercial-sized wind turbine blades to help reduce cost, improve technical advancements and speed deployment of the next generation of wind turbine blades into the marketplace. State Energy

465

WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/RERL_Fact_Sheet_6_Wind_resource_interpretation.pdf * 1 m/s = 2.237 mph. SECTION 1 January 30, 2008 Renewable Energy, and wind roses are included in APPENDIX B. January 30, 2008 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 8 ­ Turbulent Intensity vs. Wind Speed, March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 January 30, 2008 Renewable Energy Research

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

466

WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Diurnal Average Wind Speed, September 1, 2007 ­ November 30, 2007 February 7, 2008 Renewable Energy 2520151050 Figure 7 ­ Wind Rose, September 1, 2007 ­ November 30, 2007 February 7, 2008 Renewable Energy. A wind direction standard February 7, 2008 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 13 University

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

467

WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/RERL_Fact_Sheet_6_Wind_resource_interpretation.pdf * 1 m/s = 2.237 mph. July 14, 2007 Renewable Energy Research square. Figure 1 - Map of Chester wind tower site July 14, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page average wind speeds are plotted against time. July 14, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 8

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

468

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the Philippines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a wind resource analysis and mapping study for the Philippine archipelago. The study's objective was to identify potential wind resource areas and quantify the value of those resources within those areas. The wind resource maps and other wind resource characteristic information will be used to identify prospective areas for wind-energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; George, R.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; McCarthy, E.

2001-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

469

Wind Power Today and Tomorrow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Power Today and Tomorrow is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind research conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program. The purpose of Wind Power Today and Tomorrow is to show how DOE supports wind turbine research and deployment in hopes of furthering the advancement of wind technologies that produce clean, low-cost, reliable energy. Content objectives include: educate readers about the advantages and potential for widespread deployment of wind energy; explain the program's objectives and goals; describe the program's accomplishments in research and application; examine the barriers to widespread deployment; describe the benefits of continued research and development; facilitate technology transfer; and attract cooperative wind energy projects with industry. This 2003 edition of the program overview also includes discussions about wind industry growth in 2003, how DOE is taking advantage of low wind speed region s through advancing technology, and distributed applications for small wind turbines.

Not Available

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

The National Wind Technology Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy research began at the Rocky Flats test site in 1976 when Rockwell International subcontracted with the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The Rocky Flats Plant was competitively selected from a number of ERDA facilities primarily because it experienced high instantaneous winds and provided a large, clear land area. By 1977, several small wind turbines were in place. During the facility`s peak of operation, in 1979-1980, researchers were testing as many as 23 small wind turbines of various configurations, including commercially available machines and prototype turbines developed under subcontract to Rocky Flats. Facilities also included 8-kW, 40-kW, and 225-kW dynamometers; a variable-speed test bed; a wind/hybrid test facility; a controlled velocity test facility (in Pueblo, Colorado); a modal test facility, and a multimegawatt switchgear facility. The main laboratory building was dedicated in July 1981 and was operated by the Rocky Flats Plant until 1984, when the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) and Rocky Flats wind energy programs were merged and transferred to SERI. SERI and now the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) continued to conduct wind turbine system component tests after 1987, when most program personnel were moved to the Denver WEst Office Park in Golden and site ownership was transferred back to Rocky Flats. The Combined Experiment test bed was installed and began operation in 1988, and the NREL structural test facility began operation in 1990. In 1993, the site`s operation was officially transferred to the DOE Golden Field Office that oversees NREL. This move was in anticipation of NREL`s renovation and reoccupation of the facility in 1994.

Thresher, R.W.; Hock, S.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Loose, R.R.; Cadogon, J.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

WIND DATA REPORT Scituate Waste Water Treatment Plant, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributions Figure 3 ­ Wind Speed Distribution, March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 July 16, 2007 Renewable Energy Figure 5 ­ Diurnal Wind Speeds, March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 July 16, 2007 Renewable Energy Research ­ Turbulence Intensity vs. Wind Speed, March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 July 16, 2007 Renewable Energy Research

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

472

WIND DATA REPORT Upper Cape Cod Regional Technical School  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difference between the two wind speeds is greater than Factor 1. At high August 29, 2005 Renewable Energy average wind speed of 5.87 m/s (13.15 mph) in December 2004. August 29, 2005 Renewable Energy Research - Wind Speed Time Series, December 2004 ­ February 2005 August 29, 2005 Renewable Energy Research

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

473

Abstract--Pitch angle control is the most common means for adjusting the aerodynamic torque of the wind turbine when wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the wind turbine when wind speed is above rated speed and various controlling variables may be chosen Terms--Blade aerodynamic, Fatigue load, Fuzzy logic control, Pitch angle, Wind turbine I. INTRODUCTION of 40 GW. Pitch-adjusting variable-speed wind turbines have become the dominating type of yearly

Hansen, René Rydhof

474

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in the study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Revised final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in this study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 ar