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Sample records for area raft river

  1. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1988) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1988) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  2. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  3. Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  4. Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  5. Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  6. Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  7. Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  8. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1987) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1987) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  9. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  10. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  11. Aeromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  12. Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  13. Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  14. Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  15. Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  16. Tracer Testing At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  17. Aeromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  18. Ground Magnetics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979)...

  19. Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983)...

  20. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011)...

  1. Cuttings Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976)...

  2. Electromagnetic Soundings At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Electromagnetic Soundings At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977)...

  3. Thermochronometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermochronometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993)...

  4. Telluric Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Telluric Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978)...

  5. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area...

  6. Audio-Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Audio-Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978)...

  7. Petrography Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Petrography Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980)...

  8. Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration...

  9. Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Airborne Electromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area...

  10. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area...

  11. Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Chemical Logging At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979)...

  12. Acoustic Logs At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Acoustic Logs At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration...

  13. Fault Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fault Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration...

  14. Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006)...

  15. Micro-Earthquake At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  16. Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  17. Micro-Earthquake At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  18. Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  19. Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  20. Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal...

  1. Self Potential Measurements At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Measurements At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential Measurements At Raft River...

  2. Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1984) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  3. Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  4. Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  5. Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  6. Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  7. Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  8. Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  9. Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  10. Raft River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and later the US Department of Energy (DOE) which was formed by joining the Federal Energy Administration and ERDA in 1977.3 The Raft River site was identified as an area...

  11. Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Deep drilling...

  12. Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Deep drilling data Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Abstract...

  13. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    surveys were undertaken at the Raft River geothermal area. References Zohdy, A.A.R.; Jackson, D.B.; Bisdorf, R.J. (12 October 1975) Exploring the Raft River geothermal area,...

  14. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details...

  15. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details...

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details...

  17. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Exploration Activity Details...

  18. Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River...

  19. Seismic refraction study of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    refraction study of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic refraction study of the Raft...

  20. Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  1. Tracer Testing At Raft River Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    undertaken at Raft River geothermal area. References Kroneman, R. L.; Yorgason, K. R.; Moore, J. N. (1 December 1984) Preferred methods of analysis for chemical tracers in...

  2. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1997...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  3. Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1957-1961...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1957-1961) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  4. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  5. Micro-Earthquake At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zandt, G.; Mcpherson, L.; Schaff, S.; Olsen, S. (1 May 1982) Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Additional References...

  6. Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004-2011...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    limited the degree of mixing between them. References Ayling, B.; Molling, P.; Nye, R.; Moore, J. (1 January 2011) FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW...

  7. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dolenc, M. R.; Hull, L. C.; Mizell, S. A.; Russell, B. F.; Skiba, P. A.; Strawn, J. A.; Tullis, J. A. (1 November 1981) Raft River geoscience case study Dolenc, M. R.;...

  8. Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    well production was tested. Down-hole data was obtained from RRGE-3. References Speake, J.L. (1 August 1976) Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion...

  9. Petrography Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flows, tuffaceous siltstone, greywacke, and sandstone. References Clay Jones, Joseph Moore, William Teplow, Seth Craig (2011) Geology and Hydrothermal Alteration of the Raft...

  10. DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Raft River Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1975) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) At Raft River...

  11. Raft River Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Raft River Geothermal Facility General Information Name Raft River Geothermal Facility Facility Raft River...

  12. Raft River Geothermal Area Data Models - Conceptual, Logical and Fact Models

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cuyler, David

    2012-07-19

    Conceptual and Logical Data Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses at Raft River a. Logical Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 b. Fact Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 Derived from Tables, Figures and other Content in Reports from the Raft River Geothermal Project: "Technical Report on the Raft River Geothermal Resource, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., August 2002. "Results from the Short-Term Well Testing Program at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., October 2004.

  13. Raft River Geothermal Area Data Models - Conceptual, Logical and Fact Models

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cuyler, David

    Conceptual and Logical Data Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses at Raft River a. Logical Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 b. Fact Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 Derived from Tables, Figures and other Content in Reports from the Raft River Geothermal Project: "Technical Report on the Raft River Geothermal Resource, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., August 2002. "Results from the Short-Term Well Testing Program at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., October 2004.

  14. Schlumberger soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    soundings in the Upper Raft River and Raft River Valleys, Idaho and Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Schlumberger soundings in the...

  15. Geothermometry At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer, M.H. (1 January 1986) Temperature,...

  16. Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    extension over broad areas of the northern Basin and Range. References Dumitru, T.; Miller, E.; Savage, C.; Gans, P.; Brown, R. (1 April 1993) Fission track evidence for...

  17. Raft River geoscience case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (d) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  18. Raft River Idaho Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Nash

    2015-05-13

    Raw magnetotelluric (MT) data covering the geothermal system at Raft River, Idaho. The data was acquired by Quantec Geoscience. This is a zipped file containing .edi raw MT data files.

  19. Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Interpretation of electromagnetic...

  20. Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir...

  1. Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal...

  2. COMPARISON OF THREE TRACER TESTS AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TESTS AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: COMPARISON OF THREE TRACER TESTS AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE Three conservative ...

  3. Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Simulation analysis of the...

  4. Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  5. Raft River III Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Raft River III Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates...

  6. Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report Abstract The Raft...

  7. Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Hydrochemistry of...

  8. The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: The...

  9. Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Final...

  10. Reconnaissance geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geothermal exploration at Raft River, Idaho from thermal infrared scanning Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Reconnaissance...

  11. Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Abstract GEOTHERMAL...

  12. Petrography of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of late cenozoic sediments, Raft River geothermal field, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Petrography of late...

  13. Raft River II Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Raft River II Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 42.605555555556,...

  14. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon ...

  15. Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Abstract Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time...

  16. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. raftriverpeer2013.pdf More Documents &...

  17. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    output of the Raft River geothermal field by increasing production or injectivity. egsmooreraftriver.pdf (2.18 MB) More Documents & Publications Concept Testing and Development ...

  18. FLOWMETER ANALYSIS AT RAFT RIVER, IDAHO | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    leads to estimated field hydraulic conductivity. Data were obtained during an injection test of a geothermal well at the Raft River geothermal test site in Idaho. Both stationary...

  19. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. raft_river_peer2013.pdf (3.68 MB) More Documents & Publications Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho track 4: enhanced geothermal

  20. Preservation of an extreme transient geotherm in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of an extreme transient geotherm in the Raft River detachment shear zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Preservation of an...

  1. Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geophysical logging case history of the...

  2. Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flow system Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the...

  3. Raft River Rural Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Rural Elec Coop Inc Place: Idaho Service Territory: Idaho, Utah, Nevada Phone Number: 208-645-2211 Website: rrelectric.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.compages...

  4. Rheological control on the initial geometry of the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rheological control on the initial geometry of the Raft River detachment fault and shear zone, western United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  5. Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Reservoir evaluation tests on...

  6. Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaspey, Douglas J.

    2008-01-30

    Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

  7. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program 2010 Peer Review Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho, for the Engineered Geothermal Systems Demonstration Projects and Low Temperature Exploration and Demonstrations Project Track. Objective to Develop and demonstrate the techniques required to form and sustain EGS reservoirs including combined thermal and hydraulic stimulation and numerical modeling and Improve the performance and output of the Raft

  8. Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

    1981-11-17

    The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

  9. Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Spencer, S.G.; Shaber, C.R.

    1980-05-30

    The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

  10. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2013 Peer Review Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Principal Investigators: J. Moore and J. McLennan Organization: University of Utah Track Name: EGS Demonstration Projects Project Officer: W. Vandermeer Total Project Funding: $10,214,987 April 22, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research 1. Develop and demonstrate

  11. Magnetotellurics At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and at some sites than 1 ohm-m. References Stanley, W.D.; Boehl, J.E.; Bostick, F.X.; Smith, H.W. (10 June 1977) Geothermal significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the...

  12. Well Log Techniques At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the rock using well log data. Notes Information is given on the following logs: dual-induction focused log, including resistivity, sp, and conductivity; acoustic log; compensated...

  13. Exploring the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho, with the dc...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; USA; WELLS Authors Zohdy, A.A.R.; Jackson, D.B.; Bisdorf and R.J. Published Journal Geophysics, 10121975 DOI Not Provided...

  14. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    temperatures in other deep wells range from 133 to 149 0C. References Jones, C.; Moore, J.; Teplow, W.; Craig, S. (1 January 2011) GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE...

  15. Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that were conducted on the core sample are presented. References Jones, C.; Moore, J.; Teplow, W.; Craig, S. (1 January 2011) GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE...

  16. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    water 1450C reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. References Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Kinkley,...

  17. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a determination of rock types and an analysis of the degree of alteration and the density of fractures. References Applegate, J. K.; Moens, T. A. (1 April 1980) Geophysical...

  18. Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1950) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Crank wells, encountered boiling water. References Diek, A.; White, L.; Roegiers, J.-C.; Moore, J.; McLennan, J. D. (1 January 2012) BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL...

  19. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well vicinity. References Overton, H. L.; Chaney, R. E.; Mcatee, R. E.; Graham, D. L. (1 November 1979) Geochemical modeling of...

  20. Fault and joint geometry at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    may be useful for locating the surface traces of faults in the reservoir. Authors Guth, L. R.; Bruhn, R. L.; Beck and S. L. Published DOE Information Bridge, 711981 DOI...

  1. COMPARISON OF THREE TRACER TESTS AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D Mattson; Mitchell Plummer; Carl Palmer; Larry Hull; Samantha Miller; Randy Nye

    2011-02-01

    Three conservative tracer tests have been conducted through the Bridge Fault fracture zone at the Raft River Geothermal (RRG) site. All three tests were conducted between injection well RRG-5 and production wells RRG-1 (790 m distance) and RRG-4 (740 m distance). The injection well is used during the summer months to provide pressure support to the production wells. The first test was conducted in 2008 using 136 kg of fluorescein tracer. Two additional tracers were injected in 2010. The first 2010 tracer injected was 100 kg fluorescein disodium hydrate salt on June, 21. The second tracer (100 kg 2,6-naphthalene disulfonic acid sodium salt) was injected one month later on July 21. Sampling of the two productions wells is still being performed to obtain the tail end of the second 2010 tracer test. Tracer concentrations were measured using HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Results for the 2008 test, suggest 80% tracer recover at the two production wells. Of the tracer recovered, 85% of tracer mass was recovered in well RRG-4 indicating a greater flow pathway connection between injection well and RRG-4 than RRG-1. Fluorescein tracer results appear to be similar between the 2008 and 2010 tests for well RRG-4 with peak concentrations arriving approximately 20 days after injection despite the differences between the injection rates for the two tests (~950 gpm to 475 gpm) between the 2008 and 2010. The two 2010 tracer tests will be compared to determine if the results support the hypothesis that rock contraction along the flow pathway due to the 55 oC cooler water injection alters the flow through the ~140 oC reservoir.

  2. Core Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Compare microcracks between Coso and Raft River geothermal areas Notes Microcracks were observed in core samples from Coso. Both...

  3. Savannah River Site - L-Area Southern Groundwater | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    L-Area Southern Groundwater Savannah River Site - L-Area Southern Groundwater January 1, ... InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River ...

  4. Savannah River Site - R-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - R-Area Groundwater Operable Unit ... InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River ...

  5. Red River Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Red River Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Red River Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  6. Reed River Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reed River Hot Spring Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reed River Hot Spring Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  7. Geothermometry At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  8. Magnetotellurics At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  9. Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area 1977 1977 Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal...

  10. Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    microearthquakes; Nevada; North America; passive systems; Pershing County Nevada; Raft River; reservoir rocks; seismic methods; seismicity; seismology; Snake River plain;...

  11. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Flood Hazard Area & River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Flood Hazard Area & River Corridor...

  12. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New...

  13. Vermont Flood Hazard Area and River Corridor General Permit Applicatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the developer should provide a map generated from the ANR Natural Resources Atlas showing the river corridor and flood hazard area; A written description of the...

  14. Injectivity Test At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Reese...

  15. New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp:...

  16. Ground Gravity Survey At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At New River Area (DOE...

  17. Micro-Earthquake At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  18. Slim Holes At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  19. Cuttings Analysis At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  20. Refraction Survey At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  1. Reflection Survey At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  2. Development Wells At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  3. Flow Test At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location New River Area...

  4. FMI Log At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: FMI Log At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location New River Area...

  5. New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration...

  6. Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin January 1, 2014 ... InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River ...

  7. An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river metamorphic core complex- black pine mountains, southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  8. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Colorado River Storage Project Management Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Western Area Power Administration-Colorado River Storage Project Management Center.

  9. RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3B—Integration of Supply Chains III: Algal Biofuels Strategy RAFT Regional Algal Feedstock Testbed Kimberly Ogden, Professor, University of Arizona, Engineering Technical Lead, National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

  10. Flow Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    borehole geophysics in defining the physical characteristics of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Raft River Geothermal Area...

  11. Regional Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah River Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah River Area Dr. Susan A. Winsor Aiken Technical College President: P.O. Box 696, Aiken, SC 29802, winsors@atc.edu Mindy Mets Nuclear Workforce Initiative Program Manager, SRS Community Reuse Organization: P.O. Box 696, Aiken, SC 29802, mindy.mets@srscro.org INTRODUCTION An expanding role for nuclear energy in the United States has dramatic implications for the nuclear workforce demand in the two-state region of Georgia and South

  12. Savannah River Site - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC

  13. Savannah River Site - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC

  14. Yampa River Valley sub-area contingency plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    The Yampa River Valley sub-area contingency plan (Contingency Plan) has been prepared for two counties in northwestern Colorado: Moffat County and Routt County. The Contingency Plan is provided in two parts, the Contingency Plan and the Emergency Response Action Plan (ERAP). The Contingency Plan provides information that should be helpful in planning to minimize the impact of an oil spill or hazardous material incident. It contains discussions of planning and response role, hazards identification, vulnerability analysis, risk analysis, cleanup, cost recovery, training, and health and safety. It includes information on the incident command system, notifications, response capabilities, emergency response organizations, evacuation and shelter-in-place, and immediate actions.

  15. Hyporheic discharge of river water into fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R. )

    1999-12-01

    Fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawned predominantly in areas of the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River where hyporheic water discharged into the river channel. This upwelling water had a dissolved solids content (i.e., specific conductance) indicative of river water and was presumed to have entered highly permeable riverbed substrate at locations upstream of the spawning areas. Hyporheic discharge zones composed of undiluted ground water or areas with little or no upwelling were not used by spawning salmon. Rates of upwelling into spawning areas averaged 1,200 L?m-2?day-1 (95% C.I.= 784 to 1,665 L?m-2?day-1) as compared to approximately 500 L?m-2?day-1 (95% C.I.= 303 to 1,159 L?m-2?day-1) in non-spawning areas. Dissolved oxygen content of the hyporheic discharge near salmon spawning areas was about 9 mg?L-1 (+ 0.4 mg?L-1) whereas in non-spawning areas dissolved oxygen values were 7 mg?L-1 (+ 0.9 mg?L-1) or lower. In both cases dissolved oxygen of the river water was higher (11.3+ 0.3 mg?L-1). Physical and chemical gradients between the hyporheic zone and the river may provide cues for adult salmon to locate suitable spawning areas. This information will help fisheries managers to describe the suitability of salmon spawning habitat in large rivers.

  16. Water Sampling At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  17. EIS-0170: Columbia River System Operation Review, BPA Area

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Columbia River System Operation Review Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) evaluates the potential impacts of four alternatives that represent the likely range of allocations between the Federal and non-Federal projects.

  18. Probability of Liquefaction for H-Area Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.C.

    2000-09-27

    In 1995 WSRC completed the geotechnical assessment for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility and the H-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site. As part of that assessment, a probabilistic liquefaction evaluation for the Tobacco Road soils was completed.

  19. Community-Minded Interns at Savannah River Site Help Area Residents in Need with Home Repairs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – More than two dozen college interns who worked at the Savannah River Site (SRS) this summer joined other volunteers and headed into area neighborhoods to help people in need with home repairs.

  20. Flow and Transport in the Hanford 300 Area Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-13

    Contaminant migration in the 300 Area unconfined aquifer is strongly coupled to fluctuations in the Columbia River stage. To better understand the interaction between the river, aquifer, and vadose zone, a 2-D saturated-unsaturated flow and transport model was developed for a vertical cross-section aligned west-east across the Hanford Site 300 Area, nearly perpendicular to the river. The model was used to investigate water flow and tracer transport in the vadose zone-aquifer-river flow system, in support of the ongoing study of the 300 Area uranium plume. The STOMP simulator was used to model 1-year from 3/1/92 to 2/28/93, a period when hourly data were available for both groundwater and river levels. Net water flow to the river (per 1-meter width of shoreline) was 182 m3/y in the base case, but the cumulative exchange or total flow back and forth across the riverbed was 30 times greater. The low river case had approximately double the net water and Groundwater tracer flux into the river as compared to the base case.

  1. Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and weathering release of crustal He, magma aging and tritiugenic addition of 3He). Raft River contains only crustal He indicating no active volcanic sources. References...

  2. Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and weathering release of crustal He, magma aging and tritiugenic addition of 3He). Raft River contains only crustal He indicating no active volcanic sources. References...

  3. Micro-Earthquake At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zandt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zandt, G.; Mcpherson, L.; Schaff, S.; Olsen, S. (1 May 1982) Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Additional References...

  4. Effects of river discharge on hyporheic exchange flows in salmon spawning areas of a large gravel-bed river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2008-01-01

    The flow magnitude and timing from hydroelectric dams in the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States is managed in part for the benefit of salmon. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of current Hells Canyon Dam discharge operations on hydrologic exchange flows between the river and riverbed in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. Interactions between river water and pore water within the upper 1 m of the riverbed were quantified through the use of self-contained temperature and water level data loggers suspended inside of piezometers. The data were recorded at 20 min intervals over a period of 200 days when the mean daily discharge was 218–605 m3 s–1, with hourly stage changes as large as 1.9 m. Differences in head pressure between the river and riverbed were small, often within ±2 cm. Measured temperature gradients in the riverbed indicated significant interactions between the surface and subsurface water. Neither hydraulic nor temperature gradients at most sites were significantly affected by either short- or long-term changes in discharge operations from Hells Canyon Dam. Only 2 out of 14 study sites exhibited acute flux reversals between the river and riverbed resulting from short-term, large magnitude changes in discharge. The findings suggest small-scale piezometric head differences play a minor role in the hydrologic exchange between the river and riverbed at the study sites. The processes controlling hydrologic exchange at the study sites are likely to be bedform-induced advective pumping, turbulence at the riverbed surface, and large-scale hydraulic gradients along the longitudinal profile of the riverbed. By incorporating the knowledge of hydrologic exchange processes into water management planning, regional agencies will be better prepared to manage the limited water resources among competing priorities that include salmon recovery, flood control, irrigation supply, hydropower production, and

  5. Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, John N.; Dresel, P. Evan; Conrad, Mark E.; Patton, Gregory W.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2010-10-31

    Our objectives in this study are to quantify the discharge rate of uranium (U) to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site's 300 Area, and to follow that U down river to constrain its fate. Uranium from the Hanford Site has variable isotopic composition due to nuclear industrial processes carried out at the site. This characteristic makes it possible to use high-precision isotopic measurements of U in environmental samples to identify even trace levels of contaminant U, determine its sources, and estimate discharge rates. Our data on river water samples indicate that as much as 3.2 kg/day can enter the Columbia River from the 300 Area, which is only a small fraction of the total load of dissolved natural background U carried by the Columbia River. This very low-level of Hanford derived U can be discerned, despite dilution to < 1 percent of natural background U, 350 km downstream from the Hanford Site. These results indicate that isotopic methods can allow the amounts of U from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site entering the Columbia River to be measured accurately to ascertain whether they are an environmental concern, or are insignificant relative to natural uranium background in the Columbia River.

  6. Government Decision to Abandon Yucca Mountain Negatively Impacts Central Savannah River Area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For Immediate Release Contact: Rick McLeod Monday, November 9, 2009 803.593.9954 x1411 Government Decision to Abandon Yucca Mountain Negatively Impacts Central Savannah River Area AIKEN, SC - The Federal Government's failure to complete construction of its only option for long-term nuclear waste storage at Yucca Mountain in the Nevada desert will result in the Savannah River Site becoming the permanent home to tons of high- level nuclear waste, a local community group says. The SRS Community

  7. Savannah River Site - K Area Burning/Rubble Pit | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Source: Controlled Area of Plume (acres): 0.5 Plume Status: Plume static or shrinking in size Remedial Approach Remedy Name Status Start Date End Date Treatment Status (1) ...

  8. Geothermal Reconnaissance From Quantitative Analysis Of Thermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1976) Areas (1) Raft River Geothermal Area Regions (0)...

  9. Remote Sensing- Principles And Interpretation | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Raft River Geothermal Area (1997) Areas (1) Raft River Geothermal Area Regions (0) Retrieved...

  10. DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, C.E.; Janecek, L.L.

    1997-08-31

    Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site`s total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside.

  11. Earth Tidal Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Raft River Geothermal Area 1980 1980 Reservoir response to...

  12. Injectivity Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (1979) Raft River Geothermal Area 1979 1979 Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Injectivity Test...

  13. Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area 1977 1977 Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Raft River Geothermal Area Document Analysis Type Applicant Geothermal...

  14. Responsible Asia Forest Trade (RAFT) Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Development Mission for Asia (USAID RDMA) in Bangkok. RAFT is managed by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in partnership with International Union for Conservation of Nature...

  15. Regional hydrology of the Green River-Moab area, northwestern Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rush, F.E.; Whitfield, M.S.; Hart, I.M.

    1982-12-01

    The Green River-Moab area encompasses about 7800 square kilometers or about 25% of the Paradox basin. The entire Paradox basin is a part of the Colorado Plateaus that is underlain by a thick sequence of evaporite (salt) beds of Pennsylvanian age. The rock units that underlie the area have been grouped into hydrogeologic units based on their water-transmitting ability. Confining beds consist of evaporite beds of mostly salt, and overlying and underlying thick sequences of rocks with minimal permeability; above and below these confining beds are aquifers. The upper Mesozoic sandstone aquifer, probably is the most permeable hydrogeologic unit of the area and is the subject of this investigation. The principal component of groundwater outflow from this aquifer probably is subsurface flow to regional streams (the Green and Colorado Rivers) and is about 100 million cubic meters per year. All other components of outflow are relatively small. The average annual recharge to the aquifer is about 130 million cubic meters, of which about 20 million cubic meters is from local precipitation. For the lower aquifer, all recharge and discharge probably is by subsurface flow and was not estimated. The aquifers are generally isolated from the evaporite beds by the bounding confining beds; as a result, most ground water has little if any contact with the evaporites. Brines are present in the confining beds, but solution of beds of salt probably is very slow in most parts of the area. No brine discharges have been identified.

  16. Savannah River Site Retires Coal-Fired D-Area Powerhouse after Nearly 60 Years of Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The Savannah River Site (SRS) has shut down the massive, coal-powered D-Area powerhouse as the site turns to new, clean and highly efficient power generation technology.

  17. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  18. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  19. Safety analysis -- 200 Area Savannah River Plant, F-Canyon Operations. Supplement 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beary, M.M.; Collier, C.D.; Fairobent, L.A.; Graham, R.F.; Mason, C.L.; McDuffee, W.T.; Owen, T.L.; Walker, D.H.

    1986-02-01

    The F-Canyon facility is located in the 200 Separations Area and uses the Purex process to recover plutonium from reactor-irradiated uranium. The irradiated uranium is normally in the form of solid or hollow cylinders called slugs. These slugs are encased in aluminum cladding and are sent to the F-Canyon from the Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor areas or from the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF). This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the F-Canyon operations and is an update to a section of a previous SAR. The previous SAR documented an analysis of the entire 200 Separations Area operations. This SAR documents an analysis of the F-Canyon and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the Savannah River Implementation Plans. A substantial amount of the information supporting the conclusions of this SAR is found in the Systems Analysis. Some F-Canyon equipment has been updated during the time between the Systems Analysis and this SAR and a complete description of this equipment is included in this report. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the F-Canyon can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations and to the environment. In this report, risk is defined as the expected frequency of an accident, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequence in person-rem. The units of risk for radiological dose are person-rem/year. Maximum individual exposure values have also been calculated and reported.

  20. FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the fluid geochemistry in the field is spatially variable and complex, with two distinct deep geothermal fluid types (high vs. low K, Na, Cl, Ca, Li, F concentrations) and two...

  1. GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    measurements that were conducted on the core sample are presented. Authors Jones, C.; Moore, J.; Teplow, W.; Craig and S. Published PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on...

  2. Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sup 0C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot...

  3. Raft River geoscience case study | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Authors Dolenc, M. R.; Hull, L. C.; Mizell, S. A.; Russell, B. F.; Skiba, P. A.; Strawn, J. A.; Tullis and J. A. Published DOE Information Bridge, 1111981 DOI 10.21726098820...

  4. Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Authors Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace and T.L. Published Journal Geophysics, 21...

  5. Raft River geoscience case study- appendixes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Authors Dolenc, M. R.; Hull, L. C.; Mizell, S. A.; Russell, B. F.; Skiba, P. A.; Strawn, J. A.; Tullis and J. A. Published DOE Information Bridge, 1111981 DOI 10.21725988071...

  6. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review egs007moore.pdf (181.39 KB) More Documents & Publications Demonstration of an Enhanced Geothermal System at the Northwest ...

  7. Geothermal Modeling of the Raft River Geothermal Field | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and additional work needed to refine the overall reservoir model. Authors Overton, H. L.; Chaney, R. E.; Mcatee, D. L.; Graham and D. L. Published DOE Information Bridge, 111...

  8. Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and additional work needed to refine the overall reservoir model. Authors Overton, H. L.; Chaney, R. E.; Mcatee, R. E.; Graham and D. L. Published DOE Information Bridge, 111...

  9. Raft River Geothermal Field Well Head Brine Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Lanyk

    2015-12-18

    Raw data and data workup of assay for real-world brine sample. Brine sample was taken at the well head.

  10. Structural Model of the Basement in the Central Savannah River Area, South Carolina and Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Stieve, A.

    1992-03-01

    Interpretation of several generations of seismic reflection data and potential field data suggests the presence of several crustal blocks within the basement beneath the Coastal Plain in the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA). The seismic reflection and refraction data include a grid of profiles that capture shallow and deep reflection events and traverse the Savannah River Site and vicinity. Potential field data includes aeromagnetic, ground magnetic surveys, reconnaissance and detailed gravity surveys. Subsurface data from recovered core are used to constrain the model.Interpretation of these data characteristically indicate a southeast dipping basement surface with some minor highs and lows suggesting an erosional pre-Cretaceous unconformity. This surface is interrupted by several basement faults, most of which offset only early Cretaceous sedimentary horizons overlying the erosional surface. The oldest fault is perhaps late Paleozoic because it is truncated at the basement/Coastal Plain interface. This fault is related in timing and mechanism to the underlying Augusta fault. The youngest faults deform Coastal Plain sediments of at least Priabonian age (40-36.6 Ma). One of these young faults is the Pen Branch faults, identified as the southeast dipping master fault for the Triassic Dunbarton basin. All the Cenozoic faults are probably related in time and mechanism to the nearby, well studied Belair fault.The study area thus contains a set of structures evolved from the Alleghanian orogeny through Mesozoic extension to Cenozoic readjustment of the crust. There is a metamorphosed crystalline terrane with several reflector/fault packages, a reactivated Triassic basin, a mafic terrane separating the Dunbarton basin from the large South Georgia basin to the southeast, and an overprint of reverse faults, some reactivated, and some newly formed.

  11. Savannah River Site A/M Area Southern Sector Characterization Cone Penetrometer Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raabe, B.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is located in the Atlantic Coastal Plaingeologic province. This area is characterized by low relief, predominantly unconsolidated sediments of Cretaceous though Tertiary age. A multiple aquifer system underlies the A/M Area and affects the definition and distribution of a contaminant plume. The water table and uppermost confined aquifer (Steed Pond Aquifer) are contaminated with elevated concentrations of trichloroethylene(TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their associated compounds. The deeper aquifers in this area have less widely spread chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.Cone penetrometer testing was selected as the method of investigation because it is minimally invasive, offers advanced technological capabilities in gathering lithologic data, and offers groundwater sampling capabilities. CPT testing utilizes a hydraulic push tool system. The probe collects real-time data that is processed by computer into soil/lithology classifications. The system can also be used to collect sediment and soil vapor samples although these features were not utilized during this project. Advantages of the CPT system include a small borehole diameter which minimizes cross-contamination of lithologic units, virtual elimination of drill cuttings and fluids that require disposal, collection of various types of undisturbed sediment and water samples and plotting of hydrostratigraphic and lithologic data while in the field.

  12. Treatment of M-area mixed wastes at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared this environmental assessment, DOE/EA-0918, to assess the potential environmental impacts of the treatment of mixed wastes currently stored in the M-Area at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE is proposing to treat and stabilize approximately 700,000 gallons of mixed waste currently stored in the Interim Treatment/Storage Facility (IT/SF) and Mixed Waste Storage Shed (MWSS). This waste material is proposed to be stabilized using a vitrification process and temporarily stored until final disposal is available by the year 2005. This document has been prepared to assess the potential environmental impacts attributable to the treatment and stabilization of M-area mixed wastes, the closure of the interim storage area, and storage of the vitrified waste until disposal in onsite RCRA vaults. Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment, the Department of Energy has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department of Energy is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  13. Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results...

  14. Memorandum Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Sprinklers and Fire Boundaries in Selected Areas of 22 1-H Canyon at the Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Sprinklers and Fire Boundaries in Selected Areas of 22 1 -H Canyon at the Savannah River Site

  15. Memorandum, Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Sprinklers and Fire Boundaries in Selected Areas of 22 1-H Canyon at the Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Fire Safety in Selected Areas of 221-H Canyon at the Savannah River Site UNDER SECRETARY OF ENERGY

  16. Large-scale spatial variability of riverbed temperature gradients in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2007-02-01

    In the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States, hydroelectric dam operations are often based on the predicted emergence timing of salmon fry from the riverbed. The spatial variability and complexity of surface water and riverbed temperature gradients results in emergence timing predictions that are likely to have large errors. The objectives of this study were to quantify the thermal heterogeneity between the river and riverbed in fall Chinook salmon spawning areas and to determine the effects of thermal heterogeneity on fall Chinook salmon emergence timing. This study quantified river and riverbed temperatures at 15 fall Chinook salmon spawning sites distributed in two reaches throughout 160 km of the Snake River in Hells Canyon, Idaho, USA, during three different water years. Temperatures were measured during the fall Chinook salmon incubation period with self-contained data loggers placed in the river and at three different depths below the riverbed surface. At all sites temperature increased with depth into the riverbed, including significant differences (p<0.05) in mean water temperature of up to 3.8°C between the river and the riverbed among all the sites. During each of the three water years studied, river and riverbed temperatures varied significantly among all the study sites, among the study sites within each reach, and between sites located in the two reaches. Considerable variability in riverbed temperatures among the sites resulted in fall Chinook salmon emergence timing estimates that varied by as much as 55 days, depending on the source of temperature data used for the estimate. Monitoring of riverbed temperature gradients at a range of spatial scales throughout the Snake River would provide better information for managing hydroelectric dam operations, and would aid in the design and interpretation of future empirical research into the ecological significance of physical riverine processes.

  17. Savannah River Site - A/M Area Groundwater | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver...

  18. Influence of river level on temperature and hydraulic gradients in chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning areas downstream of Bonneville Dam, Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Murray, Christopher J.; McGrath, Kathy; Bott, Yi-Ju; Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2008-02-01

    Chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha) salmon segregate spatially during spawning in the Ives Island side channel of the lower Columbia River downstream from Bonneville Dam. Previous research during one spawning season (2000) suggested that these species selected spawning habitats based on differences in hyporheic temperature and vertical hydraulic gradient (VHG) with the river. In this study, we confirmed the spatial segregation of spawning based on hyporheic characteristics over four years (2001–2004) and examined the effects of load-following operations (power generation to meet short-term electrical demand) at Bonneville Dam on hyporheic function and characteristics. We found that during the study period, hyporheic temperature and VHG in chum salmon spawning areas were highly variable during periods of load-following operation when river levels fluctuated. In contrast, hyporheic water temperature and VHG within chum spawning areas fluctuated less when river levels were not changing due to load-following operation. Variable temperature and VHG could affect chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning segregation and incubation success by altering the cues each species uses to select redd sites. Alterations in site selection would result in a breakdown in the spatial segregation of spawning between chum and fall Chinook salmon, which would expose earlier spawning fall Chinook eggs to a greater risk of dislodgement from later spawning chum salmon. Additional research will be required to fully assess the effects of load-following operations on the hyporheic environment and spawning and incubation success of chum and fall Chinook salmon downstream from Bonneville Dam.

  19. Savannah River Site H-Area Tank Farm Performance Assessment Scoping Meeting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Savannah River Site Awards Small Business Contract to S&L Logistics Savannah River Site Awards Small Business Contract to S&L Logistics September 4, 2015 - 9:26am Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564, bill.taylor@srs.gov Aiken, SC (September 3, 2015) --The Department of Energy's Savannah River Operations Office awarded a $12.8 million, fixed-price, contract to S&L Logistics LLC of St. Ignatius, Montana. The contract is for project scheduling and

  20. Compliance of the Savannah River Site D-Area cooling system with environmental regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.; Mackey, H.E.; Paller, M.H.; Wike, L.D.; Wilde, E.W.

    1990-08-01

    This document presents information relating to a demonstration under Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act for the 400-D Area cooling system at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The demonstration was mandated because the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for SRS (SC0000175), granted on January 1, 1984, specified in-stream temperature limits in SRS streams of 32.2{degree}C and a {Delta}T limit of 2.8{degree}C above ambient. To achieve compliance with in-stream temperature limits, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) entered into a Consent Order (84-4-W) which temporarily superseded the temperature requirements and identified a process for attaining compliance. The preferred option for achieving thermal compliance in Beaver Dam Creek consisted of increased flow, with mixing of the raw water basin overflow with the cooling water discharge during the summer months. Although this action can achieve instream temperatures of less than 32.2{degree}C, {Delta}T's still exceed 2.8{degree}C. Therefore, a 316 (a) Demonstration was initiated to determine whether a balanced indigenous biological community can be supported in the receiving stream with {Delta}T's in excess of 2.8{degree}C. A Biological Monitoring Program for Beaver Dam Creek was approved by SCDHEC in June 1988 and implemented in September 1988. The program monitored the water quality, habitat formers, zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, fish, other vertebrate wildlife and threatened and endangered species in Beaver Dam Creek for an 18-month period (September 1988-February 1990). This document summarizes information collected during the monitoring program and evaluates the data to determine whether Beaver Dam Creek presently supports a balanced indigenous biological community. 97 refs., 32 figs., 51 tabs.

  1. First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 2

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 of 864 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This Performance Assessment (PA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) was prepared to support the eventual removal from service of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. This PA provides the technical basis and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements identified below for removal from service and eventual final closure of the HTF.  U.S. Department of Energy

  2. Safety analysis--200 Area Savannah River Site: Separations Area operations Building 211-H Outside Facilities. Supplement 11, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The H-Area Outside Facilities are located in the 200-H Separations Area and are comprised of a number of processes, utilities, and services that support the separations function. Included are enriched uranium loadout, bulk chemical storage, water handling, acid recovery, general purpose evaporation, and segregated solvent facilities. In addition, services for water, electricity, and steam are provided. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the H-Area Outside Facilities and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the SR Implementation Plan for DOE order 5481.1A. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the facility can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations, to the environment, and to operating personnel. In this report, risks are defined as the expected frequencies of accidents, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequences in person-rem. Following the summary description of facility and operations is the site evaluation including the unique features of the H-Area Outside Facilities. The facility and process design are described in Chapter 3.0 and a description of operations and their impact is given in Chapter 4.0. The accident analysis in Chapter 5.0 is followed by a list of safety related structures and systems (Chapter 6.0) and a description of the Quality Assurance program (Chapter 7.0). The accident analysis in this report focuses on estimating the risk from accidents as a result of operation of the facilities. The operations were evaluated on the basis of three considerations: potential radiological hazards, potential chemical toxicity hazards, and potential conditions uniquely different from normal industrial practice.

  3. Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Springs Geothermal Area Raft River Geothermal Area Railroad Valley Geothermal Area Red River Hot Springs Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Sharkey Hot...

  4. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF THE INTERACTION OF GROUNDWATER WITH THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE 100-D AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN SW

    2008-11-05

    Groundwater beneath much of Hanford's 100 Areas is contaminated with hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) as a consequence of treating reactor cooling water to prevent corrosion. Several treatment systems are in place to remove Cr{sup +6} from the groundwater; however, these systems currently do not reduce Cr{sup +6} to concentrations below aquatic standards. Of concern is the transport of Cr{sup +6} to areas within the channel of the river, as sensitive species inhabit the river and its associated transition zone. The aquatic standard for Cr{sup +6} is currently 11 ug/l under the Record of Decision (ROD) for Interim Action and Department of Energy (DOE) currently plans to pursue remediation of the groundwater to achieve the 11 ug/l standard. Because the compliance wells used to monitor the current remediation systems are located some distance from the river, they may not provide an accurate indication of Cr{sup +6} concentrations in the water that reaches the riverbed. In addition, because salmon spawning areas are considered a high priority for protection from Hanford contaminants, it would be advantageous to understand (1) to what extent Cr{sup +6} discharged to the near-shore or river ecosystems is diluted or attenuated and (2) mechanisms that could mitigate the exposure of the river ecosystems to the discharging Cr{sup +6}. The current concentration target for Cr{sup +6} at near-river groundwater monitoring locations is 20 {micro}g/L; it is assumed that this groundwater mixes with river water that contains virtually no chromium to meet Washington Department of Ecology's (Ecology) water quality standard of 10 {micro}g/L in the river environment. This dynamic mixing process is believed to be driven by daily and seasonal changes in river stage and groundwater remediation system operations, and has been validated using analytical data from numerous groundwater samples obtained adjacent to and within the banks of the river. Although the mean mixing factor of river

  5. Investigation of the Strontium-90 Contaminant Plume along the Shoreline of the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Patton, Gregory W.; Hartman, Mary J.; Spane, Frank A.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mackley, Rob D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts are underway to remediate strontium-laden groundwater to the Columbia River at the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site. Past practices of the 100-N reactor liquid waste disposal sites has left strontium-90 sorbed onto sediments which is a continuing source of contaminant discharge to the river. The Remediation Task of the Science and Technology Project assessed the interaction of groundwater and river water at the hyporheic zone. Limited data have been obtained at this interface of contaminant concentrations, geology, groundwater chemistry, affects of river stage and other variables that may affect strontium-90 release. Efforts were also undertaken to determine the extent, both laterally and horizontally, of the strontium-90 plume along the shoreline and to potentially find an alternative constituent to monitor strontium-90 that would be more cost effective and could possibly be done under real time conditions. A baseline of strontium-90 concentrations along the shoreline was developed to help assess remediation technologies.

  6. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Safety Basis at the Savannah River Site F-Area Central Laboratory Facility … January 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of the Safety Basis at the Savannah River Site F-Area Central Laboratory Facility January 2016 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... ii Executive Summary

  7. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 1997 and replaced with two other areas, both located in the Savannah River swamp. ... on the natural levy that parallels the Savannah River. Area: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...

  8. 2012 Annual Report: Simulate and Evaluate the Cesium Transport and Accumulation in Fukushima-Area Rivers by the TODAM Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2013-03-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the application of the time-varying, one-dimensional sediment-contaminant transport code, TODAM (Time-dependent, One-dimensional, Degradation, And Migration) to simulate the cesium migration and accumulation in the Ukedo River in Fukushima. This report describes the preliminary TODAM simulation results of the Ukedo River model from the location below the Ougaki Dam to the river mouth at the Pacific Ocean. The major findings of the 100-hour TODAM simulation of the preliminary Ukedo River modeling are summarized as follows:

  9. MOVING BEYOND PUMP AND TREAT TOWARD ENHANCED ATTENUATION AND COMBINED REMEDIES T-AREA, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Jay Noonkester, J; Gerald Blount, G

    2008-04-03

    Groundwater beneath T-Area, a former laboratory and semiworks operation at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site, is contaminated by chlorinated solvents (cVOCs). Since the contamination was detected in the 1980s, the cVOCs at T-Area have been treated by a combination of soil vapor extraction and groundwater pump and treat. The site has received approval to discontinue the active treatments and implement a full scale test of enhanced attenuation--an engineering and regulatory strategy that has recently been developed by DOE and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council. Enhanced attenuation uses active engineering solutions to alter the target site in such a way that the contaminant plume will passively stabilize and shrink and to document that the action will be effective, timely, and sustainable. The paradigm recognizes that attenuation remedies are fundamentally based on a mass balance. Thus, long-term plume dynamics can be altered either by reducing the contaminant loading from the source or by increasing the rate of natural attenuation processes within all, or part of, the plume volume. The combination of technologies that emerged for T-Area included: (1) neat (pure) vegetable oil deployment in the deep vadose zone in the former source area, (2) emulsified vegetable oil deployment within the footprint of the groundwater plume, and (3) identification of attenuation mechanisms and rates for the distal portion of the plume. In the first part, neat oil spreads laterally forming a thin layer on the water table to intercept and reduce future cVOC loading (via partitioning) and reduce oxygen inputs (via biostimulation). In the second and third parts, emulsified oil forms active bioremediation reactor zones within the plume footprint to degrade existing groundwater contamination (via reductive dechlorination) and stimulates long-term attenuation capacity in the distal plume (via cometabolism). For T-Area, the enhanced attenuation development

  10. Influence of coarsened and rafted microstructures on the thermomechanical fatigue of a Ni-base superalloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kirka, M. M.; Brindley, K. A.; Neu, R. W.; Antolovich, S. D.; Shinde, S. R.; Gravett, P. W.

    2015-08-17

    The aging of the microstructure of Ni-base superalloys during service is mainly characterized by coarsening and rafting of the γ' precipitates. The influence of these different aged microstructures on thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) under either continuously cycled (CC) and creep-fatigue (CF) was investigated. Three different aged microstructures, generated through accelerated aging and pre-creep treatments, were studied: stress-free coarsened γ', rafted with orientation perpendicular to loading direction (N-raft), and rafted with orientation parallel to loading direction (P-raft). Under most conditions, the aged microstructures were less resistant to TMF than the virgin microstructure; however, there were exceptions. Both stress-free coarsened and N-raft microstructuresmore » resulted in a reduction in TMF life under both CC and CF conditions in comparison to the virgin material. P-raft microstructure also resulted in reduction in TMF life under CC conditions; however, an increase in life over that of the virgin material was observed under CF conditions. Finally, these differences are discussed and hypothesized to be related to the interactions of the dislocations in the γ channels with γ' precipitates.« less

  11. Influence of coarsened and rafted microstructures on the thermomechanical fatigue of a Ni-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirka, M. M.; Brindley, K. A.; Neu, R. W.; Antolovich, S. D.; Shinde, S. R.; Gravett, P. W.

    2015-08-17

    The aging of the microstructure of Ni-base superalloys during service is mainly characterized by coarsening and rafting of the γ' precipitates. The influence of these different aged microstructures on thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) under either continuously cycled (CC) and creep-fatigue (CF) was investigated. Three different aged microstructures, generated through accelerated aging and pre-creep treatments, were studied: stress-free coarsened γ', rafted with orientation perpendicular to loading direction (N-raft), and rafted with orientation parallel to loading direction (P-raft). Under most conditions, the aged microstructures were less resistant to TMF than the virgin microstructure; however, there were exceptions. Both stress-free coarsened and N-raft microstructures resulted in a reduction in TMF life under both CC and CF conditions in comparison to the virgin material. P-raft microstructure also resulted in reduction in TMF life under CC conditions; however, an increase in life over that of the virgin material was observed under CF conditions. Finally, these differences are discussed and hypothesized to be related to the interactions of the dislocations in the γ channels with γ' precipitates.

  12. Late Pleistocene and Holocene-Age Columbia River Sediments and Bedforms: Hanford Reach Area, Washington - Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.R. Fecht, T.E. Marceau

    2006-03-28

    This report presents the results of a geologic study conducted on the lower slopes of the Columbia River Valley in south-central Washington. The study was designed to investigate glaciofluvial and fluvial sediments and bedforms that are present in the river valley and formed subsequent to Pleistocene large-scale cataclysmic flooding of the region.

  13. Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of about -196 mgal over the alluvium-covered graben areas. The gravity high over the Raft River Mountains apparently corresponds with the Raft River Mountains anticline. A belt...

  14. Property:TechProbSolutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dock Geothermal Area N Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area North Brawley Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area R cont. Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Rye Patch...

  15. Property:WellFieldDescription | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area N Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area North Brawley Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area R cont. Rye Patch...

  16. Property:HydroSystem | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area N Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area North Brawley Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area R cont. Rye Patch...

  17. Property:ExplorationHistory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area N Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area North Brawley Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area R cont. Rye Patch...

  18. TREATABILITY STUDY FOR EDIBLE OIL DEPLOYMENT FOR ENHANCED CVOC ATTENUATION FOR T-AREA, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riha, B.; Looney, B.; Noonkester, J.; Hyde, W.; Walker, R.

    2012-05-15

    Groundwater beneath T-Area, a former laboratory and semiworks operation at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS), is contaminated by chlorinated solvents (cVOCs). Since the contamination was detected in the 1980s, the cVOCs at T-Area have been treated by a combination of soil vapor extraction and groundwater pump and treat. The site received approval to temporarily discontinue the active groundwater treatment and implement a treatability study of enhanced attenuation - an engineering and regulatory strategy that has recently been developed by DOE and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC 2007). Enhanced attenuation uses active engineering solutions to alter the target site in such a way that the contaminant plume will passively stabilize and shrink and to document that the action will be effective, timely, and sustainable. The paradigm recognizes that attenuation remedies are fundamentally based on a mass balance. Thus, long-term plume dynamics can be altered either by reducing the contaminant loading from the source or by increasing the rate of natural attenuation processes within all, or part of, the plume volume. The combination of technologies that emerged for T-Area included: (1) neat (pure) vegetable oil deployment in the deep vadose zone in the former source area, (2) emulsified vegetable oil deployment within the footprint of the groundwater plume, and (3) identification of attenuation mechanisms and rates for the distal portion of the plume. In the first part, neat oil spreads laterally forming a thin layer on the water table to intercept and reduce future cVOC loading (via partitioning) and reduce oxygen inputs (via biostimulation). In the second and third parts, emulsified oil forms active bioremediation reactor zones within the plume footprint to degrade existing groundwater contamination (via reductive dechlorination and/or cometabolism) and stimulates long-term attenuation capacity in the distal plume (via

  19. River Corridor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    River Corridor Richland Operations Office Richland Operations Office River Corridor B Reactor 300 Area 324 Building 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds C Reactor D and DR Reactors F ...

  20. Multiscale Genetic Structure of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in the Upper Snake River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cegelski, Christine C.; Campbell, Matthew R.

    2006-05-30

    Populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvierii have declined throughout their native range as a result of habitat fragmentation, overharvest, and introductions of nonnative trout that have hybridized with or displaced native populations. The degree to which these factors have impacted the current genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout populations is of primary interest for their conservation. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity and genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout in Idaho and Nevada with data from six polymorphic microsatellite loci. A total of 1,392 samples were analyzed from 45 sample locations throughout 11 major river drainages. We found that levels of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation varied extensively. The Salt River drainage, which is representative of the least impacted migration corridors in Idaho, had the highest levels of genetic diversity and low levels of genetic differentiation. High levels of genetic differentiation were observed at similar or smaller geographic scales in the Portneuf River, Raft River, and Teton River drainages, which are more altered by anthropogenic disturbances. Results suggested that Yellowstone cutthroat trout are naturally structured at the major river drainage level but that habitat fragmentation has altered this structuring. Connectivity should be restored via habitat restoration whenever possible to minimize losses in genetic diversity and to preserve historical processes of gene flow, life history variation, and metapopulation dynamics. However, alternative strategies for management and conservation should also be considered in areas where there is a strong likelihood of nonnative invasions or extensive habitat fragmentation that cannot be easily ameliorated.

  1. Baseline Mapping Study of the Steed Pond Aquifer and Crouch Branch Confining Unit Beneath A/M Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JACKSON, DENNISG.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents the results of a baseline mapping project conducted for the Environmental Restoration Department at Savannah River Site. The purpose of this report is to map the distribution of mud (clay and silt-sized material) within each hydrogeologic unit from the surface down to the top of the Crouch Branch aquifer beneath the A/M Area. The distribution of mud layers and variations in the percentage of clay and silt within the strata is extremely important in order to fully characterize the extent of DNAPL beneath the A/M Area and determine the geometry of the contaminant plumes emanating from them. Precision mapping of these layers can aid in locating areas where contamination is most likely to have migrated into the saturated zone. In addition, this information can be used to refine the current remediation systems or assist in designing new remedial systems.

  2. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  3. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  4. Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conductivity; United States; USGS Authors Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer and M.H. Published Open-File Report - U. S. Geological...

  5. Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy DOE 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review egs_007_moore.pdf (181.39 KB) More Documents & Publications Demonstration of an Enhanced Geothermal System at the Northwest Geysers Geothermal Field, California; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Feasibility of EGS Development at Bradys Hot Springs, Nevada Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Repo

  6. Washington DC Reliability Requirements and the Need to Operate Mirant's Potomac River Generation Station to Support Local Area Reliability.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Washington Closure Hanford: Ten Years of River Corridor Cleanup Washington Closure Hanford: Ten Years of River Corridor Cleanup December 17, 2015 - 12:30pm Addthis Contract-Timeline-E1511010_4-B_756px.jpg This timeline shows contractor Washington Closure Hanford's accomplishments over the past 10 years through its River Corridor Closure Contract. Addthis Related Articles EM Update Newsletter Spotlights River Corridor Cleanup at Hanford Site River Corridor Achievements

  7. Creep of CMSX-4 superalloy single crystals: Effects of rafting at high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, R.C.; Matan, N.; Cox, D.C.; Rist, M.A.; Rae, C.M.F.

    1999-09-29

    The creep performance of (001)-orientated CMSX-4 superalloy single crystals at temperatures beyond 1000 C is analyzed. Rafting of the {gamma}{prime} structure occurs rapidly, e.g., for the 1150 C/100 MPa tests rafting is completed within the first 10 h. At this stage and for a considerable time thereafter the creep strain rate decreases with increasing strain, implying a creep hardening effect which is absent at lower temperatures when the kinetics of rafting is less rapid. Once a critical strain {epsilon}* of (0.7 {+-} 0.3)% is reached, the creep strain increases dramatically and failure occurs within a few tens of hours. It is demonstrated that methods of interpretation which, assume a proportionality between the creep strain rate and creep strain, are unable to account for creep hardening which occurs as a consequence of rafting. A modification is proposed which accounts for the blocking of the glide/climb of {l{underscore}brace}111{r{underscore}brace}{l{underscore}angle}1{bar 1}0{r{underscore}angle} creep dislocations which occurs as the number of vertical {gamma} channels is reduced and cellular dislocation networks become stabilized. Consequently, failure must be taken to be associated with creep cavitation, which occurs predominantly around casting porosity. It is emphasized that more work is required to quantify the interaction between the various creep damage mechanisms.

  8. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These studies are being conducted in habitats on the Savannah River Site where the ... activities on the Savannah River Site can expose wildlife that use contaminated areas. ...

  9. Cholesterol accumulation in Niemann Pick type C (NPC) model cells causes a shift in APP localization to lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosicek, Marko; Malnar, Martina; Goate, Alison; Hecimovic, Silva

    2010-03-12

    It has been suggested that cholesterol may modulate amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) formation, a causative factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by regulating distribution of the three key proteins in the pathogenesis of AD ({beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP), {beta}-secretase (BACE1) and/or presenilin 1 (PS1)) within lipid rafts. In this work we tested whether cholesterol accumulation upon NPC1 dysfunction, which causes Niemann Pick type C disease (NPC), causes increased partitioning of APP into lipid rafts leading to increased CTF/A{beta} formation in these cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. To test this we used CHO NPC1{sup -/-} cells (NPC cells) and parental CHOwt cells. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation we observed a shift in fl-APP/CTF compartmentalization into lipid raft fractions upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC vs. wt cells. Furthermore, {gamma}-secretase inhibitor treatment significantly increased fl-APP/CTF distribution in raft fractions in NPC vs. wt cells, suggesting that upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC1-null cells increased formation of APP-CTF and its increased processing towards A{beta} occurs in lipid rafts. Our results support that cholesterol overload, such as in NPC disease, leads to increased partitioning of APP/CTF into lipid rafts resulting in increased amyloidogenic processing of APP in these cholesterol-rich membranes. This work adds to the mechanism of the cholesterol-effect on APP processing and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and supports the role of lipid rafts in these processes.

  10. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Phytoextraction Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone – Field Treatability Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2010-01-11

    river’s edge. Less than two weeks later (March 21), the river began the spring rise. Periodic (daily) or continuous flooding occurred at the site over the next 3 to 4 months. River levels at times were over the top of the enclosure’s fence. This same pattern was repeated for the next 2 years. It was however evident that even submerged for part, or all of the day, that the plants continued to flourish. There were no indications of herbivory or animal tracks observed within the plot although animals were present in the area. Biomass production over the three years followed a typical growth curve with a yield of about 1 kg for the first year when the trees were establishing themselves, 4 kg for the second, and over 20 kg for the third when the trees were entering the exponential phase of growth. On a metric Ton per hectare (mT/ha) basis this would be 0.2 mT/ha in 2007, 0.87 mT/ha in 2008, and 4.3 mT/ha in 2009. Growth curve extrapolation predicts 13.2 mT/ha during a fourth year and potentially 29.5 mT/ha following a fifth year. Using the observed Ca and Sr concentrations found in the plant tissues, and Sr CR’s calculated from groundwater analysis, projected biomass yields suggest the trees could prove effective in removing the contaminant from the 100-NR-2 riparian zone.

  11. Use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to Identify and Characterize Overwintering Areas of Fish in Ice-Covered Arctic RIvers: A Demonstration with Broad Whitefish and their Habitats in the Sagavanirktok River, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Duguay, Claude R.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moulton, Larry; Doucette, Peter J.; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-12-01

    In northern climates, locating overwintering fish can be very challenging due to thick ice cover. Areas near the coast of the Beaufort Sea provide valuable overwintering habitat for both resident and anadromous fish species; identifying and understanding their use of overwintering areas is of special interest. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from two spaceborne satellites was examined as an alternative to radiotelemetry for identifying anadromous fish overwintering. The presence of water and ice were sampled at 162 sites and fish were sampled at 16 of these sites. From SAR imagery alone, we successfully identified large pools inhabited by overwintering fish in the ice-covered Sagavanirktok River. In addition, the imagery was able to identify all of the larger pools (mean minimum length of 138m (range 15-470 m; SD=131)) of water located by field sampling. The effectiveness of SAR to identify these pools varied from 31% to 100%, depending on imagery polarization, the incidence angle range, and the orbit. Horizontal transmit–vertical receive (HV) polarization appeared best. The accuracy of SAR was also assessed at a finer pixel-by-pixel (30-m x30-m) scale. The best correspondence at this finer scale was obtained with an image having HV polarization. The levels of agreement ranged from 54% to 69%. The presence of broad whitefish (the only anadromous species present) was associated with salinity and pool size (estimated with SAR imagery); fish were more likely to be found in larger pools with low salinity. This research illustrates that SAR imaging has great potential for identifying under-ice overwintering areas of riverine fish. These techniques should allow managers to identify critical overwintering areas with relatively more ease and lower cost than traditional techniques.

  12. A comparison of four aerial radiological surveys of Par Pond and the surrounding area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina. Dates of surveys: 1989--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1993-09-01

    A series of gamma radiation surveys was conducted over Par Pond at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in August 1993, October 1991, and August 1992 as part of an effort to monitor the radiological changes around Par Pond as its water level was lowered. The results of an April 1989 survey, which was about one-half the area of those surveys listed above, were used as baseline data for the comparison. Gamma energy spectrum analysis revealed that the only man-made gamma ray emitter detected during the four surveys in the Par Pond area was cesium-137. The comparisons revealed that: (1) significant change in the radiological environment occurred along the Par Pond shoreline as the water levels were lowered, (2) the activity in Lower Three Runs Creek varied slightly as the level/flow rate changed during the pumping process, (3) minor changes occurred in areas adjacent to the Par Pond, and (4) little or no change occurred between surveys in the spatial distribution or kind of sources detected. All changes were directly related to the moisture variations (Par Pond water lowering, rainfall, waterway flow rates) between the survey periods. The distribution, kind, and activity of sources detected beyond the pond bed were consistent between surveys. 60 figs., 14 tabs.

  13. First Draft Performance Assessment for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site - Part 3

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    66 of 864 3.0 DISPOSAL FACILITY CHARACTERISTICS Section 3.1 provides information regarding site characteristics including detailed information furnished for those characteristics that influence the contaminant transport modeling assumptions provided in Chapter 4.  Section 3.1.1 provides a general description and layout of the site and the HTF to orient the reader and includes the current (as of 2009) estimated population distribution of the surrounding area as well as future land use planning

  14. Air Pathway Modeling of the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility at the Savannah River Site - 12253

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.A.; Taylor, G.A.

    2012-07-01

    This investigation was initiated to address a concern expressed by the Department of Energy's Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) Review Team during their review of the 2008 E-Area Performance Assessment (PA). The concern was the potential for overlapping of atmospheric plumes, emanating from the soil surface above SRS LLW disposal facilities within the E-Area, to contribute to the dose received by a member of the public during the Institutional Control (IC) period. The implication of this concern was that the dose to the maximally-exposed individual (MEI) located at the SRS boundary might be underestimated during this time interval. To address this concern a re-analysis of the atmospheric pathway releases from E-Area was required. A new atmospheric release model (ARM) capable of addressing the LFRG plume overlap concern was developed. The conceptual approach to assessing the atmospheric dose to a member of the public from E-Area LLW disposal facilities is to perform sub-surface simulations of the release of volatile radionuclides from the waste zones through the overlying engineered barriers to determine a flux rate at the land surface. Then, atmospheric dispersion of the radionuclide flux is simulated in an atmospheric transport model to compute air concentrations in the vicinity of the hypothetically exposed individual. A re-analysis of atmospheric dispersion portion of the atmospheric pathway releases was not undertaken, however the Dose Release Factors (DRF's) previously computed in a atmospheric transport study were retained to convert the new surface emanation fluxes (computed with the ARM) into doses received by the MEI at the appropriate points of compliance (POC). In this way, the dose received by the MEI could be compared to the maximum permissible dose level, defined in DOE Order 435.1 as being 100 uSv/yr (10 mrem/yr). The main conclusion of this study is that for atmospheric releases from the E-Area disposal facilities, plume

  15. System-Scale Model of Aquifer, Vadose Zone, and River Interactions for the Hanford 300 Area - Application to Uranium Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Parker, Kyle R.; Waichler, Scott R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2013-10-01

    This report represents a synthesis and integration of basic and applied research into a system-scale model of the Hanford 300 Area groundwater uranium plume, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Richland Operations (DOE-RL) office. The report integrates research findings and data from DOE Office of Science (DOE-SC), Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and DOE-RL projects, and from the site remediation and closure contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH). The three-dimensional, system-scale model addresses water flow and reactive transport of uranium for the coupled vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, and Columbia River shoreline of the Hanford 300 Area. The system-scale model of the 300 Area was developed to be a decision-support tool to evaluate processes of the total system affecting the groundwater uranium plume. The model can also be used to address “what if” questions regarding different remediation endpoints, and to assist in design and evaluation of field remediation efforts. For example, the proposed cleanup plan for the Hanford 300 Area includes removal, treatment, and disposal of contaminated sediments from known waste sites, enhanced attenuation of uranium hot spots in the vadose and periodically rewetted zone, and continued monitoring of groundwater with institutional controls. Illustrative simulations of polyphosphate infiltration were performed to demonstrate the ability of the system-scale model to address these types of questions. The use of this model in conjunction with continued field monitoring is expected to provide a rigorous basis for developing operational strategies for field remediation and for defining defensible remediation endpoints.

  16. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Colorado River Storage Project Management Center Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area Power Administration-Colorado River Storage Project Management Center ...

  17. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (co)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, III, Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2011-12-27

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  18. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO) polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, III, Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2006-10-25

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surface modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a collidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as fuctionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  19. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCormick, III., Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2006-11-21

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thio-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the stops of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  20. Tumor exosomes induce tunneling nanotubes in lipid raft-enriched regions of human mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Babatunde, Victor; Dickson, Elizabeth L.; Wong, Phillip; Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy; Moreira, Andr L.; Downey, Robert J.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Lou, Emil

    2014-04-15

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 2448 h; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.31.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells. - Highlights: Exosomes derived from malignant cells can stimulate an increased rate in the formation of tunneling nanotubes. Tunneling nanotubes can serve as conduits for intercellular transfer of these exosomes. Most notably, exosomes derived from benign mesothelial cells had no effect on nanotube formation. Cells forming nanotubes were enriched in lipid rafts at a greater number compared with cells not forming nanotubes. Our findings suggest causal and potentially synergistic association of exosomes and tunneling nanotubes

  1. PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT: HUMATE INJECTION AS AN ENHANCED ATTENUATION METHOD AT THE F-AREA SEEPAGE BASINS, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.

    2013-09-16

    A field test of a humate technology for uranium and I-129 remediation was conducted at the F-Area Field Research Site as part of the Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) funded by the DOE Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation. Previous studies have shown that humic acid sorbed to sediments strongly binds uranium at mildly acidic pH and potentially binds iodine-129 (I-129). Use of humate could be applicable for contaminant stabilization at a wide variety of DOE sites however pilot field-scale tests and optimization of this technology are required to move this technical approach from basic science to actual field deployment and regulatory acceptance. The groundwater plume at the F-Area Field Research Site contains a large number of contaminants, the most important from a risk perspective being strontium-90 (Sr-90), uranium isotopes, I-129, tritium, and nitrate. Groundwater remains acidic, with pH as low as 3.2 near the basins and increasing to the background pH of approximately 5at the plume fringes. The field test was conducted in monitoring well FOB 16D, which historically has shown low pH and elevated concentrations of Sr-90, uranium, I-129 and tritium. The field test included three months of baseline monitoring followed by injection of a potassium humate solution and approximately four and half months of post monitoring. Samples were collected and analyzed for numerous constituents but the focus was on attenuation of uranium, Sr-90, and I-129. This report provides background information, methodology, and preliminary field results for a humate field test. Results from the field monitoring show that most of the excess humate (i.e., humate that did not sorb to the sediments) has flushed through the surrounding formation. Furthermore, the data indicate that the test was successful in loading a band of sediment surrounding the injection point to a point where pH could return to near normal during the study

  2. Marine carbonate embayment system in an Eolian dune terrain, Permian Upper Minnelusa Formation, Rozet Area, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achauer, C.W.

    1987-05-01

    The eolian origin for Minnelusa sandstones has been stressed in numerous published articles. However, the dolomites that are interbedded with the eolian sandstones have received little attention. Isopach mapping of one of the dolomite units (Dolomite I) reflects a marine embayment system whose individual embayments range from 1/2 to 1 mi in width and trend primarily in a northwest direction. Consistently the embayment dolomites pinch out against the flanks of reworked, low relief, broad, eolian dune ridges. So far, 108 mi/sup 2/ of the Dolomite I marine embayment system have been mapped, but the overall extent of the system is undoubtedly much greater. Dolomite I is rarely cored, but cores from stratigraphically higher embayment dolomites in the upper Minnelusa show that these dolomites display the following, shoaling-upward sequence: (1) subtidal, sparingly fossiliferous dolomite; (2) intertidal, algal-laminated or brecciated or mud-cracked dolomite; and (3) very thin, supratidal, nodular anhydrite. The embayments, therefore, became the sites of marine sabkhas located between eolian dunes. Two main conclusions emerge from this study: (1) the juxtaposition of eolian sandstones and marine dolomites in a tectonically stable area suggests that eustatic sea level changes and a very arid climate were responsible for the marked environmental and lithologic changes observed in the upper Minnelusa, and (2) arid, coastal, evaporitic sabkhas bordered by eolian dunes are known from a number of modern and ancient cases, but marine carbonate embayments and associated evaporitic sabkhas that penetrate deeply into eolian sandstone terrains are rare.

  3. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Food Chain Transfer Studies for Phytoremediation Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.

    2009-04-01

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys drinking water standards for groundwater (8 picocuries/L) by as much as a factor of 1000 at several locations within the Hanford 100-N Area and along the 100-N Area Columbia River shoreline). Phytoextraction, a managed remediation technology in which plants or integrated plant/rhizosphere systems are employed to phytoextract and/or sequester 90Sr, is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River as part of a treatment train that includes an apatite barrier to immobilize groundwater transport of 90Sr. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua) to extract 90Sr from the vadose zone soil and aquifer sediments (phytoextraction) and filter 90Sr (rhizofiltration) from the shallow groundwater along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. The stem and foliage of coyote willows accumulating 90Sr may present not only a mechanism to remove the contaminant but also can be viewed as a source of nutrition for natural herbivores, therefore becoming a potential pathway for the isotope to enter the riparian food chain. Engineered barriers such as large and small animal fencing constructed around the field plot will control the intrusion of deer, rodents, birds, and humans. These efforts, however, will have limited effect on mobile phytophagous insects. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the potential for food chain transfer by insects prior to placement of the remediation technology at 100-N. Insect types include direct consumers of the sap or liquid content of the plants vascular system (xylem and phloem) by aphids as well as those that would directly consume the plant foliage such as the larvae (caterpillars) of Lepidoptera species. Heavy infestations of aphids feeding on the stems and leaves of willows growing in 90Sr-contaminated soil can accumulate a small amount (~0.15 0.06%) of the total label removed from the soil by the

  4. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone and uppermost part of the Snake River Plain aquifer at test area north, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.R.; Bowers, B.

    1995-06-01

    A complex sequence of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds underlies Test Area North (TAN) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in eastern Idaho. Wells drilled to depths of at least 500 feet penetrate 10 basalt-flow groups and 5 to 10 sedimentary interbeds that range in age from about 940,000 to 1.4 million years. Each basalt-flow group consists of one or more basalt flows from a brief, single or compound eruption. All basalt flows of each group erupted from the same vent, and have similar ages, paleomagnetic properties, potassium contents, and natural-gamma emissions. Sedimentary interbeds consist of fluvial, lacustrine, and eolian deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel that accumulated for hundreds to hundreds of thousands of years during periods of volcanic quiescence. Basalt and sediment are elevated by hundreds of feet with respect to rocks of equivalent age south and cast of the area, a relation that is attributed to past uplift at TAN. Basalt and sediment are unsaturated to a depth of about 200 feet below land surface. Rocks below this depth are saturated and make up the Snake River Plain aquifer. The effective base of the aquifer is at a depth of 885 feet below land surface. Detailed stratigraphic relations for the lowermost part of the aquifer in the depth interval from 500 to 885 feet were not determined because of insufficient data. The stratigraphy of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds in the upper 500 feet of the unsaturated zone and aquifer was determined from natural-gamma logs, lithologic logs, and well cores. Basalt cores were evaluated for potassium-argon ages, paleomagnetic properties, petrographic characteristics, and chemical composition. Stratigraphic control was provided by differences in ages, paleomagnetic properties, potassium content, and natural-gamma emissions of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds.

  5. Microcrack technology. Progress report, 1 October 1978--31 March...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    March 1979 Abstract The microcracks were observed in core samples from Coso and Raft River Geothermal Areas. A set of observable characteristics of microcracks were...

  6. Fracture characteristics and their relationships to producing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    characteristics and their relationships to producing zones in deep wells, Raft River geothermal area Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book:...

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Silver Bow Creek/Butte Area NPL site, Warm Springs Ponds Operable Unit, Upper Clark Fork River Basin, MT. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The Silver Bow Creek site is a mining and processing area in the Upper Clark Fork River Basin, Deer Lodge County, Southwestern Montana. The Record of Decision (ROD) documents the selected interim remedial action for one of eleven operable units for the site, the Warm Springs Ponds operable unit, which covers approximately 2,500 acres just above the beginning of the Clark Fork River. Contamination at the site is the result of over 100 years of mining and process operations in the area. Mining, milling, and smelting waste were dumped directly into Silver Bow Creek and transported downstream to the Clark Fork River with final deposition downstream as far as 130 miles. Principal threats from the site include the possibility of pond berm failure due to flood and earthquake damage that could release millions of cubic yards of tailings and sediment to the river. Furthermore, the creeks are contaminated with dissolved metals, and exposed soil and tailings are contaminated with elevated levels of several metals. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, ground water, and surface water are metals including arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc.

  8. RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

    2003-06-02

    Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

  9. River and Plateau Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 2011) Page 1 Area RAP Committee Area of Interest Issue Manager(s) (*denotes lead) Other interested committee members Focus/Product For FY2012 Framing Questions/Issues (Articulated by Issue Managers) Cross- cutting River Corridor 100 & 300 Areas * 100 B/C Area * 100 K Area * 100 N Area * 100 D & H Areas * 100 F Area * 300 Area Shelley Cimon Dale Engstrom* Liz Mattson Jean Vanni Gerry Pollet Bob Suyama Wade Riggsbee 6 RODs RI/FS and Proposed Plans to be issued between now &

  10. Environmental Assessment for the Closure of the High-Level Waste Tanks in F- & H-Areas at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1996-07-31

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the closure of 51 high-level radioactive waste tanks and tank farm ancillary equipment (including transfer lines, evaporators, filters, pumps, etc) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The waste tanks are located in the F- and H-Areas of SRS and vary in capacity from 2,839,059 liters (750,000 gallons) to 4,921,035 liters (1,300,000 gallons). These in-ground tanks are surrounded by soil to provide shielding. The F- and H-Area High-Level Waste Tanks are operated under the authority of Industrial Wastewater Permits No.17,424-IW; No.14520, and No.14338 issued by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). In accordance with the Permit requirements, DOE has prepared a Closure Plan (DOE, 1996) and submitted it to SCDHEC for approval. The Closure Plan identifies all applicable or relevant and appropriate regulations, statutes, and DOE Orders for closing systems operated under the Industrial Wastewater Permits. When approved by SCDHEC, the Closure Plan will present the regulatory process for closing all of the F- and H-Area High Level Waste Tanks. The Closure Plan establishes performance objectives or criteria to be met prior to closing any tank, group of tanks, or ancillary tank farm equipment. The proposed action is to remove the residual wastes from the tanks and to fill the tanks with a material to prevent future collapse and bind up residual waste, to lower human health risks, and to increase safety in and around the tanks. If required, an engineered cap consisting of clay, backfill (soil), and vegetation as the final layer to prevent erosion would be applied over the tanks. The selection of tank system closure method will be evaluated against the following Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) criteria described in 40