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1

PARS II Process Document – DOE Period Close  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document details the process adopted by the Office of Acquisition and Project Management to prepare APM DepSec Monthly Status Report, finalize DOE close period package, and perform reporting...

2

Microsoft Word - PARS II Process Document - Close Period 2013...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

distributing and archiving of reports; and close period activities. PROCESS The Monthly Report and Close Period process starts on the 1 st working day of the reporting month. The...

3

WRAP process area development control work plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work plan defines the manner in which the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module I Process Area will be maintained under development control status. This status permits resolution of identified design discrepancies, control system changes, as-building of equipment, and perform modifications to increase process operability and maintainability as parallel efforts. This work plan maintains configuration control as these efforts are undertaken. This task will end with system testing and reissue of field verified design drawings.

Leist, K.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

4

300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ``co-operator.`` The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit.

Luke, S.N.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Dental analysis of Classic period population variability in the Maya area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DENTAL ANALYSIS OF CLASSIC PERIOD POPULATION VARIABILITY IN THE MAYA AREA A Dissertation by ANDREW KENNETH SCHERER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Morphology and Size......................................................50 Dental Anthropology and Human Population Variation...........................................57 Previous Studies of Ancient Mesoamerican Population...

Scherer, Andrew Kenneth

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

6

Controlling Change: Process Monitoring and Adjustment During Transition Periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) charts for the SPC method and some form of propor- tional-integral-derivative (PID) control for the EPC, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 KEY WORDS: Process control; Control charts; Auto- correlation; Feedback methods of statistical process control (SPC) with engineering process control (EPC). Montgomery

Nembhard, Harriet Black

7

Promising Areas for Energy Efficiency in Industrial Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Promising Areas for Energy Efficiency in Industrial Process Babu Joseph Ph.D Southern California Edison Company Almost all of the electric utilities in the US have some sort of energy efficiency improvement program for their customers. In all...

Joseph, B.

8

Supporting Generic Cost Models for Wide-Area Stream Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting Generic Cost Models for Wide-Area Stream Processing Olga Papaemmanouil #1 , Ugur C¸ etintemel 2 , John Jannotti 2 # Deparment of Computer Science, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, USA 1 olga and increased availability of receptors that report physical or software events has led to the emergence

Cetintemel, Ugur

9

Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm[sup 2]. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity. 3 figures.

Tsai, C.C.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Berry, L.A.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

10

Plasma generating apparatus for large area plasma processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasma generating apparatus for plasma processing applications is based on a permanent magnet line-cusp plasma confinement chamber coupled to a compact single-coil microwave waveguide launcher. The device creates an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma in the launcher and a second ECR plasma is created in the line cusps due to a 0.0875 tesla magnetic field in that region. Additional special magnetic field configuring reduces the magnetic field at the substrate to below 0.001 tesla. The resulting plasma source is capable of producing large-area (20-cm diam), highly uniform (.+-.5%) ion beams with current densities above 5 mA/cm.sup.2. The source has been used to etch photoresist on 5-inch diam silicon wafers with good uniformity.

Tsai, Chin-Chi (Oak Ridge, TN); Gorbatkin, Steven M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Berry, Lee A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Wide-Area Thermal Processing of Light-Emitting Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon carbide based materials and devices have been successfully exploited for diverse electronic applications. However, they have not achieved the same success as Si technologies due to higher material cost and higher processing temperatures required for device development. Traditionally, SiC is not considered for optoelectronic applications because it has an indirect bandgap. However, AppliCote Associates, LLC has developed a laser-based doping process which enables light emission in SiC through the creation of embedded p-n junctions. AppliCote laser irradiation of silicon carbide allows two different interaction mechanisms: (1) Laser conversion or induced phase transformation which creates carbon rich regions that have conductive properties. These conductive regions are required for interconnection to the light emitting semiconducting region. (2) Laser doping which injects external dopant atoms into the substrate that introduces deep level transition states that emit light when electrically excited. The current collaboration with AppliCote has focused on the evaluation of ORNL's unique Pulse Thermal Processing (PTP) technique as a replacement for laser processing. Compared to laser processing, Pulse Thermal Processing can deliver similar energy intensities (20-50 kW/cm2) over a much larger area (up to 1,000 cm2) at a lower cost and much higher throughput. The main findings of our investigation; which are significant for the realization of SiC based optoelectronic devices, are as follows: (1) The PTP technique is effective in low thermal budget activation of dopants in SiC similar to the laser technique. The surface electrical conductivity of the SiC samples improved by about three orders of magnitude as a result of PTP processing which is significant for charge injection in the devices; (2) The surface composition of the SiC film can be modified by the PTP technique to create a carbon-rich surface (increased local C:Si ratio from 1:1 to 2.9:1). This is significant as higher thermal and electrical conductivities of the surface layer are critical for a successful development of integrated optoelectronic devices; and (3) PTP provides low thermal budget dopant activation with a controlled depth profile, which can be exploited for high performance device development with selective patterning of the substrate. This project has successfully demonstrated that a low thermal budget annealing technique, such as PTP, is critical to defining the path for low cost electronic devices integrated on glass or polymeric substrates. This project is complimentary to the goals of the Solid State Lighting Program within DOE. It involves new manufacturing techniques for light emitting materials that are potentially much lower cost and energy efficient than existing products. Significant opportunity exists for further exploration of AppliCote's material and device technology in combination with ORNL's PTP technique, modeling, and characterization capabilities.

Duty, C.; Quick, N. (AppliCote Associates, LLC) [AppliCote Associates, LLC

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

MANAGING AUSTRALIA'S PROTECTED AREAS a review of visitor management models, frameworks and processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANAGING AUSTRALIA'S PROTECTED AREAS a review of visitor management models, frameworks and processes Greg Brown, Barbara Koth, Glenn Kreag & Delene Weber #12;MANAGING AUSTRALIA'S PROTECTED AREAS ii National Library of Australia Cataloguing in Publication Data Managing Australia's protected areas : review

Brown, Gregory G.

13

Project L-070, ``300 Area process sewer piping system upgrade`` Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the project management plan for Project L-070, 300 Area process sewer system upgrades.

Wellsfry, H.E.

1994-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

14

FM13 Glastir woodland creation appeals form 3 December, 2010 Glastir Woodland Creation Appeals Process-Red Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process-Red Areas Glastir Woodland Creation Appeals Process ­ Red Areas This should only be used where you: What is the reason/s for the RED designation? Why do you think that the area has been incorrectly the boundary of the area that you wish to plant in the red areas in question Project Officer

15

Large area radio frequency plasma for microelectronics processing Z. Yu and D. Shaw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focus on wide area plasma uniformity and undesired antenna window erosion caused by the plasma. OurLarge area radio frequency plasma for microelectronics processing Z. Yu and D. Shaw Colorado State November 1994 Radio-frequency rf inductively coupled planar plasma ICP provides a better way to generate

Collins, George J.

16

Computer-aided industrial process design; the ASPEN Project. First annual report for the period.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Work during the first year of this contract concentrated on acquiring the project staff, development of a prototype simulator, the simulation of three coal conversion processes, a survey of software for acquisition, the ...

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Energy Laboratory.

1977-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Synthetic process for preparation of high surface area electroactive compounds for battery applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the preparation of electroactive cathode compounds useful in lithium-ion batteries, comprising exothermic mixing of low-cost precursors and calcination under appropriate conditions. The exothermic step may be a spontaneous flameless combustion reaction. The disclosed process can be used to prepare any lithium metal phosphate or lithium mixed metal phosphate as a high surface area single phase compound.

Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

18

Y-12 Development Division technical progress report. Part 3, Metal processing period ending December 1, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type 1020 mild steel, IF-steel{reg_sign}(registered trademark of Armco Steel Corporation, Middletown, Ohio), and TI-Namel were exposed in molten lithium hydride (LiH) at 800C for cumulative times approaching 300 h. Mild steel decarburized at an extreme rate with the affected area exhibiting tremendous grain growth. In contrast, IF-steels{reg_sign} and TI-Namel do not experience decarburization or grain growth during identical exposures to LiH. All three steels experience net weight gains during extended exposure, and the data suggest that lithium penetration into the steel is the primary source of weight gain.

Northcutt, W.G. Jr. [comp.

1993-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

19

Sampling and Hydrogeology of the Vadose Zone Beneath the 300 Area Process Ponds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four open pits were dug with a backhoe into the vadose zone beneath the former 300 Area Process Ponds in April 2003. Samples were collected about every 2 feet for physical, chemical, and/or microbiological characterization. This reports presents a stratigraphic and geohydrologic summary of the four excavations.

Bjornstad, Bruce N.

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

AREA  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley ResponsibleSubmissionofDepartmentNo.7-052 ofFocusAREA FAQ #

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.

E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; Siv Aasland; Kjersti Kleveland; Ann Hooper; Leo Bonnell; John Hemmings; Jack Chen; Bart A. Van Hassel

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Bird Risk Behaviors and Fatalities at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: Period of Performance, March 1998--December 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been documented that wind turbine operations at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area kill large numbers of birds of multiple species, including raptors. We initiated a study that integrates research on bird behaviors, raptor prey availability, turbine design, inter-turbine distribution, landscape attributes, and range management practices to explain the variation in avian mortality at two levels of analysis: the turbine and the string of turbines. We found that inter-specific differences in intensities of use of airspace within close proximity did not explain the variation in mortality among species. Unique suites of attributes relate to mortality of each species, so species-specific analyses are required to understand the factors that underlie turbine-caused fatalities. We found that golden eagles are killed by turbines located in the canyons and that rock piles produced during preparation of the wind tower laydown areas related positively to eagle mortality, perhaps due to the use of these rock piles as cover by desert cottontails. Other similar relationships between fatalities and environmental factors are identified and discussed. The tasks remaining to complete the project are summarized.

Thelander, C. G.; Smallwood, K. S.; Rugge, L.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Y-12 Development Organization technical progress report: Part 3 -- Metal processing, period ending March 1, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the effort to downsize its uranium processing facilities, the Y-12 Plant has supported an investigation to identify extraction solvents that would both work efficiently in centrifugal contactors and be disposed of easily. Various organic ethers, hydroxy ethers, ether ketones, acids, amides, and diketones were studied for their ability to extract uranyl nitrate from aqueous solutions. Although many of these solvents were obtained commercially, others had to be synthesized in-house. The authors found a large range of extraction coefficients for these solvents. Because of steric hindrance or some other factor, certain ethers performed poorly. On the other hand, various mono- and diethers of tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol exhibited excellent extraction and stripping coefficients for uranyl nitrate, justifying purchase of a pilot plant batch of one of this family of solvents. Likewise, the authors determined the extraction coefficient for one of the two amides synthesized in-house to be quite high.

Northcutt, W.G. Jr. [comp.

1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

Bentonite alteration due to thermal-hydro-chemical processes during the early thermal period in a nuclear waste repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After closure of an underground nuclear waste repository, the decay of radionuclides will raise temperature in the repository, and the bentonite buffer will resaturate by water inflow from the surrounding host rock. The perturbations from these thermal and hydrological processes are expected to dissipate within hundreds to a few thousand years. Here, we investigate coupled thermal-hydro-chemical processes and their effects on the short-term performance of a potential nuclear waste repository located in a clay formation. Using a simplified geometric configuration and abstracted hydraulic parameters of the clayey formation, we examine geochemical processes, coupled with thermo-hydrologic phenomena, and potential changes in porosity near the waste container during the early thermal period. The developed models were used for evaluating the mineral alterations and potential changes in porosity of the buffer, which can affect the repository performance. The results indicate that mineral alteration and associated changes in porosity induced by early thermal and hydrological processes are relatively small and are expected to not significantly affect flow and transport properties. Chlorite precipitation was obtained in all simulation cases. A maximum of one percent volume fraction of chlorite could be formed, whose process may reduce swelling and sorption capacity of bentonite clay, affecting the performance of the repository. llitisation process was not obtained from the present simulations.

Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements FY96 technology development summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD&E) activities are part of the Retrieval and Closure Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area. The purposes of RPD&E are to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on those processes, so that end users have the requisite technical basis to make retrieval decisions. Work has been initiated to support the need for multiple retrieval technologies across the DOE complex. Technologies addressed during FY96 focused on enhancements to sluicing, borehole mining, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, the lightweight scarifier, and pulsed air mixing. Furthermore, a decision tool and database have been initiated to link retrieval processes with tank closure to assist end users in making retrieval decisions.

Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A.; Hatchell, B.K. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Designating marine protected areas in the United States and Ecuador: understanding the decision-making process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are central federal agencies and field bureaucracies, producer interests, consumer interests and occasionally Congress. Examples of producer interests in marine policy would be commercial fisheries, and the hydrocarbon industry. Examples of consumer... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences DESIGNATING MARINE PROTECTED AREAS IN THE UNITED STATES AND ECUADOR: UNDERSTANDING THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS A Thesis by AMRIT WORK KENDRICK A...

Kendrick, Amrit Work

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

Harmon, Harry D.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA)to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

Harmon, Harry D.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 112: AREA 23 HAZARDOUS WASTE TRENCHES, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 2003 - SEPTEMBER 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit located in Area 23 of the NTS. This annual Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report provides the results of inspections and monitoring for CAU 112. This report includes a summary and analysis of the site inspections, repair and maintenance, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 112 for the current monitoring period, October 2003 through September 2004. Inspections of the CAU 112 RCRA unit were performed quarterly to identify any significant physical changes to the site that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit. The overall condition of the covers and facility was good, and no significant findings were observed. The annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted on August 23, 2004, and the results indicated that no cover subsidence4 has occurred at any of the markers. The elevations of the markers have been consistent for the past 11 years. The total precipitation for the current reporting period, october 2003 to September 2004, was 14.0 centimeters (cm) (5.5 inches [in]) (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, Special Operations and Research Division, 2004). This is slightly below the average rainfall of 14.7 cm (5.79 in) over the same period from 1972 to 2004. Post-closure monitoring verifies that the CAU 112 trench covers are performing properly and that no water is infiltrating into or out of the waste trenches. Sail moisture measurements are obtained in the soil directly beneath the trenches and compared to baseline conditions for the first year of post-closure monitoring, which began in october 1993. neutron logging was performed twice during this monitoring period along 30 neutron access tubes to obtain soil moisture data and detect any changes that may indicate moisture movement beneath each trench. Soil moisture results obtained to date indicate that the compliance criterion of less than 5% Residual Volumetric Moisture Content was met. Soil conditions remain dry and stable beneath the trenches, and the cover is functioning as designed within the compliance limits.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999-October 2000 period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in August 2000. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began seven years ago. The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. Precipitation for the period October 1999 through October 2000 was 10.44 centimeters (cm) (4.11 inches [in.]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2000). The prior year annual rainfall (January 1999 through December 1999) was 10.13cm (3.99 in.). The highest 30-day cumulative rainfall occurred on March 8, 2000, with a total of 6.63 cm (2.61 in.). The heaviest daily precipitation occurred on February 23,2000, with a total of 1.70 cm (0.67 in.) falling in that 24-hour period. The recorded average annual rainfall for this site, from 1972 to January 1999, is 15.06 cm (5.93 in.). All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the trenches.

D. F. Emer

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

EM-50 Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements. FY97 technology development summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD and E) activities are part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area, Retrieval and Closure program. The purpose of RPD and E is to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on these processes, so that end users have requisite technical bases to make retrieval decisions. Technologies addressed during FY97 include enhancements to sluicing, the use of pulsed air to assist mixing, mixer pumps, innovative mixing techniques, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, borehole mining, light weight scarification, and testing of Russian-developed retrieval equipment. Furthermore, the Retrieval Analysis Tool was initiated to link retrieval processes with tank waste farms and tank geometric to assist end users by providing a consolidation of data and technical information that can be easily assessed. The main technical accomplishments are summarized under the following headings: Oak Ridge site-gunite and associated tanks treatability study; pulsed air mixing; Oak Ridge site-Old Hydrofracture Facility; hydraulic testbed relocation; cooling coil cleaning end effector; light weight scarifier; innovative tank mixing; advanced design mixer pump; enhanced sluicing; Russian retrieval equipment testing; retrieval data analysis and correlation; simulant development; and retrieval analysis tool (RAT).

Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Alberts, D.G. [Waterjet Technology, Inc., Kent, WA (United States)] [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

High-Rate Fabrication of a-Si-Based Thin-Film Solar Cells Using Large-Area VHF PECVD Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Toledo (UT), working in concert with it’s a-Si-based PV industry partner Xunlight Corporation (Xunlight), has conducted a comprehensive study to develop a large-area (3ft x 3ft) VHF PECVD system for high rate uniform fabrication of silicon absorber layers, and the large-area VHF PECVD processes to achieve high performance a-Si/a-SiGe or a-Si/nc-Si tandem junction solar cells during the period of July 1, 2008 to Dec. 31, 2011, under DOE Award No. DE-FG36-08GO18073. The project had two primary goals: (i) to develop and improve a large area (3 ft × 3 ft) VHF PECVD system for high rate fabrication of > = 8 Ĺ/s a-Si and >= 20 Ĺ/s nc-Si or 4 Ĺ/s a-SiGe absorber layers with high uniformity in film thicknesses and in material structures. (ii) to develop and optimize the large-area VHF PECVD processes to achieve high-performance a-Si/nc-Si or a-Si/a-SiGe tandem-junction solar cells with >= 10% stable efficiency. Our work has met the goals and is summarized in “Accomplishments versus goals and objectives”.

Deng, Xunming [University of Toledo] [University of Toledo; Fan, Qi Hua

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Area 6 Decontamination Pond Corrective Action Unit 92 Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report for the Period January 2000-December 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Corrective Action Unit 92, was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP, 1995]) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (NDEP, 1996) on May 11, 1999. Historically the Decontamination Pond was used for the disposal of partially treated liquid effluent discharged from the Decontamination Facility (Building 6-05) and the Industrial Laundry (Building 6-07) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1996). The Decontamination Pond was constructed and became operational in 1979. Releases of RCRA-regulated hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents have not been discharged to the Decontamination Pond since 1988 (DOE/NV, 1996). The pipe connecting the Decontamination Pond and Decontamination Facility and Industrial Laundry were cut and sealed at the Decontamination Pad Oil/Water Separator in 1992. The Decontamination Pond was closed in place by installing a RCRA cover. Fencing was installed around the periphery to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring at the site consists of quarterly inspections of the RCRA cover and fencing, and a subsidence survey. Additional inspections are conducted if: Precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period, or An earthquake occurs with a magnitude exceeding 4.5 on the Richter scale within 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) of the closure.

J. L. Traynor

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once a year for a period of 2-3 months. By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once. Figure 1.g The wet area is flooded by damming up a small streamded by damming up a smded by damwet area Vegetation data are obtained from two ri- parian grassland sites with strong hydro- logical gradients

Schierup, Mikkel Heide

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - area process trenches Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II Collection: Materials Science 35 A novel solid-state self powered neutron detector Nicholas LiCausi*a Summary: area of the p-n junction is increased proportionally to...

38

Aquifer Testing Recommendations for Supporting Phase II of the T Area Technetium-99 Data Objectives Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aquifer characterization needs are currently being assessed to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies within the 200-ZP-1 operable unit, specifically for the immediate area of the 241-T Tank Farm. This report provides a general discussion of the six identified hydrologic test methods for possible subsequent characterization within the 241-T Tank Farm area and details for implementing the large-scale recovery test after terminating pumping at the 241-Tank Farm extraction well locations.

Spane, Frank A.

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

39

Advanced coal conversion process demonstration. Technical progress report for the period July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from July 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995. The ACCP Demonstration Project is a US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Project. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the cola is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) for the 300 Area Process Sewer Cleanout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document serves as a NOC pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07, for the cleanout of sections of the 300 Area PS. Approval of the NOC will allow the pressure washing of certain pipe sections, the sump in the TEDF lift station, and the cleaning of PS 16 of the 300 Area PS that contains low levels of radioactivity. Section 15.0 of this NOC discusses the estimated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) resulting from the unabated emissions from these cleaning activities. Using the currently approved unit dose conversion factors in HNF-3602, the estimated potential TEDE to the MEI resulting from the unabated, fugitive emissions from cleanout of the 300 Area PS is 4.70 E-05 millirem (mrem) per year. This dose was derived by conservatively estimating the doses from both the pressure washing and the use of the Guzzler{trademark} for removal of the liquid/soil mixture, as described in Section 5.0. and adding these doses together.

MENARD, N.M.

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 91: AREA 3 U3fi INJECTION WELL, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA FOR THE PERIOD NOVEMBER 2003 - OCTOBER 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary of inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This report covers the annual period November 2003 through October 2004. Site inspections of CAU 91 are performed every six months to identify any significant changes that could impact the proper operation of the waste disposal unit. Inspection results for the current period indicate that the overall condition of the concrete pad, perimeter fence, and warning signs is good.

NONE

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

200 Area effluent treatment facility process control plan 98-02  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Process Control Plan (PCP) provides a description of the background information, key objectives, and operating criteria defining Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) Campaign 98-02 as required per HNF-IP-0931 Section 37, Process Control Plans. Campaign 98-62 is expected to process approximately 18 millions gallons of groundwater with an assumption that the UP-1 groundwater pump will be shut down on June 30, 1998. This campaign will resume the UP-1 groundwater treatment operation from Campaign 97-01. The Campaign 97-01 was suspended in November 1997 to allow RCRA waste in LERF Basin 42 to be treated to meet the Land Disposal Restriction Clean Out requirements. The decision to utilize ETF as part of the selected interim remedial action of the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit is documented by the Declaration of the Record of Decision, (Ecology, EPA and DOE 1997). The treatment method was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (known as the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP).

Le, E.Q.

1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Landscape dynamics and equilibrium in areas of slash-and-burn agriculture with short and long fallow period (Bragantina region, NE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the historical analysis of Houghton et al. (1991), 10% of deforestation in Latin America was caused by slash of CO2 is greater than the release in the case of young forests, agricul- tural areas using slash-and-burn are important sources of CO2 for the at

Metzger, Jean Paul Walter

44

Devices with extended area structures for mass transfer processing of fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microchannel device includes several mass transfer microchannels to receive a fluid media for processing at least one heat transfer microchannel in fluid communication with a heat transfer fluid defined by a thermally conductive wall, and at several thermally conductive fins each connected to the wall and extending therefrom to separate the mass transfer microchannels from one another. In one form, the device may optionally include another heat transfer microchannel and corresponding wall that is positioned opposite the first wall and has the fins and the mass transfer microchannels extending therebetween.

TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. (Kennewick, WA); Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Whyatt, Greg A. (West Richland, WA); King, David L. (Richland, WA); Brooks, Kriston P. (Kennewick, WA); Stenkamp, Victoria S. (Richland, WA)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Nuclear Material Focus Area Roadmapping Process Utilizing Environmental Management Complex-Wide Nuclear Material Disposition Pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the process that the Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) has developed and utilizes in working with individual Department of Energy (DOE) sites to identify, address, and prioritize research and development efforts in the stabilization, disposition, and storage of nuclear materials. By associating site technology needs with nuclear disposition pathways and integrating those with site schedules, the NMFA is developing a complex wide roadmap for nuclear material technology development. This approach will leverage technology needs and opportunities at multiple sites and assist the NMFA in building a defensible research and development program to address the nuclear material technology needs across the complex.

Sala, D. R.; Furhman, P.; Smith, J. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

46

Basic Data Report -- Defense Waste Processing Facility Sludge Plant, Savannah River Plant 200-S Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Basic Data Report for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)--Sludge Plant was prepared to supplement the Technical Data Summary. Jointly, the two reports were intended to form the basis for the design and construction of the DWPF. To the extent that conflicting information may appear, the Basic Data Report takes precedence over the Technical Data Summary. It describes project objectives and design requirements. Pertinent data on the geology, hydrology, and climate of the site are included. Functions and requirements of the major structures are described to provide guidance in the design of the facilities. Revision 9 of the Basic Data Report was prepared to eliminate inconsistencies between the Technical Data Summary, Basic Data Report and Scopes of Work which were used to prepare the September, 1982 updated CAB. Concurrently, pertinent data (material balance, curie balance, etc.) have also been placed in the Basic Data Report. It is intended that these balances be used as a basis for the continuing design of the DWPF even though minor revisions may be made in these balances in future revisions to the Technical Data Summary.

Amerine, D.B.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing {approx}60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along {approx}3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lane, John; Versteeg, Roelof; Ward, Anderson; Binley, Andrew; Johnson, Timothy; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Real-time process sensing and metrology in amorphous and selective area silicon plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using in situ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-time process sensing and metrology in amorphous and selective area silicon plasma enhanced Materials Processing, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 Received 11 July 1996 silicon deposition. The ability of mass spectrometry to observe process faults in real time is also

Rubloff, Gary W.

49

Development of process to transfer large areas of LPCVD graphene from copper foil to a porous support substrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I present a procedure by which to transfer greater than 25 mm˛ areas of high-quality graphene synthesized via low-pressure chemical vapor deposition from copper foil to porous support substrates. Large-area, ...

O'Hern, Sean C. (Sean Carson)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A 915 MHz/2. 45 GHz ECR plasma source for large area ion beam and plasma processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology for producing uniform, high density (10{sup 11}--10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3}) microwave discharges over cross sections of 50 cm{sup 2} is well established. The present challenge is to extend the high density, and electrodeless benefits of microwave discharges to produce uniform densities over an area of 300--700 cm{sup 2}. Such discharges have important applications for 6 to 8-in. single wafer processing and as large surface, broad beam, high current density ion sources. The design principles for scaling the 18 cm diam MPDR ECR cavity applicator technology to 38--47 cm diam are reviewed. Microwave discharges with diameters of 20--30 cm can be created when these applicators are excited with either 2.45 GHz or 915 MHz. The design and construction of a prototype cavity applicator with a 20 cm diam discharge is described. The discharge is enclosed with a 12-pole multicusp static magnetic field produced by 2-in. by 2-in. by 1-in. rare-earth magnets. Each magnet has a pole face field strength of 3 kG. The experimental test of this plasma source in argon gas excited with 2.45 GHz energy is reviewed.

Asmussen, J.; Hopwood, J.; Sze, F.C. (Department of Electrical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1226 (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Validation Process for the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Faultless Nuclear Test at Central Nevada Test Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many sites of groundwater contamination rely heavily on complex numerical models of flow and transport to develop closure plans. This has created a need for tools and approaches that can be used to build confidence in model predictions and make it apparent to regulators, policy makers, and the public that these models are sufficient for decision making. This confidence building is a long-term iterative process and it is this process that should be termed ''model validation.'' Model validation is a process not an end result. That is, the process of model validation cannot always assure acceptable prediction or quality of the model. Rather, it provides safeguard against faulty models or inadequately developed and tested models. Therefore, development of a systematic approach for evaluating and validating subsurface predictive models and guiding field activities for data collection and long-term monitoring is strongly needed. This report presents a review of model validation studies that pertain to groundwater flow and transport modeling. Definitions, literature debates, previously proposed validation strategies, and conferences and symposia that focused on subsurface model validation are reviewed and discussed. The review is general in nature, but the focus of the discussion is on site-specific, predictive groundwater models that are used for making decisions regarding remediation activities and site closure. An attempt is made to compile most of the published studies on groundwater model validation and assemble what has been proposed or used for validating subsurface models. The aim is to provide a reasonable starting point to aid the development of the validation plan for the groundwater flow and transport model of the Faultless nuclear test conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The review of previous studies on model validation shows that there does not exist a set of specific procedures and tests that can be easily adapted and applied to determine the validity of site-specific groundwater models. This is true for both deterministic and stochastic models, with the latter posing a more difficult and challenging problem when it comes to validation. This report then proposes a general validation approach for the CNTA model, which addresses some of the important issues recognized in previous validation studies, conferences, and symposia as crucial to the process. The proposed approach links model building, model calibration, model predictions, data collection, model evaluations, and model validation in an iterative loop. The approach focuses on use of collected validation data to reduce model uncertainty and narrow the range of possible outcomes of stochastic numerical models. It accounts for the stochastic nature of the numerical CNTA model, which used Monte Carlo simulation approach. The proposed methodology relies on the premise that absolute validity is not even a theoretical possibility and is not a regulatory requirement. Rather, it highlights the importance of testing as many aspects of the model as possible and using as many diverse statistical tools as possible for rigorous checking and confidence building in the model and its predictions. It is this confidence that will eventually allow for regulator and public acceptance of decisions based on the model predictions.

Ahmed Hassan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work under a three-year phased subcontract to develop CdS/CdTe devices and modules and to further improve the technology base at Photon Energy, Inc. (PEI) to better address the commercialization issues and objectives of the PEI and the US Department of Energy. During this reporting period we (1) achieved efficiencies of 12.7% on small area devices, (2) achieved 1-ft{sup 2} modules with over 8% aperture-area efficiency (and active area efficiencies up to {approximately}10%), (3) tested 4-ft{sup 2} modules at NREL at 23.1 (21.3) watts, normalized (6.3% efficiency), and (4) found no inherent stability problems with CdTe technology during life testing, at both NREL and PEI. 7 refs.

Albright, S.P.; Ackerman, B.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. (Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research which relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007 and CY 2008 progress summarized in preceding reports. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2009 with completion of extensive laboratory measurements on field sediments, field hydrologic and geophysical characterization, four field experiments, and modeling. The laboratory characterization results are being subjected to geostatistical analyses to develop spatial heterogeneity models of U concentration and chemical, physical, and hydrologic properties needed for reactive transport modeling. The field experiments focused on: (1) physical characterization of the groundwater flow field during a period of stable hydrologic conditions in early spring, (2) comprehensive groundwater monitoring during spring to characterize the release of U(VI) from the lower vadose zone to the aquifer during water table rise and fall, (3) dynamic geophysical monitoring of salt-plume migration during summer, and (4) a U reactive tracer experiment (desorption) during the fall. Geophysical characterization of the well field was completed using the down-well Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) array, with results subjected to robust, geostatistically constrained inversion analyses. These measurements along with hydrologic characterization have yielded 3D distributions of hydraulic properties that have been incorporated into an updated and increasingly robust hydrologic model. Based on significant findings from the microbiologic characterization of deep borehole sediments in CY 2008, down-hole biogeochemistry studies were initiated where colonization substrates and spatially discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to select wells. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes. A significant issue related to vertical flow in the IFRC wells was identified and evaluated during the spring and fall field experimental campaigns. Both upward and downward flows were observed in response to dynamic Columbia River stage. The vertical flows are caused by the interaction of pressure gradients with our heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. These impacts are being evaluated with additional modeling and field activities to facilitate interpretation and mitigation. The project moves into CY 2010 with ambitious plans for a drilling additional wells for the IFRC well field, additional experiments, and modeling. This research is part of the ERSP Hanford IFRC at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammon, Glenn; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2011 to January 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface biogeochemical setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer motivates research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated biogeochemical system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, CY 2009, and CY 2010 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project acted upon all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of 'Modeling' and 'Well-Field Mitigation' plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site, and modifications to the IFRC well-field completed in CY 2011. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2011 including: (i) well modifications to eliminate well-bore flows, (ii) hydrologic testing of the modified well-field and upper aquifer, (iii) geophysical monitoring of winter precipitation infiltration through the U-contaminated vadose zone and spring river water intrusion to the IFRC, (iv) injection experimentation to probe the lower vadose zone and to evaluate the transport behavior of high U concentrations, (v) extended passive monitoring during the period of water table rise and fall, and (vi) collaborative down-hole experimentation with the PNNL SFA on the biogeochemistry of the 300 A Hanford-Ringold contact and the underlying redox transition zone. The modified well-field has functioned superbly without any evidence for well-bore flows. Beyond these experimental efforts, our site-wide reactive transport models (PFLOTRAN and eSTOMP) have been updated to include site geostatistical models of both hydrologic properties and adsorbed U distribution; and new hydrologic characterization measurements of the upper aquifer. These increasingly robust models are being used to simulate past and recent U desorption-adsorption experiments performed under different hydrologic conditions, and heuristic modeling to understand the complex functioning of the smear zone. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, with significant and positive progress in 2011 that will enable publication in 2012. Our increasingly comprehensive field experimental results and robust reactive transport simulators, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes influencing N, S, C, Mn, and Fe. Collectively these findings and higher scale models are providing a unique and unparalleled system-scale understanding of the biogeochemical function of the groundwater-river interaction zone.

Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 110: AREA 3 WMD U-3AX/BL CRATER, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA FOR THE PERIOD JULY 2004 - JUNE 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring report provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 Waste Management Division (WMD) U-3ax/bl Crater. This report includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110, for the annual period July 2004 through June 2005. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, cover vegetation, perimeter fence, and use restriction warning signs was good. Settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VII.B.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW009 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2000). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (cm) (6 inches [in]) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Vadose Zone Remediation Assessment: M-Area Process Sewer Soil Vapor Extraction Units 782-5M, 782-7M, and 782-8M  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on the status of the vadose zone remediation along 1600 ft of the process sewer line between the M-Area security fence and the M-Area settling basin. Three soil vapor extraction (SVE) units 782-5M, 782-7M, and 782-8M, connected to 4 vertical wells and 3 horizontal wells have been addressing the vadose zone volatile organic contamination (VOC) since 1995. The specific objectives of this study were to obtain soil gas and sediment samples, evaluate SVE units and vadose zone remediation, and make recommendations to address further remediation needs.

Riha, B.D.

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

Fate and transport processes controlling the migration of hazardous and radioactive materials from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desert vadose zones have been considered as suitable environments for the safe and long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. Low precipitation, high evapotranspiration and thick unsaturated alluvial deposits commonly found in deserts make them attractive as waste disposal sites. The fate and transport of any contaminant in the subsurface is ultimately determined by the operating retention and transformation processes in the system and the end result of the interactions among them. Retention (sorption) and transformation are the two major processes that affect the amount of a contaminant present and available for transport. Retention processes do not affect the total amount of a contaminant in the soil system, but rather decrease or eliminate the amount available for transport at a given point in time. Sorption reactions retard the contaminant migration. Permanent binding of solute by the sorbent is also possible. These processes and their interactions are controlled by the nature of the hazardous waste, the properties of the porous media and the geochemical and environmental conditions (temperature, moisture and vegetation). The present study summarizes the available data and investigates the fate and transport processes that govern the migration of contaminants from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While the site is currently used only for low-level radioactive waste disposal, past practices have included burial of material now considered hazardous. Fundamentals of chemical and biological transformation processes are discussed subsequently, followed by a discussion of relevant results.

Estrella, R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility. Fourth Quarter 1994, Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unlined settling basin operated from 1958 until 1985, receiving waste water that contained volatile organic solvents used for metal degreasing and chemical constituents and depleted uranium from fuel fabrication process in M Area. The underground process sewer line transported M-Area process waste waters to the basin. Water periodically overflowed from the basin through the ditch to the seepage area adjacent to the ditch and to Lost Lake.

Chase, J.A.

1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

FINAL PROJECT REPORT: A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing ~60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along ~3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

Lee Slater

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Implementing waste minimization at an active plutonium processing facility: Successes and progress at technical area (TA) -55 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory has ongoing national security missions that necessitate increased plutonium processing. The bulk of this activity occurs at Technical Area -55 (TA-55), the nations only operable plutonium facility. TA-55 has developed and demonstrated a number of technologies that significantly minimize waste generation in plutonium processing (supercritical CO{sub 2}, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, supercritical H{sub 2}O oxidation, WAND), disposition of excess fissile materials (hydride-dehydride, electrolytic decontamination), disposition of historical waste inventories (salt distillation), and Decontamination & Decommissioning (D&D) of closed nuclear facilities (electrolytic decontamination). Furthermore, TA-55 is in the process of developing additional waste minimization technologies (molten salt oxidation, nitric acid recycle, americium extraction) that will significantly reduce ongoing waste generation rates and allow volume reduction of existing waste streams. Cost savings from reduction in waste volumes to be managed and disposed far exceed development and deployment costs in every case. Waste minimization is also important because it reduces occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, risks of transportation accidents, and transfer of burdens from current nuclear operations to future generations.

Balkey, J.J.; Robinson, M.A.; Boak, J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Storm Water Analytical Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial activities at LANL...

63

Modal Bin Hybrid Model: A Surface Area Consistent, Triple Moment Sectional Method for Use in Process-oriented Modeling of Atmospheric Aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A triple moment sectional method, Modal Bin Hybrid Model (MBHM), has been developed. In addition to number and mass (volume), surface area is predicted (and preserved), which is important for gas-to-particle mass transfer and light extinction cross section. The performance of MBHM was evaluated against double moment sectional (DMS) methods with various size resolutions up to BIN256 (BINx: x is number of sections over three orders of magnitude in size, ?logD = 3/x) for simulating evolution of particles under simultaneously occurring nucleation, condensation and coagulation processes. Because MBHM gives a physically consistent form of the intra-sectional distributions, errors and biases of MBHM at BIN4-8 resolution were almost equivalent to those of DMS at BIN16-32 resolution for various important variables such as the moments Mk (k: 0, 2, 3), dMk/dt, and the number and volume of particles larger than a certain diameter. Another important feature of MBHM is that only a single bin is adequate to simulate full aerosol dynamics for particles whose size distribution can be approximated by a single lognormal mode. This flexibility is useful for process-oriented (multi category and/or mixing state) modeling: primary aerosols whose size parameters would not differ substantially in time and space can be expressed by a single or a small number of modes, whereas secondary aerosols whose size changes drastically from one to several hundred nanometers can be expressed by a number of modes. Added dimensions can be applied to MBHM to represent mixing state or photo-chemical age for aerosol mixing state studies.

Kajino, Mizuo; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2010 to January 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer focus research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, and CY 2009 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project has responded to all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of “Modeling” and “Well-Field Mitigation” plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2010 including the quantification of well-bore flows in the fully screened wells and the testing of means to mitigate them; the development of site geostatistical models of hydrologic and geochemical properties including the distribution of U; developing and parameterizing a reactive transport model of the smear zone that supplies contaminant U to the groundwater plume; performance of a second passive experiment of the spring water table rise and fall event with a associated multi-point tracer test; performance of downhole biogeochemical experiments where colonization substrates and discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to the lower aquifer zone; and modeling of past injection experiments for model parameterization, deconvolution of well-bore flow effects, system understanding, and publication. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, and have now implemented a new strategy for this activity to bypass an approach that was found unworkable. An important focus of CY 2010 activities has been infrastructure modification to the IFRC site to eliminate vertical well bore flows in the fully screened wells. The mitigation procedure was carefully evaluated and is now being implementated. A new experimental campaign is planned for early spring 2011 that will utilize the modified well-field for a U reactive transport experiment in the upper aquifer zone. Preliminary geophysical monitoring experiments of rainwater recharge in the vadose zone have been initiated with promising results, and a controlled infiltration experiment to evaluate U mobilization from the vadose zone is now under planning for the September 2011. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes.

Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production. Annual subcontract report, 1 July 1990--31 December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work under a three-year phased subcontract to develop CdS/CdTe devices and modules and to further improve the technology base at Photon Energy, Inc. (PEI) to better address the commercialization issues and objectives of the PEI and the US Department of Energy. During this reporting period we (1) achieved efficiencies of 12.7% on small area devices, (2) achieved 1-ft{sup 2} modules with over 8% aperture-area efficiency (and active area efficiencies up to {approximately}10%), (3) tested 4-ft{sup 2} modules at NREL at 23.1 (21.3) watts, normalized (6.3% efficiency), and (4) found no inherent stability problems with CdTe technology during life testing, at both NREL and PEI. 7 refs.

Albright, S.P.; Ackerman, B.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. [Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Structural and stratigraphic evolution of the central Mississippi Canyon Area: interaction of salt tectonics and slope processes in the formation of engineering and geologic hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The analysis focused on salt tectonics and sequence stratigraphy to develop a geologic model for the study area and its potential impact on engineering and geologic hazards. Salt in the study area was found to be established structural end-members derived from...

Brand, John Richard

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

67

Broadband solar absorption enhancement via periodic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Province, 230009, P. R. China. Solution processed colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have greatBroadband solar absorption enhancement via periodic nanostructuring of electrodes Michael M. Adachi demonstrate a bottom- illuminated periodic nanostructured CQD solar cell that enhances broadband absorption

68

Summary Leaf area index (LAI) is a key biophysical vari-able in most process-based forest-ecosystem models. How-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Ad- vanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satel- lite-borne sensor of surface greenness). Because of the strong influence of leaf area on rates of canopy gas ex- change and energy balance, efforts

Minnesota, University of

69

GIS-based Multi-criteria Evaluation with Analytical Hierarchy Process to assess suitable areas for Willow Short Rotation Coppice production in Scotland   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Scotland, agriculture remains the dominant form of land use in rural areas, indicating that the successful implementation of renewable energy strategies has the potential to provide opportunities for dedicated biomass ...

Maeda, Sayaka

70

A Study to Determine the Effectiveness of Agriculture/Natural Resource Program Area Committees on the Texas AgriLife Extension Service Program Planning Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for over 50 years, serving on program area committees to develop programs that meet the needs of local clientele. This study evaluated Agriculture and Natural Resource Program Area Committee (Ag/NR PAC) members located in 36 Texas counties... accepted for 45 days. The data was analyzed using SPSS 16.0 for Windows software. iv The findings of this study showed that Ag/NR PAC members have an overall understanding of the purpose, responsibilities and qualifications of PAC?s. Overall...

Weems, Whit Holland

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

71

Geotechnical properties and their relation to geologic processes in south pass outer continental shelf lease area blocks 28, 47 and 48, offshore Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ray radiography to detect indications of subaqueous deformation as well as disturbance which may have occurred during the drilling and samplino process. Roberts et al (1975) described the disturbance evi dent in these sediments and concluded that along...

Shephard, Les Edward

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being preserved as natural areas, others, including the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being to agriculture. Some members of the Maasai tribe, traditionally a pastoral people, are changing to changes in climate. The land use box will involve further modeling of the effects of these concurrent

73

Method of particle trajectory recognition in particle flows of high particle concentration using a candidate trajectory tree process with variable search areas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The application relates to particle trajectory recognition from a Centroid Population comprised of Centroids having an (x, y, t) or (x, y, f) coordinate. The method is applicable to visualization and measurement of particle flow fields of high particle. In one embodiment, the centroids are generated from particle images recorded on camera frames. The application encompasses digital computer systems and distribution mediums implementing the method disclosed and is particularly applicable to recognizing trajectories of particles in particle flows of high particle concentration. The method accomplishes trajectory recognition by forming Candidate Trajectory Trees and repeated searches at varying Search Velocities, such that initial search areas are set to a minimum size in order to recognize only the slowest, least accelerating particles which produce higher local concentrations. When a trajectory is recognized, the centroids in that trajectory are removed from consideration in future searches.

Shaffer, Franklin D.

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

74

Extension of Comment Period on the Draft Integrated, Interagency...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Extension of Comment Period on the Draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process for Electric Transmission Projects Requiring Federal Authorizations Extension of...

75

Geologic processes in the RWMC area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Implications for long term stability and soil erosion at the radioactive waste management complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is the disposal and storage facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Transuranic waste and mixed wastes were also disposed at the RWMC until 1970. It is located in the southwestern part of the INEL about 80 km west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. The INEL occupies a portion of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), a low-relief, basalt, and sediment-floored basin within the northern Rocky Mountains and northeastern Basin and Range Province. It is a cool and semiarid, sagebrush steppe desert characterized by irregular, rolling terrain. The RWMC began disposal of INEL-generated wastes in 1952, and since 1954, wastes have been accepted from other Federal facilities. Much of the waste is buried in shallow trenches, pits, and soil vaults. Until about 1970, trenches and pits were excavated to the basalt surface, leaving no sediments between the waste and the top of the basalt. Since 1970, a layer of sediment (about 1 m) has been left between the waste and the basalt. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has developed regulations specific to radioactive-waste disposal, including environmental standards and performance objectives. The regulation applicable to all DOE facilities is DOE Order 5820.2A (Radioactive Waste Management). An important consideration for the performance assessment of the RWMC is the long-term geomorphic stability of the site. Several investigators have identified geologic processes and events that could disrupt a radioactive waste disposal facility. Examples of these {open_quotes}geomorphic hazards{close_quotes} include changes in stream discharge, sediment load, and base level, which may result from climate change, tectonic processes, or magmatic processes. In the performance assessment, these hazards are incorporated into scenarios that may affect the future performance of the RWMC.

Hackett, W.R.; Tullis, J.A.; Smith, R.P. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

Petrochemical and Mineralogical Constraints on the Source and Processes of Uranium Mineralisation in the Granitoids of Zing-Monkin Area, Adamawa Massif, NE Nigeria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zing-Monkin area, located in the northern part of Adamawa Massif, is underlain by extensive exposures of moderately radioactive granodiorites, anatectic migmatites, equigranular granites, porphyritic granites and highly radioactive fine-grained granites with minor pegmatites. Selected major and trace element petrochemical investigations of the rocks show that a progression from granodiorite through migmatite to granites is characterised by depletion of MgO, CaO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3,} Sr, Ba, and Zr, and enrichment of SiO{sub 2} and Rb. This trend is associated with uranium enrichment and shows a chemical gradation from the more primitive granodiorite to the more evolved granites. Electron microprobe analysis shows that the uranium is content in uranothorite and in accessories, such as monazite, titanite, apatite, epidote and zircon. Based on petrochemical and mineralogical data, the more differentiated granitoids (e.g., fine-grained granite) bordering the Benue Trough are the immediate source of the uranium prospect in Bima Sandstone within the Trough. Uranium was derived from the granitoids by weathering and erosion. Transportation and subsequent interaction with organic matter within the Bima Sandstone led to precipitation of insoluble secondary uranium minerals in the Benue Trough.

Haruna, I. V., E-mail: vela_hi@yahoo.co.uk [Federal University of Technology, Geology Department (Nigeria); Orazulike, D. M. [Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Geology Programme (Nigeria); Ofulume, A. B. [Federal University of Technology, Geosciences Department (Nigeria); Mamman, Y. D. [Federal University of Technology, Geology Department (Nigeria)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period April 1, 1985, through December 31, 1986. The following major areas are covered in the discussion: nuclear and chemical waste management, environmental control technology, basic science and technology, biotechnology research, transuranium-element processing, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, radioactive materials production, computer/engineering applications, fission energy, environmental cleanup projects, and various other work activities. As an appendix, the Administrative Summary presents a comprehensive compilation of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this report period. An organization chart, a staffing level and financial summary, and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included to provide additional information. 78 figs., 40 tabs.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Identification for a Nonlinear Periodic Wave Equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is concerned with an approximation process for the identification of nonlinearities in the nonlinear periodic wave equation. It is based on the least-squares approach and on a splitting method. A numerical algorithm of gradient type and the numerical implementation are given.

Morosanu, C. [Department of Mathematics, University 'Al.I.Cuza', 6600 Iasi (Romania); Trenchea, C. [Institute of Mathematics of Romanian Academy, 6600 Iasi (Romania)

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Research Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our Vision National User Facilities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Research Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our Vision National User

82

Embedding a chaotic signature in a periodic train: can periodic signals be chaotic?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show how a chaotic system can be locked to emit a periodic waveform belonging to its chaotic attractor. We numerically demonstrate our idea in a system composed of a semiconductor laser driven to chaos by optical feedback from a short external cavity. The clue is the injection of an appropriate periodic signal that modulates the phase and amplitude of the intra-cavity radiation, a chaotic analogy of conventional mode-locking. The result is a time process that manifests a chaotic signature embedded in a long-scale periodic train.

Antonio Mecozzi; Cristian Antonelli

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

83

Progress Report 16 for the period April-September 1980, and the proceedings of the 16th Project Integration Meeting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period April to September 1980, is reported in detail. Progress on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area silicon sheet and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering, and operations is described. A report on, and copies of visual presentations made at, the Project Integration Meeting held September 24 and 25, 1980 are included.

McDonald, R.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Southeast Idaho Area Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Area Attractions and Events Area Geography Area History Area Links Driving Directions Idaho Falls Attractions and Events INL History INL Today Research Park Sagebrush Steppe...

85

MAPPING FLOW LOCALIZATION PROCESSES IN DEFORMATION OF IRRADIATED REACTOR STRUCTURAL ALLOYS - FINAL REPORT. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program No. MSF99-0072. Period: August 1999 through September 2002. (ORNL/TM-2003/63)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metals that can sustain plastic deformation homogeneously throughout their bulk tend to be tough and malleable. Often, however, if a metal has been hardened it will no longer deform uniformly. Instead, the deformation occurs in narrow bands on a microscopic scale wherein stresses and strains become concentrated in localized zones. This strain localization degrades the mechanical properties of the metal by causing premature plastic instability failure or by inducing the formation of cracks. Irradiation with neutrons hardens a metal and makes it more prone to deformation by strain localization. Although this has been known since the earliest days of radiation damage studies, a full measure of the connection between neutron irradiation hardening and strain localization is wanting, particularly in commercial alloys used in the construction of nuclear reactors. Therefore, the goal of this project is to systematically map the extent of involvement of strain localization processes in plastic deformation of three reactor alloys that have been neutron irradiated. The deformation processes are to be identified and related to changes in the tensile properties of the alloys as functions of neutron fluence (dose) and degree of plastic strain. The intent is to define the role of strain localization in radiation embrittlement phenomena. The three test materials are a tempered bainitic A533B steel, representing reactor pressure vessel steel, an annealed 316 stainless steel and annealed Zircaloy-4 representing reactor internal components. These three alloys cover the range of crystal structures usually encountered in structural alloys, i.e. body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and close-packed hexagonal (cph), respectively. The experiments were conducted in three Phases, corresponding to the three years duration of the project. Phases 1 and 2 addressed irradiations and tensile tests made at near-ambient temperatures, and covered a wide range of neutron fluences. Phase 3 was aimed at a higher irradiation and test temperature of about 288 C, pertinent to the operating temperature of commercial reactor pressure vessel steels. Phase 3 explored a narrower fluence range than Phases 1 and 2, and it included an investigation of the strain rate dependence of deformation.

Farrell, K.

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

86

300 Area Disturbance Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

Large area bulk superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Field, Michael B. (Jersey City, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Site Monitoring Area Maps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

89

Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

90

Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure on the Ti-based nanolayered thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) and chemical composition changes of Ti-based nanolayered thin films (Al/Ti, Ni/Ti) after femtosecond (fs) laser pulses action were studied. Irradiation is performed using linearly polarized Ti:Sapphire fs laser pulses of 40 fs pulse duration and 800 nm wavelength. The low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL), oriented perpendicular to the laser polarization with periods slightly lower than the irradiation wavelength, was typically formed at elevated laser fluences. On the contrary, high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) with uniform period of 155 nm, parallel to the laser light polarization, appeared at low laser fluences, as well as in the wings of the Gaussian laser beam distribution for higher used fluence. LSFL formation was associated with the material ablation process and accompanied by the intense formation of nanoparticles, especially in the Ni/Ti system. The composition changes at the surface of both multilayer systems in the LSFL area indicated the intermixing between layers and the substrate. Concentration and distribution of all constitutive elements in the irradiated area with formed HSFLs were almost unchanged.

Petrovi?, Suzana M.; Gakovi?, B.; Peruško, D. [Institute of Nuclear Science—Vin?a, University of Belgrade, POB 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)] [Institute of Nuclear Science—Vin?a, University of Belgrade, POB 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Stratakis, E. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, Gr-711 10 Heraklion (Greece) [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, Gr-711 10 Heraklion (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, 710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Bogdanovi?-Radovi?, I. [Ru?er Boškovi? Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)] [Ru?er Boškovi? Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); ?ekada, M. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)] [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Fotakis, C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, Gr-711 10 Heraklion (Greece) [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology–Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, Gr-711 10 Heraklion (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, 714 09 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Jelenkovi?, B. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)] [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

91

AIR AND RADON PATHWAY MODELING FOR THE F-AREA TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) is located within F-Area in the General Separations Area (GSA) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) as seen in Figure 1. The GSA contains the F and H Area Separations Facilities, the S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility, the Z-Area Saltstone Facility, and the E-Area Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities. The FTF is a nearly rectangular shaped area and comprises approximately 20 acres, which is bounded by SRS coordinates N 76,604.5 to N 77,560.0 and E 52,435.0 to E 53,369.0. SRS is in the process of preparing a Performance Assessment (PA) to support FTF closure. As part of the PA process, an analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential magnitude of gaseous release of radionuclides from the FTF over the 100-year institutional control period and 10,000-year post-closure compliance period. Specifically, an air and radon pathways analysis has been conducted to estimate the flux of volatile radionuclides and radon at the ground surface due to residual waste remaining in the tanks following closure. This analysis was used as the basis to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for the air pathway per Curie (Ci) of each radionuclide remaining in the combined FTF waste tanks. For the air pathway analysis, several gaseous radionuclides were considered. These included carbon-14 (C-14), chlorine-36 (Cl-36), iodine-129 (I-129), selenium-79 (Se-79), antimony-125 (Sb-125), tin-126 (Sn-126), tritium (H-3), and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The dose to the MEI was estimated at the SRS Boundary during the 100 year institutional control period. For the 10,000 year post closure compliance period, the dose to the MEI was estimated at the 100 m compliance point. For the radon pathway analysis, five parent radionuclides and their progeny were analyzed. These parent radionuclides included uranium-238 (U-238), plutonium-238 (Pu-238), uranium-234 (U-234), thorium-230 (Th-230), and radium-226 (Ra-226). The peak flux of radon-222 due to each parent radionuclide was estimated for the simulation period of 10,100 years.

Dixon, K; Mark Phifer, M

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

92

Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

93

The role of money and monetary policy in crisis periods : the Euro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of money and monetary policy in crisis periods : the Euro area case Research Center ESSEC of money and monetary policy in crisis periods: the Euro area case Jonathan Benchimol and André Fourçansy on the role of money and monetary policy during crises. The role of separability between money and consumption

Boyer, Edmond

94

Down hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fission throughout the periodic table  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dualistic view of fission and evaporation as two distinct compound nucleus processes is substituted with a unified view in which fission, complex fragment emission, and light particle evaporation are seen as different aspects of a single process. 47 refs., 22 figs.

Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Lab Process AreaWhere CORAL Name It is: It does: Maker/Model Units per:(self-run) if staff EBL e-beam write24-041 Elionix 125 keV, hi-res e-beam writer Elionix F-125 7 hr 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab Process AreaWhere CORAL Name It is: It does: Maker/Model Units per:(self-run) if staff EBL e, bakes 8 hr 12 EML photo photo coater-EML spinner coats PR Solitec 8 hr 12 EML metrologyhall dektak EML diffusion Resonetics rm OxidationTube tube furnace wet & dry ox, anneals, bakesLindberg 8 hr 12

Culpepper, Martin L.

98

Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

Walter, M.Todd

99

AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE The Office of Housing and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University is seeking applicants for an Area Coordinator. The Area Coordinator is responsible for assisting in the management and operation of a residential area

Bordenstein, Seth

100

Fluorescence in nonlocal dissipative periodic structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an approach for the description of fluorescence from optically active material embedded in layered periodic structures. Based on an exact electromagnetic Green's tensor analysis, we determine the radiative properties of emitters such as the local photonic density of states, Lamb shifts, line widths etc. for a finite or infinite sequence of thin alternating plasmonic and dielectric layers. In the effective medium limit, these systems may exhibit hyperbolic dispersion relations so that the large wave-vector characteristics of all constituents and processes become relevant. These include the finite thickness of the layers, the nonlocal properties of the constituent metals, and local-field corrections associated with an emitter's dielectric environment. In particular, we show that the corresponding effects are non-additive and lead to considerable modifications of an emitter's luminescence properties.

Francesco Intravaia; Kurt Busch

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Porous siliconformation and etching process for use in silicon micromachining  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reproducible process for uniformly etching silicon from a series of micromechanical structures used in electrical devices and the like includes providing a micromechanical structure having a silicon layer with defined areas for removal thereon and an electrochemical cell containing an aqueous hydrofluoric acid electrolyte. The micromechanical structure is submerged in the electrochemical cell and the defined areas of the silicon layer thereon are anodically biased by passing a current through the electrochemical cell for a time period sufficient to cause the defined areas of the silicon layer to become porous. The formation of the depth of the porous silicon is regulated by controlling the amount of current passing through the electrochemical cell. The micromechanical structure is then removed from the electrochemical cell and submerged in a hydroxide solution to remove the porous silicon. The process is subsequently repeated for each of the series of micromechanical structures to achieve a reproducibility better than 0.3%.

Guilinger, Terry R. (Albuquerque, NM); Kelly, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Jr., Samuel B. (Albuquerque, NM); Stevenson, Joel O. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Sylvia S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basalt K Eburru Geothermal Area Eburru Geothermal Area East African Rift System Kenya Rift Basalt Fukushima Geothermal Area Fukushima Geothermal Area Northeast Honshu Arc...

103

Regulating new construction in historic areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study is an examination of how the restrictiveness of different design regulations impacts the process of new construction in historic areas. The North End, South End, and Back Bay neighborhoods of Boston were identified ...

Sellers-Garcia, Oliver

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREA OUTLOOK MORGANTOWN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS Bureau to be repeated over the next five years. The Morgantown Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had an average annual

Mohaghegh, Shahab

105

Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

106

Wildlife Management Areas (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wildlife Management Areas exist in the State of Maryland as wildlife sanctuaries, and vehicles, tree removal, and construction are severely restricted in these areas. Some of these species are also...

107

Diffusive propagation of wave packets in a fluctuating periodic potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the evolution of a tight binding wave packet propagating in a fluctuating periodic potential. If the fluctuations stem from a stationary Markov process satisfying certain technical criteria, we show that the square amplitude of the wave packet after diffusive rescaling converges to a superposition of solutions of a heat equation.

Eman Hamza; Yang Kang; Jeffrey Schenker

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

108

Periodic alignment of Si quantum dots on hafnium oxide coated single wall carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate a bottom up approach for the aligned epitaxial growth of Si quantum dots (QDs) on one-dimensional (1D) hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) ridges created by the growth of HfO{sub 2} thin film on single wall carbon nanotubes. This growth process creates a high strain 1D ridge on the HfO{sub 2} film, which favors the formation of Si seeds over the surrounding flat HfO{sub 2} area. Periodic alignment of Si QDs on the 1D HfO{sub 2} ridge was observed, which can be controlled by varying different growth conditions, such as growth temperature, growth time, and disilane flow rate.

Olmedo, Mario; Martinez-Morales, Alfredo A.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Liu Jianlin [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Liu Gang; Lau, C.N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Yengel, Emre; Ozkan, Cengiz S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Protected Areas Stacy Philpott  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Convention of Biological Diversity, 1992 #12;IUCN Protected Area Management Categories Ia. Strict Nature. Protected Landscape/ Seascape VI. Managed Resource Protected Area #12;Ia. Strict Nature Preserves and Ib. Wilderness Areas · Natural preservation · Research · No · No #12;II. National Parks · Ecosystem protection

Gottgens, Hans

110

A climatological analysis of the freeze period of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Synoptic Patterns Sample Calculations and Applications CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. . . 31 41 45 59 70 76 VI 81 APPENDIX Computer Programs 83 VITA 90 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1 Periods of record for substations 17 2 Sample of data... of the freeze in parentheses. . . . . . . . . 64 16 Dates of 10% and 90% first and last freeze probabilities 75 tx LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Map of the study area with the substation locations indicated . 2 Station history for Corsicana, Texas 16...

Donahue, Christopher Alan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Please note: A decal-restricted area is defined as an area within which an motor vehicle may be parked if it bears the appropriate decal for that area (eg. Red, Orange, Blue, Green, etc.). Parking facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/scooter parking areas Annual -- $154.00 ($6.42/pay period) Semester -- $51.33 2014-15 Faculty and Staff DecalPlease note: A decal-restricted area is defined as an area within which an motor vehicle may be parked if it bears the appropriate decal for that area (eg. Red, Orange, Blue, Green, etc.). Parking

Mazzotti, Frank

112

Please note: A decal-restricted area is defined as an area within which an motor vehicle may be parked if it bears the appropriate decal for that area (eg. Red, Orange, Blue, Green, etc.). Parking facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/scooter parking areas Annual -- $154.00 ($6.42/pay period) Semester -- $51.33 2013-14 Faculty and Staff DecalPlease note: A decal-restricted area is defined as an area within which an motor vehicle may be parked if it bears the appropriate decal for that area (eg. Red, Orange, Blue, Green, etc.). Parking

Roy, Subrata

113

MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

Beyenal, Haluk [WSU] [WSU; McLEan, Jeff [JCVI] [JCVI; Majors, Paul [PNNL] [PNNL; Fredrickson, Jim [PNNL] [PNNL

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

114

FAQS Reference Guide- Chemical Processing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the February 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1176-2010, Chemical Processing Functional Area Qualification Standard.

115

AREA 5 RWMS CLOSURE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

TRU material in the trench because there is no groundwater pathway under foreseeable climate conditions. The Area 5 RWMS probabilistic PA model can be modified and used to...

116

Groundwater Management Areas (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation,...

117

Ashland Area Support Substation Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power Light Company's (PP L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP L's Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW's) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5?Hz to 50?Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L., E-mail: yilungmo@central.uh.edu [University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Laskar, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z. [Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing (China); Menq, F. [University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Tang, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Microwave processing of ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

Katz, J.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Microwave processing of ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

Katz, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Long-Period Building Response to Earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stories; mod- ern steel-frame buildings are often much taller. Also, modern structural engineers can of 20-story, steel, welded moment-resisting frame (MRF) buildings. We consider MRF buildings designed. For two existing 3-sec isolator systems near San Francisco, the design maximum displacement is 0.5 m

Greer, Julia R.

122

Press TAB to move to input areas. Press UP or DOW Confirm consecutive 12-month period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-year to month-year) January 2011 - December 2011 Type of Public Agency (Sector): Post-Secondary EducationalElectricity Wood Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reporting - for 2011 Total (These columns Institution Agency Sub-sector University Organization Name Queen's University at Kingston Renewable? If Yes

Abolmaesumi, Purang

123

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Geographic Area Month  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

125

Metallurgy Department Progress Report for the Period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dlcfc^ooWS imsm "-"' Metallurgy Department Progress Report for the Period 1 January to 31 December 1962 (Uw National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark July 1963 #12;Risř-R-486 METALLURGY DEPARTMENT PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 1 JANUARY TO 31 DECEMBER 1982 Abstract. The activities of the Metallurgy

126

Fundamentals of! Image Processing!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectrum Slide credit: B. Freeman and A. Torralba Review - The Discrete Fourier transform" Log power frequency domain processing! · Accept or reject certain frequency components! · Fourier (1807): " Periodic Review Review - Fourier Transform" We want to understand the frequency w of our signal. So, let

Erdem, Erkut

127

Fundamentals of Image Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

credit: B. Freeman and A. Torralba Review - The Discrete Fourier transform Log power spectrum #12;Review frequency domain processing · Accept or reject certain frequency components · Fourier (1807): Periodic #12;Review - Fourier Transform We want to understand the frequency w of our signal. So, let

Erdem, Erkut

128

Facility Area Engineer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will provide cross-cutting engineering oversight of the contractor's engineering programs, processes, and products through design procurement, construction,...

129

Use and Finance BiAnnual Reporting Form Reporting Period: July 2013 through December 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use and Finance BiAnnual Reporting Form Reporting Period: July 2013 through December 2013 $ Other (Professional Fees, Telecommunications, Moving) 538,200$ Other (Finance resources services center will be established for finance and human resources transaction processing activities

Papalambros, Panos

130

Public Comment Period for Portsmouth Site D&D and Waste Disposition...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2014 8:00AM EST to March 11, 2015 5:00PM EDT Public Comment Period for the Process Buildings and Complex Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning and Site-Wide Waste...

131

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM New Jersey Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development and evaluation of the delineations for the New Jersey (NJ) WEA. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the New Jersey WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL identified a selection of leasing areas and proposed delineation boundaries within the established NJ WEA. The primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Identification of 300 Area Contaminants of Potential Concern for Soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the process used to identify source area contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) in support of the 300 Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan. This report also establishes the exclusion criteria applicable for 300 Area use and the analytical methods needed to analyze the COPCs.

R.W. Ovink

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

133

OLED area illumination source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

134

Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal (Naperville, IL); Lewellen, John (Plainfield, IL); Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Vinokurov, Nikolai (Novosibirsk, RU)

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

135

Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

136

DEVELOPMENT OF RASASASTRA IN MEDIEVAL PERIOD*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT: The paper deals with the historical development of Rasasastra in Medieval period. Knowledge of Rasa has been in existence from the time immemorial. Exploration of natural resources for the benefit of human beings is the object of this therapy. It is a medical science recognized during vedic periods for the betterment of even Devas. Medieval period can be treated as a golden age for the development of this science. Looking at its aim and objects, methodology and therapeutics, it was recognized as a medical science with an independent philosophical background in 14 th century, by Madhavacharya in his Sarva Darsana Samgraha.

Harishankar Sharma

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Common Use Areas All floored areas in the building for circulation and standard facilities provided and the like. These are extracts of NWPC standard method of measurement of building areas with an addition fromSection S ANNEXURE 4 MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS 1. GROSS BUILDING

Wang, Yan

138

Single-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum tardiness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

periods often appear in industry due to a machine breakdown (stochastic) or preventive maintenance of machine unavailability. However, in some cases (e.g. preventive maintenance), the maintenance of a machineSingle-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

139

On the Survival of Short-Period Terrestrial Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The currently feasible method of detection of Earth-mass planets is transit photometry, with detection probability decreasing with a planet's distance from the star. The existence or otherwise of short-period terrestrial planets will tell us much about the planet formation process, and such planets are likely to be detected first if they exist. Tidal forces are intense for short-period planets, and result in decay of the orbit on a timescale which depends on properties of the star as long as the orbit is circular. However, if an eccentric companion planet exists, orbital eccentricity ($e_i$) is induced and the decay timescale depends on properties of the short-period planet, reducing by a factor of order $10^5 e_i^2$ if it is terrestrial. Here we examine the influence companion planets have on the tidal and dynamical evolution of short-period planets with terrestrial structure, and show that the relativistic potential of the star is fundamental to their survival.

Rosemary A. Mardling; D. N. C. Lin

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Subsurface contaminants focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

MSL ENTERANCE REFERENCE AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSL ENTERANCE LOBBY ELEV STAIRS SSL-019 REFERENCE AREA SSL-021 GROUP STUDY SSL-018 STUDY ROOM SSL-029 SSL-020 COPY ROOM SSL-022 GROUP STUDY SSL-026 STACKS SSL-023 GROUP STUDY SSL-024 GROUP STUDY SSL TBL-014 TBL-014A STAIRS SSL-007 GIS/ WORKROOM SSL-011 SSL-008 SSL-009 SSL-010 SSL-014 SSL-017 STAIRS

Aalberts, Daniel P.

142

Plutonium focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Analytical homogenization method for periodic composite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an easy-to-implement technique for determining the effective properties of composite materials with periodic microstructures, as well as the field distributions in them. Our method is based on the transformation ...

Chen, Ying

144

Impact of Motor Failures on Payback Periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper uses MotorMaster and Vaughen's Complete Price Guide to determine payback periods for different motor failure scenarios. Some scenarios considered are rewinds, reconditions, and replacement of bearings. Prices for these repairs...

Cheek, K. F.; Pillay, P.; Dudley, K. J.

145

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1--March 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of eight Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988. The facilities represented by the eight projects are the 300 Area Process trenches, 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds, Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, 216-A-36B Crib, 1301-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, and 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds. The latter four projects are included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. This report is the seventh in a series of periodic status reports; the first six cover the period from May 1, 1986, through December 31, 1987 (PNL 1986; 1987a, b, c, d; 1988a). This report satisfies the requirements of Section 17B(3) of the Consent Agreement and Compliance Order issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (1986a) to the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office. 13 refs., 19 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Process oil manufacturing process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for producing a naphthenic process oil having reduced sulfur, nitrogen and polynuclear aromatics contents from a naphthenic feed containing same and having an atmospheric boiling range of about 650/sup 0/ to about 1200/sup 0/F. comprising: A. passing the feed into a first hydrotreating stage having a hydrotreating catalyst therein, the stage maintained at a temperature of about 600/sup 0/ to about 750/sup 0/F. and at a hydrogen partial pressure of about 400 to about 1500 psig, to convert at least a portion of the sulfur to hydrogen sulfide and the nitrogen to ammonia; B. passing the hydrotreated feed from the first hydrotreating stage in an intermediate stripping stage wherein hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or both is removed; C. passing the hydrotreated feed from the intermediate stage into a second hydrotreating stage having therein a hydrotreating catalyst selected from the group consisting of nickel-molybdenum, cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten and mixtures thereof, the second hydrotreating stage maintained at a temperature lower than that of the first hydrotreating stage and at a hydrogen partial pressure ranging between about 400 and about 1,500 psig; D. monitoring the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both of the product exiting the second hydrotreating stage; and, E. adjusting the temperature in the second hydrotreating stage to keep the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both below a limit suitable for process oil.

Corman, B.G.; Korbach, P.F.; Webber, K.M.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

CARRELL, R.D.

2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 11:12am Addthis...

149

Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notified or aware of an upcoming inspection, and the time the inspector actually enters the material balance area or facility. Termed by the authors as “delayed access,” this period of time between inspection notice and inspector entrance to a facility poses a concern. Delayed access also has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of measures applied as part of the Safeguards Approach for a facility (such as short-notice inspections). This report investigates the feasibility of using process monitoring to address safeguards challenges posed by delayed access at a subset of facility types.

Curtis, Michael M.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Johnson, Shirley J.; Schanfein, Mark; Toomey, Christopher

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

area process research: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

research environmental January 2012 The Issue Comprehensive and reliable energy statistics are essential for good policy analysis and for future projections of energy...

151

Power and area minimization for multidimensional signal processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to evaluating power IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS,Low-power CMOS digital design,” IEEE J. Solid-Statecomputational power of silicon,” in IEEE Int. Solid-State

Markovic, Dejan; Nikolic, Borivoje; Brodersen, Robert W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Functional Area Qualification Standards Review Process | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergyQualityAUGUST 2006

153

Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized91 * SeptemberUS Department

154

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Processing Area  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26, 2008 (Next1,Product: Total Crude Oil and

155

Advanced Polymer Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

Reconstruction of spatial patterns of climatic anomalies during the medieval warm period (AD 900-1300)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The workshop will focus on climatic variations during the Medieval Warm Period or Little Climatic Optimum. The nominal time interval assigned to this period is AD 900--1300, but climate information available during the century or two preceding and following this episode is welcome. The aims of the workshop will be to: examine the available evidence for the existence of this episode; assess the spatial and temporal synchronicity of the climatic signals; discuss possible forcing mechanisms; and identify areas and paleoenvironmental records where additional research efforts are needed to improve our knowledge of this period. This document consists of abstracts of eighteen papers presented at the meeting.

Diaz, H.F. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Environmental Research Labs.; Hughes, M.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Lab. of Tree-Ring Research

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Periodic subsystem density-functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By partitioning the electron density into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for reducing the computational scaling of Kohn–Sham DFT. To date, however, FDE has been employed to molecular systems only. Periodic systems, such as metals, semiconductors, and other crystalline solids have been outside the applicability of FDE, mostly because of the lack of a periodic FDE implementation. To fill this gap, in this work we aim at extending FDE to treat subsystems of molecular and periodic character. This goal is achieved by a dual approach. On one side, the development of a theoretical framework for periodic subsystem DFT. On the other, the realization of the method into a parallel computer code. We find that periodic FDE is capable of reproducing total electron densities and (to a lesser extent) also interaction energies of molecular systems weakly interacting with metallic surfaces. In the pilot calculations considered, we find that FDE fails in those cases where there is appreciable density overlap between the subsystems. Conversely, we find FDE to be in semiquantitative agreement with Kohn–Sham DFT when the inter-subsystem density overlap is low. We also conclude that to make FDE a suitable method for describing molecular adsorption at surfaces, kinetic energy density functionals that go beyond the GGA level must be employed.

Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele, E-mail: m.pavanello@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); Ceresoli, Davide [Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); CNR-ISTM, Institute of Molecular Sciences and Technologies, Milano (Italy)

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain scientific and natural areas are established throughout the state for the purpose of preservation and protection. Construction and new development is prohibited in these areas.

159

Periodic Exponential Shear of Complex Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We define a class of flows with exponential kinematics termed Periodic Exponential Shear (PES) flow which involve periodic exponential stretching of fluid elements along with their rotation. We exhibit analytical and numerical results for PES flow by using the Oldroyd-B model for viscoelastic fluids. We calculate the growth in the shear and the normal stresses analytically as well as demonstrate that repeated application of the flow leads to stable oscillatory shear and normal stresses. We define a material function applicable to a periodic, unsteady shear flow and show numerically that this material function exhibits deformation-rate thickening behavior for viscoelastic fluids subject to PES flow. We demonstrate the feasibility of PES flow by presenting preliminary experimental results from a controlled-strain rate rheometer, using a Newtonian mineral oil.

Chirag Kalelkar; Gareth McKinley

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Physics division. Progress report for period ending September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1995 and 1996 fiscal years, beginning October 1, 1994, and ending September 30, 1996. The activities of the Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. In addition, there are smaller programs in plasma diagnostics and data compilation and evaluation. During the period of this report, there has been considerable success in bringing the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) into routine operation. The budgets of the nuclear physics portion of the Division have increased each year in nearly all areas, and several new members have been added to the Division research and development staff. On August 30, 1996, the HRIBF successfully accelerated its first radioactive ion beams, {sup 69}As and {sup 70}As. Prior to this, the heart of the facility, the RIB injector system, was completed, including installation of a remote handling system for the target/ion source assembly. Target and ion source development is likely to be the technical key to success of the HRIBF. We have expanded our efforts in those development areas. Of special note is the development of highly permeable composite targets which have now been shown to allow release of difficult-to-produce radioactive ions such as {sup 17,18}F. A summary of the HRIBF work is provided in Chapter 1, along with supporting activities of the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research.

Ball, S.J. [ed.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Parc Periodical | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizingToolsto controlParc Periodical Parc Periodical

162

Processing Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Processing Science Related to the Electron Beam Melting Additive Manufacturing Process October 14 th , 2014 Ryan Dehoff Metal Additive Manufacturing Thrust Lead Manufacturing...

163

Selection Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selection Process Selection Process Fellowships will be awarded based on academic excellence, relevance of candidate's research to the laboratory mission in fundamental nuclear...

164

Proposal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal Process Network R&D Overview Experimental Network Testbeds 100G SDN Testbed Testbed Description Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and...

165

Western Area Power Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun Deng Associate ResearchWestern Area Power

166

700 Area - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011 Mon, Next2025Steps to MakingImportance of700 Area

167

CEES - Focus Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating the Past - VisualizingFocus Areas

168

100 Area - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | BlandinePrincetonOPT Optics MetrologyDepartment of00 Area

169

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

170

Kirkland gets license in hot Philippines area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Kirkland As, Oslo, has received a geophysical survey and exploration contract (GSEC) in a sizzling exploration and development theater off the Philippines. The license covers about 6,000 sq miles of undisputed waters, with depths mostly less than 300 ft, and lies in the Reed Bank area off Northwest Palawan Island, where several major oil and gas strikes have been made recently. Kirkland has 1 year in which to carry out its seismic work commitment. The terms of the GSEC then give an option to drill one well in a 6 month period. Once the results have been analyzed, the company can either drill another well or enter into a service contract for the license. Kirkland has a 65% share in the license, with the remainder split between Philippine companies Philodrill Corp., Beguet Mining Corp. subsidiary Petrofields, and Seafront Resources Corp. The Philippines is one of Kirkland's main areas of activity, the Kirkland Commercial Manager Ralph Baxter.

Kirkland, A.S.

1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

Wang, Lin-Wang

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Utility Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV -2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICITY Consumption MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 8 CCF STEAM Consumption CHILLED WATER Consumption GAS Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV - 2013 032 JACKSON HALL: 150,393 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption,550 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption 114,185 KWHRS MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 1,423 CCF STEAM Consumption

Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

173

Coherency saturation in periodic structures with randomization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,28 or multicascade stimulated Raman scattering.29­31 A major example of naturally occurring spatially periodic with very reasonable precision. In the specific case of x ray transition radiation of low layers can generate resonantly enhanced radiation in the hard x ray domain with almost unhampered

Kaplan, Alexander

174

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development of three delineated leasing area options for the Massachusetts (MA) WEA and the technical evaluation of these leasing areas. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the MA WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL worked with BOEM to identify an appropriate number of leasing areas and proposed three delineation alternatives within the MA WEA based on the boundaries announced in May 2012. A primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

Musial, W.; Parker, Z.; Fields, M.; Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Draxl, C.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Periodic Broadcast and Patching Services -Implementation, Measurement, and Analysis in an Internet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Periodic Broadcast and Patching Services - Implementation, Measurement, and Analysis in an Internet to multime- dia steams by a large number of clients. Current research in this area has focussed primarily these algorithms. We present measurements detailing the overheads associated with the various server compo- nents

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

177

T-1 Training Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

None

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

T-1 Training Area  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

179

Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Admin Chg 1, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes by Carl Sykes Functional areas: Administrative Change, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense...

180

Processing Texas Broilers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be held more than a few hours be- fore slaughter were transferred from crates to-. batteries immediately after being unloaded from the truck. They were weighed and moved to the battery-holding area to wait for slaughter later in the day or for further... are handled rapidly. Birds are weighed only at the time of purchase. With the battery system, they must be weighed a second time just before slaugh- ter to determine the weight gained or lost dur- ing the feeding period. Some processors are of the opinion...

Mountney, G. J.; Gardner, F. A. (Frederick)

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

300 Area - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011 Mon, Next2025 PowerNetwork8th MeetingProcessesR300

183

Chaotic Transport in Planar Periodic Vortical Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied a chaotic transport in a two-dimensional periodic vortical flow under a time-dependent perturbation with period T where the global diffusion occurs along the stochastic web. By using the Melnikov method we construct the separatrix map describing the approximate dynamics near the saddle separatrices. Focusing on the small T, the width of the stochastic layer is calculated analytically by using the residue criterion and the diffusion constant by using the random phase assumption and correlated random walks. The analytical results are in good agreements with the results of two different types of numerical simulations by integrations of the Hamilton's equation of motion and by iterations of the separatrix map, which establishes the validity of the use of the separatrix map.

Taehoon Ahn; Seunghwan Kim

1993-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

184

Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nev HB-Line, located on the fifth and sixth levels of Building 221-H, is designed to replace the aging existing HB-Line production facility. The nev HB-Line consists of three separate facilities: the Scrap Recovery Facility, the Neptunium Oxide Facility, and the Plutonium Oxide Facility. There are three separate safety analyses for the nev HB-Line, one for each of the three facilities. These are issued as supplements to the 200-Area Safety Analysis (DPSTSA-200-10). These supplements are numbered as Sup 2A, Scrap Recovery Facility, Sup 2B, Neptunium Oxide Facility, Sup 2C, Plutonium Oxide Facility. The subject of this safety analysis, the, Plutonium Oxide Facility, will convert nitrate solutions of {sup 238}Pu to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) powder. All these new facilities incorporate improvements in: (1) engineered barriers to contain contamination, (2) barriers to minimize personnel exposure to airborne contamination, (3) shielding and remote operations to decrease radiation exposure, and (4) equipment and ventilation design to provide flexibility and improved process performance.

Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Allen, P.M.; Gouge, A.P.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Periodic-Orbit Theory of Level Correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a semiclassical explanation of the so-called Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture which asserts universality of spectral fluctuations in chaotic dynamics. We work with a generating function whose semiclassical limit is determined by quadruplets of sets of periodic orbits. The asymptotic expansions of both the non-oscillatory and the oscillatory part of the universal spectral correlator are obtained. Borel summation of the series reproduces the exact correlator of random-matrix theory.

Stefan Heusler; Sebastian Müller; Alexander Altland; Petr Braun; Fritz Haake

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

186

Process Modeling for Process Improvement A Process Conformance Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Modeling for Process Improvement - A Process Conformance Approach Sigurd Thunem September processes. In order to improve these processes, knowledge about them is necessary. To support process improve- ment the organization should collect process data, transform process data into knowledge

187

Photolytic Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Photolytic processes use the energy in sunlight to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. These processes are in the very early stages of research but offer long-term potential for sustainable...

188

Comprehensive Research Areas in ChBE Biomedical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& BioprocessingCatalysis, Reaction Kinetics & Reaction EngineeringComplex Fluids & Multiphase Flow EnergyComprehensive Research Areas in ChBE Biomedical Engineering Biotechnology, Bioinformatics & M EM S Nanotechnology Polymers & Materials Science Process Systems Engineering Pulp & Paper

Sherrill, David

189

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

190

Hydrocarbon Processing`s petrochemical processes `97  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper compiles information on numerous petrochemical processes, describing the application, the process, yields, economics, commercial plants, references, and licensor. Petrochemicals which are synthesized include: alkylbenzene, methylamines, ammonia, benzene, bisphenol-A, BTX aromatics, butadiene, butanediol, butyraldehyde, caprolactam, cumene, dimethyl terephthalate, ethanolamines, ethylbenzene, ethylene, ethylene glycols, ethylene oxide, formaldehyde, maleic anhydride, methanol, olefins, paraxylene, phenol, phthalic anhydride, polycaproamide, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene, PVC, styrene, terephthalic acid, urea, vinyl chloride, and xylene isomers.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Attached is Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of...

192

Communication in Home Area Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

Wang, Yubo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Application Periods Open for 2014 National Clean Energy Business...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Application Periods Open for 2014 National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition's Regional Contests Application Periods Open for 2014 National Clean Energy Business Plan...

194

DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...

195

Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on niobium by femtosecond laser irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The surface morphology of a Niobium sample, irradiated in air by a femtosecond laser with a wavelength of 800?nm and pulse duration of 100 fs, was examined. The period of the micro/nanostructures, parallel and perpendicularly oriented to the linearly polarized fs-laser beam, was studied by means of 2D Fast Fourier Transform analysis. The observed Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) were classified as Low Spatial Frequency LIPSS (periods about 600?nm) and High Spatial Frequency LIPSS, showing a periodicity around 300?nm, both of them perpendicularly oriented to the polarization of the incident laser wave. Moreover, parallel high spatial frequency LIPSS were observed with periods around 100?nm located at the peripheral areas of the laser fingerprint and overwritten on the perpendicular periodic gratings. The results indicate that this method of micro/nanostructuring allows controlling the Niobium grating period by the number of pulses applied, so the scan speed and not the fluence is the key parameter of control. A discussion on the mechanism of the surface topology evolution was also introduced.

Pan, A.; Dias, A.; Gomez-Aranzadi, M.; Olaizola, S. M. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); CEIT-IK4 and Tecnun, University of Navarra, Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Rodriguez, A. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

Geothermal Resource Area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two county area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this area development plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the geothermal sites considered are summarized.

Robinson, S.; Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Geothermal resource area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two country area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 11 geothermal sites considered are summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

199

Property:TimePeriod | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellhead Jump to:Technology ReadinessTimePeriod Jump to:

200

Subproject L-045H 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study focuses on the project schedule for Project L-045H, 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility is a Department of Energy subproject of the Hanford Environmental Compliance Project. The study scope is limited to validation of the project schedule only. The primary purpose of the study is to find ways and means to accelerate the completion of the project, thereby hastening environmental compliance of the 300 Area of the Hanford site. The 300 Area'' has been utilized extensively as a laboratory area, with a diverse array of laboratory facilities installed and operational. The 300 Area Process Sewer, located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site, collects waste water from approximately 62 sources. This waste water is discharged into two 1500 feet long percolation trenches. Current environmental statutes and policies dictate that this practice be discontinued at the earliest possible date in favor of treatment and disposal practices that satisfy applicable regulations.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

On a periodicity measure and superoscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenon of superoscillation, where band limited signals can oscillate over some time period with a frequency higher than the band limit, is not only very interesting but it also seems to offer many practical applications. The first reason is that the superoscillation frequency can be exploited to perform tasks beyond the limits imposed by the lower bandwidth of the signal. The second reason is that it is generic and applies to any wave form, be it optical, electrical, sonic, or quantum mechanical. For practical applications, it is important to overcome two problems. The first problem is that an overwhelming proportion of the energy goes into the non superoscillating part of the signal. The second problem is the control of the shape of the superoscillating part of the signal. The first problem has been recently addressed by optimization of the super oscillation yield, the ratio of the energy in the superoscillations to the total energy of the signal. The second problem may arise when the superoscillation, is to mimic a high frequency purely perodic signal. This may be required, for example, when a superoscillating force is to drive a harmonic oscillator at a high resonance frequency. In this paper the degree of periodicity of a signal is defined and applied to some yield optimized superoscillating signals.

Nehemia Schwartz; Moshe Schwartz

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

202

Periodic Cluster Mutations and Related Integrable Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the remarkable properties of cluster algebras is that any cluster, obtained from a sequence of mutations from an initial cluster, can be written as a Laurent polynomial in the initial cluster (known as the "Laurent phenomenon"). There are many nonlinear recurrences which exhibit the Laurent phenomenon and thus unexpectedly generate integer sequences. The mutation of a typical quiver will not generate a recurrence, but rather an erratic sequence of exchange relations. How do we "design" a quiver which gives rise to a given recurrence? A key role is played by the concept of "periodic cluster mutation", introduced in 2009. Each recurrence corresponds to a finite dimensional map. In the context of cluster mutations, these are called "cluster maps". What properties do cluster maps have? Are they integrable in some standard sense? In this review I describe how integrable maps arise in the context of cluster mutations. I first explain the concept of "periodic cluster mutation", giving some classification results. I then give a review of what is meant by an integrable map and apply this to cluster maps. Two classes of integrable maps are related to interesting monodromy problems, which generate interesting Poisson algebras of functions, used to prove complete integrability and a linearisation. A connections to the Hirota-Miwa equation is explained.

Allan P Fordy

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

Electromagnetic Siegert states for periodic dielectric structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formalism of Siegert states to describe the resonant scattering in quantum theory is extended to the resonant scattering of electromagnetic waves on periodic dielectric arrays. The excitation of electromagnetic Siegert states by an incident wave packet and their decay is studied. The formalism is applied to develop a theory of coupled electromagnetic resonances arising in the electromagnetic scattering problem for two such arrays separated by a distance 2h (or, generally, when the physical properties of the scattering array depend on a real coupling parameter h). Analytic properties of Siegert states as functions of the coupling parameter h are established by the Regular Perturbation Theorem which is an extension the Kato-Rellich theorem to the present case. By means of this theorem, it is proved that if the scattering structure admits a bound state in the radiation continuum at a certain value of the coupling parameter h, then there always exist regions within the structure in which the near field can be amplified as much as desired by adjusting the value of h. This establishes a rather general mechanism to control and amplify optical nonlinear effects in periodically structured planar structures possessing a nonlinear dielectric susceptibility.

Friends R. Ndangali; Sergei V. Shabanov

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

204

Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

205

Studsvik Processing Facility Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

206

M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Entropy production of diffusion in spatially periodic deterministic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents an {\\it ab initio} derivation of the expression given by irreversible thermodynamics for the rate of entropy production for different classes of diffusive processes. The first class are Lorentz gases, where non-interacting particles move on a spatially periodic lattice, and collide elastically with fixed scatterers. The second class are periodic systems where $N$ particles interact with each other, and one of them is a tracer particle which diffuses among the cells of the lattice. We assume that, in either case, the dynamics of the system is deterministic and hyperbolic, with positive Lyapunov exponents. This work extends methods originally developed for a chaotic two-dimensional model of diffusion, the multi-baker map, to higher dimensional, continuous time dynamical systems appropriate for systems with one or more moving particles. Here we express the rate of entropy production in terms of hydrodynamic measures that are determined by the fractal properties of microscopic hydrodynamic modes that describe the slowest decay of the system to an equilibrium state.

J. R. Dorfman; P. Gaspard; T. Gilbert

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

Proposal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

210

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The main driver of the observed variations in DO is likely to be periodic melt-freeze cycles. We conclude ecosystems for assessing the impacts of climate warming on polar desert environments. Mean summer air temperatures are close to the 0 °C isotherm and the low, spatially limited surface melting (Fountain et al

Fountain, Andrew G.

211

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have modified our budget plan for next year to include a temporary employee that will work primarily on tree maintenance and fencing projects to make sure that we make progress in these areas and we will be investigating whether a heavier duty driveline can be obtained for the mower.

Calkins, Brian

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Total Ore Processing Integration and Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the technical progress achieved for project DE-FC26-03NT41785 (Total Ore Processing Integration and Management) during the period 01 October through 31 December of 2003.

Leslie Gertsch; Richard Gertsch

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Periodic table for topological insulators and superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gapped phases of noninteracting fermions, with and without charge conservation and time-reversal symmetry, are classified using Bott periodicity. The symmetry and spatial dimension determines a general universality class, which corresponds to one of the 2 types of complex and 8 types of real Clifford algebras. The phases within a given class are further characterized by a topological invariant, an element of some Abelian group that can be 0, Z, or Z_2. The interface between two infinite phases with different topological numbers must carry some gapless mode. Topological properties of finite systems are described in terms of K-homology. This classification is robust with respect to disorder, provided electron states near the Fermi energy are absent or localized. In some cases (e.g., integer quantum Hall systems) the K-theoretic classification is stable to interactions, but a counterexample is also given.

Alexei Kitaev

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

Steady periodic gravity waves with surface tension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider two-dimensional, stratified, steady water waves propagating over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. The motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity (that is, surface tension) on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid. We prove the existence of global continua of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. This is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, $\\mathcal{T}$, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from $\\mathcal{T}$ at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic theorem in the spirit of Rabinowitz. Finally, we complement the degree theoretic picture by proving an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer.

Samuel Walsh

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

215

Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research activities of the Division are centered primarily in three areas: experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The largest of these efforts, experimental nuclear physics, is dominated by the heavy ion research program. A major responsibility under this program is the operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. During the period of this report, the facility has begun routine operation for the experimental program. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. The theoretical physics program, both nuclear and atomic, is covered. This program has benefited this year from the success of the VAX-AP computer system and from the increase in manpower provided by the ORNL/University of Tennessee Distinguished Scientist Program. Smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics are summarized. During the period of this report, we continued to explore possible future extensions of the Holifield Facility. We retain a strong interest in a relativistic heavy-ion collider in the 10 x 10 GeV/nuclear energy range. The ideas for such a facility, described in last year's report, have been modified to utilize the HHIRF 25 MV tandem accelerator as the first stage. Finally, the report concludes with some general information on publications, Division activities, and personnel changes.

Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

IUPAC Periodic Table of Isotopes for the Educational Community  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

John Dalton first proposed the concept of atomic weights of the elements in the first decade of the nineteenth century. These atomic weights of the chemical elements were thought of as constants of nature, similar to the speed of light. Dmitri Mendeleev arranged the atomic weights of the elements in ascending order of value and used the systematic variation of their chemical properties to produce his Periodic Table of the Elements in 1869. Measurement of atomic weight values became an important chemical activity for a century and a half. Theodore Richards received a Noble Prize for his work in this area. In 1913, Fredrick Soddy found a species of radium, which had an atomic weight value of 228, compared to the familiar radium gas value of 226. Soddy coined the term 'isotope' (Greek for 'in the same place') to account for this second atomic weight value in the radium position of the Periodic Table. Both of these isotopes of radium are radioactive. Radioactive isotopes are energetically unstable and will decay (disintegrate) over time. The time it takes for one half of a sample of a given radioactive isotope to decay is the half-life of that isotope. In addition to having different atomic weight values, radium-226 and radium-228 also have different half-life values. Around the same time as Soddy's work, J.J. Thomson (discoverer of the electron) identified two stable (non-radioactive) isotopes of the same element, neon. Over the next 40 years, the majority of the known chemical elements were found to have two or more stable (or long-lived radioactive isotopes that contribute significantly to the determination of the atomic weights of the elements).

Holden N. E.; Holden,N.E.; Coplen,T.B.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Ashland Area Support Substation Project : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power & Light Company`s (PP&L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP&L`s Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP&L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW`s) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP&L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Northwest Area Foundation Horizons Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwest Area Foundation Horizons Program Final Evaluation Report ­ Executive Summary Diane L by the Northwest Area Foundation in partnership with two national organizations and delivered by a number to remember that Horizons was not designed to reduce poverty, but instead to contribute to the Foundations

Amin, S. Massoud

219

Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

226 Unscaled Scaled (% / km) Geographic Area / Assessment Unit DI Prod. N(eq) Sum Total Cumu subbasin, Washington. Geographic Area / Assessment Unit IntegratedPriorityRestoration Category Habitat% (unscaled results) of the combined protection benefit for summer steelhead within the Methow basin, and 51

220

tight environment high radiation area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Irradiation Studies of Optical Components - II CERN, week of Oct. 24, 2005 1.4 GeV proton beam 4 x· tight environment · high radiation area · non-serviceable area · passive components · optics only, no active electronics · transmit image through flexible fiber bundle Optical Diagnostics 01-13-2006 1 #12

McDonald, Kirk

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

High surface area, high permeability carbon monoliths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to prepare carbon monoliths having precisely tailored pore size distribution. Prior studies have demonstrated that poly(acrylonitrile) can be processed into a precursor having tailored macropore structure. Since the macropores were preserved during pyrolysis, this synthetic process provided a route to porous carbon having macropores with size =0.1 to 10{mu}m. No micropores of size <2 nm could be detected in the carbon, however, by nitrogen adsorption. In the present work, the authors have processed a different polymer, poly(vinylidene chloride) into a macroporous precursor, Pyrolysis produced carbon monoliths having macropores derived from the polymer precursor as well as extensive microporosity produced during the pyrolysis of the polymer. One of these carbons had BET surface area of 1,050 m{sup 2}/g and about 1.2 cc/g total pore volume, with about 1/3 of the total pore volume in micropores and the remainder in 1{mu}m macropores. No mesopores in the intermediate size range could be detected by nitrogen adsorption. Carbon materials having high surface area as well as micron size pores have potential applications as electrodes for double layer supercapacitors containing liquid electrolyte, or as efficient media for performing chemical separations.

Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Processing Dept.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1989, to September 30, 1990. During this period, division research programs were significantly enhanced by the restart of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and by new initiatives in processing and characterization of materials.

Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. (eds.)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, superconductivity, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. The High Flux Isotope Reactor was returned to full operation.

Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Industrial Revolutions and Consumption: A Common Model to the Various Periods of Industrialization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial Revolutions and Consumption: A Common Model to the Various Periods of Industrialization and establish a plausible link between consumption structure evolutions and industrial revolutions. In particular, we show that an industrial revolution starts with a "smithian growth process", which is demand

Boyer, Edmond

225

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t ? [0,1). We prove several results ...

Borodin, Alexei

226

SPECIAL ANALYSIS AIR PATHWAY MODELING OF E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Special Analysis (SA) was initiated to address a concern expressed by the Department of Energy's Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) Review Team during their review of the 2008 E-Area Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC, 2008). Their concern was the potential for overlapping of atmospheric plumes, emanating from the soil surface above SRS LLW disposal facilities within the E-Area, to contribute to the dose received by a member of the public during the Institutional Control (IC) period. The implication of this concern was that the dose to the maximally-exposed individual (MEI) located at the SRS boundary might be underestimated during this time interval. To address this concern a re-analysis of the atmospheric pathway releases from E-Area was required. In the process of developing a new atmospheric release model (ARM) capable of addressing the LFRG plume overlap concern, it became obvious that new and better atmospheric pathway disposal limits should be developed for each of the E-Area disposal facilities using the new ARM. The scope of the SA was therefore expanded to include the generation of these new limits. The initial work conducted in this SA was to develop a new ARM using the GoldSim{reg_sign} program (GTG, 2009). The model simulates the subsurface vapor diffusion of volatile radionuclides as they release from E-Area disposal facility waste zones and migrate to the land surface. In the process of this work, many new features, including several new physical and chemical transport mechanisms, were incorporated into the model. One of the most important improvements was to incorporate a mechanism to partition volatile contaminants across the water-air interface within the partially saturated pore space of the engineered and natural materials through which vapor phase transport occurs. A second mechanism that was equally important was to incorporate a maximum concentration of 1.9E-07 Ci/m{sup 3} of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in the air-filled pores of cementitious materials. The ARM also combines the individual transport models constructed for each E-Area disposal facility into a single model, and was ultimately used to analyze the LFRG concern regarding the potential for atmospheric plume overlap at the SRS boundary during the IC period. To evaluate the plume overlap issue, a conservative approach was adopted whereby the MEI at the SRS boundary was exposed to the releases from all E-Area disposal facilities simultaneously. This is equivalent to a 100% overlap of all atmospheric plumes emanating from E-Area. Should the dose received from this level of atmospheric plume overlap still fall below the permissible exposure level of 10 mrem/yr, then the LFRG concern would be alleviated. The structuring of the ARM enables this evaluation to be easily performed. During the IC period, the peak of the 'total plume overlap dose' was computed to be 1.9E-05 mrem/yr, which is five orders of magnitude lower than the 10 mrem/yr PA performance objective for the atmospheric release pathway. The main conclusion of this study is that for atmospheric releases from the E-Area disposal facilities, plume overlap does not cause the total dose to the MEI at the SRS boundary during the IC to exceed the Performance Assessment (PA) performance objective. Additionally, the potential for plume overlap was assessed in the post-Institutional Control period. Atmospheric plume overlap is less likely to occur during this period but conceivably could occur if the prevailing wind direction shifted so as to pass directly over all EArea disposal facilities and transport airborne radionuclides to the MEI at the 100 m point of compliance (POC). This concern was also demonstrated of little concern, as the maximum plume overlap dose was found to be 1.45E+00 mrem/yr (or {approx}15% of the performance measure) during this period and under these unlikely conditions.

Hiergesell, R.; Taylor, G.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

Effects of periodic matter in kaon regeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effects of periodic matter in kaon regeneration, motivated by the possibility of parametric resonance in neutrino oscillations. The large imaginary parts of the forward kaon-nucleon scattering amplitudes and the decay width difference $\\Delta\\Gamma$ prevent a sizable enhancement of the $K_L\\to K_S$ transition probability. However, some interesting effects can be produced using regenerators made of alternating layers of two different materials. Despite the fact that the regenerator has a fixed length one can obtain different values for the probability distribution of the $K_L$ decay into a final state. Using a two-arm regenerator set up it is possible to measure the imaginary parts of the $K^0(\\bar{K}^0)$-nucleon scattering amplitudes in the correlated decays of the $\\phi$-resonance. Combining the data of the single-arm regenerator experiments with direct and reverse orders of the matter layers in the regenerator one can independently measure the CP violating parameter $\\delta$.

Evgeny Akhmedov; Augusto Barroso; Petteri Keränen

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

228

Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the reporting period, relatively minor changes have occurred in the research areas of interest to the Division. Nearly all the research of the Division can be classified broadly as mission-oriented basic research. Topics covered include: theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; and preparation and characterization of research materials. (GHT)

Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - area generating function Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

systems suffers from the absence of a unique security coordinator Summary: curve of each hourly model of the multi area electric power system. The sampling process will...

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - area sheet task Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: area sheet task Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Mixed integer optimization in automobile sheet metal forming processes Summary: Mixed integer optimization in automobile...

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - asc wide area Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wayne Luk Summary: - brary code generation, and the automation of the ASC de- sign space exploration process optimizing area... segments (for table-with-polynomial method) 4....

232

Superconvergence of period doubling cascade in trapezoid maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the symmetric and the asymmetric trapezoid maps, as a slope of the trapezoid is increased, the period doubling cascade occurs and the symbolic sequence of periodic points is the Metropolis-Stein-Stein sequence and the convergence of the onset point of the period 2^m solution to the accumulation point is exponentially fast. We reported these results previously. In this paper, we give the detailed description of the proof on the results. Further, we study the period doubling cascade starting from period p solution and show the superconvergence of the period doubling cascade.

T. Uezu

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

233

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyo County, California | Open Energy InformationAirQualityPermitProcessAreaGeology

234

Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Hanford 200 Areas Development Plan (Development Plan) is to guide the physical development of the 200 Areas (which refers to the 200 East Area, 200 West Area, and 200 Area Corridor, located between the 200 East and 200 West Areas) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4320.lB (DOE 1991a) by performing the following: Establishing a land-use plan and setting land-use categories that meet the needs of existing and proposed activities. Coordinating existing, 5-year, and long-range development plans and guiding growth in accordance with those plans. Establishing development guidelines to encourage cost-effective development and minimize conflicts between adjacent activities. Identifying site development issues that need further analysis. Integrating program plans with development plans to ensure a logical progression of development. Coordinate DOE plans with other agencies [(i.e., Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)]. Being a support document to the Hanford Site Development Plan (DOE-RL 1990a) (parent document) and providing technical site information relative to the 200 Areas.

Rinne, C.A.; Daly, K.S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Research Areas Research Areas High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP) Research Areas During open solicitations proposals are sought...

236

Risk Aversion Min-Period Retiming Under Process Variations Electrical and Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimizations. In this paper, we study the statistical retiming problem, where retiming is a powerful sequential optimizations. Among the many deterministic optimization techniques, retim- ing [10] is one of the most powerful in computing arrival times under variations by extending sum and maximum operations to random variables

Zhou, Hai

237

Y-12 development organization technical progress report: Part 3 - metal processing, period ending September 1, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors melted and cast an aluminum-uranium (Al-U) alloy by vacuum induction melting (VIM) prealloyed buttons made by arc melting. The resulting alloy casting displayed a large compositional gradient from top to bottom. The authors sampled the resulting casting for uranium to check homogeneity. The sampling revealed that the top of the casting contained 23.5 wt% uranium, and the bottom (an average of two samples) contained 42.4 wt% uranium. Although each button contained 36.5% uranium, these analyses show that the solidified casting was inhomogeneous. If the buttons were homogeneous, the segregation occurred during induction melting, and this method may not be feasible for making AL-U alloys. If the buttons were not homogeneous, perhaps arc melting the buttons more times would have helped. Bottom pouring the Al-U melt into a mold for faster cooling could also help prevent segregation.

Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

238

MULTI-PERIOD CAPACITY PLANNING FOR INTEGRATED PRODUCT-PROCESS DESIGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the expense of quality, the brand image may easily be damaged and future demand may be jeopardized. However

Saitou, Kazuhiro "Kazu"

239

HAB Advice and Issue Tracking Process for Draft RCRA Site-Wide Permit Comment Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGetGraphene'sEMSLonly)EnergyP.Oc t o bSUBTASK 2.3and

240

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t in [0,1). We prove several results about these processes, which include the following. (1) We explicitly evaluate expectations of a rich family of observables for these processes. (2) In the case t=0, we find a Fredholm determinant formula for a q-Laplace transform of the distribution of the last part of the Macdonald-random partition. (3) We introduce Markov dynamics that preserve the class of Macdonald processes and lead to new "integrable" 2d and 1d interacting particle systems. (4) In a large time limit transition, and as q goes to 1, the particles of these systems crystallize on a lattice, and fluctuations around the lattice converge to O'Connell's Whittaker process that describe semi-discrete Brownian directed polymers. (5) This yields a Fredholm determinant for the Laplace transform of the polymer partition function, and taking its asymptotics we prove KPZ universality for the polymer (free energy fluctuation exponent 1/3 and Tracy-Widom GUE limit law). (6) Under intermediate disorder scaling, we recover the Laplace transform of the solution of the KPZ equation with narrow wedge initial data. (7) We provide contour integral formulas for a wide array of polymer moments. (8) This results in a new ansatz for solving quantum many body systems such as the delta Bose gas.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin

2013-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ecology of Zooplankton of the Cape Thompson Area Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Until recently (Ed- mondson 1955; Comita 1956), detailed studies of zooplankton in arctic Alaska had not been made. Most published works are short-term species sur- veys (Comita 1952; Johnson 1961; Juday and Muttkowski 1915; Marsh 1920; Reed 1962...-September and typically lasted until mid-May or early June. RESULTS During ice-free periods, physicoclhemical values found in aquatic habitats at Cape Thompson were simlilar to those recorded for other areas of Alaska (Comita and Edmondson 1953; Edmondson 1956...

Tash, Jerry C.; Armitage, Kenneth

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Period-luminosity and period-luminosity-colour relations for Mira variables at maximum light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we confirm the existence of period-luminosity (PL) and period-luminosity-colour (PLC) relations at maximum light for O and C Mira variables in the LMC. We demonstrate that in the J and H bands the maximum light PL relations have a significantly smaller dispersion than their counterparts at mean light, while the K band and bolometric PL relations have a dispersion comparable to that at mean light. In the J, H and K bands the fitted PL relations for the O Miras are found to have smaller dispersion than those for the C Miras, at both mean and maximum light, while the converse is true for the relations based on bolometric magnitudes. The inclusion of a non-zero log period term is found to be highly significant in all cases except that of the C Miras in the J band, for which the data are found to be consistent with having constant absolute magnitude. This suggests the possibility of employing C Miras as standard candles. We suggest both a theoretical justification for the existence of Mira PL relations at maximum light and a possible explanation of why these relations should have a smaller dispersion than at mean light. The existence of such maximum light relations offers the possibility of extending the range and improving the accuracy of the Mira distance scale to Galactic globular clusters and to other galaxies.

S. M. Kanbur; M. A. Hendry; D. Clarke

1997-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Focusing-to-defocusing crossover in nonlinear periodic structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Focusing-to-defocusing crossover in nonlinear periodic structures Francis H. Bennet,* Inés A. Amuli

244

Progress Update: M Area Closure  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

Cody, Tom

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

245

Wellhead Protection Area Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates activities which can occur on or below the land surface of the area surrounding a wellhead. The purpose of these regulations is to limit well contamination and preserve...

246

Controlling Bats in Urban Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to avoid obstacles and capture insects. Bats also emit audible sounds that may be used for communi- cation. L-1913 4-08 Controlling BATS Damage In urban areas, bats may become a nuisance becauseoftheirsqueaking,scratchingandcrawl- inginattics...

Texas Wildlife Services

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Protected Water Area System (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Natural Resource Commission maintains a state plan for the design and establishment of a protected water area system and those adjacent lands needed to protect the integrity of that system. A...

248

The Program Area Committee Chairperson.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

worksheets and others. Prepared by Mary G. Marshall and Burl B. RichardsQ Extension program development specialists, The Texas A&M University System. THE PROGRAM AREA COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSON You Hold an Important Position! Whenever people gather...

Marshall, Mary; Richardson, Burl B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Security Area Vouching and Piggybacking  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Security Area practice of "vouching" or "piggybacking" access by personnel. DOE N 251.40, dated 5-3-01, extends this directive until 12-31-01.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

250

Focus Area Tax Credits (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Focus Area Tax Credits for businesses in Baltimore City or Prince George’s County enterprise zones include: (1) Ten-year, 80% credit against local real property taxes on a portion of real property...

251

Transforming Parks and Protected Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming Parks and Protected Areas Policy and governance in a changing world Edited by Kevin S from the British Library Library of Congress Cataloging In Publication Data Transforming parks

Bolch, Tobias

252

Period of K system generator of pseudorandom numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the structure of the periodic trajectories of the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers which has been proposed earlier. The structure of the periodic trajectories becomes more transparent when the rational sublattice coincides with the Galois field GF[p]. We are able to compute the period of the trajectories as a function of p and the dimension of the matrix d.

Akopov, N Z; Floratos, Emmanuel G; Savvidy, G K

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Period of K System Generator of Pseudorandom Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the structure of the periodic trajectories of the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers which has been proposed earlier. The structure of the periodic trajectories becomes more transparent when the rational sublattice coincides with the Galois field $GF[p]$. We are able to compute the period of the trajectories as a function of $p$ and the dimension of the matrix $d$.

N. Z. Akopov; G. G. Athanasiu; E. G. Floratos; G. K. Savvidy

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

254

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2013 Storrs and Regional Campuses University of Connecticut Health Center Quarterly Construction Status Report for Period Ending: June 30, 2013 #12;Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2013 Project Number Project Index

Alpay, S. Pamir

255

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: March 31, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: March 31, 2014 Storrs and Regional Campuses University of Connecticut Health Center Quarterly Construction Status Report for Period Ending: March 31, 2014 #12;Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: March 31, 2014 Project Number Project

Alpay, S. Pamir

256

Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique...

257

Biological Inventory Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Inventory of the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area Prepared by: Joe Stevens .............................. 12 Identify Targeted Inventory Areas

258

Process Energy Retrofits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shows up in a discharge of added heat to ambient and is spotted more quickly. (Not Replace) I~ - ......... c.... Doml..... By IneremanUl Coata Area Fortunately, there are snort CIrcUits past some of the other activation energy barriers...optimum Is the low point on the curve. The discontinuity or activation energy Is due to the coats.of weatherproofing, etc. Note that for this exlsti" Process Energy Retrofits Dan Steinmeyer Monsanto Co St. Louis, Mo U N C E R E T N...

Steinmeyer, D.

259

Development of Advanced Concept for Shortening Construction Period of ABWR Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction of a nuclear power plant (NPP) requires a very long period because of large amount of construction materials and many issues for negotiation among multiple sections. Shortening the construction period advances the date of return on an investment, and can also result in reduced construction cost. Therefore, the study of this subject has a very high priority for utilities. We achieved a construction period of 37 months from the first concrete work to fuel loading (F/L) (51.5 months from the inspection of the foundation (I/F) to the start of commercial operation (C/O)) at the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPPs No. 6 and 7 (KK-6/7), which are the first ABWR plants in the world. At TEPCO's next plant, we think that a construction period of less than 36 months (45 months from I/F to C/O) can be realized based on conventional methods such as early start of equipment installation and blocking of equipment to be brought in advance. Furthermore, we are studying the feasibility of a 21.5-month construction period (30 months from I/F to C/O) with advanced ideas and methods. The important concepts for a 21.5-month construction period are adoption of a new building structure that is the steel plate reinforced concrete (SC) structure and promotion of extensive modularization of equipment and building structure. With introducing these new concepts, we are planning the master schedule (M/S) and finding solutions to conflicts in the schedule of area release from building construction work to equipment installation work (schedule-conflicts.) In this report, we present the shortest construction period and an effective method to put it into practice for the conventional general arrangement (GA) of ABWR. In the future, we will continue the study on the improvement of building configuration and arrangements, and make clear of the concept for large composite modules of building structures and equipment. (authors)

Hiroshi Ijichi; Toshio Yamashita; Masahiro Tsutagawa; Hiroya Mori [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Nobuaki Ooshima; Jun Miura [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan); Minoru Kanechika [Kajima Corporation (Japan); Nobuaki Miura [Shimizu Corporation (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geology of the Salt Creek area, Mason County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to the entrapment of. surface water in the fractures. GEOLXiBPBOLOGY The Salt Creek area in @aeon County, Texas is located on the southwestern flank of the Llano Uplift, a structural dome which has been reduced to a topographic basin by erosional processes.... STSUCT "SALCEOL00Y IIegional Structure The Llano region, which includes the Salt Creek area, is a structural dome which has been reduced to a topographic basin by erosional processes. The dose is roughly elliptical with a maximum diameter...

Harwood, William Eugene

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Purification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for the removal of hydrogen sulphide from gases or liquid hydrocarbons, comprises contacting the gas or liquid hydrocarbon with an aqueous alkaline solution, preferably having a pH value of 8 to 10, comprising (A) an anthraquinone disulphonic acid or a water-soluble sulphonamide thereof (B) a compound of a metal which can exist in at least two valency states and (C) a sequestering agent.

Marshall, A.

1981-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

263

Hydropyrolysis process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for producing a methane-enriched gas wherein a hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrogen-containing pyrolysis gas at an elevated temperature and pressure to produce a product gas mixture including methane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The improvement comprises passing the product gas mixture sequentially through a water-gas shift reaction zone and a gas separation zone to provide separate gas streams of methane and of a recycle gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane for recycle to the process. A controlled amount of steam also is provided which when combined with the recycle gas provides a pyrolysis gas for treatment of additional hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material. The amount of steam used and the conditions within the water-gas shift reaction zone and gas separation zone are controlled to obtain a steady-state composition of pyrolysis gas which will comprise hydrogen as the principal constituent and a minor amount of carbon monoxide, steam and methane so that no external source of hydrogen is needed to supply the hydrogen requirements of the process. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment, conditions are controlled such that there also is produced a significant quantity of benzene as a valuable coproduct.

Ullman, Alan Z. (Northridge, CA); Silverman, Jacob (Woodland Hills, CA); Friedman, Joseph (Huntington Beach, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

people. In the period from 2000 to 2008, the total manufacturing employment in the UK declined by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in manufacturing is a strength of the UK economy." >>> Photoshot "Dresden turned a green field into a semiconductorpeople. In the period from 2000 to 2008, the total manufacturing employment in the UK declined by 33%, from 4.1 m to 2.75 m jobs. In the areas of manufacturing dependent on physics, the decline

Crowther, Paul

265

A renewal theory approach to periodic copolymers with adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a general model of a heterogeneous polymer chain fluctuating in the proximity of an interface between two selective solvents. The heterogeneous character of the model comes from the fact that the monomer units interact with the solvents and with the interface according to some charges that they carry. The charges repeat themselves along the chain in a periodic fashion. The main question concerning this model is whether the polymer remains tightly close to the interface, a phenomenon called localization, or whether there is a marked preference for one of the two solvents, thus yielding a delocalization phenomenon. In this paper, we present an approach that yields sharp estimates for the partition function of the model in all regimes (localized, delocalized and critical). This, in turn, makes possible a precise pathwise description of the polymer measure, obtaining the full scaling limits of the model. A key point is the closeness of the polymer measure to suitable Markov renewal processes, Markov renewal theory being one of the central mathematical tools of our analysis.

Francesco Caravenna; Giambattista Giacomin; Lorenzo Zambotti

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

266

100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual,” requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet [ft]) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The conclusions of the optimization are found to be insensitive to all input parameters, the monetary value of the health detriment over a range of values from $200,000 to $15,000,000 per person-Sv, and the period of integration of collective dose. A 2.5 m (8.2 ft) closure cover at the Area 5 RWMS can meet all applicable regulatory requirements and maintain radionuclide releases ALARA.

Shott, Greg; Yucel, Vefa

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Measurements and modelling of atmospheric pollution over the Paris area: an overview of the ESQUIF Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dedicated to the study of the processes leading to air pollution events over the Paris area. The project, pollution levels in the Paris area due to concentrated activity have become a major health issue. CurrentMeasurements and modelling of atmospheric pollution over the Paris area: an overview of the ESQUIF

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

269

Apparatus and method for selective area deposition of thin films on electrically biased substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion beam deposition process for selective area deposition on a polarized substrate uses a potential applied to the substrate which allows the ionized particles to reach into selected areas for film deposition. Areas of the substrate to be left uncoated are held at a potential that repells the ionized particles.

Zuhr, Raymond A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Tony E. (Knoxville, TN); Golanski, Andrzej (Le Cheylas, FR)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Adjoint-based method for supersonic aircraft design using equivalent area distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adjoint-based method for supersonic aircraft design using equivalent area distributions Francisco for the design of supersonic aircraft that must match a target equivalent area distribution at constant lift of an adjoint solver for the equivalent area distribution, and the shape design process of a trijet supersonic

Alonso, Juan J.

271

Apparatus and method for selective area deposition of thin films on electrically biased substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion beam deposition process for selective area deposition on a polarized substrate uses a potential applied to the substrate which allows the ionized particles to reach into selected areas for film deposition. Areas of the substrate to be left uncoated are held at a potential that repels the ionized particles. 3 figs.

Zuhr, R.A.; Haynes, T.E.; Golanski, A.

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

272

100-N Area Decision Unit Target Analyte List Development for Soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the process used to identify source area target analytes in support of the 100-N Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) addendum to the Integrated 100 Area Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan (DOE/RL-2008-46, Rev. 0).

Ovink, R.

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

273

Plutonium focus area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Monolith electroplating process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electroplating process for preparing a monolith metal layer over a polycrystalline base metal and the plated monolith product. A monolith layer has a variable thickness of one crystal. The process is typically carried in molten salts electrolytes, such as the halide salts under an inert atmosphere at an elevated temperature, and over deposition time periods and film thickness sufficient to sinter and recrystallize completely the nucleating metal particles into one single crystal or crystals having very large grains. In the process, a close-packed film of submicron particle (20) is formed on a suitable substrate at an elevated temperature. The temperature has the significance of annealing particles as they are formed, and substrates on which the particles can populate are desirable. As the packed bed thickens, the submicron particles develop necks (21) and as they merge into each other shrinkage (22) occurs. Then as micropores also close (23) by surface tension, metal density is reached and the film consists of unstable metal grain (24) that at high enough temperature recrystallize (25) and recrystallized grains grow into an annealed single crystal over the electroplating time span. While cadmium was used in the experimental work, other soft metals may be used.

Agarrwal, Rajev R. (1410 S. Busse Rd., 2K, Mt. Prospect, IL 60056)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2006-2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 07 contract period October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was significant positive changes in the vegetative community in several wetland basins throughout the wildlife area. This major goal is being achieved in part by new equipment and operation capability funded under the BPA contract, state capital and migratory bird stamp funds, and the past or ongoing investment of other partners including Ducks Unlimited, The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Clark Public Utilities and others. We continue to be challenged by requirements under the archaeological and historic preservation act necessary to protect many sensitive sites known to occur within the wildlife area. The problems encountered to date have been largely administrative in nature and those experienced this year were unforeseen and probably unavoidable. Early in the contract period, WDFW and BPA had agreed to have a BPA staff archaeologist perform the survey and reporting work. Unexpectedly, just prior to the expected start date for the surveys, the employee resigned leaving BPA's staff short handed and necessitated contracting the work with an archaeological consultant. This delay caused us to forego work on several projects that are now deferred until the next contract period. The most notable projects impacted by this unfortunate circumstance are those involving the construction or repair of fences.

Calkins, Brian

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Decision making process and factors routing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research studies the decision-making process and the factors that affect truck routing. The data collection involved intercept interviews with truck drivers at three rest area and truck stops along major highways in ...

Sun, Yichen, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

Persinger, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Can Bohmian trajectories account for quantum recurrences having classical periodicities?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum systems in specific regimes display recurrences at the period of the periodic orbits of the corresponding classical system. We investigate the excited hydrogen atom in a magnetic field -- a prototypical system of 'quantum chaos' -- from the point of view of the de Broglie Bohm (BB) interpretation of quantum mechanics. The trajectories predicted by BB theory are computed and contrasted with the time evolution of the wavefunction, which shows pronounced features at times matching the period of closed orbits of the classical hydrogen in a magnetic field problem. Individual BB trajectories do not possess these periodicities and cannot account for the quantum recurrences. These recurrences can however be explained by BB theory by considering the ensemble of trajectories compatible with an initial statistical distribution, although none of the trajectories of the ensemble are periodic, rendering unclear the dynamical origin of the classical periodicities.

A. Matzkin

2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Tracking multiple generation and suppression of secondary electrons on periodic triangular surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To research the dynamic course of multipactor suppression on the periodically patterned surface, tens of electron collision processes are tracked by numerical calculation. The influences of microwave frequency, amplitude of RF electric field, slope angle, the local field enhancement, and the tilted incident electric field on the multipactor suppression are studied by tracking multi-generation electrons' trajectories, hopping and flight time, collision energy, and secondary emission yield. Meanwhile, the dynamic processes of secondary electrons on the periodic surface are analyzed by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The PIC results are consistent with the analytical results in which the electrons fly reciprocatingly between the slopes and impact on the slopes; the methods of increasing the slope angle, enlarging the RF field, and lowering the frequency in a certain range are helpful to enhance the multipactor suppression steadily and persistently.

Li, S.; Wang, J. G.; Zhu, M.; Peng, J. C.; Xie, J. L.; Wu, X. L.; Guo, L. T. [Laboratory on Science and Technology of High Power Microwave, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China)] [Laboratory on Science and Technology of High Power Microwave, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); Chang, C.; Xiong, Z. F. [Laboratory on Science and Technology of High Power Microwave, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China) [Laboratory on Science and Technology of High Power Microwave, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Green's function analysis of periodic structures in computational electromagnetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the two-dimensional periodic Green's function," IEEE Trans.evaluation of the Green's function for the Helmholtzrepresentations of certain Green's functions," J. Comp.

Van Orden, Derek

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

EIS-0250: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV...

283

EIS-0369: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting Supplemental Yucca Mountain Rail Corridor and Rail Alignment The Department of Energy is now announcing...

284

Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended to May 31, 2013 Draft ULPEIS comment extension community notification041813 (3).pdf More Documents & Publications...

285

Guidance on the Required Period for Grantees to Obligate Funds...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Funds and the Procedures for Reporting of Obligated Funds for the Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program Guidance on the Required Period for Grantees to...

286

EIS-0431: Extension of Public Comment Period | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Comment Period Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle and Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project, CA The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published...

287

Quality of Monitoring of Stochastic Events by Periodic and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be periodically turned off to conserve energy, thereby ... such as chemical, biological, nuclear, radiational, .... ited/offset by the latency and energy costs of turn-.

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

288

CV evolution: AM Her binaries and the period gap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AM Her variables -- synchronised magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) -- exhibit a different period distribution from other CVs across the period gap. We show that non-AM Her systems may infiltrate the longer-period end of the period gap if they are metal-deficient, but that the position and width of the gap in orbital period is otherwise insensitive to other binary parameters (excepting the normalisation of the braking rate). In AM Her binaries, magnetic braking is reduced as the wind from the secondary star may be trapped within the magnetosphere of the white dwarf primary. This reduced braking fills the period gap from its short-period end as the dipole magnetic moment of the white dwarf increases. The consistency of these models with the observed distribution of CVs, both AM Her and non-AM Her type, provides compelling evidence supporting magnetic braking as the agent of angular momentum loss among long-period CVs, and its disruption as the explanation of the 2 - 3 hour period gap among nonmagnetic CVs.

R. F. Webbink; D. T. Wickramasinghe

2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

289

Biomolecular committor probability calculation enabled by processing in network storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-processing frameworks such as SETI@home [2] and Folding@home [3] have been successfully mapped to wide-area resources

Izaguirre, JesĂşs A.

290

Oligomerization process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Etherification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

SRP engineering and design history, Vol III, 200 F and H Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume combines the record of events relating to the development of design for both the 200-F and H Areas. Chronologically, the definition of plant facilities was first established for the 200-F Area. The second area, 200-H, was projected initially to be a supplementary plutonium separations facility. This history explains the differences in character and capacity of the manufacturing facilities in both areas as production requirements and experience with separations processes advanced.

Banick, C.J.

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

293

Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1995, through March 31, 1997. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program in support of Department of Energy science and technology missions. The report includes brief summaries of research activities in condensed matter theory, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. An addendum includes listings of division publications and professional activities.

Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc weld-surfacing process Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Summary: including arc processes, laser, electron beam, and friction stir welding. Surface modification of alloys... areas: Alloy Design, Production and Processing ...

295

Advanced quadratures and periodic boundary conditions in parallel 3D S{sub n} transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant updates in numerical quadratures have warranted investigation with 3D Sn discrete ordinates transport. We show new applications of quadrature departing from level symmetric (S{sub 2}o). investigating 3 recently developed quadratures: Even-Odd (EO), Linear-Discontinuous Finite Element - Surface Area (LDFE-SA), and the non-symmetric Icosahedral Quadrature (IC). We discuss implementation changes to 3D Sn codes (applied to Hybrid MOC-Sn TITAN and 3D parallel PENTRAN) that can be performed to accommodate Icosahedral Quadrature, as this quadrature is not 90-degree rotation invariant. In particular, as demonstrated using PENTRAN, the properties of Icosahedral Quadrature are suitable for trivial application using periodic BCs versus that of reflective BCs. In addition to implementing periodic BCs for 3D Sn PENTRAN, we implemented a technique termed 'angular re-sweep' which properly conditions periodic BCs for outer eigenvalue iterative loop convergence. As demonstrated by two simple transport problems (3-group fixed source and 3-group reflected/periodic eigenvalue pin cell), we remark that all of the quadratures we investigated are generally superior to level symmetric quadrature, with Icosahedral Quadrature performing the most efficiently for problems tested. (authors)

Manalo, K.; Yi, C.; Huang, M.; Sjoden, G. [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 770 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2005 to December 31, 2005 which covers the third six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse continued to obtain additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in the last reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has obtained raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (C{sub d}/m) information for several biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated in the last reporting period. Preliminary results of the mean mass and the shape data obtained are reported here, and more data collection is in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment FY 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the Tanks Focus Area (TFA's) process of collecting, analyzing, and responding to high-level radioactive tank waste science and technology needs developed from across the DOE complex in FY 2000. The document also summarizes each science and technology need, and provides an initial prioritization of TFA's projected work scope for FY 2001 and FY 2002.

Allen, Robert W.

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

Ark-Tex Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KFH GROUP, INC. ARK-TEX AREA REGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN Developed for: ARK-TEX COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS By: KFH Group, Incorporated In Association with: Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.................................................................................................................................1 PLAN PROCESS .............................................................................................................................2 REVIEW OF EXISTING SERVICES...

Ark-Tex Council of Governments

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Biosphere Process Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor. Collectively, the potential human receptor and exposure pathways form the biosphere model. More detailed technical information and data about potential human receptor groups and the characteristics of exposure pathways have been developed in a series of AMRs and Calculation Reports.

J. Schmitt

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

HTGR Generic Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the second half of FY-80. It covers a period when the design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of an overall review. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have continued so as to provide the basic technology required for all HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop an LEU fuel and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbines and process heat plants.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

Howard, T.C.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

304

Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Montana Natural Areas Act of 1974 provides for the designation and establishment of a system of natural areas in order to preserve the natural ecosystems of these areas. Designated natural...

305

Ground-water hydrology of the Panther Junction area of Big Bend National Park, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of accumulated departure to zero following a drought indicates that the annual precipitation during the wet period has mostly been greater than the annual mean. Unfortunately, the length of the precipitation record makes it difficult to assess the frequency... and duration of droughts and wet periods in the area. Daily Precipitation Daily precipitation data recorded at each gauge in the temporary rain gauge network was plotted as a series of bar graphs; the bar graphs are shown in Figures 7 through 10...

Gibson, John Lawrence

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Innovation investment area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hydroetching of high surface area ceramics using moist supercritical fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aerogels having a high density of hydroxyl groups and a more uniform pore size with fewer bottlenecks are described. The aerogel is exposed to a mixture of a supercritical fluid and water, whereupon the aerogel forms a high density of hydroxyl groups. The process also relaxes the aerogel into a more open uniform internal structure, in a process referred to as hydroetching. The hydroetching process removes bottlenecks from the aerogels, and forms the hydrogels into more standard pore sizes while preserving their high surface area.

Fryxell, Glen; Zemanian, Thomas S.

2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Dual periodicities in the rotational modulation of Saturn narrowband emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dual periodicities in the rotational modulation of Saturn narrowband emissions S.Y. Ye,1 D. A emissions is examined, restricting the spacecraft location to either the northern or the southern hemisphere of Saturn. It is found that in both hemispheres, the modulation period of 5 kHz narrowband emissions has two

Gurnett, Donald A.

309

Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

Harrison, Neil (Santa Fe, NM); Singleton, John (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

310

Another look at periodic wavelets Brody Dylan Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Another look at periodic wavelets Brody Dylan Johnson St. Louis University 16 May 2009 Brody Dylan Johnson (St. Louis University) Another look at periodic wavelets 16 May 2009 1 / 31 #12;Overview Overview. (see, e.g., the texts of Meyer and Daubechies) Brody Dylan Johnson (St. Louis University) Another look

Johnson, Brody Dylan

311

Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell aggregates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell aggregates MICHAEL R. GUEVARA, ALVIN GUEVARA,MICHAEL R., ALVIN SHRIER,ANDLEONGLASS. Phase-locked rhythms in periodically stimulated heart cell, THE SINOATRIAL NODE acts as the pace- maker of the heart. As a result of the orderly spread of excitation

Glass, Leon

312

Insecticides and my Osmia cornifrons Nesting Container Nesting Period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insecticides and my Osmia cornifrons Nesting Container Nesting Period The Osmia cornifrons nesting male offspring. The end caps of nesting tubes made by older females are thin and weak, and they tend to break easily. In addition, near the end of the nesting period the numbers of parasites and predators

313

TIME-PERIODIC SOUND WAVE PROPAGATION COMPRESSIBLE EULER EQUATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A PARADIGM FOR TIME-PERIODIC SOUND WAVE PROPAGATION IN THE COMPRESSIBLE EULER EQUATIONS BLAKE consistent with time-periodic sound wave propagation in the 3 Ă? 3 nonlinear compressible Euler equations description of shock-free waves that propagate through an oscillating entropy field without breaking or dis

314

RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs.

Wang, J.W.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

316

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Latera area, Tuscany, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

317

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hvalfjordur Fjord area, re: Heat flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

318

Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma Chickasaw National Recreational Area, Chickasaw, Oklahoma Photo of Comfort Station at the Chickasaw National Recreation...

319

On the Mass-Period Correlation of the Extrasolar Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a possible correlation between the masses and periods of the extrasolar planets, manifested as a paucity of massive planets with short orbital periods. Monte-Carlo simulations show the effect is significant, and is not solely due to an observational selection effect. We also show the effect is stronger than the one already implied by published models that assumed independent power-law distributions for the masses and periods of the extrasolar planets. Planets found in binary stellar systems may have an opposite correlation. The difference is highly significant despite the small number of planets in binary systems. We discuss the paucity of short-period massive planets in terms of some theories for the close-in giant planets. Almost all models can account for the deficit of massive planets with short periods, in particular the model that assumes migration driven by a planet-disk interaction, if the planet masses do not scale with their disk masses.

Shay Zucker; Tsevi Mazeh

2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 110625A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that emit photons at GeV energies form a small but significant population of GRBs. However, the number of GRBs whose GeV-emitting period is simultaneously observed in X-rays remains small. We report {gamma}-ray observations of GRB 110625A using Fermi's Large Area Telescope in the energy range 100 MeV-20 GeV. Gamma-ray emission at these energies was clearly detected using data taken between 180 s and 580 s after the burst, an epoch after the prompt emission phase. The GeV light curve differs from a simple power-law decay, and probably consists of two emission periods. Simultaneous Swift X-Ray Telescope observations did not show flaring behaviors as in the case of GRB 100728A. We discuss the possibility that the GeV emission is the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of underlying ultraviolet flares.

Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fan Yizhong, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy conservation guide for industrial processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Th Energy Conservation Guide for industrial processes has simple instructions to survey energy use areas at Navy industrial activities like shipyards, Naval air rework facilities and government owned, contractor operated (GOCO) plants. This guide includes information and procedures on: organizing and conducting an industrial energy survey; evaluating purchased energy data; descriptions of industrial systems; and evaluation of industrial processes for conservation.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

5, 55855614, 2005 Processing of soot in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Processing of soot in an urban environment: case study from the Mexico City Metropolitan Area K. S state in a polluted urban environment, particles of diameter 0.2­2.0 µm were collected in the Mexico lubricating oil and water, ambient soot particles which have been processed for less than a few hours

Boyer, Edmond

323

RHIC | New Areas of Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 MediaBrookhavenBlackA New Area of

324

History of 100-B Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial three production reactors and their support facilities were designated as the 100-B, 100-D, and 100-F areas. In subsequent years, six additional plutonium-producing reactors were constructed and operated at the Hanford Site. Among them was one dual-purpose reactor (100-N) designed to supply steam for the production of electricity as a by-product. Figure 1 pinpoints the location of each of the nine Hanford Site reactors along the Columbia River. This report documents a brief description of the 105-B reactor, support facilities, and significant events that are considered to be of historical interest. 21 figs.

Wahlen, R.K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Surrounding Area Restaurants...Hungry  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof theRestoration at Young -Final»EnergySupportSurrounding Area

326

Resource Areas of Texas: Land.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prairie (Coastal ~~~(l), soils are less acid and some are calcareous. Main series: lrictoria, Orelia, Clareville. ~ight, acid sands and darker, loamy to clayey soils-some $;dine and sodic-lie in a narrow band along the coast. Main aeries: Harris...). Mai series: Truce, Waurika, Brown, moderately deep 11 shallow, calcareous, clay1 a1 oils are alg common. Main series: (: 1 to alk nts; somt Bonti. ey soils >wens. over sh Bottomlands-minor areas or brown to clam gray, loam1 1 Main senes 3...

Godfrey, Curtis L.; Carter, Clarence R.; McKee, Gordon S.

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Carlsbad Area Office strategic plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This edition of the Carlsbad Area Office Strategic Plan captures the U.S. Department of Energy`s new focus, and supercedes the edition issued previously in 1995. This revision reflects a revised strategy designed to demonstrate compliance with environmental regulations earlier than the previous course of action; and a focus on the selected combination of scientific investigations, engineered alternatives, and waste acceptance criteria for supporting the compliance applications. An overview of operations and historical aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico is presented.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Faculty Areas of Expertise Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; health and usage monitoring systems; damage detection methodology for application to drive system (gears microscopy of biological cells and tissue Judith Todd Engineering Science and Mechanics integrity of coatings, multiscale wave-material interactions, laser processing of coatings, pressure vessel applications

329

Shale oil recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing within a subterranean oil shale deposit a retort chamber containing permeable fragmented material wherein a series of explosive charges are emplaced in the deposit in a particular configuration comprising an initiating round which functions to produce an upward flexure of the overburden and to initiate fragmentation of the oil shale within the area of the retort chamber to be formed, the initiating round being followed in a predetermined time sequence by retreating lines of emplaced charges developing further fragmentation within the retort zone and continued lateral upward flexure of the overburden. The initiating round is characterized by a plurality of 5-spot patterns and the retreating lines of charges are positioned and fired along zigzag lines generally forming retreating rows of W's. Particular time delays in the firing of successive charges are disclosed.

Zerga, Daniel P. (Concord, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Aluminum powder metallurgy processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

Flumerfelt, J.F.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

331

Planar resonant periodic orbits in Kuiper belt dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the planar restricted three body problem we study a considerable number of resonances associated to the Kuiper Belt dynamics and located between 30 and 48 a.u. Our study is based on the computation of resonant periodic orbits and their stability. Stable periodic orbits are surrounded by regular librations in phase space and in such domains the capture of trans-Neptunian object is possible. All the periodic orbits found are symmetric and there is evidence for the existence of asymmetric ones only in few cases. In the present work first, second and third order resonances are under consideration. In the planar circular case we found that most of the periodic orbits are stable. The families of periodic orbits are temporarily interrupted by collisions but they continue up to relatively large values of the Jacobi constant and highly eccentric regular motion exists for all cases. In the elliptic problem and for a particular eccentricity value of the primary bodies the periodic orbits are isolated. The corresponding families, where they belong to, bifurcate from specific periodic orbits of the circular problem and seem to continue up to the rectilinear problem. Both stable and unstable orbits are obtained for each case. In the elliptic problem the unstable orbits found are associated with narrow chaotic domains in phase space. The evolution of the orbits, which are located in such chaotic domains, seems to be practically regular and bounded for long time intervals.

George Voyatzis; Thomas Kotoulas

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

332

Infiltration Testing of Homes in the Houston Gulf Coast Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that is displaced by outside a% in a 1 hour period. The Manual J Load Calculation Handbook 1.1) specifies ACH values n a 2000 square foot home from .2 to 1.8. Load calculations based on Manual J procedures on a home of 1800 square feet in the Houston, Texas... area show that when ACH is .7 (average new home), infiltration becomes a significaht contributor to heatin (20%) and air conditionyng (34% ) loads. Additionally, when the 1800 square foot home has an ACH of 1.5 (average existin home...

Howel, E. S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

334

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objectives of the proposed study were to: 1.) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100 Area spill sites; 2.) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of i.) macroscopic leaching studies and ii.) microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3.) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone. In addressing these objectives, additional benefits accrued were: (1) a fuller understanding of Cr(VI) entrained in the vadose zone that will that can be utilized in modeling potential Cr(VI) source terms, and (2) accelerating the Columbia River 100 Area corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of macroscopic column experiments were conducted with contaminated and uncontaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns in aged and freshly contaminated sediments, evaluate the transport characteristics of dichromate liquid retrieved from old pipelines of the 100 Area; and estimate the effect of strongly reducing liquid on the reduction and transport of Cr(VI). Column experiments used the < 2 mm fraction of the sediment samples and simulated Hanford groundwater solution. Periodic stop-flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. The results were fit using a two-site, one dimensional reactive transport model. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using an array of microscale techniques such as XRD, SEM, EDS, XPS, XMP, and XANES. The following are important conclusions and implications. Results from column experiments indicated that most of contaminant Cr travels fast through the sediments and appears as Cr(VI) in the effluents. The significance of this for groundwater concentrations would, however, depend on the mass flux of recharge to the water table. adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments from spiked Cr(VI) solution is low; calculated retardation coefficients are close to one. Calcium polysulfide solutions readily reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in column experiments. However a significant amount of the Cr(VI) was mobilized ahead of the polysulfide solution front. This has significant implications for in-situ reductive remediation techniques. The experiments suggest that it would be difficult to design a remedial measure using infiltration of liquid phase reductants without increasing transport of Cr(VI) toward the water table. The microscopic characterization results are consistent with the column studies. Cr(VI) is found as ubiquitous coatings on sediment grain surfaces. Small, higher concentration, chromium sites are associated with secondary clay mineral inclusions, with occasional barium chromate minerals, and reduced to Cr(III) in association with iron oxides that are most likely magnetite primary minerals. Within the restricted access domains of sediment matrix, ferrous iron could also diffuse from in situ, high-surface-area minerals to cause the reductive immobilization of chromate. This process may be favored at microscale geochemical zones where ferrous iron could be supplied. Once nucleated, micrometer-scale precipitates are favored as growing locales for further accumulation, causing the formation of discrete zones of Cr(III).

Dresel, P. Evan; Qafoku, Nikolla; McKinley, James P.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Ilton, Eugene S.; Phillips, J. L.

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

1985-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Structured wafer for device processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

337

Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. This research effort was enhanced by new capabilities in atomic-scale materials characterization, new emphasis on the synthesis and processing of materials, and increased partnering with industry and universities. The theoretical effort included a broad range of analytical studies, as well as a new emphasis on numerical simulation stimulated by advances in high-performance computing and by strong interest in related division experimental programs. Superconductivity research continued to advance on a broad front from fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity to the development of new materials and processing techniques. The Neutron Scattering Program was characterized by a strong scientific user program and growing diversity represented by new initiatives in complex fluids and residual stress. The national emphasis on materials synthesis and processing was mirrored in division research programs in thin-film processing, surface modification, and crystal growth. Research on advanced processing techniques such as laser ablation, ion implantation, and plasma processing was complemented by strong programs in the characterization of materials and surfaces including ultrahigh resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic-resolution chemical analysis, synchrotron x-ray research, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A study of offshore benthic communities in natural areas and in areas affected by dredging and dredged material disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

period not less than 24 hours, the remaining organisms were picked out. This 16 technique is similar to that used by Day et a'L. (1971) and has been found to greatly reduce the amount of time necessary for this tedious operation. The organisms... was computed to compare those sites (= stations) affected by dredged material disposal and dredging with the sites in the natural areas. Conversions for the box core and van Veen data to number of individuals/m are as follows: 1. catch/box core x 16 = indiv...

Henry, Clyde Allan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Is the apparent period-doubling in Blazhko stars actually an illusion?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is known that the light curves of many Blazhko stars exhibit intervals in which successive pulsation maxima alternate between two levels in a way that is characteristic of period-doubling. In addition, hydrodynamical models of these stars have clearly demonstrated period-doubling bifurcations. As a result, it is now generally accepted that these stars do indeed exhibit period-doubling. Here we present strong evidence that this assumption is incorrect. The alternating peak heights likely result from the presence of one or more near-resonant modes which appear in the stellar spectra and are significantly offset from 3/2 times the fundamental frequency. A previous explanation for the presence of these peaks is shown to be inadequate. The phase-slip of the dominant near-resonant peak in RR Lyr is shown to be fully correlated with the parity of the observed alternations, providing further strong evidence that the process is nonresonant and cannot be characterized as period-doubling. The dominant near-resonant p...

Bryant, Paul H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Epitaxial electrodeposition of freestanding large area single crystal substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on a method for producing freestanding single crystal metal films over large areas using electrodeposition and selective etching. The method can be turned into an inexpensive continuous process for making long ribbons or a large area of single crystal films. Results from a 5x5 mm{sup 2} Ni single crystal film using electron backscattering pattern pole figures and x-ray diffraction demonstrate that the quality of material produced is equivalent to the initial substrate without annealing or polishing.

Shin, Jae Wook; Standley, Adam; Chason, Eric [Brown University, Box D, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

342

Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Quigley, Gerard P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period March--August 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period October--December 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities of DOE's Oil Implementation Task Force for the period March--August 1991 are reviewed. Contracts for fields projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery are discussed, with a list of related publications given. Enhanced recovery processes covered include chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, and microbial recovery.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Optimization models for improving periodic maintenance schedules by utilizing opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to this as preventive maintenance activities at an oppor- tunity. The original opportunistic replacement problemOptimization models for improving periodic maintenance schedules by utilizing opportunities Torgny of Technology Abstract We present mathematical models for finding optimal opportunistic maintenance schedules

Patriksson, Michael

345

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

FY2011 FY2012 Fee Information Minimum Fee Maximum Fee September 2014 Contract Number: Cost Plus Incentive Fee Contractor: 3,260,603,765 Contract Period: EM Contractor Fee Site:...

346

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Wastren-EnergX Mission Support LLC Contract Number: DE-CI0000004 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 128,879,762 Contract Period: December 2009 - July 2015 Fee Information...

347

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- September 2015 September 2014 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Idaho Treatment Group LLC DE-EM0001467 Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Information 444,161,295 Contract Period:...

348

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Cumulative Fee Paid 22,200,285 Wackenhut Services, Inc. DE-AC30-10CC60025 Contractor: Cost Plus Award Fee 989,000,000 Contract Period: Contract Type: January 2010 - December...

349

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Number: Contract Type: Contract Period: 0 Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Washington River Protection Solutions LLC DE-AC27-08RV14800 Cost Plus Award Fee 5,553,789,617 Fee Information...

350

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

& Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number: DE-AC30-11CC40015 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Available 4,324,912 408,822,369 Contract Period: December 2010 -...

351

Variable Selection and Inference for Multi-period Forecasting Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variable Selection and Inference for Multi-period Forecasting Problems? M. Hashem Pesaran Cambridge University and USC Andreas Pick De Nederlandsche Bank and Cambridge University, CIMF Allan Timmermann UC San Diego and CREATES January 26, 2009...

Pesaran, M Hashem; Pick, Andreas; Timmermann, Allan

352

Dynamic Scheduling of Skippable Periodic Tasks: Issues and Proposals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Chetto and Audrey Marchand IRCCyN, University of Nantes, Nantes, FRANCE Email: {maryline.chetto, audrey.marchand Scheduling of Skippable Periodic Tasks in Weakly-Hard Real-Time Systems," by M. Silly-Chetto, and A. Marchand

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

activity rules periodic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WITH PERIODIC ACTIVE THERMAL IMAGING Physics Websites Summary: methods where the thermal evolution of a scene is recorded while some external time varying energyIMPACT OF A LOSSY...

354

Periodic solutions of Schrodinger equation in Hilbert space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Necessary and sufficient conditions for existence of boundary value problem of Schrodinger equation are obtained in linear and nonlinear cases. Periodic analytical solutions are represented using generalized Green's operator

A. A. Boichuk; A. A. Pokutnyi

2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

CEQ Extends Comment Period on Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

draft guidance on consideration of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of climate change in NEPA reviews. The comment period now ends on March 25, 2015. The revised...

356

Thermal equilibrium theory of periodically focused charged-particle beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A thermal equilibrium theory of periodically focused charged-particle beams is presented in the framework of both warm-fluid and kinetic descriptions. In particular, the thermal beam equilibria are discussed for paraxial ...

Samokhvalova, Ksenia R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Microsoft Word - DOE News Release - Public Comment Period Extended...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Period on Proposed Cleanup Plans Extended 60 Days On Oct. 31, 2014 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released two formal Proposed Plans for the decontamination and...

358

Wave propagation in periodic lattices with defects of smaller dimension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The procedure of evaluating of the spectrum for discrete periodic operators perturbed by operators of smaller dimensions is obtained. This result allows to obtain propagative, guided, localised spectra for different kind of physical operators on graphs with defects.

A. A. Kutsenko

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

Short-period seismic rotations and translations recorded by Rotaphone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-period Rotaphone records of events induced by natural and/or anthropogenic sources 31 5.1 Records of quarry blasts Rotation to translation relations 39 7 The problem of seismic translational components being contaminated

Cerveny, Vlastislav

360

Differential Wiener process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stochastic Processes Will Penny Stochastic Differential Equations Wiener process Sample Paths OU Process Stochastic Chain Rule Change of variables Time-varying functions Multivariate SDE Expectations Wiener Process OU Process Neural Population Fitzhugh Nagumo Gaussian approximation FN Population Fokker

Penny, Will

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Realtime controller tuning for periodic disturbance rejection with application to active noise control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

de Callafon. Scheduling control for periodic disturbance at-de Callafon, “Scheduling Control for Periodic DisturbanceR.A. de Callafon, “Scheduling Control for Periodic Distur-

Kinney, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

An Autonomous Adaptive Scheduling Agent for Period Searching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the design and implementation of an autonomous adaptive software agent that addresses the practical problem of observing undersampled, periodic, time-varying phenomena using a network of HTN-compliant robotic telescopes. The algorithm governing the behaviour of the agent uses an optimal geometric sampling technique to cover the period range of interest, but additionally implements proactive behaviour that maximises the optimality of the dataset in the face of an uncertain and changing operating environment.

Eric S. Saunders; Tim Naylor; Alasdair Allan

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

363

Ultrasonic wave propagation in random and periodic particulate composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ULTRASONIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN RANDOM AND PERIODIC PARTICULATE COMPOSITES A Thesis by BENJAMIN KYLE HENDERSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilltnent of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1996 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering ULTRASONIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN RANDOM AND PERIODIC PARTICULATE COMPOSITES A Thesis by BENJAMIN KYLE HENDERSON Submitted to Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment...

Henderson, Benjamin Kyle

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Investigation of the spontaneous lateral modulation in short-period superlattices by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of spontaneous lateral composition modulation in short-period InAs/AlAs superlattices has been investigated by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. We have developed a theoretical description of x-ray scattering from laterally modulated structures that makes it possible to determine the lateral composition modulation directly without assuming any structure model. From experimental intensity distributions in reciprocal space we have determined the amplitudes of the modulation and its degree of periodicity and their dependence on the number of superlattice periods. From the data it follows that the modulation process cannot be explained by bunching of monolayer steps and most likely, it is caused by stress-driven morphological instabilities of the growing surface.

Moss, Simon C. (University of Houston, Houston, TX); Holy, Vaclav (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic); Reno, John Louis; Krause, B. (ESRF, Grenoble, France); Norman, Andrew G. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Mikulik, P. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Caha, O. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Mascarenhas, Angelo (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Observations of long period earthquakes accompanying hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waveforms of most seismic events accompanying hydraulic fracturing have been reported to contain clear P and S waves and have fault plane solutions consistent with shear displacement across a fault. This observation is surprising since classical hydraulic fracturing theory predicts the creation of a tensile opening of a cavity in response to fluid pressure. Very small long period events, similar to long period earthquakes observed at volcanoes, were found to occur during four hydraulic fracturing experiments carried out at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Since the long period earthquakes occur in the same region as the shear type events, it is concluded that the unusual character of the long period earthquake waveforms is due to a source effect and not a path effect. The occurrence of long period earthquakes during hydraulic fracturing could indicate tensile fracturing. Many waveforms of these events are identical, which implies that these events represent repeated activation of a given source. A proposed source for these long period events is the sudden opening of a channel that connects two cracks filled with fluid at different pressures. The sizes of the two cracks differ, which causes two or more peaks to appear in the spectra, each peak being associated with one physical dimension of each crack. From the frequencies at which spectral peaks occur, crack lengths are estimated to be between 3 and 20m.

Bame, D.; Fehler, M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Prominence seismology using the period ratio of transverse thread oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ratio of the period of the fundamental mode to that of the first overtone of kink oscillations, from here on the "period ratio", is a seismology tool that can be used to infer information about the spatial variation of density along solar magnetic flux tubes. The period ratio is 2 in longitudinally homogeneous thin tubes, but it differs from 2 due to longitudinal inhomogeneity. In this paper we investigate the period ratio in longitudinally inhomogeneous prominence threads and explore its implications for prominence seismology. We numerically solve the two-dimensional eigenvalue problem of kink oscillations in a model of a prominence thread. We take into account three nonuniform density profiles along the thread. In agreement with previous works that used simple piecewise constant density profiles, we find that the period ratio is larger than 2 in prominence threads. When the ratio of the central density to that at the footpoints is fixed, the period ratio depends strongly on the form of the density profi...

Soler, R; Ballester, J L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Curious Variables Experiment (CURVE). Three Periodicities of BF Ara  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report CCD photometry of the dwarf nova BF Ara throughout fifteen consecutive nights in quiescence. Light curve in this interval is dominated by a large amplitude around 0.8 mag modulation consisting two periods. Higher amplitude signal is characterized by period of 0.082159(4) days, which was increasing at the rate of dotP/Psh = 3.8(3)* 10^{-5}. Weaker and stable signal has period of 0.084176(21) days. Knowing the superhump period of BF Ara determined by Kato et al. (2003) and equal to 0.08797(1) days, the first modulation is interpreted as quiescent negative superhump arising from retrograde precesion of titled accretion disk and the latter one as an orbital period of the binary. The respective period excess and defect are epsilon_+ = 4.51% +/- 0.03% and epsilon_- = -2.44% +/- 0.02%. Thus BF Ara is yet another in-the-gap nova with mass ratio q of around 0.21.

A. Olech; A. Rutkowski; A. Schwarzenberg-Czerny

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

368

The development of an integrated multistaged fluid bed retorting process. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis (shale oil production), gasification (synthesis gas production), and combustion of the spent oil shale for process heat. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The work completed this year involved several different areas. Basic studies of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors were carried out in fluidized and fixed bed reactors using both freshly generated shale oil vapors and model compounds. The design and fabrication of the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II reactor was completed and installation of the process components was initiated. The raw oil shale sample (Cleveland Member from Montgomery County, Kentucky) for the program was mined, prepared, characterized and stored. A preliminary study of KENTORT II-derived oil for possible paving applications was completed, and it was concluded that the shale exhibits acceptable properties as an asphalt recycling agent.

Carter, S.; Vego, A.; Stehn, J.; Taulbee, D.; Robl, T.; Hower, J.; Mahboub, K.; Robertson, R.; Hornsberger, P.; Oduroh, P.; Simpson, A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Geometrical investigation of the kinetic evolution of the magnetic field in a periodic flux rope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flux ropes are bundles of magnetic field wrapped around an axis. Many laboratory, space, and astrophysics processes can be represented using this idealized concept. Here, a massively parallel 3D kinetic simulation of a periodic flux rope undergoing the kink instability is studied. The focus is on the topology of the magnetic field and its geometric structures. The analysis considers various techniques such as Poincaré maps and the quasi-separatrix layer (QSL). These are used to highlight regions with expansion or compression and changes in the connectivity of magnetic field lines and consequently to outline regions where heating and current may be generated due to magnetic reconnection. The present study is, to our knowledge, the first QSL analysis of a fully kinetic 3D particle in cell simulation and focuses the existing QSL method of analysis to periodic systems.

Restante, A. L.; Lapenta, G. [Afdeling Plasma-astrofysica, Departement Wiskunde, KULeuven, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Afdeling Plasma-astrofysica, Departement Wiskunde, KULeuven, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Markidis, S. [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Intrator, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M.S. E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M.S. E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

2010 Groundwater Monitoring Report Central Nevada Test Area, Corrective Action Unit 443  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 2010 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of CNTA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management to LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 443 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. The corrective action strategy for the site includes proof-of-concept monitoring in support of site closure. This report summarizes investigation activities associated with CAU 443 that were conducted at the site from December 2009 through December 2010. It also represents the second year of the enhanced monitoring network and the 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period that is intended to validate the compliance boundary

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

2009 Groundwater Monitoring Report Central Nevada Test Area, Corrective Action Unit 443  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 2009 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of CNTA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management to LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 443 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. The corrective action strategy for the site includes proof-of-concept monitoring in support of site closure. This report summarizes investigation activities associated with CAU 443 that were conducted at the site from October 2008 through December 2009. It also represents the first year of the enhanced monitoring network and begins the new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period that is intended to validate the compliance boundary

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2004-2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 05 contract period October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was completion of the water system that will provide water to wetland basins within the Vancouver Lake Unit and three independent basins on adjoining Clark County owned lands. The water system paid for by Clark Public Utilities was designed and built under the direction of Ducks Unlimited. Having a reliable water supply for these areas has allowed us for the first time to begin making significant progress toward our wetland vegetation management goals on this unit. A reduction in the density of reed canary grass has already been noted and increased levels of native plant occurrence have been observed. Our most notable setback was an increase in the infestation of purple loosestrife within a portion of the Shillapoo Lakebed including parts of the North and South Units. A great deal of effort and time was spent on addressing the problem including hand cutting and spraying individual plants.

Calkins, Brian

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 24472457 (2007)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 2447­2457 (2007) Published online 18 May 2007 in Wiley for simulating watershed runoff. This data model, called nen, allows users to visualize and analyse the processes, such as raster, that do not give direct insight into the spatial dynamics and distribution of the processes

Reitsma, Femke E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period January 01, 2006 to June 30, 2006 which covers the fourth six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse completed obtaining additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in a previous reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed obtaining raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (Cd/m) information for 9 more biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated before in this project. Results of the mean mass data obtained to date are reported here, and analysis of the raw data collected by REM is in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Plutonium focus area. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA {open_quotes}...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...{close_quotes} In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or {open_quotes}white papers.{close_quotes} In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Extensible packet processing architecture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique for distributed packet processing includes sequentially passing packets associated with packet flows between a plurality of processing engines along a flow through data bus linking the plurality of processing engines in series. At least one packet within a given packet flow is marked by a given processing engine to signify by the given processing engine to the other processing engines that the given processing engine has claimed the given packet flow for processing. A processing function is applied to each of the packet flows within the processing engines and the processed packets are output on a time-shared, arbitered data bus coupled to the plurality of processing engines.

Robertson, Perry J.; Hamlet, Jason R.; Pierson, Lyndon G.; Olsberg, Ronald R.; Chun, Guy D.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

Milestone Plan Process Improvement  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Background In response to our community's concern over the milestone plan (MP) process within the system, the...

378

Environmental Assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped from the EA/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. A new drying process was subsequently developed and is analyzed in Section 2.1.2 of this document. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Intermittent and sustained periodic windows in networked chaotic Rössler oscillators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Route to chaos (or periodicity) in dynamical systems is one of fundamental problems. Here, dynamical behaviors of coupled chaotic Rössler oscillators on complex networks are investigated and two different types of periodic windows with the variation of coupling strength are found. Under a moderate coupling, the periodic window is intermittent, and the attractors within the window extremely sensitively depend on the initial conditions, coupling parameter, and topology of the network. Therefore, after adding or removing one edge of network, the periodic attractor can be destroyed and substituted by a chaotic one, or vice versa. In contrast, under an extremely weak coupling, another type of periodic window appears, which insensitively depends on the initial conditions, coupling parameter, and network. It is sustained and unchanged for different types of network structure. It is also found that the phase differences of the oscillators are almost discrete and randomly distributed except that directly linked oscillators more likely have different phases. These dynamical behaviors have also been generally observed in other networked chaotic oscillators.

He, Zhiwei; Sun, Yong [Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China) [Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhan, Meng, E-mail: zhanmeng@wipm.ac.cn [Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)] [Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Time-periodic solutions of the Benjamin-Ono equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a spectrally accurate numerical method for finding non-trivial time-periodic solutions of non-linear partial differential equations. The method is based on minimizing a functional (of the initial condition and the period) that is positive unless the solution is periodic, in which case it is zero. We solve an adjoint PDE to compute the gradient of this functional with respect to the initial condition. We include additional terms in the functional to specify the free parameters, which, in the case of the Benjamin-Ono equation, are the mean, a spatial phase, a temporal phase and the real part of one of the Fourier modes at t = 0. We use our method to study global paths of non-trivial time-periodic solutions connecting stationary and traveling waves of the Benjamin-Ono equation. As a starting guess for each path, we compute periodic solutions of the linearized problem by solving an infinite dimensional eigenvalue problem in closed form. We then use our numerical method to continue these solutions beyond the realm of linear theory until another traveling wave is reached (or until the solution blows up). By experimentation with data fitting, we identify the analytical form of the solutions on the path connecting the one-hump stationary solution to the two-hump traveling wave. We then derive exact formulas for these solutions by explicitly solving the system of ODE's governing the evolution of solitons using the ansatz suggested by the numerical simulations.

Ambrose , D.M.; Wilkening, Jon

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

E-Print Network 3.0 - area steam line Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

adiabatic process changes the temperature of the gas without heating it. 12;DC A steam engine and a Ferrari... A thermodynamic cycle W - (area under each pV curve) Wcycle ...

383

Assimilation of Somali Refugees and Immigrants in the Kansas City Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation investigates the assimilation challenges of Somali refugees and immigrants in the Kansas City area. The process of immigrant assimilation has both economic and socio- cultural dimensions, and the purpose of this project...

Shome, Shimantini

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited Flexible and large area electronics (macroelectronics) using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(augmented) in important electronics applications, then the materials, processes, and devices availableApproved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited 1 Flexible and large area electronics discuss the application drivers and the technology needs and device performance requirements to enable

Alam, Muhammad A.

385

CS445E Local Area Networks Rivier College Fall 2006 Rivier College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to distributed processing problems. Topics include: layered network architectures, signal transmission analysis, transmission media, data encoding, local and wide area networks, communications architecture and protocols, OSPF, BGP, and others), standards, analog and digital data transmission, transmission media (twisted

Riabov, Vladimir V.

386

A landslide risk rating system for the Baguio City, Philippines area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research formulates a LANDSLIDE RISK RATING SYSTEM for the Greater Baguio area in the Philippines. It is hoped that the tool will be made a part of the physical/urban planning process when used by engineers and planners ...

Saldivar-Sali, Artessa Niccola D., 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Critical Areas of State Concern (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation designates the Chesapeake Bay, other Atlantic Coastal Bays, and their tributaries and adjacent lands as critical areas of state concern. It is state policy to protect these areas...

388

Local Area Networks - Applications to Energy Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOCAL AREA NETWORKS - APPLICATIONS TO MERCY MANAGmNT Advanced BRUCE M. BAKKEN Software bfanager Micro Syatems Corporation Milwaukee, WI ABSTRACT One of the newest advances in computer technology is the Local Area Network. Its many...

Bakken, B. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Electricity Suppliers' Service Area Assignments (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To promote efficiency and avoid waste and duplication, rural and unincorporated areas of Indiana are divided into geographic areas, to be assigned to an electricity provider that will have the sole...

390

Game Preserves and Closed Areas (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Game preserves and closed areas exist within the state of Montana for the protection of all the game animals and birds. Construction and development is limited in these areas. Currently, only three...

391

Composite media for ion processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite media, systems, and devices for substantially removing, or otherwise processing, one or more constituents of a fluid stream. The composite media comprise a plurality of beads, each having a matrix substantially comprising polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and supporting one or more active components which are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream. Due to the porosity and large surface area of the beads, a high level of contact is achieved between composite media of the present invention and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the homogeneity of the beads facilitates use of the beads in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a large volume of flow per unit of time.

Mann, Nick R. (Blackfoot, ID); Wood, Donald J. (Peshastin, WA); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Sebesta, Ferdinand (Prague, CZ)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

Ground motion modeling of Hayward fault scenario earthquakes II:Simulation of long-period and broadband ground motions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We simulate long-period (T > 1.0-2.0 s) and broadband (T > 0.1 s) ground motions for 39 scenarios earthquakes (Mw 6.7-7.2) involving the Hayward, Calaveras, and Rodgers Creek faults. For rupture on the Hayward fault we consider the effects of creep on coseismic slip using two different approaches, both of which reduce the ground motions compared with neglecting the influence of creep. Nevertheless, the scenario earthquakes generate strong shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area with about 50% of the urban area experiencing MMI VII or greater for the magnitude 7.0 scenario events. Long-period simulations of the 2007 Mw 4.18 Oakland and 2007 Mw 4.5 Alum Rock earthquakes show that the USGS Bay Area Velocity Model version 08.3.0 permits simulation of the amplitude and duration of shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area, with the greatest accuracy in the Santa Clara Valley (San Jose area). The ground motions exhibit a strong sensitivity to the rupture length (or magnitude), hypocenter (or rupture directivity), and slip distribution. The ground motions display a much weaker sensitivity to the rise time and rupture speed. Peak velocities, peak accelerations, and spectral accelerations from the synthetic broadband ground motions are, on average, slightly higher than the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) ground-motion prediction equations. We attribute at least some of this difference to the relatively narrow width of the Hayward fault ruptures. The simulations suggest that the Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections to the NGA relations could be improved by including a dependence on the rupture speed and increasing the areal extent of rupture directivity with period. The simulations also indicate that the NGA relations may under-predict amplification in shallow sedimentary basins.

Aagaard, B T; Graves, R W; Rodgers, A; Brocher, T M; Simpson, R W; Dreger, D; Petersson, N A; Larsen, S C; Ma, S; Jachens, R C

2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

393

Computer integrated manufacturing/processing in the HPI. [Hydrocarbon Processing Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon Processing and Systemhouse Inc., developed a comprehensive survey on the status of computer integrated manufacturing/processing (CIM/CIP) targeted specifically to the unique requirements of the hydrocarbon processing industry. These types of surveys and other benchmarking techniques can be invaluable in assisting companies to maximize business benefits from technology investments. The survey was organized into 5 major areas: CIM/CIP planning, management perspective, functional applications, integration and technology infrastructure and trends. The CIM/CIP planning area dealt with the use and type of planning methods to plan, justify implement information technology projects. The management perspective section addressed management priorities, expenditure levels and implementation barriers. The functional application area covered virtually all functional areas of organization and focused on the specific solutions and benefits in each of the functional areas. The integration section addressed the needs and integration status of the organization's functional areas. Finally, the technology infrastructure and trends section dealt with specific technologies in use as well as trends over the next three years. In February 1993, summary areas from preliminary results were presented at the 2nd International Conference on Productivity and Quality in the Hydrocarbon Processing Industry.

Yoshimura, J.S. (Systemhouse Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Optimization Online - All Areas Submissions - February 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stochastic Optimization for Power System Configuration with Renewable Energy in Remote Areas Ludwig Kuznia, Bo Zeng, Grisselle Centeno, Zhixin Miao.

395

Considering LEDs for Street and Area Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

View Jim Brodrick's keynote video from the September 2009 IES Street and Area Lighting Conference in Philadelphia.

396

Cuttings Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

397

D-Area Preliminary Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive review of hazards associated with the D-Area was performed to identify postulated event scenarios.

Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Paik, I.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, , ()

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM); Henins, Ivars (Los Alamos, NM); Babayan, Steve E. (Huntington Beach, CA); Hicks, Robert F. (Los Angeles, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Periodic Discrete Energy for Long-Range Potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider periodic energy problems in Euclidean space with a special emphasis on long-range potentials that cannot be defined through the usual infinite sum. One of our main results builds on more recent developments of Ewald summation to define the periodic energy corresponding to a large class of long-range potentials. Two particularly interesting examples are the logarithmic potential and the Riesz potential when the Riesz parameter is smaller than the dimension of the space. For these examples, we use analytic continuation methods to provide concise formulas for the periodic kernel in terms of the Epstein Hurwitz Zeta function. We apply our energy definition to deduce several properties of the minimal energy including the asymptotic order of growth and the distribution of points in energy minimizing configurations as the number of points becomes large. We conclude with some detailed calculations in the case of one dimension, which shows the utility of this approach.

D. P. Hardin; E. B. Saff; Brian Simanek

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

400

Counting of Sieber-Richter pairs of periodic orbits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the semiclassical approach the universal spectral correlations in the Hamiltonian systems with classical chaotic dynamics can be attributed to the systematic correlations between actions of periodic orbits which (up to the switch in the momentum direction) pass through approximately the same points of the phase space. By considering symbolic dynamics of the system one can introduce a natural ultrametric distance between periodic orbits and organize them into clusters. Each cluster consists of orbits approaching closely each other in the phase space. We study the distribution of cluster sizes for the backer's map in the asymptotic limit of long trajectories. This problem is equivalent to the one of counting degeneracies in the length spectrum of the {\\it de Bruijn} graphs. Based on this fact, we derive the probability $\\P_k$ that $k$ randomly chosen periodic orbits belong to the same cluster. Furthermore, we find asymptotic behaviour of the largest cluster size $|\\Cll_{\\max}|$ and derive th...

Gutkin, Boris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Data Protection Guidance Transferring personal data outside the European Economic Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Protection Guidance Transferring personal data outside the European Economic Area The either data protection principles specifies that personal data should not be transferred outside of the EEA in relation to the processing of personal data.' The European Economic Area consists of the 25 EU Member

Mumby, Peter J.

402

EVIDENCE OF INTERACTION BETWEEN SYNOPTIC AND LOCAL SCALES IN THE SURFACE LAYER OVER THE PARIS AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Column modelling, Urban area. 1. Introduction As in many big cities throughout the world, pollution recently, no comprehensive dedicated study of the processes leading to the severe pollution episodes urban areas such as Athens, Mexico or Los Angeles, for example. Moreover, Paris is located sufficiently

Menut, Laurent

403

Original article Photosynthesis, leaf area and productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Photosynthesis, leaf area and productivity of 5 poplar clones during; The stem volume and biomass (stem + branches) production, net photosynthesis of mature leaves and leaf area found in volume production, woody biomass production, total leaf area and net photosynthesis. Above

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

404

Introduction Marine protected areas (MPA's) are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

67(1) 1 Introduction Marine protected areas (MPA's) are an important tool for managing fisheries protected area is "any area of the marine environ- ment that has been reserved by Federal, State, tribal, territorial, or local laws or regulations to provide lasting protection for part or all of the natural

405

THE 2012 KINDER HOUSTON AREA SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADJUSTED. #12;WHAT IS THE BIGGEST PROBLEM IN THE HOUSTON AREA TODAY? (1982-2012) 51 47 25 1510 36 71 27 10THE 2012 KINDER HOUSTON AREA SURVEY: Perspectives on a City inTransition STEPHEN L. KLINEBERG The GHP-Kinder Institute Luncheon and Release of the Findings, 24 April 2012 #12;KINDER HOUSTON AREA

406

Local control of area-preserving maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method of control of chaos in area-preserving maps. This method gives an explicit expression of a control term which is added to a given area-preserving map. The resulting controlled map which is a small and suitable modification of the original map, is again area-preserving and has an invariant curve whose equation is explicitly known.

Cristel Chandre; Michel Vittot; Guido Ciraolo

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

West Central North East Area of Tucson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 West Central North East Area of Tucson #Individuals Anna Broad-billed Costa Rufous Black-chinned 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 West Central North East Area of Tucson not be conflicting, and urban areas may actually provide valuable surrogates for degraded habitats. Our knowledge

Hall, Sharon J.

408

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 18, 343355 (2004)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on phosphorus retention in Everglades stormwater treatment area wetlands John R. White,1 * K. Ramesh Reddy1 treatment areas (STAs) comprising a series of constructed wetlands. A series of mesocosms were established on P retention/release by the wetland soil and on effluent water quality. Four treatment combinations

Florida, University of

409

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Phase transitions in full counting statistics for periodic pumping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the problem of full counting statistics for periodic pumping. The probability generating function is usually defined on a circle of the "physical" values of the counting parameter, with its periodicity corresponding to charge quantization. The extensive part of the generating function can either be an analytic function on this circle or have singularities. These two cases may be interpreted as different thermodynamic phases in time domain. We discuss several examples of phase transitions between these phases for classical and quantum systems. Finally, we prove a criterion for the "analytic" phase in the problem of a quantum pump for noninteracting fermions.

Dmitri A. Ivanov; Alexander G. Abanov

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

411

Truncation of Periodic Image Interactions for Confined Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First principles methods based on periodic boundary conditions are used extensively by materials theorists. However, applying these methods to systems with confined electronic states entails the use of large unit cells in order to avoid artificial image interactions. We present a general approach for truncating the Coulomb interaction that removes image effects directly and leads to well converged results for modest-sized periodic cells. As an illustration, we find the lowest-energy quasiparticle and exciton states in two-dimensional hexagonal GaN sheets. These sheets have been proposed as parent materials for single-walled GaN nanotubes which may be of interest for optoelectronics.

Sohrab Ismail-Beigi

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

412

Period doubling, information entropy, and estimates for Feigenbaum's constants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relationship between period doubling bifurcations and Feigenbaum's constants has been studied for nearly 40 years and this relationship has helped uncover many fundamental aspects of universal scaling across multiple nonlinear dynamical systems. This paper will combine information entropy with symbolic dynamics to demonstrate how period doubling can be defined using these tools alone. In addition, the technique allows us to uncover some unexpected, simple estimates for Feigenbaum's constants which relate them to log 2 and the golden ratio, phi, as well as to each other.

Reginald D. Smith

2013-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

413

Gravitational Waves from Periodic Three-Body Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three bodies moving in a periodic orbit under the influence of Newtonian gravity ought to emit gravitational waves. We have calculated the gravitational radiation quadrupolar waveforms and the corresponding luminosities for the 13+11 recently discovered three-body periodic orbits in Newtonian gravity. These waves clearly allow one to distinguish between their sources: all 13+11 orbits have different waveforms and their luminosities (evaluated at the same orbit energy and body mass) vary by up to 13 orders of magnitude in the mean, and up to 20 orders of magnitude for the peak values.

Dmitrašinovi?, V; Hudomal, Ana

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Controlling mobility via rapidly oscillating time-periodic stimulus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To address the dynamics of a Brownian particle on a periodic symmetric substrate under high-frequency periodic forcing with a vanishing time average, we construct an effective Langevin dynamics by invoking Kapitza-Landau time window. Our result is then exploited to simulate the mobility both for original and effective dynamics which are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. This close agreement and the enhancement of mobility are very robust against the tailoring of amplitude-to-frequency ratio which substantiates the correctness of our calculation. Present results may be illuminating for understanding the dynamics of cold atoms in electromagnetic fields.

Prasun Sarkar; Alok Kumar Maity; Anindita Shit; Sudip Chattopadhyay; Jyotipratim Ray Chaudhuri; Suman K Banik

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

415

Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

GLAST (FERMI) Data-Processing Pipeline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Data Processing Pipeline ('Pipeline') has been developed for the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) which launched June 11, 2008. It generically processes graphs of dependent tasks, maintaining a full record of its state, history and data products. The Pipeline is used to automatically process the data down-linked from the satellite and to deliver science products to the GLAST collaboration and the Science Support Center and has been in continuous use since launch with great success. The pipeline handles up to 2000 concurrent jobs and in reconstructing science data produces approximately 750GB of data products using 1/2 CPU-year of processing time per day.

Flath, Daniel L.; Johnson, Tony S.; Turri, Massimiliano; Heidenreich, Karen A.; /SLAC

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

Application issues for large-area electrochromic windows incommercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projections of performance from small-area devices to large-area windows and enterprise marketing have created high expectations for electrochromic glazings. As a result, this paper seeks to precipitate an objective dialog between material scientists and building-application scientists to determine whether actual large-area electrochromic devices will result in significant performance benefits and what material improvements are needed, if any, to make electrochromics more practical for commercial building applications. Few in-situ tests have been conducted with large-area electrochromic windows applied in buildings. This study presents monitored results from a full-scale field test of large-area electrochromic windows to illustrate how this technology will perform in commercial buildings. The visible transmittance (Tv) of the installed electrochromic ranged from 0.11 to 0.38. The data are limited to the winter period for a south-east-facing window. The effect of actual device performance on lighting energy use, direct sun control, discomfort glare, and interior illumination is discussed. No mechanical system loads were monitored. These data demonstrate the use of electrochromics in a moderate climate and focus on the most restrictive visual task: computer use in offices. Through this small demonstration, we were able to determine that electrochromic windows can indeed provide unmitigated transparent views and a level of dynamic illumination control never before seen in architectural glazing materials. Daily lighting energy use was 6-24 percent less compared to the 11 percent-glazing, with improved interior brightness levels. Daily lighting energy use was 3 percent less to 13 percent more compared to the 38 percent-glazing, with improved window brightness control. The electrochromic window may not be able to fulfill both energy-efficiency and visual comfort objectives when low winter direct sun is present, particularly for computer tasks using cathode-ray tube (CRT) displays. However, window and architectural design as well as electrochromic control options are suggested as methods to broaden the applicability of electrochromics for commercial buildings. Without further modification, its applicability is expected to be limited during cold winter periods due to its slow switching speed.

Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, D.L.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Process-Based Quality (PBQ) Tools Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this effort is to benchmark the development of process-based quality tools for application in CAD (computer-aided design) model-based applications. The processes of interest are design, manufacturing, and quality process applications. A study was commissioned addressing the impact, current technologies, and known problem areas in application of 3D MCAD (3-dimensional mechanical computer-aided design) models and model integrity on downstream manufacturing and quality processes. The downstream manufacturing and product quality processes are profoundly influenced and dependent on model quality and modeling process integrity. The goal is to illustrate and expedite the modeling and downstream model-based technologies for available or conceptual methods and tools to achieve maximum economic advantage and advance process-based quality concepts.

Cummins, J.L.

2001-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Meltwater flux and runoff modeling in the abalation area of jakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temporal variability in surface snow and glacier melt flux and runoff were investigated for the ablation area of lakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland. High-resolution meteorological observations both on and outside the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) were used as model input. Realistic descriptions of snow accumulation, snow and glacier-ice melt, and runoff are essential to understand trends in ice sheet surface properties and processes. SnowModel, a physically based, spatially distributed meteorological and snow-evolution modeling system was used to simulate the temporal variability of lakobshavn Isbrre accumulation and ablation processes for 2000/01-2006/07. Winter snow-depth observations and MODIS satellite-derived summer melt observations were used for model validation of accumulation and ablation. Simulations agreed well with observed values. Simulated annual surface melt varied from as low as 3.83 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to as high as 8.64 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05). Modeled surface melt occurred at elevations reaching 1,870 m a.s.l. for 2004/05, while the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) fluctuated from 990 to 1,210 m a.s.l. during the simulation period. The SnowModel meltwater retention and refreezing routines considerably reduce the amount of meltwater available as ice sheet runoff; without these routines the lakobshavn surface runoff would be overestimated by an average of 80%. From September/October through May/June no runoff events were simulated. The modeled interannual runoff variability varied from 1.81 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to 5.21 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05), yielding a cumulative runoff at the Jakobshavn glacier terminus of {approx}2.25 m w.eq. to {approx}4.5 m w.eq., respectively. The average modeled lakobshavn runoff of {approx}3.4 km{sup 3} y{sup -1} was merged with previous estimates of Jakobshavn ice discharge to quantify the freshwater flux to Illulissat Icefiord. For both runoff and ice discharge the average trends are similar, indicating increasing (insignificant) influx of freshwater to the Illulissat Icefiord for the period 2000/01-2006/07. This study suggests that surface runoff forms a minor part of the overall Jakobshavn freshwater flux to the fiord: around 7% ({approx}3.4 km{sup 3} y{sup -1}) of the average annual freshwater flux of {approx}51.0 km{sup 3} y{sup -1} originates from the surface runoff.

Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV.; Steffen, Konrad [UNIV OF COLORADO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Periodic orbit theory of chaotic tunneling Olivier Sigwarth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pre­ cisely in this organization into nearly cancelling combinations: cycle expansions are dominated Cvitanovi'c April 17, 1998 PACS: 03.20.+i, 03.65.Sq, 05.40.+j, 05.45.+b keywords: cycle expansions, periodic orbits, dynamical zeta functions, quantum tunneling. Abstract 1 cycle expansions. 1 Introduction

Cvitanovc', Predrag

422

Periodic orbit theory of linear response Niels Sndergaard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all distinct non- repeating combinations of prime cycles. For k > 1, tp1+p2+...+pk are weights pre- cisely in this organization into nearly cancelling combinations: cycle expansions are dominated: 03.20.+i, 03.65.Sq, 05.40.+j, 05.45.+b keywords: cycle expansions, periodic orbits, dynamical zeta

Cvitanovc', Predrag

423

Quality of monitoring of stochastic events by periodic and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

infeasible to transmit sensor data over long distances, or in an underground system of ... the case of static sensors, their placement to best protect people has been ... function of the event dynamics and type of events: (1) What is the QoM of a ... a class of periodic coverage algorithms considering the travel time overhead.

David K. Y. Yau, Nung Kwan Yip, Chris Y. T. Ma, Nageswara S. V. Rao, Mallikarjun Shankar

2010-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

424

lthough Earth has undergone many periods of significant environmen-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A lthough Earth has undergone many periods of significant environmen- tal change, the planet push the Earth system outside the stable environmental state of the Holocene, with consequences occurred naturally and Earth's regu- latory capacity maintained the conditions that enabled human

Horton, Tom

425

L-FUNCTIONS AND PERIODS OF ADJOINT MOTIVES Michael Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-FUNCTIONS AND PERIODS OF ADJOINT MOTIVES Michael Harris UFR de Math´ematiques Universit´e Paris 7 for unitary groups, due to Neal Harris, with Deligne's conjecture on critical values of L-functions. When for inclusions of special orthogonal groups; the version for unitary groups, due to Neal Harris [NH], gives

Harris, Michael - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

426

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fee Paid 127,390,991 Contract Number: Fee Available Contract Period: Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 4,104,318,749 28,500,000 31,597,837 0 39,171,018 32,871,600 EM...

427

Contract Periods for 2012-2013 Residence Halls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract Periods for 2012-2013 Residence Halls All of the residence halls are on Fall/Spring Contracts. THERE IS NO FALL ONLY CONTRACT. · The residence halls open for the fall semester on September 1 rate for the number of days they stay. Apartments Your contract entitles you to an apartment space

Minnesota, University of

428

Colloidal Inks for Directed Assembly of 3-D Periodic Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during assembly, which simultaneously facilitated bonding and shape retention of the deposited elements the desired 3-D periodicity, places the most stringent demands on ink design. Direct-write techniques- controlled viscoelastic response; that is, they must be able to flow through a deposition nozzle

Lewis, Jennifer

429

Particle energization through time-periodic helical magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We solve for the motion of charged particles in a helical time-periodic ABC (Arnold-Beltrami-Childress) magnetic field. The magnetic field lines of a stationary ABC field with coefficients A=B=C=1 are chaotic, and we show ...

Mitra, Dhrubaditya

430

Excitation and control of multi-phase periodic waves in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the phase of the excited wave by the driver ("phase-locking") control the wave by varying parametersExcitation and control of multi-phase periodic waves in sine-Gordon equation Arkadiy Shagalovµcr U ()eff U ()eff Threshold condition for phase-locking: µ > µcr = 0.41 > cr = 3.28 3/2 0m 3

Fominov, Yakov

431

Overall Dynamic Properties of 3-D periodic elastic composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method for the homogenization of 3-D periodic elastic composites is presented. It allows for the evaluation of the averaged overall frequency dependent dynamic material constitutive tensors relating the averaged dynamic ?eld variable tensors of velocity, strain, stress, and linear momentum. The formulation is based on micromechanical modeling of a representative unit cell of a composite proposed by Nemat-Nasser & Hori (1993), Nemat-Nasser et. al. (1982) and Mura (1987) and is the 3-D generalization of the 1-D elastodynamic homogenization scheme presented by Nemat-Nasser & Srivastava (2011). We show that for 3-D periodic composites the overall compliance (stiffness) tensor is hermitian, irrespective of whether the corresponding unit cell is geometrically or materially symmetric.Overall mass density is shown to be a tensor and, like the overall compliance tensor, always hermitian. The average strain and linear momentum tensors are, however, coupled and the coupling tensors are shown to be each others' hermitian transpose. Finally we present a numerical example of a 3-D periodic composite composed of elastic cubes periodically distributed in an elastic matrix. The presented results corroborate the predictions of the theoretical treatment.

Ankit Srivastava; Sia Nemat-Nasser

2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

432

Periodic NDE for Bridge Maintenance Ralf W. Arndt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Periodic NDE for Bridge Maintenance Ralf W. Arndt NRC Research Associate U.S. Federal Highway Administration NDE Center 6300 Georgetown Pike McLean, VA 22101, USA ralf.arndt@fhwa.dot.gov Frank Jalinoos Program Manager U.S. Federal Highway Administration NDE Center 6300 Georgetown Pike McLean, VA 22101, USA

Huston, Dryver R.

433

Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proton aurora related to intervals of pulsations of diminishing periods A. G. Yahnin,1 T. A precipitation produced by the cyclotron instability can be responsible for proton aurora. Indeed, the relationship between some types of proton aurora (proton spots and proton flashes) and pulsations in the Pc1

California at Berkeley, University of

434

Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural periodicity and produces burst patterns very similar to what is observed in temperature proxy data. Numerical experiments with the model also suggests that the characteristic period of 1,500 years is due to the geometry, or the effective heat capacity, of the ocean that comes under sea ice cover.

Raj Saha

2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

435

Effect of Materials and Curing Period on Shrinkage of Concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 365 days at 23 ± 2o C (73 ± 3o F) and 50 ± 4 percent relative humidity. Parameters include aggregate content; cement fineness; water-cement ratio; curing period; partial cement replacement by slag, Class C fly ash, or silica fume; superplasticizer...

West, Maria B.

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

436

Periodic Constraint-Based Control Using Dynamic Wireless Sensor Scheduling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Periodic Constraint-Based Control Using Dynamic Wireless Sensor Scheduling James Weimer, Jos´e Ara´ujo, Aitor Hernandez and Karl Henrik Johansson Abstract-- Constraint-based control over wireless sensor net- works (WSNs) require control strategies that achieve a desired closed-loop system performance while

Johansson, Karl Henrik

437

Devil's Staircase in Magnetoresistance of a Periodic Array of Scatterers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nonlinear response to an external electric field is studied for classical non-interacting charged particles under the influence of a uniform magnetic field, a periodic potential, and an effective friction force. We find numerical and analytical evidence that the ratio of transversal to longitudinal resistance forms a Devil's staircase. The staircase is attributed to the dynamical phenomenon of mode-locking.

Jan Wiersig; Kang-Hun Ahn

2001-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

438

QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND BROADBAND VARIABILITY IN SHORT MAGNETAR BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. However, with only three giant flares ever recorded, and only two with data of sufficient quality to search for QPOs, such analysis is seriously data limited. We set out a procedure for doing QPO searches in the far more numerous, short, less energetic magnetar bursts. The short, transient nature of these bursts requires the implementation of sophisticated statistical techniques to make reliable inferences. Using Bayesian statistics, we model the periodogram as a combination of red noise at low frequencies and white noise at high frequencies, which we show is a conservative approach to the problem. We use empirical models to make inferences about the potential signature of periodic and QPOs at these frequencies. We compare our method with previously used techniques and find that although it is on the whole more conservative, it is also more reliable in ruling out false positives. We illustrate our Bayesian method by applying it to a sample of 27 bursts from the magnetar SGR J0501+4516 observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and we find no evidence for the presence of QPOs in any of the bursts in the unbinned spectra, but do find a candidate detection in the binned spectra of one burst. However, whether this signal is due to a genuine quasi-periodic process, or can be attributed to unmodeled effects in the noise is at this point a matter of interpretation.

Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Uttley, Phil; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Van der Klis, Michiel [Astronomical Institute ''Anton Pannekoek'', University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Office of Science and Technology, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goegues, Ersin [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Granot, Jonathan [The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra'anana 43537 (Israel); Vaughan, Simon [X-Ray and Observational Astronomy Group, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Finger, Mark H., E-mail: D.Huppenkothen@uva.nl [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Kang, Dohee (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

7 -ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 7 - ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be: 1. Scattering 2. Absorption/Thermal Emission scattering, although the results won't change much when this condition is relaxed. #12;2 Absorption/Thermal Emission Free-free (continuum) ("Bremsstrahlung") Emission/Absorption Bound-Bound & Bound-Free Processes

Sitko, Michael L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Quantifying the Parallelism in BPMN Processes using Model Checking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a valuable guide for the problem of resource allocation in business processes. In this paper, we investigate . time and space, with a beginning and an end [5]. Business process modelling is an important area process efficiency and quality. More precisely, it is a stage to model activities, their causal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

442

Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this report is to provide an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period September 1, 1989 through March 31, 1991. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research on the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the division. As in previous reports, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations. Summary lists of publications and presentations, staff additions and departures, scientific and professional activities of division staff, and technical conferences organized and sponsored by the division are included as appendices. The report is organized following the division of our research among four sections and information centers. These research areas are: Mathematical Sciences; Nuclear Data Measurement and Evaluations; Intelligent Systems; Nuclear Analysis and Shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Direct periodic patterning of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by three-beam interference laser ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the direct patterning of two-dimensional periodic structures in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through laser interference ablation for the fast and reliable fabrication of periodic micro- and nano-structures aimed at enhancing light output. Holes arranged in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice array having an opening size of 500?nm, depth of 50?nm, and a periodicity of 1??m were directly formed by three-beam laser interference without photolithography or electron-beam lithography processes. The laser-patterned LEDs exhibit an enhancement in light output power of 20% compared to conventional LEDs having a flat top surface without degradation of electrical and optical properties of the top p-GaN layer and the active region, respectively.

Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Liu, Jianping [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215125 (China); Asadirad, Mojtaba [Materials Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4005 (United States); Kwon, Min-Ki [Department of Photonic Engineering, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Dupuis, Russell D. [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Das, Suman [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Ryou, Jae-Hyun, E-mail: jryou@uh.edu [Materials Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4005 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

445

Safety analysis--200 Area Savannah River Site: Separations Area operations Building 211-H Outside Facilities. Supplement 11, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The H-Area Outside Facilities are located in the 200-H Separations Area and are comprised of a number of processes, utilities, and services that support the separations function. Included are enriched uranium loadout, bulk chemical storage, water handling, acid recovery, general purpose evaporation, and segregated solvent facilities. In addition, services for water, electricity, and steam are provided. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the H-Area Outside Facilities and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the SR Implementation Plan for DOE order 5481.1A. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the facility can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations, to the environment, and to operating personnel. In this report, risks are defined as the expected frequencies of accidents, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequences in person-rem. Following the summary description of facility and operations is the site evaluation including the unique features of the H-Area Outside Facilities. The facility and process design are described in Chapter 3.0 and a description of operations and their impact is given in Chapter 4.0. The accident analysis in Chapter 5.0 is followed by a list of safety related structures and systems (Chapter 6.0) and a description of the Quality Assurance program (Chapter 7.0). The accident analysis in this report focuses on estimating the risk from accidents as a result of operation of the facilities. The operations were evaluated on the basis of three considerations: potential radiological hazards, potential chemical toxicity hazards, and potential conditions uniquely different from normal industrial practice.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Statistical Features of the Wind Field over the Indian Ccean for the period 1998-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have done a statistical analysis of the wind field from the archive of NCEP/NOAA over the Indian Ocean for the period 1998-2008yy, which is given on a grid 1x1.25 of latitude-longitude with 3h time-step. Initial analysis includes mapping the average wind fields and fields of mean density of the wind-kinetic-energy flux , obtained with different periods of time averaging T, as well as the assessment of 11-year trends in these fields. The subsequent analysis is concerned with partition of the Indian ocean area into 6 zones, provided by the spatial inhomogeneity of the analyzed wind field. This analysis includes: a) an assessment of temporal variations for the wind speed field averaged over the Ocean and the zones and for the field of wind-energy flux; b) construction of time history series of these fields averaged with different scales, and estimating frequency spectra of these series; c) finding the extremes of the wind field (in the zones of Indian Ocean); d) construction of histograms of the wind field; ...

Polnikov, Vladislav; Sannasiraj, S A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

449

Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

Langland, R. T.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ohio Community Reinvestment Area program is an economic development tool administered by municipal and county government that provides real property tax exemptions for property owners who...

451

Radiation-dominated area metric cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We provide further crucial support for a refined, area metric structure of spacetime. Based on the solution of conceptual issues, such as the consistent coupling of fermions and the covariant identification of radiation fields on area metric backgrounds, we show that the radiation-dominated epoch of area metric cosmology is equivalent to that epoch in standard Einstein cosmology. This ensures, in particular, successful nucleosynthesis. This surprising result complements the previously derived prediction of a small late-time acceleration of an area metric universe.

Frederic P. Schuller; Mattias N. R. Wohlfarth

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

452

Geothermal Literature Review At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Taupo, North Island, re: Heat Flow References G. Ranalli, L. Rybach (2005) Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples...

453

White Etch Areas: Metallurgical Characterization and Atomistic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Atomistic Modeling Presented by R. Scott Hyde of Timken Company at the 2014 Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar Timken Hyde White Etch Areas ANL Presentation Oct 2014...

454

Management of Specific Flood Plain Areas (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Floodplain management orders by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources as well as approved local ordinances designate an area as a regulated floodplain. These regulations establish minimum...

455

Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area, Indonesia (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At International Geothermal...

456

Redevelopment of Areas Needing Redevelopment Generally (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Redevelopment commissions are responsible for developing plans and managing tools used to address conditions of blight (redevelopment areas) and underutilized land of economic significance ...

457

DFAS Wide-Area Workflow Issues  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the DFAS wide-area workflow issues and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

458

Solar Power for Deployment in Populated Areas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis presents background on solar thermal energy and addresses the structural challenges associated with the deployment of concentrating solar power fields in urban areas.… (more)

Hicks, Nathan Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Periodic Schrödinger operators with local defects and spectral pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article deals with the numerical calculation of eigenvalues of perturbed periodic Schr\\"odinger operators located in spectral gaps. Such operators are encountered in the modeling of the electronic structure of crystals with local defects, and of photonic crystals. The usual finite element Galerkin approximation is known to give rise to spectral pollution. In this article, we give a precise description of the corresponding spurious states. We then prove that the supercell model does not produce spectral pollution. Lastly, we extend results by Lewin and S\\'er\\'e on some no-pollution criteria. In particular, we prove that using approximate spectral projectors enables one to eliminate spectral pollution in a given spectral gap of the reference periodic Sch\\"odinger operator.

Eric Cancčs; Virginie Ehrlacher; Yvon Maday

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

460

Periodic photometric variability of the brown dwarf Kelu-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have detected a strong periodicity of 1.80+/-0.05 hours in photometric observations of the brown dwarf Kelu-1. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the variation is ~1.1% (11.9+/-0.8 mmag) in a 41nm wide filter centred on 857nm and including the dust/temperature sensitive TiO & CrH bands. We have identified two plausible causes of variability: surface features rotating into- and out-of-view and so modulating the light curve at the rotation period; or, elliposidal variability caused by an orbiting companion. In the first scenario, we combine the observed vsin(i) of Kelu-1 and standard model radius to determine that the axis of rotation is inclined at 65+/-12 degrees to the line of sight.

F. J. Clarke; C. G. Tinney; K. R. Covey

2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural p...

Saha, Raj

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Sorting by Periodic Potential Energy Landscapes: Optical Fractionation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Viscously damped objects driven through a periodically modulated potential energy landscape can become kinetically locked in to commensurate directions through the landscape, and thus can be deflected away from the driving direction. We demonstrate that the threshold for an object to become kinetically locked in to an array can depend exponentially on its size. When implemented with an array of holographic optical tweezers, this provides the basis for a continuous and continuously optimized sorting technique for mesoscopic objects called ``optical fractionation''.

Kosta Ladavac; Karen Kasza; David G. Grier

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

463

Wave propagation in periodic networks of thin fibers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We will discuss a one-dimensional approximation for the problem of wave propagation in networks of thin fibers. The main objective here is to describe the boundary (gluing) conditions at branching points of the limiting one-dimensional graph. The results will be applied to Mach-Zehnder interferometers on chips and to periodic chains of the interferometers. The latter allows us to find parameters which guarantee the transparency and slowing down of wave packets.

S. Molchanov; B. Vainberg

2009-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

464

Ion processing element with composite media  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

Mann, Nick R. (Blackfoot, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Sebesta, Ferdinand (Prague, CZ)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

465

Management of the Sump Waters and Sediment Contained in Process and Non-Process Buildings at the Chemical Plant Area.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGYELIkNATIONHEALXH:LTS-S,:?'85 March 31.'

466

NIMH CRADAs Review and Approval Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIMH CRADAs Review and Approval Process Initiation · Principle Investigators (PIs) from both parties jointly develop a Research Plan (using NIH CRADA Subcommittee guidelines) and determine). · Collaborating party concurrently reviews CRADA boilerplate and contacts TDC with any questions or areas

Baker, Chris I.

467

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives...

468

Application Process and Eligibility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Application Process and Eligibility Application Process and Eligibility Both US and non-US citizens are eligible to apply, but US citizenship may be required for some...

469

process.h  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/* process.h Symbols and structures for process management. Copyright (c) Borland International 1987 All Rights Reserved. */ #if __STDC__ #define _Cdecl

470

Approximation of Stochastic Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 8, 2012 ... The approximation of stochastic processes by trees is an important topic in ... process ? is replaced by a finitely valued stochastic scenario ...

Alois Pichler

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

471

SAGE Application Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Application Process SAGE Application Process A National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program Contacts Institute Director Harald Dogliani-Los Alamos...

472

Undergraduate Program Selection Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selection Process Undergraduate Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich...

473

PLANE-LIKE MINIMAL SURFACES IN PERIODIC MEDIA WITH ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Key words. minimal surfaces, sets of finite perimeter, homogenization, .... troduce a particular example, and we perform several explicit computations in search .... E minimizes area outside the exclusions, it follows from Lemma A.5 that if x ? K ...... It is an easy exercise to check that, for n = 2, minimizers must enter the ...

SIAM (#1) 1035 2001 Apr 10 12:32:38

2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

474

Physics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported in detail in the following areas: Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, neutron physics, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, atomic and plasma physics, and high energy physics. Publications are listed. Separate abstracts were prepared for 34 papers. (WHK)

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research and development activities are summarized in the following areas: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, accelerator-based atomic physics, theoretical physics, nuclear science applications, atomic physics and plasma diagnostics for fusion program, high-energy physics, the nuclear data project, and the relativistic heavy-ion collider study. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses topics in the following areas: Holifield heavy ion research; Experimental Nuclear physics; The Uniser program; Experimental Atomic Physics; Theoretical Physics; Laser and electro-optics lab; High Energy Physics; compilations and evaluations; and accelerator design and development. (FI)

Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Supersonic turbulent boundary layers with periodic mechanical non-equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It was documented that proper roughness selection coupled with a sufficiently strong favorable pressure gradient produced regions of �negative� production in the transport of turbulent stress. This led to localized areas of significant turbulence stress...

Ekoto, Isaac Wesley

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

478

Physics division progress report for period ending September 30 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses research being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in physics. The areas covered are: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; low/medium energy nuclear physics; high energy experimental physics; the Unisor program; experimental atomic physics; laser and electro-optics lab; theoretical physics; compilations and evaluations; and radioactive ion beam development. (LSP)

Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Faculty & Staff Areas of Specialization ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Engineering Engagement for Student Success (ENG2 ) . . . . .9 Division of Engineering Services Services WARREN R. HULL Manager, Engineering Communication Studio MIMI LAVALLE Director of CommunicationsFaculty & Staff Areas of Specialization 2010-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING #12;Faculty & Staff Areas

Harms, Kyle E.

480

Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial & Systems Engineering Areas of Engineering Interests The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering understands our students may work as Industrial Engineers in other engineering industries, and to help prepare them for these careers, the ISE Areas of Interest was formulated. The courses

Berdichevsky, Victor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area process period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Pine Ridge Area Community Wildfire Protection Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pine Ridge Area Community Wildfire Protection Plan Update 2013 West Ash Fire: Wednesday August 29 the boundary of the original plan to include all the area within the Upper Niobrara White Natural Resource, 2012 #12;Facilitated by: Nebraska Forest Service In cooperation with: Region 23 Fire Protection

Farritor, Shane

482

Postdoctoral Scholar position Area: Mathematics Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the City of Calgary's vibrant energy and diversity. The university is home to scholars in 14 facultiesPostdoctoral Scholar position Area: Mathematics Education Duration: 18 months Start date: January 1, invites applications for a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the area of mathematics education. This competition

de Leon, Alex R.

483

ARRA Proposed Award: Retrofit Bay Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARRA Proposed Award: Retrofit Bay Area Counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco per year Prime contractor: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) Sub contractors: Alameda County Waste Management Authority (StopWaste.org) County of Contra Costa County of Marin City

484

7, 66876718, 2007 Mexico City area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discussions Emissions from forest fires near Mexico City R. Yokelson1 , S. Urbanski2 , E. Atlas3 , D. Toohey4ACPD 7, 6687­6718, 2007 Mexico City area mountain fires R. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract to: R. Yokelson (bob.yokelson@umontana.edu) 6687 #12;ACPD 7, 6687­6718, 2007 Mexico City area

Boyer, Edmond

485

Alamo Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KFH GROUP, INC. ALAMO AREA REGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN Developed for: The Alamo Area Council of Governments and the San Antonio-Bexar County Metropolitan Planning Organization By: KFH Group..............................................................................................................................4 SUMMARY OF TRAVEL PATTERNS IN THE ALAMO REGION...............................................9 COORDINATION AND SERVICE ALTERNATIVES .................................................................16 COORDINATED TRANSPORTATION: PLANNED...

Alamo Area Council of Governments

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

486

BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION FINAL Prepared by: Brookhaven FOR U.S. Department of Energy March 2009 #12;i OU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA..................................................................................................................4 4.0 Building 96 ­ Operational Background

487

Nutrient Management Examination Competency Areas Individual Specialists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reference materials are included on the Nutrient Management Resource CD distributed at the Nutrientv.01.2014 Nutrient Management Examination Competency Areas Individual Specialists The competency areas in this listing were developed according to the requirements of Pennsylvania's Nutrient Management

Guiltinan, Mark

488

Tanks focus area site needs assessment FY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tanks Focus Area`s (TFA`s) mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the application of technology to safely and efficiently accomplish tank waste remediation across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks technology development needs expressed by four DOE tank waste sites - Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The process is iterative and involves six steps: (1) Site needs identification and documentation, (2) Site communication of priority needs, (3) Technical response development, (4) Review technical responses, (5) Develop program planning documents, and (6) Review planning documents. This document describes the outcomes of the first two steps: site needs identification and documentation, and site communication of priority needs. It also describes the initial phases of the third and fourth steps: technical response development and review technical responses. Each site`s Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) was responsible for developing and delivering priority tank waste needs. This was accomplished using a standardized needs template developed by the National STCG. The standard template helped improve the needs submission process this year. The TFA received the site needs during December 1996 and January 1997.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Tanks Focus Area FY 1996 Site Needs Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tanks Focus Area`s (TFA`s) mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the application of technology to safely and efficiently accomplish tank waste remediation across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks technology development needs expressed by four DOE tank waste sites--Hanford, Idaho, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River Sites. The process is iterative and involves four steps: (1) identify and validate tank technology needs at these four sites, (2) define a technical program that responds to these needs, (3) select specific tasks and schedules that accomplish program objectives, and (4) develop integrated teams to carry out selected tasks. This document describes the first of these four steps: identification of sites` tank technology needs. This step concentrates solely on needs identification, collection, and validation. Funding requirements and specific scope of responsive technical activities are not considered until later steps in program definition. This year, the collection and validation of site needs were accomplished through written input from the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs). The TFA recognizes the importance of a continuing solid partnership with the sites through the STCG and DOE as well as contractor users and, therefore, ensured site participation and close coordination throughout the process.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River During Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Migration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10°C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir’s epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four lower Snake reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water’s surface, and during periods of low river discharge, often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The depth of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may also be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004 plus a brief one-week period in 2005 of Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite Reservoirs. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are sufficiently capable of matching diurnal and long term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the 3-D model Flow3-D. This model was used to better understand mixing processing and entrainment. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake discharge. Simulation results were also linked with the particle tracking model FINS to better understand alterations of integrated metrics due to alternative operation schemes. These findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir and may have a significant impact on the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Richmond, Marshall C.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Fu, Tao

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

491

METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible -Laser Focus World http://www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/print/volume-47/issue-8/world-news/metamaterials-large-area-printed-3d-negative-index-metamaterial-is-flexible.html[8/1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible - Laser Focus World-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative, with the advent of a printing process that produces large-area 3D multilayer optical NIMs --8.7 Ă? 8.7 cm square

Rogers, John A.

492

Process for treating moisture laden coal fines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for making a free flowing granular product from moisture laden caked coal fines, such as wet cake, by mixing a water immiscible substance, such as oil, with the caked coal, preferably under low shear forces for a period of time sufficient to produce a plurality of free flowing granules. Each granule is preferably comprised of a dry appearing admixture of one or more coal particle, 2-50% by weight water and the water immiscible substance.

Davis, Burl E. (New Kensington, PA); Henry, Raymond M. (Gibsonia, PA); Trivett, Gordon S. (South Surrey, CA); Albaugh, Edgar W. (Birmingham, AL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Confirmatory Survey Report for Area B1S/B2S at the Chevron Mining Washington Remediation Project, Washington, PA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period of October 2 and 3, 2007, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performed confirmatory radiological survey activities which included gamma surface scans within Area B1S/B2S and the collection of soil samples from these areas.

W. C. Adams

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

494

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 29022914 (2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modelling effort indicate that hyporheic and dead zone heat fluxes are important, whereas solar radiationHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 2902­2914 (2009) Published online 24 July 2009 in Wiley the significance of individual heat fluxes within streams with an emphasis on testing (i.e. identification

Kienzle, Stefan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

7 -ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 7 - ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be: 1. Scattering 2. Absorption/Thermal Emission scattering, although the results won't change much when this condition is relaxed. Absorption/Thermal Emission Free-free (continuum) ("Bremsstrahlung") Emission/Absorption #12;2 Bound-Bound & Bound

Sitko, Michael L.

496

Posted 5/10/12 Manufacturing /Process Engineer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Plymouth Tube Company is committed to providing products and services that meet or exceed customers to improve safety, quality, and manufacturing efficiency throughout the manufacturing area. Utilization, reduce cycle times, improve productivity, create and find capacity, improve process reliability

Heller, Barbara

497

The development of a cognitive process-oriented correlation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction THE DEVELOPMENT OF A COGNITIVE PROCESS-ORIENTED CORRELATION MODEL A Thesis by RICHARD JAMES KNEUVEN Approved as to style and content by: P r c'a exander ( r of Committee ) David...-processing correlation model might be translated into a secondary school curriculum. In an attempt to identify underlying cognitive processes that could provide a basis for a process-oriented correlation model, several areas of literature were reviewed. This thesis...

Kneuven, Richard James

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Office - Oak Ridge, TN Contract Name: Transuranic Waste Processing Contract Sep-14 2,433,940 Cost Plus Award Fee 150,664,017 Fee Information Minimum Fee 2,039,246 Maximum Fee...

499

Successful long-term management of refractory cutaneous and upper airway sarcoidosis with periodic infliximab infusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with periodic infliximab infusion Ted Rosen MD, Christytreated with infliximab infusion therapy at a dose ofresponse to regular periodic infusions of the chimeric anti-

Rosen, Ted; Doherty, Christy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

A study of zooplankton in the Corpus Christi ship channel area near Ingleside, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Impact of the Operation of the Proposed LNG Facility. 156 SUt&1ARY. 158 LITERATURE CITED. 160 APPENDICES. 167 VITA. 208 ax LIST OF TABLES Table Page Mean Monthly Salinity (0/00) data for Collection Sites 1, 2, 2-3, and 3 in the Corpus... Channel area near Ingleside, Tx. (Dec. 1974-Aug. 1975). . . . . . 142 18 Salinity (0/00) during the Diel Study period at Stations 2 and 5 in the Corpus Christi Ship Channel area near Ingleside, Tx. (Dec. 1974-Aug. 1975). . . . . . 143 19 The pH data...

Ansari, Fahmida

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z