National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for area probability cluster

  1. Probability of the most massive cluster under non-Gaussian initial conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Cayón; Christopher Gordon; Joseph Silk

    2011-03-22

    Very massive high redshift clusters can be used to constrain and test the Lambda CDM model. Taking into account the observational constraints of Jee et al. (2009) we have calculated the probability for the most massive cluster to be found in the range (5.2-7.6)e14 M_sun, between redshifts 1.4-2.2, with a sky area of 11 sqdeg and under non-Gaussian initial conditions. Clusters constrain the non-Gaussianity on smaller scales than current cosmic microwave background or halo bias data and so can be used to test for running of the non-Gaussianity parameter f_NL.

  2. Cluster formation probability in the trans-tin and trans-lead nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Santhosh; R. K. Biju; Sabina Sahadevan

    2010-05-10

    Within our fission model, the Coulomb and proximity potential model (CPPM) cluster formation probabilities are calculated for different clusters ranging from carbon to silicon for the parents in the trans-tin and trans- lead regions. It is found that in trans-tin region the 12^C, 16^O, 20^Ne and 24^Mg clusters have maximum cluster formation probability and lowest half lives as compared to other clusters. In trans-lead region the 14^C, 18, 20^O, 23^F, 24,26^Ne, 28,30^Mg and 34^Si clusters have the maximum cluster formation probability and minimum half life, which show that alpha like clusters are most probable for emission from trans-tin region while non-alpha clusters are probable from trans-lead region. These results stress the role of neutron proton symmetry and asymmetry of daughter nuclei in these two cases.

  3. Papyrus: A System for Data Mining over Local and Wide Area Clusters and Super-Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    Papyrus: A System for Data Mining over Local and Wide Area Clusters and Super-Clusters S. Bailey, R Grossman , H. Sivakumar, and A. Turinsky National Center for Data Mining University of Illinois at Chicago and H. Sivakumar, A. Turinsky, Papyrus: A System for Data Mining over Local and Wide Area Clusters

  4. Low Probability Tail Event Analysis and Mitigation in BPA Control Area: Task 2 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Jin, Shuangshuang

    2009-09-18

    Task report detailing low probability tail event analysis and mitigation in BPA control area. Tail event refers to the situation in a power system when unfavorable forecast errors of load and wind are superposed onto fast load and wind ramps, or non-wind generators falling short of scheduled output, causing the imbalance between generation and load to become very significant.

  5. Attempt to extract the preformation probability of. cap alpha. cluster at the surface of heavy nuclei by means of. cap alpha. -transfer reactions leading to the continuum states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Shu-wei; Wu Guo-hua; Miao Rong-zhi; Han Fei

    1983-07-01

    The method of parametrization of an EFR-DWBA overlap integral developed by T. Udagawa and T. Tamura et al./sup 1/ is improved. Using the improved method we have fitted the experimental double differential energy spectrum of the /sup 8/Be cluster coming from the reaction /sup 208/Pb(/sup 12/C, /sup 8/Be) /sup 212/Po leading to the continuum states and extracted the preformation probability of the ..cap alpha.. cluster at the surface of the /sup 212/Po nucleus. Within the range of calculation error, the result is in agreement with that extracted from fitting the experimental data of ..cap alpha.. decay.

  6. probability distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    probabilities in the standard normal table What is the area to the left of Z=1.51 in a standard normal curve? Z=1.51 Z=1.51 Area is 93.45% #12;Exercises · If scores are normally distributed with a mean of 30 beauty of the normal curve: No matter what and are, the area between - and + is about 68%; the area

  7. Mapping the formation areas of giant molybdenum blue clusters: a spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botar, Bogdan; Ellern, Arkady; Kogerler, Paul

    2012-05-18

    The self-assembly of soluble molybdenum blue species from simple molybdate solutions has primarily been associated with giant mixed-valent wheel-shaped cluster anions, derived from the {MoV/VI154/176} archetypes, and a {MoV/VI368} lemon-shaped cluster. The combined use of Raman spectroscopy and kinetic precipitation as self-assembly monitoring techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction is key to mapping the realm of molybdenum blue species by establishing spherical {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates as an important giant molybdenum blue-type species. We additionally rationalize the empirical effect of reducing agent concentration on the formation of all three relevant skeletal types: wheel, lemon and spheres. Whereas both wheels and the lemon-shaped {MoV/VI368} cluster are obtained from weakly reduced molybdenum blue solutions, considerably higher reduced solutions lead to {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates.

  8. Fig.3. Seismicity plots showing the depths and epicenters on Galapagos Is-lands. Note how the earthquakes are clustered at 10 km depth, probably contro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Dennis

    Bolivar). LAT LONG Fig.6. The GV01-GV04 baseline has recorded vertical uplift since the 2005 eruption with the vertical bars: Red = 2005 Sierra Negra, Blue= 2006 and Orange= 2007. The shallow and cluster seismicity= 2006 and Orange= 2007. A GV01GV07 2 km 0 Deep magma source B Sill magma Chamber body GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM

  9. Evaluating geostatistical modeling of exceedance probability as the first step in disease cluster investigations: very low birth weights near toxic Texas sites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, James A; Bissett, Wesley T; Sweeney, Anne M

    2014-06-07

    for the disease cluster. However, most investigations end with theprobability as the first ste investigations: very low b toxic Texas sites James A Thompson1*, Wesley T Bissett1 and Anne M Swe Abstract Background: The first step in evaluating potential geogra...

  10. 1072 IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 31, NO. 6, JUNE 2013 Consensus, Polarization and Clustering of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qing

    , Polarization and Clustering of Opinions in Social Networks Lin Li, Anna Scaglione, Ananthram Swami, and Qing. in 2000, to provide new analytical insights on the opinion dynamics in a social group. We model the trust transition from opinion polarization to consensus. Furthermore, we extend the hard- interaction model

  11. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and Migration Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dong; Hu, Wangyu; Gao, Fei; Deng, Huiqiu; Sun, Lixian

    2011-03-02

    Transition state searches have been employed to investigate the migration mechanisms of W clusters on W nanoparticles, and to determine the corresponding migration energies for the possible migration paths of these clusters. The tungsten clusters containing up to four adatoms are found to prefer 2D-compact structures with relatively low binding energies. The effect of interface and vertex regions on the migration behavior of the clusters is significantly strong, as compared to that of nanoparticle size. The migration mechanisms are quite different when the clusters are located at the center of the nanoparticle and near the interface or vertex areas. Near the interfaces and vertex areas, the substrate atoms tend to participate in the migration processes of the clusters, and can join the adatoms to form a larger cluster or lead to the dissociation of a cluster via the exchange mechanism, which results in the adatom crossing the facets. The lowest energy paths are used to be determined the energy barriers for W cluster migrations (from 1- to 4-atoms) on the facets, edges and vertex regions. The calculated energy barriers for the trimers suggest that the concerted migration is more probable than the successive jumping of a single adatom in the clusters. In addition, it of interest to note that the dimer shearing is a dominant migration mechanism for the tetramer, but needs to overcome a relatively higher migration energy than other clusters.

  12. Photon Clusters in Thermal Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksey Ilyin

    2014-10-30

    Within the framework of Bose-Einstein statistics, it is shown that the blackbody radiation, in addition to single photons, contains photon clusters, or coalescent photons. The probability to find a k-photon cluster versus radiation frequency and temperature is found, as well as the statistics of clusters. Spectra of photon-cluster radiation are calculated as functions of blackbody temperature. The Planck's radiation law is derived based on the existence of photon clusters. The possibility of experimental observation of photon clusters in thermal radiation is discussed.

  13. Intro Probability Rabbits Description Predictions Ontology of Earthquake Probability: Metaphor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Philip B.

    Intro Probability Rabbits Description Predictions Ontology of Earthquake Probability: Metaphor be abandoned in favor of common sense. #12;Intro Probability Rabbits Description Predictions Earthquake not random. ­Wm. ShakesEarth #12;Intro Probability Rabbits Description Predictions Earthquake Poker

  14. Hume, Induction, Probability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    Hume, Induction, and Probability Peter J.R. Millican The University of Leeds Department is to understand Hume's famous argument concerning induction, and to appraise its success in establishing its for the argument (§4.3); (g) Refutation of Stove's well-known alternative diagram (§5.1); (h) Likewise of Stove

  15. The Logic of Parametric Probability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    The computational method of parametric probability analysis is introduced. It is demonstrated how to embed logical formulas from the propositional calculus into parametric probability networks, thereby enabling sound reasoning about the probabilities of logical propositions. An alternative direct probability encoding scheme is presented, which allows statements of implication and quantification to be modeled directly as constraints on conditional probabilities. Several example problems are solved, from Johnson-Laird's aces to Smullyan's zombies. Many apparently challenging problems in logic turn out to be simple problems in algebra and computer science; often just systems of polynomial equations or linear optimization problems. This work extends the mathematical logic and parametric probability methods invented by George Boole.

  16. Emptiness Formation Probability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Crawford; Stephen Ng; Shannon Starr

    2014-12-30

    We present rigorous upper and lower bounds on the emptiness formation probability for the ground state of a spin-$1/2$ Heisenberg XXZ quantum spin system. For a $d$-dimensional system we find a rate of decay of the order $\\exp(-c L^{d+1})$ where $L$ is the sidelength of the box in which we ask for the emptiness formation event to occur. In the $d=1$ case this confirms previous predictions made in the integrable systems community, though our bounds do not achieve the precision predicted by Bethe ansatz calculations. On the other hand, our bounds in the case $d \\geq 2$ are new. The main tools we use are reflection positivity and a rigorous path integral expansion which is a variation on those previously introduced by Toth, Aizenman-Nachtergaele and Ueltschi.

  17. Robust Minimax Probability Machine Regression Robust Minimax Probability Machine Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grudic, Greg

    Robust Minimax Probability Machine Regression Robust Minimax Probability Machine Regression Thomas of Computer Science University of Colorado Boulder, C0 80309-0430, USA Abstract We formulate regression as maximizing the minimum probability () that the regression model is within ± of all future observations (i

  18. The Arches Cluster: Extended Structure and Tidal Radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosek, Matthew W; Anderson, Jay; Ghez, Andrea M; Morris, Mark R; Clarkson, William I

    2015-01-01

    At a projected distance of ~26 pc from Sgr A*, the Arches cluster provides insight to star formation in the extreme Galactic Center (GC) environment. Despite its importance, many key properties such as the cluster's internal structure and orbital history are not well known. We present an astrometric and photometric study of the outer region of the Arches cluster (R > 6.25") using HST WFC3IR. Using proper motions we calculate membership probabilities for stars down to F153M = 20 mag (~2.5 M_sun) over a 120" x 120" field of view, an area 144 times larger than previous astrometric studies of the cluster. We construct the radial profile of the Arches to a radius of 75" (~3 pc at 8 kpc), which can be well described by a single power law. From this profile we place a 3-sigma lower limit of 2.8 pc on the observed tidal radius, which is larger than the predicted tidal radius (1 - 2.5 pc). Evidence of mass segregation is observed throughout the cluster and no tidal tail structures are apparent along the orbital path. ...

  19. Probability and complex quantum trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, Moncy V. [Department of Physics, St. Thomas College, Kozhencherry, Pathanamthitta, Kerala 689 641 (India)], E-mail: moneyjohn@yahoo.co.uk

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that in the complex trajectory representation of quantum mechanics, the Born's {psi}*{psi} probability density can be obtained from the imaginary part of the velocity field of particles on the real axis. Extending this probability axiom to the complex plane, we first attempt to find a probability density by solving an appropriate conservation equation. The characteristic curves of this conservation equation are found to be the same as the complex paths of particles in the new representation. The boundary condition in this case is that the extended probability density should agree with the quantum probability rule along the real line. For the simple, time-independent, one-dimensional problems worked out here, we find that a conserved probability density can be derived from the velocity field of particles, except in regions where the trajectories were previously suspected to be nonviable. An alternative method to find this probability density in terms of a trajectory integral, which is easier to implement on a computer and useful for single particle solutions, is also presented. Most importantly, we show, by using the complex extension of Schrodinger equation, that the desired conservation equation can be derived from this definition of probability density.

  20. Outage probability at finite SNR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akçaba, Cemal

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, we present a technique to reduce the outage probability of a single user multiple input multiple output (MIMO) channel when a sub-optimal transceiver architecture is used. We show that in slow-fading ...

  1. Joint probabilities and quantum cognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acacio de Barros, J. [Liberal Studies, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)

    2012-12-18

    In this paper we discuss the existence of joint probability distributions for quantumlike response computations in the brain. We do so by focusing on a contextual neural-oscillator model shown to reproduce the main features of behavioral stimulus-response theory. We then exhibit a simple example of contextual random variables not having a joint probability distribution, and describe how such variables can be obtained from neural oscillators, but not from a quantum observable algebra.

  2. Analytic bounds on transmission probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonserm, Petarpa

    2009-01-01

    We develop some new analytic bounds on transmission probabilities (and the related reflection probabilities and Bogoliubov coefficients) for generic one-dimensional scattering problems. To do so we rewrite the Schrodinger equation for some complicated potential whose properties we are trying to investigate in terms of some simpler potential whose properties are assumed known, plus a (possibly large) "shift" in the potential. Doing so permits us to extract considerable useful information without having to exactly solve the full scattering problem.

  3. Joint probability distributions for projection probabilities of random orthonormal states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Alonso; T. Gorin

    2015-10-19

    A finite dimensional quantum system for which the quantum chaos conjecture applies has eigenstates, which show the same statistical properties than the column vectors of random orthogonal or unitary matrices. Here, we consider the different probabilities for obtaining a specific outcome in a projective measurement, provided the system is in one of its eigenstates. We then give analytic expressions for the joint probability density for these probabilities, with respect to the ensemble of random matrices. In the case of the unitary group, our results can be applied, also, to the phenomenon of universal conductance fluctuations, where the same mathematical quantities describe partial conductances in a two-terminal mesoscopic scattering problem with a finite number of modes in each terminal.

  4. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 11 Wiley Huetterties and C. M.Submitted to the Journal of Organometallic ChemistryCLUSTER CHEMISTRY Earl L. Muetterties TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY May

  5. Fusion Probability in Dinuclear System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juhee Hong

    2015-03-26

    Fusion can be described by the time evolution of a dinuclear system with two degrees of freedom, the relative motion and transfer of nucleons. In the presence of the coupling between two collective modes, we solve the Fokker-Planck equation in a locally harmonic approximation. The potential of a dinuclear system has the quasifission barrier and the inner fusion barrier, and the escape rates can be calculated by the Kramers' model. To estimate the fusion probability, we calculate the quasifission rate and the fusion rate. We investigate the coupling effects on the fusion probability and the cross section of evaporation residue.

  6. Cluster generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donchev, Todor I. (Urbana, IL); Petrov, Ivan G. (Champaign, IL)

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  7. Cluster Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode Cluster Compatibility Mode Edison Genepool

  8. Cluster Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode Cluster Compatibility Mode Edison

  9. Black holes in young stellar clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Sanghamitra; Kiel, Paul; Rasio, Frederic A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present theoretical models for stellar black hole (BH) properties in young, massive star clusters. Using a Monte Carlo code for stellar dynamics, we model realistic star clusters with N ? 5 × 10{sup 5} stars and significant binary fractions (up to 50%) with self-consistent treatments of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. We compute the formation rates and characteristic properties of single and binary BHs for various representative ages, cluster parameters, and metallicities. Because of dynamical interactions and supernova (SN) kicks, more single BHs end up retained in clusters compared to BHs in binaries. We also find that the ejection of BHs from a cluster is a strong function of initial density. In low-density clusters (where dynamical effects are negligible), it is mainly SN kicks that eject BHs from the cluster, whereas in high-density clusters (initial central density ? {sub c}(0) ? 10{sup 5} M {sub ?} pc{sup –3} in our models) the BH ejection rate is enhanced significantly by dynamics. Dynamical interactions of binary systems in dense clusters also modify the orbital period and eccentricity distributions while increasing the probability of a BH having a more massive companion.

  10. Lectures on probability and statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yost, G.P.

    1984-09-01

    These notes are based on a set of statistics lectures delivered at Imperial College to the first-year postgraduate students in High Energy Physics. They are designed for the professional experimental scientist. We begin with the fundamentals of probability theory, in which one makes statements about the set of possible outcomes of an experiment, based upon a complete a priori understanding of the experiment. For example, in a roll of a set of (fair) dice, one understands a priori that any given side of each die is equally likely to turn up. From that, we can calculate the probability of any specified outcome. We finish with the inverse problem, statistics. Here, one begins with a set of actual data (e.g., the outcomes of a number of rolls of the dice), and attempts to make inferences about the state of nature which gave those data (e.g., the likelihood of seeing any given side of any given die turn up). This is a much more difficult problem, of course, and one's solutions often turn out to be unsatisfactory in one respect or another.

  11. Identification of Local Clusters for Count Data: A Model-Based Moran's I Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tonglin

    in detecting local clusters by local association terms with an acceptable type I error probability. When usedIdentification of Local Clusters for Count Data: A Model-Based Moran's I Test Tonglin Zhang and Ge@wvu.edu 0 #12;Identification of Local Clusters for Count Data: A Model-Based Moran's I Test Abstract We set

  12. Wide field imaging of distant clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Treu

    2004-08-05

    Wide field imaging is key to understanding the build-up of distant clusters and their galaxy population. By focusing on the so far unexplored outskirts of clusters, where infalling galaxies first hit the cluster potential and the hot intracluster medium, we can help separate cosmological field galaxy evolution from that driven by environment. I present a selection of recent advancements in this area, with particular emphasis on Hubble Space Telescope wide field imaging, for its superior capability to deliver galaxy morphologies and precise shear maps of distant clusters.

  13. PHAT Stellar Cluster Survey. II. Andromeda Project Cluster Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, L Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Wallace, Matthew L; Simpson, Robert J; Lintott, Chris J; Kapadia, Amit; Skillman, Evan D; Caldwell, Nelson; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R; Williams, Benjamin F; Beerman, Lori C; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Sarajedini, Ata

    2015-01-01

    We construct a stellar cluster catalog for the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey using image classifications collected from the Andromeda Project citizen science website. We identify 2,753 clusters and 2,270 background galaxies within ~0.5 deg$^2$ of PHAT imaging searched, or ~400 kpc$^2$ in deprojected area at the distance of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). These identifications result from 1.82 million classifications of ~20,000 individual images (totaling ~7 gigapixels) by tens of thousands of volunteers. We show that our crowd-sourced approach, which collects >80 classifications per image, provides a robust, repeatable method of cluster identification. The high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope images resolve individual stars in each cluster and are instrumental in the factor of ~6 increase in the number of clusters known within the survey footprint. We measure integrated photometry in six filter passbands, ranging from the near-UV to the near-IR. PHAT clusters span a range of ~8 ma...

  14. Global synchronization of bursting neurons in clustered networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. S. Batista; R. V. Nunes; A. M. Batista; R. L. Viana; S. R. Lopes; T. Pereira

    2010-12-20

    We investigate the collective dynamics of bursting neurons on clustered network. The clustered network is composed of subnetworks each presenting a small-world property, and in a given subnetwork each neuron has a probability to be connected to the other subnetworks. We give bounds for the critical coupling strength to obtain global burst synchronization in terms of the network structure, i.e., intracluster and intercluster probabilities connections. As the heterogeneity in the network is reduced the network global synchronization is improved. We show that the transitions to global synchrony may be abrupt or smooth depending on the intercluster probability.

  15. Modeling probability distributions with predictive state representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiewiora, Eric Walter

    2008-01-01

    Discovery is the process of choosing the core tests, whose success probabilities will become the state of the learned model.

  16. Geographic Resource Map of Frozen Pipe Probabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation slide details a resource map showing the probability of frozen pipes in the geographic United States.

  17. Stormy Weather and Cluster Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. O. Burns; C. Loken; K. Roettiger; E. Rizza; G. Bryan; M. L. Norman; P. Gomez; F. N. Owen

    1999-08-31

    New adaptive mesh refinement N-body + hydrodynamics numerical simulations are used to illustrate the complex and changing cluster environments in which many radio galaxies live and evolve. Groups and clusters of galaxies form at the intersections of filaments where they continue to accrete gas and dark matter to the present day. The accretion process produces shocks, turbulence, and transonic bulk flows forming a kind of stormy weather within the intracluster medium (ICM). Radio sources embedded within the stormy ICM form distorted, complex morphologies as observed in recent VLA cluster surveys. We show that the bending of wide-angle tailed radio sources can be understood as the result of recent cluster-subcluster mergers. We use new MHD simulations to illustrate how cluster radio halos can be formed by the shocks and turbulence produced during cluster mergers. Finally, we discuss new observations of distant Abell clusters that reveal a class of weak radio sources, probably starbursts, likely produced during the formation of the clusters as they accrete material from the supercluster environment.

  18. Probability in the Engineering and Informational Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Probability in the Engineering and Informational Sciences http://journals.cambridge.org/PES Additional services for Probability in the Engineering and Informational Sciences: Email alerts: Click here Probability in the Engineering and Informational Sciences / Volume 8 / Issue 02 / April 1994, pp 287 290 DOI

  19. Outage Probability Under Channel Distribution Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loyka, Sergey

    Outage Probability Under Channel Distribution Uncertainty Ioanna Ioannou, Charalambos D. Charalambous and Sergey Loyka Abstract--Outage probability of a class of block-fading (MIMO) channels outage probability defined as min (over the input distribution) -max (over the channel distribution class

  20. Identifying Geographic Clusters: A Network Analytic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catini, Roberto; Penner, Orion; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in the role of networks and clusters in the global economy. Despite being a popular research topic in economics, sociology and urban studies, geographical clustering of human activity has often studied been by means of predetermined geographical units such as administrative divisions and metropolitan areas. This approach is intrinsically time invariant and it does not allow one to differentiate between different activities. Our goal in this paper is to present a new methodology for identifying clusters, that can be applied to different empirical settings. We use a graph approach based on k-shell decomposition to analyze world biomedical research clusters based on PubMed scientific publications. We identify research institutions and locate their activities in geographical clusters. Leading areas of scientific production and their top performing research institutions are consistently identified at different geographic scales.

  1. Global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way III. 139 new open clusters at high Galactic latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmeja, S; Piskunov, A E; Röser, S; Schilbach, E; Froebrich, D; Scholz, R -D

    2014-01-01

    An earlier analysis of the Milky Way Star Cluster (MWSC) catalogue revealed an apparent lack of old (> 1 Gyr) open clusters in the solar neighbourhood ( 20{\\deg}. We were looking for stellar density enhancements using a star count algorithm on the 2MASS point source catalogue. To increase the contrast between potential clusters and the field, we applied filters in colour-magnitude space according to typical colour-magnitude diagrams of nearby old open clusters. The subsequent comparison with lists of known objects allowed us to select thus far unknown cluster candidates. For verification they were processed with the standard pipeline used within the MWSC survey for computing cluster membership probabilities and for determining structural, kinematic, and astrophysical parameters. In total we discovered 782 density enhancements, 522 of which were classified as real objects. Among them 139 are new open clusters with ages 8.3 < log (t [yr]) < 9.7, distances d < 3 kpc, and distances from the Galactic plan...

  2. Probability and Quantum Paradigms: the Interplay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kracklauer, A. F. [Bauhaus Universitaet, PF 2040, 99401 Weimar (Germany)

    2007-12-03

    Since the introduction of Born's interpretation of quantum wave functions as yielding the probability density of presence, Quantum Theory and Probability have lived in a troubled symbiosis. Problems arise with this interpretation because quantum probabilities exhibit features alien to usual probabilities, namely non Boolean structure and non positive-definite phase space probability densities. This has inspired research into both elaborate formulations of Probability Theory and alternate interpretations for wave functions. Herein the latter tactic is taken and a suggested variant interpretation of wave functions based on photo detection physics proposed, and some empirical consequences are considered. Although incomplete in a few details, this variant is appealing in its reliance on well tested concepts and technology.

  3. Bayesian Probabilities and the Histories Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-03-06

    We attempt a justification of a generalisation of the consistent histories programme using a notion of probability that is valid for all complete sets of history propositions. This consists of introducing Cox's axioms of probability theory and showing that our candidate notion of probability obeys them. We also give a generalisation of Bayes' theorem and comment upon how Bayesianism should be useful for the quantum gravity/cosmology programmes.

  4. Average transmission probability of a random stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin Lu; Christian Miniatura; Berthold-Georg Englert

    2009-07-31

    The transmission through a stack of identical slabs that are separated by gaps with random widths is usually treated by calculating the average of the logarithm of the transmission probability. We show how to calculate the average of the transmission probability itself with the aid of a recurrence relation and derive analytical upper and lower bounds. The upper bound, when used as an approximation for the transmission probability, is unreasonably good and we conjecture that it is asymptotically exact.

  5. Modern Probability Theory and Its Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parzen, Emanuel

    1960-01-01

    who have contributed to this book by their comments, I offer my thanks. Particularly valuable assistance has been rendered by E. Dalton and D. Ylvisaker and also by M. Boswell and P. Williams. To the cheerful, hard-working staff of the Applied... drawings. Stanford, California January 1960 EMANUEL PARZEN Contents CHAPTER PROBABILITY THEORY AS THE STUDY OF MATHEMATICAL MODELS OF RANDOM PHENOMENA Probability theory as the study of random phenomena 2 Probability theory as the study...

  6. Probability Theory: The Logic of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    of Probability Theory Chapter 16 Orthodox Statistics: Historical Background Chapter 17 Principles and Pathology Marginalization Theory Chapter 27 Communication Theory Chapter 28 Optimal Antenna and Filter Design Chapter 29 Statistical Mechanics Chapter 30 Conclusions APPENDICES Appendix A Other Approaches to Probability Theory

  7. Analytical Study of Thermonuclear Reaction Probability Integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Chaudhry; H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16

    An analytic study of the reaction probability integrals corresponding to the various forms of the slowly varying cross-section factor $S(E)$ is attempted. Exact expressions for reaction probability integrals are expressed in terms of the extended gamma functions.

  8. 18.05 Introduction to Probability and Statistics, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panchenko, Dmitry

    This course provides an elementary introduction to probability and statistics with applications. Topics include: basic probability models; combinatorics; random variables; discrete and continuous probability distributions; ...

  9. Structural insight into the assembly of iron-sulfur clusters and their function in radical generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vey, Jessica L. (Jessica Lynn)

    2008-01-01

    This thesis addresses two emerging areas in the study of iron-sulfur cluster biochemistry: bioassembly of iron-sulfur clusters, and their involvement in initiation of radical chemistry. The structure of a cysteine desulfurase ...

  10. Information Propagation in Clustered Multilayer Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    In today's world, individuals interact with each other in more complicated patterns than ever. Some individuals engage through online social networks (e.g., Facebook, Twitter), while some communicate only through conventional ways (e.g., face-to-face). Therefore, understanding the dynamics of information propagation among humans calls for a multi-layer network model where an online social network is conjoined with a physical network. In this work, we initiate a study of information diffusion in a clustered multi-layer network model, where all constituent layers are random networks with high clustering. We assume that information propagates according to the SIR model and with different information transmissibility across the networks. We give results for the conditions, probability, and size of information epidemics, i.e., cases where information starts from a single individual and reaches a positive fraction of the population. We show that increasing the level of clustering in either one of the layers increas...

  11. SLIGHTLY MORE REALISTIC PERSONAL PROBABILITY IAN HACKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    SLIGHTLY MORE REALISTIC PERSONAL PROBABILITY IAN HACKING Makerere U~ziversityCollege A person's work are to this article. #12;312 I&? HACKING The third one, though it will appeal to logicians, might

  12. A Monotonicity Property of Binomial Probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Sergiu

    A Monotonicity Property of Binomial Probabilities Sergiu Hart Benjamin Weiss May 11, 2008 Let n 1 of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem, Israel. e-mail: hart@huji.ac.il web page: http://www.ma.huji.ac.il/hart

  13. Probability distribution of the vacuum energy density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duplancic, Goran; Stefancic, Hrvoje; Glavan, Drazen

    2010-12-15

    As the vacuum state of a quantum field is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian density, the vacuum energy density can be represented as a random variable. We present an analytical calculation of the probability distribution of the vacuum energy density for real and complex massless scalar fields in Minkowski space. The obtained probability distributions are broad and the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian density is not fully representative of the vacuum energy density.

  14. IAU Commission 37 "Star Clusters and Associations" Legacy report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carraro, Giovanni; Elmegreen, Bruce; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Geisler, Douglas; Goodwin, Simon; Stetson, Peter; Minniti, Dante

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that stars do not form in isolation but result from the fragmentation of molecular clouds, which in turn leads to star cluster formation. Over time, clusters dissolve or are destroyed by interactions with molecular clouds or tidal stripping, and their members become part of the general field population. Star clusters are thus among the basic building blocks of galaxies. In turn, star cluster populations, from young associations and open clusters to old globulars, are powerful tracers of the formation, assembly, and evolutionary history of their parent galaxies. Although their importance had been recognised for decades, major progress in this area has only become possible in recent years, both for Galactic and extragalactic cluster populations. Star clusters are the observational foundation for stellar astrophysics and evolution, provide essential tracers of galactic structure, and are unique stellar dynamical environments. Star formation, stellar structure, stellar evolution, and stellar...

  15. THE MEMBERSHIP AND DISTANCE OF THE OPEN CLUSTER COLLINDER 419

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Lewis C.; Gies, Douglas R.; Parks, J. Robert; Grundstrom, Erika D.; McSwain, M. Virginia; Berger, David H.; Mason, Brian D.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.ed E-mail: erika.grundstrom@vanderbilt.ed E-mail: dberger@sysplan.co E-mail: theo@chara-array.or

    2010-09-15

    The young open cluster Collinder 419 surrounds the massive O star, HD 193322, that is itself a remarkable multiple star system containing at least four components. Here we present a discussion of the cluster distance based upon new spectral classifications of the brighter members, UBV photometry, and an analysis of astrometric and photometric data from the third U. S. Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog and Two Micron All Sky Survey Catalog. We determine an average cluster reddening of E(B - V) = 0.37 {+-} 0.05 mag and a cluster distance of 741 {+-} 36 pc. The cluster probably contains some very young stars that may include a reddened M3 III star, IRAS 20161+4035.

  16. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    purpose of this study was to identify probable recharge areas and length of time for groundwater discharge from the Kilauea rift zones. Interpretations were based on isotropic...

  17. Resource-Efficient Generataion of Linear Cluster States by Linear Optics with postselection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uskov, Dmitry B [Brescia University, Kentucky; Alsing, Paul [Air Force Research Laboratory; Fanto, Michael [Air Force Research Laboratory; Kaplan, Lev [Tulane University; Kim, R [University of Dayton Research Institute; Szep, Atilla [Air Force Research Laboratory; Smith IV, Amos M [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We report on theoretical research in photonic cluster-state computing. Finding optimal schemes of generating non-classical photonic states is of critical importance for this field as physically implementable photon-photon entangling operations are currently limited to measurement-assisted stochastic transformations. A critical parameter for assessing the efficiency of such transformations is the success probability of a desired measurement outcome. At present there are several experimental groups that are capable of generating multi-photon cluster states carrying more than eight qubits. Separate photonic qubits or small clusters can be fused into a single cluster state by a probabilistic optical CZ gate conditioned on simultaneous detection of all photons with 1/9 success probability for each gate. This design mechanically follows the original theoretical scheme of cluster state generation proposed more than a decade ago by Raussendorf, Browne, and Briegel. The optimality of the destructive CZ gate in application to linear optical cluster state generation has not been analyzed previously. Our results reveal that this method is far from the optimal one. Employing numerical optimization we have identified that the maximal success probability of fusing n unentangled dual-rail optical qubits into a linear cluster state is equal to 1/2^n-1; an m-tuple of photonic Bell pair states, commonly generated via spontaneous parametric down-conversion, can be fused into a single cluster with the maximal success probability of 1/4^m-1.

  18. NGC 7789: An open cluster case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbeek, Jamie C.; Friel, Eileen D.; Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Mészáros, Szabolcs [Indiana University Astronomy Department, Swain West 319, 727 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Jacobson, Heather R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Johnson, Christian I., E-mail: joverbee@indiana.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution spectra of 32 giants in the open cluster NGC 7789 using the Wisconsin–Indiana–Yale–NOAO Hydra spectrograph. We explore differences in atmospheric parameters and elemental abundances caused by the use of the linelist developed for the Gaia-ESO Survey (GES) compared to one based on Arcturus used in our previous work. [Fe/H] values decrease when using the GES linelist instead of the Arcturus-based linelist; these differences are probably driven by systematically lower (??0.1 dex) GES surface gravities. Using the GES linelist we determine abundances for 10 elements—Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Na, Ni, Zr, Ba, and La. We find the cluster's average metallicity [Fe/H] = 0.03 ± 0.07 dex, in good agreement with literature values, and a lower [Mg/Fe] abundance than has been reported before for this cluster (0.11 ± 0.05 dex). We also find the neutron-capture element barium to be highly enhanced—[Ba/Fe] = +0.48 ± 0.08—and disparate from cluster measurements of neutron-capture elements La and Zr (?0.08 ± 0.05 and 0.08 ± 0.08, respectively). This is in accordance with recent discoveries of supersolar Ba enhancement in young clusters along with more modest enhancement of other neutron-capture elements formed in similar environments.

  19. Data Clustering Using Evidence Accumulation Ana L.N. Fred

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    number of compact clusters; the K-means algorithm performs this decomposition, with several clusterings addressed in areas like sensor fusion and supervised learning techniques in pattern recognition - known into a large number of compact and small clus- ters; different decompositions are obtained by random ini

  20. Reassessment of the BWR scram failure probability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    As part of the Severe Accident Policy Statement implementation, the probabilistic quantification of accident sequence frequencies that may lead to core damage is a key element in demonstrating a plant's safety status relative to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff goals. One of the key quantitative inputs in a boiling water reactor (BWR) probabilistic risk assessment is the probability of a failure to scram. The assessment of this failure probability has been the subject of a long and continuing debate over the adequacy of available data and analytic modeling. This report provides a summary of the status of this debate, including the latest data, and provides a revision to the characterization of the failure probability originally published in NUREG 0460 and the Utility Group on Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) Petition.

  1. Electric quadrupole transition probabilities for atomic lithium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Çelik, Gültekin; Gökçe, Yasin; Y?ld?z, Murat

    2014-05-15

    Electric quadrupole transition probabilities for atomic lithium have been calculated using the weakest bound electron potential model theory (WBEPMT). We have employed numerical non-relativistic Hartree–Fock wavefunctions for expectation values of radii and the necessary energy values have been taken from the compilation at NIST. The results obtained with the present method agree very well with the Coulomb approximation results given by Caves (1975). Moreover, electric quadrupole transition probability values not existing in the literature for some highly excited levels have been obtained using the WBEPMT.

  2. CLUSTERING BY HYPERBOLIC SMOOTHING Cluster analysis ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-07-31

    Jul 31, 2007 ... Cluster analysis deals with the problems of classification of a set of patterns or observa- ..... tine Library (http://www.cse.scitech.ac.uk/nag/hsl/).

  3. Useful Probability Distributions Standard Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the proportion t as a variable which is continuous over the interval (0,1) For small consignments, say N Consignment of tablets, a proportion of which are suspected drugs. For large consignments, probability distribution of the proportion t which are drugs can be modeled with a beta distribution, which treats

  4. A Formulation for Minimax Probability Machine Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grudic, Greg

    A Formulation for Minimax Probability Machine Regression Thomas Strohmann Department of Computer Science University of Colorado, Boulder grudic@cs.colorado.edu Abstract We formulate the regression of the regression model will be within some ± bound of the true regression function. Our formulation is unique

  5. MAS275 Probability Modelling 2 Renewal Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Jonathan

    MAS275 Probability Modelling 2 Renewal Theory 2.1 Renewal processes in discrete time Renewal will model the lengths of time between renewals (e.g. the life-lengths of light bulbs) as random variables there is an occurrence called a renewal, and at the points of time between these renewals, nothing happens. For example

  6. CAPES 2013 PROBABILITY and STATISTICS Ttulo ISSN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreira, Carlos Gustavo

    -0918 Communications Series A1 Mathematics & Statistics 1303-5911 Computational and mathematical organization theory-5483 Communications in Mathematical Physics 0010-3616 Communications in statistics. Simulation and computation 0361 communications in probability 1083-589X Electronic journal of applied statistical analysis 2070-5948 Electronic

  7. STATISTICS 8 -REVIEW FOR SECOND EXAM (CHAPTERS 7 TO 10, EXCEPT PARTS OF 9) 1. Understand interpretations of probability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utts, Jessica

    related to probability (Section 7.7 & Oct 27 lecture) CHAPTER 8: 1. Identify discrete versus continuous a continuous random variable is, and how probabilities are found (areas under curves). Know how to find summary on pgs 382-383) 4. Find the sampling distribution for one proportion given a value for p and n

  8. Electron: Cluster interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheidemann, A.A.; Kresin, V.V.; Knight, W.D.

    1994-02-01

    Beam depletion spectroscopy has been used to measure absolute total inelastic electron-sodium cluster collision cross sections in the energy range from E {approximately} 0.1 to E {approximately} 6 eV. The investigation focused on the closed shell clusters Na{sub 8}, Na{sub 20}, Na{sub 40}. The measured cross sections show an increase for the lowest collision energies where electron attachment is the primary scattering channel. The electron attachment cross section can be understood in terms of Langevin scattering, connecting this measurement with the polarizability of the cluster. For energies above the dissociation energy the measured electron-cluster cross section is energy independent, thus defining an electron-cluster interaction range. This interaction range increases with the cluster size.

  9. The 60% Efficient Diesel Engine: Probably, Possible, Or Just...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The 60% Efficient Diesel Engine: Probably, Possible, Or Just a Fantasy? The 60% Efficient Diesel Engine: Probably, Possible, Or Just a Fantasy? 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  10. Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beersma, Jules

    Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities Jules Beersma #12;Promotor: Prof. dr. A Onderzoekschool (BBOS) #12;Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities Extreme hydro

  11. Optimum phase space probabilities from quantum tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Arunabha S.; Roy, S. M.

    2014-01-15

    We determine a positive normalised phase space probability distribution P with minimum mean square fractional deviation from the Wigner distribution W. The minimum deviation, an invariant under phase space rotations, is a quantitative measure of the quantumness of the state. The positive distribution closest to W will be useful in quantum mechanics and in time frequency analysis. The position-momentum correlations given by the distribution can be tested experimentally in quantum optics.

  12. Pion-capture probabilities in organic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.F.; Lewis, C.A.; O'Leary, K.

    1982-06-01

    Experimental results are presented for atomic-capture probabilities of negative pions in organic molecules. The data are analyzed in terms of atomic and molecular models. This analysis shows that the Fermi-Teller law (Z law) and its modifications do not give an adequate description of the data, but that a mesomolecular model together with hydrogen transfer contains the features essential to fit the data. Clear evidence is given for chemical effects in the pion-capture process.

  13. Law of total probability Sequences of events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Robert J.

    {Second black} = P{Second red} and sum is 1! 3 #12;' & $ % Example 2: Poisonned chocolates · k chocolates in a box of N are poisoned. 2 chocolates are are drawn at random. What is the probability that the second chocolate is poisoned? P{2nd poison} = P{2nd poison|1st poison}P{1st poison} + P{2nd poison|1st OK}P{1st OK

  14. Free Energy Changes, Fluctuations, and Path Probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William G. Hoover; Carol G. Hoover

    2011-04-20

    We illustrate some of the static and dynamic relations discovered by Cohen, Crooks, Evans, Jarzynski, Kirkwood, Morriss, Searles, and Zwanzig. These relations link nonequilibrium processes to equilibrium isothermal free energy changes and to dynamical path probabilities. We include ideas suggested by Dellago, Geissler, Oberhofer, and Schoell-Paschinger. Our treatment is intended to be pedagogical, for use in an updated version of our book: Time Reversibility, Computer Simulation, and Chaos. Comments are very welcome.

  15. Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanfilippo, Antonio (Richland, WA); Calapristi, Augustin J. (West Richland, WA); Crow, Vernon L. (Richland, WA); Hetzler, Elizabeth G. (Kennewick, WA); Turner, Alan E. (Kennewick, WA)

    2009-12-22

    Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a document clustering method includes providing a document set comprising a plurality of documents, providing a cluster comprising a subset of the documents of the document set, using a plurality of terms of the documents, providing a cluster label indicative of subject matter content of the documents of the cluster, wherein the cluster label comprises a plurality of word senses, and selecting one of the word senses of the cluster label.

  16. WAS THE SUN BORN IN A MASSIVE CLUSTER?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukes, Donald; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2012-07-20

    A number of authors have argued that the Sun must have been born in a cluster of no more than several thousand stars, on the basis that, in a larger cluster, close encounters between the Sun and other stars would have truncated the outer solar system or excited the outer planets into eccentric orbits. However, this dynamical limit is in tension with meteoritic evidence that the solar system was exposed to a nearby supernova during or shortly after its formation; a several-thousand-star cluster is much too small to produce a massive star whose lifetime is short enough to have provided the enrichment. In this paper, we revisit the dynamical limit in the light of improved observations of the properties of young clusters. We use a series of scattering simulations to measure the velocity-dependent cross-section for disruption of the outer solar system by stellar encounters, and use this cross-section to compute the probability of a disruptive encounter as a function of birth cluster properties. We find that, contrary to prior work, the probability of disruption is small regardless of the cluster mass, and that it actually decreases rather than increases with cluster mass. Our results differ from prior work for three main reasons: (1) unlike in most previous work, we compute a velocity-dependent cross-section and properly integrate over the cluster mass-dependent velocity distribution of incoming stars; (2) we recognize that {approx}90% of clusters have lifetimes of a few crossing times, rather than the 10-100 Myr adopted in many earlier models; and (3) following recent observations, we adopt a mass-independent surface density for embedded clusters, rather than a mass-independent radius as assumed many earlier papers. Our results remove the tension between the dynamical limit and the meteoritic evidence, and suggest that the Sun was born in a massive cluster. A corollary to this result is that close encounters in the Sun's birth cluster are highly unlikely to truncate the Kuiper Belt unless the Sun was born in one of the unusual clusters that survived for tens of Myr. However, we find that encounters could plausibly produce highly eccentric Kuiper Belt objects such as Sedna.

  17. Stacking weak lensing signals of SZ clusters to constrain cluster physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolyn Sealfon; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2006-01-12

    We show how to place constraints on cluster physics by stacking the weak lensing signals from multiple clusters found through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. For a survey that covers about 200 sq. deg. both in SZ and weak lensing observations, the slope and amplitude of the mass vs. SZ luminosity relation can be measured with few percent error for clusters at z~0.5. This can be used to constrain cluster physics, such as the nature of feedback. For example, we can distinguish a pre-heated model from a model with a decreased accretion rate at more than 5sigma. The power to discriminate among different non-gravitational processes in the ICM becomes even stronger if we use the central Compton parameter y_0, which could allow one to distinguish between models with pre-heating, SN feedback and AGN feedback, for example, at more than 5sigma. Measurement of these scaling relations as a function of redshift makes it possible to directly observe e.g., the evolution of the hot gas in clusters. With this approach the mass-L_SZ relation can be calibrated and its uncertainties can be quantified, leading to a more robust determination of cosmological parameters from clusters surveys. The mass-L_SZ relation calibrated in this way from a small area of the sky can be used to determine masses of SZ clusters from very large SZ-only surveys and is nicely complementary to other techniques proposed in the literature.

  18. Conservative Estimates of Blocking and Outage Probabilities in CDMA Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonald, Thomas

    Conservative Estimates of Blocking and Outage Probabilities in CDMA Networks T. Bonald, A. Prouti`ere 1 France Telecom, Division R&D, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France Abstract The outage probability is a key the blocking probability. The blocking and outage probabilities do not have closed-form expressions

  19. Fluid Model of the Outage Probability in Sectored Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    Fluid Model of the Outage Probability in Sectored Wireless Networks Jean-Marc Kelif France Telecom to derive the global outage probability and the spatial outage probability, which depends on the location the derivation of outage probabilities, capacity evaluation and then, the definition of Call Admission Control

  20. Probability Grid: A Location Estimation Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stankovic, John A.

    estimation, grid topology, probability. I. INTRODUCTION Recent advances in micro-electro-mechanical systems

  1. Spin Glass Computations and Ruelle's Probability Cascades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis-Pierre Arguin

    2006-08-17

    We study the Parisi functional, appearing in the Parisi formula for the pressure of the SK model, as a functional on Ruelle's Probability Cascades (RPC). Computation techniques for the RPC formulation of the functional are developed. They are used to derive continuity and monotonicity properties of the functional retrieving a theorem of Guerra. We also detail the connection between the Aizenman-Sims-Starr variational principle and the Parisi formula. As a final application of the techniques, we rederive the Almeida-Thouless line in the spirit of Toninelli but relying on the RPC structure.

  2. Sampling with unequal probabilities and without replacement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleibrink, Ronald Gus

    1966-01-01

    . 6105 . 5161 . 6210 9 1. 0000 1. 0000 1. 0000 1. 0000 ~ 1796 . 5217 . 7073 . 6105 . 5161 . 5889 Specifically the normalized sizes and cumulative normalized. sizes are defined. as (3. 6) pi = n. xi/X so that N (3. 7) Z p = n 1=1 (3. 8) Pi = E p J... to have given the first general theory for sampling with unequal probabilities and without replacement. They used. as an estimate of the population total I for N units, the standard unbiased estimator A n (1 ' 1) I = Z (y / 77 ) i=3 where 77...

  3. Angular clustering in the SUMSS radio survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Blake; Tom Mauch; Elaine M. Sadler

    2003-10-05

    We measure the angular correlation function of radio galaxies selected by the 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS). We find that the characteristic imprint of large-scale structure is clearly detectable, and that the survey is very uniform. Through comparison with similar analyses for other wide-area radio surveys - the 1400 MHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the 325 MHz Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) - we are able to derive consistent angular clustering parameters, including a steep slope for the clustering function, $w(\\theta) \\propto \\theta^{-1.1}$. We revise upwards previous estimates of the NVSS clustering amplitude, and find no evidence for dependence of clustering properties on radio frequency. It is important to incorporate the full covariance matrix when fitting parameters to the measured correlation function. Once the redshift distribution for mJy radio galaxies has been determined, these projected clustering measurements will permit a robust description of large-scale structure at $z \\sim 0.8$, the median redshift of the sources.

  4. Prototypeless Fuzzy Clustering Christian Borgelt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgelt, Christian

    Mieres, Asturias, Spain (email: christian.borgelt@softcomputing.es). The most common fuzzy clustering

  5. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications TheGashome /Areas Research Areas

  6. Data clustering with size constraints Shunzhi Zhu a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tao

    such as image coding clustering, spa- tial clustering in geoinformatics, and document clustering [11

  7. NEW LIMITS ON GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S. E-mail: xdai@ou.edu

    2014-11-01

    Galaxy clusters are predicted to produce ?-rays through cosmic ray interactions and/or dark matter annihilation, potentially detectable by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT). We present a new, independent stacking analysis of Fermi-LAT photon count maps using the 78 richest nearby clusters (z < 0.12) from the Two Micron All Sky Survey cluster catalog. We obtain the lowest limit on the photon flux to date, 2.3 × 10{sup –11} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} (95% confidence) per cluster in the 0.8-100 GeV band, which corresponds to a luminosity limit of 3.5 × 10{sup 44} photons s{sup –1}. We also constrain the emission limits in a range of narrower energy bands. Scaling to recent cosmic ray acceleration and ?-ray emission models, we find that cosmic rays represent a negligible contribution to the intra-cluster energy density and gas pressure.

  8. Open Cluster Open Cluster Open Cluster A group of several thousand stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bechtold, Jill

    Open Cluster Open Cluster Open Cluster A group of several thousand stars which formed within the same nebula. The Pleides, or Seven Sisters, are the most visible stars in this cluster in the Milky Way. Mass:10-10,000 SM StarPower Points: 11 A group of several thousand stars which formed within the same

  9. Some Considerations on the Probability of Nuclear Fission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandenbosch, Robert; Seaborg, Glenn T.

    1957-01-01

    om THE PROBABILITY OF NUCLEAR FISSION Robert Vandenbosch andON TRE PROBABILITY OF NUCLEAR FISSION O E Contents Abstractf is the fission threshold, and the nuclear temperature T is

  10. An Introduction to the Neutrosophic Probability Applied in Quantum Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florentin Smarandache

    2000-10-10

    In this paper one generalizes the classical probability and imprecise probability to the notion of "neutrosophic probability" in order to be able to model Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle of a particle's behavior, Schr"dinger's Cat Theory, and the state of bosons which do not obey Pauli's Exclusion Principle (in quantum physics). Neutrosophic probability is close related to neutrosophic logic and neutrosophic set, and etymologically derived from "neutrosophy".

  11. Free Probability -classical and free CLTs ISI Bangalore, November 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunder, V S

    Free Probability - classical and free CLTs ISI Bangalore, November 2009 V.S. Sunder Institute Probability - classical and free CLTs ISI Bangalore, November 2009 #12;NCPS Definition A non satisfying (1) = 1 V.S. Sunder IMSc, Chennai Free Probability - classical and free CLTs ISI Bangalore

  12. Spatial Outage Probability Formula for CDMA Jean-Marc Kelif

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    Spatial Outage Probability Formula for CDMA Networks Jean-Marc Kelif France Telecom R&D Issy networks called the fluid model and we derive from this model analytical formulas for interference, outage probability, and spatial outage probability. The key idea of the fluid model is to consider the discrete base

  13. Asymptotic Analysis of Outage Probability in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loyka, Sergey

    Asymptotic Analysis of Outage Probability in Cognitive Radio Networks Yaobin Wen, Sergey Loyka but not the outage probability itself. Unlike the cumulant-based analysis, our approach provides a guaranteed level. In particular, we demonstrate that there is a critical transition point below which the outage probability

  14. Spatial Outage Probability for Cellular Networks Jean-Marc Kelif

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    Spatial Outage Probability for Cellular Networks Jean-Marc Kelif France Telecom R&D Issy networks called the fluid model and we derive from this model analytical formulas for interference, outage probability, and spatial outage probability. The key idea of the fluid model is to consider the discrete base

  15. Chapter 1 The Nature of Probability and Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    Chapter 1 The Nature of Probability and Statistics 1.1 Introduction Definition. Statistics based on probability theory. This chapter introduces the basic concepts of probability and statistics by answering questions like: · what are the branches of statistics · what are data · how are samples selected 1

  16. How a False Probability Model Changed the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steele, J. Michael

    How a False Probability Model Changed the World: Birth, Death, and Redemption of Black-Scholes J. Michael Steele March 12, 2008 J. Michael Steele How a False Probability Model Changed the World: Birth Probability Model Changed the World: Birth, Death #12;Introduction: The Special, The Empirical, The Miracle

  17. OPTICAL COLORS OF INTRACLUSTER LIGHT IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER CORE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudick, Craig S.; Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul; Morrison, Heather L. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Feldmeier, John J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Janowiecki, Steven, E-mail: csr10@case.ed [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    We continue our deep optical imaging survey of the Virgo cluster using the CWRU Burrell Schmidt telescope by presenting B-band surface photometry of the core of the Virgo cluster in order to study the cluster's intracluster light (ICL). We find ICL features down to {mu}{sub B} {approx}29 mag arcsec{sup -2}, confirming the results of Mihos et al., who saw a vast web of low surface brightness streams, arcs, plumes, and diffuse light in the Virgo cluster core using V-band imaging. By combining these two data sets, we are able to measure the optical colors of many of the cluster's low surface brightness features. While much of our imaging area is contaminated by galactic cirrus, the cluster core near the cD galaxy, M87, is unobscured. We trace the color profile of M87 out to over 2000'', and find a blueing trend with radius, continuing out to the largest radii. Moreover, we have measured the colors of several ICL features which extend beyond M87's outermost reaches and find that they have similar colors to the M87's halo itself, B - V {approx}0.8. The common colors of these features suggest that the extended outer envelopes of cD galaxies, such as M87, may be formed from similar streams, created by tidal interactions within the cluster, that have since dissolved into a smooth background in the cluster potential.

  18. Lectures on probability and statistics. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yost, G.P.

    1985-06-01

    These notes are based on a set of statistics lectures delivered at Imperial College to the first-year postgraduate students in High Energy Physics. They are designed for the professional experimental scientist. They begin with the fundamentals of probability theory, in which one makes statements about the set of possible outcomes of an experiment, based upon a complete a priori understanding of the experiment. For example, in a roll of a set of (fair) dice, one understands a priori that any given side of each die is equally likely to turn up. From that, we can calculate the probabilty of any specified outcome. They finish with the inverse problem, statistics. Here, one begins with a set of actual data (e.g., the outcomes of a number of rolls of the dice), and attempts to make inferences about the state of nature which gave those data (e.g., the likelihood of seeing any given side of any given die turn up). This is a much more difficult problem, of course, and one's solutions often turn out to be unsatisfactory in one respect or another. Hopefully, the reader will come away from these notes with a feel for some of the problems and uncertainties involved. Although there are standard approaches, most of the time there is no cut and dried ''best'' solution - ''best'' according to every criterion.

  19. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Foy, Bernard R; Wohlberg, Brendt E; Scovel, James C

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  20. Low Probability Tail Event Analysis and Mitigation in BPA Control Area: Task One Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2009-04-01

    This is a report for task one of the tail event analysis project for BPA. Tail event refers to the situation in a power system when unfavorable forecast errors of load and wind are superposed onto fast load and wind ramps, or non-wind generators falling short of scheduled output, the imbalance between generation and load becomes very significant. This type of events occurs infrequently and appears on the tails of the distribution of system power imbalance; therefore, is referred to as tail events. This report analyzes what happened during the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) reliability event on February 26, 2008, which was widely reported because of the involvement of wind generation. The objective is to identify sources of the problem, solutions to it and potential improvements that can be made to the system. Lessons learned from the analysis include the following: (1) Large mismatch between generation and load can be caused by load forecast error, wind forecast error and generation scheduling control error on traditional generators, or a combination of all of the above; (2) The capability of system balancing resources should be evaluated both in capacity (MW) and in ramp rate (MW/min), and be procured accordingly to meet both requirements. The resources need to be able to cover a range corresponding to the variability of load and wind in the system, additional to other uncertainties; (3) Unexpected ramps caused by load and wind can both become the cause leading to serious issues; (4) A look-ahead tool evaluating system balancing requirement during real-time operations and comparing that with available system resources should be very helpful to system operators in predicting the forthcoming of similar events and planning ahead; and (5) Demand response (only load reduction in ERCOT event) can effectively reduce load-generation mismatch and terminate frequency deviation in an emergency situation.

  1. Low Probability Tail Event Analysis and Mitigation in the BPA Control Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Brothers, Alan J.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2010-10-31

    This report investigated the uncertainties with the operations of the power system and their contributions to tail events, especially under high penetration of wind. A Bayesian network model is established to quantify the impact of these uncertainties on system imbalance. The framework is presented for a decision support tool, which can help system operators better estimate the need for balancing reserves and prepare for tail events.

  2. Global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way I. The pipeline and fundamental parameters in the second quadrant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharchenko, N V; Schilbach, E; Röser, S; Scholz, R -D

    2012-01-01

    Aims: On the basis of the PPMXL star catalogue we performed a survey of star clusters in the second quadrant of the Milky Way. Methods: From the PPMXL catalogue of positions and proper motions we took the subset of stars with near-infrared photometry from 2MASS and added the remaining 2MASS stars without proper motions (called 2MAst, i.e. 2MASS with astrometry). We developed a data-processing pipeline including interactive human control of a standardised set of multi-dimensional diagrams to determine kinematic and photometric membership probabilities for stars in a cluster region. The pipeline simultaneously produced the astrophysical parameters of a cluster. From literature we compiled a target list of presently known open and globular clusters, cluster candidates, associations, and moving groups. From established member stars we derived spatial parameters (coordinates of centres and radii of the main morphological parts of clusters) and cluster kinematics (average proper motions and sometimes radial velocit...

  3. Thermodynamics of clusterized matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ad. R. Raduta; F. Gulminelli

    2009-08-26

    Thermodynamics of clusterized matter is studied in the framework of statistical models with non-interacting cluster degrees of freedom. At variance with the analytical Fisher model, exact Metropolis simulation results indicate that the transition from homogeneous to clusterized matter lies along the $\\rho=\\rho_0$ axis at all temperatures and the limiting point of the phase diagram is not a critical point even if the surface energy vanishes at this point. Sensitivity of the inferred phase diagram to the employed statistical framework in the case of finite systems is discussed by considering the grand-canonical and constant-pressure canonical ensembles. A Wigner-Seitz formalism in which the fragment charge is neutralized by an uniform electron distribution allows to build the phase diagram of neutron star matter.

  4. Cluster Compatibility Mode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode Cluster Compatibility Mode Edison compute

  5. Cluster Compatibility Mode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode Cluster Compatibility Mode Edison

  6. Probable new type of reaction mechanism: Double. cap alpha. direct transfer process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Shu-wei; Wu Guo-hua; Miao Rong-zhi; Han Fei

    1983-10-01

    It is assumed that /sup 8/Be consists of two ..cap alpha.. particles which are close to each other in configuration space. A spectroscopic density of /sup 8/Be cluster in the residue nuclei is then obtained, which is proportional to the square of the preformation probability of ..cap alpha.. particle at nuclear surface. Using the improved method of parametrization of EFR-DWBA overlap integral,/sup 1//sup en-dash//sup 2/ we calculate the double differential energy spectra and angular distributions of ..cap alpha.. particles for the reactions /sup 209/Bi (/sup 12/C, ..cap alpha..) /sup 217/Fr and extract the preformation probability of ..cap alpha.. particle at the surface of /sup 217/Fr nuclei from fitting the experimental data. The agreement within the range of calculation error between the preformation probabilities extracted from transfer reactions and ..cap alpha.. decay suggests that the reaction /sup 209/Bi(/sup 12/C, ..cap alpha..) /sup 217/Fr may be explained as a double ..cap alpha.. direct transfer process.

  7. M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTER STRUCTURES AND THE PRESENCE OF X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agar, J. R. R.; Barmby, P., E-mail: pbarmby@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    The Andromeda galaxy, M31, has several times the number of globular clusters found in the Milky Way. It contains a correspondingly larger number of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) associated with globular clusters, and as such can be used to investigate the cluster properties that lead to X-ray binary formation. The best tracer of the spatial structure of M31 globulars is the high-resolution imaging available from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and we have used HST data to derive structural parameters for 29 LMXB-hosting M31 globular clusters. These measurements are combined with structural parameters from the literature for a total of 41 (of 50 known) LMXB clusters and a comparison sample of 65 non-LMXB clusters. Structural parameters measured in blue bandpasses are found to be slightly different (smaller core radii and higher concentrations) than those measured in red bandpasses; this difference is enhanced in LMXB clusters and could be related to stellar population differences. Clusters with LMXBs show higher collision rates for their mass compared to clusters without LMXBs, and collision rates estimated at the core radius show larger offsets than rates estimated at the half-light radius. These results are consistent with the dynamical formation scenario for LMXBs. A logistic regression analysis finds that, as expected, the probability of a cluster hosting an LMXB increases with increasing collision rate and proximity to the galaxy center. The same analysis finds that probability of a cluster hosting an LMXB decreases with increasing cluster mass at a fixed collision rate, although we caution that this could be due to sample selection effects. Metallicity is found to be a less important predictor of LMXB probability than collision rate, mass, or distance, even though LMXB clusters have a higher metallicity on average. This may be due to the interaction of location and metallicity: a sample of M31 LMXBs with a greater range in galactocentric distance would likely contain more metal-poor clusters and make it possible to disentangle the two effects.

  8. Logistics clusters : prevalence and impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Virgüez, Myriam Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Governments around the world are investing significant resources in the development and expansion of logistics clusters. This dissertation analyzes the cluster phenomenon focusing on four topics. First, it develops a ...

  9. BK-type inequalities and generalized random-cluster representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, J van den

    2012-01-01

    Recently, van den Berg and Jonasson gave the first substantial extension of the BK inequality for non-product measures: they proved that, for k-out-of-n measures, the probability that two increasing events occur disjointly is at most the product of the two individual probabilities. We show several other extensions and modifications of the BK inequality.In particular, we prove that the antiferromagnetic Ising Curie-Weiss model satisfies the BK inequality for all increasing events. We prove that this also holds for the Curie-Weiss model with three-body interactions under the so-called Negative Lattice Condition. For the ferromagnetic Ising model we show that the probability that two events occur `cluster-disjointly' is at most the product of the two individual probabilities, and we give a more abstract form of this result for arbitrary Gibbs measures. The above cases are derived from a general abstract theorem whose proof is based on an extension of the Fortuin-Kasteleyn random-cluster representation for all pr...

  10. Clustering Chain Additional options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linial, Michal

    ProtoClass -rationale and concept ProtoNet in brief AND BEYOND: Functional roadmap in Proto-à-vis InterPro, SCOP, FSSP etc #12;6 ProtoClass Road-Maps A horizontal view provides `distances' between clusters. Those are the basis for creating Road-Maps. We test the biological content of those road maps

  11. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Furuya, F.R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab')[sub 2] fragments are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy. 7 figs.

  12. Massive galaxy clusters and the origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Pierpaoli; Glennys Farrar

    2005-11-22

    We investigate whether ultra--high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) may be preferentially produced in massive galaxy clusters, by looking for correlations between UHECR directions and those of x-ray clusters. We find an excess-above-random of high energy cosmic rays which correlate with massive galaxy cluster positions. For cosmic rays with energies above 50 EeV the observed correlation is the strongest or angles of 1.2-1.6 degrees where it has a chance probability of about 0.1%. Including lower energy cosmic rays in the sample causes the angle where the most significant correlation is found to increase, as would be expected by virtue of instrumental and magnetic smearing increasing at lower energy. These results suggest that some UHECR are produced in galaxy clusters, or in objects that preferentially populate galaxy clusters.

  13. Dynamical state and star formation properties of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3921

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, C; Maurogordato, S; Cappi, A; Slezak, E

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a new spectroscopic and photometric survey of the central region of the galaxy cluster A3921 (z=0.094). We detect the presence of two dominant clumps of galaxies: a main cluster centred on the BCG (A3921-A), and a NW sub-cluster (A3921-B) hosting the second brightest cluster galaxy. The distorted morphology of the two sub-clusters suggests that they are interacting, while the velocity distribution of 104 confirmed cluster members does not reveal strong signatures of merging. By applying a two-body dynamical formalism to the two sub-clusters of A3921, and by comparing our optical results to the X-ray analysis of A3921 based on XMM observations (Belsole et al. 2004), we conclude that A3921-B is probably tangentially traversing the main cluster along a SW/NE direction. Our estimate of the star formation properties of the cluster members reveals substantial fractions of both emission-line (~13%) and post-star-forming objects (k+a's,~16%). A lack of bright k+a's with respect to higher red...

  14. 18.440 Probability and Random Variables, Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, Scott

    This course introduces students to probability and random variables. Topics include distribution functions, binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, and Poisson distributions. The other topics covered are uniform, exponential, ...

  15. Probability and complex quantum trajectories: Finding the missing links

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, Moncy V., E-mail: moncyjohn@yahoo.co.u [Department of Physics, St. Thomas College, Kozhencherry, Kerala 689641 (India)

    2010-10-15

    It is shown that a normalisable probability density can be defined for the entire complex plane in the modified de Broglie-Bohm quantum mechanics, which gives complex quantum trajectories. This work is in continuation of a previous one that defined a conserved probability for most of the regions in the complex space in terms of a trajectory integral, indicating a dynamical origin of quantum probability. There it was also shown that the quantum trajectories obtained are the same characteristic curves that propagate information about the conserved probability density. Though the probability density we now adopt for those regions left out in the previous work is not conserved locally, the net source of probability for such regions is seen to be zero in the example considered, allowing to make the total probability conserved. The new combined probability density agrees with the Born's probability everywhere on the real line, as required. A major fall out of the present scheme is that it explains why in the classical limit the imaginary parts of trajectories are not observed even indirectly and particles are confined close to the real line.

  16. Derivation of the coefficient squared probability law in quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey Blood

    2013-06-02

    If one assumes there is probability of perception in quantum mechanics, then unitarity dictates that it must have the coefficient squared form, in agreement with experiment.

  17. Statistical Surrogate Models for Estimating Probability of High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Statistical Surrogate Models for Estimating Probability of High-Consequence Climate Change. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Statistical Surrogate Models for Estimating...

  18. 18.440 Probability and Random Variables, Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, Richard

    This course introduces students to probability and random variables. Topics include distribution functions, binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, and Poisson distributions. The other topics covered are uniform, exponential, ...

  19. Ruin probabilities under general investments and heavy-tailed claims

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hult, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we study the asymptotic decay of finite time ruin probabilities for an insurance company that faces heavy-tailed claims, uses predictable investment strategies and makes investments in risky assets whose prices evolve according to quite general semimartingales. We show that the ruin problem corresponds to determining hitting probabilities for the solution to a randomly perturbed stochastic integral equation. We derive a large deviation result for the hitting probabilities that holds uniformly over a family of semimartingales and show that this result gives the asymptotic decay of finite time ruin probabilities under arbitrary investment strategies, including optimal investment strategies.

  20. Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : II. Atomic and Cluster Scale Models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lechman, Jeremy B.; Takato, Yoichi

    2010-09-01

    Understanding the interaction of aerosol particle clusters/flocs with surfaces is an area of interest for a number of processes in chemical, pharmaceutical, and powder manufacturing as well as in steam-tube rupture in nuclear power plants. Developing predictive capabilities for these applications involves coupled phenomena on multiple length and timescales from the process macroscopic scale ({approx}1m) to the multi-cluster interaction scale (1mm-0.1m) to the single cluster scale ({approx}1000 - 10000 particles) to the particle scale (10nm-10{micro}m) interactions, and on down to the sub-particle, atomic scale interactions. The focus of this report is on the single cluster scale; although work directed toward developing better models of particle-particle interactions by considering sub-particle scale interactions and phenomena is also described. In particular, results of mesoscale (i.e., particle to single cluster scale) discrete element method (DEM) simulations for aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls are presented. The particle-particle interaction model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular package in the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Additionally, as mentioned, results from atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations are also described as a means of developing higher fidelity models of particle-particle interactions. Ultimately, the results from these and other studies at various scales must be collated to provide systems level models with accurate 'sub-grid' information for design, analysis and control of the underlying systems processes.

  1. Dynamical state and star formation properties of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3921

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Ferrari; C. Benoist; S. Maurogordato; A. Cappi; E. Slezak

    2004-09-03

    We present the results of a new spectroscopic and photometric survey of the central region of the galaxy cluster A3921 (z=0.094). We detect the presence of two dominant clumps of galaxies: a main cluster centred on the BCG (A3921-A), and a NW sub-cluster (A3921-B) hosting the second brightest cluster galaxy. The distorted morphology of the two sub-clusters suggests that they are interacting, while the velocity distribution of 104 confirmed cluster members does not reveal strong signatures of merging. By applying a two-body dynamical formalism to the two sub-clusters of A3921, and by comparing our optical results to the X-ray analysis of A3921 based on XMM observations (Belsole et al. 2004), we conclude that A3921-B is probably tangentially traversing the main cluster along a SW/NE direction. Our estimate of the star formation properties of the cluster members reveals substantial fractions of both emission-line (~13%) and post-star-forming objects (k+a's,~16%). A lack of bright k+a's with respect to higher redshift clusters is observed, while the fraction of k+a's increases towards fainter magnitudes. The spatial and velocity distributions of k+a's galaxies, their red colours and their moderate Balmer absorption lines suggest that their presence is difficult to relate to the on-going merging event. Star forming galaxies, which are mostly concentrated in A3921-B and between the two sub-clusters, share neither the same kinematics, nor the same projected distribution of the passive cluster members. Their spectral properties may be at least partly realted to the ongoing merger.

  2. Announced Dynamic Access Probability protocol for next generation wireless networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Hanoch

    Announced Dynamic Access Probability protocol for next generation wireless networks Z. NAOR #3; H probability. Keywords: wireless networks, multiple access, MAC #3; naorz@post.tau.ac.il y hanoch@cs.tau.ac.il 1 #12; 1 Introduction Wireless networks are rapidly expanding. Future satellite-based networks

  3. Probability distributions of land surface wind speeds over North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    Probability distributions of land surface wind speeds over North America Yanping He,1 Adam Hugh of the probability distributions of surface wind speeds (SWS) is essential for surface flux estimation, wind power estimation, and wind risk assessments. The two-parameter Weibull distribution is the most widely used

  4. Efficient Posterior Probability Mapping Using Savage-Dickey Ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    Efficient Posterior Probability Mapping Using Savage- Dickey Ratios William D. Penny*, Gerard R interactive manner. Citation: Penny WD, Ridgway GR (2013) Efficient Posterior Probability Mapping Using Savage, 2013 Copyright: Ã? 2013 Penny, Ridgway. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms

  5. A discussion on the origin of quantum probabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holik, Federico; Departamento de Matemática - Ciclo Básico Común, Universidad de Buenos Aires - Pabellón III, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires ; Sáenz, Manuel; Plastino, Angel

    2014-01-15

    We study the origin of quantum probabilities as arising from non-Boolean propositional-operational structures. We apply the method developed by Cox to non distributive lattices and develop an alternative formulation of non-Kolmogorovian probability measures for quantum mechanics. By generalizing the method presented in previous works, we outline a general framework for the deduction of probabilities in general propositional structures represented by lattices (including the non-distributive case). -- Highlights: •Several recent works use a derivation similar to that of R.T. Cox to obtain quantum probabilities. •We apply Cox’s method to the lattice of subspaces of the Hilbert space. •We obtain a derivation of quantum probabilities which includes mixed states. •The method presented in this work is susceptible to generalization. •It includes quantum mechanics and classical mechanics as particular cases.

  6. PARMON: A Comprehensive Cluster Monitoring System School of Computing Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    1 PARMON: A Comprehensive Cluster Monitoring System RAJKUMAR School of Computing Science Queensland@fit.qut.edu.au KRISHNA MOHAN and BINDU GOPAL Operating Systems Group Centre for Development of Advanced Computing 2 together as one system. Rapid changes in both areas of computing and communication (availability

  7. Performance of the Rayleigh task based on the posterior probability of tomographic reconstructions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    We seek the best possible performance of the Rayleigh task in which one must decide whether a perceived object is a pair of Gaussian-blurred points or a blurred line. Two Bayesian reconstruction algorithms are used, the first based on a Gaussian prior-probability distribution with a nonnegativity constraint and the second based on an entropic prior. In both cases, the reconstructions are found that maximize the posterior probability. We compare the performance of the Rayleigh task obtained with two decision variables, the logarithm of the posterior probability ratio and the change in the mean-squared deviation from the reconstruction. The method of evaluation is based on the results of a numerical testing procedure in which the stated discrimination task is carried out on reconstructions of a randomly generated sequence of images. The ability to perform the Rayleigh task is summarized in terms of a discrimination index that is derived from the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. We find that the use of the posterior probability does not result in better performance of the Rayleigh task than the mean-squared deviation from the reconstruction. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Numerical wave optics and the lensing of gravitational waves by globular clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. Moylan; David E. McClelland; Susan M. Scott; Antony C. Searle; G. V. Bicknell

    2007-10-16

    We consider the possible effects of gravitational lensing by globular clusters on gravitational waves from asymmetric neutron stars in our galaxy. In the lensing of gravitational waves, the long wavelength, compared with the usual case of optical lensing, can lead to the geometrical optics approximation being invalid, in which case a wave optical solution is necessary. In general, wave optical solutions can only be obtained numerically. We describe a computational method that is particularly well suited to numerical wave optics. This method enables us to compare the properties of several lens models for globular clusters without ever calling upon the geometrical optics approximation, though that approximation would sometimes have been valid. Finally, we estimate the probability that lensing by a globular cluster will significantly affect the detection, by ground-based laser interferometer detectors such as LIGO, of gravitational waves from an asymmetric neutron star in our galaxy, finding that the probability is insignificantly small.

  9. Clustering data over time using kernel spectral clustering with memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    clustering framework that adaptively estimates the optimal smoothing parameter using shrinkage estimation of being cast in a learning framework allows a precise model selection scheme and the out

  10. CAN COUPLED DARK ENERGY SPEED UP THE BULLET CLUSTER?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jounghun; Baldi, Marco E-mail: marco.baldi@universe-cluster.de

    2012-03-01

    It has been recently shown that the observed morphological properties of the Bullet Cluster can be accurately reproduced in hydrodynamical simulations only when the infall pairwise velocity V{sub c} of the system exceeds 3000 km s{sup -1} (or at least possibly 2500 km s{sup -1}) at the pair separation of 2R{sub vir}, where R{sub vir} is the virial radius of the main cluster, and that the probability of finding such a bullet-like system is extremely low in the standard {Lambda} cold dark matter ({Lambda}CDM) cosmology. We suggest here the fifth force mediated by coupled dark energy (cDE) as a possible velocity-enhancing mechanism and investigate its effect on the infall velocities of bullet-like systems from the Coupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations public database. Five different cDE models are considered: three with constant coupling and exponential potential, one with exponential coupling and exponential potential, and one with constant coupling and supergravity potential. For each model, after identifying the bullet-like systems, we determine the probability density distribution of their infall velocities at pair separations of (2-3)R{sub vir}. Approximating each probability density distribution as a Gaussian, we calculate the cumulative probability of finding a bullet-like system with V{sub c} {>=} 3000 km s{sup -1} or V{sub c} {>=} 2500 km s{sup -1}. Our results show that in all of the five cDE models the cumulative probabilities increase compared to the {Lambda}CDM case and that in the model with exponential coupling P(V{sub c} {>=} 2500 km s{sup -1}) exceeds 10{sup -4}. The physical interpretations and cosmological implications of our results are provided.

  11. Cluster structures in Oxygen isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Furutachi; M. kimura; A. Doté; Y. Kanada-En'yo; S. oryu

    2007-06-01

    Cluster structure of 16O,18O and 20O is investigated by the antisymmettrized molecular dynamics (AMD) plus generator coordinate method (GCM). We have found the K^{\\pi}=0$_2^+$ and 0$_1^-$ rotational bands of 18O that have the prominent 14C+\\alpha cluster structure. Clustering systematics becomes richer in 20O. We suggest the K^{\\pi}=0$_2^+$ band that is the mixture of the 12C+\\alpha+4n and 14C+6He cluster structures, and the K^{\\pi}=0$_1^-$ band that has the 14C+6He cluster structure. The K^{\\pi}=0$_3^+$ and 0$_2^-$ bands that have the prominent 16C+\\alpha cluster structure are also found.

  12. Analysis of Cluster Management Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Configuration Management Tools Computer System, Cluster, and Networking Summer Institute Team: Evan Leeseberg, James Kang, Katherine Nystrom Mentors: Kevin Tegtmeier,...

  13. Promoting Advanced Manufacturing Clusters in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Promoting Advanced Manufacturing Clusters in Tennessee1 1 This report is supported, Economic Development Administration; and the Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program, National.........................................................................................................................1 Context: Trends in Tennessee Manufacturing

  14. Infrared Observations of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Elbaz

    1997-11-28

    This short paper reviews some of the results obtained from ISO observations (ISOCAM and ISOPHOT) on galaxy clusters: Chap.1: "Intracluster dust": new evidence for the presence of dust outside galaxies. Chap.2:"Mid-Infrared Emission of Galaxies" origin of the mid-IR emission. Chap.3:"Star Formation in Nearby Clusters" correlation of the 7 and 15 microns fluxes with the SFR. Chap.4:"Star Formation in z=0.2 Galaxy clusters" Study of the mid-IR emission of A1732 and A1689. Chap.5:"Star Formation in z>0.4 Galaxy clusters" Preliminary.

  15. Lower and upper probabilities in the distributive lattice of subsystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vourdas

    2014-10-08

    The set of subsystems of a finite quantum system (with variables in Z(n)) together with logical connectives, is a distributive lattice. With regard to this lattice, the (where P(m) is the projector to) obeys a supermodularity inequality, and it is interpreted as a lower probability in the sense of the Dempster-Shafer theory, and not as a Kolmogorov probability. It is shown that the basic concepts of the Dempster-Shafer theory (lower and upper probabilities and the Dempster multivaluedness) are pertinent to the quantum formalism of finite systems.

  16. The galaxy population of the complex cluster system Abell 3921

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pranger, Florian; Ferrari, Chiara; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Hunstead, Richard; Maurogordato, Sophie; Benoist, Christophe; Brinchmann, Jarle; Schindler, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    We present a spectrophotometric analysis of the galaxy pop. in the area of the merging cluster Abell 3921 at redshift 0.093. We investigate the impact of the complex cluster environment on galaxy properties such as morphology or star formation rate. We combine multi-object spectroscopy from the 2dF spectrograph with optical imaging taken with the ESO WFI. We carry out a redshift analysis and determine cluster velocity dispersions using biweight statistics. Applying a Dressler-Shectman (DS-)test we seek evidence for cluster substructure. Cluster and field galaxies are investigated with respect to [OII] and H{\\alpha} equivalent width, SFR and morphological descriptors such as concentration index and Gini coefficient. We study these cluster galaxy properties as a function of clustercentric distance and investigate the spatial distribution of various galaxy types. Applying the DS-test we find a 3rd component (A3921-C) in addition to the two main subclusters (A3921-A and A3921-B) already known. The re-determined m...

  17. Can a galaxy redshift survey measure dark energy clustering?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Takada

    2006-08-23

    (abridged) A wide-field galaxy redshift survey allows one to probe galaxy clustering at largest spatial scales, which carries an invaluable information on horizon-scale physics complementarily to the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Assuming the planned survey consisting of z~1 and z~3 surveys with areas of 2000 and 300 square degrees, respectively, we study the prospects for probing dark energy clustering from the measured galaxy power spectrum, assuming the dynamical properties of dark energy are specified in terms of the equation of state and the effective sound speed c_e in the context of an adiabatic cold dark matter dominated model. The dark energy clustering adds a power to the galaxy power spectrum amplitude at spatial scales greater than the sound horizon, and the enhancement is sensitive to redshift evolution of the net dark energy density, i.e. the equation of state. We find that the galaxy survey, when combined with Planck, can distinguish dark energy clustering from a smooth dark energy model such as the quintessence model (c_e=1), when c_edark energy clustering and the non-relativistic neutrinos implied from the neutrino oscillation experiments, because the two effects both induce a scale-dependent modification in the galaxy power spectrum shape at largest spatial scales accessible from the galaxy survey. It is shown that a wider redshift coverage can efficiently separate the two effects by utilizing the different redshift dependences, where dark energy clustering is apparent only at low redshifts z<1.

  18. KEYWORDS: geospatial clustering, web service, Web GIS, spatial data mining, clustering 1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 KEYWORDS: geospatial clustering, web service, Web GIS, spatial data mining, clustering 1 objects based on their distance, GeoClustering: A Web Service for Geospatial Clustering J. Wang, X. Wang, we present a geospatial clustering web service called GeoClustering. With this service, users

  19. MATH 471 PROBABILITY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faber, Xander

    MATH 471 ­ PROBABILITY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA FALL 2012 Professor Info: Dr. Xander Faber 404 Physical Sciences Building xander@math.hawaii.edu www.math.hawaii.edu/xander/ Office Hours -- MW 10

  20. Rateless Code Based Multimedia Multicasting with Outage Probability Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blostein, Steven D.

    Rateless Code Based Multimedia Multicasting with Outage Probability Constraints Wei Sheng, Wai encoding transmission (PET)-based packetization structure [1] combined with rateless codes. Outage is capable of minimizing the transmission cost while simultaneously guaranteeing outage prob- ability

  1. Review of Literature for Model Assisted Probability of Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Crawford, Susan L.; Lareau, John P.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-09-30

    This is a draft technical letter report for NRC client documenting a literature review of model assisted probability of detection (MAPOD) for potential application to nuclear power plant components for improvement of field NDE performance estimations.

  2. Toward a Full Probability Model of Edges in Natural Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    linear decompositions of an image into basis images. Our work is inspired by David Marr's ideas [17 called \\primal sketch". The basic questions we ask are: What are the probability distributions of Marr

  3. Probability 1 computation with chemical reaction networks Rachel Cummings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probability 1 computation with chemical reaction networks Rachel Cummings David Doty David Soloveichik§ Abstract The computational power of stochastic chemical reaction networks (CRNs) varies signifi computation. How can chemical reactions process information, make decisions, and solve problems? A natural

  4. Stochastic modeling for trajectories drift in the ocean: Application of Density Clustering Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shchekinova, E Y

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to address the effects of wind-induced drift on a floating sea objects using high--resolution ocean forecast data and atmospheric data. Two applications of stochastic Leeway model for prediction of trajectories drift in the Mediterranean sea are presented: long-term simulation of sea drifters in the western Adriatic sea (21.06.2009-23.06.2009) and numerical reconstruction of the Elba accident (21.06.2009-23.06.2009). Long-term simulations in the western Adriatic sea are performed using wind data from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and currents from the Adriatic Forecasting System (AFS). An algorithm of spatial clustering is proposed to identify the most probable search areas with a high density of drifters. The results are compared for different simulation scenarios using different categories of drifters and forcing fields. The reconstruction of sea object drift near to the Elba Island is performed using surface currents from the Mediterranean Forecastin...

  5. Stochastic modeling for trajectories drift in the ocean: Application of Density Clustering Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Y. Shchekinova; Y. Kumkar

    2015-05-18

    The aim of this study is to address the effects of wind-induced drift on a floating sea objects using high--resolution ocean forecast data and atmospheric data. Two applications of stochastic Leeway model for prediction of trajectories drift in the Mediterranean sea are presented: long-term simulation of sea drifters in the western Adriatic sea (21.06.2009-23.06.2009) and numerical reconstruction of the Elba accident (21.06.2009-23.06.2009). Long-term simulations in the western Adriatic sea are performed using wind data from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and currents from the Adriatic Forecasting System (AFS). An algorithm of spatial clustering is proposed to identify the most probable search areas with a high density of drifters. The results are compared for different simulation scenarios using different categories of drifters and forcing fields. The reconstruction of sea object drift near to the Elba Island is performed using surface currents from the Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) and atmospheric forcing fields from the ECMWF. The results showed that draft-limited to an upper surface drifters more closely reproduced target trajectory during the accident.

  6. Forecasting the probability of forest fires in Northeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadleigh, Stuart Allen

    1972-01-01

    FORECASTING THE PROBABILITY OF FOREST FIRES IN NORTHEAST TEXAS A Thesis by STUART ALLEN WADLEIGH Submit ted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1972 Major Subject: Meteorology FORECASTING THE PROBABILITY OF FOREST FIRES IN NORTHEAST TEXAS A Thesis by STUART ALLEN WADLEIGH Approved as to style and content by: ( irman of ee) (Head of Depar nt) (Member) (Member) December 1972 c...

  7. The resonance absorption probability function for neutron and multiplicative integral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. D. Rusov; V. A. Tarasov; S. I. Kosenko; S. A. Chernegenko

    2012-08-05

    The analytical approximations for the moderating neutrons flux density like Fermi spectra, widely used in reactor physics, involve the probability function for moderating neutron to avoid the resonant absorption obtained using some restrictive assumptions regarding the acceptable resonances width. By means of multiplicative integral (Volterra integral) theory for a commutative algebra an analytical expression for the probability function is obtained rigorously without any restrictive assumptions.

  8. Calculating the probability of detecting radio signals from alien civilizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvat, Marko

    2006-01-01

    Although it might not be self-evident, it is in fact entirely possible to calculate the probability of detecting alien radio signals by understanding what types of extraterrestrial radio emissions can be expected and what properties these emissions can have. Using the Drake equation as the obvious starting point, and logically identifying and enumerating constraints of interstellar radio communications can yield the probability of detecting a genuine alien radio signal.

  9. Calculating the probability of detecting radio signals from alien civilizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marko Horvat

    2007-07-14

    Although it might not be self-evident, it is in fact entirely possible to calculate the probability of detecting alien radio signals by understanding what types of extraterrestrial radio emissions can be expected and what properties these emissions can have. Using the Drake equation as the obvious starting point, and logically identifying and enumerating constraints of interstellar radio communications can yield the probability of detecting a genuine alien radio signal.

  10. Linear feature selection and the probability of misclassification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darcey, Louise Wilson

    1974-01-01

    ) (Member) May 1974 ABSTRACT Linear Feature Selecti. on and the Probability of Misclassification. (May 1974) Louise Wilson Darcey, B. S. , University of Texas at Austin Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. L. F. Guseman, Jr. A classifi. cation... procedure for n-dimensional normally distributed observation vectors which belong to one of two populations is described. In particular, a computational procedure is presented for finding a lxn vector B which minimizes the probability...

  11. Structure and Collective Excitations of He-4 Clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Siu A.; KROTSCHECK, E.

    1992-01-01

    . INTRODUCTION The study of finite He clusters and, more gener- ally, quantum liquids in confined geometries, is currently an active area of experimental and theoretical re- search. Helium clusters are unique in that they are the only known bosonic... than the calculation of ground-state energy. We shall return to this important point later on in our d 1scussrons. On the most advanced level, the many-particle Schrodinger equation is solved by the Green s- function ~ 22 or the diffusion2 s Monte...

  12. Characterizing common cause closedness of quantum probability theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichiro Kitajima; Miklos Redei

    2015-03-15

    We prove new results on common cause closedness of quantum probability spaces, where by a quantum probability space is meant the projection lattice of a non-commutative von Neumann algebra together with a countably additive probability measure on the lattice. Common cause closedness is the feature that for every correlation between a pair of commuting projections there exists in the lattice a third projection commuting with both of the correlated projections and which is a Reichenbachian common cause of the correlation. The main result we prove is that a quantum probability space is common cause closed if and only if it has at most one measure theoretic atom. This result improves earlier ones published in Z. GyenisZ and M. Redei Erkenntnis 79 (2014) 435-451. The result is discussed from the perspective of status of the Common Cause Principle. Open problems on common cause closedness of general probability spaces $(\\mathcal{L},\\phi)$ are formulated, where $\\mathcal{L}$ is an orthomodular bounded lattice and $\\phi$ is a probability measure on $\\mathcal{L}$.

  13. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  14. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  15. Cluster structures in $^{11}$B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadahiro Suhara; Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo

    2012-03-07

    Structures of excited states in $^{11}$B are investigated with a method of $\\beta$-$\\gamma$ constraint antisymmetrized molecular dynamics in combination with the generator coordinate method. Various excited states with developed cluster core structures are suggested in positive- and negative-parity states. For negative-parity states, we suggest a band with a $2\\alpha+t$ cluster structure. This band starts from the $3/2^{-}_{3}$ state and can correspond to the experimental band observed recently. In positive-parity states, two $\\alpha$ core cluster structures with surrounding nucleons are found. A $K^\\pi=1/2^+$ band is suggested to be constructed from a remarkably developed cluster structure with a large prolate deformation. We discuss features of the cluster structure in association with molecular orbital structures of $^{10}$Be.

  16. Relative Ages of Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas H. Puzia

    2002-10-18

    Ages of extragalactic globular clusters can provide valuable insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies. In this contribution the photometric methods of age dating old globular cluster systems are summarised. The spectroscopic approach is reviewed with an emphasis of the right choice of age diagnostics. We present a new method of quantifying the relatively best age-sensitive spectroscopic index given the quality of a data set and a certain theoretical stellar synthesis model. The relatively best diagnostic plot is constructed from the set of Lick indices and used to age date globular clusters in several early-type galaxies which are part of a large spectroscopic survey of extragalactic globular cluster systems. We find that, independently of host galaxy, metal-poor ([Fe/H] 8 Gyr) and coeval. Metal-rich clusters show a wide range of ages from ~15 down to a few Gyr.

  17. Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy SHARE Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources...

  18. Advanced Health Monitoring of Computer Cluster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Monitoring of Computer Clusters Presenter: Caleb Morse Team: Dylan Merrigan, Sherry Salas Mentors: Susan Coulter, Andree Jacobson, Kevin Tegtmeier LANL ISTIIAS Cluster...

  19. Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomplun, Marc

    Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION Advancing Area Activation towards a General Model at Boston 100 Morrissey Boulevard Boston, MA 02125-3393 USA Phone: 617-287-6485 Fax: 617-287-6433 e. Without great effort, human observers clearly outperform every current artificial vision system in tasks

  20. Some Applications of the Fractional Poisson Probability Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick Laskin

    2011-11-17

    Physical and mathematical applications of fractional Poisson probability distribution have been presented. As a physical application, a new family of quantum coherent states has been introduced and studied. As mathematical applications, we have discovered and developed the fractional generalization of Bell polynomials, Bell numbers, and Stirling numbers. Appearance of fractional Bell polynomials is natural if one evaluates the diagonal matrix element of the evolution operator in the basis of newly introduced quantum coherent states. Fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind have been applied to evaluate skewness and kurtosis of the fractional Poisson probability distribution function. A new representation of Bernoulli numbers in terms of fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind has been obtained. A representation of Schlafli polynomials in terms of fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind has been found. A new representations of Mittag-Leffler function involving fractional Bell polynomials and fractional Stirling numbers of the second kind have been discovered. Fractional Stirling numbers of the first kind have been introduced and studied. Two new polynomial sequences associated with fractional Poisson probability distribution have been launched and explored. The relationship between new polynomials and the orthogonal Charlier polynomials has also been investigated. In the limit case when the fractional Poisson probability distribution becomes the Poisson probability distribution, all of the above listed developments and implementations turn into the well-known results of quantum optics, the theory of combinatorial numbers and the theory of orthogonal polynomials of discrete variable.

  1. Structure and substructure analysis of DAFT/FADA galaxy clusters in the [0.4-0.9] redshift range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guennou, L; Durret, F; Neto, G B Lima; Ulmer, M P; Clowe, D; LeBrun, V; Martinet, N; Allam, S; Annis, J; Basa, S; Benoist, C; Biviano, A; Cappi, A; Cypriano, E S; Gavazzi, R; Halliday, C; Ilbert, O; Jullo, E; Just, D; Limousin, M; Márquez, I; Mazure, A; Murphy, K J; Plana, H; Rostagni, F; Russeil, D; Schirmer, M; Slezak, E; Tucker, D; Zaritsky, D; Ziegler, B

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range is available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter cosmology.XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a beta-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. Only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first cluster per...

  2. A statistical analysis of personnel contaminations in 200 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M.A.; Stoddard, D.H.

    1983-05-18

    This study determined the frequency statistics of personnel contaminations in 200 Area facilities. These statistics are utilized in probability calculations for contamination risks, and are part of an effort to provide reliable information for use in safety studies. Data for this analysis were obtained from the 200 Area and the Tritium Area Fault Tree Data Banks and were analyzed with the aid of the STATPAC computer code.

  3. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  4. Metal-Rich Globular Clusters: an Unaccounted Factor Responsible for Their Formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valery V. Kravtsov

    2006-05-03

    Presently unaccounted but quite probable "chemical factor" may be responsible for the formation of old metal-rich globular clusters (MRGCs) in spheroids, as well as of their conterparts, young (intermediate-age) massive star clusters (MSCs) in irregulars. Their formation presumably occurs at the same stage of the host galaxies' chemical evolution and is related to the essentially increased SF activity in the hosts around the same metallicity, Zsol/3 ([Fe/H]~-0.5). It is achieved very soon in massive spheroids, later in lower-mass spheroids, and (much) more later in irregulars.

  5. The SWIFT AGN and Cluster Survey I: Number Counts of AGN and Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S; Nugent, Jenna M; Bregman, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey (SACS) uses 125 deg^2 of Swift XRT serendipitous fields with variable depths surrounding gamma-ray bursts to provide a medium depth (4e-15 erg/s/cm^2) and area survey filling the gap between deep, narrow Chandra/XMM-Newton surveys and wide, shallow ROSAT surveys. Here we present a catalog of 22,563 point sources and 442 extended sources and examine the number counts of the AGN and galaxy cluster populations. SACS provides excellent constraints on the AGN number counts at the bright end with negligible uncertainties due to cosmic variance, and these constraints are consistent with previous measurements. We use Wise mid-infrared (MIR) colors to classify the sources. For AGN we can roughly separate the point sources into MIR-red and MIR-blue AGN, finding roughly equal numbers of each type in the soft X-ray band (0.5-2 keV), but fewer MIR-blue sources in the hard X-ray band (2-8 keV). The cluster number counts, with 5% uncertainties from cosmic variance, are also consistent with p...

  6. Clustering Analysis of Seismicity and Aftershock Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-06-26

    Jun 30, 2008 ... ... a statistical methodology for clustering analysis of seismicity in the time-space-

  7. Clustering in the biotechnology industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic P

    2006-01-01

    the world to attract high-technology industry. The mostare attempts to create high-technology industrial clusters,institutes because high-technology firms frequently spin-off

  8. Clusters and the Cosmic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rien van de Weygaert

    2006-07-24

    We discuss the intimate relationship between the filamentary features and the rare dense compact cluster nodes in this network, via the large scale tidal field going along with them, following the cosmic web theory developed Bond et al. The Megaparsec scale tidal shear pattern is responsible for the contraction of matter into filaments, and its link with the cluster locations can be understood through the implied quadrupolar mass distribution in which the clusters are to be found at the sites of the overdense patches. We present a new technique for tracing the cosmic web, identifying planar walls, elongated filaments and cluster nodes in the galaxy distribution. This will allow the practical exploitation of the concept of the cosmic web towards identifying and tracing the locations of the gaseous WHIM. These methods, the Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE) and the Morphology Multiscale Filter (MMF) find their basis in computational geometry and visualization.

  9. Large Area Vacuum Deposited Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-04-30

    It's easy to make the myriad of types of large area and decorative coatings for granted. We probably don't even think about most of them; the low-e and heat mirror coatings on our windows and car windows, the mirrors in displays, antireflection coatings on windows and displays, protective coatings on aircraft windows, heater coatings on windshields and aircraft windows, solar reflectors, thin film solar cells, telescope mirrors, Hubble mirrors, transparent conductive coatings, and the list goes on. All these products require large deposition systems and chambers. Also, don't forget that large batches of small substrates or parts are coated in large chambers. In order to be cost effective hundreds of ophthalmic lenses, automobile reflectors, display screens, lamp reflectors, cell phone windows, laser reflectors, DWDM filters, are coated in batches.

  10. Lightest Kaonic Nuclear Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya; Takibayev, Nurgali Zh

    2015-01-01

    We present our study of kaonic three-body $\\overset{\\_}{K}NN$, $\\overset{\\_}{K}\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ and $KK\\overset{\\_}{K}$ and four-body $\\overset{\\_}{K}% NNN $, $\\ $and $\\overset{\\_}{K}\\overset{\\_}{K}NN$ clusters within the framework of a potential model using the method of hyperspherical functions in momentum representation. To perform a numerical calculations for the bound state energy of the light kaonic system, we use a set of different potentials for the nucleon-nucleon and $\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ interactions, as well as for the kaon-kaon interaction. The calculations show that a quasibound state energy is not sensitive to the $NN$ interaction, and it shows very strong dependence on the $\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ potential. We also compare our results with those obtained using different theoretical approaches. The theoretical discrepancies in the binding energy and width for the lightest kaonic system related to the different $NN$ and $\\overset{\\_% }{K}N$ interactions are addressed.

  11. Dust cluster explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxena, Vikrant [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Avinash, K. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi (India); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India)

    2012-09-15

    A model for the dust cluster explosion where micron/sub-micron sized particles are accelerated at the expense of plasma thermal energy, in the afterglow phase of a complex plasma discharge is proposed. The model is tested by molecular dynamics simulations of dust particles in a confining potential. The nature of the explosion (caused by switching off the discharge) and the concomitant dust acceleration is found to depend critically on the pressure of the background neutral gas. At low gas pressure, the explosion is due to unshielded Coulomb repulsion between dust particles and yields maximum acceleration, while in the high pressure regime it is due to shielded Yukawa repulsion and yields much feebler acceleration. These results are in agreement with experimental findings. Our simulations also confirm a recently proposed electrostatic (ES) isothermal scaling relation, P{sub E}{proportional_to}V{sub d}{sup -2} (where P{sub E} is the ES pressure of the dust particles and V{sub d} is the confining volume).

  12. Adhesive Gravitational Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Buchert; Alvaro Dominguez

    2005-06-21

    The notion of `adhesion' has been advanced for the phenomenon of stabilization of large-scale structure emerging from gravitational instability of a cold medium. Recently, the physical origin of adhesion has been identified: a systematic derivation of the equations of motion for the density and the velocity fields leads naturally to the key equation of the `adhesion approximation' - however, under a set of strongly simplifying assumptions. In this work, we provide an evaluation of the current status of adhesive gravitational clustering and a clear explanation of the assumptions involved. Furthermore, we propose systematic generalizations with the aim to relax some of the simplifying assumptions. We start from the general Newtonian evolution equations for self-gravitating particles on an expanding Friedmann background and recover the popular `dust model' (pressureless fluid), which breaks down after the formation of density singularities; then we investigate, in a unified framework, two other models which, under the restrictions referred to above, lead to the `adhesion approximation'. We apply the Eulerian and Lagrangian perturbative expansions to these new models and, finally, we discuss some non-perturbative results that may serve as starting points for workable approximations of non-linear structure formation in the multi-stream regime. In particular, we propose a new approximation that includes, in limiting cases, the standard `adhesion model' and the Eulerian as well as Lagrangian first-order approximations.

  13. Lightest Kaonic Nuclear Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Ya. Kezerashvili; Shalva M. Tsiklauri; Nurgali Zh. Takibayev

    2015-10-02

    We present our study of kaonic three-body $\\overset{\\_}{K}NN$, $\\overset{\\_}{K}\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ and $KK\\overset{\\_}{K}$ and four-body $\\overset{\\_}{K}% NNN $, $\\ $and $\\overset{\\_}{K}\\overset{\\_}{K}NN$ clusters within the framework of a potential model using the method of hyperspherical functions in momentum representation. To perform a numerical calculations for the bound state energy of the light kaonic system, we use a set of different potentials for the nucleon-nucleon and $\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ interactions, as well as for the kaon-kaon interaction. The calculations show that a quasibound state energy is not sensitive to the $NN$ interaction, and it shows very strong dependence on the $\\overset{\\_}{K}N$ potential. We also compare our results with those obtained using different theoretical approaches. The theoretical discrepancies in the binding energy and width for the lightest kaonic system related to the different $NN$ and $\\overset{\\_% }{K}N$ interactions are addressed.

  14. Cosmography with cluster strong lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Gilmore; Priyamvada Natarajan

    2009-05-29

    By stacking an ensemble of strong lensing clusters, we demonstrate the feasibility of placing constraints on the dark energy equation of state. This is achieved by using multiple images of sources at two or more distinct redshift planes. The sample of smooth clusters in our simulations is based on observations of massive clusters and the distribution of background galaxies is constructed using the Hubble Deep Field. Our source distribution reproduces the observed redshift distribution of multiply imaged sources in Abell 1689. The cosmology recovery depends on the number of image families with known spectroscopic redshifts and the number of stacked clusters. Our simulations suggest that constraints comparable to those derived from other competing established techniques on a constant dark energy equation of state can be obtained using 10 to 40 clusters with 5 or more families of multiple images. We have also studied the observational errors in the image redshifts and positions. We find that spectroscopic redshifts and high resolution {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} images are required to eliminate confidence contour relaxation relative to the ideal case in our simulations. This suggests that the dark energy equation of state, and other cosmological parameters, can be constrained with existing {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} images of lensing clusters coupled with dedicated ground-based arc spectroscopy.

  15. Probability around the Quantum Gravity. Part 1: Planar Pure Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probability around the Quantum Gravity. Part 1: Planar Pure Gravity V.A.Malyshev \\Lambda September 17, 1998 Abstract In this paper we study stochastic dynamics which leaves quantum gravity equilibrium science and biology. At the same time the paper can serve an intro­ duction to quantum gravity

  16. Probability Density Function Estimation Using Orthogonal Forward Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng

    Probability Density Function Estimation Using Orthogonal Forward Regression S. Chen, X. Hong and C estimation is formulated as a regression problem and the orthogonal forward regression tech- nique is adopted procedure. Two examples are used to demonstrate the ability of this regression- based approach

  17. MAS 108 Probability I Notes 1 Autumn 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, R. A.

    .) If I toss a coin three times and record the results of the three tosses, the sample space is S = {HHH' and B the event `tails on last throw'. Then A = {HHH,HHT,HTH,THH}, B = {HHT, it is {HHH}). If A = {a} is a simple event, then the proba- bility of A is just the probability

  18. Rutgers Applied Probability Conference Department of Management Science & Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2nd Rutgers Applied Probability Conference Department of Management Science & Information Systems and the Management Sciences, New Jersey Chapter Stochastic Methods in Information Technology December 6 in memory of Research and the Management Sciences, New Jersey Chapter Stochastic Methods in Information Technology Ben

  19. Probability Distribution of Low Streamflow Series in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    estimates are crucial for: 1 water quality man- agement; 2 issuing or renewing National Pollution Discharge Elimination System NPDES permits; 3 planning water sup- plies, hydropower, cooling and irrigation systems the frequency of low streamflow series can be adequately modeled using a particular probability distribution

  20. What is the probability of a thermodynamical transition?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Álvaro M. Alhambra; Jonathan Oppenheim; Christopher Perry

    2015-04-07

    If the second law of thermodynamics forbids a transition from one state to another, then it is still possible to make the transition happen by using a sufficient amount of work. But if we do not have access to this amount of work, can the transition happen probabilistically? In the thermodynamic limit, this probability tends to zero, but here we find that for finite-sized systems, it can be finite. We compute the maximum probability of a transition or a thermodynamical fluctuation from any initial state to any final state, and show that this maximum can be achieved for any final state which is block-diagonal in the energy eigenbasis. We also find upper and lower bounds on this transition probability, in terms of the work of transition. As a bi-product, we introduce a finite set of thermodynamical monotones related to the thermo-majorization criteria which governs state transitions, and compute the work of transition in terms of them. The trade-off between the probability of a transition, and any partial work added to aid in that transition is also considered. Our results have applications in entanglement theory, and we find the amount of entanglement required (or gained) when transforming one pure entangled state into any other.

  1. STATISTICAL ASSESSMENT OF PROBABILITY OF DETECTION FOR AUTOMATED EDDY CURRENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATISTICAL ASSESSMENT OF PROBABILITY OF DETECTION FOR AUTOMATED EDDY CURRENT NONDESTRUCTIVE for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA Abstract: Eddy current inspection is widely response collected using our motion controlled eddy current inspection system, are used in the analysis

  2. Time-of-arrival probabilities for general particle detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charis Anastopoulos; Ntina Savvidou

    2012-07-16

    We develop a general framework for the construction of probabilities for the time of arrival in quantum systems. The time of arrival is identified with the time instant when a transition in the detector's degrees of freedom takes place. Thus, its definition is embedded within the larger issue of defining probabilities with respect to time for general quantum transitions. The key point in our analysis is that we manage to reduce the problem of defining a quantum time observable to a mathematical model where time is associated to a transition from a subspace of the Hilbert space of the total system to its complementary subspace. This property makes it possible to derive a general expression for the probability for the time of transition, valid for any quantum system, with the only requirement that the time of transition is correlated with a definite macroscopic record. The framework developed here allows for the consideration of any experimental configuration for the measurement of the time of arrival and it also applies to relativistic systems with interactions described by quantum field theory. We use the method in order to describe time-of-arrival measurements in high-energy particle reactions and for a rigorous derivation of the time-integrated probabilities in particle oscillations.

  3. Neural Network Probability Estimation for Broad Coverage Parsing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Ratnaparkhi, 1999; Collins, 1999; Charniak, 2001) are based on a history-based probability model (Black et al-crafted finite set of features to represent the unbounded parse history (Ratna- parkhi, 1999; Collins, 1999 Sim- ple Synchrony Networks (SSNs) (Lane and Hen- derson, 2001; Henderson, 2000). Because

  4. Grinstead and Snell's Introduction to Probability The CHANCE Project1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Harrison Huibin

    to Probability, 2nd edition', published by the American Mathematical So- ciety, Copyright (C) 2003 Charles M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433 11.4 Fundamental Limit Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447 11.5 Mean First of chance. Problems like those Pascal and Fermat solved continued to influence such early researchers

  5. The Emergence and Interpretation of Probability in Bohmian Mechanics1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    The Emergence and Interpretation of Probability in Bohmian Mechanics1 The Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics is capable of illustrating, by itself, virtually every philosophical and foundational comes in many forms, both stochastic and deterministic. The other reason is that quantum mechanics

  6. Quantum mechanical reaction probabilities with a power series Green's function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William H.

    Quantum mechanical reaction probabilities with a power series Green's function Scott M. Auerbach 1993) We present a new method to compute the energy Green's function with absorbing boundary conditions be superior to the fast Fourier transform method for reactive scattering. We apply the resulting power series

  7. Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Implications of Personal Probability for Induction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Implications of Personal Probability for Induction Author(s): Leonard J. Savage Source: The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 64, No. 19, Sixty-Fourth Annual Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division (Oct. 5, 1967), pp. 593-607 Published by: Journal of Philosophy, Inc

  8. Word learning, phonological short-term memory, phonotactic probability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Prahlad

    Word learning, phonological short-term memory, phonotactic probability and long-term memory of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA Word learning is studied in a multitude of ways, and it is often for thinking about various types of studies of word learning. We then review a number of themes that in recent

  9. A converse Lyapunov theorem for asymptotic stability in probability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hespanha, João Pedro

    1 A converse Lyapunov theorem for asymptotic stability in probability A.R. Teel, J.P. Hespanha, A. Subbaraman Abstract A converse Lyapunov theorem is established for discrete-time stochastic systems with non implies the existence of a continuous Lyapunov function, smooth outside of the attractor, that decreases

  10. Spin flip probability of electron in a uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, Richard T. [Department of Physics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina and Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27703 (United States)

    2012-03-19

    The probability that an electromagnetic wave can flip the spin of an electron is calculated. It is assumed that the electron resides in a uniform magnetic field and interacts with an incoming electromagnetic pulse. The scattering matrix is constructed and the time needed to flip the spin is calculated.

  11. Math 30530: Introduction to Probability, Fall 2012 Midterm Exam I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvin, David

    ), brewing the elixir of life (40% of the times) and creating the Philosopher's stone (40% of the time). When he tries to turn lead into gold, the result always ends with a explosion; when he brews the elixir conclude is the probability that he has just missed a demonstration of brewing the elixir of life? Solution

  12. A Probability Analysis for Frequent Itemset Mining Algorithms Nele Dexters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antwerpen, Universiteit

    M Research Group, University of Antwerp, Belgium Since the introduction of the Frequent Itemset Mining (FIMA Probability Analysis for Frequent Itemset Mining Algorithms Nele Dexters PhD student, ADRe, Mining Association Rules between Sets of Items in Large Databases, in Proc. ACM SIGMOD Conference

  13. CLIMATE RISK COMMUNICATION: EFFECTS OF COST, TIMING, AND PROBABILITY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirtes, Peter

    Chapter 2 CLIMATE RISK COMMUNICATION: EFFECTS OF COST, TIMING, AND PROBABILITY OF CLIMATE of Technology, Mandi, India 2 Dynamic Decision Making Laboratory, Department of Social and Decision Sciences the psychology of policymaking on climate change. Yet, experiencing climate change consequences in movies

  14. THE FOURIERSERIES METHOD FOR INVERTING TRANSFORMS OF PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitt, Ward

    Ward Whitt 900 Hammond Road AT&T Bell Laboratories Ridgewood, NJ 07450­2908 Room 2C­178 Murray Hill, NJ; THE FOURIER­SERIES METHOD FOR INVERTING TRANSFORMS OF PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS by Joseph Abate Ward Whitt 900 Hammond Road AT&T Bell Laboratories Ridgewood, NJ 07450­2908 Room 2C­178 Murray Hill, NJ 07974

  15. STATISTICAL HYPOTHESIS GENERATION: DETERMINING THE MOST PROBABLE SUBSET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    , of a scientific production line in which data is fed into one end and knowledge comes out of the other. Gauss for a partially automated hypothesis formulation process. The proposed hypothesis formulation process generates, the one that seems more probable should always be chosen (1713). Because of the automated nature

  16. Some Remarks on Extragalactic Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Richtler

    2005-12-21

    I comment (in a review fashion) on a few selected topics in the field of extragalactic globular clusters with strong emphasis on recent work. The topics are: bimodality in the colour distribution of cluster systems, young massive clusters, and the brightest old clusters. Globular cluster research, perhaps more than ever, has lead to important (at least to astronomers) progress and problems in galaxy structure and formation.

  17. Center clusters in full QCD at finite temperature and background magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gergely Endr?di; Andreas Schäfer; Jacob Wellnhofer

    2015-07-17

    We study the center structure of full dynamical QCD at finite temperatures and nonzero values of the background magnetic field using continuum extrapolated lattice data. We concentrate on two particular observables characterizing center clusters: their fractality and the probability for percolation. For temperatures below and around the transition region, the fractal dimension is found to be significantly smaller than three, leading to a vanishing mean free path inside the cluster structure. This finding might be relevant for center symmetry-based models of heavy-ion collisions. In addition, the percolation probability is employed to define the transition temperature and to map out the QCD phase diagram in the magnetic field-temperature plane.

  18. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2?, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  20. Chalcogen-Rich Lanthanide Clusters: Cluster Reactivity and the Influence of Ancillary Ligands on Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, Catherine L.

    Chalcogen-Rich Lanthanide Clusters: Cluster Reactivity and the Influence of Ancillary Ligands that highly electronegative, sterically saturating ancillary ligands (e.g. Cp*) are not a prerequisite

  1. Ionization of Water Clusters is Mediated by Exciton Energy Transfer from Argon Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-25

    The exciton energy deposited in an argon cluster, (Arn ,< n=20>) using VUV radiation is transferred to softly ionize doped water clusters, ((H2O)n, n=1-9) leading to the formation of non-fragmented clusters. Following the initial excitation, electronic energy is channeled to ionize the doped water cluster while evaporating the Ar shell, allowing identification of fragmented and complete water cluster ions. Examination of the photoionization efficiency curve shows that cluster evaporation from excitons located above 12.6 eV are not enough to cool the energized water cluster ion, and leads to their dissociation to (H2O)n-2H+ (protonated) clusters.

  2. THE BURST CLUSTER: DARK MATTER IN A CLUSTER MERGER ASSOCIATED WITH THE SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST, GRB 050509B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahle, H.; Sarazin, C. L.; Lopez, L. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Rol, E.; Van der Horst, A. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Fynbo, J.; Michalowski, M. J.; Burrows, D. N.; Grupe, D.; Gehrels, N.

    2013-07-20

    We have identified a merging galaxy cluster with evidence of two distinct subclusters. The X-ray and optical data suggest that the subclusters are presently moving away from each other after closest approach. This cluster merger was discovered from observations of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 050509B. The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope error position of the source is coincident with a cluster of galaxies ZwCl 1234.0+02916, while the subsequent Swift/X-Ray Telescope localization of the X-ray afterglow found the GRB coincident with 2MASX J12361286+2858580, a giant red elliptical galaxy in the cluster. Deep multi-epoch optical images were obtained in this field to constrain the evolution of the GRB afterglow, including a total of 27,480 s exposure in the F814W band with Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys, among the deepest imaging ever obtained toward a known galaxy cluster in a single passband. We perform a weak gravitational lensing analysis based on these data, including mapping of the total mass distribution of the merger system with high spatial resolution. When combined with Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and Swift/XRT observations, we are able to investigate the dynamical state of the merger to better understand the nature of the dark matter component. Our weak gravitational lensing measurements reveal a separation of the X-ray centroid of the western subcluster from the center of the mass and galaxy light distributions, which is somewhat similar to that of the famous 'Bullet cluster', and we conclude that this 'Burst cluster' adds another candidate to the previously known merger systems for determining the nature of dark matter, as well as for studying the environment of a short GRB. Finally, we discuss potential connections between the cluster dynamical state and/or matter composition, and compact object mergers, which is currently the leading model for the origin of short GRBs. We also present our results from a weak-lensing survey based on archival Very Large Telescope images in the areas of five other short GRBs, which do not provide any firm detections of mass concentrations representative of rich clusters.

  3. Probability distribution functions in the finite density lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ejiri; Y. Nakagawa; S. Aoki; K. Kanaya; H. Saito; T. Hatsuda; H. Ohno; T. Umeda

    2012-12-04

    We study the phase structure of QCD at high temperature and density by lattice QCD simulations adopting a histogram method. We try to solve the problems which arise in the numerical study of the finite density QCD, focusing on the probability distribution function (histogram). As a first step, we investigate the quark mass dependence and the chemical potential dependence of the probability distribution function as a function of the Polyakov loop when all quark masses are sufficiently large, and study the properties of the distribution function. The effect from the complex phase of the quark determinant is estimated explicitly. The shape of the distribution function changes with the quark mass and the chemical potential. Through the shape of the distribution, the critical surface which separates the first order transition and crossover regions in the heavy quark region is determined for the 2+1-flavor case.

  4. Systematics of fusion probability in "hot" fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wang; Junlong Tian; Werner Scheid

    2011-12-28

    The fusion probability in "hot" fusion reactions leading to the synthesis of super-heavy nuclei is investigated systematically. The quasi-fission barrier influences the formation of the super-heavy nucleus around the "island of stability" in addition to the shell correction. Based on the quasi-fission barrier height obtained with the Skyrme energy-density functional, we propose an analytical expression for the description of the fusion probability, with which the measured evaporation residual cross sections can be reproduced acceptably well. Simultaneously, some special fusion reactions for synthesizing new elements 119 and 120 are studied. The predicted evaporation residual cross sections for 50Ti+249Bk are about 10-150fb at energies around the entrance-channel Coulomb barrier. For the fusion reactions synthesizing element 120 with projectiles 54Cr and 58Fe, the cross sections fall to a few femtobarns which seems beyond the limit of the available facilities.

  5. What Determines the Sticking Probability of Water Molecules on Ice?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, Enrique; Ayotte, Patrick; Bilic , Ante; Kay, Bruce D.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2005-11-22

    We present both experimental and theoretical studies of the sticking of water molecules on ice. The sticking probability is unity over a wide range in energy (0.5 eV–1.5 eV) when the molecules are incident along the surface normal, but drops as the angle increases at high incident energy. This is explained in terms of the strong orientational dependence of the interaction of the molecule with the surface and the time required for the reorientation of the molecule. The sticking probability is found to scale with the component of the incident velocity in the plane of the surface, unlike the commonly assumed normal or total energy scaling.

  6. Economic choices reveal probability distortion in macaque monkeys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stauffer, William R.; Lak, Armin; Bossaerts, Peter; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-02-17

    , similar to humans, monkeys displayed an inverted S-shaped probability weighting function with a crossover point below p? 0.5. Materials andMethods Animals and experimental setup. Twomale rhesusmonkeys (Macacamu- latta) were used for these studies (9... - portional to the SD of a binomial distribution, ?? p ? ?1 ? p?, and po- sition LR indicated the position (right or left) of the cues on the screen. Each regression coefficient was standardized by multiplying the raw re- gression coefficient with the ratio...

  7. Using percolation techniques to estimate interwell connectivity probability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Weiqiang

    2009-06-02

    results for fluid travel time between locations in a percolation model, we developed a method to estimate interwell connectivity. Three parameters are needed to use this approach: the sandbody occupied probability sand p , the dimensionless reservoir... and can estimate the interwell connectivity accurately for thin intervals with sand p in the 60% to 80% range. The proposed method requires that the reservoir interval for evaluation be sufficiently thin so that 2D percolation results can...

  8. Simple and Compact Expressions for Neutrino Oscillation Probabilities in Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hisakazu Minakata; Stephen J Parke

    2015-05-07

    We reformulate perturbation theory for neutrino oscillations in matter with an expansion parameter related to the ratio of the solar to the atmospheric Delta m^2 scales. Unlike previous works, we use a renormalized basis in which certain first-order effects are taken into account in the zeroth-order Hamiltonian. Using this perturbation theory we derive extremely compact expressions for the neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter. We find, for example, that the $\

  9. Evaluations of Structural Failure Probabilities and Candidate Inservice Inspection Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2009-05-01

    The work described in this report applies probabilistic structural mechanics models to predict the reliability of nuclear pressure boundary components. These same models are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative programs for inservice inspection to reduce these failure probabilities. Results of the calculations support the development and implementation of risk-informed inservice inspection of piping and vessels. Studies have specifically addressed the potential benefits of ultrasonic inspections to reduce failure probabilities associated with fatigue crack growth and stress-corrosion cracking. Parametric calculations were performed with the computer code pc-PRAISE to generate an extensive set of plots to cover a wide range of pipe wall thicknesses, cyclic operating stresses, and inspection strategies. The studies have also addressed critical inputs to fracture mechanics calculations such as the parameters that characterize the number and sizes of fabrication flaws in piping welds. Other calculations quantify uncertainties associated with the inputs calculations, the uncertainties in the fracture mechanics models, and the uncertainties in the resulting calculated failure probabilities. A final set of calculations address the effects of flaw sizing errors on the effectiveness of inservice inspection programs.

  10. What is the probability that radiation caused a particular cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voelz, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    Courts, lawyers, health physicists, physicians, and others are searching for a credible answer to the question posed in the title of this paper. The cases in which the question arises frequently stem from an individual that has cancer and they, or their next-of-kin, are convinced that a past radiation exposure - usually small - is responsible for causing it. An arithmetic expression of this problem is simple: the probability of causation by the radiation dose in question is equal to the risk of cancer from the radiation dose divided by the risk of cancer from all causes. The application of risk factors to this equation is not so simple. It must involve careful evaluation of the reliability of and variations in risk coefficients for development of cancer due to radiation exposure, other carcinogenic agents, and natural causes for the particular individual. Examination of our knowledge of these various factors indicates that a large range in the answers can result due to the variability and imprecision of the data. Nevertheless, the attempts to calculate and the probability that radiation caused the cancer is extremely useful to provide a gross perspective on the probability of causation. It will likely rule in or out a significant number of cases despite the limitations in our understandings of the etiology of cancer and the risks from various factors. For the remaining cases, a thoughtful and educated judgment based on selected data and circumstances of the case will also be needed before the expert can develop and support his opinion.

  11. Recursive recovery of Markov transition probabilities from boundary value data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patch, S.K.

    1994-04-01

    In an effort to mathematically describe the anisotropic diffusion of infrared radiation in biological tissue Gruenbaum posed an anisotropic diffusion boundary value problem in 1989. In order to accommodate anisotropy, he discretized the temporal as well as the spatial domain. The probabilistic interpretation of the diffusion equation is retained; radiation is assumed to travel according to a random walk (of sorts). In this random walk the probabilities with which photons change direction depend upon their previous as well as present location. The forward problem gives boundary value data as a function of the Markov transition probabilities. The inverse problem requires finding the transition probabilities from boundary value data. Problems in the plane are studied carefully in this thesis. Consistency conditions amongst the data are derived. These conditions have two effects: they prohibit inversion of the forward map but permit smoothing of noisy data. Next, a recursive algorithm which yields a family of solutions to the inverse problem is detailed. This algorithm takes advantage of all independent data and generates a system of highly nonlinear algebraic equations. Pluecker-Grassmann relations are instrumental in simplifying the equations. The algorithm is used to solve the 4 {times} 4 problem. Finally, the smallest nontrivial problem in three dimensions, the 2 {times} 2 {times} 2 problem, is solved.

  12. Brightest Cluster Galaxies in the Extended GMRT radio halo cluster sample. Radio properties and cluster dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kale, Ruta; Cassano, Rossella; Giacintucci, Simona; Bardelli, sandro; Dallacasa, Daniele; Zucca, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) show exceptional properties over the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Their special location at the centres of galaxy clusters raises the question of the role of the environment on their radio properties. To decouple the effect of the galaxy mass and of the environment in their statistical radio properties, we investigate the possible dependence of the occurrence of radio loudness and of the fractional radio luminosity function on the dynamical state of the hosting cluster. We studied the radio properties of the BCGs in the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS). We obtained a statistical sample of 59 BCGs, which was divided into two classes, depending on the dynamical state of the host cluster, i.e. merging (M) and relaxed (R). Among the 59 BCGs, 28 are radio-loud, and 31 are radio--quiet. The radio-loud sources are located favourably located in relaxed clusters (71\\%), while the reverse is true for the radio-quiet BCGs, mostly located in merging systems (81\\%). The fraction...

  13. Clustering of exponentially separating trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Wilkinson; B. Mehlig; K. Gustavsson; E. Werner

    2010-01-16

    It might be expected that trajectories for a dynamical system which has no negative Lyapunov exponent (implying exponential growth of small separations will not cluster together. However, clustering can occur such that the density $\\rho(\\Delta x)$ of trajectories within distance $\\Delta x$ of a reference trajectory has a power-law divergence, so that $\\rho(\\Delta x)\\sim \\Delta x^{-\\beta}$ when $\\Delta x$ is sufficiently small, for some $0<\\beta<1$. We demonstrate this effect using a random map in one dimension. We find no evidence for this effect in the chaotic logistic map, and argue that the effect is harder to observe in deterministic maps.

  14. Cosmological constraints from clustering properties of galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo; N. Ercan; S. Yesilyurt

    2005-08-27

    In this paper, we discuss improvements of the Suto et al. (2000) model, in the light of recent theoretical developments (new theoretical mass functions, a more accurate mass-temperature relation and an improved bias model) to predict the clustering properties of galaxy clusters and to obtain constraints on cosmological parameters. We re-derive the two-point correlation function of clusters of galaxies for OCDM and LambdaCDM cosmological models, and we compare these results with the observed spatial correlation function for clusters in RASS1 (ROSAT All-Sky Survey 1), and in XBACs (X-RAY Brighest Abell-Type) samples. The comparison shows that the best agreement is obtained for the LambdaCDM model with Omega=0.3. The values of the correlation length obtained, (r_\\simeq 28.2 \\pm 5.2 \\rm h^{-1}} Mpc for LambdaCDM), are larger than those found in the literature and comparable with the results found in Borgani, Plionis & Kolokotronis (1999). (REST IN THE PAPER ABSTRACT)

  15. Impact of Topology and Shadowing on the Outage Probability of Cellular Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    Impact of Topology and Shadowing on the Outage Probability of Cellular Networks Jean-Marc Kelif--This paper proposes an analytical study of the shadowing impact on the outage probability in cellular radio in the outage probability. From f, we are able to derive the outage probability of a mobile station (MS

  16. Visualization of Tokamak Operational Spaces Through the Projection of Data Probability Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visualization of Tokamak Operational Spaces Through the Projection of Data Probability Distributions

  17. Statistical Models for Globular Cluster Luminosity Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, David

    Statistical Models for Globular Cluster Luminosity Distribution Max Buot Donald Richards Xavier statistical models which have been proposed for luminosity distributions for the globular clusters galaxies were well fit by Gaussian distributions, subsequent investigations suggested

  18. Architectural support for enhancing security in clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Man Hee

    2009-05-15

    Cluster computing has emerged as a common approach for providing more comput- ing and data resources in industry as well as in academia. However, since cluster computer developers have paid more attention to performance ...

  19. Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy SHARE Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy ORNL has a 40-year history in R&D on fiber-reinforced composite materials, and has been leading DOE's low-cost...

  20. Perspectives for logistics clusters development in Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tantsuyev, Andriy

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a normative work aimed at identifying locations in Russia with high, medium and unclear potentials for logistics cluster development. As a framework this work uses four different models of logistics clusters: ...

  1. Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 51, CC in GIS; Cowen, David; Ferguson, Warren

    1990-01-01

    51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS1990 Page 1 Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas Computers inyour students. UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS Compiled with

  2. Preliminary Experiment for the Control of Cluster Vibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Cluster Vibration for the Control of Cluster Vibration 99 7 20 1. 15 3 http-harmonic generation from laser irradiated clusters, it has been proved that laser induced cluster vibration

  3. POLYPHONIC INSTRUMENT RECOGNITION SPECTRAL CLUSTERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzanetakis, George

    POLYPHONIC INSTRUMENT RECOGNITION USING SPECTRAL CLUSTERING Luis Gustavo Martins Telecommunications]@uvic.ca ABSTRACT The identification of the instruments playing in a poly- phonic music signal is an important source separation and tim- bre classification of polyphonic, multi-instrumental music signals. The sound

  4. Gravitational `Convergence' and Cluster Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-12-01

    Two colour photometry of the cluster A1689 reveals a `relative magnification-bias' between lensed blue and red background galaxies, arising from a dependence of the faint galaxy count-slope on colour. The colour distribution is skewed blueward of the far field, allowing us to measure the cluster magnification and to understand the notorious blueness of large arcs. We show that the magnification information can be combined with the usual image distortion measurements to isolate the local `convergence' component of lensing and hence derive the projected mass. This is achieved through a simple local relation between the convergence and the observables, which can be applied generally over the surface a cluster. In the weak lensing limit, the convergence reduces to a dependence on the magnification alone, so that in the outskirts of clusters the surface-density of matter is obtained directly from the surface-density of background galaxies. Hence, useful lensing work requires colour information but not necessarily good seeing. Interestingly, convergence varies slowly at high redshift, saturating at a level depending on the Horizon distance, allowing a useful model-independent measurement of the Global Geometry.

  5. CLUSTER LENSING PROFILES DERIVED FROM A REDSHIFT ENHANCEMENT OF MAGNIFIED BOSS-SURVEY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coupon, Jean; Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: coupon@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-07-20

    We report the first detection of a redshift-depth enhancement of background galaxies magnified by foreground clusters. Using 300,000 BOSS survey galaxies with accurate spectroscopic redshifts, we measure their mean redshift depth behind four large samples of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveys, totaling 5000-15,000 clusters. A clear trend of increasing mean redshift toward the cluster centers is found, averaged over each of the four cluster samples. In addition, we find similar but noisier behavior for an independent X-ray sample of 158 clusters lying in the foreground of the current BOSS sky area. By adopting the mass-richness relationships appropriate for each survey, we compare our results with theoretical predictions for each of the four SDSS cluster catalogs. The radial form of this redshift enhancement is well fitted by a richness-to-mass weighted composite Navarro-Frenk-White profile with an effective mass ranging between M{sub 200} {approx} 1.4-1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the optically detected cluster samples, and M{sub 200} {approx} 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the X-ray sample. This lensing detection helps to establish the credibility of these SDSS cluster surveys, and provides a normalization for their respective mass-richness relations. In the context of the upcoming bigBOSS, Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph, and EUCLID-NISP spectroscopic surveys, this method represents an independent means of deriving the masses of cluster samples for examining the cosmological evolution, and provides a relatively clean consistency check of weak-lensing measurements, free from the systematic limitations of shear calibration.

  6. Modeling the Energy Efficiency of Heterogeneous Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Yong-Meng

    are an alternative for energy-efficient clusters [18], [20], [23]. On the contrary, other researchersModeling the Energy Efficiency of Heterogeneous Clusters Lavanya Ramapantulu, Bogdan Marius Tudor analyze the energy efficiency of mixing high-performance and low-power nodes in a cluster. Using a model

  7. Relating Clusterization Measures and Software Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beszedes, Árpád

    Relating Clusterization Measures and Software Quality Béla Csaba, Lajos Schrettner, Árpád Beszédes clusters and software quality. Such attempts are hindered by a number of difficulties: there are problems in assessing the quality of software, measuring the degree of clusterization of software and finding the means

  8. Transmission probabilities and the Miller-Good transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petarpa Boonserm; Matt Visser

    2009-01-08

    Transmission through a potential barrier, and the related issue of particle production from a parametric resonance, are topics of considerable general interest in quantum physics. The authors have developed a rather general bound on quantum transmission probabilities, and recently applied it to bounding the greybody factors of a Schwarzschild black hole. In the current article we take a different tack -- we use the Miller-Good transformation (which maps an initial Schrodinger equation to a final Schrodinger equation for a different potential) to significantly generalize the previous bound.

  9. Jamming probabilities for a vacancy in the dimer model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. S. Poghosyan; V. B. Priezzhev; P. Ruelle

    2008-01-28

    Following the recent proposal made by Bouttier et al [Phys. Rev. E 76, 041140 (2007)], we study analytically the mobility properties of a single vacancy in the close-packed dimer model on the square lattice. Using the spanning web representation, we find determinantal expressions for various observable quantities. In the limiting case of large lattices, they can be reduced to the calculation of Toeplitz determinants and minors thereof. The probability for the vacancy to be strictly jammed and other diffusion characteristics are computed exactly.

  10. Transmission probabilities and the Miller-Good transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonserm, Petarpa

    2008-01-01

    Transmission through a potential barrier, and the related issue of particle production from a parametric resonance, are topics of considerable general interest in quantum physics. The authors have developed a rather general bound on quantum transmission probabilities, and recently applied it to bounding the greybody factors of a Schwarzschild black hole. In the current article we take a different tack -- we use the Miller-Good transformation (which maps an initial Schrodinger equation to a final Schrodinger equation for a different potential) to significantly generalize the previous bound.

  11. A GMBCG Galaxy Cluster Catalog of 55,424 Rich Clusters from SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Jiangang; /Fermilab; McKay, Timothy A.; /Michigan U.; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U.; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara /LBL, Berkeley; Rozo, Eduardo; /Chicago U.; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Wechsler, Risa H.; /SLAC; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Siegel, Seth R.; /Michigan U.; Becker, Matthew; /Chicago U.; Busha, Michael; /SLAC; Gerdes, David; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David E.; /Fermilab; Sheldon, Erin; /Brookhaven

    2011-08-22

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  12. Characterization of open cluster remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B Pavani; E. Bica

    2007-04-11

    Despite progress in the theoretical knowledge of open cluster remnants and the growing search for observational identifications in recent years, open questions still remain. The methods used to analyze open cluster remnants and criteria to define them as physical systems are not homogeneous. In this work we present a systematic method for studying these objects that provides a view of their properties and allows their characterization. Eighteen remnant candidates are analyzed by means of photometric and proper motion data. These data provide information on objects and their fields. We establish criteria for characterizing open cluster remnants, taking observational uncertainties into account. 2MASS J and H photometry is employed (i) to study structural properties of the objects by means of radial stellar density profiles, (ii) to test for any similarity between objects and fields with a statistical comparison method applied to the distributions of stars in the CMDs, and (iii) to obtain ages, reddening values, and distances from the CMD, taking an index of isochrone fit into account. The UCAC2 proper motions allowed an objective comparison between objects and large solid angle offset fields. The objective analysis based on the present methods indicates 13 open-cluster remnants in the sample. Evidence of the presence of binary stars is found, as expected for dynamically evolved systems. Finally, we infer possible evolutionary stages among remnants from the structure, proper motion, and CMD distributions. The low stellar statistics for individual objects is overcome by means of the construction of composite proper motion and CMD diagrams. The distributions of remnants in the composite diagrams resemble the single-star and unresolved binary star distributions of open clusters.

  13. A Clustering Topology Control Algorithms For Heterogeneous Wireless Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yu

    of cluster head. I. INTRODUCTION. The rapid development in small, low-power, low-cost microelectronic degree of cluster-heads by up to 75% and translate power o f cluster-heads by up to 75%, implying with a cluster- head, forming a direct link between cluster-head and cluster- members. Note that the links can

  14. Constraint-based Graph Clustering through Node Sequencing and Partitioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Kang

    -input in the clustering process, clustering criteria can be classified into two categories: user-centric and data-centric clustering method should be both user-centric and data-centric, e.g., in most clustering algorithms at the centers of clusters. In Fig. 1 (a), we can see that a correct and "good" data-centric clustering algorithm

  15. The Evolution of Structure in Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    The Evolution of Structure in Clusters of Galaxies with C. Canizares, M. Bautz, and D. Buote · The observed evolution of cluster morphology ­ Introduction: cosmology with clusters cluster mergers. · Constrain m and 8 from evolution in cluster number density and cluster baryon fraction. #12;· High

  16. 2011 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2011-07-29

    Small particles have been at the heart of nanoscience since the birth of the field and now stand ready to make significant contributions to the big challenges of energy, health and sustainability. Atomic clusters show exquisite size-dependent electronic and magnetic properties and offer a new level of control in catalyses, sensors and biochips; functionalised nanocrystals offer remarkable optical properties and diverse applications in electronic devices, solar energy, and therapy. Both areas are complemented by a raft of recent advances in fabrication, characterization, and performance of a diversity of nanomaterials from the single atom level to nanowires, nanodevices, and biologically-inspired nanosystems. The goal of the 2011 Gordon Conference is thus to continue and enhance the interdisciplinary tradition of this series and discuss the most recent advances, fundamental scientific questions, and emerging applications of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. A single conference covering all aspects of nanoscience from fundamental issues to applications has the potential to create new ideas and stimulate cross fertilization. The meeting will therefore provide a balance among the three sub-components of the conference, true to its title, with a selection of new topics added to reflect rapid advances in the field. The open atmosphere of a Gordon conference, emphasizing the presentation of unpublished results and extensive discussions, is an ideal home for this rapidly developing field and will allow all participants to enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Historically, this Gordon conference has been oversubscribed, so we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral presentations. Given the important role students and postdocs play in the future of this field, we also anticipate several talks of this kind from young investigators.

  17. A short course on measure and probability theories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PÔebay, Philippe Pierre

    2004-02-01

    This brief Introduction to Measure Theory, and its applications to Probabilities, corresponds to the lecture notes of a seminar series given at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, during the spring of 2003. The goal of these seminars was to provide a minimal background to Computational Combustion scientists interested in using more advanced stochastic concepts and methods, e.g., in the context of uncertainty quantification. Indeed, most mechanical engineering curricula do not provide students with formal training in the field of probability, and even in less in measure theory. However, stochastic methods have been used more and more extensively in the past decade, and have provided more successful computational tools. Scientists at the Combustion Research Facility of Sandia National Laboratories have been using computational stochastic methods for years. Addressing more and more complex applications, and facing difficult problems that arose in applications showed the need for a better understanding of theoretical foundations. This is why the seminar series was launched, and these notes summarize most of the concepts which have been discussed. The goal of the seminars was to bring a group of mechanical engineers and computational combustion scientists to a full understanding of N. WIENER'S polynomial chaos theory. Therefore, these lectures notes are built along those lines, and are not intended to be exhaustive. In particular, the author welcomes any comments or criticisms.

  18. Absorption probability of neutrino fields and Hawking radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koray Düzta?

    2015-05-14

    We analyse the scattering of neutrino fields (massless spin 1/2 fields) from Kerr black holes. Adopting the notation of Teukolsky and Press, we derive the connection relation between the normalizations of ingoing and outgoing waves at the horizon and at infinity. It turns out that the connection relation for neutrino waves neither depends on the frequency $\\omega$ and angular momentum quantum numbers $l,m$ of the wave, nor on the black hole parameters $M,a$. As a result of that the absorption probability of neutrino fields $\\Gamma_{lm}(\\omega)$ which determines the average number of neutrinos emitted in the mode $(\\omega,l,m)$ in Hawking radiation, does not explicitly depend on the frequency $\\omega$ and angular momentum quantum numbers $l,m$. The form of $\\Gamma$ only in terms of Teukolsky's normalizations at infinity and at the horizon is derived. This is another aspect in which neutrino fields are essentially different than bosonic fields. The independence of the absorption probability of all parameters, also implies a violation of cosmic censorship since an extremal Kerr black hole can absorb modes carrying less energy than angular momentum. This is in accord with a recent work of the author evaluating the classical interaction of Kerr black holes with neutrino fields.

  19. Measurement of the Fusion Probability, PCN, for Hot Fusion Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Yanez; W. Loveland; J. S. Barrett; L. Yao; B. B. Back; S. Zhu; T. L. Khoo

    2013-06-17

    Background: The cross section for forming a heavy evaporation residue in fusion reactions depends on the capture cross section, the fusion probability, PCN, i.e., the probability that the projectile-target system will evolve inside the fission saddle point to form a completely fused system rather than re-separating (quasifission), and the survival of the completely fused system against fission. PCN is the least known of these quantities. Purpose: To measure PCN for the reaction of 101.2 MeV 18O, 147.3 MeV 26Mg, 170.9 MeV 30Si and 195.3 MeV 36S with 197Au. Methods: We measured the fission fragment angular distributions for these reactions and used the formalism of Back to deduce the fusion-fission and quasifission cross sections. From these quantities we deduced PCN for each reaction. Results: The values of PCN for the reaction of 101.2 MeV 18O, 147.3 MeV 26Mg, 170.9 MeV 30Si and 195.3 MeV 36S with 197Au are 0.66, 1.00, 0.06, 0.13, respectively. Conclusions: The new measured values of PCN agree roughly with the semi-empirical system- atic dependence of PCN upon fissility for excited nuclei.

  20. IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 11, NO. 7, JULY 2007 589 Outage Probability of Selection Cooperation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adve, Raviraj

    IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 11, NO. 7, JULY 2007 589 Outage Probability of Selection (SNR) regimes. We approximate the outage probability of selection cooperation for all SNR levels approximations for practical values of outage probability. Index Terms-- Outage probability, cooperative

  1. The Phoenix Deep Survey: Extremely Red Galaxies and Cluster Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony G. Smith; Andrew M. Hopkins; Richard W. Hunstead; Samuel J. Schmidt; José Afonso; Antonis E. Georgakakis; Lawrence E. Cram; Bahram Mobasher; Mark Sullivan

    2008-04-24

    We present the results of a study of a sample of 375 Extremely Red Galaxies (ERGs) in the Phoenix Deep Survey, 273 of which constitute a subsample which is 80% complete to K_s = 18.5 over an area of 1160 arcmin^2. The angular correlation function for ERGs is estimated, and the association of ERGs with faint radio sources explored. We find tentative evidence that ERGs and faint radio sources are associated at z > 0.5. A new overdensity-mapping algorithm has been used to characterize the ERG distribution, and identify a number of cluster candidates, including a likely cluster containing ERGs at 0.5 4 criterion is more efficient than R - K_s > 5 at selecting dusty star-forming galaxies, rather than passively evolving ERGs.

  2. ATCOM: Automatically Tuned Collective Communication System for SMP Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng-Shiou Wu

    2005-12-17

    Conventional implementations of collective communications are based on point-to-point communications, and their optimizations have been focused on efficiency of those communication algorithms. However, point-to-point communications are not the optimal choice for modern computing clusters of SMPs due to their two-level communication structure. In recent years, a few research efforts have investigated efficient collective communications for SMP clusters. This dissertation is focused on platform-independent algorithms and implementations in this area. There are two main approaches to implementing efficient collective communications for clusters of SMPs: using shared memory operations for intra-node communications, and overlapping inter-node/intra-node communications. The former fully utilizes the hardware based shared memory of an SMP, and the latter takes advantage of the inherent hierarchy of the communications within a cluster of SMPs. Previous studies focused on clusters of SMP from certain vendors. However, the previously proposed methods are not portable to other systems. Because the performance optimization issue is very complicated and the developing process is very time consuming, it is highly desired to have self-tuning, platform-independent implementations. As proven in this dissertation, such an implementation can significantly out-perform the other point-to-point based portable implementations and some platform-specific implementations. The dissertation describes in detail the architecture of the platform-independent implementation. There are four system components: shared memory-based collective communications, overlapping mechanisms for inter-node and intra-node communications, a prediction-based tuning module and a micro-benchmark based tuning module. Each component is carefully designed with the goal of automatic tuning in mind.

  3. The GALEX Ultraviolet Virgo Cluster Survey (GUViCS). VI: The UV luminosity function of the Virgo cluster and its surrounding regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boselli, A; Voyer, E; Ferrarese, L; Consolandi, G; Cortese, L; Cote, P; Cuillandre, J C; Gavazzi, G; Gwyn, S; Heinis, S; Ilbert, O; MacArthur, L; Roehlly, Y

    2015-01-01

    We use the GALEX data of the GUViCS survey to construct the NUV luminosity function of the Virgo cluster over ~ 300 deg.2, an area covering the cluster and its surrounding regions up to ~ 1.8 virial radii. The NUV luminosity function is also determined for galaxies of different morphological type and NUV-i colour, and for the different substructures within the cluster. These luminosity functions are robust vs. statistical corrections since based on a sample of 833 galaxies mainly identified as cluster members with spectroscopic redshift (808) or high-quality optical scaling relations (10). We fit these luminosity functions with a Schechter function, and compare the fitted parameters with those determined for other nearby clusters and for the field. The faint end slope of the Virgo NUV luminosity function (alpha = -1.19), here sampled down to ~ NUV = -11.5 mag, is significantly flatter than the one measured in other nearby clusters and similar to the field one. Similarly M* = -17.56 is one-to-two magnitudes fa...

  4. Analysis of cluster explosive synchronization in complex networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Ji; Thomas K. DM. Peron; Francisco A. Rodrigues; Jürgen Kurths

    2014-12-17

    Correlations between intrinsic dynamics and local topology have become a new trend in the study of synchronization in complex networks. In this paper, we investigate in this paradigm the influence of topology on dynamics of networks made up of second-order Kuramoto oscillators. In particular, based on mean-field calculations, we provide a detailed investigation of the recently reported phenomena of cluster explosive synchronization (CES)[Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 218701 (2013)], analysing the model in scale-free and small-world networks as a function of several topological properties. We show that, in contrast to scale-free networks, the transition to the synchronous state in small-world structures tends to be continuous as the probability of rewiring increases. These results complement the previous findings regarding CES and also fundamentally deepen the understanding of the interplay between topology and dynamics under the constraint of correlating natural frequencies and local structure.

  5. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and roads The spatial location and boundaries for each Site shown on the Site Monitoring Area maps originate from activities conducted under the Compliance Order on Consent with...

  6. The Curious Reluctance to Define Prime Probability Statistically & An elementary probability-based approach to estimating prime counting functions statistically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhupinder Singh Anand

    2015-10-13

    All the known approximations of the number of primes pi(n) not exceeding any given integer n are derived from real-valued functions that are asymptotic to pi(x), such as x/log x, Li(x) and Riemann's function R(x). The degree of approximation for finite values of n is determined only heuristically, by conjecturing upon an error term in the asymptotic relation that can be seen to yield a closer approximation than others to the actual values of pi(n) within a finite range of values of n. None of these can, however, claim to estimate pi(n) uniquely for all values of n. We show that the statistical probability of n being a prime is the product (1-1/p) over all primes not exceeding the square root of n; and that statistically the expected value of the number pi(n) of primes not exceeding n is given uniquely by the sum, over all j not exceeding n, of the product (1-1/p) over all primes not exceeding the square root of j. We then demonstrate how this yields elementary probability-based proofs of the Prime Number Theorem, Dirichlect's Theorem, and the Twin-Prime Conjecture.

  7. BULLET CLUSTER: A CHALLENGE TO {Lambda}CDM COSMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jounghun; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2010-07-20

    To quantify how rare the bullet-cluster-like high-velocity merging systems are in the standard {Lambda} cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology, we use a large-volume (27 h {sup -3} Gpc{sup 3}) cosmological N-body MICE simulation to calculate the distribution of infall velocities of subclusters around massive main clusters. The infall velocity distribution is given at (1-3)R{sub 200} of the main cluster (where R{sub 200} is similar to the virial radius), and thus it gives the distribution of realistic initial velocities of subclusters just before collision. These velocities can be compared with the initial velocities used by the non-cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of 1E0657-56 in the literature. The latest parameter search carried out by Mastropietro and Burkert has shown that an initial velocity of 3000 km s{sup -1} at about 2R{sub 200} is required to explain the observed shock velocity, X-ray brightness ratio of the main and subcluster, X-ray morphology of the main cluster, and displacement of the X-ray peaks from the mass peaks. We show that such a high infall velocity at 2R{sub 200} is incompatible with the prediction of a {Lambda}CDM model: the probability of finding 3000 km s{sup -1} in (2-3)R{sub 200} is between 3.3 x 10{sup -11} and 3.6 x 10{sup -9}. A lower velocity, 2000 km s{sup -1} at 2R{sub 200}, is also rare, and moreover, Mastropietro and Burkert have shown that such a low initial velocity does not reproduce the X-ray brightness ratio of the main and subcluster or morphology of the main cluster. Therefore, we conclude that the existence of 1E0657-56 is incompatible with the prediction of a {Lambda}CDM model, unless a lower infall velocity solution for 1E0657-56 with {approx}<1800 km s{sup -1} at 2R{sub 200} is found.

  8. Cluster synchronization induced by one-node clusters in networks with asymmetric negative couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jianbao [School of Science, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)] [School of Science, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Ma, Zhongjun, E-mail: mzj1234402@163.com [School of Mathematics and Computing Science, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)] [School of Mathematics and Computing Science, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Zhang, Gang [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)] [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2013-12-15

    This paper deals with the problem of cluster synchronization in networks with asymmetric negative couplings. By decomposing the coupling matrix into three matrices, and employing Lyapunov function method, sufficient conditions are derived for cluster synchronization. The conditions show that the couplings of multi-node clusters from one-node clusters have beneficial effects on cluster synchronization. Based on the effects of the one-node clusters, an effective and universal control scheme is put forward for the first time. The obtained results may help us better understand the relation between cluster synchronization and cluster structures of the networks. The validity of the control scheme is confirmed through two numerical simulations, in a network with no cluster structure and in a scale-free network.

  9. Hierarchical Clustering and Active Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Hatziminaoglou; G. Mathez; A. Manrique

    2000-09-18

    The growth of Super Massive Black Holes and the parallel development of activity in galactic nuclei are implemented in an analytic code of hierarchical clustering. The evolution of the luminosity function of quasars and AGN will be computed with special attention paid to the connection between quasars and Seyfert galaxies. One of the major interests of the model is the parallel study of quasar formation and evolution and the History of Star Formation.

  10. Molecular clouds have power-law probability distribution functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, Marco; Lada, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter we investigate the shape of the probability distribution of column densities (PDF) in molecular clouds. Through the use of low-noise, extinction-calibrated \\textit{Herschel}/\\textit{Planck} emission data for eight molecular clouds, we demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, the PDFs of molecular clouds are not described well by log-normal functions, but are instead power laws with exponents close to two and with breaks between $A_K \\simeq 0.1$ and $0.2\\,\\mathrm{mag}$, so close to the CO self-shielding limit and not far from the transition between molecular and atomic gas. Additionally, we argue that the intrinsic functional form of the PDF cannot be securely determined below $A_K \\simeq 0.1\\,\\mathrm{mag}$, limiting our ability to investigate more complex models for the shape of the cloud PDF.

  11. A probability theory for non-equilibrium gravitational systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses dynamical invariants to describe the evolution of collisionless systems subject to time-dependent gravitational forces without resorting to maximum-entropy probabilities. We show that collisionless relaxation can be viewed as a special type of diffusion process in the integral-of-motion space. In time-varying potentials with a fixed spatial symmetry the diffusion coefficients are closely related to virial quantities, such as the specific moment of inertia, the virial factor and the mean kinetic and potential energy of microcanonical particle ensembles. The non-equilibrium distribution function (DF) is found by convolving the initial DF with the Green function that solves Einstein's equation for freely diffusing particles. Such a convolution also yields a natural solution to the Fokker-Planck equations in the energy space. Our mathematical formalism can be generalized to potentials with a time-varying symmetry, where diffusion extends over multiple dimensions of the integral-of-motion space. Th...

  12. Probability distributions of some power system reliability indices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dip, Minh

    1978-01-01

    of three renewal process Let {N.(t),t>0} denote the i t h renewal process. Thus i f N (t) i s the number of renewals ( f a i l u r e s ) in (0,t) in the pooled process, then: m N D(t) = E N.(t) . (13) " i=l 1 9 10 Khintchine and Gri g e l i o n i...PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOME POWER SYSTEM RELIABILITY INDICES A Thesis by MINH DIP (DIEP) Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in p a r t i a l f u l f i l l m e n t of the requirement f o r the degree of MASTER...

  13. How to Determine the Probability of the Higgs Boson Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Unzicker

    2009-12-02

    The Higgs boson is the most important, though yet undiscovered ingredient of the standard model of particle physics. Its detection is therefore one of the most important goals of high energy physics that can guide future research in theoretical physics. Enormous efforts have been undertaken to prove the existence of the Higgs boson, and the physics community is excitedly awaiting the restart of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. But how sure can we be that the Higgs exits at all? The German philosopher Immanuel Kant recommended betting at such controversial questions, and Stephen Hawking announced a $100 bet against the Higgs. But seriously, online prediction markets, which are a generalized form of betting, do provide the best possible probability estimates for future events. It is proposed that the scientific community uses this platforms for evaluation. See also an online description www.Bet-On-The-Higgs.com.

  14. Probability-theoretical analog of the vector Lyapunov function method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakonechnyi, A.N.

    1995-01-01

    The main ideas of the vector Lyapunov function (VLF) method were advanced in 1962 by Bellman and Matrosov. In this method, a Lyapunov function and a comparison equation are constructed for each subsystem. Then the dependences between the subsystems and the effect of external noise are allowed for by constructing a vector Lyapunov function (as a collection of the scalar Lyapunov functions of the subsystems) and an aggregate comparison function for the entire complex system. A probability-theoretical analog of this method for convergence analysis of stochastic approximation processes has been developed. The abstract approach proposed elsewhere eliminates all restrictions on the system phase space, the system trajectories, the class of Lyapunov functions, etc. The analysis focuses only on the conditions that relate sequences of Lyapunov function values with the derivative and ensure a particular type (mode, character) of stability. In our article, we extend this approach to the VLF method for discrete stochastic dynamic systems.

  15. Bayesian failure probability model sensitivity study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-30

    The Office of the Manager, National Communications System (OMNCS) has developed a system-level approach for estimating the effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the connectivity of telecommunications networks. This approach incorporates a Bayesian statistical model which estimates the HEMP-induced failure probabilities of telecommunications switches and transmission facilities. The purpose of this analysis is to address the sensitivity of the Bayesian model. This is done by systematically varying two model input parameters--the number of observations, and the equipment failure rates. Throughout the study, a non-informative prior distribution is used. The sensitivity of the Bayesian model to the noninformative prior distribution is investigated from a theoretical mathematical perspective.

  16. Seismic pulse propagation with constant Q and stable probability distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Mainardi; Massimo Tomirotti

    2010-08-07

    The one-dimensional propagation of seismic waves with constant Q is shown to be governed by an evolution equation of fractional order in time, which interpolates the heat equation and the wave equation. The fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are expressed in terms of entire functions (of Wright type) in the similarity variable and their behaviours turn out to be intermediate between those for the limiting cases of a perfectly viscous fluid and a perfectly elastic solid. In view of the small dissipation exhibited by the seismic pulses, the nearly elastic limit is considered. Furthermore, the fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are shown to be related to stable probability distributions with index of stability determined by the order of the fractional time derivative in the evolution equation.

  17. STATISTICAL DAMAGE CLASSIFICATION USING SEQUENTIAL PROBABILITY RATIO TESTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SOHN, HOON; ALLEN, DAVID W; WORDEN, KEITH; FARRAR, CHARLES R

    2002-02-16

    The primary objective of damage detection is to ascertain with confidence if damage is present or not within a structure of interest. In this study, a damage classification problem is cast in the context of the statistical pattern recognition paradigm. First, a time prediction model, called an autoregressive and autoregressive with exogenous inputs (AR-ARX) model, is fit to a vibration signal measured during a normal operating condition of the structure. When a new time signal is recorded from an unknown state of the system, the prediction errors are computed for the new data set using the time prediction model. When the structure undergoes structural degradation, it is expected that the prediction errors will increase for the damage case. Based on this premise, a damage classifier is constructed using a sequential hypothesis testing technique called the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT). The SPRT is one form of parametric statistical inference tests, and the adoption of the SPRT to damage detection problems can improve the early identification of conditions that could lead to performance degradation and safety concerns. The sequential test assumes a probability distribution of the sample data sets, and a Gaussian distribution of the sample data sets is often used. This assumption, however, might impose potentially misleading behavior on the extreme values of the data, i.e. those points in the tails of the distribution. As the problem of damage detection specifically focuses attention on the tails, the assumption of normality is likely to lead the analysis astray. To overcome this difficulty, the performance of the SPRT is improved by integrating extreme values statistics, which specifically models behavior in the tails of the distribution of interest into the SPRT.

  18. Matter-enhanced transition probabilities in quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, Kenzo Tobita, Yutaka

    2014-05-15

    The relativistic quantum field theory is the unique theory that combines the relativity and quantum theory and is invariant under the Poincaré transformation. The ground state, vacuum, is singlet and one particle states are transformed as elements of irreducible representation of the group. The covariant one particles are momentum eigenstates expressed by plane waves and extended in space. Although the S-matrix defined with initial and final states of these states hold the symmetries and are applied to isolated states, out-going states for the amplitude of the event that they are detected at a finite-time interval T in experiments are expressed by microscopic states that they interact with, and are surrounded by matters in detectors and are not plane waves. These matter-induced effects modify the probabilities observed in realistic situations. The transition amplitudes and probabilities of the events are studied with the S-matrix, S[T], that satisfies the boundary condition at T. Using S[T], the finite-size corrections of the form of 1/T are found. The corrections to Fermi’s golden rule become larger than the original values in some situations for light particles. They break Lorentz invariance even in high energy region of short de Broglie wave lengths. -- Highlights: •S-matrix S[T] for the finite-time interval in relativistic field theory. •S[T] satisfies the boundary condition and gives correction of 1/T . •The large corrections for light particles breaks Lorentz invariance. •The corrections have implications to neutrino experiments.

  19. Hot Outflows in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, C C

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase metallicity distribution has been analyzed for the hot atmospheres of 29 galaxy clusters using {\\it Chandra X-ray Observatory} observations. All host brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with X-ray cavity systems produced by radio AGN. We find high elemental abundances projected preferentially along the cavities of 16 clusters. The metal-rich plasma was apparently lifted out of the BCGs with the rising X-ray cavities (bubbles) to altitudes between twenty and several hundred kiloparsecs. A relationship between the maximum projected altitude of the uplifted gas (the "iron radius") and jet power is found with the form $R_{\\rm Fe} \\propto P_{\\rm jet}^{0.45}$. The estimated outflow rates are typically tens of solar masses per year but exceed $100 ~\\rm M_\\odot ~yr^{-1}$ in the most powerful AGN. The outflow rates are 10% to 20% of the cooling rates, and thus alone are unable to offset a cooling inflow. Nevertheless, hot outflows effectively redistribute the cooling gas and may play a significant role at ...

  20. Evolution of Nuclear Star Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    2009-01-05

    Two-body relaxation times of nuclear star clusters are short enough that gravitational encounters should substantially affect their structure in 10 Gyr or less. In nuclear star clusters without massive black holes, dynamical evolution is a competition between core collapse, which causes densities to increase, and heat input from the surrounding galaxy, which causes densities to decrease. The maximum extent of a nucleus that can resist expansion is derived numerically for a wide range of initial conditions; observed nuclei are shown to be compact enough to resist expansion, although there may have been an earlier generation of low-density nuclei that were dissolved. An evolutionary model for NGC 205 is presented which suggests that the nucleus of this galaxy has already undergone core collapse. Adding a massive black hole to a nucleus inhibits core collapse, and nuclear star clusters with black holes always expand, due primarily to heat input from the galaxy and secondarily to heating from stellar disruptions. The expansion rate is smaller for larger black holes due to the smaller temperature difference between galaxy and nucleus when the black hole is large. The rate of stellar tidal disruptions and its variation with time are computed for a variety of initial models. The disruption rate generally decreases with time due to the evolving nuclear density, particularly in the faintest galaxies, assuming that scaling relations derived for luminous galaxies can be extended to low luminosities.

  1. Acta Palaeontol. Pol. 59 (4): 827833, 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.4202/app.2012.0128 Juvenile-only clusters and behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    of such juveniles. A previously described specimen, which consists of an "adult" Psittacosaurus with 34 fully articulated juveniles, turns out to be a composite: the "adult" skull probably has been added, and in any case-only cluster of Psittacosaurus shows clear evidence of different ages (five 2-year olds and one 3-year old

  2. Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Ordovician shale quartzite MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest...

  3. Merger signatures in the galaxy cluster A98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paterno-Mahler, R.; Blanton, E. L.; Randall, S. W.; Bulbul, E.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.; Johnson, R. E. E-mail: eblanton@bu.edu E-mail: ebulbul@head.cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: cjones@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: rjohnson@gettysburg.edu

    2014-08-20

    We present results from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of Abell 98 (A98), a galaxy cluster with three major components: a relatively bright subcluster to the north (A98N), a disturbed subcluster to the south (A98S), and a fainter subcluster to the far south (A98SS). We find evidence for surface brightness and temperature asymmetries in A98N consistent with a shock-heated region to the south, which could be created by an early stage merger between A98N and A98S. Deeper observations are required to confirm this result. We also find that A98S has an asymmetric core temperature structure, likely due to a separate ongoing merger. Evidence for this is also seen in optical data. A98S hosts a wide-angle tail radio source powered by a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). We find evidence for a cavity in the intracluster medium that has been evacuated by one of the radio lobes, suggesting that AGN feedback is operating in this system. Examples of cavities in non-cool core clusters are relatively rare. The three subclusters lie along a line in projection, suggesting the presence of a large-scale filament. We observe emission along the filament between A98N and A98S, and a surface brightness profile shows emission consistent with the overlap of the subcluster extended gas halos. We find the temperature of this region is consistent with the temperature of the gas at similar radii outside this bridge region. Lastly, we examine the cluster dynamics using optical data. We conclude A98N and A98S are likely bound to one another with a 67% probability, while A98S and A98SS are not bound at a high level of significance.

  4. Neutron Science Research Areas | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home | Science & Discovery | Neutron Science | Research Areas SHARE Research Areas Neutron scattering research at ORNL covers four broad research areas: biology and soft...

  5. Cluster structures and superdeformation in $^{28}$Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasutaka Taniguchi; Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo; Masaaki Kimura

    2009-10-13

    We have studied positive-parity states of $^{28}$Si using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) and multi-configuration mixing (MCM) with constrained variation. Applying constraints to the cluster distance and the quadrupole deformation of the variational calculation, we have obtained basis wave functions that have various structures such as $\\alpha$-$^{24}$Mg and $^{12}$C-$^{16}$O cluster structures as well as deformed structures. Superposing those basis wave functions, we have obtained a oblate ground state band, a $\\beta$ vibration band, a normal-deformed prolate band, and a superdeformed band. It is found that the normal-deformed and superdeformed bands contain large amounts of the $^{12}$C-$^{16}$O and $\\alpha$-$^{24}$Mg cluster components, respectively. The results also suggest the presence of two excited bands with the developed $\\alpha$-$^{24}$Mg cluster structure, where the inter-cluster motion and the $^{24}$Mg-cluster deformation play important roles.

  6. AN -NASH EQUILIBRIUM WITH HIGH PROBABILITY FOR STRATEGIC CUSTOMERS IN HEAVY TRAFFIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atar, Rami

    AN -NASH EQUILIBRIUM WITH HIGH PROBABILITY FOR STRATEGIC CUSTOMERS IN HEAVY TRAFFIC RAMI ATAR of an -Nash equilibrium with probability approaching 1. On way to proving this result, new diffusion limit customers; -Nash equilibrium with high probability 1. INTRODUCTION Equilibrium behavior of strategic

  7. Ruin probabilities and de cit for the renewal risk model with phase{type interarrival times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avram, Florin

    Ruin probabilities and de#12;cit for the renewal risk model with phase{type interarrival times F killed ruin probability, de#12;cit at ruin, Sparre Andersen Model, phase{type distributions, Laplace transform of the #12;nite time ruin probability, by considering also the de#12;cit at ruin; the model

  8. APPL: A Probability Programming Language Maj. Andrew G. GLEN, Diane L. EVANS, and Lawrence M. LEEMIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemis, Larry

    APPL: A Probability Programming Language Maj. Andrew G. GLEN, Diane L. EVANS, and Lawrence M having arbitrary distributions. This arti- cle presents a prototype probability package named APPL (A probability software package, referred to as "A Prob- ability Programming Language" (APPL), that fills

  9. Low Probability Differentials and the Cryptanalysis of Full-Round CLEFIA-128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Low Probability Differentials and the Cryptanalysis of Full-Round CLEFIA-128 Sareh Emami2, San Ling far, low probability differentials for the key schedule of block ciphers have been used to exploit particularly cho- sen differentials with a probability as low as 2-128 . CLEFIA-128 has 214

  10. Outage Probability of the Gaussian Free Space Optical Channel with Pulse-Position Modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillén i Fàbregas, Albert

    Outage Probability of the Gaussian Free Space Optical Channel with Pulse-Position Modulation Nick adopt a quasi-static block fading model and study the outage probability of the channel under gains are possible by using power allocation techniques to minimise the outage probability. I

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 58, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2012 6825 Outage Probability Under Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loyka, Sergey

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 58, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2012 6825 Outage Probability Abstract--Outage probability and capacity of a class of block- fading MIMO channels are considered under distributions. Compound outage probability defined as min (over the transmitted signal distribution) -max (over

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 57, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2009 319 Outage Probability of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhashyam, Srikrishna

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 57, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2009 319 Outage Probability on the outage probability of multiple-input single-output (MISO) fading channels. Channel state information. With perfect CSIR, under a short-term power con- straint, we determine: (a) the outage probability

  13. von Neumann algebras and Free Probability RMS meeting, ISI Bengaluru, May 13 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunder, V S

    von Neumann algebras and Free Probability RMS meeting, ISI Bengaluru, May 13 2009 V.S. Sunder von Neumann algebras and Free Probability RMS meeting, ISI Bengaluru, M #12;Groups and algebras Groups: V.S. Sunder IMSc, Chennai von Neumann algebras and Free Probability RMS meeting, ISI Bengaluru, M

  14. Geographic Area Month

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

  15. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  16. Mineral resources of the North Algodones Dunes Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-360), Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.S.U.; Yeend, W.; Dohrenwend, J.C.; Gese, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the North Algodones Dunes Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-360), California Desert Conservation Area, Imperial County, California. The potential for undiscovered base and precious metals, and sand and gravel within the North Algodones Dunes Wilderness Study Area is low. The study area has a moderate potential for geothermal energy. One small sand-free area between the Coachella Canal and the west edge of the dune field would probably be the only feasible exploration site for geothermal energy. The study area has a moderate to high potential for the occurrence of undiscovered gas/condensate within the underlying rocks. 21 refs.

  17. Utilizing the sequential probability ratio test for building joint monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, D. W. (David W.); Sohn, H. (Hoon); Worden, K.; Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.)

    2002-01-01

    In this application of the statistical pattern recognition paradigm, a prediction model of a chosen feature is developed from the time domain response of a baseline structure. After the model is developed, subsequent feature sets are tested against the model to determine if a change in the feature has occurred. In the proposed statistical inference for damage identification there are two basic hypotheses; (1) the model can predict the feature, in which case the structure is undamaged or (2) the model can not accurately predict the feature, suggesting that the structure is damaged. The Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) develops a statistical method that quickly arrives at a decision between these two hypotheses and is applicable to continuous monitoring. In the original formulation of the SPRT algorithm, the feature is assumed to be Gaussian and thresholds are set accordingly. It is likely, however, that the feature used for damage identification is sensitive to the tails of the distribution and that the tails may not necessarily be governed by Gaussian characteristics. By modeling the tails using the technique of Extreme Value Statistics, the hypothesis decision thresholds for the SPRT algorithm may be set avoiding the normality assumption. The SPRT algorithm is utilized to decide if the test structure is undamaged or damaged and which joint is exhibiting the change.

  18. Parameterizing deep convection using the assumed probability density function method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Storer, R. L.; Griffin, B. M.; Höft, J.; Weber, J. K.; Raut, E.; Larson, V. E.; Wang, M.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-01-06

    Due to their coarse horizontal resolution, present-day climate models must parameterize deep convection. This paper presents single-column simulations of deep convection using a probability density function (PDF) parameterization. The PDF parameterization predicts the PDF of subgrid variability of turbulence, clouds, and hydrometeors. That variability is interfaced to a prognostic microphysics scheme using a Monte Carlo sampling method. The PDF parameterization is used to simulate tropical deep convection, the transition from shallow to deep convection over land, and midlatitude deep convection. These parameterized single-column simulations are compared with 3-D reference simulations. The agreement is satisfactory except when the convective forcingmore »is weak. The same PDF parameterization is also used to simulate shallow cumulus and stratocumulus layers. The PDF method is sufficiently general to adequately simulate these five deep, shallow, and stratiform cloud cases with a single equation set. This raises hopes that it may be possible in the future, with further refinements at coarse time step and grid spacing, to parameterize all cloud types in a large-scale model in a unified way.« less

  19. Parameterizing deep convection using the assumed probability density function method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Storer, R. L.; Griffin, B. M.; Höft, J.; Weber, J. K.; Raut, E.; Larson, V. E.; Wang, M.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-01-06

    Due to their coarse horizontal resolution, present-day climate models must parameterize deep convection. This paper presents single-column simulations of deep convection using a probability density function (PDF) parameterization. The PDF parameterization predicts the PDF of subgrid variability of turbulence, clouds, and hydrometeors. That variability is interfaced to a prognostic microphysics scheme using a Monte Carlo sampling method.The PDF parameterization is used to simulate tropical deep convection, the transition from shallow to deep convection over land, and midlatitude deep convection. These parameterized single-column simulations are compared with 3-D reference simulations. The agreement is satisfactory except when the convective forcing is weak.more »The same PDF parameterization is also used to simulate shallow cumulus and stratocumulus layers. The PDF method is sufficiently general to adequately simulate these five deep, shallow, and stratiform cloud cases with a single equation set. This raises hopes that it may be possible in the future, with further refinements at coarse time step and grid spacing, to parameterize all cloud types in a large-scale model in a unified way.« less

  20. The First Passage Probability of Intracellular Particle Trafficking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salman S. Rogers; Neftali Flores-Rodriguez; Victoria J. Allan; Philip G. Woodman; Thomas A. Waigh

    2009-04-13

    The first passage probability (FPP), of trafficked intracellular particles reaching a displacement L, in a given time t or inverse velocity S = t/L, can be calculated robustly from measured particle tracks, and gives a measure of particle movement in which different types of motion, e.g. diffusion, ballistic motion, and transient run-rest motion, can readily be distinguished in a single graph, and compared with mathematical models. The FPP is attractive in that it offers a means of reducing the data in the measured tracks, without making assumptions about the mechanism of motion: for example, it does not employ smoothing, segementation or arbitrary thresholds to discriminate between different types of motion in a particle track. Taking experimental data from tracked endocytic vesicles, and calculating the FPP, we see how three molecular treatments affect the trafficking. We show the FPP can quantify complicated movement which is neither completely random nor completely deterministic, making it highly applicable to trafficked particles in cell biology.

  1. Financial derivative pricing under probability operator via Esscher transfomation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achi, Godswill U., E-mail: achigods@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Abia State Polytechnic Aba, P.M.B. 7166, Aba, Abia State (Nigeria)

    2014-10-24

    The problem of pricing contingent claims has been extensively studied for non-Gaussian models, and in particular, Black- Scholes formula has been derived for the NIG asset pricing model. This approach was first developed in insurance pricing{sup 9} where the original distortion function was defined in terms of the normal distribution. This approach was later studied6 where they compared the standard Black-Scholes contingent pricing and distortion based contingent pricing. So, in this paper, we aim at using distortion operators by Cauchy distribution under a simple transformation to price contingent claim. We also show that we can recuperate the Black-Sholes formula using the distribution. Similarly, in a financial market in which the asset price represented by a stochastic differential equation with respect to Brownian Motion, the price mechanism based on characteristic Esscher measure can generate approximate arbitrage free financial derivative prices. The price representation derived involves probability Esscher measure and Esscher Martingale measure and under a new complex valued measure ? (u) evaluated at the characteristic exponents ?{sub x}(u) of X{sub t} we recuperate the Black-Scholes formula for financial derivative prices.

  2. Parameterizing deep convection using the assumed probability density function method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storer, R. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Griffin, B. M. [Univ. of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Höft, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Weber, J. K. [Univ. of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Raut, E. [Univ. of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Larson, V. E. [Univ. of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Wang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)] (ORCID:000000029179228X); Rasch, P. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Due to their coarse horizontal resolution, present-day climate models must parameterize deep convection. This paper presents single-column simulations of deep convection using a probability density function (PDF) parameterization. The PDF parameterization predicts the PDF of subgrid variability of turbulence, clouds, and hydrometeors. That variability is interfaced to a prognostic microphysics scheme using a Monte Carlo sampling method.The PDF parameterization is used to simulate tropical deep convection, the transition from shallow to deep convection over land, and midlatitude deep convection. These parameterized single-column simulations are compared with 3-D reference simulations. The agreement is satisfactory except when the convective forcing is weak. The same PDF parameterization is also used to simulate shallow cumulus and stratocumulus layers. The PDF method is sufficiently general to adequately simulate these five deep, shallow, and stratiform cloud cases with a single equation set. This raises hopes that it may be possible in the future, with further refinements at coarse time step and grid spacing, to parameterize all cloud types in a large-scale model in a unified way.

  3. Optimization of synchronization in gradient clustered networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingang Wang; Liang Huang; Ying-Cheng Lai; Choy Heng Lai

    2007-11-23

    We consider complex clustered networks with a gradient structure, where sizes of the clusters are distributed unevenly. Such networks describe more closely actual networks in biophysical systems and in technological applications than previous models. Theoretical analysis predicts that the network synchronizability can be optimized by the strength of the gradient field but only when the gradient field points from large to small clusters. A remarkable finding is that, if the gradient field is sufficiently strong, synchronizability of the network is mainly determined by the properties of the subnetworks in the two largest clusters. These results are verified by numerical eigenvalue analysis and by direct simulation of synchronization dynamics on coupled-oscillator networks.

  4. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Spinelli, N.; Wang, X.

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  5. Globular Cluster Formation in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Lipscy; P. Plavchan

    2003-11-12

    We present high resolution mid-infrared (mid-IR; 11.7 and 17.65 micron) maps of the central 400 pc region of the starburst galaxy M82. Seven star forming clusters are identified which together provide ~ 15% of the total mid-IR luminosity of the galaxy. Combining the mid-IR data with thermal radio measurements and near- and mid-IR line emission, we find that these young stellar clusters have inferred masses and sizes comparable to globular clusters. At least 20% of the star formation in M82 is found to occur in super-star clusters.

  6. Dynamic Clustering in Suspension of Motile Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao Chen; Xiang Yang; Mingcheng Yang; Hepeng Zhang

    2015-09-22

    Bacteria suspension exhibits a wide range of collective phenomena arising from interactions between individual cells. Here we show Serratia marcescens cells near an air-liquid interface spontaneously aggregate into dynamic clusters through surface-mediated hydrodynamic interactions. These long-lived clusters translate randomly and rotate in the counter-clockwise direction; they continuously evolve, merge with others and split into smaller ones. Measurements indicate that long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions have strong influences on cluster properties. Bacterial clusters change material and fluid transport near the interface and hence may have environmental and biological consequences.

  7. Dynamic Clustering in Suspension of Motile Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Mingcheng; Zhang, Hepeng

    2015-01-01

    A bacteria suspension exhibits a wide range of collective phenomena arsing from interactions between individual cells. Here we show that Serratia marcescens cells near an air-liquid interface spontaneously aggregate into dynamic clusters through surface-mediated hydrodynamic interactions. These long-lived clusters translate randomly and rotate in the counter-clockwise direction; they continuously evolve, merge with others and split into smaller ones. The observed cluster dynamics is qualitatively reproduced by a numerical model of self-propelled particles that interact via pair-wise forces extracted from hydrodynamic calculations. Bacterial clusters change material and fluid transport near the interface and hence may have environmental and biological consequences.

  8. Performance Comparisons of PSO based Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satapathy, Suresh Chandra; Pattnaik, Sabyasachi; Murthy, J V R; Reddy, P V G D Prasad

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the performance of PSO Particle Swarm Optimization based clustering on few real world data sets and one artificial data set. The performances are measured by two metric namely quantization error and inter-cluster distance. The K means clustering algorithm is first implemented for all data sets, the results of which form the basis of comparison of PSO based approaches. We have explored different variants of PSO such as gbest, lbest ring, lbest vonneumann and Hybrid PSO for comparison purposes. The results reveal that PSO based clustering algorithms perform better compared to K means in all data sets.

  9. The fundamental plane of clusters of galaxies: a quest for understanding cluster dynamics and morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Fritsch; Thomas Buchert

    1999-03-10

    We discuss implications of the fundamental plane parameters of clusters of galaxies derived from combined optical and X-ray data of a sample of 78 nearby clusters. In particular, we investigate the dependence of these parameters on the dynamical state of the cluster. We introduce a new concept of allocation of the fundamental plane of clusters derived from their intrinsic morphological properties, and put some theoretical implications of the existence of a fundamental plane into perspective.

  10. The WARPS Survey: VI. Galaxy Cluster and Source Identifications from Phase I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Perlman; D. J. Horner; L. R. Jones; C. A. Scharf; H. Ebeling; G. Wegner; M. Malkan

    2002-09-25

    We present in catalog form the optical identifications for objects from the first phase of the Wide Angle ROSAT Pointed Survey (WARPS). WARPS is a serendipitous survey of relatively deep, pointed ROSAT observations for clusters of galaxies. The X-ray source detection algorithm used by WARPS is Voronoi Tessellation and Percolation (VTP), a technique which is equally sensitive to point sources and extended sources of low surface brightness. WARPS-I is based on the central regions of 86 ROSAT PSPC fields, covering an area of 16.2 square degrees. We describe here the X-ray source screening and optical identification process for WARPS-I, which yielded 34 clusters at 0.06clusters form a complete, statistically well defined sample drawn from 75 of these 86 fields, covering an area of 14.1 square degrees, with a flux limit of $F (0.5-2.0 keV) = 6.5 \\times 10^{-14} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}}$. This sample can be used to study the properties and evolution of the gas, galaxy and dark matter content of clusters, and to constrain cosmological parameters. We compare in detail the identification process and findings of WARPS to those from other recently published X-ray surveys for clusters, including RDCS, SHARC-Bright, SHARC-south and the CfA 160 deg$^2$ survey.

  11. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  12. Detecting Climate Change in Multivariate Time Series Data by Novel Clustering and Cluster Tracing Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detecting Climate Change in Multivariate Time Series Data by Novel Clustering and Cluster Tracing Aachen University, Germany {kremer, guennemann, seidl}@cs.rwth-aachen.de Abstract--Climate change can series, and trace the clusters over time. A climate pattern is categorized as a changing pattern

  13. TIME-SERIES PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: M62 (NGC 6266), THE MOST RR LYRAE-RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER IN THE GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contreras, R.; Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.; Kuehn, C. A.; Pritzl, B. J.; Borissova, J.

    2010-12-15

    We present new time-series CCD photometry, in the B and V bands, for the moderately metal-rich ([Fe/H] {approx_equal} -1.3) Galactic globular cluster M62 (NGC 6266). The present data set is the largest obtained so far for this cluster and consists of 168 images per filter, obtained with the Warsaw 1.3 m telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory and the 1.3 m telescope of the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, in two separate runs over the time span of 3 months. The procedure adopted to detect the variable stars was the optimal image subtraction method (ISIS v2.2), as implemented by Alard. The photometry was performed using both ISIS and Stetson's DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME package. We have identified 245 variable stars in the cluster fields that have been analyzed so far, of which 179 are new discoveries. Of these variables, 133 are fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars (RRab), 76 are first overtone (RRc) pulsators, 4 are type II Cepheids, 25 are long-period variables (LPVs), 1 is an eclipsing binary, and 6 are not yet well classified. Such a large number of RR Lyrae stars places M62 among the top two most RR Lyrae-rich (in the sense of total number of RR Lyrae stars present) globular clusters known in the Galaxy, second only to M3 (NGC 5272) with a total of 230 known RR Lyrae stars. Since this study covers most but not all of the cluster area, it is not unlikely that M62 is in fact the most RR Lyrae-rich globular cluster in the Galaxy. In like vein, thanks to the time coverage of our data sets, we were also able to detect the largest sample of LPVs known so far in a Galactic globular cluster. We analyze a variety of Oosterhoff type indicators for the cluster, including mean periods, period distribution, Bailey diagrams, and Fourier decomposition parameters (as well as the physical parameters derived therefrom). All of these indicators clearly show that M62 is an Oosterhoff type I system. This is in good agreement with the moderately high metallicity of the cluster, in spite of its predominantly blue horizontal branch morphology-which is more typical of Oosterhoff type II systems. We thus conclude that metallicity plays a key role in defining Oosterhoff type. Finally, based on an application of the 'A-method', we conclude that the cluster RR Lyrae stars have a similar He abundance as M3, although more work on the temperatures of the M62 RR Lyrae is needed before this result can be conclusively established.

  14. Chandra Imaging of the X-ray Core of the Virgo Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Young; A. S. Wilson; C. G. Mundell

    2002-07-15

    We report sub-arcsecond X-ray imaging spectroscopy of M87 and the core of the Virgo cluster with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The X-ray morphology shows structure on arcsecond (~100 pc) to ten arcminute (~50 kpc) scales, the most prominent feature being an "arc" running from the east, across the central region of M87 and off to the southwest. A ridge in the radio map, ending in an "ear"-shaped structure, follows the arc to the east. Depressions in the X-ray surface brightness correspond to the inner radio lobes and there is no evidence of shock-heated gas surrounding them. There are also at least two approximately circular (centered near the nucleus) "edges" in the X-ray brightness distribution, the radii of which are slightly larger than the nuclear distances of the inner radio lobes and intermediate radio ridges, respectively. We speculate that these discontinuities may be spherical pulses or "fronts" driven by the same jet activity as is responsible for the radio structure; such pulses are found in recent numerical simulations. All these results provide good evidence that the nuclear activity affects the intra-cluster medium. We present a temperature map of the intra-cluster medium, and obtain the temperature, pressure and cooling time as a function of nuclear distance for the arcs and the ambient intra-cluster medium. We show that the gas in the arcs is cooler than, and probably over-pressured with respect to, the ambient intra-cluster medium. The metal abundances of the cooler gas in the arc are somewhat enhanced relative to the ambient intra-cluster medium, favoring a ``buoyant plume'' origin for the X-ray arc, in which ambient gas near the nucleus is entrained by buoyant radio plasma and carried to larger nuclear distances. (Abstract truncated).

  15. Analysis and Mitigation of Tropospheric Effects on Ka Band Satellite Signals and Estimation of Ergodic Capacity and Outage Probability for Terrestrial Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enserink, Scott Warren

    2012-01-01

    of Outage Probability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vii OutageResults Using the LLN Outage Probability

  16. THE APM CLUSTER SURVEY: CLUSTER DETECTION AND LARGE-SCALE STRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. B. Dalton

    1995-05-17

    The APM Cluster Survey was based on a modification of Abell's original classification scheme for galaxy clusters. Here we discuss the results of an investigation of the stability of the statistical properties of the cluster catalogue to changes in the selection parameters. For a poor choice of selection parameters we find clear indications of line-of-sight clusters, but there is a wide range of input parameters for which the statistical properties of the catalogue are stable. We conclude that clusters selected in this way are indeed useful as tracers of large-scale structure.

  17. When Network Coding improves the Performances of Clustered Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    When Network Coding improves the Performances of Clustered Wireless Networks that significantly increases the performances of clustering algorithms in wireless multi-hop networks-XOR coding; wireless multi-hop networks; clustering I. INTRODUCTION Partitioning nodes

  18. Exploring Virtual Depth for Automotive Instrument Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploring Virtual Depth for Automotive Instrument Cluster Concepts Nora Broy1,2,3 , Benedikt Zierer instrument cluster. Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal more pronounced as auto-stereoscopic displays become available for the car. For instance, H¨akkil¨a et

  19. Redshift Evolution of Galaxy Cluster Densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; S. L. Morris; H. K. C. Yee; E. Ellingson

    1997-01-20

    The number of rich galaxy clusters per unit volume is a strong function of Omega, the cosmological density parameter, and sigma_8, the linear extrapolation to z=0 of the density contrast in 8/h Mpc spheres. The CNOC cluster redshift survey provides a sample of clusters whose average mass profiles are accurately known, which enables a secure association between cluster numbers and the filtered density perturbation spectrum. We select from the CNOC cluster survey those EMSS clusters with bolometric L_x>=10^45 erg/s and a velocity dispersion exceeding 800 km/s in the redshift ranges 0.18-0.35 and 0.35-0.55. We compare the number density of these subsamples with similar samples at both high and low redshift. Using the Press-Schechter formalism and CDM style structure models, the density data are described with sigma_8=0.75+/-0.1 and Omega=0.4+/-0.2 (90% confidence). The cluster dynamical analysis gives Omega=0.2+/-0.1$ for which sigma_8=0.95+/-0.1 (90% confidence). The predicted cluster density evolution in an \\Omega=1 CDM model exceeds that observed by more than an order of magnitude.

  20. Clustering Web Search Results Using Fuzzy Ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Clustering Web Search Results Using Fuzzy Ants Steven Schockaert,* Martine De Cock, Chris Cornelis and Uncertainty Modelling Research Unit, Krijgslaan 281 (S9), B-9000 Gent, Belgium Algorithms for clustering Web existing approaches and illustrates how our algorithm can be applied to the problem of Web search results

  1. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  2. Young massive star clusters in nearby galaxies. I. Identification and general properties of cluster systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soeren S. Larsen; Tom Richtler

    1999-02-19

    Using ground-based UBVRI+Halpha CCD photometry we have been carrying out a search for young massive star clusters (YMCs) in a sample consisting of 21 nearby spiral galaxies. We find a large variety concerning the richness of the cluster systems, with some galaxies containing no YMCs at all and others hosting very large numbers of YMCs. Examples of galaxies with poor cluster systems are NGC 300 and NGC 4395, while the richest cluster systems are found in the galaxies NGC 5236, NGC 2997 and NGC 1313. The age distributions of clusters in these galaxies show no obvious peaks, indicating that massive star clusters are formed as an ongoing process rather than in bursts. This is in contrast to what is observed in starbursts and merger galaxies. The radial distributions of clusters follow the Halpha surface brightness. For the galaxies in our sample there is no correlation between the morphological type and the presence of YMCs

  3. Clustering attributed graphs: models, measures and methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bothorel, Cecile; Magnani, Matteo; Micenkova, Barbora

    2015-01-01

    Clustering a graph, i.e., assigning its nodes to groups, is an important operation whose best known application is the discovery of communities in social networks. Graph clustering and community detection have traditionally focused on graphs without attributes, with the notable exception of edge weights. However, these models only provide a partial representation of real social systems, that are thus often described using node attributes, representing features of the actors, and edge attributes, representing different kinds of relationships among them. We refer to these models as attributed graphs. Consequently, existing graph clustering methods have been recently extended to deal with node and edge attributes. This article is a literature survey on this topic, organizing and presenting recent research results in a uniform way, characterizing the main existing clustering methods and highlighting their conceptual differences. We also cover the important topic of clustering evaluation and identify current open ...

  4. High performance computing: Clusters, constellations, MPPs, and future directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongarra, Jack; Sterling, Thomas; Simon, Horst; Strohmaier, Erich

    2003-01-01

    and Jim Gray, “High Performance Computing: Crays, Clusters,The Marketplace of High-Performance Computing”, ParallelHigh Performance Computing Clusters, Constellations, MPPs,

  5. Toward Understanding the Microscopic Origin of Nuclear Clustering...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toward Understanding the Microscopic Origin of Nuclear Clustering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward Understanding the Microscopic Origin of Nuclear Clustering Open...

  6. Gate-tunable exchange coupling between cobalt clusters on graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Gate-tunable exchange coupling between cobalt clusters on graphene Title: Gate-tunable exchange coupling between cobalt clusters on graphene Authors:...

  7. Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geeothermal Reservoirs Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal Reservoirs Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal Reservoirs...

  8. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  9. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  10. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral presentations. Because of the important role that students and postdocs play in the future of this field, we also anticipate to select several posters from young investigators for oral presentations.

  11. Passive Evolution of Galaxy Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hee-Jong Seo; Daniel J. Eisenstein; Idit Zehavi

    2007-12-11

    We present a numerical study of the evolution of galaxy clustering when galaxies flow passively from high redshift, respecting the continuity equation throughout. While passive flow is a special case of galaxy evolution, it allows a well-defined study of galaxy ancestry and serves as an interesting limit to be compared to non-passive cases. We use dissipationless N-body simulations, assign galaxies to massive halos at z=1 and z=2 using various HOD models, and trace these galaxy particles to lower redshift while conserving their number. We find that passive flow results in an asymptotic convergence at low redshift in the HOD and in galaxy clustering on scales above ~3Mpc/h for a wide range of initial HODs. As galaxies become less biased with respect to mass asymptotically with time, the HOD parameters evolve such that M1/Mm decreases while alpha converges toward unity, where Mm is the characteristic halo mass to host a central galaxy, M1 is the halo mass to host one satellite galaxy, and alpha is the power-law index in the halo-mass dependence of the average number of satellites per halo. The satellite populations converge toward the Poisson distribution at low redshift. The convergence is robust for different number densities and is enhanced when galaxies evolve from higher redshift. We compare our results with the observed LRG sample from Sloan Digital Sky Survey that has the same number density. We claim that if LRGs have experienced a strict passive flow, their should be close to a power law with an index of unity in halo mass. Discrepancies could be due to dry galaxy merging or new members arising between the initial and the final redshifts. The spatial distribution of passively flowing galaxies within halos appears on average more concentrated than the halo mass profile at low redshift. (abridged)

  12. Suppression of alpha formation probability around the N = 126 shell closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Chong; Liotta, R. J.; Wyss, R.; Andreyev, A. N.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P.

    2011-10-28

    {alpha} formation amplitudes extracted from experimental data are presented and an abrupt change around the N = 126 shell closure is noted. It is explained as a sudden hindrance of the clustering of nucleons. The clustering induced by the pairing mode acting upon the four nucleons is inhibited if the configuration space does not allow a proper manifestation of the pairing collectivity.

  13. Discrimination with error margin between two states - Case of general occurrence probabilities -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Sugimoto; T. Hashimoto; M. Horibe; A. Hayashi

    2009-11-18

    We investigate a state discrimination problem which interpolates minimum-error and unambiguous discrimination by introducing a margin for the probability of error. We closely analyze discrimination of two pure states with general occurrence probabilities. The optimal measurements are classified into three types. One of the three types of measurement is optimal depending on parameters (occurrence probabilities and error margin). We determine the three domains in the parameter space and the optimal discrimination success probability in each domain in a fully analytic form. It is also shown that when the states to be discriminated are multipartite, the optimal success probability can be attained by local operations and classical communication. For discrimination of two mixed states, an upper bound of the optimal success probability is obtained.

  14. CANDIDATE CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AT z > 1.3 IDENTIFIED IN THE SPITZER SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE DEEP FIELD SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rettura, A.; Stern, D.; Martinez-Manso, J.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Mei, S.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Bartlett, J. G.

    2014-12-20

    We present 279 galaxy cluster candidates at z > 1.3 selected from the 94 deg{sup 2} Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field (SSDF) survey. We use a simple algorithm to select candidate high-redshift clusters of galaxies based on Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared data combined with shallow all-sky optical data. We identify distant cluster candidates adopting an overdensity threshold that results in a high purity (80%) cluster sample based on tests in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the Boötes field. Our simple algorithm detects all three 1.4 < z ? 1.75 X-ray detected clusters in the Boötes field. The uniqueness of the SSDF survey resides not just in its area, one of the largest contiguous extragalactic fields observed with Spitzer, but also in its deep, multi-wavelength coverage by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), Herschel/SPIRE, and XMM-Newton. This rich data set will allow direct or stacked measurements of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect decrements or X-ray masses for many of the SSDF clusters presented here, and enable a systematic study of the most distant clusters on an unprecedented scale. We measure the angular correlation function of our sample and find that these candidates show strong clustering. Employing the COSMOS/UltraVista photometric catalog in order to infer the redshift distribution of our cluster selection, we find that these clusters have a comoving number density n{sub c}=(0.7{sub ?0.6}{sup +6.3})×10{sup ?7} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup ?3} and a spatial clustering correlation scale length r {sub 0} = (32 ± 7) h {sup –1} Mpc. Assuming our sample is comprised of dark matter halos above a characteristic minimum mass, M {sub min}, we derive that at z = 1.5 these clusters reside in halos larger than M{sub min}=1.5{sub ?0.7}{sup +0.9}×10{sup 14} h{sup ?1} M{sub ?}. We find that the mean mass of our cluster sample is equal to M{sub mean}=1.9{sub ?0.8}{sup +1.0}×10{sup 14} h{sup ?1} M{sub ?}; thus, our sample contains the progenitors of present-day massive galaxy clusters.

  15. Quantum Implementation of Unitary Coupled Cluster for Simulating Molecular Electronic Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yangchao; Zhang, Shuaining; Zhang, Jing-Ning; Yung, Man-Hong; Kim, Kihwan

    2015-01-01

    Quantum simulation represents an efficient solution to a certain classically intractable problem in various research area including quantum chemistry. The central problem of quantum chemistry is to determine the electronic structure and the ground-state energy of atoms and molecules. The exact classical calculation of the problem is demanding even for molecules with moderate size due to the "exponential catastrophe." To deal with such quantum chemistry problem, the coupled-cluster methods have been successfully developed, which are considered to be the current "gold standard" in classical computational chemistry. However, the coupled-cluster ansatz is built with non-unitary operation, which leads to drawbacks such as lacking variational bound of ground-state energy. The unitary version of the coupled-cluster methods would perfectly address the problem, whereas it is classically inefficient without proper truncation of the infinite series expansion. It has been a long-standing challenge to build an efficient c...

  16. Effects of $?$-cluster breaking on 3$?$ cluster structures in $^{12}$C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadahiro Suhara; Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo

    2015-02-17

    To clarify the effects of $\\alpha$-cluster breaking on 3$\\alpha$ cluster structures in $^{12}$C, we investigate $^{12}$C using a hybrid model that combines the Brink-Bloch cluster model with the $p_{3/2}$ subshell closure wave function. We have found that $\\alpha$-cluster breaking caused by spin-orbit force significantly changes cluster structures of excited $0^{+}$ states through orthogonality to lower states. Spatially developed cluster components of the $0^{+}_{2}$ state are reduced. The $0^{+}_{3}$ state changes from a vibration mode in the bending motion of three $\\alpha$ clusters to a chain-like 3$\\alpha$ structure having an open triangle configuration. As a result of these structure changes of $0^{+}$ states, the band assignment for the $2^{+}_{2}$ state is changed by the $\\alpha$-cluster breaking effect. Namely, in model calculations without the $\\alpha$-cluster breaking effect, the $0^{+}_{2}$ state is assigned to be the band-head of the $2^{+}_{2}$ state. However, when we incorporate $\\alpha$-cluster breaking caused by the spin-orbit force, the $0^{+}_{3}$ state is regarded as the band-head of the $2^{+}_{2}$ state.

  17. Comment on “Measurement of two- and three-nucleon short-range correlation probabilities in nuclei”

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Hen, Or

    2015-04-24

    Comment on 'Measurement of 2- and 3-nucleon short range correlation probabilities in nuclei' shows how the reported three-nucleon plateau was likely due to resolution effects.

  18. Program Areas | National Security | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Program Areas SHARE Program Areas image Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a robust...

  19. Two formation paths for cluster dwarf galaxies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianca M. Poggianti; Nobunari Kashikawa; Terry Bridges; Bahram Mobasher; Yutaka Komiyama; Dave Carter; Sadanori Okamura; Masafumi Yagi

    2003-10-15

    A surprising result of our recent spectroscopic survey of galaxies in the Coma cluster has been the discovery of a possible bimodal distribution in the metallicities of faint galaxies at $M_B>-17$. We identified a group of dwarfs with luminosity-weighted metallicities around solar and a group with [M/H] around -1.5. A metallicity bimodality among galaxies of similar luminosities is unexpected and suggests that faint cluster galaxies could be an heterogeneous population that formed through more than one evolutionary path, possibly as a consequence of the cluster environment.

  20. X-ray Selected Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabella M. Gioia

    1996-01-21

    This paper given at the meeting on "Mapping, Measuring and Modelling the Universe" presents three topics: 1) the study of the clusters and groups of galaxies found serendipitously in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) region of the ROSAT all-sky survey; 2) the highest redshift clusters found in the EMSS (up to z=0.82) and the cosmological implications of their very existence; 3) the gravitational lensing in the EMSS X-ray selected clusters of galaxies observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

  1. Clustering and Correlations in Neutron Haloes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Orr

    2002-01-25

    In the present paper clustering and correlations within halo systems is explored. In particular, the application of neutron-neutron interferometry and Dalitz-plot type analyses is presented through the example provided by the dissociation of 14Be. A novel approach for producing and detecting bound neutron clusters is also described. The observation of some 6 events with characteristics consistent with the liberation of a multineutron cluster in the breakup of 14Be -- possibly in the channel 10Be+4n -- is discussed.

  2. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  3. Nutrient Shielding in Clusters of Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim O. Lavrentovich; John H. Koschwanez; David R. Nelson

    2013-06-13

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells' spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness $\\ell$ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter $\

  4. Discovery of a cluster of galaxies behind the Milky Way: X-ray and optical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Lopes de Oliveira; G. B. Lima Neto; C. Mendes de Oliveira; E. Janot-Pacheco; C. Motch

    2006-08-18

    We report the discovery of Cl 2334+48, a rich cluster of galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance, identified in public images from the XMM-Newton archive. We present the main properties of this cluster using the XMM-Newton X-ray data, along with new optical spectroscopic and photometric observations. Cl 2334+48 is located at z = 0.271 +/- 0.001, as derived from the optical spectrum of the brightest member galaxy. Such redshift agrees with a determination from the X-ray spectrum (z = 0.263 (+0.012/-0.010)), in which an intense emission line is matched to the rest wavelength of the Fe Kalpha complex. Its intracluster medium has a plasma temperature of 4.92 (+0.50/-0.48) keV, sub-solar abundance (0.38 +/- 0.12 Zsun), and a bolometric luminosity of 3.2 x 10^44 erg/s. A density contrast delta = 2500 is obtained in a radius of 0.5 Mpc/h70, and the corresponding enclosed mass is 1.5 x 10^14 Msun. Optical images show an enhancement of g'-i' > 2.5 galaxies around the central galaxy, as expected if these were cluster members. The central object is a luminous E-type galaxy, which is displaced ~ 40 kpc/h70 from the cluster X-ray center. In addition, it has a neighbouring arc-like feature (~ 22" or 90 kpc/h70 from it), probably due to strong gravitational lensing. The discovery of Cl 2334+48 emphasises the remarkable capability of the XMM-Newton to reveal new clusters of galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance.

  5. Continuity of the phase transition for planar random-cluster and Potts models with $1\\le q\\le4$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugo Duminil-Copin; Vladas Sidoravicius; Vincent Tassion

    2015-05-15

    This article studies the planar Potts model and its random-cluster representation. We show that the phase transition of the nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic $q$-state Potts model on $\\mathbb Z^2$ is continuous for $q\\in\\{2,3,4\\}$, in the sense that there exists a unique Gibbs state, or equivalently that there is no ordering for the critical Gibbs states with monochromatic boundary conditions. The proof uses the random-cluster model with cluster-weight $q\\ge1$ (note that $q$ is not necessarily an integer) and is based on two ingredients: 1. The fact that the two-point function for the free state decays sub-exponentially fast for cluster-weights $1\\le q\\le 4$, which is derived studying parafermionic observables on a discrete Riemann surface. 2. A new result proving the equivalence of several properties of critical random-cluster models: - the absence of infinite-cluster for wired boundary conditions, - the uniqueness of infinite-volume measures, - the sub-exponential decay of the two-point function for free boundary conditions, - a Russo-Seymour-Welsh type result on crossing probabilities in rectangles with arbitrary boundary conditions. The result leads to a number of consequences concerning the scaling limit of the random-cluster model with $1\\le q \\le 4$. It shows that the family of interfaces (for instance for Dobrushin boundary conditions) are tight when taking the scaling limit and that any sub-sequential limit can be parametrized by a Loewner chain. We also study the effect of boundary conditions on these sub-sequential limits. Let us mention that the result should be instrumental in the study of critical exponents as well.

  6. 86 IEEE Concurrency Because high-performance cluster comput-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    many topics makes High Performance Cluster Computing: Architectures and Systems unique, and the bibli

  7. Interest Rate Clustering in UK Financial Services Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    clustering in retail markets, through an examination of how interest rates cluster in two UK financial services markets. It is proposed that price or interest rate clustering forms in retail markets as firms1 Interest Rate Clustering in UK Financial Services Markets by John K. Ashton Norwich Business

  8. Do open clusters have distinguishable chemical signatures?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanco-Cuaresma, S; Heiter, U

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have already shown that stars in open clusters are chemically homogeneous (e.g. De Silva et al. 2006, 2007 and 2009). These results support the idea that stars born from the same giant molecular cloud should have the same chemical composition. In this context, the chemical tagging technique was proposed by Freeman et al. 2002. The principle is to recover disrupted stellar clusters by looking only to the stellar chemical composition. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this approach, it is necessary to test if we can distinguish between stars born from different molecular clouds. For this purpose, we studied the chemical composition of stars in 32 old and intermediate-age open clusters, and we applied machine learning algorithms to recover the original cluster by only considering the chemical signatures.

  9. Clustering of Galaxies in Brane World Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Hameeda; Mir Faizal; Ahmed Farag Ali

    2015-06-14

    In this paper, we analyze the clustering of galaxies using a modified Newtonian potential. This modification of the Newtonian potential occurs due to the existence of extra dimensions in brane world models. We will analyze a system of galaxies interacting with each other through this modified Newtonian potential. The partition function for this system of galaxies will be calculated, and this partition function will be used to calculate the free energy of this system of galaxies. The entropy and the chemical potential for this system will also be calculated. We will derive an explicit expression for the clustering parameter for this system. This parameter will determine the behavior of this system, and we will be able to express various thermodynamic quantities using this clustering parameter. Thus, we will be able to explicitly analyze the effect that modifying the Newtonian potential can have on the clustering of galaxies.

  10. Gravitational clustering in Static and Expanding Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    2003-08-28

    A brief summary of several topics in the study of gravitational many body problem is given. The discussion covers both static backgrounds (applicable to astrophysical systems) as well as clustering in an expanding background (relevant for cosmology)

  11. Cool Core Clusters from Cosmological Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasia, E; Murante, G; Planelles, S; Beck, A M; Biffi, V; Ragone-Figueroa, C; Granato, G L; Steinborn, L K; Dolag, K

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained from a set of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters, aimed at comparing predictions with observational data on the diversity between cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our simulations include the effects of stellar and AGN feedback and are based on an improved version of the Smoothed-Particle-Hydrodynamics code GADGET-3, which ameliorates gas mixing and better captures gas-dynamical instabilities by including a suitable artificial thermal diffusion. In this Letter, we focus our analysis on the entropy profiles, our primary diagnostic to classify the degree of cool-coreness of clusters, and on the iron profiles. In keeping with observations, our simulated clusters display a variety of behaviors in entropy profiles: they range from steadily decreasing profiles at small radii, characteristic of cool-core systems, to nearly flat core isentropic profiles, characteristic of non cool-core systems. Using observational criteria to distinguish between the two classes of...

  12. X-ray Clusters at High Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Gioia

    1997-11-30

    As the largest gravitationally bound structures known, clusters provide clear constraints on the formation of structure and on the composition of the universe. Despite their extreme importance for cosmology the number of clusters at high redshift (z > 0.75) is rather small. There are only a few X-ray emitting examples reported and a handful of optically-selected ones. These clusters can provide stringent constrains on theories of large scale structure formation, if they are massive enough. I will review the status of these distant X-ray selected clusters. These objects are of special importance because their X-ray emission implies that they are massive, comparable to low redshift examples, and their existence is problematic for some theories of structure formation.

  13. Online Spectral Clustering on Network Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Yi

    2012-12-31

    Graph is an extremely useful representation of a wide variety of practical systems in data analysis. Recently, with the fast accumulation of stream data from various type of networks, significant research interests have arisen on spectral clustering...

  14. Photometric study of five open star clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lata, Sneh; Sharma, Saurabh; Bonatto, Charles; Yadav, Ram Kesh

    2013-01-01

    $UBVRI$ photometry of the five open clusters Czernik 4, Berkeley 7, NGC 2236, NGC 7226 and King 12 has been carried out using ARIES 104 cm telescope, Nainital. Fundamental cluster parameters such as foreground reddening $E(B-V)$, distance, and age have been derived by means of the observed two colour and colour-magnitude diagrams, coupled to comparisons with theoretical models. $E(B-V)$ values range from 0.55 to 0.74 mag, while ages derived for these clusters range from $\\sim$10 to $\\sim$500 Myr. We have also studied the spatial structure, mass function and mass segregation effects. The present study shows that evaporation of low mass stars from the halo of the clusters increases as they evolve.

  15. Feature Clustering for Accelerating Parallel Coordinate Descent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherrer, Chad; Tewari, Ambuj; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Haglin, David J.

    2012-12-06

    We demonstrate an approach for accelerating calculation of the regularization path for L1 sparse logistic regression problems. We show the benefit of feature clustering as a preconditioning step for parallel block-greedy coordinate descent algorithms.

  16. 100 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentataboutScalablePhysicist: Christian Bauer 101000 Area

  17. 300 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are newsBelle-IIProcesses -1300 Area

  18. 700 Area - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are4B Drawings 4B618-10 and700 Area

  19. Tank Farm Area Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:Take Action APPENDIX-11CoverArea

  20. Tank Farm Area Closure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliers Tag:Take Action APPENDIX-11CoverArea

  1. Material Disposal Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterial Disposal Areas Material

  2. PROBABILITY OF CORRECT SELECTION OF GAMMA VERSUS GE OR WEIBULL VERSUS GE BASED ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    PROBABILITY OF CORRECT SELECTION OF GAMMA VERSUS GE OR WEIBULL VERSUS GE BASED ON LIKELIHOOD RATIO proposes the use of likelihood ratio statistic in choosing between gamma and GE models or between Weibull and GE models. Probability of correct selec- tions are obtained using Monte Carlo simulations for various

  3. Harmonic Functions and Collision Probabilities Christopher I. Connolly, EK 266 y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choset, Howie

    Harmonic Functions and Collision Probabilities Christopher I. Connolly, EK 266 y Arti cial-5022, FAX (415) 859-3735 email: connolly@ai.sri.com Abstract There is a close relationship between harmonic processes. The hitting probabilities for random walks can be cast as a Dirichlet problem for harmonic func

  4. Logistic Regression and Bayesian Model Selection in Estimation of Probability of Success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shemyakin, Arkady

    1 1 Logistic Regression and Bayesian Model Selection in Estimation of Probability of Success Arkady ABSTRACT Logistic regression and linear discriminant analysis are used to estimate probability of success X is analyzed as an explanatory variable. A comparison is made between logistic regression technique

  5. Optimal Points for a Probability Distribution on a Nonhomogeneous Cantor Set 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roychowdhury, Lakshmi 1975-

    2012-12-21

    line with distinct similarity ratios. Then we have defined a nonhomogeneous probability measure, the support of which lies on the Cantor set. For such a probability measure first we have determined the n-optimal points and the nth quantization error...

  6. APPENDIX 2 --ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT This document assesses the probable impacts on the human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPENDIX 2 -- ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 1. SUMMARY This document assesses the probable impacts here by reference. 3. ASSESSMENT OF THE PROBABLE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS 3.1. Impacts of the Proposed to define overfishing will have no significant impacts on the human environment, on marine mammals

  7. Reduced-Outage-Probability Algorithms for Cross-Layer Call Admission Control in CDMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blostein, Steven D.

    1 Reduced-Outage-Probability Algorithms for Cross-Layer Call Admission Control in CDMA Beamforming, increases outage probability in the physical layer. In this paper, we investigate the mitigation of the outage problem in the context of cross-layer performance, and propose CAC algorithms for code

  8. Outage Probability for Free-Space Optical Systems Over Slow Fading Channels With Pointing Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hranilovic, Steve

    Outage Probability for Free-Space Optical Systems Over Slow Fading Channels With Pointing Errors, Canada. Email: farid@grads.ece.mcmaster.ca, hranilovic@mcmaster.ca Abstract-- We investigate the outage errors. An expression for the outage probability is derived and we show that optimizing the transmit- ted

  9. SUBMITTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS 1 Outage Probability for Diversity Combining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Brian L.

    SUBMITTED TO IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS 1 Outage Probability for Diversity of outage probability in the low-outage regime. The contributions of this paper are (1) derivation of closed, selection and post-detection combining; (2) comparison of the relative outage performance

  10. The Impact of Fading on the Outage Probability in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loyka, Sergey

    1 The Impact of Fading on the Outage Probability in Cognitive Radio Networks Yaobin Wen, Sergey Loyka and Abbas Yongacoglu Abstract--This paper analyzes the outage probability in cog- nitive radio possible scenarios are classified into three cases based on typical outage events. When the average number

  11. Outage Probability in a Multi-Cellular Network using Alamouti Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    Outage Probability in a Multi-Cellular Network using Alamouti Scheme Dorra Ben Cheikh , Jean to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) or equivalently the outage probability in flat Rayleigh fading. The system power from the interfering base stations. In the first case, a closed- form expression for the outage

  12. Cut-off Rate based Outage Probability Analysis of Frequency Hopping Mobile Radio under Jamming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yýlmaz, Özgür

    Cut-off Rate based Outage Probability Analysis of Frequency Hopping Mobile Radio under Jamming--This paper deals with the achievable spectral ef- ficiency and outage analysis of short burst frequency hopping (FH) mobile radios under heavy jamming scenarios. With the use of outage probability analysis

  13. Analysis and Computation of the Outage Probability of Discrete-Input Block-Fading Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillén i Fàbregas, Albert

    Analysis and Computation of the Outage Probability of Discrete-Input Block-Fading Channels Khoa D IS ELIGIBLE FOR THE STUDENT PAPER AWARD. In this paper, we propose a tight lower bound to the outage is not supported by a particular channel realization [1], [2]. This probability is named the information outage

  14. On the Impact of Mobility on Outage Probability in Cellular Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    On the Impact of Mobility on Outage Probability in Cellular Networks Jean-Marc Kelif France Telecom an analytical study of the mobility in cellular networks and its impact on quality of service and outage power. It allows us to analyze users mobility and to derive expressions of the outage probability. We

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 62, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2014 699 Outage Probability in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durrani, Salman

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 62, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2014 699 Outage Probability, IEEE, and Xiangyun Zhou, Member, IEEE Abstract--This paper analyzes the outage performance in finite the outage probability at any arbitrary location of an arbitrarily-shaped finite wireless network: (i

  16. Outage Probability of Amplify-and-Forward Opportunistic Relaying with Multiple Interferers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jae Hong

    Outage Probability of Amplify-and-Forward Opportunistic Relaying with Multiple Interferers over channels. We derive the closed-form expression of the outage probability for the AF opportunistic relaying derive the analytical results. Also, in [9], the authors investigate the outage behavior of the dual

  17. Modification for complex-particle emission probability in the pre-equilibrium exciton model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao Ron-zhi; Wu Guo-hua; Zheng Wei-han; Liu Jian-ye; Yu Chao-fan; Yu Xie

    1986-04-01

    Starting from a state density formula that distinguishes between neutrons and protons, we have derived corrections for the emission probability W/sub alphabeta/ for complex particles and the purely combinatorial probability R/sub alphabeta/. The calculated results agree well with experimental data and show clear improvement over previous calculations.

  18. Bit Transmission Probability Maximizing the Key Rate of the BB84 Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonny Lumbantoruan; Ryutaroh Matsumoto; Tomohiko Uyematsu

    2010-03-11

    In all papers on the BB84 protocol, the transmission probability of each bit value is usually set to be equal. In this paper, we show that by assigning different transmission probability to each transmitted qubit within a single polarization basis, we can generally improve the key generation rate of the BB84 protocol and achieve a higher key rate.

  19. Applied Probability Trust (4 February 2008) INDEX POLICIES FOR DISCOUNTED BANDIT PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    . Then it is assumed that arms may break down, but repair is an option at some cost, and the new Whittle index policyApplied Probability Trust (4 February 2008) INDEX POLICIES FOR DISCOUNTED BANDIT PROBLEMS/action-dependent probabilities. It is proven that no index policy can attain the maximum expected total discounted reward

  20. On the probability of hitting a deer with a car Robert Estalella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    On the probability of hitting a deer with a car Robert Estalella 2003 August 1 Introduction Hitting an animal while driving a car, or even being close to hitting it, is terribly upsetting. This is what that jumped across the road just in front of our car. I started thinking about the probability of hitting

  1. Probability-density function for energy perturbations of isolated optical pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoba, Taras I.

    Probability-density function for energy perturbations of isolated optical pulses C. J. Mc to determine the probability-density function (PDF) for noise-induced energy perturbations of isolated (solitary) optical pulses in fiber communication systems. The analytical formula is consistent

  2. A Unifying Field in Logics: Neutrosophic Logic, Neutrosophic Set, Neutrosophic Probability and Statistics (fourth edition)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florentin Smarandache

    2010-08-31

    In this book one makes an introduction to non-standard analysis in the first part, needed to the next four chapters in order to study the neutrosophics: 1. Neutrosophy - a new branch of philosophy. 2. Neutrosophic Logic - a unifying field in logics. 3. Neutrosophic Set - a unifying field in sets. 4. Neutrosophic Probability - a generalization of classical and imprecise probabilities - and Neutrosophic Statistics.

  3. Proceedings of the First International Conference on Neutrosophy, Neutrosophic Logic, Neutrosophic Set, Neutrosophic Probability and Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florentin Smarandache; Jean Dezert; S. Bhattacharya; Andrzej Buller; M. Khoshnevisan; S. Singh; Feng Liu; Gh. C. Dinulescu-Campina; Chris Lucas; C. Gershenson

    2003-06-26

    Papers on neutrosophy (a generalization of dialectics), on neutrosophic logic, set, probability and statistics (generalizations of fuzzy logic, fuzzy set, and imprecise probability respectively), by Florentin Smarandache, Jean Dezert, S. Bhattacharya, Andrzej Buller, M. Khoshnevisan, S. Singh, Feng Liu, Gh. C. Dinulescu-Campina, Chris Lucas, and C. Gershenson.

  4. Calculation of the cumulative reaction probability via a discrete variable representation with absorbing boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William H.

    of a bimo- lecular chemical reaction, i.e., state-to-state differential and integral cross sections. HoweverCalculation of the cumulative reaction probability via a discrete variable representation is suggested for the calculation of the microcanonical cumulative reaction probability uia flux autocorrelation

  5. Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Probability Theory, But Were Afraid to Ask \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    of the subject to provide the reader a working knowledge of probabilities. This paper is an attempt to provide, in the case of acquiring a ``working knowledge'' of probability theory, there is much more to be concerned of the subject to provide the reader a ``working knowledge.'' This paper is an attempt to provide

  6. Detection Probability Modeling for Airport Wind-Shear August 28, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, John Y. N.

    Detection Probability Modeling for Airport Wind-Shear Sensors August 28, 2008 John Y. N. Cho Robert An objective wind-shear detection probability estimation model is developed for radar, lidar, and sensor combinations. The model includes effects of system sensitivity, site-specific wind-shear, clutter, and terrain

  7. PROBABILITY OF ERROR FOR TRAINED UNITARY SPACE-TIME MODULATION OVER A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swindlehurst, A. Lee

    PROBABILITY OF ERROR FOR TRAINED UNITARY SPACE-TIME MODULATION OVER A GAUSS-INNOVATIONS RICIAN probability of error for trained uni- tary space-time modulation over channels with a constant specular trained modulation, assuming that the channel is constant between training periods. All of the above

  8. LES/probability density function approach for the simulation of an ethanol spray flame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Venkat

    LES/probability density function approach for the simulation of an ethanol spray flame Colin Heye a an experimental pilot-stabilized ethanol spray flame. In this particular flame, droplet evaporation occurs away: Large-eddy simulation; Probability density function; Flamelet/progress variable approach; Ethanol

  9. Constrained simulation of the Bullet Cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lage, Craig; Farrar, Glennys, E-mail: csl336@nyu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we report on a detailed simulation of the Bullet Cluster (1E0657-56) merger, including magnetohydrodynamics, plasma cooling, and adaptive mesh refinement. We constrain the simulation with data from gravitational lensing reconstructions and the 0.5-2 keV Chandra X-ray flux map, then compare the resulting model to higher energy X-ray fluxes, the extracted plasma temperature map, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect measurements, and cluster halo radio emission. We constrain the initial conditions by minimizing the chi-squared figure of merit between the full two-dimensional (2D) observational data sets and the simulation, rather than comparing only a few features such as the location of subcluster centroids, as in previous studies. A simple initial configuration of two triaxial clusters with Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter profiles and physically reasonable plasma profiles gives a good fit to the current observational morphology and X-ray emissions of the merging clusters. There is no need for unconventional physics or extreme infall velocities. The study gives insight into the astrophysical processes at play during a galaxy cluster merger, and constrains the strength and coherence length of the magnetic fields. The techniques developed here to create realistic, stable, triaxial clusters, and to utilize the totality of the 2D image data, will be applicable to future simulation studies of other merging clusters. This approach of constrained simulation, when applied to well-measured systems, should be a powerful complement to present tools for understanding X-ray clusters and their magnetic fields, and the processes governing their formation.

  10. Contribution of White Dwarfs to Cluster Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ted von Hippel

    1998-02-14

    I present a literature search through 31 July 1997 of white dwarfs (WDs) in open and globular clusters. There are 36 single WDs and 5 WDs in binaries known among 13 open clusters, and 340 single WDs and 11 WDs in binaries known among 11 globular clusters. From these data I have calculated WD mass fractions for four open clusters (the Pleiades, NGC 2168, NGC 3532, and the Hyades) and one globular cluster (NGC 6121). I develop a simple model of cluster evolution that incorporates stellar evolution but not dynamical evolution to interpret the WD mass fractions. I augment the results of my simple model with N-body simulations incorporating stellar evolution (Terlevich 1987; de la Feunte Marcos 1996; Vesperini & Heggie 1997). I find that even though these clusters undergo moderate to strong kinematical evolution the WD mass fraction is relatively insensitive to kinematical evolution. By comparing the cluster mass functions to that of the Galactic disk, and incorporating plausibility arguments for the mass function of the Galactic halo, I estimate the WD mass fraction in these two populations. I assume the Galactic disk is ~10 Gyrs old (Winget et al. 1987; Liebert, Dahn, & Monet 1988; Oswalt et al. 1996) and that the Galactic halo is ~12 Gyrs old (Reid 1997b; Gratton et al. 1997; Chaboyer et al. 1998), although the WD mass fraction is insensitive to age in this range. I find that the Galactic halo should contain 8 to 9% (alpha = -2.35) or perhaps as much as 15 to 17% (alpha = -2.0) of its stellar mass in the form of WDs. The Galactic disk WD mass fraction should be 6 to 7% (alpha = -2.35), consistent with the empirical estimates of 3 to 7% (Liebert, Dahn, & Monet 1988; Oswalt et al. 1996). (abridged)

  11. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Collingwood CFB Borden 0 10 20 Kilometers Area = 521,900 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Population

  12. NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 10 | FEBRUARY 2014 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 81 String and sealing wax --although probably

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    and sealing wax -- although probably no longer physicists' preferred ingredients for their experiments

  13. The Average Mass Profile of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; H. K. C. Yee; E. Ellingson; S. L. Morris; R. Abraham; P. Gravel; C. J. Pritchet; T. Smecker-Hane; F. D. A. Hartwick; J. E. Hesser; J. B. Hutchings; J. B. Oke

    1997-05-23

    The average mass density profile measured in the CNOC cluster survey is well described with the analytic form rho(r)=A/[r(r+a_rho)^2], as advocated on the basis on n-body simulations by Navarro, Frenk & White. The predicted core radii are a_rho=0.20 (in units of the radius where the mean interior density is 200 times the critical density) for an Omega=0.2 open CDM model, or a_rho=0.26 for a flat Omega=0.2 model, with little dependence on other cosmological parameters for simulations normalized to the observed cluster abundance. The dynamically derived local mass-to-light ratio, which has little radial variation, converts the observed light profile to a mass profile. We find that the scale radius of the mass distribution, 0.20<= a_rho <= 0.30 (depending on modeling details, with a 95% confidence range of 0.12-0.50), is completely consistent with the predicted values. Moreover, the profiles and total masses of the clusters as individuals can be acceptably predicted from the cluster RMS line-of-sight velocity dispersion alone. This is strong support of the hierarchical clustering theory for the formation of galaxy clusters in a cool, collisionless, dark matter dominated universe.

  14. Sputtering of neutral and ionic indium clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Z.; Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Von Nagy-Felsobuki, E.I.

    1993-10-01

    Secondary neutral and secondary ion cluster yields were measured during the sputtering of a polycrystalline indium surface by normally incident {approximately}4 keV Ar{sup +} ions. In the secondary neutral mass spectra, indium clusters as large as In{sub 32} were observed. In the secondary ion mass spectra, indium clusters up to In{sub 18}{sup +} were recorded. Cluster yields obtained from both the neutral and ion channel exhibited a power law dependence on the number of constituent atoms, n, in the cluster, with the exponents measured to be {minus}5.6 and {minus}4. 1, respectively. An abundance drop was observed at n=8, 15, and 16 in both the neutral and ion yield distributions suggesting that the stability of the ion (either secondary ion or photoion) plays a significant role in the observed distributions. In addition, our experiments suggest that unimolecular decomposition of the neutral cluster may also plays an important role in the measured yield distributions.

  15. Electron attenuation in free, neutral ethane clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, M.; Harnes, J.; Børve, K. J.; Myrseth, V.

    2014-10-28

    The electron effective attenuation length (EAL) in free, neutral ethane clusters has been determined at 40 eV kinetic energy by combining carbon 1s x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical lineshape modeling. More specifically, theory is employed to form model spectra on a grid in cluster size (N) and EAL (?), allowing N and ? to be determined by optimizing the goodness-of-fit ?{sup 2}(N, ?) between model and observed spectra. Experimentally, the clusters were produced in an adiabatic-expansion setup using helium as the driving gas, spanning a range of 100–600 molecules in mean cluster size. The effective attenuation length was determined to be 8.4?±?1.9 Å, in good agreement with an independent estimate of 10 Å formed on the basis of molecular electron-scattering data and Monte Carlo simulations. The aggregation state of the clusters as well as the cluster temperature and its importance to the derived EAL value are discussed in some depth.

  16. Disentangling Clustering Effects in Jet Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall Kelley; Jonathan R. Walsh; Saba Zuberi

    2012-04-04

    Clustering algorithms build jets though the iterative application of single particle and pairwise metrics. This leads to phase space constraints that are extremely complicated beyond the lowest orders in perturbation theory, and in practice they must be implemented numerically. This complication presents a significant barrier to gaining an analytic understanding of the perturbative structure of jet cross sections. We present a novel framework to express the jet algorithm's phase space constraints as a function of clustered groups of particles, which are the possible outcomes of the algorithm. This approach highlights the analytic properties of jet observables, rather than the explicit constraints on individual final state momenta, which can be unwieldy at higher orders. We derive the form of the n-particle phase space constraints for a jet algorithm with any measurement. We provide an expression for the measurement that makes clustering effects manifest and relates them to constraints from clustering at lower orders. The utility of this framework is demonstrated by using it to understand clustering effects for a large class of jet shape observables in the soft/collinear limit. We apply this framework to isolate divergences and analyze the logarithmic structure of the Abelian terms in the soft function, providing the all-orders form of these terms and showing that corrections from clustering start at next-to-leading logarithmic order in the exponent of the cross section.

  17. Free floating planets in stellar clusters?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kester W. Smith; Ian A. Bonnell

    2001-01-05

    We have simulated encounters between planetary systems and single stars in various clustered environments. This allows us to estimate the fraction of systems liberated, the velocity distribution of the liberated planets, and the separation and eccentricity distributions of the surviving bound systems. Our results indicate that, for an initial distribution of orbits that is flat in log space and extends out to 50AU, 50% of the available planets can be liberated in a globular cluster, 25% in an open cluster, and less than 10% in a young cluster. These fractions are reduced to 25%, 12% and 2% if the initial population extends only to 20AU. Furthermore, these free-floating planets can be retained for longer than a crossing time only in a massive globular cluster. It is therefore difficult to see how planets, which by definition form in a disc around a young star, could be subsequently liberated to form a significant population of free floating substellar objects in a cluster.

  18. Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The Well Cluster ER-20-6 drilling and completion project was conducted during February, March, and April of 1996 in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. This project is part of the DOE`s Underground Test Area (UGTA) subproject at the NTS. The primary UGTA tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, and hydrological data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality as well as pathways and rates of groundwater migration at the NTS. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented as part of the UGTA subproject to obtain site-specific data on the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides produced by an underground nuclear explosion. The ER-20-6 near-field drilling project was originally planned to be very similar to that recently conducted at Well Cluster ER-20-5, which was designed to obtain data on the existing hydrologic regime near the site of an underground nuclear explosion (IT, 1995; IT, 1996a). However, after further consideration of the goals of the near-field drilling program and the characteristics of the BULLION site, the TWG recommended that the ER-20-6 project be redesigned to accommodate a forced-gradient experiment. This proposed experiment is expected to yield more realistic estimates of transport parameters than can be deduced from sampling and testing natural groundwater flow systems.

  19. Polar Chemoreceptor Clustering by Coupled Trimers of Dimers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert G. Endres

    2009-06-11

    Receptors of bacterial chemotaxis form clusters at the cell poles, where clusters act as "antennas" to amplify small changes in ligand concentration. Interestingly, chemoreceptors cluster at multiple length scales. At the smallest scale, receptors form dimers, which assemble into stable timers of dimers. At a large scale, trimers form large polar clusters composed of thousands of receptors. Although much is known about the signaling properties emerging from receptor clusters, it is unknown how receptors localize at the cell poles and what the cluster-size determining factors are. Here, we present a model of polar receptor clustering based on coupled trimers of dimers, where cluster size is determined as a minimum of the cluster-membrane free energy. This energy has contributions from the cluster-membrane elastic energy, penalizing large clusters due to their high intrinsic curvature, and receptor-receptor coupling favoring large clusters. We find that the reduced cluster-membrane curvature mismatch at the curved cell poles leads to large and robust polar clusters in line with experimental observation, while lateral clusters are efficiently suppressed.

  20. The sluggs survey: HST/ACS mosaic imaging of the NGC 3115 globular cluster system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Strader, Jay; Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Wong, Ka-Wah; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2014-08-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) g and z photometry and half-light radii R {sub h} measurements of 360 globular cluster (GC) candidates around the nearby S0 galaxy NGC 3115. We also include Subaru/Suprime-Cam g, r, and i photometry of 421 additional candidates. The well-established color bimodality of the GC system is obvious in the HST/ACS photometry. We find evidence for a 'blue tilt' in the blue GC subpopulation, wherein the GCs in the blue subpopulation get redder as luminosity increases, indicative of a mass-metallicity relationship. We find a color gradient in both the red and blue subpopulations, with each group of clusters becoming bluer at larger distances from NGC 3115. The gradient is of similar strength in both subpopulations, but is monotonic and more significant for the blue clusters. On average, the blue clusters have ?10% larger R {sub h} than the red clusters. This average difference is less than is typically observed for early-type galaxies but does match that measured in the literature for the Sombrero Galaxy (M104), suggesting that morphology and inclination may affect the measured size difference between the red and blue clusters. However, the scatter on the R {sub h} measurements is large. We also identify 31 clusters more extended than typical GCs, which we term ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) candidates. Many of these objects are actually considerably fainter than typical UCDs. While it is likely that a significant number will be background contaminants, six of these UCD candidates are spectroscopically confirmed as NGC 3115 members. To explore the prevalence of low-mass X-ray binaries in the GC system, we match our ACS and Suprime-Cam detections to corresponding Chandra X-ray sources. We identify 45 X-ray-GC matches: 16 among the blue subpopulation and 29 among the red subpopulation. These X-ray/GC coincidence fractions are larger than is typical for most GC systems, probably due to the increased depth of the X-ray data compared to previous studies of GC systems.

  1. The 2013 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures Gordon Research Conference/Gordon Research Seminar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauss, Todd D.

    2014-11-25

    The fundamental properties of small particles and their potential for groundbreaking applications are among the most exciting areas of study in modern physics, chemistry, and materials science. The Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures Gordon ResearchConference and Gordon Research Seminar synthesize contributions from these inter-related fields that reflect the pivotal role of nano-particles at the interface between these disciplines. Size-dependent optical, electronic, magnetic and catalytic properties offer prospects for applications in many fields, and possible solutions for many of the grand challenges facing energy generation, consumption, delivery, and storage in the 21st century. The goal of the 2013 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures Gordon Research Conference and Gordon Research Seminar is to continue the historical interdisciplinary tradition of this series and discuss the most recent advances, basic scientific questions, and emerging applications of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. The Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC/GRS traditionally brings together the leading scientific groups that have made significant recent advances in one or more fundamental nanoscience or nanotechnology areas. Broad interests of the DOE BES and Solar Photochemistry Program addressed by this meeting include the areas of solar energy to fuels conversion, new photovoltaic systems, fundamental characterization of nanomaterials, magnetism, catalysis, and quantum physics. The vast majority of speakers and attendees will address either directly the topic of nanotechnology for photoinduced charge transfer, charge transport, and catalysis, or will have made significant contributions to related areas that will impact these fields indirectly. These topics have direct relevance to the mission of the DOE BES since it is this cutting-edge basic science that underpins our energy future.

  2. NCS area of applicability determination for AVLIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, C.; Koopman, R.P.

    1999-07-01

    The authors present a method for examining congruence between the processes that make up an AVLIS enrichment plant and the benchmark critical experiments that are used to establish the bias and validate the codes used for nuclear criticality safety (NCS) calculations of those processes. A measure of the validity of the process of selecting critical experiments that are similar in nature to processes found in the plant is presented. The probability of fission depends primarily on neutron energy and the interaction cross sections of the materials in the process. The physics of fission has led one to consider the energy of neutrons causing fission to be the fundamental parameter for examining the area of applicability. Benchmark experiments are chosen to cover the material compositions, geometric arrangements, neutron energy spectra, and other parameters such as material heterogeneity, neutron leakage or reflection, interaction, and absorption in special materials. These parameters influence the process by affecting the number of neutrons available to cause fission at any given energy. The neutron energy distribution is established primarily as a result of the energy-dependent cross sections for the materials that are present. Thus, the energy of neutrons causing fission is the fundamental parameter needed for examining the effects of other parameters within the area of applicability.

  3. T-1 Training Area

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  4. T-1 Training Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-07

    Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

  5. A populous intermediate-age open cluster and evidence of an embedded cluster among the FSR globular cluster candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bica, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    We study the nature of the globular cluster (GC) candidates FSR 1603 and FSR 1755 selected from the catalogue of \\citet{FSRcat}. Their properties are investigated with 2MASS field-star decontaminated photometry, which is used to build colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and stellar radial density profiles (RDPs). FSR 1603 has the open cluster (OC) Ruprecht 101 as optical counterpart, and we show it to be a massive intermediate age cluster (IAC). Relevant parameters of FSR 1603 are the age $\\approx1$ Gyr, distance from the Sun $\\ds\\approx2.7$ kpc, Galactocentric distance $\\dgc\\approx6.4$ kpc, core radius $\\rc\\approx1.1$ pc, mass function slope $\\chi\\approx1.8$, observed stellar mass (for stars with mass in the range $\\rm 1.27 \\ms\\leq m\\leq2.03 \\ms$) $\\mObs\\approx500 \\ms$, and a total (extrapolated to $\\rm m=0.08 \\ms$) stellar mass $\\mTot\\approx2300 \\ms$. FSR 1755, on the other hand, is not a populous cluster. It may be a sparse young cluster embedded in the H II region Sh2-3, subject to an absorption $\\aV\\approx...

  6. Transition properties from the Hermitian formulation of the coupled cluster polarization propagator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucholska, Aleksandra M. Modrzejewski, Marcin; Moszynski, Robert

    2014-09-28

    Theory of one-electron transition density matrices has been formulated within the time-independent coupled cluster method for the polarization propagator [R. Moszynski, P. S. ?uchowski, and B. Jeziorski, Coll. Czech. Chem. Commun. 70, 1109 (2005)]. Working expressions have been obtained and implemented with the coupled cluster method limited to single, double, and linear triple excitations (CC3). Selected dipole and quadrupole transition probabilities of the alkali earth atoms, computed with the new transition density matrices are compared to the experimental data. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found. The results obtained with the new approach are of the same quality as the results obtained with the linear response coupled cluster theory. The one-electron density matrices for the ground state in the CC3 approximation have also been implemented. The dipole moments for a few representative diatomic molecules have been computed with several variants of the new approach, and the results are discussed to choose the approximation with the best balance between the accuracy and computational efficiency.

  7. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 2:50pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department...

  8. The richness dependence of galaxy cluster correlations Results from a redshift survey of rich APM clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croft, R A C; Efstathiou, G P; Sutherland, W; Maddox, S J; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Efstathiou, George; Sutherland, Will; Maddox, Steve

    1997-01-01

    We analyse the spatial clustering properties of a new catalogue of very rich galaxy clusters selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. These clusters are of comparable richness and space density to Abell Richness Class $\\geq 1$ clusters, but selected using an objective algorithm from a catalogue demonstrably free of artificial inhomogeneities. Evaluation of the two-point correlation function $\\xi_{cc}(r)$ for the full sample and for richer subsamples reveals that the correlation amplitude is consistent with that measured for lower richness APM clusters and X-ray selected clusters. We apply a maxmimum likelihood estimator to find the best fitting slope and amplitude of a power law fit to $\\xi_{cc}(r)$, and to estimate the correlation length $r_{0}$ (the value of $r$ at which $\\xi_{cc}(r)$ is equal to unity). For clusters with a mean space density of $1.6\\times 10^{-6}\\hmpccc$ (equivalent to the space density of Abell Richness $\\geq 2$ clusters), we find $r_{0}=21.3^{+11.1}_{-9.3} \\hmpc$ (95% confidence limits). Thi...

  9. NetCluster: A clustering-based framework to analyze internet passive measurements data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NetCluster: A clustering-based framework to analyze internet passive measurements data Elena, Sophia Antipolis, France a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 29 October 2012 Received algorithms Data analytics Internet measurements and characterization a b s t r a c t Internet measured data

  10. Clusters, groups, and filaments in the Chandra deep field-south up to redshift 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghan, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M., E-mail: siamak.dehghan@vuw.ac.nz [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand)

    2014-03-01

    We present a comprehensive structure detection analysis of the 0.3 deg{sup 2} area of the MUSYC-ACES field, which covers the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDFS). Using a density-based clustering algorithm on the MUSYC and ACES photometric and spectroscopic catalogs, we find 62 overdense regions up to redshifts of 1, including clusters, groups, and filaments. We also present the detection of a relatively small void of ?10 Mpc{sup 2} at z ? 0.53. All structures are confirmed using the DBSCAN method, including the detection of nine structures previously reported in the literature. We present a catalog of all structures present, including their central position, mean redshift, velocity dispersions, and classification based on their morphological and spectroscopic distributions. In particular, we find 13 galaxy clusters and 6 large groups/small clusters. Comparison of these massive structures with published XMM-Newton imaging (where available) shows that 80% of these structures are associated with diffuse, soft-band (0.4-1 keV) X-ray emission, including 90% of all objects classified as clusters. The presence of soft-band X-ray emission in these massive structures (M {sub 200} ? 4.9 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ?}) provides a strong independent confirmation of our methodology and classification scheme. In the closest two clusters identified (z < 0.13) high-quality optical imaging from the Deep2c field of the Garching-Bonn Deep Survey reveals the cD galaxies and demonstrates that they sit at the center of the detected X-ray emission. Nearly 60% of the clusters, groups, and filaments are detected in the known enhanced density regions of the CDFS at z ? 0.13, 0.52, 0.68, and 0.73. Additionally, all of the clusters, bar the most distant, are found in these overdense redshift regions. Many of the clusters and groups exhibit signs of ongoing formation seen in their velocity distributions, position within the detected cosmic web, and in one case through the presence of tidally disrupted central galaxies exhibiting trails of stars. These results all provide strong support for hierarchical structure formation up to redshifts of 1.

  11. 6 Model Evaluation III -Radiosonde and radar wind profiler cluster This section describes some of the cluster by cluster comparisons between the WRFb simulations and the radiosonde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    excess moisture transport from the Gulf of Mexico. For wind speed, the most striking feature6 Model Evaluation III - Radiosonde and radar wind profiler cluster analysis This section describes wind profiler clusters. The clusters and the method used to obtain them are described in detail in de

  12. Quasi-probability representations of quantum theory with applications to quantum information science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Ferrie

    2011-10-15

    This article comprises a review of both the quasi-probability representations of infinite-dimensional quantum theory (including the Wigner function) and the more recently defined quasi-probability representations of finite-dimensional quantum theory. We focus on both the characteristics and applications of these representations with an emphasis toward quantum information theory. We discuss the recently proposed unification of the set of possible quasi-probability representations via frame theory and then discuss the practical relevance of negativity in such representations as a criteria for quantumness.

  13. Metal Abundance Properties of M81 Globular Cluster System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Ma; David Burstein; Zhou Fan; Xu Zhou; Jiansheng Chen; Zhaoji Jiang; Zhenyu Wu; Jianghua Wu

    2007-08-30

    This paper is the third in the series of papers on M81 globular clusters. In this paper, we present spatial and metal abundance properties of 95 M81 globular clusters, which comprise nearly half of all the M81 globular cluster system. These globular clusters are divided into two M81 metallicity groups by a KMM test. Our results show that, the metal-rich clusters did not demonstrate a centrally concentrated spatial distribution as ones in M31, and metal-poor clusters tend to be less spatially concentrated. In other words, the distribution of the metal-rich clusters in M81 is not very similar to that of M31. Most of the metal-rich clusters distribute at projected radii of 4-8 kpc. It is also noted that the metal-rich clusters distribute within the inner 20 kpc, and the metal-poor ones do out to radii of ~40 kpc. Like our Galaxy and M31, the metallicity distribution of globular clusters in M81 along galactocentric radius suggests that some dissipation occurred during the formation of the globular cluster system, i.e. smooth, pressure-supported collapse models of galaxies are unlikely to produce such radial distribution of metallicity presented in this paper. There is not evident correlation between globular cluster luminosity and metallicity in M81 globular clusters. The overwhelming conclusion of this paper seems to be that a more complete and thorough cluster search is needed in M81.

  14. Probing the z > 6 universe with the first Hubble frontier fields cluster A2744

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atek, Hakim; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Richard, Johan; Clement, Benjamin; Egami, Eiichi; Ebeling, Harald; Jauzac, Mathilde; Jullo, Eric; Limousin, Marceau; Laporte, Nicolas; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2014-05-01

    The Hubble Frontier Fields program combines the capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with the gravitational lensing of massive galaxy clusters to probe the distant universe to an unprecedented depth. Here, we present the results of the first combined HST and Spitzer observations of the cluster A-2744. We combine the full near-infrared data with ancillary optical images to search for gravitationally lensed high-redshift (z ? 6) galaxies. We report the detection of 15 I {sub 814} dropout candidates at z ? 6-7 and one Y {sub 105} dropout at z ? 8 in a total survey area of 1.43 arcmin{sup 2} in the source plane. The predictions of our lens model also allow us to identify five multiply imaged systems lying at redshifts between z ? 6 and z ? 8. Thanks to constraints from the mass distribution in the cluster, we were able to estimate the effective survey volume corrected for completeness and magnification effects. This was in turn used to estimate the rest-frame ultraviolet luminosity function (LF) at z ? 6-8. Our LF results are generally in agreement with the most recent blank field estimates, confirming the feasibility of surveys through lensing clusters. Although based on a shallower observations than what will be achieved in the final data set including the full Advanced Camera for Survey observations, the LF presented here goes down to M {sub UV} ?–18.5, corresponding to 0.2L {sup *} at z ? 7 with one identified object at M {sub UV} ?–15 thanks to the highly magnified survey areas. This early study forecasts the power of using massive galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes and its complementarity to blank fields.

  15. Clusters and halos in light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Neff

    2012-10-15

    The fermionic molecular dynamics approach uses Gaussian wave packets as single-particle basis states. Many-body basis states are Slater determinants projected on parity, angular momentum and total linear momentum. The wave-packet basis is very flexible - FMD contains harmonic oscillator shell model and Brink-type cluster states as special cases. The parameters of the wave packets are obtained by variation. A realistic effective interaction derived from the Argonne V18 interaction by means of the unitary correlation operator method is employed. We discuss the fully microscopic calculation of the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be capture reaction within the FMD approach. The model space contains frozen cluster configurations at large distances and polarized configurations in the interaction region. The polarized configurations are essential for a successful description of the 7Be bound state properties and for the S- and D-wave scattering states. The calculated cross section agrees well with recent measurements regarding both the absolute normalization and the energy dependence. We also discuss the structure of the cluster states, including the famous Hoyle state, in 12C. From the two-body densities we conclude that the Hoyle state has a spatially extended triangular alpha-cluster structure, whereas the third 0+ state features a chain-like obtuse triangle structure. We also calculate the N hbar Omega decomposition of our wave functions to illuminate the challenges of no-core shell model calculations for these cluster states.

  16. Heating Rate Profiles in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward C. D. Pope; Georgi Pavlovski; Christian R. Kaiser; Hans Fangohr

    2006-01-05

    In recent years evidence has accumulated suggesting that the gas in galaxy clusters is heated by non-gravitational processes. Here we calculate the heating rates required to maintain a physically motived mass flow rate, in a sample of seven galaxy clusters. We employ the spectroscopic mass deposition rates as an observational input along with temperature and density data for each cluster. On energetic grounds we find that thermal conduction could provide the necessary heating for A2199, Perseus, A1795 and A478. However, the suppression factor, of the clasical Spitzer value, is a different function of radius for each cluster. Based on the observations of plasma bubbles we also calculate the duty cycles for each AGN, in the absence of thermal conduction, which can provide the required energy input. With the exception of Hydra-A it appears that each of the other AGNs in our sample require duty cycles of roughly $10^{6}-10^{7}$ yrs to provide their steady-state heating requirements. If these duty cycles are unrealistic, this may imply that many galaxy clusters must be heated by very powerful Hydra-A type events interspersed between more frequent smaller-scale outbursts. The suppression factors for the thermal conductivity required for combined heating by AGN and thermal conduction are generally acceptable. However, these suppression factors still require `fine-tuning` of the thermal conductivity as a function of radius. As a consequence of this work we present the AGN duty cycle as a cooling flow diagnostic.

  17. Quantum Implementation of Unitary Coupled Cluster for Simulating Molecular Electronic Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yangchao Shen; Xiang Zhang; Shuaining Zhang; Jing-Ning Zhang; Man-Hong Yung; Kihwan Kim

    2015-06-01

    Quantum simulation represents an efficient solution to a certain classically intractable problem in various research area including quantum chemistry. The central problem of quantum chemistry is to determine the electronic structure and the ground-state energy of atoms and molecules. The exact classical calculation of the problem is demanding even for molecules with moderate size due to the "exponential catastrophe." To deal with such quantum chemistry problem, the coupled-cluster methods have been successfully developed, which are considered to be the current "gold standard" in classical computational chemistry. However, the coupled-cluster ansatz is built with non-unitary operation, which leads to drawbacks such as lacking variational bound of ground-state energy. The unitary version of the coupled-cluster methods would perfectly address the problem, whereas it is classically inefficient without proper truncation of the infinite series expansion. It has been a long-standing challenge to build an efficient computational scheme for the unitary coupled-cluster ansatz. Here we report an experimental realization of the unitary coupled cluster ansatz based on quantum simulation. The experiments are performed in a scalable platform containing a trapped multi-level \\Yb ion for simulating the electronic structure of a molecular ion (HeH$^+$); we experimentally compute ground-state the energy curve and simulate chemical-bond softening non-perturbatively, which clearly shows the quantum implementation of the unitary coupled-cluster method yields better ground-states energies than classical implementations with truncations. Furthermore, the energy measurements, one most time consuming part in the experiments, can be parallelized. Our experimental results provide a new and solid evidence of how quantum simulation can advance the field of quantum chemistry.

  18. F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractors have cleaned up the F Reactor Area, the first reactor area at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state to be fully remediated.

  19. Solution Path Clustering with Minimax Concave Penalty and Its Applications to Noisy Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Yuliya

    2014-01-01

    Path Clustering of Noisy Big Data . . . . . . . . . . . .Y. Wah, and T. Herawan. “Big Data Clustering: A Review. ” InPath Clustering of Noisy Big Data Introduction In this

  20. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY Accurate measurement of galaxy cluster masses is an essential component not only in studies of cluster physics but...

  1. The next generation Virgo cluster survey. VIII. The spatial distribution of globular clusters in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durrell, Patrick R.; Accetta, Katharine [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Côté, Patrick; Blakeslee, John P.; Ferrarese, Laura; McConnachie, Alan; Gwyn, Stephen [Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hongxin [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Mihos, J. Christopher [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Puzia, Thomas H.; Jordán, Andrés [Institute of Astrophysics, Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Av. Vicu'a Mackenna 4860, Macul 7820436, Santiago (Chile); Lançon, Ariane [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l'Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Courteau, Stéphane [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Duc, Pierre-Alain [AIM Paris Saclay, CNRS/INSU, CEA/Irfu, Université Paris Diderot, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Emsellem, Eric [Université de Lyon 1, CRAL, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 av. Charles André, F-69230 Saint-Genis Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, ENS de Lyon (France); and others

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large-scale study of the distribution of globular clusters (GCs) throughout the Virgo cluster, based on photometry from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), a large imaging survey covering Virgo's primary subclusters (Virgo A = M87 and Virgo B = M49) out to their virial radii. Using the g{sub o}{sup ?}, (g' – i') {sub o} color-magnitude diagram of unresolved and marginally resolved sources within the NGVS, we have constructed two-dimensional maps of the (irregular) GC distribution over 100 deg{sup 2} to a depth of g{sub o}{sup ?} = 24. We present the clearest evidence to date showing the difference in concentration between red and blue GCs over the full extent of the cluster, where the red (more metal-rich) GCs are largely located around the massive early-type galaxies in Virgo, while the blue (metal-poor) GCs have a much more extended spatial distribution with significant populations still present beyond 83' (?215 kpc) along the major axes of both M49 and M87. A comparison of our GC maps to the diffuse light in the outermost regions of M49 and M87 show remarkable agreement in the shape, ellipticity, and boxiness of both luminous systems. We also find evidence for spatial enhancements of GCs surrounding M87 that may be indicative of recent interactions or an ongoing merger history. We compare the GC map to that of the locations of Virgo galaxies and the X-ray intracluster gas, and find generally good agreement between these various baryonic structures. We calculate the Virgo cluster contains a total population of N {sub GC} = 67, 300 ± 14, 400, of which 35% are located in M87 and M49 alone. For the first time, we compute a cluster-wide specific frequency S {sub N,} {sub CL} = 2.8 ± 0.7, after correcting for Virgo's diffuse light. We also find a GC-to-baryonic mass fraction ? {sub b} = 5.7 ± 1.1 × 10{sup –4} and a GC-to-total cluster mass formation efficiency ? {sub t} = 2.9 ± 0.5 × 10{sup –5}, the latter values slightly lower than but consistent with those derived for individual galactic halos. Taken as a whole, our results show that the production of the complex structures in the unrelaxed Virgo cluster core (including the production of the diffuse intracluster light) is an ongoing and continuing process.

  2. Monroe Urbanized Area MTP 2035 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2010-10-31

    /plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Monroe Urbanized Area MTP 2035 The 2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan for the Monroe Urbanized Area Developed for The Monroe Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization and The Louisiana Department... of Transportation and Development Developed by In association with Neel-Schaffer, Inc. **DRAFT** Adopted Date Here This document was prepared in cooperation with: The Monroe Urbanized Area MPO Technical Advisory Committee and The Louisiana...

  3. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

  4. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    RidgeRd. SimcoeSt. Hwy.7&12 RegRd.57 0 4 8 Kilometers Area = 51,980 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICSdatamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY Drivers Vehicles Trips/day 2011 2006 1996 1986 datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT

  5. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    .7 4.1 5.8 27.9 TRIPS MADE TO TTS AREA 4,070,800 22.8% 51% 22% 6% 21% 61% 13% 12% 2% 8% 4% 7.1 3.3 7datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 5 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY AREA City of Orillia Durham Region City

  6. MA/STAT 25000 Syllabus Fall 2015 Problem Solving in Probability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-08-28

    MA/STAT 25000. Syllabus. Fall 2015. Problem Solving in Probability. Meeting Times and Location: TR 3:30-4:20pm in UNIV 003. Instructor: Rachel Lynn. E-

  7. Reconstruction of ionization probabilities from spatially averaged data in N dimensions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroahaber, James; Kolomenskii, A; Schuessler, Hans

    2010-07-06

    . In three dimensions, ionization probabilities of Xe were successfully recovered with MPE from simulated (using the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov tunneling theory) ion yields. Finally, we tested our approach with intensity-resolved benzene-ion yields, which show a...

  8. Simultaneous surface topography and spin-injection probability D. W. Bullock,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibado, Paul M.

    Simultaneous surface topography and spin-injection probability D. W. Bullock,a) V. P. LaBella, Z polarization at the instant of recombination. Details of how to simultaneously measure the surface topography

  9. Error Analysis of Free Probability Approximations to the Density of States of Disordered Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiahao

    Theoretical studies of localization, anomalous diffusion and ergodicity breaking require solving the electronic structure of disordered systems. We use free probability to approximate the ensemble-averaged density of states ...

  10. Preferences, Knowledge, and Citizen Probability Assessments of the Terrorism Risk of Nuclear Power 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Quan; Fuhrmann, Matthew; Early, Bryan R.; Vedlitz, Arnold

    How does the American public assess risk when it comes to national security issues? This paper addresses this question by analyzing variation in citizen probability assessments of the terrorism risk of nuclear power plants. Drawing on the literature...

  11. On the evaluation of human error probabilities for post-initiating events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presley, Mary R

    2006-01-01

    Quantification of human error probabilities (HEPs) for the purpose of human reliability assessment (HRA) is very complex. Because of this complexity, the state of the art includes a variety of HRA models, each with its own ...

  12. Representing aquifer architecture in macrodispersivity models with an analytical solution of the transition probability matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    Representing aquifer architecture in macrodispersivity models with an analytical solution] The multi-dimensional transition probability model represents hydrofacies architecture in modeling aquifer heterogeneity. The structure of the aquifer architecture is mathematically characterized by a canonical

  13. Scaling of strength and lifetime probability distributions of quasibrittle structures based on atomistic fracture mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Zdenek P.

    The failure probability of engineering structures such as aircraft, bridges, dams, nuclear structures, and ships, as well as microelectronic components and medical implants, must be kept extremely low, typically <10?6. The ...

  14. Joint probability safety assessment for NPP defense infrastructure against extreme external natural hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilin, L.; Defu, L.; Huajun, L.; Fengqing, W.; Tao, Z.

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing tendency of natural hazards, the typhoon, hurricane and tropical Cyclone induced surge, wave, precipitation, flood and wind as extreme external loads menacing Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) in coastal and inland provinces of China. For all of planned, designed And constructed NPP the National Nuclear Safety Administration of China and IAEA recommended Probable Maximum Hurricane /Typhoon/(PMH/T), Probable Maximum Storm Surge (PMSS), Probable Maximum Flood (PMF), Design Basis Flood (DBF) as safety regulations for NPP defense infrastructures. This paper discusses the joint probability analysis of simultaneous occurrence typhoon induced extreme external hazards and compare with IAEA 2006-2009 recommended safety regulation design criteria for some NPP defense infrastructures along China coast. (authors)

  15. Nonlinear Gravitational Clustering in Expanding Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    1996-07-19

    The gravitational clustering of collisionless particles in an expanding universe is modelled using some simple physical ideas. I show that it is possible to understand the nonlinear clustering in terms of three well defined regimes: (1) linear regime; (2) quasilinear regime which is dominated by scale-invariant radial infall and (3) nonlinear regime dominated by nonradial motions and mergers. Modelling each of these regimes separately I show how the nonlinear two point correlation function can be related to the linear correlation function in hierarchical models. This analysis leads to results which are in good agreement with numerical simulations thereby providing an explanation for numerical results. Using this model and some simple extensions, it is possible to understand the transfer of power from large to small scales and the behaviour of higher order correlation functions. The ideas presented here will also serve as a powerful analytical tool to investigate nonlinear clustering in different models.

  16. Alpha Cluster Model of Atomic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosin, Zbigniew; Kallunkathariyil, Jinesh; ?ukasik, Jerzy; Paw?owski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The description of the nuclear system in its ground state and at low excitations based on the equation of state (EoS) around the saturation density is presented. In the expansion of the EoS around the saturation point additional spin polarization terms are taken into account. In addition for atomic nuclei a correction of the average nucleonic energy for the surface energy is introduced. The ground state configurations for the N=Z even-even nuclei, obtained with the proposed EoS, exhibit a clear cluster structure. At the nuclear surface these clusters can be identified as alpha particles. Taking into account an additional interaction between clusters the binding energy and sizes of the considered nuclei are very accurately described. From properties of the {\\alpha} particle, 3He and t limits of the EoS parameters are established.

  17. Theoretical stellar models for old galactic clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Castellani; S. Degl'Innocenti; M. Marconi

    1998-12-05

    We present new evolutionary stellar models suitable for old Population I clusters, discussing both the consequences of the most recent improvements in the input physics and the effect of element diffusion within the stellar structures. Theoretical cluster isochrones are presented, covering the range of ages from 1 to 9 Gyr for the four selected choices on the metallicity Z= 0.007, 0.010, 0.015 and 0.020. Theoretical uncertainties on the efficiency of superadiabatic convection are discussed in some details. Isochrone fitting to the CM diagrams of the two well observed galactic clusters NGC2420 and M67 indicates that a mixing length parameter alpha = 1.9 appears adequate for reproducing the observed color of cool giant stars. The problems in matching theoretical preditions to the observed slope of MS stars are discussed.

  18. A probabilistic approach to the prediction of area weather events, applied to precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Volker

    A probabilistic approach to the prediction of area weather events, applied to precipitation Bjoern in the context of estimating the probability of the meteorological event `occurrence of precipitation'. We treat roughly be interpreted as precipitation cells. The germ-grain model is completely characterized

  19. Probability of a Solution to the Solar Neutrino Problem Within the Minimal Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsten M. Heeger; R. G. H. Robertson

    1996-10-22

    Tests, independent of any solar model, can be made of whether solar neutrino experiments are consistent with the minimal Standard Model (stable, massless neutrinos). If the experimental uncertainties are correctly estimated and the sun is generating energy by light-element fusion in quasi-static equilibrium, the probability of a standard-physics solution is less than 2%. Even when the luminosity constraint is abandoned, the probability is not more than 4%. The sensitivity of the conclusions to input parameters is explored.

  20. Breaking Cosmological Degeneracies in Galaxy Cluster Surveys with a Physical Model of Cluster Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua D. Younger; Zoltan Haiman; Greg L. Bryan; Sheng Wang

    2006-12-22

    Forthcoming large galaxy cluster surveys will yield tight constraints on cosmological models. It has been shown that in an idealized survey, containing > 10,000 clusters, statistical errors on dark energy and other cosmological parameters will be at the percent level. It has also been shown that through "self-calibration", parameters describing the mass-observable relation and cosmology can be simultaneously determined, though at a loss in accuracy by about an order of magnitude. Here we examine the utility of an alternative approach of self-calibration, in which a parametrized ab-initio physical model is used to compute cluster structure and the resulting mass-observable relations. As an example, we use a modified-entropy ("pre-heating") model of the intracluster medium, with the history and magnitude of entropy injection as unknown input parameters. Using a Fisher matrix approach, we evaluate the expected simultaneous statistical errors on cosmological and cluster model parameters. We study two types of surveys, in which a comparable number of clusters are identified either through their X-ray emission or through their integrated Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We find that compared to a phenomenological parametrization of the mass-observable relation, using our physical model yields significantly tighter constraints in both surveys, and offers substantially improved synergy when the two surveys are combined. These results suggest that parametrized physical models of cluster structure will be useful when extracting cosmological constraints from SZ and X-ray cluster surveys. (abridged)

  1. Evidence of Cluster Structure of $^9$Be from $^3$He+$^9$Be Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Lukyanov; M. N. Harakeh; M. A. Naumenko; Yi Xu; W. H. Trzaska; V. Burjan; V. Kroha; J. Mrazek; V. Glagolev; Š. Pisko?; E. I. Voskoboynik; S. V. Khlebnikov; Yu E. Penionzhkevich; N. K. Skobelev; Yu G. Sobolev; G. P. Tyurin; K. Kuterbekov; Yu Tuleushev

    2015-04-15

    The study of inelastic scattering and multi-nucleon transfer reactions was performed by bombarding a $^{9}$Be target with a $^3$He beam at an incident energy of 30 MeV. Angular distributions for $^9$Be($^3$He,$^3$He)$^{9}$Be, $^9$Be($^3$He,$^4$He)$^{8}$Be, $^9$Be($^3$He,$^5$He)$^{7}$Be, $^9$Be($^3$He,$^6$Li)$^6$Li and $^9$Be($^3$He,$^5$Li)$^7$Li reaction channels were measured. Experimental angular distributions for the corresponding ground states (g.s.) were analysed within the framework of the optical model, the coupled-channel approach and the distorted-wave Born approximation. Cross sections for channels leading to unbound $^5$He$_{g.s.}$, $^5$Li$_{g.s.}$ and $^8$Be systems were obtained from singles measurements where the relationship between the energy and the scattering angle of the observed stable ejectile is constrained by two-body kinematics. Information on the cluster structure of $^{9}$Be was obtained from the transfer channels. It was concluded that cluster transfer is an important mechanism in the investigated nuclear reactions. In the present work an attempt was made to estimate the relative strengths of the interesting $^8$Be+$n$ and $^5$He+$\\alpha$ cluster configurations in $^9$Be. The branching ratios have been determined confirming that the $^5$He+$\\alpha$ configuration plays an important role. The configuration of $^9$Be consisting of two bound helium clusters $^3$He+$^6$He is significantly suppressed, whereas the two-body configurations ${}^{8}$Be+$n$ and ${}^{5}$He+$\\alpha$ including unbound $^8$Be and $^5$He are found more probable.

  2. Weighing Neutrinos with Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng Wang; Zoltan Haiman; Wayne Hu; Justin Khoury; Morgan May

    2005-05-19

    Large future galaxy cluster surveys, combined with cosmic microwave background observations, can achieve a high sensitivity to the masses of cosmologically important neutrinos. We show that a weak lensing selected sample of ~100,000 clusters could tighten the current upper bound on the sum of masses of neutrino species by an order of magnitude, to a level of 0.03 eV. Since this statistical sensitivity is below the best existing lower limit on the mass of at least one neutrino species, a future detection is likely, provided that systematic errors can be controlled to a similar level.

  3. Non-thermal phenomena in galaxies clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianfranco Brunetti

    2004-04-26

    The discovery of diffuse synchrotron radio emission and, more recently, of the hard X-ray (HXR) tails have triggered a growing interest about non-thermal phenomena in galaxy clusters. After a brief review of the most important evidences for non-thermal emission, I will focus on the origin of the emitting particles and of the hadronic component. In particular I will describe the particle-injection and -acceleration mechanisms at work in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) and, at the same time, discuss the possibility to test current modellings of these phenomena with future radio, HXR, and gamma rays observatories.

  4. Algorithms for Gene Clustering Analysis on Genomes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Gang Man

    2012-07-16

    CLUSTERING ANALYSIS ON GENOMES A Dissertation by GANG MAN YI Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2011 Major Subject: Computer Science... ALGORITHMS FOR GENE CLUSTERING ANALYSIS ON GENOMES A Dissertation by GANG MAN YI Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair...

  5. Stability of adhesion clusters under constant force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Erdmann; U. S. Schwarz

    2004-01-27

    We solve the stochastic equations for a cluster of parallel bonds with shared constant loading, rebinding and the completely dissociated state as an absorbing boundary. In the small force regime, cluster lifetime grows only logarithmically with bond number for weak rebinding, but exponentially for strong rebinding. Therefore rebinding is essential to ensure physiological lifetimes. The number of bonds decays exponentially with time for most cases, but in the intermediate force regime, a small increase in loading can lead to much faster decay. This effect might be used by cell-matrix adhesions to induce signaling events through cytoskeletal loading.

  6. Mass Distributions of Clusters Using Gravitational Magnification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst

    1995-05-03

    Lensing in the context of rich clusters is normally quantified from small image distortions, yielding a relative mass distribution in the limit of weak lensing. Here we show the magnification effect of lensing can also be mapped over a cluster, resulting in absolute mass determinations for the weak limit. Furthermore, given both magnification and distortion measurements, the mass distribution may be constrained in the strong regime. Methods for obtaining the magnification using spectroscopic and/or photometric information are discussed, for object detection within a fixed isophote or to a given flux limit. A map of the magnification around A1689 is constructed from the observed depletion of background red galaxy counts.

  7. Rotational and radial velocities of 1.3-2.2 M {sub ?} red giants in open clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ?1.6M {sub ?} arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  8. Exploring the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars: II. New magnetic field measurements in cluster and field stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Ilyin, I; Kharchenko, N V; Oskinova, L M; Langer, N; Gonzalez, J F; Kholtygin, A F; Briquet, M

    2013-01-01

    Theories on the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars remain poorly developed, because the properties of their magnetic field as function of stellar parameters could not yet be investigated. To investigate whether magnetic fields in massive stars are ubiquitous or appear only in stars with a specific spectral classification, certain ages, or in a special environment, we acquired 67 new spectropolarimetric observations for 30 massive stars. Among the observed sample, roughly one third of the stars are probable members of clusters at different ages, whereas the remaining stars are field stars not known to belong to any cluster or association. Spectropolarimetric observations were obtained during four different nights using the low-resolution spectropolarimetric mode of FORS2 (FOcal Reducer low dispersion Spectrograph) mounted on the 8-m Antu telescope of the VLT. Furthermore, we present a number of follow-up observations carried out with the high-resolution spectropolarimeters SOFIN mounted at the Nordic O...

  9. Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

  10. Beltrami Equation and Cluster Lensing: Characteristic Equations and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schramm; T

    1995-07-24

    Arclets in clusters of galaxies can be used to determine the lens mapping and not only to constrain the mass density of the cluster. Multiply imaged arclets are therefore easily identified without further modelling.

  11. Dynamics of Solvated Electrons in Clusters Ryan M. Young,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    in Water-Based Cluster Anions 5561 3.3. Dynamics in Halide-Water Clusters 5563 4. Methanol 5564 5. Ammonia 5567 6. Acetonitrile and Primary Amides 5568 7. Benzene, Toluene, and Other Aromatic Solvents 5571 8

  12. Spatial clustering of pixels of a multispectral image

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-08-19

    A method and system for clustering the pixels of a multispectral image is provided. A clustering system computes a maximum spectral similarity score for each pixel that indicates the similarity between that pixel and the most similar neighboring. To determine the maximum similarity score for a pixel, the clustering system generates a similarity score between that pixel and each of its neighboring pixels and then selects the similarity score that represents the highest similarity as the maximum similarity score. The clustering system may apply a filtering criterion based on the maximum similarity score so that pixels with similarity scores below a minimum threshold are not clustered. The clustering system changes the current pixel values of the pixels in a cluster based on an averaging of the original pixel values of the pixels in the cluster.

  13. Refactoring the nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Klebsiella oxytoca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Dehua

    Bacterial genes associated with a single trait are often grouped in a contiguous unit of the genome known as a gene cluster. It is difficult to genetically manipulate many gene clusters because of complex, redundant, and ...

  14. A first site of galaxy cluster formation: complete spectroscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A first site of galaxy cluster formation: complete spectroscopy of a protocluster at z 6.01 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A first site of galaxy cluster formation:...

  15. Supplementary Materials Table 1: Simulated log-normal survival data marginal posterior probability of inclusion of relevant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vannucci, Marina

    .1835 Table 1: Simulated log-normal survival data: Marginal posterior probabilities of inclusion of rele- vant: Marginal posterior probabilities of inclusion of rele- vant variables under different maximum correlation

  16. International Journal of Complex Systems in Science vol. 1(2) pp 115118. Systematic learning of edge probabilities in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pluhár, András

    along with a small set of initial adopters W0. The members of W0 are infecting neighboring vertices V we define a probability pv, creating a probability distribution indicating the chance of infection

  17. Energy Proportionality and Performance in Data Parallel Computing Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jinoh

    2011-01-01

    8] presented a hybrid datacenter model with two-class nodesbe ideally zero. Thus, a datacenter cluster still needs to

  18. Cluster-based architecture for fault-tolerant quantum computation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CLUSTER MODEL; CORRECTIONS; ERRORS; NOISE; QUANTUM COMPUTERS; QUBITS; RESOURCES; VERIFICATION COMPUTERS; INFORMATION;...

  19. Computer System, Cluster and Networking Summer Institute (CSCNSI...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in setting up, configuring, administering, testing, monitoring, and scheduling computer systems, supercomputer clusters, and computer networks through a variety of...

  20. Cluster Flies Family, Home & Garden Education Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , or "attic," flies often invade New Hampshire homes in the fall to become annoying wintertime pests containers safely, according to NH regulations. If you suspect pesticide poisoning, call the New Hampshire frames and electrical fixtures. Cluster flies are usually sluggish and make little attempt to escape, so

  1. Merging history of three bimodal clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurogordato, S; Bourdin, H; Cappi, A; Benoist, C; Ferrari, C; Mars, G; Houairi, K

    2010-01-01

    We present a combined X-ray and optical analysis of three bimodal galaxy clusters selected as merging candidates at z ~ 0.1. These targets are part of MUSIC (MUlti--Wavelength Sample of Interacting Clusters), which is a general project designed to study the physics of merging clusters by means of multi-wavelength observations. Observations include spectro-imaging with XMM-Newton EPIC camera, multi-object spectroscopy (260 new redshifts), and wide-field imaging at the ESO 3.6m and 2.2m telescopes. We build a global picture of these clusters using X-ray luminosity and temperature maps together with galaxy density and velocity distributions. Idealized numerical simulations were used to constrain the merging scenario for each system. We show that A2933 is very likely an equal-mass advanced pre-merger ~ 200 Myr before the core collapse, while A2440 and A2384 are post-merger systems ~ 450 Myr and ~1.5 Gyr after core collapse, respectively). In the case of A2384, we detect a spectacular filament of galaxies and gas ...

  2. Evolution of star clusters on eccentric orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Maxwell Xu; Heggie, Douglas C; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of star clusters on circular and eccentric orbits using direct $N$-body simulations. We model clusters with initially $N=8{\\rm k}$ and $N=16{\\rm k}$ single stars of the same mass, orbiting around a point-mass galaxy. For each orbital eccentricity that we consider, we find the apogalactic radius at which the cluster has the same lifetime as the cluster with the same $N$ on a circular orbit. We show that then, the evolution of bound particle number and half-mass radius is approximately independent of eccentricity. Secondly, when we scale our results to orbits with the same semi-major axis, we find that the lifetimes are, to first order, independent of eccentricity. When the results of Baumgardt and Makino for a singular isothermal halo are scaled in the same way, the lifetime is again independent of eccentricity to first order, suggesting that this result is independent of the Galactic mass profile. From both sets of simulations we empirically derive the higher order dependence of the lif...

  3. College of Engineering High Performance Computing Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    College of Engineering High Performance Computing Cluster Policy and Procedures COE-HPC-01 and registered as requiring high performance computing; the course identification/registrations process the College High Performance Computing system will need register for system access by visiting http

  4. Requirements for Clustering Data Streams Daniel Barbard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honavar, Vasant

    in astronomy, telecommunication operations, banking and stock- market applications, e-commerce and other fields and discovering new interesting facts. The challenge is to design algorithms that can track changes. Finding changes in clusters as new data is collected can prove fruitful in scenarios like the following

  5. Knowledge Engineering Technique for Cluster Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Knowledge Engineering Technique for Cluster Development Pradorn Sureephong1 , Nopasit Chakpitak1 management by using knowledge engineering which is one of the most important method for managing knowledge. This work analyzed three well known knowledge engineering methods, i.e. MOKA, SPEDE and Common

  6. Bridges in the random-cluster model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elçi, Eren Metin; Fytas, Nikolaos G

    2015-01-01

    The random-cluster model, a correlated bond percolation model, unifies a range of important models of statistical mechanics in one description, including independent bond percolation, the Potts model and uniform spanning trees. By introducing a classification of edges based on their relevance to the connectivity we study the stability of clusters in this model. We derive several exact relations for general graphs that allow us to derive unambiguously the finite-size scaling behavior of the density of bridges and non-bridges. For percolation, we are also able to characterize the point for which clusters become maximally fragile and show that it is connected to the concept of the bridge load. Combining our exact treatment with further results from conformal field theory, we uncover a surprising behavior of the variance of the number of (non-)bridges, showing that these diverge in two dimensions below the value $4\\cos^2{(\\pi/\\sqrt{3})}=0.2315891\\cdots$ of the cluster coupling $q$. Finally, it is shown that a par...

  7. Detecting the Gravitational Redshift of Cluster Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst; Evan Scannapieco

    2000-03-08

    We examine the gravitational redshift of radiation emitted from within the potential of a cluster. Spectral lines from the intracluster medium (ICM) are redshifted in proportion to the emission-weighted mean potential along the line of sight, amounting to approximately 50 km/s at a radius of 100 kpc/h, for a cluster dispersion of 1200 km/s. We show that the relative redshifts of different ionization states of metals in the ICM provide a unique probe of the three-dimensional matter distribution. An examination of the reported peculiar velocities of cD galaxies in well studied Abell clusters reveals they are typically redshifted by an average of $\\sim +200$ km/s. This can be achieved by gravity with the addition of a steep central potential associated with the cD galaxy. Note that in general gravitational redshifts cause a small overestimate of the recessional velocities of clusters by an average of $\\sim$ 20 km/s.

  8. Tasseography , Scrying , & Cluster Status As cluster supercomputers have grown from a few nodes to giant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Henry G. "Hank"

    cluster status is about as intuitive and effective as reading tea leaves or gazing into a crystal ball by nodescape as a real-time status display. Nodes are tinted from blue-to-green-to-red based on attribute

  9. Ionization of Water Clusters is Mediated by Exciton Energy Transfer from Argon Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golan, Amir

    2013-01-01

    VUV) Photoionization of Small Water Clusters. J. Phys. Chem.Energy Transfer between Water Molecules. Nat. Phys. 2010, 6,of Low-Energy Electrons in Water. Nat. Phys. 2010, 6, 78-81.

  10. The dwarf galaxy population of the Coma cluster to M_R=-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Trentham

    1997-08-20

    We present the luminosity function (LF) and measurements of the scalelengths, colours, and radial distribution of dwarf galaxies in the Coma cluster down to R=24. Our survey area is 674 arcmin^2; this is the deepest and most detailed survey covering such a large area. Our measurements agree with those of most previous authors at bright and intermediate magnitudes. The new results are: 1) Galaxies in the Coma cluster have a luminosity function that is steep (\\alpha \\sim -1.7) for -15 < M_R < -11, and is shallower brighter than this. The curvature in the LF at M_R \\sim -15 is statistically significant. 2) The galaxies that contribute most strongly to the luminosity function at -14 < M_R < -12 have colours and scalelengths that are consistent with those of local dwarf spheroidal galaxies placed at the distance of Coma. 3) These galaxies with -14 < M_R < -12 have a colour distribution that is very strongly peaked at B-R = 1.3. This is suggestive of a substantial degree of homogeneity in their star formation histories and metallicities. 4) These galaxies with -14 < M_R < -12 also appear to be more confined to the cluster core (r \\sim 200 kpc) than the brighter galaxies.

  11. CONVECTIVE STABILITY OF GALAXY-CLUSTER PLASMAS Benjamin D. Chandran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandran, Ben

    criterion by causing heat to diffuse primarily along magnetic field lines. We extend earlier analyses a cluster's age. In the cooling flow model, plasma heating is neglected, and the rate at which plasma cools nuclei and cosmic rays drive convection in galaxy-cluster plasmas and that convection heats cluster cores

  12. Topological Structures of Cluster Spins for Ising Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You-gang Feng

    2010-03-19

    We discussed hierarchies and rescaling rule of the self similar transformations in Ising models, and define a fractal dimension of an ordered cluster, which minimum corresponds to a fixed point of the transformations. By the fractal structures we divide the clusters into two types: irreducible and reducible. A relationship of cluster spin with its coordination number and fractal dimension is obtained.

  13. COWES: Clustering Web Users Based on Historical Web Sessions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhowmick, Sourav S.

    COWES: Clustering Web Users Based on Historical Web Sessions Ling Chen1,2 , Sourav S. Bhowmick1 Institute for Infocomm Research, Singapore, 119613 Abstract. Clustering web users is one of the most important research topics in web usage mining. Existing approaches cluster web users based on the snapshots

  14. Time-synchronized Clustering of Gene Expression Trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Hans-Georg

    Time-synchronized Clustering of Gene Expression Trajectories RONG TANG Division of Biostatistics, USA ABSTRACT Current clustering methods are routinely applied to gene expression time course data at different rates, successful clustering in this context requires dealing with varying time and shape patterns

  15. Aalborg Universitet Modular Power Architectures for Microgrid Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    Aalborg Universitet Modular Power Architectures for Microgrid Clusters Lin, Hengwei; Liu, Chengxi., Vasquez, J. C., & Dragicevic, T. (2014). Modular Power Architectures for Microgrid Clusters from vbn.aau.dk on: juli 04, 2015 #12;Modular Power Architectures for Microgrid Clusters ­ Invited

  16. Aalborg Universitet Hierarchical Control for Multiple DC Microgrids Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    Aalborg Universitet Hierarchical Control for Multiple DC Microgrids Clusters Shafiee, Qobad). Hierarchical Control for Multiple DC Microgrids Clusters. I E E E Transactions on Energy Conversion, 29(4), 922. Dragicevic, J. C. Vasquez, and J. M. Guerrero, "Hierarchical Control for Multiple DC-Microgrids Clusters

  17. TIGER:Thermal-Aware File Assignment in Storage Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    TIGER:Thermal-Aware File Assignment in Storage Clusters Ajit Chavan, Xunfei Jiang, Mohemmad I/O performance. I. INTRODUCTION Thermal management for power-dense storage clusters can address cooling problems. The following three factors make thermal-aware file assign- ment desirabe and practical for storage clusters

  18. Scene Modeling Using Co-Clustering Computer Vision Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central Florida, University of

    concept corresponds to a cluster of visterms in the Bag of Vis- terms (BOV) paradigm for scene to cluster image patches based on their appearances in BOV, MMI co-clustering can group the visterms which interest-points and their descriptors have attracted lots of attention. Bag of Visterms (BOV) approaches

  19. Memory Hierarchy Considerations for Cost-Effective Cluster Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhichun

    quantitative recommendations for building cost-effective clusters for different workloads. Index TermsMemory Hierarchy Considerations for Cost-Effective Cluster Computing Xing Du, Member, IEEE Computer workstations and PCs to build a cluster for parallel computing has become a common practice. The cost

  20. Towards Energy-Efficient Database Cluster Design Willis Lang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Jignesh

    Towards Energy-Efficient Database Cluster Design Willis Lang University of Wisconsin wlang efficiency of DBMSs, none of these studies have looked at the architectural design space of energy-efficient parallel DBMS clusters. There are many challenges to increasing the energy efficiency of a DBMS cluster

  1. Quick cluster analysis of Thomas Weber's Christian Hennig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennig, Christian

    ;Discriminant coordinates of original groups (plot that shows group means optimally separated) Christian Hennig;Discriminant coordinates of mclust clustering: Christian Hennig Quick cluster analysis of Thomas Weber's data set #12;Original groups vs. clusters table(groups,smpoprc$classification) groups 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 5 7 0

  2. Distributed Energy-Efficient Hierarchical Clustering for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, JoAnne

    Distributed Energy-Efficient Hierarchical Clustering for Wireless Sensor Networks Ping Ding, Jo important. In this paper, we propose a distributed weight-based energy-efficient hierarchical clustering of the network topology. Younis and Fahmy [4] propose a Hybrid Energy-Efficient Distributed clustering (HEED

  3. Systematics of Pure and Doped He-4 Clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Siu A.; KROTSCHECK, E.

    1995-01-01

    Optimized variational calculations have been carried out for pure and doped clusters of He-4 atoms up to a cluster size of N=1000 particles. For small cluster sizes with less than or equal to 112 particles, where comparisons with existing diffusion...

  4. The Sustainability FYE Cluster The Sustainability FYE Cluster will make sustainable urban living a core experience for First

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Sustainability FYE Cluster The Sustainability FYE Cluster will make sustainable urban living University. The Sustainability community infuses the learning-living community with practical and theoretical approaches to sustainable living, merging students' living community with unique academic and field

  5. THE BURST CLUSTER: DARK MATTER IN A CLUSTER MERGER ASSOCIATED WITH THE SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST, GRB 050509B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahle, Hakon

    We have identified a merging galaxy cluster with evidence of two distinct subclusters. The X-ray and optical data suggest that the subclusters are presently moving away from each other after closest approach. This cluster ...

  6. Fast chemical reaction in a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes flow: Probability distribution in the initial regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farid Ait-Chaalal; Michel S. Bourqui; Peter Bartello

    2011-10-17

    We study an instantaneous bimolecular chemical reaction in a two-dimensional chaotic, incompressible and closed Navier-Stokes flow. Areas of well mixed reactants are initially separated by infinite gradients. We focus on the initial regime, characterized by a well-defined one-dimensional contact line between the reactants. The amount of reactant consumed is given by the diffusive flux along this line, and hence relates directly to its length and to the gradients along it. We show both theoretically and numerically that the probability distribution of the modulus of the gradient of the reactants along this contact line multiplied by {\\kappa} does not depend on the diffusion {\\kappa} and can be inferred, after a few turnover times, from the joint distribution of the finite time Lyapunov exponent {\\lambda} and the frequency 1/{\\tau} . The equivalent time {\\tau} measures the stretching time scale of a Lagrangian parcel in the recent past, while {\\lambda} measures it on the whole chaotic orbit. At smaller times, we predict the shape of this gradient distribution taking into account the initial random orientation between the contact line and the stretching direction. We also show that the probability distribution of the reactants is proportional to {\\kappa} and to the product of the ensemble mean contact line length with the ensemble mean of the inverse of the gradient along it. Besides contributing to the understanding of fast chemistry in chaotic flows, the present study based on a Lagrangian stretching theory approach provides results that pave the way to the development of accurate sub- grid parametrizations in models with insufficient resolution for capturing the length scales relevant to chemical processes, for example in Climate-Chemsitry Models.

  7. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    % 7% 6.5 5.5 6.5 68.5 30,100 10% 5% 51% 34% 73% 17% 1% * 3% 7% 7.0 7.2 10.0 * ANCASTER AREA CITYdatamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 85 ANCASTER AREA CITY OF HAMILTON Mohawk Rd. Main St. Carluke Rd. Governors Rd. Garner

  8. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    ,213,000 38% 13% 35% 14% 60% 14% 16% 1% 7% 2% 5.7 4.1 6.6 30.0 TRIPS MADE TO TTS AREA 3,168,200 23.5% 51% 22datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 5 GREATER TORONTO HAMILTON AREA Durham Region Peel Region City of Hamilton City

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 10, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2011 407 Outage Probability and Optimum Power Allocation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Il-Min

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 10, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2011 407 Outage Probability-duplex mode. For this system, we first derive a tight lower bound of outage probability, which is very close to the exact outage probability in the whole signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) range irrespective of the values

  10. 2120 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 59, NO. 5, JUNE 2010 Outage Probability of Multiuser Relay Networks in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkashlan, Maged

    2120 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 59, NO. 5, JUNE 2010 Outage Probability and exact analysis is conducted to analyze the outage probability of MRNs under dissimilar Nakagami-m fading conditions. More specifically, we derive new closed-form expressions for the outage probability and the prob

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 9, NO. 3, MARCH 2010 1139 Outage Probability of Multi-Hop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Il-Min

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 9, NO. 3, MARCH 2010 1139 Outage Probability--The outage probability of multi-hop amplify-and- forward relay systems with multiple relays is analyzed. Previ- ously, the outage probability of the two-hop system with multiple relays had been analyzed

  12. Varying Probability Sampling The simple random sampling scheme provides a random sample where every unit in the population has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalabh

    where every unit in the population has equal probability of selection. Under certain circumstances, more efficient estimators are obtained by assigning unequal probabilities of selection to the units scheme, the units are selected with probability proportional to the value of X, called as size

  13. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Lombriser, Lucas; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C. E-mail: lucas.lombriser@port.ac.uk E-mail: david.bacon@port.ac.uk E-mail: bob.nichol@port.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |f{sub R0}| < 6 × 10{sup ?5}, which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales.

  14. THERMODYNAMICS OF THE COMA CLUSTER OUTSKIRTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Walker, S. A.; Mantz, A.; Matsushita, K.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, T.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Takei, Y.

    2013-09-20

    We present results from a large mosaic of Suzaku observations of the Coma Cluster, the nearest and X-ray brightest hot ({approx}8 keV), dynamically active, non-cool core system, focusing on the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium on large scales. For azimuths not aligned with an infalling subcluster toward the southwest, our measured temperature and X-ray brightness profiles exhibit broadly consistent radial trends, with the temperature decreasing from about 8.5 keV at the cluster center to about 2 keV at a radius of 2 Mpc, which is the edge of our detection limit. The southwest merger significantly boosts the surface brightness, allowing us to detect X-ray emission out to {approx}2.2 Mpc along this direction. Apart from the southwestern infalling subcluster, the surface brightness profiles show multiple edges around radii of 30-40 arcmin. The azimuthally averaged temperature profile, as well as the deprojected density and pressure profiles, all show a sharp drop consistent with an outwardly-propagating shock front located at 40 arcmin, corresponding to the outermost edge of the giant radio halo observed at 352 MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The shock front may be powering this radio emission. A clear entropy excess inside of r{sub 500} reflects the violent merging events linked with these morphological features. Beyond r{sub 500}, the entropy profiles of the Coma Cluster along the relatively relaxed directions are consistent with the power-law behavior expected from simple models of gravitational large-scale structure formation. The pressure is also in agreement at these radii with the expected values measured from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich data from the Planck satellite. However, due to the large uncertainties associated with the Coma Cluster measurements, we cannot yet exclude an entropy flattening in this system consistent with that seen in more relaxed cool core clusters.

  15. Galaxy Cluster Virial Masses and Omega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlberg; Yee; Ellingson; Abraham; Gravel; Morris; Pritchet

    1995-09-06

    To re-examine the rich cluster $\\Omega$ value the CNOC Cluster Survey has observed 16 high X-ray luminosity clusters in the redshift range 0.17 to 0.55, obtaining approximately 2600 velocities in their fields. Directly adding all the K and evolution corrected $r$ band light to $M_r(0)=-18.5$, about $0.2L_\\ast$, and correcting for the light below the limit, the average mass-to-light ratio of the clusters is $283\\pm27h\\msun/\\lsun$ and the average mass per galaxy is $3.5\\pm0.4\\times10^{12}h^{-1}\\msun$. The clusters are consistent with having a universal $M_v/L$ value (within the errors of about 20\\%) independent of their velocity dispersion, mean color of their galaxies, blue galaxy content, redshift, or mean interior density. Using field galaxies within the same data set, with the same corrections, we find that the closure mass-to-light, $\\rho_c/j$, is $1160\\pm130h\\msun/\\lsun$ and the closure mass per galaxy, $\\rho_c/\\phi(>0.2L_\\ast)$, is $13.2\\pm1.9\\times10^{12}h^{-1}\\msun$. Under the assumptions that the galaxies are distributed like the mass and that the galaxy luminosities and numbers are statistically conserved, which these data indirectly support, $\\Omega_0=0.20\\pm0.04\\pm0.09$ where the errors are, respectively, the $1\\sigma$ internal and an estimate of the $1\\sigma$ systematic error resulting from the luminosity normalization.

  16. Kodiak Area Management Reports, 19242010 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 19242010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    367 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 1924­2010 APPENDIX 4 Kodiak Area Management Reports, 1924­2010 1924: Fred R. Lucas. Report of Kodiak-Afognak Fish- eries District to August 31, 1924. U.S. Bureau of Fisheries, Afognak, AK (5 September 1924). 8 p. 1924: Fred R. Lucas. Report of Kodiak-Afognak Dis- trict

  17. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01

    and implementation of smart home energy management systemsStandard Technologies for Smart Home Area Networks EnablingInteroperability framework for smart home systems”, Consumer

  18. Obscured clusters.I. GLIMPSE30 - Young Milky Way Star Cluster Hosting Wolf-Rayet Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurtev, R; Georgiev, L; Ortolani, S; Ivanov, V D

    2007-01-01

    Young massive clusters are perfect astrophysical laboratories for study of massive stars. Clusters with Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are of special importance, since this enables us to study a coeval WR population at a uniform metallicity and known age. GLIMPSE30 (G30) is one of them. The cluster is situated near the Galactic plane (l=298.756deg, b=-0.408deg) and we aimed to determine its physical parameters and to investigate its high-mass stellar content and especially WR stars. Our analysis is based on SOFI/NTT JsHKs imaging and low resolution (R~2000) spectroscopy of the brightest cluster members in the K atmospheric window. For the age determination we applied isochrone fits for MS and Pre-MS stars. We derived stellar parameters of the WR stars candidates using a full nonLTE modeling of the observed spectra. Using a variety of techniques we found that G30 is very young cluster, with age t~4Myr. The cluster is located in Carina spiral arm, it is deeply embedded in dust and suffers reddening of Av~10.5+-1.1mag. T...

  19. Searching for massive clusters in weak lensing surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Hamana; Masahiro Takada; Naoki Yoshida

    2004-02-02

    We explore the ability of weak lensing surveys to locate massive clusters. We use both analytic models of dark matter halos and mock weak lensing surveys generated from a large cosmological N-body simulation. The analytic models describe average properties of weak lensing halos and predict the number counts, enabling us to compute an effective survey selection function. We test the model prediction for the peak number counts in weak lensing mass maps against the mock numerical data, and find that the noise due to intrinsic galaxy ellipticities causes a systematic effect which increases the peak counts. We develop a correction scheme for the systematic effect in an empirical manner, and show that, after the correction, the model prediction agrees well with the mock data. The mock data is also used to examine the completeness and efficiency of the weak lensing halo search with fully taking into account the noise and the projection effect by large-scale structures. We show that the detection threshold of S/N=4-5 gives an optimal balance between completeness and efficiency. Our results suggest that, for a weak lensing survey with a galaxy number density of ng=30/arcmin^2 with a mean redshift z=1, the mean number of peaks in the 10sq deg area is N_peak=62 for a detection threshold S/N=4. The contamination rate is 42%, and thus, on average, 36 out of 62 peaks (at least) are signals from real halos. Weak lensing surveys thus provide a reasonably efficient way to searching for massive clusters.

  20. Intense emission of cluster anions from gold targets under impact of keV/u gold clusters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intense emission of cluster anions from gold targets under impact of keV/u gold clusters. M the emission yield of anionic clusters increases much faster with n than expected from simple proportionality. Accordingly, the most intense emission is observed for Au7 - : under Au9 + impact the Au7 - yield per incident

  1. Reconstruction of ionization probabilities from spatially averaged data in N dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strohaber, J.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2010-07-15

    We present an analytical inversion technique, which can be used to recover ionization probabilities from spatially averaged data in an N-dimensional detection scheme. The solution is given as a power series in intensity. For this reason, we call this technique a multiphoton expansion (MPE). The MPE formalism was verified with an exactly solvable inversion problem in two dimensions, and probabilities in the postsaturation region, where the intensity-selective scanning approach breaks down, were recovered. In three dimensions, ionization probabilities of Xe were successfully recovered with MPE from simulated (using the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov tunneling theory) ion yields. Finally, we tested our approach with intensity-resolved benzene-ion yields, which show a resonant multiphoton ionization process. By applying MPE to this data (which were artificially averaged), the resonant structure was recovered, which suggests that the resonance in benzene may have been observed in spatially averaged data taken elsewhere.

  2. Survival Probability of the Néel State in Clean and Disordered Systems: an Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. J. Torres-Herrera; Lea F. Santos

    2015-06-30

    We provide an overview of our recents results about the quench dynamics of one-dimensional many-body quantum systems described by spin-1/2 models. Both cases are considered: clean chains without any disorder and disordered systems with static on-site magnetic fields. The quantity used for the analysis is the probability for finding the initial state later in time, the so-called survival probability. In the absence of random disorder, the survival probability may decay faster than exponentially. Gaussian behaviors and even the limit established by the energy-time uncertainty relation are displayed. In the presence of strong disorder, the dynamics at long-times slows down significantly and shows a powerlaw behavior. For both scenarios, we provide analytical expressions that agree very well with our numerical results.The initial state used for the illustrations is the experimentally accessible N\\'eel state.

  3. Statistic inversion of multi-zone transition probability models for aquifer characterization in alluvial fans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Lin; Gong, Huili; Gable, Carl; Teatini, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity arising from the complex architecture of sedimentary sequences in alluvial fans is challenging. This paper develops a statistical inverse framework in a multi-zone transition probability approach for characterizing the heterogeneity in alluvial fans. An analytical solution of the transition probability matrix is used to define the statistical relationships among different hydrofacies and their mean lengths, integral scales, and volumetric proportions. A statistical inversion is conducted to identify the multi-zone transition probability models and estimate the optimal statistical parameters using the modified Gauss-Newton-Levenberg-Marquardt method. The Jacobian matrix is computed by the sensitivity equation method, which results in an accurate inverse solution with quantification of parameter uncertainty. We use the Chaobai River alluvial fan in the Beijing Plain, China, as an example for elucidating the methodology of alluvial fan characterization. The alluvial fan is divided...

  4. Noble Gas Clusters and Nanoplasmas in High Harmonic Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aladi, M; Rácz, P; Földes, I B

    2015-01-01

    We report a study of high harmonic generation from noble gas clusters of xenon atoms in a gas jet. Harmonic spectra were investigated as a function of backing pressure, showing spectral shifts due to the nanoplasma electrons in the clusters. At certain value of laser intensity this process may oppose the effect of the well-known ionization-induced blueshift. In addition, these cluster-induced harmonic redshifts may give the possibility to estimate cluster density and cluster size in the laser-gas jet interaction range.

  5. Characterizing cluster morphology using vector-valued Minkowski functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claus Beisbart; Thomas Buchert

    1997-11-04

    The morphology of galaxy clusters is quantified using Minkowski functionals, especially the vector-valued ones, which contain directional information and are related to curvature centroids. The asymmetry of clusters and the amount of their substructure can be characterized in a unique way using these measures. -- We briefly introduce vector-valued Minkowski functionals (also known as Querma\\ss vectors) and suggest their application to cluster data in terms of a morphological characterization of excursion sets. Furthermore, we develop robust structure functions which describe the dynamical state of a cluster and study the evolution of clusters using numerical simulations.

  6. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 51 TOWN OF RICHMOND HILL REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF YORK LeslieSt. Stouffville Rd. King 6 Kilometers Area = 10,180 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Population Age Daily

  7. Area Health Education Center of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Area Health Education Center of Eastern Washington Washington State University Extension's Area Health Education Center of Eastern Washington works with university and community allies to promote health for underserved and at-risk populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions

  8. Multi-seeded multi-mode formation of embedded clusters in the RMC: Structured star formation toward the south-east boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Z. Li; M. D. Smith

    2005-08-23

    The Rosette Molecular Complex contains embedded clusters with diverse properties and origins. We have previously explored the shell mode of formation in the north (Regions A & B) and the massive concentrations in the ridge (Region C). Here, we explore star formation towards the south of the complex, Region D, based on data from the spatially complete 2 Micron All Sky Survey. We find that stars are forming prolifically throughout this region in a highly structured mode with both clusters and loose aggregates detected. The most prominent cluster (Region D1) lies in the north-center. This cluster is over 20 pc to the south of the Monoceros ridge, the interface of the emerging young OB cluster NGC 2244 with its ambient molecular clouds. In addition, there are several branches stemming from AFGL 961 in Region C and extending to the south-east boundary of the cloud. We invoke a tree model to interpret this pattern, corresponding to probable tracks of abrupt turbulent excitation and subsequent decay. Alternatively, we discuss gravoturbulent collapse scenarios based on numerical simulations. Relative stellar ages and gas flow directions will differentiate between these mechanisms.

  9. Before Mapping After Mapping Area Power Area Delay Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    32 Exam- ples Before Mapping After Mapping Area Power Area Delay Power 5xp1 0.93 0.98 0.86 0.82 0 1.01 1.01 1.02 1.07 0.99 duke2 1.01 1.01 0.99 1.13 0.97 e64 1.00 0.51 0.83 1.16 0.50 ex5 0.99 0.89 0.99 0.92 0.96 1.05 0.90 Table 2: Area, delay and power statistics for power script (normalized

  10. Electric quadrupole transition probabilities and line strengths of Ti{sup 11+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gökçe, Yasin; Çelik, Gültekin; Y?ld?z, Murat

    2014-07-15

    Electric quadrupole transition probabilities and line strengths have been calculated using the weakest bound electron potential model for sodium-like titanium, considering many transition arrays. We employed numerical Coulomb approximation and non-relativistic Hartree–Fock wavefunctions for the expectation values of radii in determination of parameters of the model. The necessary energy values have been taken from experimental data in the literature. The calculated electric quadrupole line strengths have been compared with available data in the literature and good agreement has been obtained. Moreover, some electric quadrupole transition probability and line strength values not existing in the literature for some highly excited levels have been obtained using this method.

  11. An Algorithm for Calculating the Probability of Classes of Data Patterns on a Genealogy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Jordan M.; Holder, Mark T.

    2012-12-14

    of Classes of Data Patterns on a Genealogy December 14, 2012 · Algorithms/Software Jordan M. Koch1, Mark T. Holder2 1 University of Kansas, 2 Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas Koch JM, Holder MT. An Algorithm for Calculating... the Probability of Classes of Data Patterns on a Genealogy. PLOS Currents Tree of Life. 2012 Dec 14. Edition 1. doi: 10.1371/4fd1286980c08. Abstract Felsenstein’s pruning algorithm allows one to calculate the probability of any particular data pattern arising...

  12. The Voronoi Tessellation Cluster Finder in 2 1 Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soares-Santos, Marcelle; /Fermilab /Sao Paulo U.; de Carvalho, Reinaldo R.; /Sao Jose, INPE; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Gal, Roy R.; /Hawaii U.; La Barbera, Francesco; /Capodimonte Observ.; Lopes, Paulo A.A.; /Valongo Observ.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.; Gerke, Brian F.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-06-23

    We present a detailed description of the Voronoi Tessellation (VT) cluster finder algorithm in 2+1 dimensions, which improves on past implementations of this technique. The need for cluster finder algorithms able to produce reliable cluster catalogs up to redshift 1 or beyond and down to 10{sup 13.5} solar masses is paramount especially in light of upcoming surveys aiming at cosmological constraints from galaxy cluster number counts. We build the VT in photometric redshift shells and use the two-point correlation function of the galaxies in the field to both determine the density threshold for detection of cluster candidates and to establish their significance. This allows us to detect clusters in a self-consistent way without any assumptions about their astrophysical properties. We apply the VT to mock catalogs which extend to redshift 1.4 reproducing the ?CDM cosmology and the clustering properties observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. An objective estimate of the cluster selection function in terms of the completeness and purity as a function of mass and redshift is as important as having a reliable cluster finder. We measure these quantities by matching the VT cluster catalog with the mock truth table. We show that the VT can produce a cluster catalog with completeness and purity >80% for the redshift range up to {approx}1 and mass range down to {approx}10{sup 13.5} solar masses.

  13. The Properties of Young Clusters in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. J. Smith; J. S. Gallagher

    2000-01-31

    We present a detailed study of two luminous super star clusters in the starburst galaxy M82. Spectra, covering 3250-8790 A at a resolution of 1.6 A, were obtained at the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) for cluster F and the highly reddened cluster L. We compare the strengths of the observed Balmer absorption lines and the Balmer jump in the blue spectrum of F with theoretical model cluster spectra using the PEGASE spectral synthesis code to derive an age of 60+/-20 Myr. For cluster L, we find that the similarities in the strength of the Ca II triplet and overall spectral appearance with cluster F suggest a similar age. The brightness and compactness of cluster F make it an ideal candidate for determining its dynamical mass by measuring the velocity dispersion. We present the results of such an investigation based on echelle spectra at a resolution of 8 km/s obtained at the WHT from 5760-9140 A. By cross-correlating various wavelength regions in the spectrum of cluster F with cool giant and supergiant template stars, we derive a velocity dispersion and, by application of the virial theorem, determine a dynamical mass of 2 million solar masses. We compare our derived mass with those determined for other young super star clusters and discuss whether our derived parameters are consistent with cluster F being able to survive to become a globular cluster.

  14. Substructure in the Globular Cluster System of the Milky Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Burkert; G. Smith

    1996-10-23

    The kinematical and spatial properties of the metal-rich globular clusters in the Galaxy ([Fe/H] > -0.8) indicates that these objects do not comprise a homogeneous population. Three subsystems are identified. The highest-mass clusters exhibit a very slow net rotation with a speed of v_rot = 24 km/s and v_rot/sigma = 0.3, indicative of a centrally condensed, spheroidal subsystem. Roughly half of the lower-mass clusters appear to be located in an elongated bar-like structure which passes through the Galactic Center, and has similar properties to the central stellar bar of the Milky Way. The remaining lower-mass clusters exhibit very rapid net rotation, with a rotation speed of v_rot = 164 km/s and v_rot/sigma = 6. These clusters are located in the Galactic plane, within a ring of 4 to 6 kpc radial distance from the Galactic Center. The highest-mass clusters may have formed during relatively advanced stages of the dissipative evolution of the inner Galactic halo. The lower-mass bar clusters may be associated with the formation of the Galactic stellar bar or bulge. The lower-mass ring clusters appear to be real disk objects. They may represent a stage in cluster formation that was intermediate between that of the halo globular clusters and the oldest extant open clusters.

  15. Laser induced neutron production by explosion of the deuterium clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holkundkar, Amol R., E-mail: amol.holkundkar@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [Department of Physics, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani 333 031 (India); Mishra, Gaurav, E-mail: gauravm@barc.gov.in; Gupta, N. K., E-mail: nkgupta@barc.gov.in [Theoretical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-01-15

    The high energy deuterium ions serve as compact source of neutrons when fused with either deuterium or tritium atoms. In view of this, the explosion of the deuterium clusters under the influence of the laser pulse with intensity ranging from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 19}?W/cm{sup 2} is being studied along with the effect of the cluster radius and inter-cluster distance. The objective of this article is to study the efficiency of the deuterium cluster as a compact source of neutrons under various laser and cluster parameters. It is being observed that the cluster density (number of clusters per unit volume) is quite important to gain high neutron yield.

  16. DUST PRODUCTION AND MASS LOSS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Boyer, M. L. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Loon, J. Th., E-mail: iain.mcdonald-2@manchester.ac.uk [Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    Dust production among post-main-sequence stars is investigated in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) based on infrared photometry and spectroscopy. We identify metallic iron grains as the probable dominant opacity source in these winds. Typical evolutionary timescales of asymptotic giant branch stars suggest the mass-loss rates we report are too high. We suggest that this is because the iron grains are small or elongated and/or that iron condenses more efficiently than at solar metallicity. Comparison to other works suggests metallic iron is observed to be more prevalent toward lower metallicities. The reasons for this are explored, but remain unclear. Meanwhile, the luminosity at which dusty mass loss begins is largely invariant with metallicity, but its presence correlates strongly with long-period variability. This suggests that the winds of low-mass stars have a significant driver that is not radiation pressure, but may be acoustic driving by pulsations.

  17. Technical evaluation: 300 Area steam line valve accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    On June 7, 1993, a journeyman power operator (JPO) was severely burned and later died as a result of the failure of a 6-in. valve that occurred when he attempted to open main steam supply (MSS) valve MSS-25 in the U-3 valve pit. The pit is located northwest of Building 331 in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Figure 1-1 shows a layout of the 300 Area steam piping system including the U-3 steam valve pit. Figure 1-2 shows a cutaway view of the approximately 10- by 13- by 16-ft-high valve pit with its various steam valves and connecting piping. Valve MSS-25, an 8-in. valve, is located at the bottom of the pit. The failed 6-in. valve was located at the top of the pit where it branched from the upper portion of the 8-in. line at the 8- by 8- by 6-in. tee and was then ``blanked off`` with a blind flange. The purpose of this technical evaluation was to determine the cause of the accident that led to the failure of the 6-in. valve. The probable cause for the 6-in. valve failure was determined by visual, nondestructive, and destructive examination of the failed valve and by metallurgical analysis of the fractured region of the valve. The cause of the accident was ultimately identified by correlating the observed failure mode to the most probable physical phenomenon. Thermal-hydraulic analyses, component stress analyses, and tests were performed to verify that the probable physical phenomenon could be reasonably expected to produce the failure in the valve that was observed.

  18. WMAP OBSERVATIONS OF PLANCK ESZ CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Yinzhe; Hinshaw, Gary; Scott, Douglas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2013-07-10

    We examine the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect in the seven year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data by cross-correlating it with the Planck Early-release Sunyaev-Zeldovich catalog. Our analysis proceeds in two parts. We first perform a stacking analysis in which the filtered WMAP data are averaged at the locations of the 175 Planck clusters. We then perform a regression analysis to compare the mean amplitude of the SZ signal, Y{sub 500}, in the WMAP data to the corresponding amplitude in the Planck data. The aggregate Planck clusters are detected in the seven year WMAP data with a signal-to-noise ratio of 16.3. In the regression analysis, we find that the SZ amplitude measurements agree to better than 25%: a = 1.23 {+-} 0.18 for the fit Y{sup wmap}{sub 500}= aY{sup planck}{sub 500}.

  19. Investigating the Correspondence Between Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Profiles Using Coupled Cluster Models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Simon; Girolami, Mark; Kolch, Walter; Waters, Katrina M.; Liu, Tao; Thrall, Brian D.; Wiley, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    Modern transcriptomics and proteomics enable us to survey the expression of RNAs and proteins at large scales. While these data are usually generated and analysed separately, there is an increasing interest in comparing and co-analysing transcriptome and proteome expression data. A major open question is whether transcriptome and proteome expression is linked and how it is coordinated. Results: Here we have developed a probabilistic clustering model that permits analysis of the links between transcriptomic and proteomic profiles in a sensible and flexible manner. Our coupled mixture model defines a prior probability distribution over the component to which a protein profile should be assigned conditioned on which component the associated mRNA profile belongs to. By providing probabilistic assignments this approach sits between the two extremes of concatenating the data on the assumption that mRNA and protein clusters would have a one-to-one relationship, and independent clustering where the mRNA profile provides no information on the protein profile and vice-versa. We apply this approach to a large dataset of quantitative transcriptomic and proteomic expression data obtained from a human breast epithelial cell line (HMEC) stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) over a series of timepoints corresponding to one cell cycle. The results reveal a complex relationship between transcriptome and proteome with most mRNA clusters linked to at least two protein clusters, and vice versa. A more detailed analysis incorporating information on gene function from the gene ontology database shows that a high correlation of mRNA and protein expression is limited to the components of some molecular machines, such as the ribosome, cell adhesion complexes and the TCP-1 chaperonin involved in protein folding. Conclusions: The dynamic regulation of the transcriptome and proteome in mammalian cells in response to an acute mitogenic stimulus appears largely independent with very little correspondence between mRNA and protein expression. The exceptions involve a few selected multi-protein complexes that require the stoichiometric expression of components for correct function. This finding has wide ramifications regarding the understanding of gene and protein expression including its control and evolution. It also shows that transcriptomic and proteomic expression analysis are complementary and non-redundant.

  20. Influence of cluster–support interactions on reactivity of size-selected NbxOy clusters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nakayama, Miki; Xue, Meng; An, Wei; Liu, Ping; White, Michael G.

    2015-04-17

    Size-selected niobium oxide nanoclusters (Nb3O5, Nb3O7, Nb4O7, and Nb4O10) were deposited at room temperature onto a Cu(111) surface and a thin film of Cu2O on Cu(111), and their interfacial electronic interactions and reactivity toward water dissociation were examined. These clusters were specifically chosen to elucidate the effects of the oxidation state of the metal centers; Nb3O5 and Nb4O7 are the reduced counterparts of Nb3O7 and Nb4O10, respectively. From two-photon photoemission spectroscopy (2PPE) measurements, we found that the work function increases upon cluster adsorption in all cases, indicating a negative interfacial dipole moment with the positive end pointing into the surface.more »The amount of increase was greater for the clusters with more metal centers and higher oxidation state. Additional analysis with DFT calculations of the clusters on Cu(111) indicated that the reduced clusters donate electrons to the substrate, indicating that the intrinsic cluster dipole moment makes a larger contribution to the overall interfacial dipole moment than charge transfer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that the Nb atoms of Nb3O7 and Nb4O10 are primarily Nb5+ on Cu(111), while for the reduced Nb3O5 and Nb4O7 clusters, a mixture of oxidation states was observed on Cu(111). Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments with D2O showed that water dissociation occurred on all systems except for the oxidized Nb3O7 and Nb4O10 clusters on the Cu2O film. A comparison of our XPS and TPD results suggests that Nb5+ cations associated with Nb=O terminal groups act as Lewis acid sites which are key for water binding and subsequent dissociation. TPD measurements of 2-propanol dehydration also show that the clusters active toward water dissociation are indeed acidic. DFT calculations of water dissociation on Nb3O7 support our TPD results, but the use of bulk Cu2O(111) as a model for the Cu2O film merits future scrutiny in terms of interfacial charge transfer. The combination of our experimental and theoretical results suggests that both Lewis acidity and metal reducibility are important for water dissociation.« less