Sample records for area offshore projects

  1. Three Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Receive Phase 2 Funding Three Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Receive Phase 2 Funding September...

  2. Offshore Wind Project Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Image that shows the demonstration project site and developer headquarters for two funding opportunity announcements: the 2011 Grants for Technology Development and the 2011 Grants for Removing Market Barriers.

  3. U.S. Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Public Meeting Transcript for Offshore Wind Demonstrations U.S. Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration...

  4. OFFSHORE WIND FARM LAYOUT OPTIMIZATION (OWFLO) PROJECT: AN INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    OFFSHORE WIND FARM LAYOUT OPTIMIZATION (OWFLO) PROJECT: AN INTRODUCTION C. N. Elkinton* , J. F focused on land-based wind farms, rather than on offshore farms. The conventional method used to lay out that distinguish offshore wind farms from their onshore counterparts, the Offshore Wind Farm Layout Optimization

  5. Offshore Wind Farm Layout Optimization (OWFLO) Project: Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Offshore Wind Farm Layout Optimization (OWFLO) Project: Preliminary Results Christopher N. Elkinton the layout of an offshore wind farm presents a significant engineering challenge. Most of the optimization literature to date has focused on land-based wind farms, rather than on offshore farms. Typically, energy

  6. EA-1970: Fishermen's Energy LLC Offshore Wind Demonstration Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm, LLC to construct and operate up to six wind turbine generators, for an offshore wind demonstration project, approximately 2.8 nautical...

  7. Offshore Wind Projects | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, JulyIssueOffshore Wind Projects

  8. EA-1992: Funding for Principle Power, Inc., for the WindFloat Pacific Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore of Coos Bay, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funding for Principle Power, Inc., for the WindFloat Pacific Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore of Coos Bay, Oregon

  9. Meren field water injection project offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adetoba, L.A.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Meren Water Injection Project, which is one of the largest in West Africa in terms of injection volume, secondary reserves to be recovered and cost, is located in the Meren field offshore Nigeria. This study presents an updated comprehensive plan to deplete 7 reservoir units in sands that have been producing under solution gas drive and gravity segregation with minimal water influx. The reservoir units contain ca 80% of the original oil-in-place in Meren field. Detailed studies have been undertaken to evaluate the performances of the 7 reservoirs with a view to developing a secondary recovery plan which has been brought into reality. Injection was to start in mid-1982 but was delayed until mid-1983. The effect of the delay and the changing of injector locations on recovery and cost is discussed.

  10. EA-1970: Fishermen’s Energy LLC Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore Atlantic City, New Jersey

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is proposing to provide funding to Fishermen’s Atlantic City Windfarm, LLC to construct and operate up to six wind turbine generators, for an offshore wind demonstration project, approximately 2.8 nautical miles off the coast of Atlantic City, NJ. The proposed action includes a cable crossing from the turbines to an on-shore existing substation.

  11. EA-1985: Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP), 24 nautical miles offshore of Virginia Beach, Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is proposing to fund Virginia Electric and Power Company's Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP). The proposed VOWTAP project consists of design, construction and operation of a 12 megawatt offshore wind facility located approximately 24 nautical miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, VA on the Outer Continental Shelf.

  12. EIS-0511: Aguirre Offshore GasPort Project, Puerto Rico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FERC prepared an EIS with 10 cooperating agencies, including DOE, for the proposed Aguirre Offshore GasPort Project. The proposal would include construction and operation of a marine LNG-receiving facility about 1 mile outside of Jobos Bay, near the towns of Salinas and Guayama, Puerto Rico, and a 4-mile subsea pipeline connecting to the Aguirre Plant in Salinas.

  13. GEOL 467/667/MAST 667 -GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND PROJECTS **TENTATIVE** COURSE SYLLABUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    GEOL 467/667/MAST 667 - GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND PROJECTS **TENTATIVE** COURSE SYLLABUS Description: Investigation of the geological and geotechnical aspects of offshore wind projects. Emphasis will be designed around geological and geotechnical topics that are relevant to the development of offshore wind

  14. PREDICTION OF WAVES, WAKES AND OFFSHORE WIND THE RESULTS OF THE POW'WOW PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PREDICTION OF WAVES, WAKES AND OFFSHORE WIND ­ THE RESULTS OF THE POW'WOW PROJECT Gregor Giebel: The POWWOW project (Prediction of Waves, Wakes and Offshore Wind, a EU Coordination Action) aimed to develop. Keywords: Wind resource, wave resource, offshore, short-term prediction, wakes 1 Introduction The nearly

  15. Exploring Flexible Strategies in Engineering Systems Using Screening Models Applications to Offshore Petroleum Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    , such as offshore petroleum exploration and production systems, generally require a significant amount of capital to Offshore Petroleum Projects by Jijun Lin B.E., Mechanical Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics Flexible Strategies in Engineering Systems Using Screening Models Applications to Offshore Petroleum

  16. Short-term Forecasting of Offshore Wind Farm Production Developments of the Anemos Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Short-term Forecasting of Offshore Wind Farm Production ­ Developments of the Anemos Project J to the large dimensions of offshore wind farms, their electricity production must be known well in advance networks) models were calibrated on power data from two offshore wind farms: Tunoe and Middelgrunden

  17. | | | | |Monday, July 16, 2012 Three Northeast Ohio offshore wind power projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    | | | | |Monday, July 16, 2012 Home Three Northeast Ohio offshore wind power projects secure federal money By SCOTT SUTTELL 1:52 pm, September 9, 2011 Three Northeast Ohio offshore wind power to "speed technical innovations, lower costs, and shorten the timeline for deploying offshore wind energy

  18. Secretary Chu Unveils 41 New Offshore Wind Power R&D Projects...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The above map shows the headquarters locations of all 41 projects. Those shown in blue are focused on advancing offshore wind technologies, such as modeling and design of...

  19. New Report Shows Trend Toward Larger Offshore Wind Systems, with 11 Advanced Stage Projects Proposed in U.S. Waters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today released a new report showing progress for the U.S. offshore wind energy market in 2012, including the completion of two commercial lease auctions for federal Wind Energy Areas and 11 commercial-scale U.S. projects repre

  20. DISTRIBUTION AND ECOLOGY OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, IN AN OFFSHORE AREA OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISTRIBUTION AND ECOLOGY OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, IN AN OFFSHORE AREA OF THE EASTERN, Katsuwonus pelamis, were studied in the offshore eastern tropical Pacific between lat. 15°N and 50 S, long and relative abun- dance of skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, in relation to environmental conditions

  1. Routing Subsea Cables for Scottish Offshore Renewable Search Areas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iredale, Ingrid

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UK has been the leading nation in offshore renewable energy generation since 2010 (Kern et. al., 2014), due to its substantial resources, technical expertise and strong economic and political support (Jay, 2011). Many of the resources remain...

  2. adjacent offshore area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 441 OFF-SHORE WIND AND GRID-CONNECTED PV: HIGH PENETRATION PEAK SHAVING FOR NEW YORK CITY Renewable Energy Websites Summary:...

  3. Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinick, Charles; Riccobono, Antonino, MS; Messing, Charles G., Ph.D.; Walker, Brian K., Ph.D.; Reed, John K., Ph.D.

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehlsen Associates, LLC was awarded a grant by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Golden Field Office for a project titled 'Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida,' corresponding to DOE Grant Award Number DE-EE0002655 resulting from DOE funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000069 for Topic Area 2, and it is referred to herein as 'the project.' The purpose of the project was to enhance the certainty of the survey requirements and regulatory review processes for the purpose of reducing the time, efforts, and costs associated with initial siting efforts of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore Southeast Florida. To secure early input from agencies, protocols were developed for collecting baseline geophysical information and benthic habitat data that can be used by project developers and regulators to make decisions early in the process of determining project location (i.e., the siting process) that avoid or minimize adverse impacts to sensitive marine benthic habitat. It is presumed that such an approach will help facilitate the licensing process for hydrokinetic and other ocean renewable energy projects within the study area and will assist in clarifying the baseline environmental data requirements described in the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly Minerals Management Service) final regulations on offshore renewable energy (30 Code of Federal Regulations 285, published April 29, 2009). Because projects generally seek to avoid or minimize impacts to sensitive marine habitats, it was not the intent of this project to investigate areas that did not appear suitable for the siting of ocean renewable energy projects. Rather, a two-tiered approach was designed with the first step consisting of gaining overall insight about seabed conditions offshore southeastern Florida by conducting a geophysical survey of pre-selected areas with subsequent post-processing and expert data interpretation by geophysicists and experienced marine biologists knowledgeable about the general project area. The second step sought to validate the benthic habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data by conducting benthic video and photographic field surveys of selected habitat types. The goal of this step was to determine the degree of correlation between the habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data and what actually exists on the seafloor based on the benthic video survey logs. This step included spot-checking selected habitat types rather than comprehensive evaluation of the entire area covered by the geophysical survey. It is important to note that non-invasive survey methods were used as part of this study and no devices of any kind were either temporarily or permanently attached to the seabed as part of the work conducted under this project.

  4. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  5. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Maryland Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of the delineation proposed by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) for the Maryland (MD) WEA and two alternative delineations. The objectives of the NREL evaluation were to assess MEA's proposed delineation of the MD WEA, perform independent analysis, and recommend how the MD WEA should be delineated.

  6. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM New Jersey Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development and evaluation of the delineations for the New Jersey (NJ) WEA. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the New Jersey WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL identified a selection of leasing areas and proposed delineation boundaries within the established NJ WEA. The primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

  7. New Report Highlights Trends in Offshore Wind with 14 Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the advanced stages of development- together representing nearly 4,900 megawatts (MW) of potential offshore wind energy capacity for the United States. Further, this year's report...

  8. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Parker, Z.; Fields, M.; Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Draxl, C.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's development of three delineated leasing area options for the Massachusetts (MA) WEA and the technical evaluation of these leasing areas. The overarching objective of this study is to develop a logical process by which the MA WEA can be subdivided into non-overlapping leasing areas for BOEM's use in developing an auction process in a renewable energy lease sale. NREL worked with BOEM to identify an appropriate number of leasing areas and proposed three delineation alternatives within the MA WEA based on the boundaries announced in May 2012. A primary output of the interagency agreement is this report, which documents the methodology, including key variables and assumptions, by which the leasing areas were identified and delineated.

  9. Offshore Wind Market Acceleration Projects | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to connect this offshore wind energy to the grid. The University of Delaware is examining potential effects of wind penetration on the Mid-Atlantic electric grid and facilitating...

  10. Offshore Wind Energy Permitting: A Survey of U.S. Project Developers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Cleve, Frances B.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has adopted a goal to generate 20% of the nation’s electricity from wind power by 2030. Achieving this “20% Wind Scenario” in 2030 requires acceleration of the current rate of wind project development. Offshore wind resources contribute substantially to the nation’s wind resource, yet to date no offshore wind turbines have been installed in the U.S. Progress developing offshore wind projects has been slowed by technological challenges, uncertainties about impacts to the marine environment, siting and permitting challenges, and viewshed concerns. To address challenges associated with siting and permitting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) surveyed offshore wind project developers about siting and project development processes, their experience with the environmental permitting process, and the role of coastal and marine spatial planning (CMSP) in development of the offshore wind industry. Based on the responses to survey questions, we identify several priority recommendations to support offshore wind development. Recommendations also include considerations for developing supporting industries in the U.S. and how to use Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) to appropriately consider ocean energy among existing ocean uses. In this report, we summarize findings, discuss the implications, and suggest actions to improve the permitting and siting process.

  11. A study of offshore benthic communities in natural areas and in areas affected by dredging and dredged material disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Clyde Allan

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY QF OFFSHORE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN NATURAL AREAS AND IN AREAS AFFECTED BY DREDGING AND DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL A Thesis by CLYDE ALLAN HENRY e Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Biology A STCDY OF 0-FSHOBE BENTHIC COMKTNITIES IN NATURAL AREAS AND IN AREAS AFFECTED BY DREDGING AND DREDCFD NATERIAL DISPOSAL A Thesis by CLYDE ALLAN HENRY Approved...

  12. Offshore Wind Technology Development Projects | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, JulyIssueOffshore Wind

  13. 2011 DOE Funded Offshore Wind Project Updates | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is always evolving, soFuel Cell Technologies1 -2011 DOE Funded Offshore

  14. U.S. Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Public

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success| DepartmentEnergyFeedMeeting Transcript for Offshore

  15. EIS-0470: Cape Wind Energy Project, Nantucket Sound, Offshore...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 25, 2014 EIS-0470: Cape Wind Energy Project, Final General Conformity Determination Cape Wind Energy Project, Final General Conformity Determination, June 23, 2014 December...

  16. Functional Area Assessments Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    with Huron on detailed project plan. Subject Experts Subject Expert Role Functional leadership Administrative1 of 2 Functional Area Assessments ­ Project Charter Workstream Name Functional Area Assessments - Internal Budgeting - Human Resources These diagnostics will be performed using interviews, surveys, data

  17. Coastal Ohio Wind Project for Reduced Barriers to Deployment of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Carroll, Michael

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project was created to establish the viability of wind turbines on the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project’s main goal was to improve operational unit strategies used for environmental impact assessment of offshore turbines on lake wildlife by optimizing and fusing data from the multi-instrument surveillance system and providing an engineering analysis of potential design/operational alternatives for offshore wind turbines. The project also developed a general economic model for offshore WTG deployment to quantify potential revenue losses due to wind turbine shutdown related to ice and avian issues. In a previous phase of this project (Award Number: DE-FG36-06GO86096), we developed a surveillance system that was used to collect different parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directions, and flight altitudes of nocturnal migrating species, movements of birds and bats, and bird calls for assessing patterns and peak passage rates during migration. To derive such parameters we used thermal IR imaging cameras, acoustic recorders, and marine radar Furuno (XANK250), which was coupled with a XIR3000B digitizing card from Russell Technologies and open source radR processing software. The integration yielded a development of different computational techniques and methods, which we further developed and optimized as a combined surveillance system. To accomplish this task we implemented marine radar calibration, optimization of processing parameters, and fusion of the multi-sensor data in order to make inferences about the potential avian targets. The main goal of the data fusion from the multi-sensor environment was aimed at reduction of uncertainties while providing acceptable confidence levels with detailed information about the migration patterns. Another component comprised of an assessment of wind resources in a near lake environment and an investigation of the effectiveness of ice coating materials to mitigate adverse effects of ice formation on wind turbine structures. Firstly, a Zephir LiDAR system was acquired and installed at Woodlands School in Huron, Ohio, which is located near Lake Erie. Wind resource data were obtained at ten measurement heights, 200m, 150m, 100m, 80m, 60m, 40m, 38m, 30m, 20m, and 10m. The Woodlands School’s wind turbine anemometer also measured the wind speed at the hub height. These data were collected for approximately one year. The hub anemometer data correlated well with the LiDAR wind speed measurements at the same height. The data also showed that on several days different power levels were recorded by the turbine at the same wind speed as indicated by the hub anemometer. The corresponding LiDAR data showed that this difference can be attributed to variability in the wind over the turbine rotor swept area, which the hub anemometer could not detect. The observation suggests that single point hub wind velocity measurements are inadequate to accurately estimate the power generated by a turbine at all times since the hub wind speed is not a good indicator of the wind speed over the turbine rotor swept area when winds are changing rapidly. To assess the effectiveness of ice coatings to mitigate the impact of ice on turbine structures, a closed-loop icing research tunnel (IRT) was designed and constructed. By controlling the temperature, air speed, water content and liquid droplet size, the tunnel enabled consistent and repeatable ice accretion under a variety of conditions with temperatures between approximately 0°C and -20°C and wind speeds up to 40 miles per hour in the tunnel’s test section. The tunnel’s cooling unit maintained the tunnel temperature within ±0.2°C. The coatings evaluated in the study were Boyd Coatings Research Company’s CRC6040R3, MicroPhase Coatings Inc.’s PhaseBreak TP, ESL and Flex coatings. Similar overall performance was observed in all coatings tested in that water droplets form on the test articles beginning at the stagnation region and spreading in the downstream direction in time. When compari

  18. Accelerating Offshore Wind Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today the Energy Department announced investments in seven offshore wind demonstration projects. Check out our map to see where these projects will be located.

  19. Optimizing Installation, Operation, and Maintenance at Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimizing Installation, Operation, and Maintenance at Offshore Wind Projects in the United States Optimizing Installation, Operation, and Maintenance at Offshore Wind Projects in...

  20. Ashland Area Support Substation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power Light Company's (PP L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP L's Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW's) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

  1. MODEL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO PROVIDE ENERGY AND OTHER ATTRIBUTES FROM AN OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a model RFP for new generation. The 'base' RFP is for a single-source offshore wind RFP. Required modifications are noted should a state or utility seek multi-source bids (e.g., all renewables or all sources). The model is premised on proposals meeting threshold requirements (e.g., a MW range of generating capacity and a range in terms of years), RFP issuer preferences (e.g., likelihood of commercial operation by a date certain, price certainty, and reduction in congestion), and evaluation criteria, along with a series of plans (e.g., site, environmental effects, construction, community outreach, interconnection, etc.). The Model RFP places the most weight on project risk (45%), followed by project economics (35%), and environmental and social considerations (20%). However, if a multi-source RFP is put forward, the sponsor would need to either add per-MWh technology-specific, life-cycle climate (CO2), environmental and health impact costs to bid prices under the 'Project Economics' category or it should increase the weight given to the 'Environmental and Social Considerations' category.

  2. Exploring flexible strategies in engineering systems using screening models : applications to offshore petroleum projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jijun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering Systems, such as offshore petroleum exploration and production systems, generally require a significant amount of capital investment under various technical and market uncertainties. Choosing appropriate designs ...

  3. North Area Right-of-Way Maintenance Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Area Right-of-Way Maintenance Project North Area Right-of-Way Maintenance Project Western FONSI (PDF - 487 KB) Final Environmental Assessment (PDF - 4200 KB) Environmental...

  4. Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report.pdf More Documents & Publications Computational Advances in Applied...

  5. The Future of Offshore Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 The Future of Offshore Wind Energy #12;2 #12;3 Offshore Wind Works · Offshore wind parks: 28 in 10 countries · Operational since 1991 · Current installed capacity: 1,250 MW · Offshore wind parks in the waters around Europe #12;4 US Offshore Wind Projects Proposed Atlantic Ocean Gulf of Mexico Cape Wind

  6. DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for...

  7. Virginia Offshore Wind Cost Reduction Through Innovation Study (VOWCRIS) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.; Campbell, J.; Arora, D.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The VOWCRIS project is an integrated systems approach to the feasibility-level design, performance, and cost-of-energy estimate for a notional 600-megawatt offshore wind project using site characteristics that apply to the Wind Energy Areas of Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina.

  8. area rehabilitation project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    concentration area. Interdisciplinary Core: Credits: Course : Foundations of Physical Weber, David J. 7 Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects in British Columbia...

  9. CONMOW: Condition Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 CONMOW: Condition Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms Edwin Wiggelinkhuizen, Theo Verbruggen, Henk in practice the European project CONMOW (Condition Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms) was started in November for Offshore Wind Farms) was started in November 2002. This paper briefly describes the CONMOW project approach

  10. Energy Department Announces Offshore Wind Demonstration Awardees...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    demonstration partnerships with broad consortia that are developing breakthrough offshore wind energy generation projects. The primary goals of these projects are to...

  11. Sediment Properties: E-Area Completion Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Bagwell, L.; Amidon, M.; Dixon, K.

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    To accommodate a future need for additional waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site, the Solid Waste Management Division (SWMD) designated nine additional plots for development (Kasraii 2007; SRS 2010); these plots are collectively known as the E Area Completion Project (ECP). Subsurface samples were collected from ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 (Figure 1) for chemical and physical property analyses to support Performance Assessment (PA) and Special Analyses (SA) modeling. This document summarizes the sampling and analysis scheme and the resultant data, and provides interpretations of the data particularly in reference to existing soil property data. Analytical data in this document include: gamma log, cone penetrometer log, grain size (sieve and hydrometer), water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity (falling head permeameter), porosity, dry bulk density, total organic carbon, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence data. SRNL provided technical and safety oversight for the fieldwork, which included completion of eight soil borings, four geophysical logs, and the collection of 522 feet of core and 33 Shelby tubes from ECP plots 6, 7, 8, and 9. Boart Longyear provided sonic drilling and logging services. Two soil borings were completed at each location. The first set of boreholes extended into (but did not fully penetrate) the Warley Hill Formation. These boreholes were continuously cored, then geophysically (gamma ray) logged. The recovered core was split, photographed, and described; one half of the core was archived at SRS's Core Lab facilities, and the remaining half was consumed as necessary for testing at SRS and off-site labs. Core descriptions and geophysical data were used to calculate target elevations for Shelby tube samples, which were obtained from the second set of boreholes. Shelby tubes were shipped to MACTEC Engineering and Consulting Inc. (MACTEC) in Atlanta for physical property testing. SRNL deployed their Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) cone penetrometer test (CPT) truck at ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 to collect inferred lithology data for the vadose zone. Results from this study are used to make recommendations for future modeling efforts involving the ECP plots. The conceptual model of the ECP hydrogeology differs from the conceptual model of the current ELLWF disposal area in that for the ECP plots, the topography (ground surface) is generally lower in elevation; The Upland and top of Tobacco Road lithostratigraphic units are missing (eroded); The water table occurs lower in elevation (i.e., it occurs in lower stratigraphic units); and the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) often occurs within the vadose zone (rather than in the saturated zone). Due to the difference in the hydrogeology between the current ELLWF location and the ECP plots, different vadose zone properties are recommended for the ECP plots versus the properties recommended by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current disposal units. Results from this study do not invalidate or conflict with the current PA's use of the Upper and Lower Vadose Zone properties as described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current ELLWF disposal units. The following modeling recommendations are made for future modeling of the ECP plots where vadose zone properties are required: (1) If a single vadose zone property is preferred, the properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the Upper Vadose Zone encompass the general physical properties of the combined sands and clays in the ECP vadose zone sediments despite the differences in hydrostratigraphic units. (2) If a dual zone system is preferred, a combination of the Lower Zone properties and the Clay properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) are appropriate for modeling the physical properties of the ECP vadose zone. The Clay properties would be assigned to the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) and any other significant clay layers, while the Lower Zone properties would be assigned for the remainder of the vadose zone. No immediate updates or changes are recommended for

  12. Offshore Coastal Wind Speed Gradients: issues for the design and development of large offshore windfarms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    -situ and remote sensing data from offshore wind farms in Denmark, are used to examine both horizontal and vertical the area of the wind farm appear to be small and negligible. 1. INTRODUCTION As large offshore wind farmsOffshore Coastal Wind Speed Gradients: issues for the design and development of large offshore

  13. Exploration concept and characteristic of the dinarides stratigraphic and structural model in the Croatian offshore area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grandic, S. (Western Geophysical, Isleworth, Middlesex (United Kingdom)); Susterciv, M.; Balas, E. (Ina-Naftaplin, Zagreb (Croatia))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dinarides Mesozoic carbonate platform constitutes an extensive paleogeographic unit of the Neo-Tethys platform system. Despite a large sedimentary complex within the platform displaying good hydrocarbon potential, no economic oil accumulations have as yet been discovered. A detailed study of the latest seismic and well data from the Kornati block and other relevant areas suggests, however, that a modified exploration scenario, based on the following elements, could be proposed: (1) Systematic lateral distribution of potential petroliferous facies between the Istrian-Dalmatian marginal zones and the central zone of the external Dinarides. Also, evidence of regular facies changes during platform evolution. (2) Paleotectonic control of varying depositional environments. These range from extremely restricted (anoxic) conditions, to high-energy zones on the platform margins and the edges of intraplatform basins and lagoons. (3) A link between the structural style of the final platform carbonates and the underlying Permian-Triassic halokinetic deposits. This relationship occurred during the Apulia microplate collision and shearing. (4) Differential platform subsidence and burial of potential source rock during platform evolution. Also, post-platform flysch and Molasse sedimentation. (5) Rotational displacement of potential hydrocarbon reservoirs away from the conventional target of exploratory drilling. An acceptance of the above-mentioned elements, particularly the rotation concept, could contribute toward developing a more effective exploration strategy. This should involve seismostratigraphic and other refined exploration methods in many zones of the Neo-Tethys carbonate platform system characterized by similar rotational displacement.

  14. Regional fault pattern study - Sonam/Ajapa area offshore Western Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanu, K.A.; Glass, J.E.; Okoro, P.C. [Chevron Nigeria Ltd., Lagos (Nigeria)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 900 km{sup 2} of high quality 3-D data was used to interpret structural trends: an inner trend containing the Mefa, Meji and Ajapa oil fields and a younger outer trend containing the large Sonam condensate field. Each trend is bounded by a large, regional down-to-the-coast fault system on the northeast and its associated counter-regional fault to the southwest. Hydrocarbon accumulations are contained within rollover anticlines adjacent to the main seaward-dipping fault trends. However, our data shows that structural geometries within each trend are highly three-dimensional. Anticlinal end closure is achieved by changes in fault detachment level and displacement which generally occur near major fault junctions. Thus, significant accumulations are associated with first-order high-relief accommodation zones. In the absence of such first-order closure, we cannot rely upon the systems of relatively small faults that occur on seaward dipping flanks and in areas of crestal collapse. Detailed 3-D mapping, supported by drilling results, shows that such faults do not link strongly together, thereby allowing leakage of hydrocarbons mound fault tips and up relay ramps between faults.

  15. Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2004 Published: 21 April-2004................................................. 48 Wind farm area (Turbine), Reference area (Ref

  16. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  17. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Power Sales Rate History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Power Sales Rate History Updated: 9112013 Rate Schedule Effective Dates Energy (MillskWh) Capacity (kW-mo.) Combined (MillskWh) 1...

  18. Ashland Area Support Substation Project : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power & Light Company`s (PP&L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP&L`s Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP&L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW`s) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP&L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

  19. NREL Assesses National Design Standards for Offshore Wind (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report summarizes regulations, standards, and guidelines for the design and operation of offshore wind projects in the United States.

  20. Developing Integrated National Design Standards for Offshore...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    report that summarizes the regulations, standards, and guidelines for the design and operation of offshore wind projects in the United States. In 2012, the American Wind Energy...

  1. Surface tension in bilayer membranes with fixed projected area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Imparato

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the elastic response of bilayer membranes with fixed projected area to both stretching and shape deformations. A surface tension is associated to each of these deformations. By using model amphiphilic membranes and computer simulations, we are able to observe both the types of deformation, and thus, both the surface tensions, related to each type of deformation, are measured for the same system. These surface tensions are found to assume different values in the same bilayer membrane: in particular they vanish for different values of the projected area. We introduce a simple theory which relates the two quantities and successfully apply it to the data obtained with computer simulations.

  2. 200 Area Deactivation Project Facilities Authorization Envelope Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DODD, E.N.

    2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Project facilities as required by HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The Authorization Agreements (AA's) do not identify the specific set of environmental safety and health requirements that are applicable to the facility. Therefore, the facility Authorization Envelopes are defined here to identify the applicable requirements. This document identifies the authorization envelopes for the 200 Area Deactivation.

  3. Plant biodiversity and ethnobotany inside the projected impact area of the Upper Seti Hydropower Project,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asselin, Hugo

    Plant biodiversity and ethnobotany inside the projected impact area of the Upper Seti Hydropower hydropower project, currently under feasibility study. The objective of the study was to document plant the construction of major hydropower infrastructure (Pokharel 2001; Bartle 2002). However, potential impacts

  4. ForPeerReview PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    ForPeerReview PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECTS IN THE UNITED STATES Journal: Wind, Andrew; Minerals Management Service Keywords: offshore wind power, public opinion, social acceptancePeerReview 1 PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECTS IN THE UNITED STATES Jeremy Firestone*, Willett

  5. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Bruce Duncan [Navigant Consulting, Inc.

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the report is to provide an assessment of the domestic supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure supporting the U.S. offshore wind market. The report provides baseline information and develops a strategy for future development of the supply chain required to support projected offshore wind deployment levels. A brief description of each of the key chapters includes: » Chapter 1: Offshore Wind Plant Costs and Anticipated Technology Advancements. Determines the cost breakdown of offshore wind plants and identifies technical trends and anticipated advancements in offshore wind manufacturing and construction. » Chapter 2: Potential Supply Chain Requirements and Opportunities. Provides an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding the uncertainties associated with a future U.S. offshore wind market. It projects potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios and identifies key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market as well as current suppliers of the nation’s land-based wind market. » Chapter 3: Strategy for Future Development. Evaluates the gap or competitive advantage of adding manufacturing capacity in the U.S. vs. overseas, and evaluates examples of policies that have been successful . » Chapter 4: Pathways for Market Entry. Identifies technical and business pathways for market entry by potential suppliers of large-scale offshore turbine components and technical services. The report is intended for use by the following industry stakeholder groups: (a) Industry participants who seek baseline cost and supplier information for key component segments and the overall U.S. offshore wind market (Chapters 1 and 2). The component-level requirements and opportunities presented in Section 2.3 will be particularly useful in identifying market sizes, competition, and risks for the various component segments. (b) Federal, state, and local policymakers and economic development agencies, to assist in identifying policies with low effort and high impact (Chapter 3). Section 3.3 provides specific policy examples that have been demonstrated to be effective in removing barriers to development. (c) Current and potential domestic suppliers in the offshore wind market, in evaluating areas of opportunity and understanding requirements for participation (Chapter 4). Section 4.4 provides a step-by-step description of the qualification process that suppliers looking to sell components into a future U.S. offshore wind market will need to follow.

  6. Advanced Offshore Wind Tech: Accelerating New Opportunities for Clean Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department today announced the selection of three projects that aim to advance the offshore wind industry and lower the cost of offshore wind technologies. Learn more about these technological innovations.

  7. EA-1792-S1: University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project – Castine Harbor Test Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the University of Maine proposal to use Congressionally directed federal funding, from DOE, to deploy, test and retrieve one 1/8-scale floating wind turbine (20kw) prototype in Castine Harbor, offshore of Castine Maine. This test would be conducted prior to testing at the site 2 miles from Monhegan Island (evaluated under DOE EA-1792).

  8. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  9. Offshore wind resource assessment in European Seas, state-of-the art. A survey within the FP6 "POW'WOW" Coordination Action Project.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Germany (5) FORWIND, University of Oldenburg, Germany ABSTRACT To plan an offshore wind farm, a careful 1999, large wind farms with wind turbines up to 5 MW have been erected offshore especially in the NorthOffshore wind resource assessment in European Seas, state-of- the ­art. A survey within the FP6

  10. Three-dimensional seismic study of structures and salt tectonics of Eugene Island Area offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Ye

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eugene Island OCS is one of the largest oil-producing areas in federally owned waters of the U.S. outer continental shelf. Fault development and salt tectonics are the most important structural features of the study area. The study is based...

  11. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4), Phase I - Results of Coupled Simulations of an Offshore Wind Turbine with Jacket Support Structure: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popko, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Zuga, A.; Kohlmeier, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Larsen, T. J.; Yde, A.; Saetertro, K.; Okstad, K. M.; Nichols, J.; Nygaard, T. A.; Gao, Z.; Manolas, D.; Kim, K.; Yu, Q.; Shi, W.; Park, H.; Vasquez-Rojas, A.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of the IEA Wind Task 30, Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation Project - Phase 1.

  12. Engineering properties of shallow sediments in West Delta and South Pass Outer Continental Shelf Lease Areas, offshore Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helwick, Sterling J

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and sandy silt (WD024 1 WD028 ly WD029 1 WD029 2& WD029 3 1 1 These designations identify borehole locations. WD refers to West Delta OCS Lease Area, and SP refers to South Pass OCS Lease Area. The next three digits identify the number of the lease block... AREA SEDIMENTS IN DEPTH INTERVAL 2Ir50' 0-50 M 89'20' Fig. 4 ? General lithology of borehole sediments in the upper 50 m. The number next to each borehole location is used to distinguish boreholes located in the same lease block. 18 WD029-5, WD...

  13. Ris-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resources, e.g. in future planning of offshore wind farms. The report describes the validation analysisRisø-R-1298(EN) Validation of Satellite SAR Offshore Wind Speed Maps to In-Situ Data, Microscale project goal is to develop a method for utilizing the satellite wind speed maps for offshore wind

  14. Review report 2004 The Danish Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Review report 2004 The Danish Offshore Wind Farm Demonstration Project: Horns Rev and Nysted Offshore Wind Farms Environmental impact assessment and monitoring Prepared for The Environmental Group By Elsam Engineering and ENERGI E2 October 2005 #12;- 2 - Review Report 2004 The Danish Offshore Wind Farm

  15. Relationships of seismic amplitudes and gas content of the Miocene Amos Sand, Mobile Bay area, offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reif, L.T. (Mobil Oil Company, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Kinsland, G.L. (Univ. of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, LA (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobil Oil Company has collected three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data over Mary Ann field in the Mobile Bay area, Alabama. Although the survey was designed and collected so as to image the deeper Norphlet Sands, amplitude anomalies in the image of the shallow Miocene Amos Sand are evident. Relationships are developed between the seismic amplitudes and net feet of gas in the Amos Sand at the few existing wells. These relationships are used to predict net feet of gas everywhere in the area of the seismic survey. The result is a contoured map of net feet of gas in the Miocene Amos Sand in Mary Ann field.

  16. U.S. Department of Energy and SWAY Collaborate on Offshore Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy and SWAY Collaborate on Offshore Wind Demonstration Project U.S. Department of Energy and SWAY Collaborate on Offshore Wind Demonstration Project October...

  17. Quantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    the spatial extent of the wake behind large offshore wind farms. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, LtdQuantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps: Study Area the North Sea C. B National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Offshore wind resources are quantified from satellite synthetic

  18. EA-1792: University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to support research on floating offshore wind turbine platforms. This project would support the mission, vision, and goals...

  19. University of Michigan Gets Offshore Wind Ready for Winter on...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Receive Energy Department Funding United States Launches First Grid-Connected Offshore Wind Turbine Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development Project...

  20. Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

  1. The River Team Corridor Project The Gateshead area of North East England contains some

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The River Team Corridor Project objectives The Gateshead area of North East England contains some of a wider project to regenerate the River Team area, the River Team Corridor Project seeks to enhance Reserve, the Team Valley Trading Estate, riverbanks and the Bowes Railway Path. · Expand involvement

  2. Fluid management plan for the Project Shoal Area Offsites Subproject

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has initiated the Offsites Subproject to characterize the hazards posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at facilities other than the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A primary Subproject objective is to gather adequate data to characterize the various Subproject sites through the collection of surface and subsurface soil samples and by drilling several wells for the collection of groundwater data. The Project Shoal Area (PSA) is one of the Subproject`s Nevada sites and is subject to the requirements set forth in the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (DOE, 1996a). In accordance with the FFACO, a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for work at the PSA (designated as Corrective Action Unit Number 416). This Fluid Management Plan (FMP) provides guidance for the management of fluids generated from wells constructed at the PSA. Long-term monitoring and future activities at the site, if required, will be set forth in additional documents as required by the FFACO. The ultimate method for disposition of fluids generated by site operations depends upon sample analysis and process knowledge in relation to fluid management criteria. Section 2 describes well site operations; Section 3 discusses fluid management criteria; Section 4 includes the fluid monitoring program; Section 5 presents the fluid management strategy; Section 6 provides for fluid management during routine well monitoring; and Section 7 contains reporting criteria.

  3. North Area Right-of-Way Maintenance Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sacramento Valley Right-of-Way Maintenance Project Sacramento Valley Right-of-Way Maintenance Project Final EA Report Cover Vol I August 2005(PDF - 492 MG) Final EA Main Volume...

  4. Sandia Energy - Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Rotor Development Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development Offshore Wind RD&D:...

  5. Sandia Energy - Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor...

  6. EIS-0325: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA proposes to construct a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in central Washington. This project would increase transmission system capacity north of Hanford.

  7. A REAL OPTIONS OPTIMIZATION MODEL TO MEET AVAILABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandborn, Peter

    wind farm with prognostic capabilities. Alternative energy sources such as offshore wind turbines-based maintenance. This is especially important for offshore wind farms that require non- traditional resources for a Typical Baseline Offshore Wind Project [2] Wind farms are capital intensive projects, and the economics

  8. From the SelectedWorks of George R. Parsons Valuing the Visual Disamenity of Offshore Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    From the SelectedWorks of George R. Parsons May 2011 Valuing the Visual Disamenity of Offshore Wind of Offshore Wind Power Projects at Varying Distances from the Shore: An Application on the Delaware Shoreline Andrew D. Krueger, George R. Parsons, and Jeremy Firestone ABSTRACT. Several offshore wind power projects

  9. Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples geoff@clearpathenergyllc.com #12;Frequently Unanswered Ques?ons · Why don't "they" build more offshore wind? · Why not make States Cape Wind PPA at 18 c/kWh #12;The cycle of non-innova?on Offshore

  10. CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind Lessons Learned from Europe: Reducing Costs and Creating Jobs Thursday, June 12, 2014 Capitol Visitors Center, Room SVC 215 Enough offshore wind capacity to power six the past decade. What has Europe learned that is applicable to a U.S. effort to deploy offshore wind off

  11. Assessment of Ports for Offshore Wind Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkinton, Chris [DNV GL] [DNV GL; Blatiak, Alicia; Ameen, Hafsa

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As offshore wind energy develops in the United States, port facilities will become strategic hubs in the offshore wind farm supply chain because all plant and transport logistics must transit through these facilities. Therefore, these facilities must provide suitable infrastructure to meet the specific requirements of the offshore wind industry. As a result, it is crucial that federal and state policy-makers and port authorities take effective action to position ports in the offshore wind value chain to take best advantage of their economic potential. The U.S. Department of Energy tasked the independent consultancy GL Garrad Hassan (GL GH) with carrying out a review of the current capability of U.S. ports to support offshore wind project development and an assessment of the challenges and opportunities related to upgrading this capability to support the growth of as many as 54 gigawatts of offshore wind installed in U.S. waters by 2030. The GL GH report and the open-access web-based Ports Assessment Tool resulting from this study will aid decision-makers in making informed decisions regarding the choice of ports for specific offshore projects, and the types of investments that would be required to make individual port facilities suitable to serve offshore wind manufacturing, installation and/or operations. The offshore wind industry in the United States is still in its infancy and this study finds that additional port facilities capable of supporting offshore wind projects are needed to meet the anticipated project build-out by 2030; however, no significant barriers exist to prevent the development of such facilities. Furthermore, significant port capabilities are in place today with purpose-build port infrastructure currently being built. While there are currently no offshore wind farms operating in the United States, much of the infrastructure critical to the success of such projects does exist, albeit in the service of other industries. This conclusion is based on GL GH’s review of U.S. ports infrastructure and its readiness to support the development of proposed offshore wind projects in U.S. waters. Specific examples of facility costs and benefits are provided for five coastal regions (North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Great Lakes, and Pacific) around the country. GL GH began this study by identifying the logistical requirements of offshore wind ports to service offshore wind. This review was based on lessons learned through industry practice in Northern Europe. A web-based port readiness assessment tool was developed to allow a capability gap analysis to be conducted on existing port facilities based on the identified requirements. Cost models were added to the assessment tool, which allowed GL GH to estimate the total upgrade cost to a port over the period 2014-2030 based on a set of regional project build-out scenarios. Port fee information was gathered from each port allowing an estimate of the potential revenue to the port under this same set of scenarios. The comparison of these revenue and improvement cost figures provides an initial indication of the level of offshore wind port readiness. To facilitate a more in-depth infrastructure analysis, six ports from different geographic regions, with varied levels of interest and preparedness towards offshore wind, were evaluated by modeling a range of installation strategies and port use types to identify gaps in capability and potential opportunities for economic development. Commonalities, trends, and specific examples from these case studies are presented and provide a summary of the current state of offshore wind port readiness in the U.S. and also illustrate the direction some ports have chosen to take to prepare for offshore wind projects. For example, the land area required for wind turbine and foundation manufacturing is substantial, particularly due to the large size of offshore wind components. Also, the necessary bearing capacities of the quayside and storage area are typically greater for offshore wind components than for more conventiona

  12. Business Continuity Project Project Summary: Develop Business Continuity Plans for all critical functional areas of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and methods to "invoke" individual plans, · Identify critical materials, parts, equipment needed, · Identify resources for obtaining critical materials, parts, equipment, · Identify resources for critical servicesBusiness Continuity Project Project Summary: Develop Business Continuity Plans for all critical

  13. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boezaart, Arnold [GVSU; Edmonson, James [GVSU; Standridge, Charles [GVSU; Pervez, Nahid [GVSU; Desai, Neel [University of Michigan; Williams, Bruce [University of Delaware; Clark, Aaron [GVSU; Zeitler, David [GVSU; Kendall, Scott [GVSU; Biddanda, Bopi [GVSU; Steinman, Alan [GVSU; Klatt, Brian [Michigan State University; Gehring, J. L. [Michigan State University; Walter, K. [Michigan State University; Nordman, Erik E. [GVSU

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the project including to: 1) test and validate floating LIDAR technology; 2) collect and access offshore wind data; 3) detect and measure bird and bat activity over Lake Michigan; 4) conduct an over water sound propagation study; 5) prepare and offer a college course on offshore energy, and; 6) collect other environmental, bathometric, and atmospheric data. Desk-top research was performed to select anchorage sites and to secure permits to deploy the buoy. The project also collected and analyzed data essential to wind industry investment decision-making including: deploying highly mobile floating equipment to gather offshore wind data; correlating offshore wind data with conventional on-shore MET tower data; and performing studies that can contribute to the advancement and deployment of offshore wind technologies. Related activities included: • Siting, permitting, and deploying an offshore floating MET facility; • Validating the accuracy of floating LWS using near shoreline cup anemometer MET instruments; • Assessment of laser pulse technology (LIDAR) capability to establish hub height measurement of wind conditions at multiple locations on Lake Michigan; • Utilizing an extended-season (9-10 month) strategy to collect hub height wind data and weather conditions on Lake Michigan; • Investigation of technology best suited for wireless data transmission from distant offshore structures; • Conducting field-validated sound propagation study for a hypothetical offshore wind farm from shoreline locations; • Identifying the presence or absence of bird and bat species near wind assessment facilities; • Identifying the presence or absence of benthic and pelagic species near wind assessment facilities; All proposed project activities were completed with the following major findings: • Floating Laser Wind Sensors are capable of high quality measurement and recordings of wind resources. The WindSentinel presented no significant operational or statistical limitations in recording wind data technology at a at a high confidence level as compared to traditional an

  14. Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for Offshore Oilfield Infrastructure Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for Offshore Oilfield Infrastructure Planning under is implemented in the GAMS grid computing environment. Computational results on a variety of oilfield development cycle of a typical offshore oilfield project consists of the following five steps: (1) Exploration

  15. Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldsonInformation 61TokamachiTonglingToolTopic Area 1:

  16. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model for Offshore Wind, is a computer tool for studying the economic impacts of fixed-bottom offshore wind projects in the United States. This presentation provides the results of an analysis of four offshore wind development scenarios in the Southeast Atlantic, Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico regions.

  17. Novel Foundations for Offshore Wind Farms Research Proposal to EPSRC (August 2001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Byron

    1 Novel Foundations for Offshore Wind Farms Research Proposal to EPSRC (August 2001) Prof G offshore foundations, in situ testing, tunnelling and reinforced soil). Only projects on shallow foundation grant GR/M55657 ( 17k) was for instrumentation of a field trial of an offshore caisson. Some preliminary

  18. Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU- sponsored EnerGEO project, aiming, and its use for the evaluation of environmental impacts of wind energy. The effects of offshore wind farms

  19. GEOL 663 -GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND COURSE SYLLABUS 2014 Fall Semester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    GEOL 663 - GEOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF OFFSHORE WIND COURSE SYLLABUS ­ 2014 Fall Semester Course Meets will be designed around geological and geotechnical topics that are relevant to the development of offshore wind wind turbine foundations; 2) A review of existing, or under construction, offshore wind projects; and 3

  20. LEEDCo awarded $4 million to launch offshore wind development on Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    LEEDCo awarded $4 million to launch offshore wind development on Lake Erie By Teresa Dixon Murray in the United States, the Lake Erie Energy Development Corp. of Cleveland will launch an offshore wind, Democrat of Ohio, who has pushed for such alternative energy projects for years, said offshore wind could

  1. Hanford Area 1990 population and 50-year projections. [Appendix contains computer programming for population projections and graphs showing them by grid areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.M.; Scott, M.J.; Shindle, S.F.; Napier, B.A.; Thurman, A.G.; Batishko, N.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Davis, M.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Pittenger, D.B. (Demographics Lab., Olympia, WA (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex and comprehensive safety analysis activities carried out at Hanford for nonreactor nuclear facilities require data from a number of scientific and engineering disciplines. The types of data that are required include data pertaining to current population and population projections. The types of data found in this document include 1990 census totals for residential population within a 50-mile radius of the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Area meteorological towers. This document also contains 50-year projections for residential populations within a 50-mile radius of these four meteorological towers. The analysis of population projections indicates that residential population within a 50-mile radius of the four meteorological towers in question will continue to grow through 2040, although at a slower rate each decade. In all cases, the highest growth is projected for the decade ending in the year 2000. The annual growth rate for this period is projected to be 0.646, 0.633, 0.543, and 0.570 in the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Areas, respectively. By 2040, these growth rates are projected to drop to 0.082, 0.068, 0.078, 0.078, respectively. 4 refs., 1 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Walton County Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project Walton County, FL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ). Of that amount, the cost of lands, easements, rights-of-way, relocations, and dredged or excavated material construction and renourishment will be dredged from a borrow site identified offshore of the project area, the estimated total nourishment cost of the recommended plan is $170,197,000, which includes the project first

  3. Automatic picking and attribute mapping for a quick evaluation of the potential of turbiditic sands and stratigraphic traps in frontier areas. An example from the deep offshore of the Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montagnier, P.; Rossi, T. (Elf Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)); Clergeat, B.; Dall'astam, W.F. (Elf Aquitaine Production, Paris (France))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most interpretation teams involved in the exploration of Nigeria's deep offshore have been faced with a major challenge: (1) how to scan through a large volume of 3D data in a drastically short time frame... (2) with the captive of understanding the depositional pattern of slope fan and basin floor fan turbidites to identify mostly stratigraphic traps... (3) in an environment almost devoid of reference wells and calibration. A traditional approach was likely to miss both the deadlines and the sensitivity required for the sedimentological aspects of the study. Elfs answer was to rely extensively on the advanced functionalities of the SISMAGE (TM) workstation, in order to quickly generate time and seismic attribute maps which could then be interpreted in terms of structure and sedimentology. Two critical aspects were particularly well handled by the workstation: (1) the reliability of the extrapolation process from a loose grid of manually picked lines, and (2) the generation of seismic attribute maps relative not only to surfaces (e.g. sequence boundaries), but also to whole intervals through statistical calculation. In a second stage, the interpreters were able to focus on the most prospective areas and to move on to prospect generation, with the help of AVO studies. This approach is illustrated through an example from the deep offshore of the Niger delta.

  4. Automatic picking and attribute mapping for a quick evaluation of the potential of turbiditic sands and stratigraphic traps in frontier areas. An example from the deep offshore of the Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montagnier, P.; Rossi, T. [Elf Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria); Clergeat, B.; Dall`astam, W.F. [Elf Aquitaine Production, Paris (France)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Most interpretation teams involved in the exploration of Nigeria`s deep offshore have been faced with a major challenge: (1) how to scan through a large volume of 3D data in a drastically short time frame... (2) with the captive of understanding the depositional pattern of slope fan and basin floor fan turbidites to identify mostly stratigraphic traps... (3) in an environment almost devoid of reference wells and calibration. A traditional approach was likely to miss both the deadlines and the sensitivity required for the sedimentological aspects of the study. Elfs answer was to rely extensively on the advanced functionalities of the SISMAGE (TM) workstation, in order to quickly generate time and seismic attribute maps which could then be interpreted in terms of structure and sedimentology. Two critical aspects were particularly well handled by the workstation: (1) the reliability of the extrapolation process from a loose grid of manually picked lines, and (2) the generation of seismic attribute maps relative not only to surfaces (e.g. sequence boundaries), but also to whole intervals through statistical calculation. In a second stage, the interpreters were able to focus on the most prospective areas and to move on to prospect generation, with the help of AVO studies. This approach is illustrated through an example from the deep offshore of the Niger delta.

  5. Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

  6. EIS-0150: Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration prepared this environmental impact statement to analyze the environmental impacts of its proposal to establish the level of its commitment (sales) of long- term firm electrical capacity and energy from the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects hydroelectric power plants.

  7. Reassessment of offshore platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, V.V.D.; Kuhn, J.M. (Mobil Research and Development Corporation, Dallas, TX (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from Hurricane Andrew demonstrated that the systems and procedures in place for evacuating offshore workers and minimizing oil spills and environmental damage functioned as planned. While the vast majority of the platforms survived the storm with no damage, a few of the older platforms (installed prior to 1972) either collapsed or suffered severe damage. The collapsed platforms were designed with insufficient deck height to clear the storm waves. In recent years, the API RP 2A has introduced guidance for minimum air gap, minimum structures, platform inspection and platform reuse. These provisions, coupled with natural attribution of the older platforms, will significantly improve the performance of platforms in the future. The reliability of NDT techniques to detect major structural defects should be improved through continued research. While flooded member detection is used by several operators as a screening tool to detect major defects underwater, its reliability is not always good and further research is needed in this area. Another area of high priority research is related to the use of Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) to perform underwater inspection of structures. 51 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Influence of Nonlinear Irregular Waves on the Fatigue Loads of an Offshore Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    it acts as a bottleneck to the realization of offshore wind farms that can compete with traditional energy sources [3]. Currently, offshore wind farms are typically sited in coastal areas with water depths aroundInfluence of Nonlinear Irregular Waves on the Fatigue Loads of an Offshore Wind Turbine Michiel B

  9. A FETCH DEPENDENT MODEL OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    , Resources, Roughness, Coastal Sea Areas, Waves, Rødsand 1 INTRODUCTION Large offshore wind farms are beingA FETCH DEPENDENT MODEL OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has to compensate the additional

  10. Analytical Modelling of Wind Speed Deficit in Large Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    Analytical Modelling of Wind Speed Deficit in Large Offshore Wind Farms Sten Frandsen*, Rebecca areas.As is often the need for offshore wind farms, the model handles a regular array geometry for offshore wind farms, the model handles a priori a regular array geometry with straight rows of wind

  11. Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irene Farnham

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) program requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Sub-Project (hereafter the Sub-Project) activities. The requirements in this QAPP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). The QAPP Revision 0 supersedes DOE--341, Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 4.

  12. Offshore Lubricants to Exhibit 7.07% CAGR from 2014 to 2020 Due...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Due to Increased Investment in Offshore Exploration Projects Home > Groups > Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency John55364's picture Submitted by John55364(100) Contributor...

  13. Rhode Island to Build First Offshore Wind Farm

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Block Island, a small town with only 1,000 full-time, residents, is the site for a big project, when it will become home to Rhode Island’s first offshore wind farm.

  14. DOE Offers Conditional Commitment to Cape Wind Offshore Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    step toward issuing a 150 million loan guarantee to support the construction of the Cape Wind offshore wind project with a conditional commitment to Cape Wind Associates, LLC. The...

  15. Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirnivas, S.; Musial, W.; Bailey, B.; Filippelli, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a deliverable for a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) entitled National Offshore Wind Energy Resource and Design Data Campaign -- Analysis and Collaboration (contract number DE-EE0005372; prime contractor -- AWS Truepower). The project objective is to supplement, facilitate, and enhance ongoing multiagency efforts to develop an integrated national offshore wind energy data network. The results of this initiative are intended to 1) produce a comprehensive definition of relevant met-ocean resource assets and needs and design standards, and 2) provide a basis for recommendations for meeting offshore wind energy industry data and design certification requirements.

  16. Removal Action Plan for the Accelerated Retrieval Project for a Described Area within Pit 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. M. Tyson

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Removal Action Plan documents the plan for implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compenstion, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action to be performed by the Accelerated Retrieval Project. The focus of the action is the limited excavation and retrieval of selected waste streams from a designated portion of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Subsurface Disposal Area that are contaminated with volatile organic compounds, isotopes of uranium, or transuranic radionuclides. The selected retrieval area is approximately 0.2 ha (1/2 acre) and is located in the eastern portion of Pit 4. The proposed project is referred to as the Accelerated Retrieval Project. This Removal Action Plan details the major work elements, operations approach, and schedule, and summarizes the environmental, safety and health, and waste management considerations associated with the project.

  17. Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

  18. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  19. A Phase I Cultural Resources Survey of the Walker County Jail and Office Expansion Area Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    documents the results of a Phase I assessment of a 12.82 acre tract on land owned by the County of Walker in central Walker County, Texas (Figure 1). The site area is on a high clay ridge overlooking a low area to the north. The project area is bounded... as defined by the United States Forest Service for the four National Forests in East Texas. According to Ippolito (1983:6-7), the major forest cover types in this community include loblolly pine, shortleaf pine, slash pine, post oak, southern red oak...

  20. Assessment of the Southern New England Offshore Wind Energy Resource James F. Manwell, Anthony Rogers, Jon G. McGowan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    1 Assessment of the Southern New England Offshore Wind Energy Resource James F. Manwell, Anthony the potential for the near term development of offshore wind energy projects in that region. The work summarized here consists of four aspects: 1) a review of existing offshore wind data, 2) the measurement of new

  1. Experiences from the offshore installation of a composite materials firewater system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciaraldi, S.W. [Amoco Norway Oil Co., Stavanger (Norway). Production Dept.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype 300 m composite dry deluge firewater system was installed in December 1991 at the Valhall Field in the southern North Sea Norwegian offshore sector. This installation followed successful safety verification of the explosion and fire resistant design concept consisting of glass-fiber reinforced epoxy (GRE) piping components protected with a reinforced intumescent epoxy fire insulation. The installation was based primarily on the use of prefabricated GRE piping spools and fire insulation cast onto the piping or applied in the form of cast half shells. Significant experiences gained from the project are described. These experiences involve pre-engineering activities, detailed engineering, onshore fabrication, shipping, offshore hook-up, quality assurance, safety and economics. Although the overall installation was successful and the system is functioning as intended, areas of possible optimization and cost reduction for future composite firewater systems were identified. These findings are also briefly reviewed.

  2. Canadian offshore oil production solution gas utilization alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.V.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil and gas development in the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador is in its early stage and the offshore industry emphasis is almost exclusively on oil production. At the Hibernia field, the Gravity Base Structure (GBS) is installed and the first wells are in production. The Terra Nova project, based on a Floating Production Storage Offloading (FPSO) ship shaped concept, is in its engineering and construction stage and first oil is expected by late 2000. Several other projects, such as Husky's White Rose and Chevron's Hebron, have significant potential for future development in the same area. It is highly probably that these projects will employ the FPSO concept. It is also expected that the solution gas disposal issues of such second generation projects will be of more significance in their regulatory approval process and of such second generation projects will be of more significance in their regulatory approval process and the operators may be forced to look for alternatives to gas reinjection. Three gas utilization alternatives for a FPSO concept based project have been considered and evaluated in this paper: liquefied natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG), and gas-to-liquids conversion (GTL). The evaluation and the relative ranking of these alternatives is based on a first pass screening type of study which considers the technical and economical merits of each alternative. Publicly available information and in-house data, compiled within Fluor Daniel's various offices, was used to establish the basic parameters.

  3. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  4. Energy from Offshore Wind: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; Ram, B.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the nascent offshore wind energy industry including a status of the commercial offshore industry and the technologies that will be needed for full market development.

  5. The 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a group of expert collaborators are using the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site 300 Area uranium plume within the footprint of the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit as a site for an Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC). The IFRC is entitled Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on the Hanford Site 300 Area Uranium Plume Project. The theme is investigation of multi-scale mass transfer processes. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research that relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements/approaches needed to characterize and model a mass transfer-dominated system. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the 300 Area IFRC Project. This plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  6. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Eastchester Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Gardiner, W.W.; Tokos, J.J.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Eastchester project (Federal Project [FP] No. 6) was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area in the Hutchinson River to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Eastchester was one of seven waterways that the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water- column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Eighteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Eastchester project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Two composite sediment samples, representing the upstream and lower reaches of the area proposed for dredging, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the two Eastchester sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. An additional 1 1 composite samples were created for the USACE-New England Division (USACE-NED) using the same 18 Eastchester core samples but combined into different composites. These composites were analyzed for metals, chlorinated pesticides, PCB congeners, PAHS, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed along with bioaccumulation tests.

  7. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) for IEA Wind Task 23 Offshore Wind Technology and Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports, Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). Subtask 1 discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. Subtask 2 included here, is the larger of the two volumes and contains five chapters that cover background information and objectives of Subtask 2 and results from each of the four phases of the project.

  8. Dynamic analysis of a 5 megawatt offshore floating wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriger, Evan Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Why offshore wind energy? Offshore wind turbines have theturbine will also uncover potential problems that exist with offshore wind energy.

  9. Region-to-area screening methodology for the Crystalline Repository Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Crystalline Repository Project's (CRP) process for region-to-area screening of exposed and near-surface crystalline rock bodies in the three regions of the conterminous United States where crystalline rock is being evaluated as a potential host for the second nuclear waste repository (i.e., in the North Central, Northeastern, and Southeastern Regions). This document indicates how the US Department of Energy's (DOE) General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories (10 CFR 960) were used to select and apply factors and variables for the region-to-area screening, explains how these factors and variable are to be applied in the region-to-area screening, and indicates how this methodology relates to the decision process leading to the selection of candidate areas. A brief general discussion of the screening process from the national survey through area screening and site recommendation is presented. This discussion sets the scene for detailed discussions which follow concerning the region-to-area screening process, the guidance provided by the DOE Siting Guidelines for establishing disqualifying factors and variables for screening, and application of the disqualifying factors and variables in the screening process. This document is complementary to the regional geologic and environmental characterization reports to be issued in the summer of 1985 as final documents. These reports will contain the geologic and environmental data base that will be used in conjunction with the methodology to conduct region-to-area screening.

  10. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Arthur Kill Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruendell, B.D.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of Arthur Kill Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material following current ammonia reduction protocols. Arthur Kill was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were recollected from the Arthur Kill Project areas in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted according to the manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Green Book,{close_quotes} and the regional manual developed by the USACE-NYD and EPA Region II, Guidance for Performing Tests on Dredged Material to be Disposed of in Ocean Waters. The reevaluation of proposed dredged material from the Arthur Kill project areas consisted of benthic acute toxicity tests. Thirty-three individual sediment core samples were collected from the Arthur Kill project area. Three composite sediments, representing each reach of the area proposed for dredging, was used in benthic acute toxicity testing. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia. The amphipod and mysid benthic toxicity test procedures followed EPA guidance for reduction of total ammonia concentrations in test systems prior to test initiation. Statistically significant acute toxicity was found in all Arthur Kill composites in the static renewal tests with A. abdita, but not in the static tests with M. bahia. Statistically significant acute toxicity and a greater than 20% increase in mortality over the reference sediment was found in the static renewal tests with A. abdita. M. bahia did not show statistically significant acute toxicity or a greater than 10% increase in mortality over reference sediment in static tests. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hackensack River Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruendell, B.D.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of the Hackensack River Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material with current ammonia reduction protocols. Hackensack River was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were re-collected from the Hackensack River Project area in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted according to the manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Green Book,{close_quotes} and the regional manual developed by the USACE-NYD and EPA Region II, Guidance for Performing Tests on Dredged Material to be Disposed of in Ocean Waters. The reevaluation of proposed dredged material from the Hackensack River project area consisted of benthic acute toxicity tests. Thirty-three individual sediment core samples were collected from the Hackensack River project area. Three composite sediments, representing each reach of the area proposed for dredging, were used in benthic acute toxicity testing. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia. The amphipod and mysid benthic toxicity test procedures followed EPA guidance for reduction of total ammonia concentrations in test systems prior to test initiation. Statistically significant acute toxicity was found in all three Hackensack River composites in the static renewal tests with A. abdita, but not in the static tests with M. bahia. Statistically significant acute toxicity and a greater than 20% increase in mortality over the reference sediment was found in the static renewal tests with A. abdita. Statistically significant mortality 10% over reference sediment was observed in the M. bahia static tests. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A Phase I Cultural Resources Survey of the Walker County Jail and Office Expansion Area Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    with little or no subsurface testing. As a result, much of the information for Walker County is taken from projects in surrounding areas such as Lake Livingston in Polk and San Jacinto counties (McClurkan 1968; Ensor and Carlson 1988), Lake Conroe... at Huntsville Fish Hatchery, Walker County, Texas. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Cultural Resources Program. Austin. Ensor, H. Blaine, and David L. Carlson 1988 The Crawford Site, 41PK69, Central Trinity River Uplands, Polk County, Texas. Texas...

  13. Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary covers the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the BPA Schultz-Hanford Transmission Project proposed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project involves constructing a new 500-kilovolt (kV) line in central Washington, north of Hanford. The new line would connect to an existing line at the Schultz Substation near Ellensburg and to a new or existing substation in the Hanford area (see Map 2 in EIS). The project may also involve constructing a new substation to accommodate the new transmission line. As a federal agency, BPA is required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to take into account potential environmental consequences of its proposal and take action to protect, restore, and enhance the environment during and after construction. Preparation of this EIS assists in meeting those requirements.

  14. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Bronx River Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruendell, B.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Bronx River project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Bronx River project area in Bronx, New York, to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Bronx River was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USAGE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and to evaluate for dredging and disposal. Sediment samples were submitted for physical and chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Fifteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Bronx River project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample, representing the entire reach of the area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which was prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Bronx River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  15. Offshore Renewable Energy Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sustainable energy supply. The UK is uniquely placed to harness its natural resources ­ wind, wave and tidal power ­ to meet its target of achieving 15% of energy consumption from renewable sources by 2020. CefasOffshore Renewable Energy Solutions #12;Cefas: meeting complex requirements The Centre

  16. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  17. Petroleum Service Projects in the Gulf of Guinea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken-Worgu, Kenneth Chukwumeka

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    carried out by the OIS group in the gulf of Guinea. The following are the specific projects in the Gulf of Guinea that I participated in: Managing delivering, maintenance and marketing of offshore vessels, Offshore pipe laying project, Integrated pipeline...

  18. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for Coal Storage Area Stabilization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Project and Design Engineering

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this project is to stabilize the abandoned coal storage area and redirect the storm water runoff from sanitary sewer system to the storm drain system. Currently, the existing storm water runoff is directed to a perimeter concrete drainage swale and collected in a containment basin. The collected water is then pumped to a treatment facility and after treatment, is discharged to the Y-12 sanitary sewer system. The existing drainage swale and collection basin along with silt fencing will be used during aggregate placement and grading to provide erosion and sediment control. Inlet protection will also be installed around existing structures during the storm water diversion construction. This project scope will include the installation of a non-woven geotextile fabric and compacted mineral aggregate base (paving optional) to stabilize the site. The geotextile specifications are provided on the vendor cut sheets in Appendix B. The installation of a storm water collection/retention area will also be installed on the southern side of the site in accordance with EPA Technical Guidance on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for federal Projects under Section 438 of the Energy Independence and Security Act. The total area to be disturbed is approximately 2.5 acres. The order of activities for this Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) will be: (1) post notice of coverage (NOC) in a prominent display near entrance of the site; (2) install rain gauge on site or contact Y-12 Plant Shift Superintendent daily for Met tower rain gauge readings; (3) install stabilized construction exit on site; (4) install silt fencing along perimeter as indicated on the attached site plan; (5) regrade site; (6) install geotextile fabric and compacted mineral aggregate base; (7) install catch basin inlet protection where required; (8) excavate and lower existing catch basin tops, re-grade and asphalt to drain; and (9) when all disturbed areas are re-stabilized, remove silt fencing and any other temporary erosion control.

  19. Conceptual Model of Offshore Wind Environmental Risk Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Hamilton, Erin L.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of offshore wind energy generation projects. The development of ERES for offshore wind is closely allied to a concurrent process undertaken to examine environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy generation, although specific risk-relevant attributes will differ between the MHK and offshore wind domains. During FY10, a conceptual design of ERES for offshore wind will be developed. The offshore wind ERES mockup described in this report will provide a preview of the functionality of a fully developed risk evaluation system that will use risk assessment techniques to determine priority stressors on aquatic organisms and environments from specific technology aspects, identify key uncertainties underlying high-risk issues, compile a wide-range of data types in an innovative and flexible data organizing scheme, and inform planning and decision processes with a transparent and technically robust decision-support tool. A fully functional version of ERES for offshore wind will be developed in a subsequent phase of the project.

  20. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean Disposal from Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Borde, A.B.; Nieukirk, S.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Shoal harbor/Compton Creek Project Area in Belford and Monmouth, New Jersey to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. This was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project area consisted of bulk chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation studies. Eleven core samples were analyzed or grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. Other sediments were evaluated for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  1. Underground Test Area Project Waste Management Plan (Rev. No. 2, April 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas

    2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) initiated the UGTA Project to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The UGTA Project investigation sites have been grouped into Corrective Action Units (CAUs) in accordance with the most recent version of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The primary UGTA objective is to gather data to characterize the groundwater aquifers beneath the NTS and adjacent lands. The investigations proposed under the UGTA program may involve the drilling and sampling of new wells; recompletion, monitoring, and sampling of existing wells; well development and hydrologic/ aquifer testing; geophysical surveys; and subsidence crater recharge evaluation. Those wastes generated as a result of these activities will be managed in accordance with existing federal and state regulations, DOE Orders, and NNSA/NV waste minimization and pollution prevention objectives. This Waste Management Plan provides a general framework for all Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project participants to follow for the characterization, storage/accumulation, treatment, and disposal of wastes generated by UGTA Project activities. The objective of this waste management plan is to provide guidelines to minimize waste generation and to properly manage wastes that are produced. Attachment 1 to this plan is the Fluid Management Plan and details specific strategies for management of fluids produced under UGTA operations.

  2. A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Strategic plan for accelerating the responsible deployment of offshore wind energy in the United States. nationaloffshorewindstrategy.pdf More Documents & Publications Southeast...

  3. Geological evaluation of San Diego Norte Pilot Project, Zuata area, Orinoco Oil Belt, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Rojas, I.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Diego Norte Pilot Project consists of twelve inclined wells (7 producing wells 300 m (984 ft) apart, plus 5 observation wells) drilled from a cluster, to study the production and compaction behavior under steam soak (huff and puff) of the Tertiary heavy crude oil reservoirs of the Zuata area. This area is located within the Orinoco Heavy Oil belt of Venezuela. A geological model was needed as a base for the reservoir studies and to understand the geological setting. This model was constructed from extensive log information, seismic lines, well samples, and cores. The reservoir sands are friable with an average porosity of 34% and permeabilities ranging from 1 to 7 ..mu..m/sup 2/ (1 to 7 darcys). The sands were deposited in meander belts that stacked up forming multistory bodies. Point bars and channel fills account for 80-90% of the total sand. These sands are internally heterogeneous, sinuous and elongated, and larger than the 1 km/sup 2/ area covered by the project. The topmost two productive sands, which together average 22 m (72 ft), show the best porosities and permeabilities and are isolated by thick clays that make them suitable for selective steam injection. In the project, the oil has a density of about 1.0 g/cm/sup 3/ (10/sup 0/ API) and fills all the sands down to the oil-water contact. The depth of this contact is controlled by regional faults. Based on core compressibility tests, compaction is expected to be the principal production mechanism that could increase the expected primary recovery of 4 to 12% by huff and puff steam injection, leading to a possible recovery of 0.64 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3/ (4 million bbl) in six years with four cycles of steam injection. 16 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

  5. Cost of Offshore Wind Energy Charlene Nalubega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    water as well as on land based wind farms. The specific offshore wind energy case under consideration, most of the offshore wind farms are in Europe, which started being developed in the early 1990's Cost of Offshore Wind Energy

  6. E-Area Vault Concrete Material Property And Vault Durability/Degradation Projection Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M. A.

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsequent to the 2008 E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC 2008), two additional E-Area vault concrete property testing programs have been conducted (Dixon and Phifer 2010 and SIMCO 2011a) and two additional E-Area vault concrete durability modeling projections have been made (Langton 2009 and SIMCO 2012). All the information/data from these reports has been evaluated and consolidated herein by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) at the request of Solid Waste Management (SWM) to produce E-Area vault concrete hydraulic and physical property data and vault durability/degradation projection recommendations that are adequately justified for use within associated Special Analyses (SAs) and future PA updates. The Low Activity Waste (LAW) and Intermediate Level (IL) Vaults structural degradation predictions produced by Carey 2006 and Peregoy 2006, respectively, which were used as the basis for the 2008 ELLWF PA, remain valid based upon the results of the E-Area vault concrete durability simulations reported by Langton 2009 and those reported by SIMCO 2012. Therefore revised structural degradation predictions are not required so long as the mean thickness of the closure cap overlying the vaults is no greater than that assumed within Carey 2006 and Peregoy 2006. For the LAW Vault structural degradation prediction (Carey 2006), the mean thickness of the overlying closure cap was taken as nine feet. For the IL Vault structural degradation prediction (Peregoy 2006), the mean thickness of the overlying closure cap was taken as eight feet. The mean closure cap thicknesses as described here for both E-Area Vaults will be included as a key input and assumption (I&A) in the next revision to the closure plan for the ELLWF (Phifer et al. 2009). In addition, it has been identified as new input to the PA model to be assessed in the ongoing update to the new PA Information UDQE (Flach 2013). Once the UDQE is approved, the SWM Key I&A database will be updated with this new information.

  7. COMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1), Jrgen Hjstrup(2), Sren Larsen(2), Rebecca Barthelmie(2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Large offshore wind farms are being built in several countries in Europe. The economic viabilityCOMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1 of such projects depends on the favourable wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has

  8. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

  9. American Wind Energy Association Offshore WINDPOWER Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Wind Energy Association Offshore WINDPOWER Conference & Exhibition American Wind Energy Association Offshore WINDPOWER Conference & Exhibition October 7, 2014 9:00AM EDT...

  10. Draft Area Recommendation Report for the Crystalline Repository Project: Overview. [Second repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The draft Area Recommendation Report (ARR) for the Crystalline Repository Project identifies portions of crystalline rock bodies as proposed potentially acceptable sites for the Nation's second repository for deep geologic burial of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. This Overview provides a brief summary of that report. The US Department of Energy (DOE) evaluated available geologic and environmental data for 235 crystalline rock bodies in the North Central, Northeastern, and Southeastern Regions to identify preliminary candidate areas. The 12 proposed potentially acceptable sites are located in the States of Georgia (1), Maine (2), Minnesota (3), New Hampshire (1), North Carolina (2), Virginia (2), and Wisconsin (1). The data, analyses and rationale pertaining to the identification of the 12 proposed potentially acceptable sites are presented in the draft ARR. The analyses presented in the draft ARR demonstrate that the evidence available for each proposed potentially acceptable site supports (1) a finding that the site is not disqualified under Appendix III of the DOE Siting Guidelines and (2) a decision to proceed with the continued investigation of the site on the basis of the favorable and potentially adverse conditions identified to date. These potentially acceptable sites will be investigated and evaluated in more detail during the area phase of the siting process and considered along with other candidate sites in a progressive narrowing process to finally choose the site of the second repository in 1998.

  11. Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm #12;By August 2005 the offshore wind farm at Kentish Flats plateau just outside the main Thames shipping lanes. The Kentish Flats wind farm will comprise 30 of the wind farm could be up to 90 MW. For the benefit of the environment The British Government has set

  12. Offshore Wind Potential Tables

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout PrintableEducationOffshore wind

  13. 2009 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the 2009 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management to LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 447 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 1996, as amended February 2008) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. The corrective action strategy for the site includes monitoring in support of site closure. This report summarizes investigation activities associated with CAU 447 that were conducted at the PSA during fiscal year 2009.

  14. Technical Area V (TA-V) transformation project close-out report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Technical Area V (TA-V) has provided unique nuclear experimental environments for decades. The technologies tested in TA-V facilities have furthered the United States Nuclear Weapons program and has contributed to the national energy and homeland security mission. The importance of TA-V working efficiently to produce an attractive and effective platform for experiments should not be underestimated. Throughout its brief history, TA-V has evolved to address multiple and diverse sets of requirements. These requirements evolved over many years; however, the requirements had not been managed nor communicated comprehensively or effectively. A series of programmatic findings over several years of external audits was evidence of this downfall. Today, these same requirements flow down through a new TA-V management system that produces consistently applied and reproducible approaches to work practices. In 2008, the TA-V department managers assessed the state of TA-V services and work activities to understand how to improve customer interfaces, stakeholders perceptions, and workforce efficiencies. The TA-V management team initiated the TA-V Transformation Project after they deemed the pre-June 2008 operational model to be ineffective in managing work and in providing integrated, continuous improvement to TA-V processes. This report summarizes the TA-V Transformation Project goals, activities, and accomplishments.

  15. Offshore Wind Turbines: Some Technical Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houlsby, Guy T.

    1 Offshore Wind Turbines: Some Technical Challenges Prof. Guy Houlsby FREng Oxford University House engineers concerned with installation of offshore wind turbines. The author is Professor of Civil University Civil Engineering Offshore wind power · Scale of offshore wind power developments · Engineering

  16. Systematic prioritization of considerations in making offshore software development outsourcing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bo S. (Bo Sung)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore outsourcing of software development projects has become increasingly prevalent over the past decade. In order to avoid potential pitfalls in outsourcing, companies must carefully select who to outsource to. Although ...

  17. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices of the following: US Geological Survey Arctic operating orders, 1979; Det Noske Vertas', rules for the design, construction and inspection of offshore technology, 1977; Alaska Oil and Gas Association, industry research projects, March 1980; Arctic Petroleum Operator's Association, industry research projects, January 1980; selected additional Arctic offshore bibliography on sea ice, icebreakers, Arctic seafloor conditions, ice-structures, frost heave and structure icing.

  18. Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) for Offshore Wind - Mock-Up of ERES, Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) has been created to set priorities among the environmental risks from offshore wind development. This report follows the conceptual design for ERES and shows what the system would look like, using a web interface created as part of a Knowledge Management System (KMS) for offshore wind. The KMS, called Zephyrus, and ERES for offshore wind, will be populated and made operational in a later phase of the project.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Damiami, R.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Veers, P.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No matter the source, offshore wind energy plant cost estimates are significantly higher than for land-based projects. For instance, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) review on the 2010 cost of wind energy found baseline cost estimates for onshore wind energy systems to be 71 dollars per megawatt-hour ($/MWh), versus 225 $/MWh for offshore systems. There are many ways that innovation can be used to reduce the high costs of offshore wind energy. However, the use of such innovation impacts the cost of energy because of the highly coupled nature of the system. For example, the deployment of multimegawatt turbines can reduce the number of turbines, thereby reducing the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with vessel acquisition and use. On the other hand, larger turbines may require more specialized vessels and infrastructure to perform the same operations, which could result in higher costs. To better understand the full impact of a design decision on offshore wind energy system performance and cost, a system analysis approach is needed. In 2011-2012, NREL began development of a wind energy systems engineering software tool to support offshore wind energy system analysis. The tool combines engineering and cost models to represent an entire offshore wind energy plant and to perform system cost sensitivity analysis and optimization. Initial results were collected by applying the tool to conduct a sensitivity analysis on a baseline offshore wind energy system using 5-MW and 6-MW NREL reference turbines. Results included information on rotor diameter, hub height, power rating, and maximum allowable tip speeds.

  20. Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm #12;Prepared for: ELSAM A/S, Overgade 45 prior to the construction of an offshore wind farm at Horns Rev, situated approximately 15 km off

  1. Sandia Energy - Offshore Wind RD&D: Sediment Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind Offshore Wind RD&D: Sediment Transport Offshore Wind RD&D: Sediment TransportTara...

  2. Sandia Energy - Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine...

  3. Offshoring and Directed Technical Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acemoglu, Daron

    2012-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    To study the short-run and long-run implications on wage inequality, we introduce directed technical change into a Ricardian model of offshoring. A unique final good is produced by combining a skilled and an unskilled ...

  4. L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: Final Compensation Area Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, Robin E.; Becker, James M.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a review and status of activities conducted in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor), now Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades (2007). Three plantings have been installed on a 4.5-hectare mitigation area to date. This review provides a description and chronology of events, monitoring results, and mitigative actions through fiscal year (FY) 2012. Also provided is a review of the monitoring methods, transect layout, and FY 2012 monitoring activities and results for all planting years. Planting densities and performance criteria stipulated in the MAP were aimed at a desired future condition (DFC) of 10 percent mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp wyomingensis) cover. Current recommendations for yielding this DFC are based upon a conceptual model planting of 1000 plants/ha (400/ac) exhibiting a 60-percent survival rate after 5 monitoring years (DOE 2003). Accordingly, a DFC after 5 monitoring years would not be less than 600 plants/ha (240/ac). To date, about 8700 sagebrush plants have been grown and transplanted onto the mitigation site. Harsh site conditions and low seedling survival have resulted in an estimated 489 transplants/ha on the mitigation site, which is 111 plants/ha short of the target DFC. Despite this apparent shortcoming, 71, 91, and 24 percent of the surviving seedlings planted in FY 2007 and FY 2008 and FY 2010, respectively, showed signs of blooming in FY 2012. Blooming status may be a positive indication of future sagebrush recruitment, and is therefore a potential source for reaching the target DFC of 600 plants/ha on this mitigation site over time. Because of the difficulty establishing small transplants on this site, we propose that no additional plantings be considered for this mitigation area and to rely upon the potential recruitment by established seedlings to achieve the mitigation commitment set forth in the MAP of 600 plants/ha.

  5. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

  6. Class 1 overview of cultural resources for the Western Area Power Administration Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects electric power marketing environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, K.L.; Malinowski, L.M.; Hoffecker, J.F.; Walitschek, D.A.; Shogren, L.; Mathews, J.E.; Verhaaren, B.T.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory conducted an inventory of known archaeological and historic sites in areas that could be affected by the hydropower operation alternatives under analysis in the power marketing environmental impact statement for the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects. The study areas included portions of the Green River (Flaming Gorge Dam to Cub Creek) in Utah and Colorado and the Gunnison River (Blue Mesa Reservoir to Crystal Dam) in Colorado. All previous archaeological surveys and previously recorded prehistoric and historic sites, structures, and features were inventoried and plotted on maps (only survey area maps are included in this report). The surveys were classified by their level of intensity, and the sites were classified according to their age, type, and contents. These data (presented here in tabular form) permit a general assessment of the character and distribution of archaeological remains in the study areas, as well as an indication of the sampling basis for such an assessment. To provide an adequate context for the descriptions of the archaeological and historic sites, this report also presents overviews of the environmental setting and the regional prehistory, history, and ethnography for each study area.

  7. Coupled dynamic analysis of floating offshore wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shim, Sangyun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    it is economically feasible and technologically manageable. So far, most of the offshore wind farm research has been limited to fixed platforms in shallow-water areas. In the water depth deeper than 30m, however, floating-type wind farms tend to be more feasible...

  8. The world's offshore continental margins contain vast reserves of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    The world's offshore continental margins contain vast reserves of gas hydrate, a frozen form of nat-seafloor geology. Increasing use of marine multicomponent seismic technol- ogy by oil and gas companies now allows seafloor strata over distances of several kilometers across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico

  9. Coupled dynamic analysis of floating offshore wind farms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shim, Sangyun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    it is economically feasible and technologically manageable. So far, most of the offshore wind farm research has been limited to fixed platforms in shallow-water areas. In the water depth deeper than 30m, however, floating-type wind farms tend to be more feasible...

  10. Offshore Wind Plant Balance-of-Station Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Maples, B.; Meadows, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.; Elkington, C.; Clayton, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 70% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understanding the BOS costs for offshore wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger offshore turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by GL Garrad Hassan. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, ports and staging, transportation and installation, vessels, foundations, and electrical. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and soil type. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non-turbine costs associated with offshore turbine sizes ranging from 3 MW to 6 MW and offshore wind plant sizes ranging from 100 MW to 1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of offshore wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrates the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US offshore wind plants.

  11. Department of Energy Awards $43 Million to Spur Offshore Wind Energy, Wind Program Newsletter, September 2011 Edition (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EERE Wind Program Quarterly Newsletter - September 2011. In September, the U.S. Department of Energy announced that it will award $43 million over the next five years to 41 projects across 20 states to speed technical innovations, lower costs, and shorten the timeline for deploying offshore wind energy systems. The projects will advance wind turbine design tools and hardware, improve information about U.S. offshore wind resources, and accelerate the deployment of offshore wind by reducing market barriers such as supply chain development, transmission and infrastructure. The projects announced in September focus on approaches to advancing offshore technology and removing market barriers to responsible offshore wind energy deployment. Funding is subject to Congressional appropriations.

  12. Offshore Wind Energy Market Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes the current international market conditions regarding offshore wind, including the breakdown of installation costs, how to reduce costs, and the physical siting considerations considered when planning offshore wind construction. The presentation offers several examples of international existing and planned offshore wind farm sites and compares existing international offshore resources with U.S. resources. The presentation covers future offshore wind trends and cites some challenges that the United States must overcome before it will be able to fully develop offshore wind sites.

  13. New Report Characterizes Existing Offshore Wind Grid Interconnection...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Report Characterizes Existing Offshore Wind Grid Interconnection Capabilities New Report Characterizes Existing Offshore Wind Grid Interconnection Capabilities September 3,...

  14. Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm #12;Prepared for: ELSAM A/S, Overgade 45 to establish an offshore wind farm with an output of 150 MW in the waters of Horns Rev, approximately 15 km off to some environmental guidelines for offshore wind farms prepared by the Dani

  15. Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 #12;Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 Published: 13 May 2004 Prepared: Michael Bech

  16. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Red HookIBay Ridge project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from these two areas to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Sediment samples were collected from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas. Tests and analyses were conducted. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests. Twenty-four individual sediment core samples were collected from these two areas and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Three composite sediment samples, representing Red Hook Channel and the two Bay Ridge Reaches to be dredged, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the three Red Hook Bay Ridge sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

  17. 2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 447

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Nevada was the site of a 12-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1963. Although the surface of the site has been remediated, investigation of groundwater contamination resulting from the test is still in the corrective action process. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted at the site as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of the previous years, with tritium detected only in well HC-4. The tritium concentration in groundwater from well HC-4 remains far below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-established maximum contaminant level of 20,000 picocuries per liter. Concentrations of total uranium and gross alpha were also detected during this monitoring period, with uranium accounting for nearly all the gross alpha activity. The total uranium concentrations obtained from this monitoring period were consistent with previous results and reflect a slightly elevated natural uranium concentration, consistent with the mineralized geologic terrain. Isotopic ratios of uranium also indicate a natural source of uranium in groundwater, as opposed to a nuclear-test-related source. Water level trends obtained from the 2012 water level data were consistent with those of previous years. The corrective action strategy for the PSA is currently focused on revising the site conceptual model (SCM) and evaluating the adequacy of the current monitoring well network. Some aspects of the SCM are known; however, two major concerns are the uncertainty in the groundwater flow direction and the cause of rising water levels in site wells west of the shear zone. Water levels have been rising in the site wells west of the shear zone since the first hydrologic characterization wells were installed in 1996. While water levels in wells west of the shear zone continue to rise, the rate of increase is less than in previous years. The SCM will be revised, and an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring network will be conducted when water levels at the site have stabilized.

  18. Offshore Wind Power Farm Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns Rev Offshore Wind Power Farm Environmental Impact Assessment on Water Quality #12;Prepared with a planned 150 MW offshore wind farm at Horns Rev, an assessment was made of the effects the wind farm would for the preparation of EIA studies for offshore wind farms." Horns Rev is situated off Blåvands Huk, which is Denmark

  19. OFFSHORE WIND FARMS Guidance note for Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OFFSHORE WIND FARMS Guidance note for Environmental Impact Assessment In respect of FEPA and CPA requirements Version 2 - June 2004 #12;Offshore Wind Farms: Guidance Note for Environmental Impact Assessment 2004 #12;Offshore Wind Farms: Guidance Note for Environmental Impact Assessment in Respect of FEPA

  20. Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Slide no. 4 Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images Charlotte Bay Hasager images for offshore wind ressource assessment in lieu of in-situ mast observations #12;4 Slide no Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps in the North

  1. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

  2. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2010 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skwarek, B. J.

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the deactiviation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2010.

  3. EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental Assessment, Esmeralda County, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM)(lead agency) and DOE are jointly preparing this EA, which evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a project proposed by Rockwood Lithium Inc (Rockwood), formerly doing business as Chemetall Foote Corporation.

  4. Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447, Project Shoal Area, Churchill County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Findlay

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Well Completion Report is being provided as part of the implementation of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 (NNSA/NSO, 2006a). The CADD/CAP is part of an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) funded project for the investigation of CAU 447 at the Project Shoal Area (PSA). All work performed on this project was conducted in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996), and all applicable Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) policies and regulations. Investigation activities included the drilling, construction, and development of three monitoring/validation (MV) wells at the PSA. This report summarizes the field activities and data collected during the investigation.

  5. COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CSMRI) SITE FLOOD PLAIN AREA CLEANUP FACT SHEET & PROJECT SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In 1992 a water main break at the Site flooded a tailings pond that overflowed into Clear Creek. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency excavated and stockpiled soil from the tailings pond and surrounding area at the west end of the former tailings pond area previously cleaned up by EPA was found to contain

  6. Final Summary Report: Em-Powering Coastal States and Utilities through Model Offshore Wind Legislation and Outreach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The final summary report summarizes the most significant findings from three project reports detailing: feed-in tariffs, model request for proposals for new generation, and model state offshore wind power legislation.

  7. National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, John P. [ABB Inc; Liu, Shu [ABB Inc; Ibanez, Eduardo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Pennock, Ken [AWS Truepower; Reed, Greg [University of Pittsburgh; Hanes, Spencer [Duke Energy

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study (NOWEGIS) considers the availability and potential impacts of interconnecting large amounts of offshore wind energy into the transmission system of the lower 48 contiguous United States. A total of 54GW of offshore wind was assumed to be the target for the analyses conducted. A variety of issues are considered including: the anticipated staging of offshore wind; the offshore wind resource availability; offshore wind energy power production profiles; offshore wind variability; present and potential technologies for collection and delivery of offshore wind energy to the onshore grid; potential impacts to existing utility systems most likely to receive large amounts of offshore wind; and regulatory influences on offshore wind development. The technologies considered the reliability of various high-voltage ac (HVAC) and high-voltage dc (HVDC) technology options and configurations. The utility system impacts of GW-scale integration of offshore wind are considered from an operational steady-state perspective and from a regional and national production cost perspective.

  8. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation: Phase II Results of a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. The Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3), which operated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23, was established to verify the accuracy of these simulation tools [1]. This work was then extended under the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project under IEA Wind Task 30 [2]. Both of these projects sought to verify the accuracy of offshore wind turbine dynamics simulation tools (or codes) through code-to-code comparison of simulated responses of various offshore structures. This paper describes the latest findings from Phase II of the OC4 project, which involved the analysis of a 5-MW turbine supported by a floating semisubmersible. Twenty-two different organizations from 11 different countries submitted results using 24 different simulation tools. The variety of organizations contributing to the project brought together expertise from both the offshore structure and wind energy communities. Twenty-one different load cases were examined, encompassing varying levels of model complexity and a variety of metocean conditions. Differences in the results demonstrate the importance and accuracy of the various modeling approaches used. Significant findings include the importance of mooring dynamics to the mooring loads, the role nonlinear hydrodynamic terms play in calculating drift forces for the platform motions, and the difference between global (at the platform level) and local (at the member level) modeling of viscous drag. The results from this project will help guide development and improvement efforts for these tools to ensure that they are providing the accurate information needed to support the design and analysis needs of the offshore wind community.

  9. 100 Area D4 Project Semi-Annual 2006 Building Completion Report, August 2005 - April 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. C. Griff

    2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the decontamination, decommissioining (D&D) and the demolition of select facilities in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site as required by DOE G 430.1-4.

  10. The extension of the port of Bastia. The integration of stakeholders in the project area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the fragmentation of local representations in knowledge sharing in order to mobilize project energy? This route? This work is questioning the concept of local development. This development, that is to say one in which that the concept of local development that is questioned, especially the representations of this development. 1

  11. EA-1994: Malheur Resource Area Jonesboro Diversion Dam Replacement Project, Malheur County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Land Management, with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of the proposed authorization of a right of way to the Burns Paiute Tribe for replacement of an existing diversion dam and installation of a fish passage structure. BPA’s proposed action was to fund the project

  12. Conditioning geological reservoir realizations with time-dependent data with applications to the Carpenteria Offshore Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendall, R.P.; Campbell, K.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project effort was directed toward preliminary geostatistical analysis of the Carpenteria Offshore Field as a precursor to the step of integrating time-dependent data into a geostatistical model of the Field.

  13. Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Development. Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Blake, Kara M.; Stavole, Jessica

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy projects are not well understood, and regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. To examine the environmental risks associated with OSW developments in the U.S. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) focused on the following four priority research areas in FY 2012: • Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) - Followed project developments on the two OSW projects that PNNL screened in FY 2011 for environmental consequence: Fishermen’s Energy off the coast of Atlantic City, NJ and LEEDCo. near Cleveland, OH in Lake Erie. • Tethys - Developed a smart knowledge base which houses environmental research, data and information pertaining to OSW energy: • Technical Assessment - Produced a new software to create an automated process of identifying and differentiating between flying organism such as birds and bats by using thermal imagery; and • North Atlantic Right Whales - Developed an environmental risk management system to mitigate the impacts on North Atlantic Right Whales (NARW) during installation and piledriving stages of OSW developments. By identifying and addressing the highest priority environmental risks for OSW devices and associated installations the ERES process assists project proponents, regulators, and stakeholders to engage in the most efficient and effective siting and permitting pathways.

  14. State waste discharge permit application: 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (Project W-049H)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the original Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Concent Order negotiations, US DOE, US EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground to the Hanford Site are subject to permitting in the State Waste Discharge Permit Program (SWDP). This document constitutes the SWDP Application for the 200 Area TEDF stream which includes the following streams discharged into the area: Plutonium Finishing Plant waste water; 222-S laboratory Complex waste water; T Plant waste water; 284-W Power Plant waste water; PUREX chemical Sewer; B Plant chemical sewer, process condensate, steam condensate; 242-A-81 Water Services waste water.

  15. 300 Area D4 Project 3rd Quarter Fiscal Year 2006 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Smith

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of five buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  16. 300 Area D4 Project 2nd Quarter FY06 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Smith

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of 16 buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  17. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2007 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Westberg

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of twenty buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilties included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate.

  18. 300 Area D4 Project 1st Quarter Fiscal Year 2006 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Smith

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of the MO-052, 3225, 334, 334A, and 334-TF Buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation as appropriate.

  19. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2009 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. J. Skwarek

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition activities of seven facilities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in fiscal year 2009. The D4 of these facilities included characterization; engineering; removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials; equipment removal; utility disconnection; deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure; and stabilization or removal of slabs and foundations. This report also summarizes the nine below-grade slabs/foundations removed in FY09 of buildings demolished in previous fiscal years.

  20. 100 Area D4 Project Building Completion Report May 2006 - June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. G. Ison

    2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) and the demolition of the 153-N, 1515-N, 1516-N, 1517-N, 1518-N, 1519-N, 1331-N, 1332-N, and 181-NC facilities in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The D&D and demolition of these facilities included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and removal of the remaining slabs.

  1. Project Work Plan: Hanford 100-D Area Treatability Demonstration - In Situ Biostimulation for Reducing Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This work plan supports a new, integrated approach to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the Hanford 100 Areas. This new approach will provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the ISRM barrier by directly treating chromium and other oxidizing species in groundwater (i.e., nitrate and dissolved oxygen), thereby increasing the longevity of the ISRM barrier and protecting the ecological receptors and human health at the river boundary.

  2. Columbia River : Select Area Fishery Evaluation project : 1995-96 Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water quality monitoring was conducted from November 1994 through October 1996 at five Oregon and three Washington select area study sites in the lower Columbia River. Physicochemical monitoring and aquatic biomonitoring programs were established to profile baseline parameters at each study site and document differences between study sites. Data collected at study sites where fish rearing operations were initiated indicate a potential negative impact on the surrounding benthic invertebrate communities.

  3. 300 Area D4 Project Fiscal Year 2008 Building Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Westberg

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of eighteen buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site that were demolished in Fiscal Year 2008. The D4 of these facilties included characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiologically contaminated materials, equipment removal, utility disconnection, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and stabilization or removal of the remaining slab and foundation, as appropriate.

  4. Integrated reservoir management in the Carpinteria Offshore Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, E.M.; Pawar, R.J.; Kendall, R.P.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carpinteria Offshore Field is located near Santa Barbara, California. The State of California owns the portion of the field nearest the coast, and the US Federal Government the portion of the field that lies beyond a statutory three-mile coastal water limit. This mature reservoir has yielded more than 100 million barrels of oil from five platforms in its 30 years of production. The US Department of Energy`s Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California) has joined with the State Lands Commission of California, the US Department of Interior`s Minerals Management Service, and the independent operator of the field, Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc., in a unique collaboration to redevelop the field. The reservoir management strategy for the Carpinteria Field relies on a long-term investment in simulation tools and expertise. These technologies and expertise are available to all project participants through a virtual enterprise business model.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF METHODS USED TO INVESTIGATE THE IMPACT OF OFFSHORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    ASSESSMENT OF METHODS USED TO INVESTIGATE THE IMPACT OF OFFSHORE WIND FARMS ON SEABIRDS Kate Louise....................................................................................2 Environmental impact assessments for offshore wind developments..................7 Study aims Chapter three: Offshore marine surveillance radar installation and methods for ensuring data quality

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Offshore Wind Energy Simulation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Wind Energy Simulation Toolkit Sandia Vertical-Axis Wind-Turbine Research Presented at Science of Making Torque from Wind Conference On July 8, 2014, in Computational...

  7. Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority is a public body, established for the purposes of facilitating, coordinating, and supporting the development, either by the Authority or by other...

  8. Developing Integrated National Design Standards for Offshore...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Certifications Signal Maturing Industry Letter from the Wind Program Director, Third Quarter 2013 edition New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore Wind Plants...

  9. Offshore Wind in NY State (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSERDA has expressed support for the development of offshore wind and committed funding to several publicly-available assessments that measure the potential energy benefits and environmental...

  10. Oregon Department of Energy Webinar: Offshore Wind

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The intended audience for this webinar on offshore wind basics is decision-makers, energy industry practitioners, utilities, and those knowledgeable about renewable energy. The webinar will feature...

  11. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Shark River Project area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, L.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Shark River Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Tests and analyses were conducted on the Shark River sediments. The evaluation of proposed dredged material consisted of bulk sediment chemical and physical analysis, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation tests. Individual sediment core samples collected from the Shark River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One sediment composite was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate, prepared from suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Shark River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs. Benthic acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation tests were performed.

  12. Transferability of Data Related to the Underground Test Area Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Technical Working Group (TWG). The UGTA Project relies on data from a variety of sources; therefore, a process is needed to identify relevant factors for determining whether material-property data collected from other areas can be used to support groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and other models within a Corrective Action Unit (CAU), and for documenting the data transfer decision and process. This document describes the overall data transfer process. Separate Parameter Descriptions will be prepared that provide information for selected specific parameters as determined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) UGTA Project Manager. This document and its accompanying appendices do not provide the specific criteria to be used for transfer of data for specific uses. Rather, the criteria will be established by separate parameter-specific and model-specific Data Transfer Protocols. The CAU Data Documentation Packages and data analysis reports will apply the protocols and provide or reference a document with the data transfer evaluations and decisions.

  13. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  14. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the exterior land areas at the Grand Junction Projects Office facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility occupies approximately 56.4 acres (22.8 hectares) along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. The site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium-refining activities conducted by the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot-milling experiments conducted for the US Atomic Energy Commission`s (AEC`s) domestic uranium procurement program. The GJPO facility was the collection and assay point for AEC uranium and vanadium oxide purchases until the early 1970s. The DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program sponsored the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to remediate the facility lands, site improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor, Rust Geotech, was the Remedial Action Contractor for GJPORAP. The exterior land areas of the facility assessed as contaminated have been remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unrestricted use. Restoration of the aquifer will be accomplished through the natural flushing action of the aquifer during the next 50 to 80 years. The remediation of the DOE-GJPO facility buildings is ongoing and will be described in a separate report.

  15. Strengthening America's Energy Security with Offshore Wind (Fact Sheet) (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides a brief description of offshore wind energy development in the U.S. and DOE's Wind Program offshore wind R&D activities.

  16. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model and provides four case studies of potential offshore wind deployment scenarios in different regions of the...

  17. Sandia Energy - Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors Innovative...

  18. arabian gulf offshore: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  19. SciTech Connect: Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technologies Office Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 17 WIND ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY OFFSHORE WIND JOBS; OFFSHORE WIND...

  20. Advanced Offshore Wind Tech: Accelerating New Opportunities for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Offshore Wind Tech: Accelerating New Opportunities for Clean Energy Advanced Offshore Wind Tech: Accelerating New Opportunities for Clean Energy May 7, 2014 - 12:11pm...

  1. WINDExchange Webinar: Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind: Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will moderate, and the following speakers will discuss recent developments in the economics of offshore wind: Bruce Hamilton, Navigant: Offshore Wind Market Report. This...

  2. New Research Facility to Remove Hurdles to Offshore Wind and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Facility to Remove Hurdles to Offshore Wind and Water Power Development New Research Facility to Remove Hurdles to Offshore Wind and Water Power Development January 10,...

  3. DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy Financing Programs, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy Financing Programs, and More...

  4. Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)...

  5. American Wind Energy Association Offshore WINDPOWER Conference & Exhibition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AWEA Offshore WINDPOWER 2014 Conference & Exhibition is the largest offshore wind energy event in North America. The conference and exhibition will be held at the Atlantic City Convention...

  6. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States This report summarizes the offshore wind resource potential for the contiguous United States and Hawaii as of May 2009. The...

  7. Dynamic analysis of a 5 megawatt offshore floating wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriger, Evan Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines have the potential to generateuncover potential problems that exist with offshore windwind turbines in operation, this technology has the potential

  8. 100 Area D4 Project Building Completion Report - July 2007 to December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. T. Stankovich

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of the 105-NB, 163-N, 183-N, 183-NA, 183-NB, 183-NC, 184-N, 184-NA, 184-NB, 184-NC, 184-ND, 184-NE, 184-NF, 1312-N, 1330-N, 1705-N, 1705-NA, 1706-N, 1712-N, 1714-N, 1714-NA, 1714-NB, 1802-N, MO-050, MO-055, MO-358, MO-390, MO-900, MO-911, and MO-950 facilities in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The D4 activities for these facilities include utility disconnection, planning, characterization, engineering, removal of hazardous and radiological contaminated materials, equipment removal, decommissioning, deactivation, decontamination, demolition of the structure, and removal of the remaining slabs.

  9. Canby Area Service Project substation and associated transmission line. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides power to Surprise Valley Electrification Corporation (SVEC) in Modoc County, California. BPA uses PacificCorp`s substation and transmission facilities between Alturas and Canby, California to transfer power to SVEC`s Canby Substation. In the next year, SVEC expects increased industrial, agricultural, and residential electric loads on their 69-kV transmission system south of Canby. SVEC`s substation can accommodate only about 10 percent of the expected additional electric load. BPA`s proposed action is intended to meet SVEC`s increasing electric load. BPA proposes to meet SVEC`s increasing energy load by tapping into BPA`s existing BPA Malin-Warner 230-kV transmission line, and building an 7.9-mile transmission line to a new BPA substation. BPA proposes to build the new substation next to the west side of SVEC`s Canby Substation (Figure 1). This new substation will allow SVEC to move the additional power over their existing transmission or distribution lines. This report is the environmental assessment of the potential impact of the proposed project. The assessment determined that no ``environmental impact statement`` is not required.

  10. Canby Area Service Project : Substation and Associated Transmission Line : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides power to Surprise Valley Electrification Corporation (SVEC) in Modoc County, California. BPA uses PacificCorp's substation and transmission facilities between Alturas and Canby, California to transfer power to SVEC's Canby Substation. In the next year, SVEC expects increased industrial, agricultural, and residential electric loads on their 69-kV transmission system south of Canby. SVEC's substation can accommodate only about 10 percent of the expected additional electric load. BPA's proposed action is intended to meet SVEC's increasing electric load. BPA proposes to meet SVEC's increasing energy load by tapping into BPA's existing BPA Malin-Warner 230-kV transmission line, and building an 7.9-mile transmission line to a new BPA substation. BPA proposes to build the new substation next to the west side of SVEC's Canby Substation (Figure 1). This new substation will allow SVEC to move the additional power over their existing transmission or distribution lines. This report is the environmental assessment of the potential impact of the proposed project. The assessment determined that no environmental impact statement'' is not required.

  11. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 2, Sections 1-16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  12. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 3, Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  13. Jefferson Offshore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Wind FarmJefferson City, Missouri:Offshore

  14. CT Offshore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/CuriumAguaBBBWind-BrizaHKC WindCT Offshore Place:

  15. Restoration of areas disturbed by site studies for a mined commercial radioactive waste repository: The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Biehert, R.W.; Newell, R.L.; Page, T.L.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) was undertaken to environmentally characterize a portion of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State as a potential host for the nation's first mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Studies were terminated by Congress in 1987. Between 1976 and 1987, 72 areas located across the Hanford Site were disturbed by the BWIP. These areas include borehole pads, a large Exploratory Shaft Facility, and the Near Surface Test Facility. Most boreholes were cleared of vegetation, leveled, and stabilized with a thick layer of compacted pit-run gravel and sand. The Near Surface Test Facility consists of three mined adits, a rock-spoils bench, and numerous support facilities. Restoration began in 1988 with the objective of returning sites to pre-existing conditions using native species. The Hanford Site retains some of the last remnants of the shrub-steppe ecosystem in Washington. The primary constraints to restoring native vegetation at Hanford are low precipitation and the presence of cheatgrass, an extremely capable alien competitor. 5 figs.

  16. Loads Analysis of Several Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a comprehensive dynamic-response analysis of six offshore floating wind turbine concepts.

  17. Offshore Series Wind Turbine Variable Hub heights & rotor diameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    3.6MW Offshore Series Wind Turbine GE Energy #12;Feature Variable Hub heights & rotor diameters-savings feature, considering the rigors of offshore power generation. The 3.6 MW offshore wind turbine also, for both on and offshore use. Special features include... As the world's first commercially available wind

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Review of Methodologies for Offshore Wind Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Review of Methodologies for Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in European Seas A. M installation, operation and maintenance costs associated with offshore wind parks. Successful offshore wind. Keywords Wind energy Á Offshore Á Resources assessment Á European seas Á Wind mapping Á Wind climatology Á

  19. Quantifying the hurricane risk to offshore wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    Quantifying the hurricane risk to offshore wind turbines Stephen Rosea , Paulina Jaramilloa,1. Turbine tower buckling has been observed in typhoons, but no offshore wind turbines have yet been built be destroyed by hurricanes in an offshore wind farm. We apply this model to estimate the risk to offshore wind

  20. Offshore wind profile measurements from remote sensing instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offshore wind profile measurements from remote sensing instruments Ioannis Antoniou (1) , Hans E) have been mounted on top of a transformer platform situated offshore close to the Nysted wind farm offshore wind energy potential depends greatly on the ability to make offshore windfarms economically

  1. Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Strategies to Reduce the Cost of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.; Saur, G.; Hand, M.; van de Pieterman, R.; Obdam, T.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, installation, operation, and maintenance (IO&M) costs contribute approximately 30% to the LCOE of offshore wind plants. To reduce LCOE while ensuring safety, this paper identifies principal cost drivers associated with IO&M and quantifies their impacts on LCOE. The paper identifies technology improvement opportunities and provides a basis for evaluating innovative engineering and scientific concepts developed subsequently to the study. Through the completion of a case study, an optimum IO&M strategy for a hypothetical offshore wind project is identified.

  2. DOE-DOI Strategy Seeks to Harness U.S. Offshore Wind Energy Potential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    offshore wind power in U.S. waters, a major step in harnessing the nation's offshore wind potential. Generating electricity from offshore wind yields multiple benefits for the...

  3. Offshore Wind Turbines Estimated Noise from Offshore Wind Turbine, Monhegan Island, Maine Addendum 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aker, Pamela M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional modeling for offshore wind turbines, for proposed floating wind platforms to be deployed by University of Maine/DeepCwind.

  4. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation] [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  5. Functional requirements of the borrow area and haul route for the Waste Area Grouping projects at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.G.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the mission and functional requirements for the development of a borrow area and the associated haul route to support closure and/or remediation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 and other WAGs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document specifies the basic functional requirements that must be met by the borrow area and haul route developed to produce low-permeability soil for the covers or caps at WAG 6.

  6. System architecture of offshore oil production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, James (James Thomas)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an approach to applying Systems Architecture methods to the development of large, complex, commercial systems, particularly offshore oil and gas productions systems. The aim of this research was to ...

  7. Engineering Challenges for Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, S.; Musial, W.; Jonkman, J.; Sclavounos, P.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objective of this paper is to survey the technical challenges that must be overcome to develop deepwater offshore wind energy technologies and to provide a framework from which the first-order economics can be assessed.

  8. Outsourcing, offshoring and the US office market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topolewski, Tanya M., 1969-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is intense debate among industry analysts and scholars over potential job losses caused by offshoring. The real estate industry has been grappling to understanding the implications of these numbers, as some have ...

  9. Future characteristics of Offshore Support Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Robin Sebastian Koske

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to examine trends in Offshore Support Vessel (OSV) design and determine the future characteristics of OSVs based on industry insight and supply chain models. Specifically, this thesis focuses ...

  10. Visualization of vibration experienced in offshore platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrikalakis, Alexander Marinos Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I design and evaluate methods to optimize the visualization of vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in marine risers. VIV is vibration experienced by marine risers in offshore drilling platforms due to ocean ...

  11. ANTARCTIC OFFSHORE LEADS AND POLYNYAS AND OCEANOGRAPHIC EFFECTS H. Jay Zwally and J. C. Comiso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Arnold L.

    water are located within the Antarctic sea ice pack in a near-shore zone of several hundred kilo- meters Introduction The Antarctic sea ice pack is known to con- rain substantial areas of open water during all pack are highly variable located offshore of major outlet glaciers that as the sea ice grows, deforms

  12. Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Dynamics: Large-Angle Motions in Euler-Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    wind turbines in deep water, where environmental forcing could subject the rotor to meaningful angular relative to (X,Y,Z) CT Thrust coefficient, used to calculate wind force on the blade swept area 1Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Dynamics: Large-Angle Motions in Euler-Space Bert Sweetman Texas A

  13. Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory Across Generations. An emerging Multidisciplinary Work Area and an NEA Project - 12218

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Jantine [Belgian Nuclear Research Institute SCK.CEN, Mol (Belgium); Pescatore, Claudio [OECD NEA, Paris (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposal in engineered facilities built in stable, deep geological formations is the reference means for permanently isolating long-lived radioactive waste from the human biosphere. This management method is designed to be intrinsically safe and final, i.e. not dependent on human presence and intervention in order to fulfil its safety goal. There is however no intention to forgo, at any time, knowledge and awareness either of the repository or of the waste that it contains. The preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) is seen as an integral part of radioactive waste management, supporting lengthy and complex socio-technical processes across pre-operational, operational and post-operational lifetimes. Long-term preservation of RK and M is an emerging multidisciplinary work area in which much learning is expected over the coming years. Novel methods are being sought that are least vulnerable to both natural degradation and to changes in socio-economic conditions. Progress has been made in individual countries, but there is a need to internationalise the thinking, compare approaches, investigate potential solutions and share decisions. This is the task of the NEA RK and M project. A major outcome of the project will be a 'menu-driven document' that will allow people to identify the main elements of a strategic action plan for RK and M preservation. In sum, the preservation of RK and M is a unprecedented task in which technical, scientific and social information is interwoven and needs to be developed and preserved across generations and across specialist boundaries. Important studies have been undertaken in the past decades to explore a variety of approaches to preserving RK and M across different timescales, including archives and markers. The work of the past in this area is useful, but innovative thinking is also needed. Seen from today's perspective, very little work is available on for example the contextualization of data for later use; on the systematic identification of mechanisms for RK and M transfer; on implementing a culture of RK and M-keeping in organisations; and on creating cultural links between the waste disposals and the siting communities. Moreover, international cooperation is recognised as being crucial in providing shared means and meanings for memory transmission over longer timescales. International cooperation has also been identified as a catalyst to ensure that a wide range of approaches and experiences is considered, thus potentially reducing uncertainty related to variations in approach. Overall, multiple approaches, requiring active and less active care, need to be considered from the start of the radioactive waste management programme and refined in the course of time. The RK and M project members want to further investigate and deliver support to fulfil this task. (authors)

  14. Petroleum geology of the Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic), S. W. and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent successful gas test in the Norphlet formation (up to 26 million CF/day) at depths exceeding 20,500 ft in the Mobile Bay area demonstrate a high potential for hydrocarbon production in the Alabama offshore area. In addition, wells drilled in the upper Mobile Bay area could encounter gas condensate in the Norphlet formation; gas condensate is being produced from wells in Hatter's Pond field about 14 miles north of Mobile Bay and 45 miles north of the Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann field. With continued petroleum exploration, additional Norphlet petroleum fields should be discovered in southwestern and offshore Alabama in the years ahead. In light of the recent discoveries in Escambia County and in the lower Mobile Bay area, Mobile, Baldwin, and Escambia counties and Mobile Bay appear to be the most prospective hydrocarbon areas.

  15. Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Appendix F

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    501 homeowners in the six towns around the Sound photo simulations of what the offshore wind project would allegedly look like from their homes. Then the team asked homeowners if...

  16. Simulating Turbulent Wind Fields for Offshore Turbines in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y.; Damiani, R.; Musial, W.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme wind load cases are one of the most important external conditions in the design of offshore wind turbines in hurricane prone regions. Furthermore, in these areas, the increase in load with storm return-period is higher than in extra-tropical regions. However, current standards have limited information on the appropriate models to simulate wind loads from hurricanes. This study investigates turbulent wind models for load analysis of offshore wind turbines subjected to hurricane conditions. Suggested extreme wind models in IEC 61400-3 and API/ABS (a widely-used standard in oil and gas industry) are investigated. The present study further examines the wind turbine response subjected to Hurricane wind loads. Three-dimensional wind simulator, TurbSim, is modified to include the API wind model. Wind fields simulated using IEC and API wind models are used for an offshore wind turbine model established in FAST to calculate turbine loads and response.

  17. About Hercules Offshore Headquartered in Houston, Texas, Hercules Offshore serves the oil and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    About Hercules Offshore Headquartered in Houston, Texas, Hercules Offshore serves the oil and gas largest in the world. The company's jackup rigs, liftboats and inland barges are used for oil and gas provides shallow-water drilling and support services to the oil and gas industry. The company serves

  18. Recent drilling activities at the earth power resources Tuscarora geothermal power project's hot sulphur springs lease area.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goranson, Colin

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by at least 6,000 feet long with up to 1,700 feet of vertical offset. The well (HSS-2) was successfully drilled through a shallow thick sequence of altered Tertiary Volcanic where previous exploration wells had severe hole-caving problems. The ''tight-hole'' drilling problems were reduced using drilling fluids consisting of Polymer-based mud mixed with 2% Potassium Chloride (KCl) to reduce Smectite-type clay swelling problems. Core from the 330 F fractured geothermal reservoir system at depths of 2,950 feet indicated 30% Smectite type clays existed in a fault-gouge zone where total loss of circulation occurred during coring. Smectite-type clays are not typically expected at temperatures above 300 F. The fracture zone at 2,950 feet exhibited a skin-damage during injection testing suggesting that the drilling fluids may have caused clay swelling and subsequent geothermal reservoir formation damage. The recent well drilling experiences indicate that drilling problems in the shallow clays at Hot Sulphur Springs can be reduced. In addition, average penetration rates through the caprock system can be on the order of 25 to 35 feet per hour. This information has greatly reduced the original estimated well costs that were based on previous exploration drilling efforts. Successful production formation drilling will depend on finding drilling fluids that will not cause formation damage in the Smectite-rich fractured geothermal reservoir system. Information obtained at Hot Sulphur Springs may apply to other geothermal systems developed in volcanic settings.

  19. Federal Offshore Statistics, 1993. Leasing, exploration, production, and revenue as of December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francois, D.K.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains statistical data on the following: federal offshore lands; offshore leasing activity and status; offshore development activity; offshore production of crude oil and natural gas; federal offshore oil and natural gas sales volume and royalties; revenue from federal offshore leases; disbursement of federal offshore revenue; reserves and resource estimates of offshore oil and natural gas; oil pollution in US and international waters; and international activities and marine minerals. A glossary is included.

  20. An assessment of the mechanical stability of wells offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, J.P.; Ottesen, S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991 lost time due to stuck pipe related drilling problems accounted for approximately 18% of total drilling time in Mobil Producing Nigeria Ultd.`s (MPN) offshore operations. The primary cause of stuck pipe was identified as mechanical wellbore instability. This paper presents an assessment of the mechanical stability of MPN`s wells offshore Nigeria. The objectives of the study were to: (1) determine the magnitude of the in-situ principal stresses and material properties of the troublesome Intra-Biafra and Qua Iboe shale sequences; (2) quantify the drilling fluid densities required to drill mechanically stable wells through these formations; (3) review and recommend well planning and operational parameters which aid in minimizing wellbore stability-related drilling problems. The well-bore stability assessment was carried out with the aid of a 3-dimensional wellbore stability model using field derived data from the study area to corroborate the results. The collection and analysis of drilling data (borehole geometry and density logs, pore pressure, leak-off tests, local geology and other relevant well records) to determine the magnitude of the in-situ principal stresses, together with compressive strength tests on formation cores are discussed. Minimum safe drilling fluid densities to promote wellbore stability as a function of well geometry and depth are presented for the most troublesome shales drilled in the study area. Implementation of the results reduced wellbore stability related problems and associated trouble time to less than 5% in 1992.

  1. EIS-0325: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0325 (January 2003)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BPA proposes to construct a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in central Washington. This project would increase transmission system capacity north of Hanford.

  2. Strengthening America's Energy Security with Offshore Wind (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the current state of the offshore wind industry in the United States and the offshore wind research and development activities conducted the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program.

  3. Improving Design Methods for Fixed-Foundation Offshore Wind Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving Design Methods for Fixed-Foundation Offshore Wind Energy Systems Improving Design Methods for Fixed-Foundation Offshore Wind Energy Systems October 1, 2013 - 3:10pm...

  4. Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 #12;Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 Published: 14 May 2004

  5. Offshore Natural Gas Royalty Regime (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The province’s offshore contains large natural gas deposits. The Provincial Government has developed an Offshore Natural Gas Royalty Regime that will ensure these resources are developed in the...

  6. New Model Demonstrates Offshore Wind Industry's Job Growth Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model Demonstrates Offshore Wind Industry's Job Growth Potential New Model Demonstrates Offshore Wind Industry's Job Growth Potential May 18, 2015 - 3:11pm Addthis The U.S....

  7. Energy Department Releases New Land-Based/Offshore Wind Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    up to 50 nautical miles from shore. It allows users to easily compare land-based with offshore wind resources. For example, it shows that the offshore wind resource of the...

  8. Study Finds 54 Gigawatts of Offshore Wind Capacity Technically...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    According to a new study funded by DOE, the United States has sufficient offshore wind energy resources to legitimize the installation of at least 54 gigawatts (GW) of offshore...

  9. Energy and Interior Departments Host Offshore Energy Knowledge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Articles DOE to Host a Booth at Offshore WINDPOWER Wind Program Newsletter: Second Quarter 2012 DOE-DOI Strategy Seeks to Harness U.S. Offshore Wind Energy Potential...

  10. Offshore Renewable Energy R&D (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the offshore renewable energy R and D efforts at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  11. Philip E. Long, Ph.D. Geological Project Scientist and Deputy Lead, Sustainable Systems Science Focus Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    , Ellensburg, WA 1977-1978 Sr. Scientist, Basalt Waste Isolation Project, Rockwell Hanford Operations, Richland for Earth Sciences. 1979 to 1988 Sr. Scientist and Manager, Hydrology Group, Basalt Waste Isolation Project as Technical Group Manager, Section Manager, Associate Department Manager, and Technical Network Leader

  12. Making Offshore Wind Areas Available for Leasing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing |PrepareMOJAVEDevelopingMakingMakingMaking

  13. Property:PotentialOffshoreWindArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGeneration Jump to:

  14. E2I EPRI Assessment Offshore Wave Energy Conversion Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E2I EPRI Assessment Offshore Wave Energy Conversion Devices Report: E2I EPRI WP ­ 004 ­ US ­ Rev 1 #12;E2I EPRI Assessment - Offshore Wave Energy Conversion Devices Table of Contents Introduction Assessment - Offshore Wave Energy Conversion Devices Introduction E2I EPRI is leading a U.S. nationwide

  15. Hydroacoustic Monitoring of Fish Communities in Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hydroacoustic Monitoring of Fish Communities in Offshore Wind Farms Annual Report 2004 Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Published: May 2005 Prepared by: Christian B. Hvidt Lars Brünner Frank Reier farms Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm 2004 2519-03-003-rev3.doc TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE 1. Introduction

  16. REVIEW Open Access Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    REVIEW Open Access Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind farms: lessons learned offshore wind farm, Horns Rev 1 (160 MW with 80 turbines of 2 MW), became operational in 2002. The aver- age capacity of turbines and size of offshore wind farms have been increasing since then

  17. Using satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (no wind) Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Blaavandshuk Met. mast N #12;Wind Horns Rev Wind speed map from · Wake near large offshore wind farms is quantified in space and time · Software for usersUsing satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete

  18. Ris-R-1407(EN) Efficient Development of Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    leading to improved prediction of wind speed and turbu- lence profiles within large offshore wind farms. Use of new databases from existing offshore wind farms and detailed wake profiles collected using to optimise power output from offshore wind farms through minimised wake effects and optimal grid connections

  19. Challenges in Predicting Power Output from Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    Challenges in Predicting Power Output from Offshore Wind Farms R. J. Barthelmie1 and S. C. Pryor2 Abstract: Offshore wind energy is developing rapidly in Europe and the trend is towards large wind farms an offshore wind farm, accurate assessment of the wind resource/power output from the wind farm is a necessity

  20. Offshore Wind Power Experiences, Potential and Key Issues for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    offshore wind farms are installed in British, Swedish and Danish waters, and present-day costs in 2015, 2030 and 2050 14 3.1 Offshore wind farms under construction and in planning stage 14 3Offshore Wind Power Experiences, Potential and Key Issues for Deployment Jørgen Lemming, Poul Erik

  1. Scour around an offshore wind turbine W.F. Louwersheimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Scour around an offshore wind turbine MSc Thesis W.F. Louwersheimer January, 2007 Delft University #12;Scour around an offshore wind turbine Delft University of Technology Ballast Nedam - Egmond iii Scour around an offshore wind turbine W.F. Louwersheimer Student number 1067419 January, 2007

  2. Assessing Novel Foundation Options for Offshore Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Byron

    Assessing Novel Foundation Options for Offshore Wind Turbines B.W. Byrne, BE(Hons), BCom, MA, DPhil G.T. Houlsby, MA, DSc, FREng, FICE Oxford University, UK SYNOPSIS Offshore wind farms, and of these wind power is the only one to be exploited on a commercial scale at present. Three major offshore

  3. FEED-IN TARIFFS AND OFFSHORE WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    FEED-IN TARIFFS AND OFFSHORE WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT Prepared by Jon Lilley, Blaise Sheridan, Dawn.......................................................................................................................... 25 FERC Clarification as Applied to Offshore Wind........................................................................................................................ 28 #12; 3 Feed-in Tariffs and Offshore Wind Power Development Prepared Pursuant to DOE Grant Em

  4. Wave Models for Offshore Wind Turbines Puneet Agarwal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    Wave Models for Offshore Wind Turbines Puneet Agarwal§ and Lance Manuely Department of Civil. These wave modeling assumptions do not adequately represent waves in shallow waters where most offshore wind for estimating loads on the support structure (monopile) of an offshore wind turbine. We use a 5MW utility

  5. Extreme Loads for an Offshore Wind Turbine using Statistical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    Extreme Loads for an Offshore Wind Turbine using Statistical Extrapolation from Limited Field Data,itiscommontoeithercarry out extensive simulation studies or undertake a field measurement campaign. At the Blyth offshore wind here is to estimate extreme loads for an offshore wind turbine for which the environmental and load

  6. Floating Offshore Wind Technology Generating Resources Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floating Offshore Wind Technology Jeff King Generating Resources Advisory Committee May 28, 2014 1 to site) Potential interconnection to future offshore PNWCA intertie 4 #12;5 Ave wind speed >= 10 m. (2010) Large-scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2012

  7. Electric power from offshore wind via synoptic-scale interconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Electric power from offshore wind via synoptic-scale interconnection Willett Kemptona,1 , Felipe M regional estimate, Kempton et al. (2) calculated that two-thirds of the offshore wind power off the U in the U.S. Atlantic region is already underway. Fig. 1 shows as black squares offshore wind developments

  8. Ris National Laboratory Satellite SAR applied in offshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø National Laboratory Satellite SAR applied in offshore wind ressource mapping: possibilities is to quantify the regional offshore wind climate for wind energy application based on satellite SAR ·Study of 85SAR(m/s) Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps

  9. OFFSHORE BOUNDARY-LAYER MODELLING H. Bergstrm1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    currently be incorporated into a wind farm design tool. The offshore thermal stratification climate is also investigated. 1 INTRODUCTION Mapping the offshore wind climate, it is important to take into account both land contribute to a complex wind field, and affect the wind also at large offshore distances. Spatial variations

  10. Project identification and evaluation techniques for transportation infrastructure : assessing their role in metropolitan areas of developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vimal, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project identification and evaluation of transportation infrastructure play a vital role in shaping and sustaining the forms of cities all over the world. These cities differ substantially in character and urban form and ...

  11. Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of Iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947: Draft. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

  12. Simulation-Length Requirements in the Loads Analysis of Offshore Floating Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haid, L.; Stewart, G.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Lackner, M.; Matha, D.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this paper is to examine the appropriate length of a floating offshore wind turbine (FOWT) simulation - a fundamental question that needs to be answered to develop design requirements. To examine this issue, a loads analysis of an example FOWT was performed in FAST with varying simulation lengths. The offshore wind system used was the OC3-Hywind spar buoy, which was developed for use in the International Energy Agency Code Comparison Collaborative Project and supports NREL's offshore 5-megawatt baseline turbine. Realistic metocean data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and repeated periodic wind files were used to excite the structure. The results of the analysis clearly show that loads do not increase for longer simulations. In regards to fatigue, a sensitivity analysis shows that the procedure used for counting half cycles is more important than the simulation length itself. Based on these results, neither the simulation length nor the periodic wind files affect response statistics and loads for FOWTs (at least for the spar studied here); a result in contrast to the offshore oil and gas industry, where running simulations of at least 3 hours in length is common practice.

  13. U.S. Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Public Meeting Transcript for Offshore Wind Demonstrations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation&Department of Energy U.S. DEPARTMENT

  14. The Carpenteria reservoir redevelopment project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M.; Krogh, K.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coombs, S. [Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc., Carpinteria, CA (United States); Paul, R.G. [Dept. of the Interior (United States); Voskanian, M.M. [California State Lands Commission, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ershaghi, I. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop a simulation-based reservoir management system that could be used to guide the redevelopment of the Carpenteria Offshore Field, which is located just seven miles from Santa Barbara. The system supports geostatistical and geological modeling and reservoir forecasting. Moreover, it is also a shared resource between the field operator, Pacific Operators Offshore, and the mineral owners, the U.S. Department of the Interior and the State of California.

  15. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Phytoextraction Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone – Field Treatability Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) is present both in the aquifer near the river and in the vadose and riparian zones of the river’s shore at 100-NR-2. Phytoextraction of 90Sr is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua). Past studies have shown that willow roots share uptake mechanisms for Sr with Ca, a plant macronutrient as well as no discrimination between Sr and 90Sr. Willow 90Sr concentration ratios [CR’s; (pCi 90Sr/g dry wt. of new growth tissue)/(pCi 90Sr/g soil porewater)] were consistently greater than 65 with three-quarters of the assimilated label partitioned into the above ground shoot. Insect herbivore experiments also demonstrated no significant potential for bioaccumulation or food chain transfer from their natural activities. The objectives of this field study were three-fold: (1) to demonstrate that a viable, “managed” plot of coyote willows can be established on the shoreline of the Columbia River that would survive the same microenvironment to be encountered at the 100-NR-2 shoreline; (2) to show through engineered barriers that large and small animal herbivores can be prevented from feeding on these plants; and (3) to show that once established, the plants will provide sufficient biomass annually to support the phytoextraction technology. A field treatability demonstration plot was established on the Columbia River shoreline alongside the 100-K West water intake at the end of January 2007. The plot was delimited by a 3.05 m high chain-link fence and was approximately 10 x 25 m in size. A layer of fine mesh metal small animal screening was placed around the plot at the base of the fencing to a depth of 45 cm. A total of sixty plants were placed in six slightly staggered rows with 1-m spacing between plants. The actual plot size was 0.00461 hectare (ha). At the time of planting (March 12, 2007), the plot was located about 10 m from the river’s edge. Less than two weeks later (March 21), the river began the spring rise. Periodic (daily) or continuous flooding occurred at the site over the next 3 to 4 months. River levels at times were over the top of the enclosure’s fence. This same pattern was repeated for the next 2 years. It was however evident that even submerged for part, or all of the day, that the plants continued to flourish. There were no indications of herbivory or animal tracks observed within the plot although animals were present in the area. Biomass production over the three years followed a typical growth curve with a yield of about 1 kg for the first year when the trees were establishing themselves, 4 kg for the second, and over 20 kg for the third when the trees were entering the exponential phase of growth. On a metric Ton per hectare (mT/ha) basis this would be 0.2 mT/ha in 2007, 0.87 mT/ha in 2008, and 4.3 mT/ha in 2009. Growth curve extrapolation predicts 13.2 mT/ha during a fourth year and potentially 29.5 mT/ha following a fifth year. Using the observed Ca and Sr concentrations found in the plant tissues, and Sr CR’s calculated from groundwater analysis, projected biomass yields suggest the trees could prove effective in removing the contaminant from the 100-NR-2 riparian zone.

  16. Powering the World: Offshore Oil & Gas Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Gulf of Mexico's oil and gas production Conclusions ­ p.5/59 #12;Summary of Conclusions. . . The globalPowering the World: Offshore Oil & Gas Production Macondo post-blowout operations Tad Patzek that it may be on call for a further ordering." Technology is a "standing-reserve" of energy for humans

  17. Unique wellhead solves offshore cementing problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A special subsea wellhead assembly that allows 2stage cementing (from both top and bottom) in weak, unconsolidated seabed sediments has been used successfully from a semi-submersible rig offshore Malta. Presented here is a description of the system and a discussion of operational considerations used to set and cement 20 and 16-in. surface casing strings.

  18. Western Area Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development...

  19. Bioremediation Well Borehole Soil Sampling and Data Analysis Summary Report for the 100-N Area Bioremediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. A. Gamon

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present data and findings acquired during the drilling and construction of seven bioremediation wells in the 100-N Area in conjunction with remediation of the UPR-100-N-17 petroleum waste site.

  20. HAZWOPER work plan and site safety and health plan for the Alpha characterization project at the solid waste storage area 4 bathtubbing trench at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work plan/site safety and health plan is for the alpha sampling project at the Solid Waste Storage Area 4 bathtubbing trench. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. This activity will fall under the scope of 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER). The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. Work will be conducted in accordance with requirements as stipulated in the ORNL HAZWOPER Program Manual and applicable ORNL; Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.; and U.S. Department of Energy policies and procedures. The levels of protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from historical data and preliminary evaluations of the area. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project. Unforeseeable site conditions or changes in scope of work may warrant a reassessment of the stated protection levels and controls. All adjustments to the plan must have prior approval by the safety and health disciplines signing the original plan.

  1. Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states.

  2. The wind speed profile at offshore wind farm sites Bernhard Lange(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    The wind speed profile at offshore wind farm sites Bernhard Lange(1) , Søren E. Larsen(2) , Jørgen in Europe will come from offshore sites. The first large offshore wind farms are #12;currently being built feasibility of offshore wind power utilisation depends on the favourable wind conditions offshore compared

  3. Letter report: Population estimates by age, sex and race for 10-county study area. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pittenger, D.B.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Environmental Does Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. To identify groups that may have received doses, population estimates containing age, race, and sex detail for ten counties in Washington and Oregon for the years 1940 to 1980 were prepared by the Demographics Laboratory under a subcontract with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A data base of population information was developed from census reports and published and unpublished collections from the Washington State Office of Financial Management and Center for Population Research. Three estimation methods were then explored: the cohort-component model, cohort interpolation, and age-group interpolation. The estimates generated through cohort and age-group interpolation are considered adequate for initial use in the HEDR Project. Results are presented in two forms: (1) county populations by sex and single year of age and (2) county populations by sex and race for age groupings. These results are made available to the HEDR Project for further refinement into population estimates by county census divisions.

  4. CIMAR and UA examine marine protected areas off the coast of Lebanon for the MedMPAnet Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    Sea and the effect of global warming up to 40 metres deep. The result of the working group after carried out on the coast are allowed, but with a coastal planning and avoiding - if possible - the human impact on the coast. Following the same model, the researchers have defined Enfeh and Tyre as areas

  5. The geotechnical centrifuge in offshore engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murff, J.D.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest needs in offshore geotechnical engineering is for large scale test measurements on which to calibrate design procedures. The geotechnical centrifuge offers at least a partial remedy. Because it allows one to properly simulate stresses, it is a legitimate, relatively inexpensive option to full scale field testing. As such it is a valuable technique and can be an excellent complement to laboratory tests, 1-g model tests and numerical analyses. However, it has not been widely used by industry even though the capability has existed for almost thirty years. This paper argues that this technology should gain acceptance beyond the research community. The paper presents an overview of centrifuge principles, philosophies of use, and limitations of the technique. For illustration, several actual applications of centrifuge testing for complex offshore problems are described. Results are shown to provide important insights into prototype behavior and to agree well with full scale measurements where these are available.

  6. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We then used TOUGH + Hydrate to simulate the observed gas production and reservoir pressure field data at Messoyakha. We simulated various scenarios that help to explain the field behavior. We have evaluated the effect of reservoir parameters on gas recovery from hydrates. Our work should be beneficial to others who are investigating how to produce gas from a hydrate capped gas reservoir. The results also can be used to better evaluate the process of producing gas from offshore hydrates. The Schlumberger PETREL model is used in industry to the description of geologic horizons and the special distribution of properties. An interface between FLAC3D and Petrel was built by Schlumberger to allow for efficient data entry into TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D.

  7. Offshore wind project surges ahead in South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Researchers from Coastal Carolina University, working alongside Clemson University, Savannah River National Laboratory and the University of South Carolina, started collecting wind speeds, as well as current, wave and other oceanographic information, in July 2009 from near the coast to as far as 12 miles off shore.

  8. Offshore Wind Project Surges Ahead in South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Center for Marine and Wetland Studies studies wind speed data from buoys, which have been measuring wind speed and direction for the past year.

  9. Energy Department Announces Innovative Offshore Wind Energy Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register /of EnergyDepartment ofHVAC Systems |Health of

  10. Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, JulyIssue 15IssueEnergy

  11. Offshore Wind Market Acceleration Projects | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, JulyIssue

  12. EIS-0470: Cape Wind Energy Project, Nantucket Sound, Offshore of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartment of Energy Notice8: American8:Massachusetts

  13. Energy Department Announces Innovative Offshore Wind Energy Projects |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen O'Kane Tauscher -TheEconomy,ResearchHealth

  14. EA-1970: Fishermen's Energy LLC Offshore Wind Demonstration Project,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBasedThe U.S.

  15. EA-1985: Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project (VOWTAP), 24

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBasedTheCounty, IdahoDisposition

  16. DOE Selects Projects to Assess Offshore Carbon Storage | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732 DOE F 243.2 Records Scheduling3-2008Department ofEnergy

  17. Three Offshore Wind Advanced Technology Demonstration Projects Receive

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy SolarRadioactive LiquidSavingsAugustPhase 2 Funding |

  18. Grid Integration of Offshore Windparks (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrderNebraska: EnergyStrategy |Information

  19. Michigan Offshore Wind Pilot Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name:

  20. Texas Offshore Pilot Research Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrillbeInformationNatural

  1. Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

  2. Articles about Offshore Wind | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartment ofATVMAgriculturalAn1(BENEFIT)GridOffshore Wind

  3. Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment of Sea Bottom and Marine Biology #12 Design ApS 01.03.2000 #12;Bio/consult A/S Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1........................................................................................................................................................... 36 #12;Bio/consult A/S ELSAM Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1 Page 4

  4. Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among the California Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Eric R.A.N.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    005 "Support for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling Among theSupport for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among theSupport for Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling among the

  5. UNDERLYING MOTIVATIONS FOR DELAWARE PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN SUPPORT OF OFFSHORE WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    UNDERLYING MOTIVATIONS FOR DELAWARE PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN SUPPORT OF OFFSHORE WIND: IMPLICATIONS PARTICIPATION IN SUPPORT OF OFFSHORE WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR STATE ENERGY POLICY by Jacqueline D Piero Approved ................................................................................................. 3 Offshore wind: a new option in the United States.............................................. 4

  6. Mooring Line Modelling and Design Optimization of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Mooring Line Modelling and Design Optimization of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines by Matthew Thomas Mooring Line Modelling and Design Optimization of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines by Matthew Thomas Jair. Curran Crawford, Supervisor (Department of Mechanical Engineering) ABSTRACT Floating offshore wind

  7. Microalgae Cultivation using Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiley, Patrick Edward

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Trent (2013). Microalgae cultivation using offshoreJ. Trent, Harvesting Microalgae by Forward Osmosis. The Open5, 1943 (2012). E. W. Becker, Microalgae: Biotechnology and

  8. Offshore Resource Assessment and Design Conditions Public Meeting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Resource Assessment and Design Conditions Public Meeting Summary Report Offshore Resource Assessment and Design Conditions Public Meeting Summary Report Report from DOE's June 2011...

  9. annual offshore technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Renewable Energy Center California Off-shore Wind Technology Assessment 12;California Renewable EnergyRESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE...

  10. Operational Impacts of Large Deployments of Offshore Wind (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibanez, E.; Heaney, M.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential operational impact of deploying 54 GW of offshore wind in the United States was examined. The capacity was not evenly distributed; instead, it was concentrated in regions with better wind quality and close to load centers (Table 1). A statistical analysis of offshore wind power time series was used to assess the effect on the power system. The behavior of offshore wind resembled that of onshore wind, despite the former presenting higher capacity factors, more consistent power output across seasons, and higher variability levels. Thus, methods developed to manage onshore wind variability can be extended and applied to offshore wind.

  11. Sandia Energy - Quantifying Offshore Wind Scour with Sandia's...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia's Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL---EFDC) Home Renewable Energy Energy News Wind Energy News & Events Computational Modeling & Simulation Quantifying Offshore Wind...

  12. Ecological Issues Related to Decommissioning of California's Offshore Production Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Mark H.

    Ecological Issues Related to Decommissioning of California's Offshore Production Platforms Report................................................................................................................ 8 II.A. Review of California platforms............................................................................. 8 II.A.i Geography of California platforms

  13. New Model Demonstrates Offshore Wind Industry's Job Growth Potential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    has developed a tool to estimate jobs and other economic impacts associated with offshore wind development in the United States. The modeling tool, which illustrates the potential...

  14. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    wind development in the Great Lakes closer to fruition." "The country's vast offshore wind resources have the potential to dramatically reduce America's dependence on fossil...

  15. New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    renewable power plants. The updated version allows users to better understand the potential regional economic impacts of offshore wind development. DOE is using the new...

  16. DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    systems cost. Suzanne Tegen, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL): Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios. This presentation...

  17. PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    monitoring birds, bats, and aquatic animals such as marine mammals, sea turtles, and fish in the offshore wind farm environment. Informed by monitoring results and research...

  18. Ben Ticha M. B., Ranchin T., Wald L., Using several data sources for offshore wind resource assessment, 2005, Copenhagen Offshore Wind conference 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    financial risks associated to the installation of offshore wind farms. Usually, for evaluating the resourceBen Ticha M. B., Ranchin T., Wald L., Using several data sources for offshore wind resource assessment, 2005, Copenhagen Offshore Wind conference 2005 1 Using several data sources for offshore wind

  19. Improved Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in Global Climate Stabilization Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Sullivan, P.; Heimiller, D.; Lopez, A.; Eurek, K.; Badger, J.; Jorgensen, H. E.; Kelly, M.; Clarke, L.; Luckow, P.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a technique for digesting geospatial wind-speed data into areally defined -- country-level, in this case -- wind resource supply curves. We combined gridded wind-vector data for ocean areas with bathymetry maps, country exclusive economic zones, wind turbine power curves, and other datasets and relevant parameters to build supply curves that estimate a country's offshore wind resource defined by resource quality, depth, and distance-from-shore. We include a single set of supply curves -- for a particular assumption set -- and study some implications of including it in a global energy model. We also discuss the importance of downscaling gridded wind vector data to capturing the full resource potential, especially over land areas with complex terrain. This paper includes motivation and background for a statistical downscaling methodology to account for terrain effects with a low computational burden. Finally, we use this forum to sketch a framework for building synthetic electric networks to estimate transmission accessibility of renewable resource sites in remote areas.

  20. Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

  1. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation within IEA Wind Task 30: Phase II Results Regarding a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.; Qvist, J.; Froyd, L.; Chen, X.; Azcona, J.; Uzungoglu, E.; Guedes Soares, C.; Luan, C.; Yutong, H.; Pengcheng, F.; Yde, A.; Larsen, T.; Nichols, J.; Buils, R.; Lei, L.; Anders Nygard, T.; et al.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools (or codes) that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project, which operates under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 30. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of simulation codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating semisubmersible in 200 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants? codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  2. Abstract the search for new oil reserves in Florida and its offshore basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Applegate, A.V.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential for new oil discoveries both on land and offshore in Florida appears to be best in the offshore portion of the South Florida Basin and in the areas in northwest Florida which are underlain by the Smackover Formation. Evidence for this appraisal includes newly acquired deep reflection seismic lines in the South Florida Basin. Geologic features believed to be present include Paleozoic strata lying unconformably beneath an igneous flow, normal faulting, and reefal development in carbonate rocks. In offshore northwest Florida, although no official announcement has been made, there is a strong possibility that a thick section of pay is present in the Smackover and Norphlet Formations in OCS-G-6417 on the Destin Dome about 40 miles south of the city of Destin. This well and the excellent Norphlet tests in the Mobile Bay area should lead to more wildcat well drilling in northwest Florida. Paleozoic drilling in Florida has ceased, and large blocks of acreage have been dropped after five dry holes were drilled in the past few years. The Sunniland Formation of Lower Cretaceous is a favorite and enduring target. The Sunniland Field was discovered in 1943 and an estimated 100 million barrels of reserves have been found in the six major fields in the South Florida Basin.

  3. FOUR ESSAYS ON OFFSHORE WIND POWER POTENTIAL, DEVELOPMENT, REGULATORY FRAMEWORK, AND INTEGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    FOUR ESSAYS ON OFFSHORE WIND POWER POTENTIAL, DEVELOPMENT, REGULATORY FRAMEWORK, AND INTEGRATION 2010 Amardeep Dhanju All Rights Reserved #12;FOUR ESSAYS ON OFFSHORE WIND POWER POTENTIAL, DEVELOPMENT

  4. NREL GIS Data: U.S. Atlantic Coast Offshore Windspeed 90m Height...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    offshore regions of the United States. To learn more, please see the Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States. These data were produced in...

  5. Offshore Wind Turbines - Estimated Noise from Offshore Wind Turbine, Monhegan Island, Maine: Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aker, Pamela M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep C Wind, a consortium headed by the University of Maine will test the first U.S. offshore wind platforms in 2012. In advance of final siting and permitting of the test turbines off Monhegan Island, residents of the island off Maine require reassurance that the noise levels from the test turbines will not disturb them. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, at the request of the University of Maine, and with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program, modeled the acoustic output of the planned test turbines.

  6. Optimizing safety by inherent offshore platform design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansfield, D.P. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom); Kletz, T.A. [Kletz (T.A.), Cheadle (United Kingdom); Al-Hassan, T. [HSE Offshore Safety Div., Bootle (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the Cullen Report into the Piper Alpha Disaster, UK Operators and the Health and Safety Executive Offshore Safety Division (OSD) have been working together to bring in a new safety regime, progressively replacing prescriptive requirements with goal setting regulations to enable a more integrated approach to hazard management. This is allowing the industry to be more flexible and specific about the way it manages hazards throughout the life of the installation. In particular it is encouraging a hazards based focus to design which is changing the way installations are designed and which would promote the use of inherently safer design. Conventional installation design often relies on standard specification engineered safety systems such as shutdown systems and water deluge to control hazards, with less attention paid to minimizing the hazards at source. These add-on safety systems can be expensive to install and maintain, and may only be effective in some circumstances. This paper reports on a pilot study sponsored by OSD, involving offshore operators and design contractors, to assess the status of inherent safety in offshore installation design in the UK and to encourage its further use spreading best practice and examples of the benefits of the approach. The paper outlines the key considerations for implementation of inherently safer design, and describes some of the benefits these can bring to the industry. It also highlights the role regulations, industry initiatives and guidance can play in promoting inherently safer design both now and in the future. The study`s findings suggest that awareness of the inherent safety principles is limited to some safety specialists and designers, but that the industry is beginning to recognize the role and benefits of inherent safety. As a result its principles are starting to appear in some design procedures and hazard management guides.

  7. Offshore Oilfield Development Planning under Uncertainty and Fiscal Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Offshore Oilfield Development Planning under Uncertainty and Fiscal Considerations Vijay Gupta1 of oilfields in remote locations that are often hundreds of miles offshore. Surprisingly, there has been a net by the terms of the contract between oil companies and governments. Figure 1: A unified framework for Oilfield

  8. Numerical Simulation of Wave Loads on Static Offshore Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Wave Loads on Static Offshore Structures ­ p. #12;VOF Free Surface Flow Model Modelling of Free Surface-cell resolution of prescribed wave forms in relaxation zones · Support for dynamic mesh with 6-DOF solver meshNumerical Simulation of Wave Loads on Static Offshore Structures Hrvoje Jasak, Inno Gatin, Vuko

  9. Riser and wellhead monitoring for improved offshore drilling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Riser and wellhead monitoring for improved offshore drilling operations Gullik A. Jensen, Ph ­ Offshore drilling with riser ­ On the riser and the riser joints ­ On damage and consequences · Operational Page 2 #12;The KONGSBERG Riser Management Systems (RMS) Integrity of drilling riser based on monitoring

  10. Ab Frhjahr 2009 startet hier der Bau von sechs Offshore-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vollmer, Heribert

    Ent- wicklung der Offshore-Wind- energie besondere Bedeutung zu. Derzeit laufen in der AusAb Frühjahr 2009 startet hier der Bau von sechs Offshore- Windenergieanlagen (OWEA) vom Typ Wind- parks sind etwa die Erweite- rung des Pilotprojektes alpha ventus, der Park Borkum West (45

  11. Visual Simulation of Offshore Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Terminals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Visual Simulation of Offshore Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Terminals in a Decision-Making Context1 potential offshore Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) sites and the types of terminals that might occupy those sites. The study had to evaluate the engineering feasibility of siting an LNG receiving terminal

  12. Integrated Multidisciplinary Constrained Optimization of Offshore Support Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    and convergence rate. This integrated methodology is used to redesign an existing SWT-3.6-107 wind turbine support.haghi@siemens.com Abstract. In the current offshore wind turbine support structure design method, the tower and foundation of the structure. To show the usefulness of the method, an existing SWT-3.6-107 offshore wind turbine where its

  13. DISTRIBUTED OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF OFFSHORE OIL PRODUCTION: THE INTELLIGENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    DISTRIBUTED OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF OFFSHORE OIL PRODUCTION: THE INTELLIGENT PLATFORM Michael R to distributed optimization and control of offshore oil production systems. The model incorporates a complex pipeline network. Oil and gas production systems are represented as a network of connected hierarchical

  14. Taming Hurricanes With Arrays of Offshore Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Taming Hurricanes With Arrays of Offshore Wind Turbines Mark Z. Jacobson Cristina Archer, Willet) or 50 m/s (destruction) speed. Can Walls of Offshore Wind Turbines Dissipate Hurricanes? #12;Katrina Kempton Wind Energy Symposium University of Delaware February 27, 2013 145 mph; Jeff Schmaltz, NASA GSFC

  15. RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Joseph B.

    RELIABILITY COMPARISON MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES (OWT) Yizhou Lu, T. M. Delorm, A. Christou of survivor functions R(t) of drive-trains, after 1 year of operation, between Offshore Wind Turbine (OWT) vs of the reliability of these 5 Types Surrogate failure rate data Onshore wind turbines (OT) 1-1.5MW CONCLUSIONS

  16. Improvement of Offshore Wind Resource Modeling in the Mid-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Improvement of Offshore Wind Resource Modeling in the Mid- Atlantic Bight Wind Energy Symposium Sienkiewicz , Chris Hughes 26 February 2013 #12;Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Interaction Tower ­ 23 m NOAA Buzzard's Bay Tower ­ 25 m Cape Wind Tower (60 m from 2003-2011; just platform

  17. Cathodic protection retrofit of an offshore pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, R.H.; Holk, A.C. [Tenneco Energy, Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cathodic protection anodes and corrosion coating on two 8-inch (203.2 mm) outside diameter (O.D.) offshore pipelines were damaged during deep water ({minus}380 feet, {minus}116 m) installation. In-situ methods for deep water inspection and repair of the pipelines` cathodic protection and coating systems were developed and performed. Methods are described in which underwater anode retrofits were performed and friction welding technology was used to re-attach anode leads. Standard procedures for underwater pipeline coating repair and remediation of damaged line pipe are provided.

  18. Cathodic protection retrofit of an offshore pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, R.H.; Holk, A.C. [Tenneco Energy, Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cathodic protection (CP) anodes and corrosion coating on two offshore pipelines were damaged during deep water installation. In-situ methods for deep-water inspection and repair of the pipelines` CP and coating systems were developed and used. High-pressure natural gas Pipeline. A design was 5.6 miles of 8.625 in. OD by 0.406 in. W.T. API SL, Grade X-42, seamless line pipe. Pipeline B design was 0.3 miles of similar specification pipe. Both pipelines were mill-coated with 14 mil of fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE) corrosion coating. Girth welds were field-coated with FBE.

  19. Scira Offshore Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: WindRiegotec InternacionalhasASScira Offshore

  20. Offshore Lubricants Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns JumpsourceOffshore Lubricants Market Size Home

  1. Capital Energy Offshore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy Offshore Place: Spain Sector: Wind energy Product: JV

  2. Norfolk Offshore Wind NOW | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen EnergyNelsoniXInformationNongqishiNorfolk Offshore Wind

  3. Offshore Wind Energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdaleOdersun AG JumpOffshore Wind

  4. Offshore Wind Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdaleOdersun AG JumpOffshore

  5. Tillamook Offshore Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePty Ltd Jump to:Offshore Wind Farm Jump

  6. European Wind Atlas: Offshore | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision|LLCInsulationInformation)CommissionOffshore Jump

  7. Copyright 1999, Offshore Technology Conference This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 Offshore Technology Conference held in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Byron

    to explore plasticity related concepts. The tests are on dry sand to ensure drained behaviour. Eight testsCopyright 1999, Offshore Technology Conference This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 Offshore Technology Conference held in Houston, Texas, 3­6 May 1999. This paper was selected

  8. Oxford University Civil Engineering Novel Foundations for Offshore Wind FarmsNovel Foundations for Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houlsby, Guy T.

    Oxford University Civil Engineering Novel Foundations for Offshore Wind FarmsNovel Foundations for Offshore Wind Farms Prof. Guy Houlsby, Dr Byron Byrne, Dr Chris Martin Oxford University #12;Oxford each turbine does not generate all the time, say 3000) #12;Oxford University Civil Engineering Wind

  9. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the treatability study of in situ vitrification of Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) establishes the quality assurance procedures and requirements to be implemented for the control of quality-related activities for Phase 3 of the Treatability Study (TS) of In Situ Vitrification (ISV) of Seepage Pit 1, ORNL Waste Area Grouping 7. This QAPjP supplements the Quality Assurance Plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program by providing information specific to the ISV-TS. Phase 3 of the TS involves the actual ISV melt operations and posttest monitoring of Pit 1 and vicinity. Previously, Phase 1 activities were completed, which involved determining the boundaries of Pit 1, using driven rods and pipes and mapping the distribution of radioactivity using logging tools within the pipes. Phase 2 involved sampling the contents, both liquid and solids, in and around seepage Pit 1 to determine their chemical and radionuclide composition and the spatial distribution of these attributes. A separate QAPjP was developed for each phase of the project. A readiness review of the Phase 3 activities presented QAPjP will be conducted prior to initiating field activities, and an Operational Acceptance, Test (OAT) will also be conducted with no contamination involved. After, the OAT is complete, the ISV process will be restarted, and the melt will be allowed to increase with depth and incorporate the radionuclide contamination at the bottom of Pit 1. Upon completion of melt 1, the equipment will be shut down and mobilized to an adjacent location at which melt 2 will commence.

  10. Intensive archaeological survey of the F/H Surface Enhancement Project Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sassaman, K.E.; Gillam, J.C.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twelve archaeological sites and four artifact occurrences were located by intensive survey of two tracts of land for the F and H Surface Enhancement Project on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Fieldwork in the 480-acre project area included surface reconnaissance of 3.6 linear kilometers of transects, 140 shovel tests along 4.2 linear kilometers of transects, an additional 162 shovel tests at sites and occurrences, and the excavation of six l {times} 2 m test units. All but one of the sites contained artifacts of the prehistoric era; the twelfth site consists of the remains of a twentieth-century home place. The historic site and six of the prehistoric sites consist of limited and/or disturbed contexts of archaeological deposits that have little research potential and are therefore considered ineligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The remaining five sites have sufficient content and integrity to yield information important to ongoing investigations into upland site use. These sites (38AK146, 38AK535, 38AK539, 38AK541, and 38AK543) are thus deemed eligible for nomination to the NRHP and the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) recommends that they be preserved through avoidance or data recovery.

  11. Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bos, W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

  12. New Facility to Shed Light on Offshore Wind Resource (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chesapeake Light Tower facility will gather key data for unlocking the nation's vast offshore wind resource.

  13. ENDOW: EfficieNt Development of Offshore Windfarms Rebecca Barthelmie1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    offshore wind farms. Use of new databases from existing offshore wind farms and detailed wake profiles manufacturers to optimise power output from offshore wind farms through minimised wake effects and optimal grid from two offshore wind farms at which both meteorological observations and power output were available

  14. EVALUATION OF MODELS FOR THE VERTICAL EXTRAPOLATION OF WIND SPEED MEASUREMENTS AT OFFSHORE SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    will come from offshore sites. The first large offshore wind farms are currently being built in severalEVALUATION OF MODELS FOR THE VERTICAL EXTRAPOLATION OF WIND SPEED MEASUREMENTS AT OFFSHORE SITES important for offshore wind energy utilisation are discussed and tested: Four models for the surface

  15. Method for computing efficient electrical indicators for offshore wind turbine monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by offshore deployment of wind farms. The offshore turbines have much lower accessibility(1) so maintenanceMethod for computing efficient electrical indicators for offshore wind turbine monitoring Georgia.cablea, pierre.granjon, christophe.berenguer} @gipsa-lab.grenoble-inp.fr Abstract Offshore wind turbines

  16. MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND FARM SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    in Europe will come from offshore sites. The first large offshore wind farms are currently being builtMODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND for conditions important for offshore wind energy utilisation are compared and tested: Four models

  17. Where is the ideal location for a US East Coast offshore grid? Michael J. Dvorak,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    weather model data from 2006­2010 were used to approximate wind farm output. The offshore grid was located%, and the combined capacity factor was 48% (gross). By interconnecting offshore wind energy farms 450 km apart of no and full-power events. Offshore grids to connect offshore wind energy (OWE) farms have been proposed

  18. Fluctuations of offshore wind generation -Statistical modelling , L.E.A. Christensen, H. Madsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of power fluctuations at large offshore wind farms has a significant impact on the control and management of their parameters. Simulation results are given for the case of the Horns Rev and Nysted offshore wind farms. An overview of offshore wind energy in Europe is given in [1]. Such large offshore wind farms concentrate

  19. Offshore Wind Power: Science, engineering, and policy MAST 628-010, Fall 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Offshore Wind Power: Science, engineering, and policy MAST 628-010, Fall 2008 Revised 10 October@udel.edu Class web site with lecture notes: www.udel.edu/sakai UD offshore wind research: http, plan, regulate, and develop offshore wind resources for large-scale power production. Offshore wind

  20. Time-domain Fatigue Response and Reliability Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Time-domain Fatigue Response and Reliability Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines with Emphasis of offshore wind turbines Defense: 09.12.2012 2012 - : Structural Engineer in Det Norske Veritas (DNV) 2007 and higher wind speed, and less visual disturbance and noise for offshore wind energy. Offshore wind

  1. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Environmental Monitoring Program in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 is a hazardous and low-level radioactive waste disposal site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Extensive site investigations have revealed contaminated surface water, sediments, groundwater, and soils. Based on the results of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) conducted from 1989--1991 and on recent interactions with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), a decision was made to defer implementing source control remedial measures at the WAG. The information shows WAG 6 contributes < 2% of the total off-site contaminant risk released over White Oak Dam (WOD). The alternative selected to address hazards at WAG 6 involves maintenance of site access controls to prevent public exposure to on-site contaminants, continued monitoring of contaminant releases to determine if source control measures will be required in the future, and development of technologies to support final remediation of WAG 6. This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-1192&D1). Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model. The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12-18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC. The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for {approximately}4 years.

  2. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  3. Environmental data for the planning of off-shore wind parks from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated Assessment (PIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    GIS client tool. For a description of the LCA for the wind pilot see Blanc et al 2012. 1 BMT ARGOSSEnvironmental data for the planning of off-shore wind parks from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated of renewable energy. One of the pillars of the project is the Wind Energy Pilot, addressing the effects

  4. Development of Sockeye field in offshore California - A case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankur, V. (Chevron, USA, Inc., La Habra, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sockeye field, discovered in 1970, lies offshore California in the Santa Barbara Channel. The decision to develop the field was made in 1983 based on 1979-1983 exploration drilling. Platform Gail was installed in 1987 and development drilling commenced in June 1988. Currently, there are eleven single completions. The field produces from five reservoirs: middle and upper Sespe Sands, lower and upper Topanga Sands, and the Monterey Formation. Sespe Sands are fluvial channel deposits with individual sand bodies with limited areal extents. The middle Sespe produces dry sweet gas and the upper Sespe produces sweet 29{degree} API gravity oil. The Topanga Sands were deposited in a near shore environment and are more continuous in nature. Lower Topanga Sands contain sweet oil whereas upper Topanga Sands test a low gravity 18{degree} API sour oil. The Monterey Formation is composed of thin beds of chert, porcellanites, siliceous shales, mudstones, and dolostones. The fractured Lower monterey produces heavy sour oil, similar to that of the upper Topanga. To minimize risk, delineation wells were drilled early in the development program to ensure that reserves warranted additional investment in wells and facilities. Nine wells were completed during the first phase of the drilling program. Gas production from these wells was projected to exceed the capacity of the Carpinteria gas modifications to handle production. At the conclusion of the evaluation, drilling was resumed with plans to drill four more wells.

  5. Mid-year report. [Review of offshore petroleum industry activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mid-year review and forecast for the offshore energy focuses on the impact of energy prices, worldwide drilling, the market for marine transportation, the mobile rig market, the diving industry, construction prospects, and seismic activity. The price of oil is seen as the most influential factor affecting offshore programs being considered for the next 10 yr. The analysis of drilling data indicates the trend for offshore activity will continue to rise, notwithstanding the current rig activity statistics. The growing importance of remotely operated vehicles in the diving industry is noted.

  6. NREL Software Aids Offshore Wind Turbine Designs (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL researchers are supporting offshore wind power development with computer models that allow detailed analyses of both fixed and floating offshore wind turbines. While existing computer-aided engineering (CAE) models can simulate the conditions and stresses that a land-based wind turbine experiences over its lifetime, offshore turbines require the additional considerations of variations in water depth, soil type, and wind and wave severity, which also necessitate the use of a variety of support-structure types. NREL's core wind CAE tool, FAST, models the additional effects of incident waves, sea currents, and the foundation dynamics of the support structures.

  7. Sequence stratigraphic framework of Neogene strata in offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacht, J.A. [Seis Strat Services, Inc., Sugar Land, TX (United States); Bowen, B.E.; Hall, D.J. [Excalibur Consulting, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The western portion of the Nigerian continental margin (Dahomey Basin) exhibits stable to moderately unstable progradation. Systems tracts are similar to those described by Vail for stable progradational margins. In contrast, strata off the central and eastern portions of the Nigerian coast (Niger Delta Complex) exhibit highly unstable progradation, and systems tracts are similar to those in Neogene strata of the offshore Gulf of Mexico. Lowstand basin floor fans in both areas are defined by a well-developed upper reflection. This reflection downlaps along the sequence boundary or abuts against the downthrown side of a growth fault surface. Most lower lowstand (slope fan) strata exhibit discontinuous to semi-continuous subparallel reflections. However, this systems tract also contains channel complexes characterized by chaotic bedding with small bright spots and less common large channels, which exhibit concave-upward reflections. In the western portion of the study area, lower lowstand deposits commonly pinch out on the slope. Deposition occurred largely from point sources. In contrast, contemporaneous shallow-water facies are developed in lower lowstand systems tracts in the Niger Delta Complex. Deposition occurred along a line source. Large amplitude anomalies in the upper lowstand (prograding wedge) suggest well-developed sheet sands occur in shallow-water and deep-water in the Niger Delta complex. However, in the Dahomey Basin there is little evidence of deep-water sands in this interval. The transgressive and highstand systems tracts are usually very thin in outer shelf to basin floor strata in both areas. Both the Dahomey Basin and Niger Delta Complex exhibit different stratigraphic geometries, and therefore, require different exploration strategies.

  8. Factors affect offshore production loss control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ash, C.S.

    1986-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Many aspects of petroleum measurement on an offshore production platform are the same as at an onshore facility, but there are some unique differences. Before going into them it should be noted that even in today's climate of low or declining oil prices that stock loss control is still important. Improving measurement of the quantity of oil transfers can help reduce the amount of stock that is ''unaccounted for'' or lost. As stock loss is reduced, the salable quantity increases, the gross revenue increases, and the net revenue increases. Even in cases where transfers are between two departments of the same company, accurate measurement and proper accountability are required because they often are the basis for determining costs and can thus affect the price that is charged on a later custody transfer. Inefficiencies in intracompany transfers can often hide real losses which may occur during intercompany transfers.

  9. Radiological Survey Results for Areas A1 North, A5A, A6, and B2 at the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project, Washington, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.C. Adams

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Perform radiological surveys of the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project (MWRP) facility in Washington, Pennsylvania

  10. Integrated reservoir management for the long term - the Carpinteria Offshore Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, E.M.; Brickey, M.R.; Coombs, S.E. [and others

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carpinteria Offshore Field, Santa Barbara, California, has produced more than 100 million barrels of oil to date. This mature field has continued operations in an economically and politically challenging environment that finally resulted in the abandonment of the field`s California State leases by the lease holder. The abandoned leases, together with adjoining federal leases are now operated by an independent producer. Los Alamos National Laboratory has joined with that independent operator, Pacific Operators Offshore, and with the State Lands Commission of California and the Minerals Management Service, in a unique collaborative effort to redevelop the mature field. This project is a part of a larger umbrella project, the Advanced Reservoir Management Project (ARM), that is designed to demonstrate the worth of advanced computational tools and state of the art methods for independent oil and gas producers. The Carpinteria Reservoir Redevelopment project takes a long-term view of reservoir management - as a result, our management plan includes a continuing investment in time and technology in order to better understand the reservoir. In particular, we have completed an extensive reservoir characterization and geological modeling effort that has created a self-consistent model, satisfying geophysical, geological, and engineering data constraints. We have begun the engineering-intensive flow simulation phase of the project using the current geological description of the reservoir, and are confident that our careful efforts in geological modeling will result in a reasonable reservoir flow model. Dynamic documents exist that are used by participants to stay abreast of developments on the project.

  11. CRSP Power Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expenses of the project each year, and receive all of the energy it produces. Salt Lake City AreaIntegrated Projects: Power from the Colorado River Storage Project plants was...

  12. Project Selection - Record Keeping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    4-H members have many project areas to choose from, depending on where they live. Members should consult with their parents and 4-H leaders when choosing a project. This publication outlines project considerations....

  13. alaskan offshore silts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Caledonia Louis Geli Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 363 OFF-SHORE WIND AND GRID-CONNECTED PV: HIGH PENETRATION PEAK SHAVING FOR NEW YORK CITY Renewable Energy Websites Summary:...

  14. atividades offshore da: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Caledonia Louis Geli Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 388 OFF-SHORE WIND AND GRID-CONNECTED PV: HIGH PENETRATION PEAK SHAVING FOR NEW YORK CITY Renewable Energy Websites Summary:...

  15. Attitudes toward offshore oil development: A summary of current evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gramling, R; Freudenburg, Wm R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    History of oil well drilling. Houston: Gulf Publishing Co;1955. World’s deepest well. Drilling December:52. [8] Logandrilling efforts continued to expand, however, the offshore industry found itself in waters that were literally as well

  16. Aeroelastic Instabilities of Large Offshore and Onshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bir, G.; Jonkman, J.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the aeroelastic stability of a 5-MW conceptual wind turbine mounted on a floating barge and presents results for onshore and offshore configurations for various conditions.

  17. New Report Shows Trend Toward Larger Offshore Wind Systems, with...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Department today released a new report showing progress for the U.S. offshore wind energy market in 2012, including the completion of two commercial lease auctions for...

  18. Multi-hazard Reliability Assessment of Offshore Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mardfekri Rastehkenari, Maryam 1981-

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A probabilistic framework is developed to assess the structural reliability of offshore wind turbines. Probabilistic models are developed to predict the deformation, shear force and bending moment demands on the support structure of wind turbines...

  19. Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Yoon Hyeok

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, a numerical simulation tool has been developed for the rotor-floater-tether coupled dynamic analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (MUFOWT) in the time domain including aero-blade-tower dynamics and control...

  20. "Design of Offshore Wind Turbines for Hurricane Resilience" Graduate Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Ed

    "Design of Offshore Wind Turbines for Hurricane Resilience" Graduate Seminar Thursday, December 5, 2013, 12pm ­ 1pm Andrew Myers, Ph.D. Northeastern University. "Computational Methods for Evolving

  1. Development of a composite repair system for reinforcing offshore risers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Christopher Richard

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program was conducted to investigate the application of composite materials in repairing corroded offshore risers, leading to the development of an optimized repair using a hybrid carbon/E-glass system. The objective of this research...

  2. Dynamic analysis of a 5 megawatt offshore floating wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriger, Evan Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1985. 23. Hau, E. Wind Turbines: Fundamentals, Technologies,for Floating Offshore Wind Turbines. Tech. no. NREL/CP-500-Full-scale Floating Wind Turbine." Statoil, 14 Oct. 2009.

  3. Multi-hazard Reliability Assessment of Offshore Wind Turbines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mardfekri Rastehkenari, Maryam 1981-

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A probabilistic framework is developed to assess the structural reliability of offshore wind turbines. Probabilistic models are developed to predict the deformation, shear force and bending moment demands on the support structure of wind turbines...

  4. Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Yoon Hyeok

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, a numerical simulation tool has been developed for the rotor-floater-tether coupled dynamic analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (MUFOWT) in the time domain including aero-blade-tower dynamics and control...

  5. Offshore Wind Energy Market Installed Capacity is Anticipated...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Offshore Wind Energy Market Installed Capacity is Anticipated to Reach 52,120.9 MW by 2022 Home > Groups > Renewable Energy RFPs Wayne31jan's picture Submitted by Wayne31jan(150)...

  6. NREL: Wind Research - New Report Characterizes Existing Offshore...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a three-year collaborative investigation with positive outlooks for U.S.-based offshore wind potential by 2030. September 4, 2014 The Energy Department has released the first...

  7. EIS-0470: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Cape Wind Energy Project on the Outer Continental Shelf off Massachusetts, Nantucket Sound

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Loan Programs Office is proposing to offer a loan guarantee to Cape Wind Associates, LLC for the construction and start-up of the Cape Wind Energy Project in Nantucket Sound, offshore of Massachusetts. The proposed Cape Wind Energy Project would consist of up to 130, 3.6-MW turbine generators, in an area of roughly 25-square miles, and would include 12.5 miles of 115-kilovolt submarine transmission cable and an electric service platform. To inform DOE's decision regarding a loan guarantee, DOE adopted the Department of the Interior’s 2009 Final Cape Wind Energy Project EIS, in combination with two Cape Wind Environmental Assessments dated May 2010 and April 2011 (per 40 CFR 1506.4), as a DOE Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0470). The adequacy of the Department of the Interior final EIS adopted by DOE is the subject of a judicial action. This project is inactive.

  8. The submerged offshore breakwater and its effects on seafloor topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tallent, James Russell

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE SUBMERGED OFFSHORE BREAKWATER AND ITS EFFECTS ON SEAFLOOR TOPOGRAPHY A Thesis by JAMES RUSSELL TALLENT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AGM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 19BG Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE SUBMERGEO OFFSHORE BREAKWATER AND ITS EFFECTS ON SEAFLOOR TOPOGRAPHY A Thesis by JAMES RUSSELL TALLENT Approved as to style and content by: John B. Herbich (Chairman) Lauriston R. King...

  9. How to reduce sigma in offshore pipe fabrications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Still, J.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of stainless steel for offshore oil and gas applications has increased dramatically over the last 20 years. Stainless steels fall into a number of categories depending on the composition and microstructure formed after heat treatment. Selection of pipe materials for offshore applications is dependent on the product to be carried. Austenitic and ferritic/austenitic (duplex) stainless steels are commonly used for process and utility piping systems offshore, whereas martensitic and ferritic are restricted to specific applications. Reference to sigma in offshore welding specifications has been mixed. Previously, the identification of sigma was wither not quoted or stated as being not permitted. However, achieving zero sigma content in duplex stainless steel welds and HAZs is questionable, particularly in steels and weld metals having a high chromium and molybdenum content. In the real world, how does one ensure that production welds performed offshore are free of sigma--or have a limited volume fraction of it--without having to constantly monitor welder performance? This review examines the difficulties and controls required to limit the presence of sigma in austenitic and duplex weld metals and HAZs associated with offshore piping and pipeline systems. Materials described here are those manufactured using contemporary steel making processes.

  10. To appear in: Boden A, Mller C, Nett B. Conducting Business Ethnography in Global Software Development Projects of Small German Enterprises. Information and Software Technology. 2010; accepted for publication.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of offshored software development work in SMEs [3,4,5,6]. The first part of the project was an explorative into offshoring in German small to medium-sized enterprises. Method: The material for this paper is based on reflections and field notes from two methodologically different research projects: an explorative ethnographic

  11. Structure, stratigraphy, and hydrocarbons offshore southern Kalimantan, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, W.F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore southern Kalimantan (Borneo), Indonesia, the Sunda Shelf is bounded on the south by the east-west-trending Java-Madura foreland basin and on the north by outcrops of the granitic core of Kalimantan. Major northeast-southwest-trending faults created a basin and ridge province which controlled sedimentation at least until early Miocene time. Just above the unconformity, the oldest pre-CD Limestone clastic strata are fluviatile and lacustrine, the remainder consisting largely of shallow-marine, calcareous shale with interbeds of fine-grained, quartzose sandstone. A flood of terrigenous detritus - Kudjung unit 3 - resulted from post-CD Limestone uplift, and is more widely distributed. Unit 3 consists largely of fluviatile sandstone interbedded with shale and mudstone, grading upward to marine clastics with a few thin limestones near the top. The resulting Kudjing unit 2 is largely a shallow-basinal deposit, comprising thin, micritic limestones interbedded with calcareous shale and mudstone. Infilling of the basins was nearly complete by the end of Kudjing unit 1 deposition. Eastern equivalents of Kudjing units 1 and 2 are known as the Berai limestone interval (comprising bank, reefal, basinal, and open-marine limestones, and marl). Of the three oil fields in the area, two are shut in, but one has produced nearly 100 million bbl. Gas shows were recorded in most wells of the area, but the maximum flow was 1.8 MMcf methane/day, although larger flows with high percentages of carbon dioxide and nitrogen were reported. Fine-grained clastic strata of unit 3 are continuous with those farther south, where geochemical data indicate good source and hydrocarbon-generating potential. Sandstones with reservoir capability are present in the clastic intervals, and several carbonate facies have sporadically developed porosity. A variety of structural and stratigraphic traps is present. 20 figures, 1 table.

  12. Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Large-Scale Mono-Column Offshore Wind Turbine with a Single Tether Hinged in Seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jieyan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The increased interest in the offshore wind resource in both industry and academic and the extension of the wind field where offshore wind turbine can be deployed has stimulated quite a number of offshore wind turbines concepts. This thesis presents...

  13. Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Large-Scale Mono-Column Offshore Wind Turbine with a Single Tether Hinged in Seabed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jieyan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The increased interest in the offshore wind resource in both industry and academic and the extension of the wind field where offshore wind turbine can be deployed has stimulated quite a number of offshore wind turbines concepts. This thesis presents...

  14. Livingston Solar Canopy Project The Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Mauricio

    ,000 high efficiency solar panels on canopy structures over two major surface parking areasLivingston Solar Canopy Project The Project: This project entails the installation of more than 40. In conjunction with the existing 1.4 megawatt solar energy facility on this campus, this project will generate

  15. Root cause analysis for waste area grouping 1, Batch I, Series 1 Tank T-30 project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks were scheduled for remedial actions as the Batch L Series I Tank Project during fiscal year (FY) 1995. These tanks are 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. The initial tank remediation project was conducted as a maintenance action. One project objective was to gain experience in remediation efforts (under maintenance actions) to assist in conducting remedial action projects for the 33 remaining inactive LLLW tanks. Batch I, Series 1 project activities resulted in the successful remediation of tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and 3013. Tank T-30 remedial actions were halted as a result of information obtained during waste characterization activities. The conditions discovered on tank T-30 would not allow completion of tank removal and smelting as originally planned. A decision was made to conduct a root cause analysis of Tank T-30 events to identify and, where possible, correct weaknesses that, if uncorrected, could result in similar delays for completion of future inactive tank remediation projects. The objective of the analysis was to determine why a portion of expected project end results for Tank T-30 were not fully achieved. The root cause analysis evaluates project events and recommends beneficial improvements for application to future projects. This report presents the results of the Batch I, Series root cause analysis results and makes recommendations based on that analysis.

  16. Development of Offshore Wind Recommended Practice for U.S. Waters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W. D.; Sheppard, R. E.; Dolan, D.; Naughton, B.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses how the American Petroleum Institute oil and gas standards were interfaced with International Electrotechnical Commission and other wind turbine and offshore industry standards to provide guidance for reliable engineering design practices for offshore wind energy systems.

  17. Final Report DE-EE0005380 - Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DE-EE0005380 - Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems Final Report DE-EE0005380 - Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm...

  18. Floating offshore wind farms : demand planning & logistical challenges of electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nnadili, Christopher Dozie, 1978-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Floating offshore wind farms are likely to become the next paradigm in electricity generation from wind energy mainly because of the near constant high wind speeds in an offshore environment as opposed to the erratic wind ...

  19. Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Ram, B.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a summary of a 236-page NREL report that provides a broad understanding of today's offshore wind industry, the offshore wind resource, and the associated technology challenges, economics, permitting procedures, and potential risks and benefits.

  20. Federal offshore statistics: 1992. Leasing, exploration, production, and revenues as of December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francois, D.K.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, enacted in 1953 and amended several times, charges the Secretary of the Interior with the responsibility for administering and managing mineral exploration and development of the outer continental shelf, as well as for conserving its natural resources. This report documents the following: Federal offshore lands; offshore leasing activity and status; offshore development activity; offshore production of crude oil and natural gas; Federal offshore oil and natural gas sales volume and royalties; revenue from Federal offshore leases; disbursement of Federal offshore revenue; reserves and resource estimates of offshore oil and natural gas; oil pollution in US and international waters; and international activities and marine minerals. 11 figs., 83 tabs.

  1. DOE Launches High-Tech Research Buoys to Advance U.S. Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Launches High-Tech Research Buoys to Advance U.S. Offshore Wind Development DOE Launches High-Tech Research Buoys to Advance U.S. Offshore Wind Development May 18, 2015 - 3:18pm...

  2. First U.S. Grid-Connected Offshore Wind Turbine Installed Off...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    First U.S. Grid-Connected Offshore Wind Turbine Installed Off the Coast of Maine First U.S. Grid-Connected Offshore Wind Turbine Installed Off the Coast of Maine October 1, 2013 -...

  3. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments in Offshore Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen A. Holditch

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this study is to develop the necessary knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus is on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. To achieve this objective, we have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. To be sure our geomechanical modeling is realistic, we are also investigating the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. In Phase II of the project, we will review all published core data and generate additional core data to verify the models. To generate data for our models, we are using data from the literature and we will be conducting laboratory studies in 2007 that generate data to (1) evaluate the conceptual pore-scale models, (2) calibrate the mathematical models, (3) determine dominant relations and critical parameters defining the geomechanical behavior of HBS, and (4) establish relationships between the geomechanical status of HBS and the corresponding geophysical signature. The milestones for Phase I of this project are given as follows: Literature survey on typical sediments containing gas hydrates in the ocean (TAMU); Recommendations on how to create typical sediments in the laboratory (TAMU); Demonstrate that typical sediments can be created in a repeatable manner in the laboratory and gas hydrates can be created in the pore space (TAMU); Develop a conceptual pore-scale model based on available data and reports (UCB); Test the developed pore-scale concepts on simple configurations and verify the results against known measurements and observations (UCB); Complete the FLAC3D routines that will be linked with the reservoir model (LBNL); Complete the TOUGH+/HYDRATE modifications and extensions (LBNL); Complete the TOUGH+/FLAC3D interaction interface (LBNL); Integrate and test the coupled geomechanical numerical model TFxH/FLAC3D (LBNL); and Demonstrate that Petrel can be used to develop an earth model for providing data to the TOUGH+/FLAC3D (SLB).

  4. The effectiveness of 3-D marine systems as an exploration tool in the offshore Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idowu, A.O. (Nigerian National Petroleum Corp., Lagos (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From inception in 1984, three-dimensional (3-D) marine surveys have been used widely for field development where commercial hydrocarbons were known to exist in Nigeria. The high-trace density and full 3-D migration provide a data set that allows detailed interpretation of complex geologic structures and, in many cases, provides good stratigraphic information as well. The result has been better placement of development wells, making field development more efficient and cost effective. Previous application of the 3-d method (i.e., reconaissance 3-D) as an exploration tool in 1987 has demonstrated its effectiveness for predrilling detailing of prospects in offshore Niger Delta in a situation where a large volume of seismic data were acquired at relatively reduced unit costs. The technique involves acquiring data along a line every 200 m spacing, while interpretation in 3-D data processing is applied for subsequent 3-D migration. Based on pattern recognition of events on the input traces, the links are established to allow traces to be formed between input locations by comparing several attributes of events on neighboring traces. A case history example from the offshore Niger delta shows that the collection costs for the reconnaissance 3-D method are comparable to two-dimensional detailing based on similar line kilometer and time duration for the survey. A trade-off between cost and technical specifications can be programmed by focusing on the geologic objective. The technique brings the advantage of 3-D methods, but not their costs, to the exploration phase of the search for petroleum, and it is highly recommended for exploration in frontier areas, particularly the deep offshore of the Niger Delta.

  5. Plate tectonics and offshore boundary delimitation: Tunisia-Libya case at the International Court of Justice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, D.J.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in the technology for exploiting resources of the oceans, particularly recovery of hydrocarbons and minerals in deep water, is benefiting a growing number of nations. At the same time, however, economic and political pressures have induced concern and there is now a much increased emphasis on jurisdiction to divide the offshore areas between the 132 coastal nations. Negotiations affect research operations at sea and, in consequence, marine scientists have been made aware of offshore problems as highlighted by the Law of the Sea Treaty (UNCLOS III) and complications arising from the legal versus scientific definitions of continental shelves and margins. The first major offshore boundary case of international scope where plate tectonics has constituted a significant argument is the one recently brought before the International Court of Justice by Libya and Tunisia concerning the delimitation of their continental shelves. Of the two parties, Libya placed the greatest emphasis on this concept as a means to determine natural prolongation of its land territory into and under the sea. Tunisia contested Libya's use of the whole of the African continental landmass as a reference unit; in Tunisia's view, considerations of geography, geomorphology, and bathymetry are at least as relevant as are those of geology. In its landmark judgment (February 1982) - which almost certainly will have far-reaching consequences in future such boundary delimitation cases - the court pronounced that It is the outcome, not the evolution in the long-distant past, which is of importance, and that it is the present-day configuration of the coasts and sea bed which are the main factors to be considered, not geology.

  6. United States- Land Based and Offshore Annual Average Wind Speed at 100 Meters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Full-size, high resolution version of the 100-meter land-based and offshore wind speed resource map.

  7. Geological play analysis of the Pacific Federal Offshore Region - A status report on the National Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunkel, C.A. (Minerals Management Service, Camarillo, CA (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological and geophysical data from the federal offshore areas seaward of California, Oregon, and Washington (Pacific Outer Continental Shelf or OCS) are being used to identify petroleum plays for the Department of the Interior's National Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources project. Analysis of these data by a team of Minerals Management Service geo-scientists have led to the definition, delineation, and qualitative characterization of plays in six Pacific OCS assessment provinces: Pacific Northwest, Central California, Santa-Barbara-Ventura Basin, Los Angeles Basin, inner borderland, and other borderland. Plays are defined on the bases of reservoir rock stratigraphy, trap style, and hydrocarbon type. Each play is classified as established, frontier, or conceptual according to its discovery status and data availability. Preliminary analysis of the plays are complete and have been compiled in map and text formats by province. Plays are being further analyzed to characterize their quantitative attributatives such as numbers and sizes of undiscovered fields and geologic risk. Statistical evaluation to develop volumetric estimates of undiscovered oil and gas resources will be completed in late 1994. A discovery process modeling technique will be used to evaluate established plays in the Santa Maria and Santa Barbara-Ventura basins. Subjective modeling, based on estimated field-size distributions, will be applied to frontier and conceptual plays. Formal reports of the assessment results will be presented in 1995.

  8. Lower cost offshore field development utilizing autonomous vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frisbie, F.R.; Vie, K.J.; Welch, D.W.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The offshore oil and gas industry has the requirement to inspect offshore oil and gas pipelines for scour, corrosion and damage as well as inspect and intervene on satellite production facilities. This task is currently performed with Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) operated from dynamically positioned (DP) offshore supply or diving support boats. Currently, these tasks are expensive due to the high day rates for DP ships and the slow, umbilical impeded, 1 knot inspection rates of the tethered ROVs, Emerging Autonomous Undersea Vehicle (AUV) technologies offer opportunities to perform these same inspection tasks for 50--75% lower cost, with comparable or improved quality. The new generation LAPV (Linked Autonomous Power Vehicles) will operate from fixed facilities such as TLPs or FPFs and cover an operating field 10 kms in diameter.

  9. MHK Projects/Makah Bay Offshore Wave Pilot Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet <| Open EnergyInformation Makah Bay

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Echelard

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

  11. Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Appendix E

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 2, 2009 District Las Vegas Field Office Resource Area Activity (program) Proposed Wind Generation SECTION A. PROJECT INFORMATION 1. Project Name Searchlight Wind Project 4....

  12. Offshore Renewable Energy R&D (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the offshore renewable energy R&D efforts at NREL's NWTC. As the United States increases its efforts to tap the domestic energy sources needed to diversify its energy portfolio and secure its energy supply, more attention is being focused on the rich renewable resources located offshore. Offshore renewable energy sources include offshore wind, waves, tidal currents, ocean and river currents, and ocean thermal gradients. According to a report published by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in 2010,1 U.S. offshore wind resources have a gross potential generating capacity four times greater than the nation's present electric capacity, and the Electric Power Research Institute estimates that the nation's ocean energy resources could ultimately supply at least 10% of its electric supply. For more than 30 years, NREL has advanced the science of renewable energy while building the capabilities to guide rapid deployment of commercial applications. Since 1993, NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) has been the nation's premier wind energy research facility, specializing in the advancement of wind technologies that range in size from a kilowatt to several megawatts. For more than 8 years, the NWTC has been an international leader in the field of offshore floating wind system analysis. Today, researchers at the NWTC are taking their decades of experience and extensive capabilities and applying them to help industry develop cost-effective hydrokinetic systems that convert the kinetic energy in water to provide power for our nation's heavily populated coastal regions. The center's capabilities and experience cover a wide spectrum of wind and water energy engineering disciplines, including atmospheric and ocean fluid mechanics, aerodynamics; aeroacoustics, hydrodynamics, structural dynamics, control systems, electrical systems, and testing.

  13. 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 Network of offshore wind farms connected by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    2 33 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 Network of offshore wind farms connected by gas insulated transmission of connecting these offshore wind farms by gas in- sulated transmission lines (GIL) is investigated. Aim, Germany Corresponding author: anja.drews@forwind.de Offshore wind parks in different stages.Green- in op

  14. Mesoscale modelling for an offshore wind farm Jake Badger*, Rebecca Barthelmie, Sten Frandsen, Merete Bruun Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesoscale modelling for an offshore wind farm Jake Badger*, Rebecca Barthelmie, Sten Frandsen for an offshore wind farm in a coastal location. Spatial gradients and vertical profiles between 25 m and 70 m offshore wind farms tend to be placed within the coastal zone, the region within around 50km from

  15. TRANSMISSION OPTIONS FOR OFFSHORE WIND FARMS IN THE UNITED STATES Sally D. Wright, PE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    TRANSMISSION OPTIONS FOR OFFSHORE WIND FARMS IN THE UNITED STATES Sally D. Wright, PE Anthony L@ecs.umass.edu, rerl@ecs.umass.edu Abstract While offshore wind farms have been installed in Europe for over a decade an introduction to transmission issues for offshore wind farms in North America, aimed towards non

  16. California offshore wind energy potential Michael J. Dvorak a,*, Cristina L. Archer b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California (CA). The siting of an offshore wind farm is limited by water depth, with shallow water being generally preferable economically. Acceptable depths for offshore wind farms are divided into three based wind farms which peak at night, the offshore winds near Cape Mendocino are consistently fast

  17. Modelling of offshore wind turbine wakes with the wind farm program FLaP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Modelling of offshore wind turbine wakes with the wind farm program FLaP Bernhard Lange(1) , Hans from the Danish offshore wind farm Vindeby. Vertical wake profiles and mean turbulence intensities are not modelled satisfactorily. Keywords: Offshore, wind farm, wake model, Vindeby, turbulence intensity

  18. EVALUATION OF MODELS FOR THE VERTICAL EXTRAPOLATION OF WIND SPEED MEASUREMENTS AT OFFSHORE SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    sites. The first large offshore wind farms are currently being built in several countries in Europe. For the planning of offshore wind farms the vertical wind speed profile is needed for two main reasons: WindEVALUATION OF MODELS FOR THE VERTICAL EXTRAPOLATION OF WIND SPEED MEASUREMENTS AT OFFSHORE SITES

  19. ENERGY FOR SUSTAINABILITY: HIGHLY COMPLIANT FLOATING OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES: FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENT THROUGH THEORY, SIMULATION AND DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    revolution that enables economic development of wind farms in very challenging deepwater offshore locationsA-1 ENERGY FOR SUSTAINABILITY: HIGHLY COMPLIANT FLOATING OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES: FEASIBILITY surrounding Europe, and plans are in place for offshore developments in the US. Locating these wind turbines

  20. RWT TOOL: OFFSHORE WIND ENERGY MAPPING FROM SAR C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    much interest during the last decade. The adventure started in 1991 when the first offshore wind farm. New development plans near Horns Rev and Nysted are ongoing. Offshore wind farms are in development the highest spatial detail (~500 m by 500 m grid cells) and are observed within the offshore `wind-farming

  1. Risk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    to generate 20% of its electricity from wind. Developers are actively planning offshore wind farms along the URisk Analysis DOI: 10.1111/risa.12085 Quantifying the Hurricane Catastrophe Risk to Offshore Wind of Energy has estimated that over 50 GW of offshore wind power will be required for the United States

  2. Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    sites. The first large offshore wind farms are currently being built in several countries in EuropeImportance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Abstract The economic feasibility of offshore wind power utilisation

  3. LiDAR observations of offshore winds at future wind turbine operating heights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm. The influence of atmospheric stability on the surface layer wind shear of offshore wind farms in the coming years. In contrast with the situation over land, the knowledge turbine manufacturers and wind farm developers, although the offshore environment represents other

  4. Offshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp-Johansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the next generation of offshore wind farms are designed. The aim of this paper is to discuss existingOffshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp@civil.auc.dk leje@elsam-eng.com Abstract: Current offshore wind turbine design methods have matured to a 1st

  5. Optimal Selection of AC Cables for Large Scale Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Weihao

    Optimal Selection of AC Cables for Large Scale Offshore Wind Farms Peng Hou, Weihao Hu, Zhe Chen@et.aau.dk, whu@iet.aau.dk, zch@iet.aau.dk Abstract--The investment of large scale offshore wind farms is high the operational requirements of the offshore wind farms and the connected power systems. In this paper, a new cost

  6. RECYCLING AND REMOVAL OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES AN INTERACTIVE METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF NEGATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    phases of new wind turbines. There are plans about offshore wind farms in many countries e.g. in northernRECYCLING AND REMOVAL OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES ­ AN INTERACTIVE METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF NEGATIVE and an analysis of future removal and recycling processes of offshore wind turbines. The method is process

  7. MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND FARM SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND important for offshore wind energy utilisation are discussed and tested: Four models for the surface tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rødsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind

  8. Comparison of Wake Model Simulations with Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Profiles Measured by Sodar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    a ship-mounted sodar at a small offshore wind farm. The experiments were conducted at varying distances Offshore wind farms have increased in size from the first phase of installation with up to 20 turbinesComparison of Wake Model Simulations with Offshore Wind Turbine Wake Profiles Measured by Sodar R

  9. Wind resources and wind farm wake effects offshore observed from satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind resources and wind farm wake effects offshore observed from satellite Charlotte Bay Hasager to quantify the wake effect at two large offshore wind farms in Denmark. It is found that the wake velocity further. There is fast progress on planning and installation of offshore wind farms in the European waters

  10. Feasibility of Underwater Sensor Networks for Lifetime Assessment of Offshore Civil Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    farms, the Middelgrunden and Horn Revs offshore wind farms in Denmark, are considered based on numerical, Middelgrunden and Horns Rev offshore wind farms, are simulated as case studies using numerical simulation. In this paper, the network communication topology and in-network processing algorithm for two offshore wind

  11. From%laggard%to%leader:%% Explaining%offshore%wind%developments%in%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    From%laggard%to%leader:%% Explaining%offshore%wind%developments%in% the%UK% Florian!laggard!to!leader:!Explaining! offshore!wind!developments!in!the!UK! Florian Kern1* , Adrian Smith1 , Chris Shaw1 , Rob Raven2 and Bram for publication in Energy Policy, 19 Feb 2014 Abstract Offshore wind technology has recently undergone rapid

  12. Energy Policy 35 (2007) 15841598 Public opinion about large offshore wind power: Underlying factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Policy 35 (2007) 1584­1598 Public opinion about large offshore wind power: Underlying opinion regarding offshore wind power based on a survey of residents near a proposed development off Cape, the first offshore wind proposal in North America, in Nantucket Sound (MA, USA) has generated a strong

  13. Offshore wind resources from satellite SAR Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete Bruun Christiansen, Morten Nielsen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offshore wind resources from satellite SAR Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete Bruun Christiansen, Morten ocean wind maps were described. For offshore wind resource estimation based on satellite observations and the near-coastal zone (up to 40 km offshore) is not mapped. In contrast, Envisat ASAR wind maps can

  14. Evaluation of Offshore Wind Simulations with MM5 in the Japanese and Danish Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Evaluation of Offshore Wind Simulations with MM5 in the Japanese and Danish Coastal Waters Teruo to evaluate the accuracy of offshore wind simulation with the mesoscale model MM5, long-term simulations to simulate offshore wind conditions in the Japanese coastal waters even using a mesoscale model, compared

  15. Investigations of migratory birds during operation of Horns rev offshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigations of migratory birds during operation of Horns rev offshore wind farm: Preliminary analyses of bird studies conducted during spring 2004 in relation to the offshore wind farm at Horns Rev of the Horns Rev offshore wind farm - preliminary note on the issue of potential habitat loss. Christensen, T

  16. Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental impact assessment NERI Report Environmental Research Institute Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental impact of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental impact assessment Authors: Henning Noer, Thomas Kjær

  17. VALUING PUBLIC PREFERENCES FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER: A CHOICE EXPERIMENT APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    VALUING PUBLIC PREFERENCES FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER: A CHOICE EXPERIMENT APPROACH by Andrew D. Krueger All Rights Reserved #12;ii VALUING PUBLIC PREFERENCES FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER: A CHOICE EXPERIMENT thank you for your perspective on offshore renewable energy regulation. As committee members, your

  18. www.cesos.ntnu.no Author Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    1 www.cesos.ntnu.no Author ­ Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation Structures Deep Water Offshore Wind Economic Production Cost WT Life Time : 20 Years Introduction Vast icing for offshore Wind Turbines ? · Wherever there is sea icing ! · Temperature bellow zero degree

  19. SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES-based Damage Detec- tion (SSDD) method on model structures for an utilization of this approach on offshore wind damage in real size structural components of offshore wind turbines. KEYWORDS : Damage detection

  20. Simulation of electricity supply of an Atlantic island by offshore wind turbines and wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Simulation of electricity supply of an Atlantic island by offshore wind turbines and wave energy an electricity storage for a 5000 inhabitants island supplied by both marine renewables (offshore wind and waves community. Key words: Wave energy, offshore wind turbines, marine energy 1 Introduction Marine renewables

  1. Influences of offshore environmental conditions on wind shear profile parameters in Nantucket Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Influences of offshore environmental conditions on wind shear profile parameters in Nantucket Sound@ecs.umass.edu ABSTRACT Simultaneous wind resource and oceanographic data are available from an offshore monitoring tower how oceanographic data can be used to aid offshore wind resource assessment evaluations. This study

  2. CONTINUOUS FATIGUE ASSESSMENT OF AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE USING A LIMITED NUMBER OF VIBRATION SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CONTINUOUS FATIGUE ASSESSMENT OF AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE USING A LIMITED NUMBER OF VIBRATION, Modal decomposition and expansion, Finite Element Model INTRODUCTION Offshore wind turbines are exposed locations along the structure. This is not the case though in monopile offshore wind turbines, where fatigue

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF WAVES ON THE OFFSHORE WIND Bernhard Lange, Jrgen Hjstrup*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    THE INFLUENCE OF WAVES ON THE OFFSHORE WIND RESOURCE Bernhard Lange, Jørgen Højstrup* Risø National and waves and thus in air-sea interaction in general. For predicting the offshore wind climate'8&7,21 The favourable wind resource at offshore compared to land sites is caused by the very low surface roughness

  4. MAST628 Syllabus-8/12/2014 p. 1 Offshore Wind Power: Science, engineering, and policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    MAST628 Syllabus- 8/12/2014 p. 1 Offshore Wind Power: Science, engineering, and policy MAST 628-4842, dveron@udel.edu, Robinson 114B Class web site with lecture notes: www.udel.edu/sakai UD offshore wind the multiple disciplines required to understand, plan, regulate, and develop offshore wind resources for large

  5. MODULAR MULTI-LEVEL CONVERTER BASED HVDC SYSTEM FOR GRID CONNECTION OF OFFSHORE WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Sanjay

    MODULAR MULTI-LEVEL CONVERTER BASED HVDC SYSTEM FOR GRID CONNECTION OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER PLANT U off-shore wind power plants. The MMC consists of a large number of simple voltage sourced converter offshore wind power plants (WPP) because they offer higher energy yield due to a superior wind profile

  6. A FRESH LOOK AT OFFSHORE WIND OPPORTUNITIES IN MASSACHUSETTS Anthony L. Rogers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    A FRESH LOOK AT OFFSHORE WIND OPPORTUNITIES IN MASSACHUSETTS Anthony L. Rogers, Ph.D. James F at Amherst Amherst, MA 01003 The utilization of offshore winds for generating electricity was first proposed that offshore wind development anywhere would be unlikely. More recently, a number of European countries have

  7. Incorporating Irregular Nonlinear Waves in Coupled Simulation of Offshore Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    Incorporating Irregular Nonlinear Waves in Coupled Simulation of Offshore Wind Turbines Puneet, and Environmental Engineering The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 Design of an offshore wind turbine requires on the support structure (monopile) of an offshore wind turbine. We present the theory for the irregular

  8. AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL POWER. Jarvis All Rights Reserved #12;AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT in offshore wind energy. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Jeremy Firestone

  9. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Foundation Models for Offshore Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Foundation Models for Offshore Wind Turbines of alternative models for monopile pile foundations for shallow-water offshore wind turbines has on extreme loads) is the most common type of foundation used today for offshore wind turbines; the support structure connects

  10. 1 Copyright 2007 by ASME SIMULATION OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE RESPONSE FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    1 Copyright © 2007 by ASME SIMULATION OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE RESPONSE FOR EXTREME LIMIT STATES P loads for an offshore wind turbine using simulation, statistical extrapolation is the method of choice in the design of offshore wind turbines against ultimate limit states, and a recent draft [1] of design

  11. DATA NORMALIZATION FOR FOUNDATION SHM OF AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE : A REAL-LIFE CASE STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DATA NORMALIZATION FOR FOUNDATION SHM OF AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE : A REAL-LIFE CASE STUDY Wout the first results in the development of a SHM approach for the foun- dations of an offshore wind turbine the performance of the presented approach. KEYWORDS : Foundation Monitoring, Offshore Wind Turbine, Operational

  12. St h ti d i l i fStochastic dynamic analysis of offshore wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    1 St h ti d i l i fStochastic dynamic analysis of offshore wind turbines ­ with emphasis on fatigue Co te ts · Overview of offshore wind technology · Modelling of environmental conditions · Dynamic analysis of offshore bottom-fixed wind turbines · Modelling and dynamic analysis of floating wind turbines

  13. The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing), The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing on the fate of topography, winddriven and eddydriven circulation on the offshore removal of plume waters. A realistically

  14. A MODULAR SHM-SCHEME FOR ENGINEERING STRUCTURES UNDER CHANGING CONDITIONS: APPLICATION TO AN OFFSHORE WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TO AN OFFSHORE WIND TURBINE Moritz W. H¨ackell1, Raimund Rolfes1 1 Institute of Structural Analysis, Leibniz in common. A shift from fossil to renewable energy source is the logical con- sequence. (Offshore) wind : Offshore Wind Turbine, Machine Learning, Condition Parameter, Control Charts, Affinity Propagation

  15. Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    Estimation of methane flux offshore SW Taiwan and the influence of tectonics on gas hydrate simulating reflectors (BSRs) imply the potential existence of gas hydrates offshore southwestern Taiwan settings in offshore SW Taiwan might strongly control the stability of gas hydrates, and thus affect

  16. Summary of Conclusions and Recommendations Drawn from the DeepCWind Scaled Floating Offshore Wind System Test Campaign: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.; Masciola, M. D.; Molta, P.; Goupee, A. J.; Coulling, A. J.; Prowell, I.; Browning, J.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DeepCwind consortium is a group of universities, national labs, and companies funded under a research initiative by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to support the research and development of floating offshore wind power. The two main objectives of the project are to better understand the complex dynamic behavior of floating offshore wind systems and to create experimental data for use in validating the tools used in modeling these systems. In support of these objectives, the DeepCwind consortium conducted a model test campaign in 2011 of three generic floating wind systems, a tension-leg platform (TLP), a spar-buoy (spar), and a semisubmersible (semi). Each of the three platforms was designed to support a 1/50th-scale model of a 5 MW wind turbine and was tested under a variety of wind/wave conditions. The focus of this paper is to summarize the work done by consortium members in analyzing the data obtained from the test campaign and its use for validating the offshore wind modeling tool, FAST.

  17. A study of cyclic pressuremeter testing for offshore applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riner, Kenneth Byard

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    volume corresponding to the bottom of the Nth cycle. For the curve shown in Figure 1, the secant' shear modulus and the cyclic shear modulus for the Nth cycle are calculated as follows: ~Z(M) P (r +r ) T(N) 4 (r r) R T(N) B(N) ~C(N) T(N) B(N) (2... of cycles. Discussion of C clic Loads Offshore structures are subjected to a complicated and varying wave loading history. The number of wave loading cycles to which an offshore platform may be subjected throughout its life is around 10 cycles...

  18. Offshore Wind Technologie GmbH OWT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdaleOdersun AG JumpOffshoreOffshore

  19. Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles, for Large-Scale Geologic Storage of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Michael

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Geomechanics Technologies has completed a detailed characterization study of the Wilmington Graben offshore Southern California area for large-scale CO2 storage. This effort has included: an evaluation of existing wells in both State and Federal waters, field acquisition of about 175 km (109 mi) of new seismic data, new well drilling, development of integrated 3D geologic, geomechanics, and fluid flow models for the area. The geologic analysis indicates that more than 796 MMt of storage capacity is available within the Pliocene and Miocene formations in the Graben for midrange geologic estimates (P50). Geomechanical analyses indicate that injection can be conducted without significant risk for surface deformation, induced stresses or fault activation. Numerical analysis of fluid migration indicates that injection into the Pliocene Formation at depths of 1525 m (5000 ft) would lead to undesirable vertical migration of the CO2 plume. Recent well drilling however, indicates that deeper sand is present at depths exceeding 2135 m (7000 ft), which could be viable for large volume storage. For vertical containment, injection would need to be limited to about 250,000 metric tons per year per well, would need to be placed at depths greater than 7000ft, and would need to be placed in new wells located at least 1 mile from any existing offset wells. As a practical matter, this would likely limit storage operations in the Wilmington Graben to about 1 million tons per year or less. A quantitative risk analysis for the Wilmington Graben indicate that such large scale CO2 storage in the area would represent higher risk than other similar size projects in the US and overseas.

  20. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton, J.D. [CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Edwards, E.B. [ Ogle & Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States); Heck, R.G. [Ogle & Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  1. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton, J.D. (CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Edwards, E.B. ( Ogle Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Heck, R.G. (Ogle Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)) (and others)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  2. Confirmatory Survey Report for Area B1S/B2S at the Chevron Mining Washington Remediation Project, Washington, PA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of October 2 and 3, 2007, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performed confirmatory radiological survey activities which included gamma surface scans within Area B1S/B2S and the collection of soil samples from these areas.

  3. Verification of the New FAST v8 Capabilities for the Modeling of Fixed-Bottom Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barahona, B.; Jonkman, J.; Damiani, R.; Robertson, A.; Hayman, G.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled dynamic analysis has an important role in the design of offshore wind turbines because the systems are subject to complex operating conditions from the combined action of waves and wind. The aero-hydro-servo-elastic tool FAST v8 is framed in a novel modularization scheme that facilitates such analysis. Here, we present the verification of new capabilities of FAST v8 to model fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines. We analyze a series of load cases with both wind and wave loads and compare the results against those from the previous international code comparison projects-the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23 Subtask 2 Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) and the IEA Wind Task 30 OC3 Continued (OC4) projects. The verification is performed using the NREL 5-MW reference turbine supported by monopile, tripod, and jacket substructures. The substructure structural-dynamics models are built within the new SubDyn module of FAST v8, which uses a linear finite-element beam model with Craig-Bampton dynamic system reduction. This allows the modal properties of the substructure to be synthesized and coupled to hydrodynamic loads and tower dynamics. The hydrodynamic loads are calculated using a new strip theory approach for multimember substructures in the updated HydroDyn module of FAST v8. These modules are linked to the rest of FAST through the new coupling scheme involving mapping between module-independent spatial discretizations and a numerically rigorous implicit solver. The results show that the new structural dynamics, hydrodynamics, and coupled solutions compare well to the results from the previous code comparison projects.

  4. ENDOW: EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENT OF OFFSHORE WINDFARMS Rebecca Barthelmie and Gunner Larsen, *Wind Energy Department, Ris National Laboratory, 4000 Roskilde,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    developers and turbine manufacturers to optimise power output from offshore wind farms through minimised wake offshore wind farms (Vindeby and Bockstigen) to undertake the first comprehensive evaluation of offshore with a mesoscale model focusing on boundary-layer development within and over a large offshore wind farm

  5. On Assessing the Accuracy of Offshore Wind Turbine Reliability-Based Design Loads from the Environmental Contour Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    On Assessing the Accuracy of Offshore Wind Turbine Reliability-Based Design Loads from to derive design loads for an active stall-regulated offshore wind turbine. Two different Danish offshore contour method; wind turbine; offshore; reliability. INTRODUCTION Inverse reliability techniques

  6. Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for wind resource and wind shear at offshore sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    at offshore sites Bernhard Lange*, Søren Larsen# , Jørgen Højstrup# , Rebecca Barthelmie# *ForWind - Centre of offshore wind power utilisation depends on the favourable wind conditions offshore as compared to sites for this flow. It's applicability for wind power prediction at offshore sites is investigated using data from

  7. Access Framework: Model Text (November 2011) An Act to Establish a Framework for Development of Offshore Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    of Offshore Wind Power Whereas, the offshore waters of [State] are ecologically and economically vital public, Whereas, offshore wind power provides utility-scale renewable energy at competitive costs, helps to meet consequences; and Whereas, offshore wind power, being a domestic source of energy enhances U.S. energy

  8. A Predictive Maintenance Policy Based on the Blade of Offshore Wind Wenjin Zhu, Troyes University of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    A Predictive Maintenance Policy Based on the Blade of Offshore Wind Turbine Wenjin Zhu, Troyes onshore to offshore locations [1]. As offshore wind turbines are located at remote sites withlimited]. Operation and maintenance (O&M) costs of off-shore wind turbines contribute about 25-30% to the total energy

  9. Ultrasonic thickness testing of aging offshore structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellison, Brian Kirk

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    research on the use of corrosion protection. New corrosion resistant membranes are sometimes placed on the members in the splash zone area. Pemex Exploration and Production has used a protective epoxy coating called "RE-32" in the Bay of Campeche...

  10. Offshore Petroleum Resource Development and Marine Mammals: A Review and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with all phases of petroleum exploration and production. The physical, physiological, and behavioral efOffshore Petroleum Resource Development and Marine Mammals: A Review and Research Recommendations J to cause acute toxicity. However, the long- term effects of accumulation of petroleum basic data needed

  11. U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and BP's Macondo Well Spill Tad Patzek, Petroleum form well-rounded petroleum engineers, and deliver science and technology to O&G Industry, while trying that run the U.S. Complexity, models, risks Gulf of Mexico's oil and gas production Conclusions ­ p.3/4 #12

  12. arctic offshore drilling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    offshore drilling First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Riser and wellhead monitoring for...

  13. Bidding optimum bonus for federal offshore oil and gas leases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohrenz, J.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How a bidder should bid for federal offshore oil and gas leases offered by bonus bidding is detailed. Quantitative answers are given for bidders seeking to maximize value as well as reserves. The winner's curse is delineated. Further, it is shown how bidding as a joint venture rather than solo can diminish bidders' values.

  14. Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm 2004 Survey Report No. 1 March protection and at the wind turbine towers at six turbine sites. Video recordings were planned at different- scription. 2. Methodology Weather and wind conditions as well as hydrographical data such as current

  15. Electrical Collection and Transmission Systems for Offshore Wind Power: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.; Bowen, A.; Fingersh, L.J.; Wan, Y.

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical systems needed for offshore wind farms to collect power from wind turbines--and transmit it to shore--will be a significant cost element of these systems. This paper describes the development of a simplified model of the cost and performance of such systems.

  16. Basic Integrative Models for Offshore Wind Turbine Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aljeeran, Fares

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    were modeled using apparent fixity level, Randolph elastic continuum, and modified cone models. The offshore wind turbine structures were developed using a finite element formulation. A two-bladed 3.0 megawatt (MW) and a three-bladed 1.5 MW capacity...

  17. Energy Efficient Pump Control for an Offshore Oil Processing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenyu

    Esbjerg, Denmark (e-mail: yang@et.aau.dk). Ramboll Oil and Gas A/S, Willemoesgade 2, DK-6700 Esbjerg control, energy saving 1. INTRODUCTION Pump systems have been extensively used in offshore oil & gas industries, for instance, in order to get the crude oil/gas out of reservoirs, transport the produced oil/gas

  18. Onshore and offshore basins of northeast Libya: Their origin and hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shegewi, O.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive data base of more than 3000 km of seismic lines, gravity and magnetic data, more than 30 subsurface well logs, and surface geology data were utilized to examine and interpret the sedimentary and tectonic history of the onshore and offshore parts of Northeast Libya and their hydrocarbon potential. The Dernah-Tobruk and Benghazi offshore basins form the northern parts of the study area. The Cyrenaica Stable Platform represents the southern parts. The Sirual Trough stretches E-W and opens into the Antelat Trough in the west. Between these elements is the uplifted areas of the Al Jabal Al Akhdar. Six principal tectonic phases were responsible for the formation and development of these structural elements: the pre-Mesozoic phase, the Triassic-Jurassic rifting phase, the Neocomian and the Aptian-Albian renewed rifting phases, the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene uplifting phase; and the Eocene-Middle Oligocene rifting phase. Oceanic crust of probable Aptian-Albian age is evident on the seismic lines north of the master fault marking the southern boundary of the rift separating the north African plate and Apulia. The western boundary of the Dernah High displayed clearly NE-SW strike-slip movement of these trajectories. Oceanic crust is also present west of the Dernah High. Positive gravity and magnetic anomalies traverse parallel to the boundary of this oceanic plate Mesogea. The prerequisites for commercial hydrocarbon production are present in abundance. Reservoirs ranging in age from Paleozoic clastics in the Cyrenaica Stable Platform to Mesozoic and Tertiary carbonates throughout the rest of the region. Several deep sites for the generation of hydrocarbons were also present, including the rifted northern parts of the Dernah-Tobruk basin, the Antelat Trough and the Cyrenaica Passive Margin. The Cretaceous and Tertiary section in the study area contain several potential seal rocks. Several potential trap types are also present.

  19. Access Framework: Model Text (November 2011): An Act to Establish a Framework for Development of Offshore Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The model offshore wind power legislation focused on two aspects: compensation for use of ocean space and environmental assessment. In particular, the model legislation recommends the adoption of a rent and royalty scheme that is premised on high rent and low royalties in order to stimulate qualified bids from developers who are motivated to begin production as early as possible and to discourage sham bidding. The model legislation also includes a provision that sets royalties at a lower rate in the early years of project operation, and that provides states with the discretion to waive or defer rent and/or royalties for a period of time to meet the goals and objectives of energy independence, job creation, reduced emissions of conventional pollutants and greenhouse gases and increased state requirements for electricity from renewable sources. The environmental impact assessment (EIA) is structured to provide a systematic and interdisciplinary evaluation of the potential positive and negative life-cycle effects of a proposed offshore wind project on the physical, biological, cultural and socio-economic attributes of the project.

  20. An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, Steve; Ershaghi, Iraj

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to over 10,000,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intended to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. In the first phase of the project, state of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic, interference tests and production logs were employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database were used in the construction of a new geologic model of the fracture network. An innovative fracture network reservoir simulator was developed to better understand and manage the aquifer’s role in pressure maintenance and water production. In the second phase of this project, simulation models were used to plan the redevelopment of the field using high angle wells. Correct placement of the wells is critical to intersect the best-developed fracture zones and to avoid producing large volumes of water from the water leg. Particula r attention was paid to those areas of the field that have not been adequately developed with the existing producers. In cooperation with the DOE and the PTTC, the new data and the new fracture simulation model were shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during Budget Periods I and II. Venoco elected to terminate the project after Budget Period II and not to proceed with the activities planned for Budget Period III.