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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Refraction Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Northern Basin &...

2

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal...

3

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract N/A Authors Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1980 Report Number GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation Elaine J. Bell,Lawrence T. Larson,Russell W. Juncal. 1980. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province,

4

Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Range Geothermal Region and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (34) Power Plants (3) Projects (7) Techniques (33) Map: {{{Name}}} Examination of seismicity and late Quaternary faults in Montana and Idaho north of the Snake River Plain shows a geographic correspondence between high seismicity and 24 faults that have experienced surface rupture during the late Quaternary. The Lewis and Clark Zone delineates the northern boundary of this tectonically active extensional region. Earthquakes greater than magnitude 5.5 and all identified late Quaternary faults are confined to the Montana-Idaho portion of the Basin and Range Province south of the Lewis and Clark Zone. Furthermore, all 12 Holocene faults are

5

Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature geothermal systems, and to use this technique to target potential geothermal resources in the Great Basin. Two potential target areas were identified in year one (FY03) by regional-scale studies: (1) the area

6

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration...

7

Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005)...

8

Geothermometry At Northern Basin & Range Region (Cole, 1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region Northern Basin & Range Region (Cole, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Wstern Utah hot springs: Antelope, Fish (Deadman), Fish (Wilson), Twin Peak, Cudahy, Laverkin, Grantsville, Crystal Prison, Arrowhead, Red Hill, Monroe, Joseph, Castilla, Saratoga, Thermo, Crater, Wasatch, Beck, Deseret, Big Spring, Blue Warm, Crystal Madsen, Udy, Cutler, Garland, Utah, Ogden, Hooper, Newcastle Area References David R. Cole (1983) Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Faults In Utah Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermometry_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Cole,_1983)&oldid=4014

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - area northern baltic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the Baltic Sea Basin Summary: C in south- ern areas such as Poland and northern Germany. Water surface temperatures in the Baltic Sea could... landscape, and the Baltic Sea...

10

Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida W $38.51 W $140.84 27.3% 134 W 100.0% Florida W $38.51 W $140.84 27.3% 134 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - W W W - W Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W $16.14 W $63.35 25.5% 1,681 W 88.5% Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $20.69 $19.60 -5.3% $74.23 26.4% 4,845 31.9% 97.7% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $13.74 $16.13 17.4% $99.82 16.2% 840 32.1% 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W $40.18 W $94.03 42.7% 699 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Jersey W $32.44 W $89.13 36.4% 1,064 W 47.6% Northern Appalachian Basin New York $21.87 $18.86 -13.8% $59.40 31.7% 2,373 49.3% 91.9%

11

Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware W $28.49 W $131.87 21.6% 59 W 100.0% Delaware W $28.49 W $131.87 21.6% 59 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Florida W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W $20.35 W $64.82 31.4% 1,715 W 75.9% Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.73 $19.64 -0.4% $81.15 24.2% 4,650 24.8% 99.3% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan W $14.02 W $76.22 18.4% 713 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W $43.43 W $90.90 47.8% 499 W 89.6% Northern Appalachian Basin New Jersey W $27.19 W $74.81 36.3% 1,864 W 44.1% Northern Appalachian Basin New York $20.08 $15.26 -24.0% $53.68 28.4% 3,726 39.2% 79.1%

12

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mark Coolbaugh, Richard Zehner, Corne Kreemer, David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa-

13

Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region Magnetotellurics At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

14

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Regional Assessment of Exploration Potential for Geothermal Systems in The Great Basin Using a Geographic Information System (GIS) - Part II, Coolbaugh, Zehner, Raines, Shevenell, Minor, Sawatzky and Oppliger. The objective is to generate new exploration targets for both conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital geothermal data will be made available to industry and researchers on a web site. Relationships among the data will be explored using spatial

15

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Cole,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cole, Cole, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Cole, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Wstern Utah hot springs: Antelope, Fish (Deadman), Fish (Wilson), Twin Peak, Cudahy, Laverkin, Grantsville, Crystal Prison, Arrowhead, Red Hill, Monroe, Joseph, Castilla, Saratoga, Thermo, Crater, Wasatch, Beck, Deseret, Big Spring, Blue Warm, Crystal Madsen, Udy, Cutler, Garland, Utah, Ogden, Hooper, Newcastle Area References David R. Cole (1983) Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm

16

Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region Water Sampling At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

17

Isotopic Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Northern Basin & Range Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

18

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

19

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

20

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W. Pritchett (2004) Finding Hidden Geothermal Resources In The Basin And Range Using Electrical Survey Techniques- A Computational Feasibility Study Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Pritchett,_2004)&oldid=401423"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=40142

22

Contemporary Strain Rates in the Northern Basin and Range Province from GPS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contemporary Strain Rates in the Northern Basin and Range Province from GPS Contemporary Strain Rates in the Northern Basin and Range Province from GPS Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Contemporary Strain Rates in the Northern Basin and Range Province from GPS Data Abstract [1] We investigate the distribution of active deformation in the northern Basin and Range province using data from continuous GPS (CGPS) networks, supplemented by additional campaign data from the Death Valley, northern Basin and Range, and Sierra Nevada-Great Valley regions. To understand the contemporary strain rate field in the context of the greater Pacific (P)-North America (NA) plate boundary zone, we use GPS velocities to estimate the average relative motions of the Colorado Plateau (CP), the Sierra Nevada-Great Valley (SNGV) microplate, and a narrow north-south

23

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blackwell,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Northern Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dixie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Blackwell,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=401422

24

Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Geoffrey Blewitt, William C. Hammond, Corne Kreemer (2005) Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geodetic_Survey_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Blewitt_Et_Al,_2005)&oldid=401408" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

25

Heat flow in the northern Basin and Range province | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the northern Basin and Range province in the northern Basin and Range province Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Heat flow in the northern Basin and Range province Abstract The heat flow in the Basin and Range province of northern Nevada is extremely complex. It is a product of superposition of the regional effects of extension and volcanism /intrusion modified by the local conductive effects of thermal refraction (complicated structural settings),variations in radioactive heat production, erosion and sedimentation. In addition to these conductive effects,groundwater flow, both on a local and a regional basis,affects heat-flow measurements. Typical heat -flow values for the Basin and Range province average 85 +/- 10 mWm-2. The higher estimates are

26

Geothermometry At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Geothermometry At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of

27

Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

28

Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Northern Basin & Range Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes On a more local scale, Faulds et al. (2003, 2005a, 2005b, 2006) have conducted structural analysis and detailed geologic mapping at a number of sites throughout Nevada and have found that productive geothermal systems typically occur in one of several structural settings, including step-overs in normal fault zones, near the ends of major normal faults where the

29

Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

30

Isotopic Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Kennedy & Van Soest,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region (Kennedy & Van Soest, Northern Basin & Range Region (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Northern Basin & Range Region (Kennedy & Van Soest, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active transtensional deformation indicates a deformation-enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere, even in regions where there is no substantial magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local, high 3He/4He anomalies indicating hidden magmatic activity and/or deep

31

Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Geoffrey Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geodetic_Survey_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Blewitt,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=401407"

32

Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown References Geoffrey Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Field_Mapping_At_Northern_Basin_%26_Range_Region_(Blewitt,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=510749"

33

Incipient diagenesis of sediments from the Pigmy Basin, northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCIPIENT DIAGENESIS OF SEDIMENTS FROM THE PIGMY BASIN, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by STEVEN VINCENT STEARNS Submitted t. o the Graduate College of Texas ASM Unrversity in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 19B5 Major Subject: Geology INCIPIENT DIAGENESIS OF SEDIMENTS FROM THE PIGMY BASIN, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by STEVEN VINCENT STEARNS Approved as to style and content by: Thomas T. Tieh (Co-Chair of Committee...

Stearns, Steven Vincent

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fracture history of the Northern Piceance Creek Basin, Northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fracture pattern of the Northern Piceance Creek Basin, in Rio Blanco and Garfield Counties of Northwestern Colorado, evolved during at least four periods of brittle failure in Eocene rocks of the Green River and overlying Uinta Formations. Fractures in these rocks of are interest to hydrologists because matrix permeabilities in both formations are low, due either to poor sorting and interstitial calcite cement (Uinta sandstones) or to low pore volume and growth of authigenic minerals (Green River oil shales). Ground water at shallow to intermediate depths thus circulates mostly through secondary openings such as fractures and through voids created by the dissolution of nahcolite and halite. Fracture-induced permeabilities probably dominate most at shallow depths, where fractures are most abundant, apertures of fracture walls are greates, and solution openings are least common. Shallow, fracture-dominated aquifers are strongly anisotropic. At deeper levels, in leached zones of the ''saline facies'' of the lower part of the Green River Formation, solution openings contribute greatly to fluid flow and permeabilities probably are less direction dependent.

Verbeek, E.R.; Grout, M.A.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Driver and Pedestrian Behavior at Uncontrolled Crosswalks in the Tahoe Basin Recreation Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Tahoe Basin Recreation Area Meghan Fehlig Mitman,in the Tahoe Basin Recreation Area Submission Date: Augusttraverses rural and/or recreation areas, the findings from

Mitman, Meghan Fehlig; Cooper, Douglas; DuBose, Brooke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Self Potential At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Northern Basin & Range Region Self Potential At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

37

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blackwell,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Determining heat loss is one more tool to use in geothermal exploration. It is relatively easy to calculate if the thermal aureole has been mapped with thermal gradient well measurements. With the heat loss information, predicted production capacity can be used to help review the system being explored. References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

38

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

39

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

40

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin...

42

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract NA Authors Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1980 Report Number...

43

Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- W - W W W - W Central Appalachian Basin Alabama 26.18 26.10 -0.3% 118.06 22.1% 930 37.4% 100.0% Central Appalachian Basin Delaware 23.73 15.12 -36.3% 88.59 17.1%...

44

Dr Stephen Dry, Canada Research Chair in Northern Hydrometeorology, discusses research projects on the Quesnel River Basin in British Columbia and wider concerns for freshwater supply in the area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focuses on the impacts of climate change on Canada's northern and alpine regions.The anthropogenic. In particular, I am attempting to determine what effect climate change will have on the environment in Canada in the oil and gas sectors with subsurface extraction (through fracking) requiring abundant freshwater

Dery, Stephen

45

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

46

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

47

Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume II. Palo Duro basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and high variable precipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume I. Dalhart Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and highly variable prcipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

East Basin Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East Basin Creek Geothermal Area East Basin Creek Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: East Basin Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.2633,"lon":-114.811,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes On the regional scale, we investigated the spatial relationship of known geothermal activity with: (1) the regional tendency of Quaternary fault orientations; (2) the direction of extensional strain; and (3) the magnitudoef fault-normal extensional strain. Item (1) is purely a structural analysis based on documented Quatemary faulting. Item (2) is purely an empirical strain-rate analysis, based on GPS station velocity

51

Field Mapping At Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region (1993) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region (1993) Geothermal Region (1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region (1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1993 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes New apatite fission track cooling age and track length data, supplemented by other information, point to the Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the Utah-Nevada-Idaho border to southernmost Nevada experience extension and major exhumation in Early to Middle Miocene time. Reconnaissance apatite ages from the Toiyabe

52

GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION ASSESSMENT AND INTERPRETATION, KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON-SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

survey of the Swan Lake Valley area, Oregon: Geonornicssurvey of the Swan Lake Valley Area, Oregon: GeonomicsKLAMATH BASIN, OREGON SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA M.

Stark, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION ASSESSMENT AND INTERPRETATION, KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON-SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA M.survey of the Swan Lake Valley area, Oregon: Geonornicssurvey of the Swan Lake Valley Area, Oregon: Geonomics

Stark, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Ash Quality of a Beneficiated Lignite from Ptolemais Basin, Northern Greece  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ash Quality of a Beneficiated Lignite from Ptolemais Basin, Northern Greece ... Knowing that oil and gas reserves are diminishing very fast, the beneficiation of coals is of most importance, since this energy source is widely distributed around the world. ... The present research was carried in collaboration with Public Power Corporation of Greece, which simultaneously conducted pilot plant tests for beneficiating Greek lignites, using the TRI-FLO technique. ...

D. Vamvuka; E. Mistakidou; S. Drakonaki; A. Foscolos; K. Kavouridis

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

D-Area Oil Seepage Basin Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report...

56

GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION ASSESSMENT AND INTERPRETATION, KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON-SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KLAMATH BASIN, OREGON SWAN LAKE AND KLAMATH HILLS AREA M.of the Swan Lake-Yonna Valley area, Klamath County, Oregon:

Stark, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

On the origin of graben and ridges within and near volcanically buried craters and basins in Mercury's northern plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Mercury's northern plains Andrew M. Freed,1 David M. Blair,1 Thomas R. Watters,2 Christian Klimczak,3 Paul volcanic plains taken by the MESSENGER spacecraft reveal a large number of buried impact craters and basins pooled lavas were thickest, and no graben are predicted within generally thinner plains outside of major

Zuber, Maria

58

Audit of the Western Area Power Administration's Contract with Basin Electric Power Cooperative, IG-0409  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 25, 1997 June 25, 1997 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: John C. Layton Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of the Western Area Power Administration's Contract with Basin Electric Power Cooperative" BACKGROUND: At the request of the Western Area Power Administration (Western), we conducted an audit of charges to Western made by Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin), under Contract No. DE- MP65-82WP-19001. The contract for Westernms purchase of electric power from Basin was entered into on April 15, 1982, and was in effect from January 1, 1986, through October 31, 1990. Western identified 17 areas where overcharges might have occurred. The

59

A numerical soil-water-balance (SWB) model was used to estimate groundwater recharge in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains. The SWB model consisted of 1 km2 to 2011. Average calculated recharge in the Williston basin was 0.190 in/yr (1,281 ft3 /sec) and ranged.1 percent of precipitation in the Williston basin. Average recharge in the Powder River basin was 0.136 in

Torgersen, Christian

60

Remote sensing for groundwater modelling in large semiarid areas: Lake Chad Basin, Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is lower than 200 mm and the population density does not exceed 0.05 inhabitants per km2 . PreviousRemote sensing for groundwater modelling in large semiarid areas: Lake Chad Basin, Africa Marc.springerlink.com #12;2 Remote sensing for groundwater modelling in large semiarid areas: Lake Chad Basin, Africa Marc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

F-Area Seepage Basins: Environmental information document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides environmental information on postulated closure options for the F-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Plant and was developed as background technical documentation for the Department of Energy's proposed Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on waste management activities for groundwater protection at the plant. The results of groundwater and atmospheric pathway analyses, accident analysis, and other environmental assessments discussed in this document are based upon a conservative analysis of all foreseeable scenarios as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (40 CFR 1502.22). The scenarios do not necessarily represent actual environmental conditions. This document is not meant to represent or be used as a regulatory closure plan or other regulatory sufficient document. Technical assistance in the environmental analyses of waste site closures was provided by Clemson University; GeoTrans, Inc.; JBF Associates, Inc.; S.S. Papadopulos and Associates Inc.; Radiological Assessments Corporation; Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation; Science Applications International Corporation; C.B. Shedrow Environmental Consultants, Inc.; Exploration Software; and Verbatim Typing and Editing.

Corbo, P.; Killian, T.H.; Kolb, N.L.; Marine, I.W.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Area Study prior to Companion Modelling to Integrate Multiple Interests in Upper Watershed Management of Northern Thailand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management of Northern Thailand C. Barnaud*, G. Trébuil**, P. Dumrongrojwatthana***, J. Marie**** * CU of northern Thailand have long been accused of degrading the upper watersheds of the country's major basins communities and state agencies, calling for the need for adapted participatory methodologies to facilitate

Boyer, Edmond

63

The Winter Diurnal Circulation and Its Influence on Precipitation over the Coastal Area of Northern Taiwan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind and rainfall data for December, January and February, 197680, over the northern coastal area of Taiwan were analyzed to examine the diurnal patterns of these parameters. Results show that the diurnal variation of rainfall was strongly ...

George Tai-Jen Chen; Shi-Yang Chen; Miin-Huey Yan

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - area northern sweden Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technologies and Information Sciences 83 Ris-R-1182(EN) Equalizing Effects of the Wind Energy Summary: resource of Northern Europe is spread out over a geographically large area....

65

Rock-water interactions of the Madison Aquifer, Mission Canyon Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Williston Basin is located in the northern Great Plains of the United States. This area includes eastern Montana, northwestern South Dakota, and western North (more)

Spicer, James Frank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

Porter, Russell [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission].

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hydrocarbon trapping mechanisms in the Miller Creek area of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'' 1975 43'W'79 ABSTRACT Hydrocarbon Trapoing Mechanisms in the Miller Creek Area of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. (May 1975) Jennifer Ann Armstrong, B. S. , University of Texas at Austin Chairman of Advisory Committee: 17r. Robert. R. Berg...

Armstrong, Jennifer Ann

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $28.49 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $38.51 $39.67 - 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $20.35 $16.14 $16.64 -9.6 3.1 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.64 $19.60 $20.41 1.9 4.2 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $14.02 $16.13 $16.23 7.6 0.6 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $43.43 $40.18 $39.62 -4.5 -1.4

69

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $26.24 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $35.10 $35.74 - 1.8 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $18.74 $14.70 $14.99 -10.6 1.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $18.09 $17.86 $18.39 0.8 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $12.91 $14.70 $14.63 6.4 -0.5 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $40.00 $36.62 $35.70 -5.5 -2.5

70

Guidelines for acceptable soil concentrations in the old F- and H-Area Retention Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentration guidelines for residual radionuclides in soil at the sites of the Old F- and H-Area Retention Basins (281-3F, 281-3H) have been calculated using a dose-based approach. The guidelines also are being applied to areas around the F-Basin`s Process Line. Estimation of these soil guidelines was completed using RESRAD 5.0 in accordance with the DOE RESRAD methodology specified in DOE/CH/8901 (Gi89). Guidelines are provided for the nuclides known to be present in the soils at each basin (Sc87). Soil and hydrologic characteristics specific to each basin are defined for the areas above, within, and beneath the contaminated zones.

Hamby, D.M.

1994-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

71

Modelling rockwater interactions in flooded underground coal mines, Northern Appalachian Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Office of Surface Mining 3 Parkway Center...flooded underground coal mines in northern Appalachia, USA. In early...the Effects of Coal Mining, Greene County...Seam of Northern Appalachia. In: Proceedings Eastern Coal Mine Geomechanics...

Eric F. Perry

72

Numerical Simulation of Inter-basin Groundwater Flow into Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Using the Death Valley Regional Flow System Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models of groundwater flow for the Yucca Flat area of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) are under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for corrective action investigations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). One important aspect of these models is the quantity of inter-basin groundwater flow from regional systems to the north. This component of flow, together with its uncertainty, must be properly accounted for in the CAU flow models to provide a defensible regional framework for calculations of radionuclide transport that will support determinations of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine contaminant boundary. Because characterizing flow boundary conditions in northern Yucca Flat requires evaluation to a higher level of detail than the scale of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model can efficiently provide, a study more focused on this aspect of the model was required.

Pohlmann Karl,Ye Ming

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Quality ranking of twelve columnar basalt occurrences in the northern portion of the Paran BasinBrazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents results obtained from a study of basal degrading conducted on samples of basaltic rocks found in the northern part of the Paran Basin in the State of So Paulo, Brazil. To meet the objectives of the study, natural and accelerated alteration tests were carried out followed by a comparison of the quantitative analysis of the two alteration processes. The combined analysis of the information proved to be very useful tool for rock qualification and the quantification of alterability, thus providing a basis for comparative analysis of massive and columnar jointed basalt relative to their use as aggregate for civil construction purposes.

R.L. Gomes; J.E. Rodrigues

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazon basin northern Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Michael E. McClain Department of Environmental Summary: WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN THE AMAZON BASIN ISSUES, CHALLENGES, AND OPPORTUNITIES...

75

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - 43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0161 W W W W $0.0216 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0296 $0.0277 $0.0292 $0.0309 $0.0325 $0.0328 $0.0357 $0.0451 $0.0427 4.7 -5.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

76

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - $15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $19.46 W W W W $29.49 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $10.33 $9.58 $10.68 $12.03 $13.69 $14.71 $16.11 $19.72 $20.69 9.1 4.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

77

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - $0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0146 W W W W $0.0223 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0269 $0.0255 $0.0275 $0.0299 $0.0325 $0.0339 $0.0380 $0.0490 $0.0468 7.2 -4.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

78

RESRAD soil concentration guidelines for the Old F-Area Retention Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentration guidelines for residual radionuclides in soil at the site of the Old F-Area Retention Basin have been calculated using a dose-based approach. Estimation of these soil guidelines was completed using RESRAD 5.0 in accordance with the DOE RESRAD methodology specified in DOE/CH/8901. Guidelines are provided for the two predominant nuclides, Sr-90 and Cs-137, known to be present in the soil beneath the old basin. A guideline is also given for Pu-238 since it is known to exist at the H-Area Retention Basin. Site-specific soil characteristics are defined for the areas above, within, and beneath the contaminated zone.

Hamby, D.M.

1994-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

79

Seismic facies and growth history of Miocene carbonate platforms, Wonocolo Formation, North Madura area, East Java Basin, Indonesia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Miocene Wonocolo Formation in the North Madura area, East Java Basin, contains numerous isolated carbonate platforms that are broadly distributed across a ~3000 sq (more)

Adhyaksawan, Rahadian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K- Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Landslide Inventory in the Area of Dubra?ina River Basin (Croatia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic landslide mapping was performed for an area of 9.35 km2 of the geomorphological unit of hills in the Dubra?ina River Basin. Based on the visual interpretation of LiDAR imagery, supplemented by field re...

Petra ?omlija; Sanja Bernat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

H-Area Seepage Basins Groundwater Monitoring Report: Volume 1, Third and Fourth quarters 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isoconcentration/isocactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1994. Geologic cross sections indicate both the extent and depth of contamination of the primary contaminants in all of the hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1994. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the H-Area Seepage Basins have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

Chase, J.A.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and Gross Merchantable Volume: 1890-1990 (DB1017) data Data DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.db1017 Contributors A. N. D. Auclair, J. A. Bedford, and C. Revenga Description This database lists annual changes in areal extent (Ha) and gross merchantable wood volume (m3) produced by depletion and accrual processes in boreal and temperate forests in Alaska, Canada, Europe, Former Soviet Union, Non-Soviet temperate Asia, and the contiguous United States for the years 1890 through 1990. Forest depletions (source terms for atmospheric CO2) are identified as forest pests, forest dieback, forest fires, forest harvest, and land-use changes (predominantly the conversion of forest, temperate woodland, and shrubland to cropland). Forest accruals (sink terms

84

Sub-crop geologic map of pre-Tertiary rocks in the Yucca Flat and northern Frenchman Flat areas, Nevada Test Site, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This map displays interpreted structural and stratigraphic relations among the Paleozoic and older rocks of the Nevada Test Site region beneath the Miocene volcanic rocks and younger alluvium in the Yucca Flat and northern Frenchman Flat basins. These interpretations are based on a comprehensive examination and review of data for more than 77 drillholes that penetrated part of the pre-Tertiary basement beneath these post-middle Miocene structural basins. Biostratigraphic data from conodont fossils were newly obtained for 31 of these holes, and a thorough review of all prior microfossil paleontologic data is incorporated in the analysis. Subsurface relationships are interpreted in light of a revised regional geologic framework synthesized from detailed geologic mapping in the ranges surrounding Yucca Flat, from comprehensive stratigraphic studies in the region, and from additional detailed field studies on and around the Nevada Test Site. All available data indicate the subsurface geology of Yucca Flat is considerably more complicated than previous interpretations have suggested. The western part of the basin, in particular, is underlain by relics of the eastward-vergent Belted Range thrust system that are folded back toward the west and thrust by local, west-vergent contractional structures of the CP thrust system. Field evidence from the ranges surrounding the north end of Yucca Flat indicate that two significant strike-slip faults track southward beneath the post-middle Miocene basin fill, but their subsurface traces cannot be closely defined from the available evidence. In contrast, the eastern part of the Yucca Flat basin is interpreted to be underlain by a fairly simple north-trending, broad syncline in the pre-Tertiary units. Far fewer data are available for the northern Frenchman Flat basin, but regional analysis indicates the pre-Tertiary structure there should also be relatively simple and not affected by thrusting. This new interpretation has implications for ground water flow through pre-Tertiary rocks beneath the Yucca Flat and northern Frenchman Flat areas, and has consequences for ground water modeling and model validation. Our data indicate that the Mississippian Chainman Shale is not laterally extensive confining unit in the western part of the basin because it is folded back onto itself by the convergent structures of the Belted Range and CP thrust systems. Early and Middle Paleozoic limestone and dolomite are present beneath most of both basins and, regardless of structural complications, are interpreted to form a laterally continuous and extensive carbonate aquifer. Structural culmination that marks the French Peak accommodation zone along the topographic divide between the two basins provides a lateral pathway through highly fractured rock between the volcanic aquifers of Yucca Flat and the regional carbonate aquifer. This pathway may accelerate the migration of ground-water contaminants introduced by underground nuclear testing toward discharge areas beyond the Nevada Test Site boundaries. Predictive three-dimensional models of hydrostratigraphic units and ground-water flow in the pre-Tertiary rocks of subsurface Yucca Flat are likely to be unrealistic due to the extreme structural complexities. The interpretation of hydrologic and geochemical data obtained from monitoring wells will be difficult to extrapolate through the flow system until more is known about the continuity of hydrostratigraphic units. 1 plate

Cole, J.C.; Harris, A.G.; Wahl, R.R.

1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

Bakken and other Devonian-Mississippian petroleum source rocks, northern Rocky Mtns.-Williston basin: Depositional and burial history and maturity estimations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The three-member Devonian-Mississippian Bakken-Exshaw organic-rich shaly facies is widely distributed in the northern U.S. and southern Canadian Cordillera. Equivalent facies are also present as far south as Utah and Nevada. Paleogeographically, these rocks thin markedly or pinchout to the west approximately along the Devonian-Mississippian carbonate reef-mound belt of the Cordilleran shelf margin. Although these rocks reach maximum organic richness approximately at the Devonian-Carboniferous transition, similar but somewhat less organic-rich Bakken-like beds are also present in underlying Upper Devonian and overlying Lower Carboniferous carbonate depositional cycles. At least ten cycles are identified in the underlying Duperow and Jefferson Formations, characterized by basal organic-rich Bakken-like shale or shaly carbonate that grades upward into carbonate mound or reefal beds, overlain by evaporite or solution breccia. Cycles in the overlying Lodgepole and Mission Canyon Formations, as many as 10-12 in number, are similar except that the carbonates are composed of algal-oolith, crinoid, or mixed skeletal beds, and end-cycle evaporitic units are less prevalent in the lower cycles. These dark shaly beds are the most important source of hydrocarbon reserves in Montana and the Williston basin. Maximum net thickness of the Devonian-Mississippian organic-rich facies is in the Williston basin. However, variable thicknesses of these potential source rocks is present in parts of Montana as far west as the thrust belt. Burial history studies suggest that in some areas these rocks are probably thermally immature. However, in much of the area original burial depths are sufficient for them to reach the thermally mature stage, and therefore are of importance to further exploration efforts in the Devonian-Mississippian Madison-Duperow-Jefferson Formations.

Peterson, J.A. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Hydrocarbon accumulation conditions and exploration direction of Baiyun-Liwan deep water areas in the Pearl River Mouth Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An integrated geologic study was performed in the Baiyun-Liwan deep water areas, Pearl River Mouth Basin, based on the achievements obtained during the past five exploration stages. The following understandings were obtained. (1) The Baiyun Sag has superior source rock conditions and has experienced three tectonic evaluation stages like rifting, rifting-depression and depression. The Wenchang-Enping Fms deposited during the rifting stage have large hydrocarbon generation potentials. During the rifting-depression and depression stages, the deposition in the study area was controlled by the Oligocene and Miocene shelf slope break zones. The Oligocene Zhuhai Fm shallow marine delta-longshore depositional system and the Miocene Zhujiang-Hanjiang Fms deep fan depositional system were formed, and they are the most favorable reservoir-caprock assemblages in the study area. (2) The Hydrocarbon accumulation pattern in the deep waters is different from that in the northern shallow waters. Shelf slope break zone, composite conduction system consisting of structural ridge, fault, sandbody, unconformity and fluid diapir as well as late tectonic movement are the three major factors controlling hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in the study area. (3) The Liwan 3-1 gas field is a typical example. The superior trapping conditions, high-quality reservoirs of delta distributary channel controlled by shelf slope break zone, vertical conduction system consisting of fault and diapir, as well as the overlying massive marine mudstone caprock provide favorable geologic conditions for the formation of large gas fields. Four areas were identified as the targets of gas exploration in the near future: the deep water fan system in the central sag, the structural-stratigraphic traps in the uplifted areas on both sides of the main sag of Baiyun, a series of large structural traps on the fault terrace to the southwest of the main sag, and the ultradeep frontiers in sags such as Liwan to the south of the main sag.

Lin Heming; Shi Hesheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Regional summary and recommended study areas for the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the regional geologic and environmental characterizations that have been completed for the Permian region of study, and describes the procedure used to identify study areas for the next phase of investigation. The factors evaluated in the Permian region fall into three broad areas: health and safety, environmental and socioeconomic, and engineering and economic considerations. Health and safety considerations included salt depth and thickness, faults, seismic activity, groundwater, salt dissolution, energy and mineral resources, presence of boreholes, and interactive land uses. Salt depth and thickness was the key health and safety factor, and when mapped, provded to be a discriminator. The evaluation of environmental and socioeconomic conditions focused primarily on the presence of urban areas and on designated land uses such as parks, wildlife areas, and historic sites. Engineering and economic considerations centered primarily on salt depth, which was already evaluated in the health and safety area. The Palo Duro and Dalhart basins are recommended for future studies on the basis of geology. In these two basins, salt depth and thickness appear promising, and there is less likelihood of past or future oil and gas exploratory holes. Environmental and socioeconomic factors did not preclude any of the basins from further study. 66 references, 16 figures, 2 tables.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For two consecutive years, 2004 and 2005, the largest natural gas well (in terms of gas flow/day) drilled onshore USA targeted the Ordovician Trenton/Black River (T/BR) play in the Appalachian Basin of New York State (NYS). Yet, little data were available concerning the characteristics of the play, or how to recognize and track T/BR prospects across the region. Traditional exploration techniques for entry into a hot play were of limited use here, since existing deep well logs and public domain seismic were almost non-existent. To help mitigate this problem, this research project was conceived with two objectives: (1) to demonstrate that integrative traditional and innovative techniques could be used as a cost-effective reconnaissance exploration methodology in this, and other, areas where existing data in targeted fracture-play horizons are almost non-existent, and (2) determine critical characteristics of the T/BR fields. The research region between Seneca and Cayuga lakes (in the Finger Lakes of NYS) is on strike and east of the discovery fields, and the southern boundary of the field area is about 8 km north of more recently discovered T/BR fields. Phase I, completed in 2004, consisted of integrating detailed outcrop fracture analyses with detailed soil gas analyses, lineaments, stratigraphy, seismic reflection data, well log data, and aeromagnetics. In the Seneca Lake region, Landsat lineaments (EarthSat, 1997) were coincident with fracture intensification domains (FIDs) and minor faults observed in outcrop and inferred from stratigraphy. Soil gas anomalies corresponded to ENE-trending lineaments and FIDs. N- and ENE-trending lineaments were parallel to aeromagnetic anomalies, whereas E-trending lineaments crossed aeromagnetic trends. 2-D seismic reflection data confirmed that the E-trending lineaments and FIDs occur where shallow level Alleghanian salt-cored thrust-faulted anticlines occur. In contrast, the ENE-trending FIDs and lineaments occur where Iapetan rift faults have been episodically reactivated, and a few of these faults extend through the entire stratigraphic section. The ENE-trending faults and N-striking transfer zones controlled the development of the T/BR grabens. In both the Seneca Lake and Cayuga Lake regions, we found more FIDs than Landsat lineaments, both in terms of individual FIDs and trends of FIDs. Our fused Landsat/ASTER image provided more lineaments, but the structural framework inferred from these lineaments is incomplete even for the fused image. Individual lineaments may not predict surface FIDs (within 500m). However, an individual lineament that has been groundtruthed by outcrop FIDs can be used as a proxy for the trend of intense fracturing. Aeromagnetics and seismic reflection data across the discovery fields west of Keuka Lake demonstrate that the fields terminate on the east against northerly-striking faults that extend from Precambrian basement to, in some cases, the surface; the fields terminate in the west at N- and NW-striking faults. Seismic and well log data show that the fields must be compartmentalized, since different parts of the same field show different histories of development. T/BR fields south of the research area also terminate (on the east) against northerly-trending lineaments which we suggest mark faults. Phase II, completed in 2006, consisted of collection and analysis of an oriented, horizontal core retrieved from one of the T/BR fields in a graben south of the field area. The field is located along ENE-trending EarthSat (1997) lineaments, similar to that hypothesized for the study area. The horizontal core shows much evidence for reactivation along the ENE-trending faults, with multiple events of vein development and both horizontal and vertical stylolite growth. Horizontal veins that post- and pre-date other vein sets indicate that at least two orogenic phases (separated by unloading) affected vein development. Many of the veins and releasing bend features (rhombochasms) are consistent with strike-slip motion (oblique) along ENE-striking faults as a result

Robert Jacobi; John Fountain; Stuart Loewenstein; Edward DeRidder; Bruce Hart

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Timing and Tectonic implications of basin inversion in the Nam Con Son Basin and adjacent areas, southern South China Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Malay basins. Contraction in the Western NCS, West Natuna, and Malay basins was accommodated through reactivation of major basin-bounding fault systems that resulted in asymmetric fault-bend folding of syn- and early post-rift strata. Inversion...

Olson, Christopher Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

90

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, adionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while turbidity was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Chase, J.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During third quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During second quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in four of the six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells (PAC 2, 5, and 6). Radium-228 exceeded Level 2 Flagging Criteria in one well (PAC 2); however this was an estimated value because quantitation in the sample did not meet specifications. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard (50 NTU) are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eastern Ivory Coast, off Benin and western Nigeria, and off the Brazilian conjugates of these areas), while large areas were subjected to transform rifting (northern Sierra Leone, southern Liberia, Ghana and the Brazilian conjugates of these areas...). The future Demerara-Guinea marginal plateaus were also progressively subjected to this new rifting event. Stage 2: In Aptian times, the progress of rifting resulted in the creation of small divergent Basins (off northern Liberia, eastern Ivory Coast, Benin...

Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

95

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Basin Basin Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware W W $16.45 $14.29 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $21.45 W W W W $28.57 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $11.39 $10.39 $11.34 $12.43 $13.69 $14.25 $15.17 $18.16 $18.85 6.5 3.8

96

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (first quarter 1995 is the third of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in wells FAC 3 and 11C. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (second quarter 1995 is the fourth of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and radium-226 exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west at a rate of 1300 feet per year. Groundwater flow in the Barnwell/McBean was to the northeast at a rate of 50 feet per year.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Area balance and strain in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama has established a correspondence between productivity and structural position, but the reasons for this correspondence remain uncertain. In Cedar Cove field, for example, exceptionally productive wells are concentrated in a rollover anticline, whereas in Oak Grove field, exceptionally productive wells are aligned along a synclinal axis. This suggests that factors controlling gas production are a derivative of the structural geometry, and not the geometry by itself. Natural fractures and a low state of in-situ stress facilitate depressurization of coalbed reservoirs by dewatering, and hence, desorption and production of coalbed gas. Our hypothesis is that the abundance and openness of natural fractures in the Black Warrior basin are a direct expression of the layer-parallel strain dictated by map-scale structural geometry. Area balancing techniques can be used to quantify requisite strain, which is the homogeneous layer-parallel strain required for local area balance, and can also be used to constrain and verify structural cross sections. Application of area balancing techniques to extensional structures in the Black Warrior basin indicates that coalbed gas is produced from thin-skinned structures detached within the coal-bearing Pottsville Formation. Within reservoir intervals, requisite strain values are as high as 10 percent and increase downward toward the basal detachment. Mapping structure and production indicates that some productivity sweet spots correlate with enhanced bed curvature. Whereas requisite strain is the homogeneous strain calculated for discrete bed segments, curvature affects the distribution of strain within those segments. Recognizing this, our research is now focused on integrating area balancing techniques with curvature analysis to explain production patterns in coalbed methane reservoirs.

Pashin, J.C. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Groshong, R.H., Jr. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Coalbed methane production potential in U. S. basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major emphasis of the U.S. DOE's coalbed methane research has been on estimating the magnitude of the resource and developing systems for recovery. Methane resource estimates for 16 basins show that the greatest potential is in the Piceance, Northern Appalachian, Central Appalachian, Powder River, and Greater Green River coal basins. Small, high-potential target areas have been selected for in-depth analysis of the resource. Industry interest is greatest in the Warrior, San Juan, Piceance, Raton Mesa, and Northern and Central Appalachian basins. Production curves for several coalbed methane wells in these basins are included.

Byer, C.W.; Mroz, T.H.; Covatch, G.L.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Controls of oil family distribution and composition in nonmarine petroleum systems: A case study from Inner Mongolia Erlian basin, Northern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Erlian basin is a continental rift basin located in Inner Mongolia, Northern China. It is a typical representative of Cretaceous Northeast Asian Rift System, which includes many small petroliferous basins in Mongolia Republic and Northern China. Although Lower Cretaceous source rocks are understood to be most important in the Erlian petroleum systems, the precise identification of these source rock intervals and their determination on oil families distribution and composition are poorly understood in this tectonically complicated, nonmarine basin. New bulk data have been gathered from source rock intervals, oil sands and crude oil samples in eight main oil-producing subbasins. Geochemical analyses indicate that Lower Cretaceous Aershan formation (K1ba) and Tengger 1 formation (K1bt1) are two main source intervals in the Erlian basin and their source rock facies vary from profundal lacustrine to marginal lacustrine according to biomarker and trace elements calibration, the profundal lacustrine facies is characterised by brackish water and anoxic environment, which is similar to their correlative oils (Family 1 oils). The marginal lacustrine facies is characterised by freshwater and suboxic environment, which sourced the most common Family 2 oils. Meanwhile, different maturation processes exercise the second control on oil groups and their compositions, the profundal lacustrine source rocks characterised by their sulphur-rich kerogens lead to two oil groups (group 1 and group 2 oils), whose maturity range from low to normal; while, the marginal lacustrine source rock only lead to normal-maturity oils. At last, biodegradation affected the composition of a certain oils and formed group 4 heavy oils. In addition, short migration distance in small subbasins made the contamination or fractionation less notable in the Erlian basin.

Zhelong Chen; Guangdi Liu; Zhilong Huang; Xuejun Lu; Qiang Luo; Xiujian Ding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

RECONNAISSANCE ASSESSMENT OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL IN THE TRIASSIC AGE RIFT BASIN TREND OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND NORTHERN FLORIDA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reconnaissance assessment of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration potential within the Triassic age rift trend sediments of South Carolina, Georgia and the northern Florida Rift trend was performed for the Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This rift trend also extends into eastern Alabama, and has been termed the South Georgia Rift by previous authors, but is termed the South Carolina, Georgia, northern Florida, and eastern Alabama Rift (SGFAR) trend in this report to better describe the extent of the trend. The objectives of the study were to: (1) integrate all pertinent geologic information (literature reviews, drilling logs, seismic data, etc.) to create an understanding of the structural aspects of the basin trend (basin trend location and configuration, and the thickness of the sedimentary rock fill), (2) estimate the rough CO{sub 2} storage capacity (using conservative inputs), and (3) assess the general viability of the basins as sites of large-scale CO{sub 2} sequestration (determine if additional studies are appropriate). The CO{sub 2} estimates for the trend include South Carolina, Georgia, and northern Florida only. The study determined that the basins within the SGFAR trend have sufficient sedimentary fill to have a large potential storage capacity for CO{sub 2}. The deeper basins appear to have sedimentary fill of over 15,000 feet. Much of this fill is likely to be alluvial and fluvial sedimentary rock with higher porosity and permeability. This report estimates an order of magnitude potential capacity of approximately 137 billion metric tons for supercritical CO{sub 2}. The pore space within the basins represent hundreds of years of potential storage for supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} stored in aqueous form. There are many sources of CO{sub 2} within the region that could use the trend for geologic storage. Thirty one coal fired power plants are located within 100 miles of the deepest portions of these basins. There are also several cement and ammonia plants near the basins. Sixteen coal fired power plants are present on or adjacent to the basins which could support a low pipeline transportation cost. The current geological information is not sufficient to quantify specific storage reservoirs, seals, or traps. There is insufficient hydrogeologic information to quantify the saline nature of the water present within all of the basins. Water data in the Dunbarton Basin of the Savannah River Site indicates dissolved solids concentrations of greater than 10,000 parts per million (not potential drinking water). Additional reservoir characterization is needed to take advantage of the SGFAR trend for anthropogenic CO{sub 2} storage. The authors of this report believe it would be appropriate to study the reservoir potential in the deeper basins that are in close proximity to the current larger coal fired power plants (Albany-Arabi, Camilla-Ocilla, Alamo-Ehrhardt, and Jedburg basin).

Blount, G.; Millings, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results for year twelve in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale.

Porter, Russell G.; Winther, Eric C.; Fox, Lyle G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Guidelines for acceptable soil concentrations in the Old F- and H-Area Retention Basins. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentration guidelines for residual radionuclides in soil at the sites of the Old F- and a Retention Basins (281-3F, 281-3H) have been calculated using a dose-based approach. The guidelines also are being applied to areas around the F-Basin`s Process Line. Estimation of these soil guidelines was completed using RESRAD 5.0 in accordance with the DOE RESRAD methodology specified in DOE/CH/8901 (Gi89). Guidelines are provided for the nuclides known to be present in the soils at each basin (Sc87). Soil and hydrologic characteristics specific to each basin are defined for the areas above, within, and beneath the contaminated zones.

Hamby, D.M.

1994-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

104

E-Print Network 3.0 - area-3 northern palmyrides Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

). In many managed forests, including the northern hardwood forests of North America, wind disturbance events... Keywords: Wildlife distribution Landscape characteristics...

105

Groundwater model recalibration and remediation well network design at the F-Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 30, 1992, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Part B Permit prescribing remediation of contaminated groundwater beneath and downgradient of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site. The remediation outlined in the Part B Permit calls for a three phase approach. For the F-Area Seepage Basins, the first phase requires the ``installation of an adequate number of pumping and injection wells or trenches, as appropriate, to capture and remediate those portions of-the contaminant plume delineated by the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour.`` Geochemical results from 1992 groundwater monitoring were used to delineate this isoconcentration contour in the Corrective Action Program (CAP) (WSRC, 1992a). The 1992 results were used based on SCDHEC written requirement to use the most recent data available at the time the CAP was formulated. The rationale used by SCDHEC in selecting the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour was that it also encompassed most of the other contaminants listed in the Groundwater Protection Standards. After extraction and treatment, the water is required to be reinjected into the aquifer due to the high levels of tritium still present in the treated water. The conceptual plan is to have recirculation of the tritium (as much as can practically be accomplished) to allow more time for radioactive decay before natural discharge to surface water.

Sadler, W.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results for year ten in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trapnets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report under Section I, Implementation. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Section II of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed under Section II.

Porter, Russell G.; Glaser, Bryce G.; Amren, Jennifer

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The sequence stratigraphy of the latest Cretaceous sediments of northern Wyoming: The interplay of tectonic and eustatic controls on foreland basin sedimentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A west-east chronostratigraphic correlation has been made of the latest Cretaceous sediments of northern Wyoming. Five sections from Jackson Hole to Red Bird have been dated magnetostratigraphically (C34N-C26R) and radiometrically (81-68 Ma), and integrated with the ammonite biostratigraphy of the Niobrara and Pierre Shale. Four major sequence surfaces have been identified in section and the time missing within the unconformities has been measured and traced laterally. These bounding unconformities define six alloformations. The lowest straddles the C34N/C33R chronic boundary and contains the Cody, Telegraph Creek and Eagle Fms. The second ranges from the mid- to upper part of C33N of C32R and contains the Claggett and Judith River/Mesaverde Fms. The third (C32R ) is the Teapot Sandstone Member of the Mesaverde Fm. The fourth extends from the lower to upper part of C32N or to mid-C31R and includes the Bearpaw Shale and Meeteetse Fm. The fifth extends from C31N to C30N or C29N and includes the Harebell and Lance Fms. The base of the uppermost alloformation has been identified within C26R in the uppermost alloformation has been identified within C26R in the lowermost Fort Union. The unconformable surfaces are angular adjacent to the Sevier Thrust Belt but form paraconformities or hiatuses in the marine units to the east. The unconformities are eustatically controlled throughout the Campanian, but become tectonically driven in the Maastrichtian with the onset of rapid foredeep subsidence in Jackson Hole, and forebulge uplift in the Bighorn and Wind River Basin region which correlates exactly to the rapid regression of the Bearpaw Sea from the area in the range of Baculites clinolobatus.

Hicks, J.F. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Geology); Tauxe, L. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, LaJolla, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

INNOVATAIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the structure task, for this reporting period, the authors also edited and revised the map that displays the modified rose diagrams for the data they collected and reduced along the east side of Seneca Lake. They also revised the N-S transect that displays the frequency of ENE-striking fractures, and constructed a new N-S transect that shows the frequency of E-striking fractures. This transect compliments the earlier transect they constructed for fracture frequency of ENE-striking fractures. Significantly, the fracture frequency transect for E-W fractures shows a spike in fracture frequency in the region of the E-striking Firtree anticline that is observed on seismic reflection sections. The ENE fracture set does not exhibit an unusually high fracture frequency in this area. In contrast, the fracture frequency of the ENE-striking set is anomalously high in the region of the Trenton/Black River grabens. They have nearly completed reducing the data they collected from a NNW-SSE transect on the west side of Cayuga Lake and they have constructed modified rose diagrams for most sites. Structure contour maps and isopach maps have been revised based on additional well log analyses. Except for the Glodes Corners Field, the well spacing generally remains insufficient to identify faults or their precise locations. However, relatively sharp elevational changes east of Keuka Lake support the contention that faults occur along the east side of Keuka Lake. Similarly, a single well east of Seneca Lake shows that the Trenton there is low compared to distant wells, based on an assumed regional slope. This same area is where one of the Trenton grabens occurs. They have completed the interpretation of the reprocessed data that Quest licensed and had reprocessed. Several grabens observed in the Trenton and Black River reflectors are consistent with surface structure, soil gas, and aeromagnetic anomalies. In this report they display all four interpreted seismic lines. These data indicate that integration of aeromagnetic and topographic lineaments, surface structure, soil gas with seismic and well logs allows them to extrapolate Trenton-Black River trends away from confirmatory seismic lines.

Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) was monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning first quarter 1993, the HASB`s Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS), established in Appendix 3D-A of the cited permit, became the standard for comparison. Historically as well as currently, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constitutents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB (notably aluminum, iodine-129, strontium-90, technetium-99, and zinc) during the second half of 1993. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1}. However, constituents exceeding standards also occurred in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1} and Aquifer Unit 2A. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps include in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1993. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the HASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

Butler, C.T.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Remote sensing analysis of natural oil and gas seeps on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico is an economically important hydrocarbon basin. As oil-drilling technologies improve and reservoirs on the continental shelf are depleted, more companies are leasing drilling areas on the slope. The number.... The continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico is an economically important hydrocarbon basin. As oil-drilling technologies improve and reservoirs on the continental shelf are depleted, more companies are leasing drilling areas on the slope. The number...

De Beukelaer, Sophie Magdalena

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Laboratory Evaluation of Base Materials for Neutralization of the Contaminated Aquifer at the F-Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were performed to support field-testing of base injection into the F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater. The general purpose of these experiments is to provide information to guide the test of base injection and to identify potential adverse effects.

Serkiz, S.M.

2001-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Geothermal exploration assessment and interpretation, Upper Klamah Lake Area, Klamath Basin, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from public and private sources on the Klamath Basin geothermal resource are reviewed, synthesized, and reinterpreted. In this, the second and final phase of the work, geological, remote sensing, geochemical, temperature gradient, gravity, aeromagnetic, and electrical resistivity data sets are examined. These data were derived from surveys concentrated on the east and west shores of Upper Klamath Lake. The geological, remote sensing, and potential field data suggest a few northeast-trending discontinuities, which cross the regional north-westerly strike. The near-surface distribution of warm water appears to be related to the intersections of these lineaments and northwest-trending faults. The groundwater geochemical data are reviewed and the various reservoir temperature estimates compared. Particular attention is given to specific electrical conductivities of waters as an interpretational aid to the subsurface resistivity results. A clear trend emerges in the Klamath Falls/Olene Gap area; hotter waters are associated with higher specific conductivities. In the Nuss Lake/Stukel Mountain area the opposite trend prevails, although the relationship is somewhat equivocal.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

H-Area seepage basins groundwater monitoring report. Volume 1, First and second quarters 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) is monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SCl-890-008-989. The monitoring wells network is composed of 130 HSB wells that monitor the three separate hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the HASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Data from 16 HSL wells are included in this report only to provide additional information for the HASB. Monitoring results are compared to the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS), established in Appendix IIID-A of the permit. Historically as well as currently, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB (notably aluminum, iodine-129, strontium-90, and zinc) during the first half of 1995. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone IIB. However, constituents exceeding standards also occurred in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone IIB, and Aquifer Unit IIA.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report. Volume 1, First and second quarters 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first half of 1993, the groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) was monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit. Samples were collected from 130 wells that monitor the three separate hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the HASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Post-Closure Care Permit Application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. HASB`s Groundwater Protection Standard is the standard for comparison. Historically, as well as currently, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB, notably aluminum, iodine-129, mercury, nickel-63, strontium-89, strontium-90, technetium-99, and zinc during the first half of 1993. Elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}. However, constituents exceeding standards also occur in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1} and Aquifer Unit IIA.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Phase I Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (904-83G)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the completed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study (CMS/FS) for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (LAOCB)/L-Area Acid Caustic Basin (9LAACB) Solid Waste Management Unit/Operable Unit (SWMU/OU) at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Geologic and production characteristics of the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This study provides a critical comparison of the geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of existing Mesaverde gas producing areas within the basin to those same characteristics at the MWX site near Rifle, Colorado. As will be discussed, the basin has been partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Stimulation techniques have been reviewed for each partitioned area to determine the most effective stimulation technique currently used in the Mesaverde. This study emphasizes predominantly the southern Piceance Basin because of the much greater production and geologic data there. There may be Mesaverde gas production in northern areas but because of the lack of production and relatively few penetrations, the northern Piceance Basin was not included in the detailed parts of this study. 54 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

Myal, F.R.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Kukal, G.C.; Abadie, P.A.; Riecken, C.C.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River-water-balance (SWB) model to estimate groundwater recharge in the Williston and Powder River structural basins

Torgersen, Christian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Prospects For Electricity Generation In The San Luis Basin, Colorado, Usa |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prospects For Electricity Generation In The San Luis Basin, Colorado, Usa Prospects For Electricity Generation In The San Luis Basin, Colorado, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Prospects For Electricity Generation In The San Luis Basin, Colorado, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The San Luis basin is the largest and deepest basin in the Neogene Rio Grande rift, and has many similarities to the basins of the US Basin and Range Province. It is asymmetric with a displacement of as much as 9 km on its eastern margin, and approximately 6.4 km of sedimentary rocks of late Oligocene or younger age in the deepest portion of the basin. Temperature measurements in shallow wells in the northern basin have an average geothermal gradient of 59.0 ± 11.8°C km-1 (± standard

122

Regional aquifers and petroleum in Williston Basin region of US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At least five major aquifers underlie the northern Great Plains of the US, which includes parts of the Williston basin in Montana and North Dakota. These aquifers form a hydrologic system that extends more than 960 km from recharge areas in the Rocky Mountains to discharge areas in eastern North Dakota and the Canadian Provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. The regional flow system in the aquifers has had a major effect on the chemical composition of ground water within the Williston basin. Hydrodynamic forces may contribute to the accumulation of petroleum within the basin.

Downey, J.S.; Busby, J.F.; Dinwiddie, G.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management An investigation into the feasibility of using SWAT at the sub-basin level for simulating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management An investigation the potential for use in agricultural water scarcity management. Keywords: Hydrology, Streamflow, Basin., 2005). A pro-active approach to agricultural water scarcity management needs to take place through

Barthelat, Francois

124

Estimates of Vadose Zone Drainage from a Capped Seepage Basin, F-Area, Savannah River Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...because saturated unit gradient (gravity...primarily NO3 salts and because NO3...M.E. 1995. SRS geology/hydrogeology...Rehfeldt. 1992. A critical review of data...Superfund record of decision: Savannah River...SC1890008989, Operable Unit 6. USEPA, Aiken...2012088776 Waste disposal into seepage basins...

Tetsu K. Tokunaga; Jiamin Wan; Miles E. Denham

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - area northern tibet Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GSA, or editing@geos Summary: the South Tibet detachment can be traced from Nepal to this area, its westward extension is poorly defined... ) and termina- tion in the...

126

Geologic controls on transgressive-regressive cycles in the upper Pictured Cliffs sandstone and coal geometry in the lower Fruitland Formation, Northern San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three upper Pictured Cliffs Sandstone tongues in the northern part of the San Juan Basin record high-frequency transgressive episodes during the Late Cretaceous and are inferred to have been caused by eustatic sea level rise coincident with differential subsidence. Outcrop and subsurface studies show that each tongue is an amalgamated barrier strand-plain unit up to 100 ft (30 m) thick. Upper Pictured Cliffs barrier strand-plain sandstones underlie and bound thickest Fruitland coal seams on the seaward side. Controls on Fruitland coal-seam thickness and continuity are a function of local facies distribution in a coastal-plain setting, shoreline positions related to transgressive-regressive cycles, and basin subsidence. During periods of relative sea level rise, the Pictured Cliffs shoreline was temporarily stabilized, allowing thick, coastal-plain peats to accumulate. Although some coal seams in the lower Fruitland tongue override abandoned Pictured Cliffs shoreline deposits, many pinch out against them. Differences in the degree of continuity of these coal seams relative to coeval shoreline sandstones are attributed to either differential subsidence in the northern part of the basin, multiple episodes of sea level rise, local variations in accommodation and progradation, stabilization of the shoreline by aggrading peat deposits, or a combination of these factors. Fruitland coalbed methane resources and productivity are partly controlled by coal-seam thickness; other important factors include thermal maturity, fracturing, and overpressuring. The dominant production trend occurs in the northern part of the basin and is oriented northwestward, coinciding with the greatest Fruitland net coal thickness.

Ambrose, W.A.; Ayers, W.B. [University of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

128

Analysis of power loss data for the 200 Area Tank Farms in support of K Basin SAR work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of power loss data for the 200 Area Tank Farms was performed in support of K Basin safety analysis report work. The purpose of the analysis was to establish a relationship between the length of a power outage and its yearly frequency. This relationship can be used to determine whether the duration of a specific power loss is a risk concern. The information was developed from data contained in unusual occurrence reports (UORs) spanning a continuous period of 19.75 years. The average frequency of power loss calculated from the UOR information is 1.22 events per year. The mean of the power loss duration is 32.5 minutes an the median duration is 2 minutes. Nine events resulted in loss of power to both 200 East and 200 West areas simultaneously. Seven events (not necessarily the same events that resulted in loss of power to both 200 areas) resulted in outage durations exceeding 5 minutes. Approximately one-half of the events were caused by human error. The other half resulted from natural phenomena or equipment failures. None of the outages were reported to have any adverse effect on the tank farms.

Shultz, M.V. Jr.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

130

Geologic characterization report for the Paradox Basin Study Region, Utah Study Areas. Volume 6. Salt Valley  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface landforms in the Salt Valley Area are generally a function of the Salt Valley anticline and are characterized by parallel and subparallel cuestaform ridges and hogbacks and flat valley floors. The most prominent structure in the Area is the Salt Valley anticline. Erosion resulting from the Tertiary uplift of the Colorado Plateau led to salt dissolution and subsequent collapse along the crest of the anticline. Continued erosion removed the collapse material, forming an axial valley along the crest of the anticline. Paleozoic rocks beneath the salt bearing Paradox Formation consist of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, siltstone and shale. The salt beds of the Paradox Formation occur in distinct cycles separated by an interbed sequence of anhydrite, carbonate, and clastic rocks. The Paradox Formation is overlain by Pennsylvanian limestone; Permian sandstone; and Mesozoic sandstone, mudstone, conglomerate and shale. No earthquakes have been reported in the Area during the period of the historic record and contemporary seismicity appears to be diffusely distributed, of low level and small magnitude. The upper unit includes the Permian strata and upper Honaker Trail Formation. The current data base is insufficient to estimate ground-water flow rates and directions in this unit. The middle unit includes the evaporites in the Paradox Formation and no laterally extensive flow systems are apparent. The lower unit consists of the rocks below the Paradox Formation where permeabilities vary widely, and the apparent flow direction is toward the west. 108 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas-Louisiana- Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin Appalachian Basin Wind River Basin Eastern Shelf NW Shelf Abo Sussex-Shannon Muddy J Mesaverde- Lance-Lewis Medina/Clinton-Tuscarora Bradford-Venango-Elk Berea-Murrysville Piceance Basin Bossier Williston Basin Ft Worth Basin Davis Bighorn Basin Judith River- Eagle Permian Basin Anadarko Basin Denver Basin San Juan Basin North-Central Montana Area Uinta Basin Austin Chalk Codell-Niobrara Penn-Perm Carbonate Niobrara Chalk Dakota Morrow Mesaverde Thirty- One Cleveland Ozona Canyon Wasatch- Mesaverde Red Fork Mesaverde Granite Wash Stuart City-Edwards Bowdoin- Greenhorn Travis Peak Olmos Cotton Valley Vicksburg Wilcox Lobo Pictured Cliffs Cretaceous Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Mancos- Dakota Gilmer Lime Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States

132

The balance between deposition and subsidence (tectonics) in a rift basin playa and its effect on the climatic record of an area: Evidence from Bristol Dry Lake, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two continuous core intervals drilled in Bristol Dry Lake, a large (150 km{sup 2}) playa in the central Mojave Desert of California, penetrated over 500 m of sediment and did not reach basement. The repetitious nature of the alternating shallow brine pond halite and siliciclastic and the consistency of the carbonate isotopic data from the surface and core indicate a relatively stable brine composition for most of the history of Bristol Dry Lake. All sedimentary structures and primary halite fabrics in the core indicate shallow-water, brine-pond halite alternated with halite-saturated siliciclastic muds in the basin center. A delicate balance of subsidence and mechanical and chemical deposition of evaporite and siliciclastic minerals was necessary to maintain the largely ephemeral lake environment of deposition through over 550 m of basin fill. The alternating brine pond/saline lake setting in Bristol Dry Lake is not directly related to climatic influences, and the sediments do not record major climatic events demonstrated in other closed-basin lakes. The reason for this insensitivity to climatic events is explained by the interior location of the basin, the low relief of the mountains surrounding the catchment, the large surface area of the catchment, and the low average sedimentation rates. All of the above criteria are at least partially controlled by the tectonics of the area, which, in turn, affect the sedimentation rate and supply water to the basin. Therefore, it is important to consider the influence of the above factors in determining global versus local, or regional, climate curves for a particular basin.

Rosen, M.R. (CSIRO, Floreat Park (Australia))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Use of a comprehensive calibration ``gauntlet`` approach for improved contaminants transport modeling at the F and H Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many types of facility and monitoring data have been collected to support operation, closure and envirorunental restoration of the F and H-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site. Based on the various types of data, we developed contaminant transpose models to allow projection of contaminant releases and comparison of restoration alternatives. The modeling was performed in the following three stages: postulation of a conceptual model of the flow and transport system; development of a simplified analytical model based on a transfer function; development of a numerical model. A key feature of the work was use of both traditional data sources and calibration targets such as heads, geological data and pump test results, and non-traditional data sources and calibration targets, such as plume arrival times and shapes, contaminant release rates, and surface water concentrations. Throughout the process, the intermediate and final results were compared to all of the various data types and the earlier modeling stages. The result was a calibration ``gauntlet`` with explicit criteria for refinement and acceptance of the final model. Failure to match at any step within the gauntlet necessitated appropriate reformulation or modification of the model and rechecking for acceptable matches.

Looney, B.B.; Haselow, J.S.; Pidcoe, W.W.; Lewis, C.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Andersen, P.F.; Spalding, C.P. [GeoTrans, Inc., Sterling, VA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Regional stratigraphy and general petroleum geology, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in the Northern Great Plains and northern Rocky Mountain region include a sequence of dominantly shallow-water marine carbonate, clastic, and evaporite deposits of Middle Cambrian through Early Permian age. The lower part of the Paleozoic section is a sequence of marine sandstone, shale, and minor limestone, rangeing in age from Middle Cambrian through Middle Ordovician. Some porous sandstone beds occur in this section, mainly in the eastern and southern bordering areas of the Williston basin and Central Montana trough. Upper Ordovician through middle Upper Mississippian rocks are primarily carbonate beds, which contain numerous widespread cyclic interbeds of evaporite and fine-grained clastic deposits. Carbonate mounds or banks were deposited through most of this time in the shallow-water areas of the Williston basin and northern Rocky Mountains. Porous units, mainly dolomite or dolomitic limestone, are common but discontinuous in most of this sequence, and are more widespread in the eastern and southern margins of the Williston basin. Cumulative petroleum production (January 1982) in the United States part of the Williston basin was about 1.1 billion bbl of oil and 1.6 tcf gas. Estimated remaining recoverable reserves are about 400 million bbl of oil and 0.8 tcf gas. U.S. Geological Survey 1980 estimates of undiscovered recoverable oil and gas resources are about 900 million bbl of oil and 3.5 tcf gas.

Peterson, J.A.; Maccary, L.M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Selected bibliography of the Southern Appalachian basin area: Alabama-Georgia-Kentucky-North Carolina-South Carolina-Tennessee-Virginia-West Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains 2972 records related to the geology of the Southern Appalachian basin. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, oil shale, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; drilling; geochemistry; geophysics; geologic structures; and uranium deposits. The subject index provides listings of records related to each state and the geologic ages covered by this area. Some of the items (24) are themselves bibliographies.

Lindh, L.; McLaughlin, J.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Subsurface temperature anomalies as a key to petroleum-producing areas in the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, eastern Kansas?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relation of subsurface temperature to `plain-type fold` structure in the Midcontinent (USA) as an exploration tool has been speculated on for a long time. Structural highs, termed `plains-type folds,` are partly the result of differential compaction of sediments over rigid crystalline fault blocks in the Precambrian basement. In the Midcontinent, bottom-hole temperature (BHT) data, temperatures measured in drillstem tests (DSTs), and structural data are abundant. In the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, we analyzed BHT data by depth and stratigraphic unit (Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle carbonates; Mississippian carbonates; and Perm-Pennsylvanian clastics). By relating the BHTs to DSTs, it was noted that the thermal disturbance inherent in BHT by drilling is minor and comparable within a formation. Also, the signal-noise ratio of BHTs could be improved utilizing the large data set. Although the resulting BHT formation gradients show unexpected values from the thermal conductivity in the carbonates and from the evaluated temperature disturbance by the drilling process, analysis of the BHT spatial pattern shows a coincidence of structural highs and temperature anomalies both in the clastics and in the carbonates. These BHT anomalies are outlined by values higher than the regional temperature trend. We attribute the anomalies partly to the insulation effect of petroleum (which may include the self-generation of heat) and partly to the movement of fluids vertically through the fracture and fault system created in the sedimentary veneer. Numerous examples from the oil- and gas-producing areas in eastern Kansas show that the nature of origin of fluids contained in a porous medium can alter local geothermal conditions.

Merriam, D.F. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Foerster, A. [GeoForschungsZentrum Posdam (Germany)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT: HUMATE INJECTION AS AN ENHANCED ATTENUATION METHOD AT THE F-AREA SEEPAGE BASINS, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test of a humate technology for uranium and I-129 remediation was conducted at the F-Area Field Research Site as part of the Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) funded by the DOE Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation. Previous studies have shown that humic acid sorbed to sediments strongly binds uranium at mildly acidic pH and potentially binds iodine-129 (I-129). Use of humate could be applicable for contaminant stabilization at a wide variety of DOE sites however pilot field-scale tests and optimization of this technology are required to move this technical approach from basic science to actual field deployment and regulatory acceptance. The groundwater plume at the F-Area Field Research Site contains a large number of contaminants, the most important from a risk perspective being strontium-90 (Sr-90), uranium isotopes, I-129, tritium, and nitrate. Groundwater remains acidic, with pH as low as 3.2 near the basins and increasing to the background pH of approximately 5at the plume fringes. The field test was conducted in monitoring well FOB 16D, which historically has shown low pH and elevated concentrations of Sr-90, uranium, I-129 and tritium. The field test included three months of baseline monitoring followed by injection of a potassium humate solution and approximately four and half months of post monitoring. Samples were collected and analyzed for numerous constituents but the focus was on attenuation of uranium, Sr-90, and I-129. This report provides background information, methodology, and preliminary field results for a humate field test. Results from the field monitoring show that most of the excess humate (i.e., humate that did not sorb to the sediments) has flushed through the surrounding formation. Furthermore, the data indicate that the test was successful in loading a band of sediment surrounding the injection point to a point where pH could return to near normal during the study timeframe. Future work will involve a final report, which will include data trends, correlations and interpretations of laboratory data.

Millings, M.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Palaeomagnetism of the Antrim Plateau Volcanics of Northern Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......just south of the Australian Bight from the Upper Carboniferous...1969. North Australian Plateau Volcanics...the Bonaparte Gulf Basin, Bur. Miner. Resour...palaeomagnetism of the Great Dyke of Southern...part of the Wiso Basin, Northern Territory......

M. W. McElbinny; G. R. Luck

1970-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Telluric Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Telluric Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Telluric Survey Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To investigate electrical properties of rocks associated with thermal phenomena of the Devil's Kitchen-Coso Hot Springs area Notes Telluric current mapping outlined major resistivity lows associated with conductive valley fill of the Rose Valley basin, the Coso Basin, and the northern extension of the Coso Basin east of Coso Hot Springs. A secondary resistivity low with a north-south trend runs through the Coso Hot Springs--Devil's Kitchen geothermal area.

140

The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And Its Relationship To San Juan Mountains Thermal Sources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous Times And Its Relationship To San Juan Mountains Thermal Sources Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Heat-flow and coal-maturation data suggest that the thermal history of the San Juan Basin has been influenced by magmatic and volcanic activity in the San Juan Mountains-San Juan volcanic field located to the north of the Basin. Time-dependent isothermal step models indicate that the observed heat flow may be modelled by a (near) steadystate isothermal step extending from 30-98 km depth whose edge underlies the northern San Juan

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141

Nitrogen gas emissions from stormwater retention basins during wet weather events in the Phoenix Metropolitan area: an additional ecosystem service?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrogen gas emissions from stormwater retention basins during wet weather events in the Phoenix Special thanks to all of our field and lab help: Rebecca Hale, Stevan Earl, Bony Ahmed, Lin Ye, Jolene. Samples were then taken throughout the day to assess water concentrations and gas losses (see photos

Hall, Sharon J.

142

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

143

A multiple-tracer approach to understanding regional groundwater flow in the Snake Valley area of the eastern Great Basin, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Groundwater in Snake Valley and surrounding basins in the eastern Great Basin province of the western United States is being targeted for large-scale groundwater extraction and export. Concern about declining groundwater levels and spring flows in western Utah as a result of the proposed groundwater withdrawals has led to efforts that have improved the understanding of this regional groundwater flow system. In this study, environmental tracers (?2H, ?18O, 3H, 14C, 3He, 4He, 20Ne, 40Ar, 84Kr, and 129Xe) and major ions from 142 sites were evaluated to investigate groundwater recharge and flow-path characteristics. With few exceptions, ?2H and ?18O show that most valley groundwater has similar ratios to mountain springs, indicating recharge is dominated by relatively high-altitude precipitation. The spatial distribution of 3H, terrigenic helium (4Heterr), and 3H/3He ages shows that modern groundwater (temperatures (NGTs) are generally 111C in Snake and southern Spring Valleys and >11C to the east of Snake Valley and indicate a hydraulic discontinuity between Snake and Tule Valleys across the northern Confusion Range. The combination of \\{NGTs\\} and 4Heterr shows that the majority of Snake Valley groundwater discharges as springs, evapotranspiration, and well withdrawals within Snake Valley rather than continuing northeastward to discharge at either Fish Springs or the Great Salt Lake Playa. The refined understanding of groundwater recharge and flow paths acquired from this multi-tracer investigation has broad implications for interbasin subsurface flow estimates and future groundwater development.

Philip M. Gardner; Victor M. Heilweil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Appalachian basin coal-bed methane: Elephant or flea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, interest in the Appalachian basin coal-bed methane resource extends at least over the last 50 years. The Northern and Central Appalachian basins are estimated to contain 61 tcf and 5 tcf of coal-bed methane gas, respectively. Development of this resource has not kept pace with that of other basins, such as the Black Warrior basin of Alabama of the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico and Colorado. Without the benefit of modern completion, stimulation, and production technology, some older Appalachian basin coal-bed methane wells were reported to have produced in excess of 150 used here to characterize some past projects and their results. This work is not intended to comprise a comprehensive survey of all Appalachian basin projects, but rather to provide background information from which to proceed for those who may be interested in doing so. Several constraints to the development of this resource have been identified, including conflicting legal rights of ownership of the gas produced from the coal seams when coal and conventional oil and gas rights are controlled by separate parties. In addition, large leaseholds have been difficult to acquire and finding costs have been high. However, the threshold of minimum economic production may be relatively low when compared with other areas, because low-pressures pipelines are available and gas prices are among the highest in the nation. Interest in the commercial development of the resource seems to be on the increase with several projects currently active and more reported to be planned for the near future.

Hunt, A.M. (Dames and Moore, Cincinnati, OH (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Palaeomagnetism of the Antrim Plateau Volcanics of Northern Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......unchanged position just south of the Australian Bight from the Upper Carboniferous to the mid-Cretaceous...the southern part of the Bonaparte Gulf Basin, Bur. Miner. Resour. Geol. Geophys...geology of the northern part of the Wiso Basin, Northern Territory, Bull. Bur. Miner......

M. W. McElbinny; G. R. Luck

1970-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Microbial Biomass and Activity Distribution in an Anoxic, Hypersaline Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the northern Gulf of Mexico with anoxic conditions...the northern Gulf of Mexico with anoxic conditions...basin in the Gulf of Mexico. The Orca Basin, as...Table 1 is a result of geothermal heat brought into the...sulfate-reducing as well as sulfide-oxidizing...

Paul A. LaRock; Ray D. Lauer; John R. Schwarz; Kathleen K. Watanabe; Denis A. Wiesenburg

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Expansion of Urban Area in Irrigation Districts of the Rio Grande River Basin, 1996 - 2006: A Map Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The border region of Texas is experiencing rapid urban growth which is expected to have a continuing and increasing impact on the irrigation districts of the region. This report presents an analysis of the expansion of urban area during the ten year...

Leigh, Eric; Barroso, M.; Fipps, G.

148

Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Overview of the structural geology and tectonics of the Central Basin Platform, Delaware Basin, and Midland Basin, West Texas and New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural geology and tectonics of the Permian Basin were investigated using an integrated approach incorporating satellite imagery, aeromagnetics, gravity, seismic, regional subsurface mapping and published literature. The two primary emphases were on: (1) delineating the temporal and spatial evolution of the regional stress state; and (2) calculating the amount of regional shortening or contraction. Secondary objectives included delineation of basement and shallower fault zones, identification of structural style, characterization of fractured zones, analysis of surficial linear features on satellite imagery and their correlation to deeper structures. Gandu Unit, also known as Andector Field at the Ellenburger level and Goldsmith Field at Permian and younger reservoir horizons, is the primary area of interest and lies in the northern part of Ector county. The field trends northwest across the county line into Andrews County. The field(s) are located along an Ellenburger thrust anticline trap on the eastern margin of the Central Basin Platform.

Hoak, T. [Kestrel Geoscience, Littleton, CO (United States); Sundberg, K. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Ortoleva, P. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Redirected from Roosevelt Hot Springs Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 10 Heat Source 11 Geofluid Geochemistry 12 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 13 Exploration Activities (9) 14 References Map: Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Milford, Utah Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region

151

AREA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

152

McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area McGuiness Hills Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

153

Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 10 Heat Source 11 Geofluid Geochemistry 12 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 13 Exploration Activities (9) 14 References Map: Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Milford, Utah Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

154

SALINITY MANAGEMENT IN THE UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN: MODELING, MONITORING, AND COST-EQUITY CHALLENGES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Salinity issues in the Upper Colorado River Basin have been a serious concern to the western United States and northern Mexico. The Colorado River (more)

Keum, Jongho

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

E-Print Network 3.0 - alluvial basin numerical Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Great Britain. Palaeocurrents and provenance of the Mae Rim Formation, Northern Thailand Summary: as alluvial fans along the basin's edge. The main goals for this study...

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - alluvial basins in-depth Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Great Britain. Palaeocurrents and provenance of the Mae Rim Formation, Northern Thailand Summary: as alluvial fans along the basin's edge. The main goals for this study...

157

Summary of Age-Dating Analysis in the Fenner Basin, Eastern Mojave Desert, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stable isotopes of oxygen (oxygen-18) and hydrogen (deuterium) in water were measured to determine recharge sources for Fenner Basin groundwater. The deuterium and oxygen-18 signatures (reported as {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O values) ranged from -11.9 to -9.3 per mil. The more negative values originate from high elevation recharge in the New York Mountains and were also observed in the northern and eastern parts of the groundwater basin. less negative values were observed in the Providence Mountains along the western part of the basin. Groundwater collected in the Fenner Gap (i.e. Project Area) had signatures between -10.6 and -10.9 per mil, suggesting a mixture of recharge from both northern, western, and probably local recharge areas in the basin. The annual contribution of groundwater recharge to Fenner Gap from the Clipper, Marble, and Old Woman mountains is still inconclusive due to lack of isotopic data. Isotopic signatures of mean annual precipitation collected by Friendman and others (1992) at Mitchell Caverns, as well as recently recharged groundwater in the Providence and New York mountains, are similar to the isotopic values in Fenner Gap groundwater. This indicates that this groundwater has a Holocene age (less than 10,000 years old), since groundwater recharged during the Pleistocene had isotopic signatures significantly more negative than today due to past global cooling.

Davisson, M.L.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Northern Lights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Northern Lights Northern Lights Nature Bulletin No. 178-A February 6, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation NORTHERN LIGHTS To a person seeing the Aurora Borealis or "northern lights" for the first time, it is an uncanny awe-inspiring spectacle. Sometimes it begins as a glow of red on the northern horizon, ominously suggesting a great fire, gradually changing to a curtain of violet-white, or greenish-yellow light extending from east to west. Some times this may be transformed to appear as fold upon fold of luminous draperies that march majestically across the sky; sometimes as a vast multitude of gigantic flaming swords furiously slashing at the heavens; sometimes as a flowing crown with long undulating colored streamers fanning downward and outward.

159

Northern Cheyenne Reservation Coal Bed Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis of Produced Water Disposal Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) development in the Powder River Basin (PRB) is currently one of the most active gas plays in the United States. Monthly production in 2002 reached about 26 BCF in the Wyoming portion of the basin. Coalbed methane reserves for the Wyoming portion of the basin are approximately 25 trillion cubic feet (TCF). Although coal beds in the Powder River Basin extend well into Montana, including the area of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, the only CBM development in Montana is the CX Field, operated by the Fidelity Exploration, near the Wyoming border. The Northern Cheyenne Reservation is located on the northwest flank of the PRB in Montana with a total land of 445,000 acres. The Reservation consists of five districts, Lame Deer, Busby, Ashland, Birney, and Muddy Cluster and has a population of 4,470 according to the 2000 Census. The CBM resource represents a significant potential asset to the Northern Cheyenne Indian Tribe. Methane gas in coal beds is trapped by hydrodynamic pressure. Because the production of CBM involves the dewatering of coalbed to allow the release of methane gas from the coal matrix, the relatively large volume of the co-produced water and its potential environmental impacts are the primary concerns for the Tribe. Presented in this report is a study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) in partnership with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe to assess the Tribes CBM resources and evaluate applicable water handling options. The project was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the Native American Initiative of the National Petroleum Technology Office, under contract DEAC07- 99ID13727. Matching funds were granted by the MBMG in supporting the work of geologic study and mapping conducted at MBMG.

Shaochang Wo; David A. Lopez; Jason Whiteman Sr.; Bruce A. Reynolds

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Utilizing commercial mine blasts and local earthquakes, as well as a dense array of portable seismographs, we have achieved long-range crustal refraction profiles across northern Nevada and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. In our most recent refraction experiment, the Idaho-Nevada-California (INC) transect, we used a dense spacing of 411 portable seismographs and 4.5-Hz geophones. The instruments were able to record events ranging from large mine blasts to small local earthquakes.

162

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area (Redirected from Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

163

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area (Redirected from Nevada Test And Training Range Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

164

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

165

MULTICOMPONENT SEISMIC ANALYSIS AND CALIBRATION TO IMPROVE RECOVERY FROM ALGAL MOUNDS: APPLICATION TO THE ROADRUNNER/TOWAOC AREA OF THE PARADOX BASIN, UTE MOUNTAIN UTE RESERVATION, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-02NT15451, ''Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado''. Optimizing development of highly heterogeneous reservoirs where porosity and permeability vary in unpredictable ways due to facies variations can be challenging. An important example of this is in the algal mounds of the Lower and Upper Ismay reservoirs of the Paradox Basin in Utah and Colorado. It is nearly impossible to develop a forward predictive model to delineate regions of better reservoir development, and so enhanced recovery processes must be selected and designed based upon data that can quantitatively or qualitatively distinguish regions of good or bad reservoir permeability and porosity between existing well control. Recent advances in seismic acquisition and processing offer new ways to see smaller features with more confidence, and to characterize the internal structure of reservoirs such as algal mounds. However, these methods have not been tested. This project will acquire cutting edge, three-dimensional, nine-component (3D9C) seismic data and utilize recently-developed processing algorithms, including the mapping of azimuthal velocity changes in amplitude variation with offset, to extract attributes that relate to variations in reservoir permeability and porosity. In order to apply advanced seismic methods a detailed reservoir study is needed to calibrate the seismic data to reservoir permeability, porosity and lithofacies. This will be done by developing a petrological and geological characterization of the mounds from well data; acquiring and processing the 3D9C data; and comparing the two using advanced pattern recognition tools such as neural nets. In addition, should the correlation prove successful, the resulting data will be evaluated from the perspective of selecting alternative enhanced recovery processes, and their possible implementation. The work is being carried out on the Roadrunner/Towaoc Fields of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, located in the southwestern corner of Colorado. Although this project is focused on development of existing resources, the calibration established between the reservoir properties and the 3D9C seismic data can also enhance exploration success. During the time period covered by this report, the majority of the project effort has gone into the permitting, planning and design of the 3D seismic survey, and to select a well for the VSP acquisition. The business decision in October, 2002 by WesternGeco, the projects' seismic acquisition contractor, to leave North America, has delayed the acquisition until late summer, 2003. The project has contracted Solid State, a division of Grant Geophysical, to carry out the acquisition. Moreover, the survey has been upgraded to a 3D9C from the originally planned 3D3C survey, which should provide even greater resolution of mounds and internal mound structure.

Paul La Pointe; Claudia Rebne; Steve Dobbs

2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Caribbean basin framework, 3: Southern Central America and Colombian basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors recognize three basin-forming periods in southern Central America (Panama, Costa Rica, southern Nicaragua) that they attempt to correlate with events in the Colombian basin (Bowland, 1984): (1) Early-Late Cretaceous island arc formation and growth of the Central American island arc and Late Cretaceous formation of the Colombian basin oceanic plateau. During latest Cretaceous time, pelagic carbonate sediments blanketed the Central American island arc in Panama and Costa Rica and elevated blocks on the Colombian basin oceanic plateau; (2) middle Eocene-middle Miocene island arc uplift and erosion. During this interval, influx of distal terrigenous turbidites in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks the uplift and erosion of the Central American island arc. In the Colombian basin, turbidites fill in basement relief and accumulate to thicknesses up to 2 km in the deepest part of the basin. In Costa Rica, sedimentation was concentrated in fore-arc (Terraba) and back-arc (El Limon) basins; (3) late Miocene-Recent accelerated uplift and erosion of segments of the Central American arc. Influx of proximal terrigenous turbidites and alluvial fans in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks collision of the Panama arc with the South American continent (late Miocene early Pliocene) and collision of the Cocos Ridge with the Costa Rican arc (late Pleistocene). The Cocos Ridge collision inverted the Terraba and El Limon basins. The Panama arc collision produced northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults and fault-related basins throughout Panama as Panama moved northwest over the Colombian basin.

Kolarsky, R.A.; Mann, P. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Death of a carbonate basin: The Niagara-Salina transition in the Michigan basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The A-O Carbonate in the Michigan basin comprises a sequence of laminated calcite/anhydrite layers intercalated with bedded halite at the transition between normal marine Niagaran carbonates and lower Salina Group evaporites. The carbonate/anhydrite interbeds represent freshing events during initial evaporative concentration of the Michigan basin. Recent drilling in the Michigan basin delineates two distinct regions of A-O Carbonate development: a 5 to 10 m thick sequence of six 'laminites' found throughout most of the western and northern basin and a 10 to 25 m thick sequence in the southeastern basin containing both thicker 'laminates' and thicker salt interbeds. Additionally, potash deposits of the overlying A-1 evaporite unit are restricted to the northern and western basin regions. The distribution of evaporite facies in these two regions is adequately explained by a source of basin recharge in the southeast-perhaps the 'Clinton Inlet' of earlier workers. This situation suggest either that: (1) the source of basin recharge is alternately supplying preconcentrated brine and more normal marine water, or (2) that the basin received at least two distinct sources of water during A-O deposition.

Leibold, A.W.; Howell, P.D. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

E-Print Network 3.0 - active single basin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basins... ) existed during the Late Oligocene and Miocene when the rift basins of Thailand were active because active... into three main areas and tec- tonic provinces: 1)...

169

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

170

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

171

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter HQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

172

Table 10. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, STB dat  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, STB data" Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, STB data" ,,"Real Dollars per Ton",,,,,,,,,,"Annual Percent Change" "Basin","Destination State",2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,," 2001-2009"," 2008-2009" "Northern Appalachian Basin","Delaware"," W"," W"," $16.45"," $14.29"," W"," -"," W"," W"," -",," -"," -" "Northern Appalachian Basin","Florida"," $21.45"," W"," W"," W"," W"," $28.57"," W"," W"," W",," W"," W"

173

Regional correlations and reservoir characterization studies of the Pennsylvanian system in the Anadarko Basin area of Western Oklahoma and the Panhandle of Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Correlations problems have long existed between the Pennsylvanian marine clastics of the northeastern half of the Anadarko Basin and Shelf and the Pennsylvanian terrigenous washes of the extreme southwestern portion of the Anadarko Basin. These correlation problems have created nomenclature problems resulting in thousands of feet of washes often referred to on completion reports and production records as {open_quotes}granite wash{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Atoka Wash{close_quotes} when much greater accuracy and specificity is both needed and possible. Few detailed cross-sections are available. Regional and field scale cross-sections were constructed which have been correlated well by well and field by field using nearly every deep well drilled in the basin. This process has provided for a high degree of consistency. These cross-sections have greatly diminished the correlation and nomenclature problems within the Anadarko Basin. Certain markers proved to be regionally persistent from the marine clastics into the terrigenous washes making the subdivision of thousands of feet of washes possible. Those of greatest importance were the top of the Marmaton, the Cherokee Marker, the Pink {open_quotes}Limestone{close_quotes} Interval, the top of the Atoka and the top of the Morrow. Once these and other subdivisions were made, production was allocated on a much more definitive basis. Additionally, detailed reservoir characterization of the reservoirs was conducted to include geologic and engineering data. Finally, a {open_quotes}field-specific{close_quotes} reservoir type log was chosen. A series of regional cross-sections will be presented along with the results of reservoir characterization studies conducted on reservoirs within the fields located along the cross-sections. A type log for each reservoir will also be illustrated.

Hendrickson, W.J.; Smith, P.W.; Williams, C.M. [Dwights Energydata Inc., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Hydrodynamic analysis as an aid in exploration within mature basins: Examples from Sawtooth and Sunburst Reservoirs, northwestern Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Linking hydrodynamics to detailed stratigraphic and structural analyses is a powerful tool in hydrocarbon exploration in mature basins, In southernmost Canada straddling the Alberta-Saskatchewan border, significant petroleum reserves are encountered within Mesozoic units which are largely controlled by subsurface flow cells. The Jurassic Sawtooth Formation is characterized by an eastward shift from lower shoreface quartzarenites to basinal coquinas. The Sawtooth is a blanket deposit and crops out along the flanks of several Tertiary uplifts in northern Montana. In the subsurface the Sawtooth is draped over several relatively young structures. Potentiometric mapping illustrates a northerly flow orientation within the Sawtooth, and oil pools under artesian conditions are located where flow paths cross steeply flanked structures. The Lower Cretaceous Sunburst Formation is a series of valley-fill sandstones with mainly southwesterly paleoflow orientations. Hydrocarbon pools (e.g., Manyberries field) are located within a regional potentiometric low formed by three converging cells which recharge in the south, northwest, and east. This potentiometric low is characterized by systematic changes in oil and water compositions, with progressively lighter oils and NaCl-rich waters found toward the low's center. Stratigraphic variability controls pooling within the low, with hydrocarbons located on the updip flanks of valley fills which border nonreservoir rocks. In the northwestern Williston basin regional hydrodynamic analysis, combined with standard subsurface approaches, allows operators to discern large new hydrocarbon-bearing trends within and between densely drilled areas characterized by complex structure and stratigraphy.

Putnam, P.E.; Moore, S. (Petrel Robertson Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Ward, G. (Ward Hydrodynamics, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Task 50 - deposition of lignites in the Fort Union Group and related strata of the northern Great Plains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Late Cretaceous, Paleocene, and early Eocene geologic and paleontologic studies were undertaken in western North Dakota, eastern and south-central Montana, and northwestern and northeastern Wyoming. These study areas comprise the Williston, Bighorn, and Powder River Basins, all of which contain significant lignite resources. Research was undertaken in these basins because they have the best geologic sections and fossil record for the development of a chronostratigraphic (time-rock) framework for the correlation of lignite beds and other economic resources. A thorough understanding of the precise geologic age of the deposition of sediments permits a powerful means of interpreting the record of geologic events across the northern Great Plains. Such an understanding allows for rigorous interpretation of paleoenviromnents and estimates of resource potential and quality in this area of economically significant deposits. This work is part of ongoing research to document change in the composition of molluscan fossil faunas to provide a paleoenvironmentally sensitive independent means of interpreting time intervals of brief duration during the Late Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene. This study focuses on the record of mollusks and, to a lesser extent, mammals in the (1) Hell Creek-Tullock Formations, which include the Cretaceous-Paleocene boundary, in the western portion of the Williston Basin, Montana; (2) uppermost Cretaceous, Paleocene, and lowermost Eocene strata in western North Dakota, which -includes the last interior seaway in North Dakota; (3) upper Paleocene and lowermost Eocene of the northern portion of the Bighorn Basin of south-central Montana and northwestern Wyoming; and (4) Powder River Basin of northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana. The geologic record provides different physical and paleontological information to aid in interpreting the geologic record through the study interval.

Hartman, J.H.; Roth, B.; Kihm, A.J.

1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1999 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata Notes A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history.

177

Petroleum basin studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book reviews the tectonic setting, basin development and history of exploration of a number of selected petroleum provinces located in a variety of settings in the Middle East, North Sea, Nigeria, the Rocky Mountains, Gabon and China. This book illustrates how ideas and models developed in one area may be applied to other regions. Regional reviews and the reassessment of petroleum provinces are presented.

Shannon, P.M. (Univ. College, Dublin (IE)); Naylor, D. (Westland Exploration Ltd., Dublin (IE))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effects of reduced voltage on the operation and efficiency of electric systems. Volume 3. Field tests in a northern utility service area. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 3 of this three-volume report for RP1419-1 describes the tests on selected residential, commercial, and small industry areas of the Detroit Edison Company system and the statistical analysis performed on the test data gathered. The purpose of the field testing was to provide data to analyze changes in energy consumption due to changes in feeder voltage levels. Detroit Edison was chosen to represent a winter peaking load area. Original intent was to present these results simultaneously with results from a summer peaking load area, Texas Electric Service Company (TESCO). Unavoidable delays retarded the Detroit study results to this Volume 3. TESCO results were reported in Volume 1, and the Distribution System Analysis and Simulation (DSAS) program for these studies was presented in Volume 2 in the form of a User's Manual.

Chen, M.S.; Shoults, R.R.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Development of a Systemwide Predator Control Program, Section I : Northern Squawfish Management Program Implementation, 1994 annual report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report the results from the forth year of a basinwide program to harvest northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in an effort to reduce mortality due to northern squawfish predation on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern squawfish on juvenile salmonids may account for most of the 10--20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated it is not necessary to eradicate northern squawfish to substantially reduce predation-caused mortality of juvenile salmonids. Instead, if northern squawfish were exploited at a 10--20% rate, reductions in numbers of larger, older fish resulting in restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50% or more. Consequently, the authors designed and tested a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day pool in 1990. They also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, they implemented three test fisheries on a multi-pool, or systemwide, scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery.

Willis, Charles F. (S.P. Cramer and Associates, Inc., Gresham, OR); Young, Franklin R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Northern Wind Farm  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a draft environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed interconnection of the Northern Wind Farm (Project) in Roberts County, near the city of Summit, South Dakota. Northern Wind,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Great Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Basin Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Great Basin Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.609920257001,"lon":-114.0380859375,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

Seasonal and spatial distribution of bacterial production and biomass along a salinity gradient (Northern Adriatic Sea)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Adriatic Sea is a semi-enclosed ecosystem that receives in its shallow part, the northern basin, significant freshwater inputs which markedly increase its productivity with respect to the oligotrophic feature...

A. Puddu; R. La Ferla; A. Allegra; C. Bacci

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Disposal of produced waters: Undergrown injection option in the Black Warrior Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of large volumes of water produced simultaneously with coal-bed methane is a costly, environmentally sensitive problem. Underground injection into deeper, naturally fractured, low-porosity formations is feasible provided that the total dissolved solids level of these formation waters comply with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. Greater fracture density in proximity to structures formed by Appalachian and Ouachita tectonism, along with a higher total dissolved solids level in both the production and injection formation waters, occurs in the eastern, southern, and northern margins of the coal-bed methane (CBM) area of the Black Warrior basin in Alabama. Injection permeability is developed where fractures intersect formations with suitable lithologies and thickness. Initial results indicate that the lower Pottsville sands, which thicken to the south, have the highest initial injection potential, although these sands appear dirty and tight on the logs. Normal faulting and matrix porosity, in addition to fracturing, may increase permeability in this formation. In the shallower, northern edge of the CBM area, thin-bedded Mississippian sands with high porosity, such as the Hartzelle, may be present. Injection potential also occurs in the fractured Devonian chert and silecous carbonate lithologies in the Upper Silurian where they thicken to the southwest, and in sandy carbonate lithologies in the undifferentiated Silurian and Ordovician at the eastern margin of the overthrust. The Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Formation has injection potential in a 6-mi wide zone at the eastern margin of the basin, where the upper Knox is dolomitized below the unconformity.

Ortiz, I.; Weller, T.F.; Anthony, R.V. (United Energy Development Consultants, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Dziewulski, D. (BioIndustrial Technologies, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Lorenzen, J. (ResTech, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Frantz, J.H. Jr. (S.A. Holditch Associates, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

EIS-0411: Transmission Agency of Northern California Transmission Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS is for the Western Area Power Administration construction, operation, and maintenance of the proposed transmission agency of Northern California Transmission Project, California.

185

A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter SB A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U...........................................................................................................................SB-1 Coal Production History

186

Northern Rockies Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Rockies Geothermal Region Northern Rockies Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northern Rockies Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} Province is situated in northern Idaho and western Montana and includes folded mountains, fault-bounded uplifts, and volcanics formed during middle Cretaceous to late Eocene mountain period. The region is structtually cojmplex with faulting and folding asociated with eastward thrust faulting. Western Montana and northwestern Wyoming contain large areas of Tertiary volcanic rocks, including smaller localized Quaternary silicic volcanic rocks. Replace Citation[1] References ↑ "Replace Citation" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Idaho, Montana Area 97,538 km²97,538,000,000 m²

187

Geology of interior cratonic sag basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interior cratonic sag basins are thick accumulations of sediment, generally more or less oval in shape, located entirely in the interiors of continental masses. Some are single-cycle basins and others are characterized by repeated sag cycles or are complex polyhistory basins. Many appear to have developed over ancient rift systems. Interior cratonic sag basins are typified by a dominance of flexural over fault-controlled subsidence, and a low ratio of sediment volume to surface area of the basin. The Baltic, Carpentaria, Illinois, Michigan, Parana, Paris, and Williston basins are examples of interior cratonic sag basins. Tectonics played a dominant role in controlling the shapes and the geometries of the juxtaposed packets of sedimentary sequences. While the mechanics of tectonic control are not clear, evidence suggests that the movements are apparently related to convergence of lithospheric plates and collision and breakup of continents. Whatever the cause, tectonic movements controlled the freeboard of continents, altering base level and initiating new tectono-sedimentologic regimes. Sag basins situated in low latitudes during their development commonly were sites of thick carbonates (e.g., Illinois, Michigan, Williston, and Paris basins). In contrast, siliciclastic sedimentation characterized basins that formed in higher latitudes (e.g., Parana and Carpentaria basins). Highly productive sag basins are characterized by widespread, mature, organic-rich source rocks, large structures, and good seals. Nonproductive basins have one or more of the following characteristics: immature source rocks, leaky plumbing, freshwater flushing, and/or complex geology due to numerous intrusions that inhibit mapping of plays.

Leighton, M.W.; Eidel, J.J.; Kolata, D.R.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Mercury in the Northern Crayfish, Orconectes virilis (Hagen), in New England, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury in the Northern Crayfish, Orconectes virilis (Hagen), in New England, USA CHRIS M. PENNUTO of mercury bioavail- ability in aquatic ecosystems. In this study, we assessed the effects of drainage basin, habitat type, size class, and sex on mercury concentrations in the northern crayfish, Orconectes virilis

Pennuto, Chris

189

Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

Tropical forests: Include Congo basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 478, 378381; 2011). But their meta-analysis of 138 studies overlooks the Congo basin, the second-largest continuous area of rainforest in the world; moreover, only ... the lack of recent and accessible legacy data for this region. The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which contains 98 million hectares of rainforest (60% of the ...

Hans Verbeeck; Pascal Boeckx; Kathy Steppe

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1993 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine the importance of Early to Middle Miocene period in the northern Basin and Range region. Notes New apatite fission track cooling age and track length data, supplemented by other information, point to the Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the Utah-Nevada-Idaho border to southernmost Nevada experience extension and major exhumation in Early to Middle Miocene time. Reconnaissance apatite ages from the Toiyabe

192

Hack's law of debris-flow basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hack's law was originally derived from basin statistics for varied spatial scales and regions. The exponent value of the law has been shown to vary between 0.47 and 0.70, causing uncertainty in its application. This paper focuses on the emergence of Hack's law from debris-flow basins in China. Over 5,000 debris-flow basins in different regions of China with drainage areas less than 100km2 are included in this study. Basins in the different regions are found to present similar distributions. Hack's law is derived from maximum probability and conditional distributions, suggesting that the law should describe some critical state of basin evolution. Results suggest the exponent value is approximately 0.5. Further analysis indicates that Hack's law is related to other scaling laws underlying the evolution of a basin and that the exponent is not dependent on basin shape but rather on the evolutionary stage. A case study of a well known debris-flow basin further confirms Hack's law and its implications in basin evolution.

Yong LI; Z.Q. YUE; C.F. LEE; R.E. BEIGHLEY; Xiao-Qing CHEN; Kai-Heng HU; Peng CUI

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Northern Aral Sea recovering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... During the 1960s, the two rivers that fed the Aral the Syr Darya, which empties into the northern Aral, and the ... , which empties into the northern Aral, and the Amu ...

Daemon Fairless

2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

194

Quantifying the seasonal variations in fluvial and eolian sources of terrigenous material to Cariaco Basin, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Cariaco Basin, Venezuela Aurora C. Elmore a,*, Robert C. Thunell b , Richard Styles b , David Black c, Venezuela a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 27 February 2008 Accepted 10 November 2008 the northern continental shelf of Venezuela and consists of two 1400 m deep sub-basins separated by an 900 m

Meyers, Steven D.

195

Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Lane: 2. Velocity and Strain Rate Tensor Analysis- In: Late Cenozoic Structure and Evolution of the Great Basin-Sierra Nevada Transition Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation in the Northern Walker Lane: 2. Velocity and Strain Rate Tensor Analysis- In: Late Cenozoic Structure and Evolution of the Great Basin-Sierra Nevada Transition Abstract Abstract unavailable Authors C. Kreemer, Geoffrey Blewitt and William C. Hammond Editors John S. Oldow and Patricia H. Cashman Published Geological Society of America, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geodetic Constraints on Contemporary Deformation

196

COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter PN COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2 S, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

197

FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

198

SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter PH SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES By M assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

199

Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basin and Range Geothermal Region Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} North-south-striking and west-dipping Basin and Range province normal faults form the western edge of the Sierra Madre Occidental plateau in northeastern Sonora. These faults and associated half-grabens extend over a distance of more than 300 km between the San Bernardino basin in the north and the Sahuaripa basin in the south. Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake [1] References ↑ "Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

202

Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic Basin framework and petroleum potential of Panama and Costa Rica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite its location between major petroleum provinces in northwestern South America and northern Central America, there is a widespread negative perception of the petroleum potential of Panama and Costa Rica in southern Central America. Several factors may contribute to this perception: (1) the on and offshore geology of many areas has only be studied in a reconnaissance fashion; (2) sandstone reservoirs and source rocks are likely to be of poor quality because Upper Cretaceous-Cenozoic sandstones are eroded from island arc or oceanic basement rocks and because oil-prone source rocks are likely to be scarce in near-arc basins; and (3) structural traps are likely to be small and fragmented because of complex late Cenozoic thrust and strike-slip tectonics. On the other hand, onshore oil and gas seeps, shows and small production in wildcat wells, and source rocks with TOC values up to 26% suggest the possibility of future discoveries. In this talk, we present the results of a regional study using 3100 km of offshore seismic lines kindly provided by industry. Age and stratigraphic control of offshore lines is constrained by limited well data and detailed field studies of basin outcrops in coastal areas. We describe the major structures, stratigraphy, and tectonic history of the following areas: Gulf of Panama and Gulf of Chiriqui of Panama and the Pacific and Caribbean margins of Costa Rica.

Mann, P. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States)); Kolarsky, R. (Texaco USA, New Orleans, LA (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Northern Ireland | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Ireland Northern Ireland Dataset Summary Description The windspeed database provides estimates of mean annual wind speed throughout the UK, averaged over a 1-kilometer square area, at each of the following three heights above ground level (agl): 10 meters, 25 meters, and 45 meters. The windspeed database is available through the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) website, and is provided for archive purposes only. The database is comprised of historic information, including results derived from mathematical models, so it should not be considered to be measured data, or up to date or accurate. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released December 31st, 2000 (14 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords archive Great Britain

204

File:Black.Warrior.Basin usgs.map.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Black.Warrior.Basin usgs.map.pdf Black.Warrior.Basin usgs.map.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Black Warrior Basin Province of Alabama and Mississippi Size of this preview: 742 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,860 × 1,504 pixels, file size: 148 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Black Warrior Basin Province of Alabama and Mississippi Sources USGS Related Technologies Oil, Gas Creation Date 2007 Extent Black Warrior Basin Province Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alabama, Mississippi Location of the Black Warrior Basin Province in northwestern Alabama and northeastern Mississippi, published in the USGS report entitled, Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Black Warrior Basin

205

Northern New Mexico  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 million for education, economic development, charitable giving in Northern New Mexico September 23, 2014 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Sept. 23, 2014-The Los Alamos National Security,...

206

Two-Phase Westward Encroachment of Basin and Range Extension into the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Two-Phase Westward Encroachment of Basin and Range Extension into the Two-Phase Westward Encroachment of Basin and Range Extension into the Northern Sierra Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Two-Phase Westward Encroachment of Basin and Range Extension into the Northern Sierra Nevada Abstract [1] Structural, geophysical, and thermochronological data from the transition zone between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range province at latitude ∼39°N suggest ∼100 km westward encroachment of Basin and Range extensional deformation since the middle Miocene. Extension, accommodated primarily by east dipping normal faults that bound west tilted, range-forming fault blocks, varies in magnitude from <2% in the interior of the Sierra Nevada crustal block to >150% in the Wassuk and

207

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

208

Groundwater recharge estimates for the Powder River and Williston structural basins Katherine R. Aurand and Andrew J. Long  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater recharge estimates for the Powder River and Williston structural basins Katherine R Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins. The study area covers about 75 production in the Powder River structural basin and oil production in the Williston structural basin

Torgersen, Christian

209

Evolution and hydrocarbon prospectivity of the Douala Basin, Cameroon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Douala Basin is a stable Atlantic-type, predominantly offshore basin and forms the northern terminal of a series of divergent passive margin basins located on the Southwest coast of Africa that resulted from the rifting of Africa from South America. An integration of new studies including detailed well, biostratigraphic, sedimentological, geochemical and seismic data has confirmed that the tectonostratigraphic evolution in the basin can be broadly divided into three developmental phases: the Syn-rift, Transitional and Drift phases. This basis has been explored intermittently for hydrocarbon for the past 40 years with two important gas fields discovered and no commercial oil found as yet. This early gas discovery and a corresponding lack of any significant oil discovery, led early operators to term this basin as essentially a gas province. However, recent geochemical analyses of various oil-seeps and oil samples from various localities in the basin, using state-of-the-art techniques have demonstrated that this basin is a potential oil prone basin. The results show that two models of oil sourcing are possible: a Lower Cretaceous lacustrine saline source, similar to the presalt basins of Gabon or a marine Upper Cretaceous to lower Tertiary source, similar to the neighbouring Rio del Rey/Niger Delta Complex. Additionally, seismic reflection data also demonstrate a variety of reservoir horizons, including submarine fans, channel-like features and buried paleohighs, all interbedded within regionally extensive, uniformity bounded mudstone units. Hence, it is now quite evident that within this basin, there exist a vast potential for a wide variety of stratigraphic, structural and combined traps. These features, which are considered to have significantly enhanced the prospectivity of this basin, will be discussed in this paper.

Batupe, M.; Tampu, S.; Aboma, R.S. [National Hydrocarbons Corporation, Yaounde (Cameroon)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fracture-enhanced porosity and permeability trends in Bakken Formation, Williston basin, western North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fractures play a critical role in oil production from the Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian) in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. The Bakken Formation in the study area is known for its low matrix porosity and permeability, high organic content, thermal maturity, and relative lateral homogeneity. Core analysis has shown the effective porosity and permeability development within the Bakken Formation to be related primarily to fracturing. In theory, lineaments mapped on the surface reflect the geometry of basement blocks and the zones of fracturing propagated upward from them. Fracturing in the Williston basin is thought to have occurred along reactivated basement-block boundaries in response to varying tectonic stresses and crustal flexure throughout the Phanerozoic. Landsat-derived lineament maps were examined for the area between 47/degrees/ and 48/degrees/ north lat. and 103/degrees/ and 104/degrees/ west long. (northern Billings and Golden Valley Counties, and western McKenzie County, North Dakota) in an attempt to identify large-scale fracture trends. In the absence of major tectonic deformation in the craton, a subtle pattern of fracturing has propagated upward through the sedimentary cover and emerged as linear topographic features visible on these large-scale, remote-sensed images.

Freisatz, W.B.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

EA-1902: Northern Wind Project, Roberts County, South Dakota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOEs Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Northern Wind Project in Summit, Roberts County, South Dakota. Additional information is available on the project webpage, http://www.wapa.gov/ugp/Environment/NorthernWindFarm.htm.

213

A source study of the Thessaloniki (northern Greece) 1978 earthquake sequence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......nature and origin of basin and range faulting...massif (a series of Permian and Jurassic carbonates...area has occurred in historic times in the form of...Proffett (1977) in the Basin and Range province of...nature and origin of basin and range faulting......

Christos Soufleris; Gordon S. Stewart

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Temperatures of 150°C to 200°C Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid Temperatures of 150°C to 200°C Abstract Six geothermal reservoirs with fluid temperatures over 200°C and ten geothermal systems with measured fluid temperatures of 150-200°C have been discovered in the northern Basin and Range Province of the USA. A comparison of these high and moderate temperature systems shows considerable overlap in geographical distribution, geology, and physical properties. Our ability to distinguish between moderate and high temperature systems using fluid chemistry has been limited by often

215

Divergent/passive margin basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book discusses the detailed geology of the four divergent margin basins and establishes a set of analog scenarios which can be used for future petroleum exploration. The divergent margin basins are the Campos basin of Brazil, the Gabon basin, the Niger delta, and the basins of the northwest shelf of Australia. These four petroleum basins present a wide range of stratigraphic sequences and structural styles that represent the diverse evolution of this large and important class of world petroleum basins.

Edwards, J.D. (Shell Oil Company (US)); Santogrossi, P.A. (Shell Offshore Inc. (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Development of coalbed methane in Mississippi Warrior Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1980, over 3,863 coalbed methane wells have been drilled in the Warrior basin of Alabama at a drilling cost of $1.138 billion. Production of 119 bcf of gas has been sold. The important findings of this study were probable coalbeds across Monroe County at depths and thicknesses being produced profitably in Alabama as well as in the Northern Appalachian and Central Appalachian basins. The logs showed the coal to often be close to conventional gas reservoirs in sandstone, indicating a probable equilibrium gas content of the adjacent coals. The most prevalent depth of the coal seams was 1,600-1,800 ft across northeast Monroe County from near the Alabama state line in the Splunge Field to the Four Mile Creek Field near the Tombigbee River. Individual seam thickness ranged up to 11 ft. Cumulative thickness of all coal in a single well was a maximum of 30 ft in the 1,000 ft to 2,000 ft interval usually logged. These estimates were based on density, compensated neutron, caliper, and gamma ray logs. A core hole would be necessary to verify exact thicknesses, presence of a seam, gas content, and permeability of the coal seams. It is stressed that conventional well logs have limitations, but they are a valid first estimate of the potential of an area. The subject study also verified the discovery of coal in Clay County reported by the Mississippi Bureau of Geology in 1989. Also, deep-lying coals were observed on logs of single wells in Noxubee, Oktibbeha, and Lowndes Counties, where one deep well had a cumulative 72 ft of coal indicated. Although beyond the reach of industry now, technology of the coalbed methane process is progressing toward eventually managing coal at those depths.

Rogers, R.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Modelling ocean currents in the northern Adriatic Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ocean circulation in the northern Adriatic Sea is characterised by the interactions of tidal currents, bathymetric constraints, wind forcing and density gradients induced by river input and heat exchange. The MIKE 3/21 modelling system, together with measurements of wind, waves, currents and water levels at one location, has been used to investigate the currents dynamics of the northern Adriatic basin and to assess model sensitivity to the parameterisation of different processes and implementation strategies. An assessment has been carried out against available in-situ observations (waves, currents, surface elevation, and water temperature), and also in comparison with a high-resolution modelling system (COAWST) implemented in the same area during the corresponding period. The MIKE 3/21 system was implemented for a 1-year simulation period and validation of surface elevation, wind, and waves with data indicated a good model performance, statistically very similar to the COAWST implementation. Depth-averaged, surface and bottom currents were more difficult to reproduce by both models, with the observed high variability not being fully captured by the model systems. Some of the differences between the models results may be due to model configuration, spatial resolution and the way they treat atmosphereocean momentum and heat transfers, turbulence, and are therefore discussed in the paper. From the thorough analysis of MIKE 3/21 system, wind is found to be the main forcing factor inducing currents in the northern Adriatic; tides and baroclinic motions were of second order, although some specific events seems to be forced by these processes. Waves were found to be highly correlated with local wind, and a rather weak wavecurrent interaction was observed. Even if the inclusion of wave effects trough radiation stress did not seem to lead to significant improvements in the modelled currents with MIKE 3/21, the full waveocean coupling in COAWST was significant in explaining small scale features, especially in the Gulf of Venice. Spectral and SVD analysis showed energy around diurnal and semidiurnal frequencies and that about 50% of variance in the current profile was explained by the first mode, which was well captured by both modelling systems.

Rodolfo Bolaos; Jacob V. Tornfeldt Srensen; Alvise Benetazzo; Sandro Carniel; Mauro Sclavo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Wstern Utah hot springs: Antelope, Fish (Deadman), Fish (Wilson), Twin Peak, Cudahy, Laverkin, Grantsville, Crystal Prison,...

219

Isotopic Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Kennedy ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active transtensional deformation indicates a deformation-enhanced...

220

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes On the regional scale, we investigated the spatial relationship of known geothermal activity with: (1) the regional tendency of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

will be made available to industry and researchers on a web site. Relationships among the data will be explored using spatial statistical analysis, and regional assessments and...

222

Post-paleozoic structural styles in northern Sierra de Palomas: Chihuahua, Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sierra de Palomas is the largest and most northerly range of the Boca Grande trend in northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico. Sierra de Palomas is composed of more than 1.5 km of late Paleozoic shelf carbonates and clastics. Detailed mapping the northern 150 km/sup 2/ of the range (at a scale of 1:12,500) has shown that four post-Paleozoic tectonic events have affected the range. The Laramide orogeny, two separate periods of basin and range extension, and recent (Rio Grande rift.) extension have left very distinct structures in the range. Laramide structures are predominantly vergent to the northeast, and are manifested as folds and thrusts. Folds are asymmetric and northwest trending, with amplitudes on the order of 10-50 m. Major thrusts in the range have minimum displacements on the order of a few kilometers. Basin and range structures include two distinct sets of high-angle faults; an early northeast-trending set is truncated by a late northwest-trending set. Recent Rio Grande rift(.) extension in the area is evident in fault scarps that offset alluvial fan deposits and in steeply eastward-tilted alluvial deposits.

Sivils, D.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Gravity modeling of Cenozoic extensional basins, offshore Vietnam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . 78 . . . 81 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 Southeast Asian study area location map 2 Major tectonic features of Southeast Asia 3 Mekong basin sediment isopach map . 4 Mekong basin generalized stratigraphy . Page . . . . 1 0 5 Mekong basin... gravity model 2 17 Mekong 2D forward gravity model 3 18 Mekong 2D forward gravity model 4 19 Mekong 2D forward gravity model 5 32 34 . . . 35 . . . 36 Page 20 Schematic 3D forward gravity model of Yinggehai basin sediment . . . 21 3D forward...

Mauri, Steven Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

225

Origin of cratonic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520-460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530-500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation, histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian supercontinent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

de V. Klein, G.; Hsui, A.T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations the Northern Study Area.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results from research aimed at improving short-range (0-6 hour) hub-height wind forecasts in the NOAA weather forecast models through additional data assimilation and model physics improvements for use in wind energy forecasting. Additional meteorological observing platforms including wind profilers, sodars, and surface stations were deployed for this study by NOAA and DOE, and additional meteorological data at or near wind turbine hub height were provided by South Dakota State University and WindLogics/NextEra Energy Resources over a large geographical area in the U.S. Northern Plains for assimilation into NOAA research weather forecast models. The resulting improvements in wind energy forecasts based on the research weather forecast models (with the additional data assimilation and model physics improvements) were examined in many different ways and compared with wind energy forecasts based on the current operational weather forecast models to quantify the forecast improvements important to power grid system operators and wind plant owners/operators participating in energy markets. Two operational weather forecast models (OP_RUC, OP_RAP) and two research weather forecast models (ESRL_RAP, HRRR) were used as the base wind forecasts for generating several different wind power forecasts for the NextEra Energy wind plants in the study area. Power forecasts were generated from the wind forecasts in a variety of ways, from very simple to quite sophisticated, as they might be used by a wide range of both general users and commercial wind energy forecast vendors. The error characteristics of each of these types of forecasts were examined and quantified using bulk error statistics for both the local wind plant and the system aggregate forecasts. The wind power forecast accuracy was also evaluated separately for high-impact wind energy ramp events. The overall bulk error statistics calculated over the first six hours of the forecasts at both the individual wind plant and at the system-wide aggregate level over the one year study period showed that the research weather model-based power forecasts (all types) had lower overall error rates than the current operational weather model-based power forecasts, both at the individual wind plant level and at the system aggregate level. The bulk error statistics of the various model-based power forecasts were also calculated by season and model runtime/forecast hour as power system operations are more sensitive to wind energy forecast errors during certain times of year and certain times of day. The results showed that there were significant differences in seasonal forecast errors between the various model-based power forecasts. The results from the analysis of the various wind power forecast errors by model runtime and forecast hour showed that the forecast errors were largest during the times of day that have increased significance to power system operators (the overnight hours and the morning/evening boundary layer transition periods), but the research weather model-based power forecasts showed improvement over the operational weather model-based power forecasts at these times. A comprehensive analysis of wind energy forecast errors for the various model-based power forecasts was presented for a suite of wind energy ramp definitions. The results compiled over the year-long study period showed that the power forecasts based on the research models (ESRL_RAP, HRRR) more accurately predict wind energy ramp events than the current operational forecast models, both at the system aggregate level and at the local wind plant level. At the system level, the ESRL_RAP-based forecasts most accurately predict both the total number of ramp events and the occurrence of the events themselves, but the HRRR-based forecasts more accurately predict the ramp rate. At the individual site level, the HRRR-based forecasts most accurately predicted the actual ramp occurrence, the total number of ramps and the ramp rates (40-60% improvement in ramp rates over the coarser resolution forecast

Finley, Cathy [WindLogics

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Details Activities (9) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: We apply a new method to target potential geothermal resources on the regional scale in the Great Basin by seeking relationships between geologic structures and GPS-geodetic observations of regional tectonic strain. First, we establish a theoretical basis for underst~dingh ow the rate of fracture opening can be related to the directional trend of faults

228

Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (48) Power Plants (8) Projects (15) Techniques (33) The Basin and Range Province in northwestern Nevada and northeastern California is characterized by late Cretaceous - early Cenozoic regional erosion, Oligocene - Miocene volcanism, and subsequent late Miocene extension. Extensional faulting in northwestern Nevada began everywhere at 12 Ma and has continued up to the present. Faulting in the Warner Range in northeastern California can only be constrained to have begun between 14 and 3 Ma, but may represent westward migration of Basin and Range extension during the Pliocene. Compared to the many parts of the Basin and Range in

229

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The objective of this ongoing project is the development of a representative geochemical database for a comprehensive range of elemental and isotopic parameters (i.e., beyond the typical data suite) for a range of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin is utilizing

230

Geohydrology of bedrock aquifers in the Northern Great Plains in parts of Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of energy-related resources in the northern Great Plains of the US will require large quantities of ground water. Because Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming are semiarid, the primary local sources of nonappropriated water are the deep bedrock aquifers of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age. The US Geological Survey undertook a 4-year interdisciplinary study that has culminated in a digital-simulation model of the regional flow system and incorporates the results of geochemical, hydrologic, and geologic studies. Rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age form at least five artesian aquifers that are recharged in the mountainous areas of Montana, South Dakota, and Wyoming. The aquifers extend for more than 600 mi to discharge areas in the northeastern part of North Dakota and in Manitoba. In general, the direction of flow in each aquifer is east to northeast, but flow is deflected to the north and south around the Williston basin. Flow through the Williston basin is restricted because of brine (200,000-350,000 mg/l), halite beds, geologic structures, and decreased permeability of rocks in the deeper parts of the basin. Fracture systems and lineaments transverse the entire area and act either as conduits or as barriers to ground-water flow, depending on their hydrogeologic and geochemical history. Vertical leakage from the aquifers is restricted by shale with low permeability, by halite beds, and by stratigraphic traps or low-permeability zones associated with petroleum accumulations. However, interaquifer leakage appears to occur through and along some of the major lineaments and fractures. Interaquifer leakage may be a major consideration in determining the quality of water produced from wells.

Downey, J.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The tectonics of eastern Hispaniola: an investigation into the formation and episodic uplift of the Beata Ridge and the geologic and velocity structure of the Cibao basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Lateral variations in the elastic thickness of the Caribbean plate may be responsible for some of the topography of the Beata Ridge. The Cibao basin in the northern Dominican Republic is investigated using data obtained from a seismic reconnaissance survey...

Boucher, Paul James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

Detrital thermochronology of the Alpine foreland basin in Central Switzerland: Insights into tectonic and erosion history of the North Central Alps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study systematically integrates zircon U-Pb geochronology and (U-Th)/He low-temperature thermochronology to correlate the Northern Alpine Foreland Basin (NAFB) sediment provenance and the tectonic and thermal evolution of the thrust stack...

Miller, Joseph Christopher

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan island is 9.5 km east-west by 3.5 km north-south and truncated by an elongate caldera 5 km east-west by 2.5 km north-south. A steep-walled pit crater ~1 km across and ~200 m deep occupies the eastern part of the caldera. The island is the summit region of a mostly submarine stratovolcano. The oldest subaerial rocks (stage 1) are exposed low on the

234

A complete record of Holocene glacier variability at Austre Okstindbreen, northern Norway: an integrated approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arctic glaciers are currently undergoing major changes, but accurate knowledge about how they varied during the entire Holocene is still scarce. Here we present a new complete glacier record from Austre Okstindbreen in Nordland, northern Norway. This reconstruction is based on a number of short and long cores retrieved from several downstream basins, which have been analyzed by a suite of methods including geochemical elements (XRF), rock magnetic properties, dry bulk density (DBD) and Loss-on-ignition (LOI). Lake sediment distribution was surveyed and mapped prior to coring by the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR). Independently lichen-dated marginal moraines and historical information about the glacier frontal positions from old photographs and maps have made it possible to link the moraine sequence to the 210Pb dated lake sediment chronology. This integrated approach reveals that Austre Okstindbreen is the first known glacier in Scandinavia to possibly have survived the Holocene Thermal Optimum. It also brackets the four largest glacier advances to c 74007000, 14001200, 900700 and 300150 years before AD 2000 (b2k). In contrast to most reconstructed glaciers in Scandinavia, the largest glacier advance was not associated with the Little Ice Age, but rather to an earlier period centred at 1300 b2k. Both the moraine chronology and the lacustrine records document this Neoglacial advance. Compared to other glacier reconstructions from the Northern Hemisphere, we identify near-synchronous glacier advances occurring roughly at 4000 b2k; 2700 b2k; 1300 b2k and during the Little Ice Age. These correlative advances across the Northern Hemisphere suggest that these observed centennial-scale events are a shared feature regardless of the large geographical distances separating them. Some minor discrepancies between different geographical areas may be caused by lack of precise dating, but local climatic conditions may play a role as well.

Jostein Bakke; Svein Olaf Dahl; yvind Paasche; Joachim Riis Simonsen; Bjrn Kvisvik; Kristina Bakke; Atle Nesje

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Williston in the family of cratonic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Williston basin is one of a clan of subcircular to elliptical elements in the interiors of all cratons; such basins are distinguished by characteristics common to all. In each, the basement consists of continental crust and each basin is surrounded by areas of continental crust. Subsidence rates are typically low, so that conditions near depositional base level prevailed during much of the history of sediment accumulation. Episodic subsidence occurred over time spans of 10/sup 7/-10/sup 8/ years; major episodes of subsidence are broadly concurrent on all cratons. Tectonic tempo and mode of subsidence evolved synchronously on all cratons; therefore, similar isopach and facies patterns (and similar oil or gas maturation, migration, and trap potentials) occur on all cratons. All members of the clan exhibit a range of individual variations imposed by latitude and climate. Intraplate tectonism and volcanism, approach to or distance from source areas, and distribution paths of detrital sediment. Nevertheless, facts and concepts developed by intensive study of basins with high-density documentation (outcrop and subsurface) are commonly applicable to basins such as the Williston, which is in a less mature stage of exploration.

Sloss, L.L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

K-Basins.pub  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 AUDIT REPORT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES COMPLETION OF K BASINS MILESTONES APRIL 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Completion of K Basins Milestones" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) has been storing 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The fuel, used in support of Hanford's former mission, is currently stored in canisters that are kept in two enclosed water-filled pools known as the K Basins. The K Basins represent a significant risk to the environment due to their deteriorating condition. In fact, the K East Basin, which is near the Columbia River, has

237

User:Kyoung/Sandbox/Areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search User page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » User:Kyoung/Sandbox/Areas < User:Kyoung‎ | Sandbox Jump to: navigation, search CSV Geothermal Resource Area Geothermal Region Control Structure Brophy Model Host Rock Age Host Rock Lithology Mean Capacity Mean Reservoir Temp Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region 4.02 MW4,020 kW 4,020,000 W 4,020,000,000 mW 0.00402 GW 4.02e-6 TW 363.15 K90 °C 194 °F 653.67 °R Adak Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal Region 13.35 MW13,350 kW 13,350,000 W 13,350,000,000 mW 0.0134 GW 1.335e-5 TW 428.15 K155 °C 311 °F 770.67 °R Akun Strait Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal Region 0.61 MW610 kW

238

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

239

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

Southwestern Regional Partnership For Carbon Sequestration (Phase 2) Pump Canyon CO2- ECBM/Sequestration Demonstration, San Juan Basin, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP), three demonstrations of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration are being performed -- one in an oilfield (the SACROC Unit in the Permian basin of west Texas), one in a deep, unmineable coalbed (the Pump Canyon site in the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico), and one in a deep, saline reservoir (underlying the Aneth oilfield in the Paradox basin of southeast Utah). The Pump Canyon CO{sub 2}-enhanced coalbed methane (CO{sub 2}/ECBM) sequestration demonstration project plans to demonstrate the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coal seams via a small-scale geologic sequestration project. The site is located in San Juan County, northern New Mexico, just within the limits of the high-permeability fairway of prolific coalbed methane production. The study area for the SWP project consists of 31 coalbed methane production wells located in a nine section area. CO{sub 2} was injected continuously for a year and different monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques were implemented to track the CO{sub 2} movement inside and outside the reservoir. Some of the MVA methods include continuous measurement of injection volumes, pressures and temperatures within the injection well, coalbed methane production rates, pressures and gas compositions collected at the offset production wells, and tracers in the injected CO{sub 2}. In addition, time-lapse vertical seismic profiling (VSP), surface tiltmeter arrays, a series of shallow monitoring wells with a regular fluid sampling program, surface measurements of soil composition, CO{sub 2} fluxes, and tracers were used to help in tracking the injected CO{sub 2}. Finally, a detailed reservoir model was constructed to help reproduce and understand the behavior of the reservoir under production and injection operation. This report summarizes the different phases of the project, from permitting through site closure, and gives the results of the different MVA techniques.

Advanced Resources International

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Paleotopography and hydrocarbon accumulation: Williston, Powder River, and Denver basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent geomorphic analyses of 1:24,000 scale topographic maps in the three major basins of the northern Great Plains have disclosed a persistent system of basement paleotopographic features that trend north-northeast throughout the region. Superimposed across this system and subtly influenced by it, are the northwesterly trending Laramide structural features. Paleozoic depositional patterns have been strongly influenced by the paleoridge and trough system formed by the north-northeast features. Mesozoic deposition has also been affected by the ancient subsurface system but in a more subtle manner. Many of the Paleozoic and Mezoxoic hydrocarbon locations in the three basins appear to be the results of paleotopographic control on hydrocarbon accumulation sites. This affect ranges from Paleozoic reef sites in the Williston basin through paleotrough localization of Pennsylvanian Minnelusa production in the Powder River basin to fractured Cretaceous Niobrara production at the Silo field in the Denver basin. Basement paleotopography is the underlying factor in all deposition and subsequent hydrocarbon migration in any basin. As such, it should be considered a major factor in the exploration for oil and gas.

Thomas, G.E. (Thomas and Associates, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Minturn Formation of Eagle basin: an exploration frontier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eagle basin, a predominantly Desmoinesian evaporite basin in northwestern Colorado, contains many targets for oil and gas reserves. Facies patterns of the Minturn Formation of the Eagle basin are strikingly similar to those of the prolific Paradox Formation of the Paradox basin. Both basins and formations also contain lens-shaped carbonate algal-bioherms. These algal-bioherms are particularly attractive reservoirs where they flank halite-basin margins, the areas of optimum dolomitization. The Minturn formation has been subdivided into individual rock packages using subsurface control. Facies maps constructed for individual units indicate the Eagle basin is a series of smaller basins, each having served as a center for halite deposition. Data support a deep-water model for the deposition of halite; however, a sabkhalike environment existed between the halite basins and the normal marine facies. Halite depocenters appear to have been structurally controlled. The Minturn Formation is very thick and may contain multiple prospective zones at any one location. Within the past year, two and possibly three Minturn discoveries have been made in northwestern Colorado.

Dodge, C.J.N.; Bartleson, B.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Review of High-Temperature Geothermal Developments in the Northern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intensive geothermal exploration i n the northernBasin.and Range province has r e s u l t e d i n thethe discovery of nine high-temperature (>ZOO"C)geothermal r e s e r v o i r...

245

Modelling the vertical heat exchanger in thermal basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In geographical area characterize by specific geological conformations such as the Viterbo area which comprehend active volcanic basins, it is difficult to use conventional geothermal plants. In fact the area presents at shallow depths thermal falde ... Keywords: heat, thermal aquifer, thermal energy

Maurizio Carlini; Sonia Castellucci

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Origin, distribution, and movement of brine in the Permian Basin (U. S. A. ). A model for displacement of connate brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Na-Cl, halite Ca-Cl, and gypsum Ca-Cl brines with salinities from 45 to >300 g/L are identified and mapped in four hydrostratigraphic units in the Permian Basin area beneath western Texas and Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico, providing spatial and lithologic constraints on the interpretation of the origin and movement of brine. Na-Cl brine is derived from meteoric water as young as 5-10 Ma that dissolved anhydrite and halite, whereas Ca-Cl brine is interpreted to be ancient, modified-connate Permian brine that now is mixing with, and being displaced by, the Na-Cl brine. Displacement fronts appear as broad mixing zones with no significant salinity gradients. Evolution of Ca-Cl brine composition from ideal evaporated sea water is attributed to dolomitization and syndepositional recycling of halite and bittern salts by intermittent influx of fresh water and sea water. Halite Ca-Cl brine in the evaporite section in the northern part of the basin differs from gypsum Ca-Cl brine in the south-central part in salinity and Na/Cl ratio and reflects segregation between halite- and gypsum-precipitating lagoons during the Permian. Ca-Cl brine moved downward through the evaporite section into the underlying Lower Permian and Pennsylvanian marine section that is now the deep-basin brine aquifer, mixing there with pre-existing sea water. Buoyancy-driven convection of brine dominated local flow for most of basin history, with regional advection governed by topographically related forces dominant only for the past 5 to 10 Ma. 71 refs., 11 figs.

Bein, A.; Dutton, A.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Coalbed methane potential assessed in Forest City basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the Forest City basin is a shallow cratonic depression located in northeastern Kansas, southeastern Nebraska, southern Iowa and northern Missouri. Historically, the Forest City basin in northeastern Kansas has been a shallow oil and gas province with minor coal production. The Iowa and Missouri portion has had minor oil production and moderate coal mining. In recent years there has been little coal mining in the Forest City in Iowa and Kansas and only minor production in Missouri. Before 1940, gas was produced from coal beds and shales in the Kansas portion of the Forest City basin. The Cherokee group (Altokan and Desmoinesian age) includes section containing the largest number of actively mined coals and has the greatest available data for coalbed methane evaluation.

Tedesco, S.A. (CST Oil and Gas Corp., Denver, CO (US))

1992-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geological and hydrogeological controls on the accumulation of coalbed methane in the Weibei field, southeastern Ordos Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Commercial exploration and production of coalbed methane (CBM) in the Weibei field, Ordos Basin, China has rapidly increased since 2010. The Weibei field has become one of the most productive CBM areas in China. However, relatively few studies have investigated the migration of gas and water in the coal reservoir and their controls on the gas accumulation. This study conducts stable isotope analyses and quality tests for groundwater samples, discusses the relationships between the fluid flow pathways and tectonics, and concludes by discussing the geological and hydrological controls on potential gas accumulation in the Weibei field. The coalbed groundwaters contain primarily sodium and bicarbonate and are effectively devoid of sulfate, calcium and magnesium. The groundwaters are typically freshwater, with total dissolved solids (TDS) values ranging from 814 to 2657mg/L. Differences in hydrogeology and structural geology divide the study area into four gas domains. In the northern Hancheng area, the predominant northwest flow of groundwater has resulted in higher gas content in the west (>12m3/t) than in the east (812m3/t), even though the coals in the east have high thermal maturity (2.1%2.3% Ro). The area with the highest gas content (>16m3/t) is in the region near the downthrown side of the XuefengNan Thrust Fault in the northern Hancheng area, and the fault forms a barrier to the northwestward flow of groundwater. The area with the lowest gas content (gas has been flushed out of the coals due to a reduction of hydrostatic pressure and active groundwater flow from the east. Structural and hydrodynamic mechanisms, especially the intensity of the hydrodynamic activity and the groundwater flow pathways, are important for gas accumulation in the Weibei field.

Yanbin Yao; Dameng Liu; Taotao Yan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Central-northern Appalachian coalbed methane flow grows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past decade in the US, coalbed methane (CBM) has become an increasingly important source of unconventional natural gas. The most significant CBM production occurs in the San Juan basin of Colorado and new Mexico and the Black Warrior basin of Alabama, which collective in 1995 accounted for about 94% of US CBM production. The paper discusses early CBM production, recent production, gas composition, undiscovered potential, and new exploration areas.

Lyons, P.C. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range geothermal areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range geothermal areas Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: applications; Basin and Range Province; Black Rock Desert; Cassia County Idaho; earthquakes; economic geology; exploration; fracture zones; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; Humboldt County Nevada; Idaho; microearthquakes; Nevada; North America; passive systems; Pershing County Nevada; Raft River; reservoir rocks; seismic methods; seismicity; seismology; Snake River plain; surveys; United States; Western U.S. Author(s): Kumamoto, L.H.

251

Indicators Of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources In Northern Louisiana  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indicators Of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources In Northern Louisiana Indicators Of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources In Northern Louisiana And Central Mississippi Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Indicators Of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources In Northern Louisiana And Central Mississippi Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurements of heat flow and near-surface (< 500 m) geothermal gradients in the Gulf Coastal Plain suggest a zone of low-grade geothermal resources extending from northern Louisiana across south-central Mississippi. Subsurface temperatures exceeding 50°C, suitable for space-heating use, seem probable at depths of 1 km. Thermal conditions within the zone are comparable to those known for areas having attractive thermal energy prospects on the Atlantic Coastal Plain.

252

Refraction Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Assembling Crustal Geophysical Data for Geothermal Exploration in the Great Basin, Louie and Coolbaugh. We have compiled velocity information from sources in the literature, results of previous seismic experiments and earthquake-monitoring projects, and data donated from mining, geothermal, and petroleum companies. We also collected (May 2002 and August 2004) two new crustal refraction profiles across western Nevada and the northern and

253

Basinwide fold evolution and geometric development of cratonic - foreland basin interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Latest results of the Williston Basin Project incorporate a north-south regional seismic line, which is crossing the deepest part of the Williston Basin from Saskatchewan to South Dakota. The integration of this new profile to the two, existing east-west regional seismic sections, gives a quasi-3D image of the basin. The combined seismic data illustrate alternating extensive and compressive phases during basin development, marked by basinwide circular and radial folds. This alternating pattern of basin subsidence is the very nature of crotonic basin evolution. The structural necessity for compressive phases during crotonic basin subsidence, is shown in a regional scale interpretation that has undergone an Earth-curvature correction. The geometrical evolution of the neighboring foreland basin is also interpreted from data that has been corrected with the Earth-curvature function. It shows that basinwide folds sub-parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the basin are analogous to the circular and radial folds of the crotonic basins. These folds, in the foreland belt, are less pronounced because larger scale structural elements can overprint them. Where the crotonic and foreland basins overlap, a complex, deformed zone is present, and contains late stage volcanism, in this area. The geometry of the Williston Basin can be modeled by the Sloss-type [open quote]inverted Gaussian function[close quote] that is modified by the periodic westward tilting of the basin and the Earth-curvature function.

Redly, P.; Hajnal, Z. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Basinwide fold evolution and geometric development of cratonic - foreland basin interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Latest results of the Williston Basin Project incorporate a north-south regional seismic line, which is crossing the deepest part of the Williston Basin from Saskatchewan to South Dakota. The integration of this new profile to the two, existing east-west regional seismic sections, gives a quasi-3D image of the basin. The combined seismic data illustrate alternating extensive and compressive phases during basin development, marked by basinwide circular and radial folds. This alternating pattern of basin subsidence is the very nature of crotonic basin evolution. The structural necessity for compressive phases during crotonic basin subsidence, is shown in a regional scale interpretation that has undergone an Earth-curvature correction. The geometrical evolution of the neighboring foreland basin is also interpreted from data that has been corrected with the Earth-curvature function. It shows that basinwide folds sub-parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the basin are analogous to the circular and radial folds of the crotonic basins. These folds, in the foreland belt, are less pronounced because larger scale structural elements can overprint them. Where the crotonic and foreland basins overlap, a complex, deformed zone is present, and contains late stage volcanism, in this area. The geometry of the Williston Basin can be modeled by the Sloss-type {open_quote}inverted Gaussian function{close_quote} that is modified by the periodic westward tilting of the basin and the Earth-curvature function.

Redly, P.; Hajnal, Z. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Accomplishments At The Great Basin Center For Geothermal Energy Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE) has been funded by DOE since March 2002 to conduct geothermal resource exploration and assessment in the Great Basin. In that time, those efforts have led to significant advances in understanding the regional and local conditions necessary for the formation of geothermal systems. Accomplishments include the development of GPS-based crustal strain rate measurements as a geothermal exploration tool, development of new methods of detecting geothermal features with remotely sensed imagery, and the detection of

256

Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Relating Geothermal Resources To Great Basin Tectonics Using Gps Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: The Great Basin is characterized by non-magmatic geothermal fields, which we hypothesize are created, sustained, and controlled by active tectonics. In the Great Basin, GPS-measured rates of tectonic "transtensional" (shear plus dilatational) strain rate is correlated with geothermal well temperatures and the locations of known geothermal fields. This has led to a conceptual model in which non-magmatic geothermal systems are controlled by the style of strain, where shear (strike-slip faulting)

257

Power Marketing - Sierra Nevada Region - Western Area Power Administra...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pool Resource Adequacy Capacity Plan Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing Power Marketing Depicts SNR's service area, which extends from northern and central...

258

The Use of Geographic Information Systems to Model Habitat for Puma concolor cougar in the Northern Blue Ridge of Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) was used to predict suitable habitat for the eastern cougar (Puma concolor cougar) in the Northern Blue Ridge of Virginia. Two areas were studied, a primary area nested inside a secondary area. Objectives were...

Houser, Rhonda

2002-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................PS-18 Coal-Bed Methane ResourceChapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U

260

GRC Transactions, Vol. 31, 2007 Geothermal, energy resources, Great Basin, GPS, geodesy,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRC Transactions, Vol. 31, 2007 391 Keywords Geothermal, energy resources, Great Basin, GPS, and will be incorporated in future models. Introduction Geothermal energy resources have long been associated of active crustal deformation and its spatial relationship to active geothermal systems in the northern

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

2.9 to 1.9 Ga paleoalterations ofArchean granitic basement of the Franceville basin (Gabon).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2.9 to 1.9 Ga paleoalterations ofArchean granitic basement of the Franceville basin (Gabon: Paleocirculation and Diagenesis in Archean basement, Franceville basin, Gabon3 4 Abstract The Archean granitoids in the Ki�n� area, Gabon, are overlained by the Paleoproterozoic sediments of the Franceville basin (2.1 Ga

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

262

Northern Pass WLT Filing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 12, 2013 Electronic filing September 12, 2013 Electronic filing Christopher Lawrence Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE-20), U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW. Washington, DC 20585 Fax: (202) 586-8008 Christopher.Lawrence@hq.doe.gov Re: Petition by The Weeks Lancaster Trust to intervene in the matter of the Northern Pass Transmission LLC Application for a Presidential Permit (OE Docket No. PP-371) Dear Mr. Lawrence, Following is the petition by The Weeks Lancaster Trust LLC to intervene and comment in the matter of Northern Pass Transmission LLC's Application for a Presidential Permit (PP-371). In accordance with the Notice of Application for this proceeding (75FR 69990), we are also sending a hard copy to the address above. Please contact us by

263

The Caribbean Basin: A prime market for renewables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Countries in the Caribbean basin have high energy prices and need additional electrical generating capacity. Renewable energy and independent power sources could help meet that need. The Caribbean Basin and the Pacific Rim appear to offer the best total market opportunities considering government energy policies, prices of energy, and consumer attitudes on renewable energy applications. The Caribbean Basin was selected for an industry project opportunity review. This area was selected due to its proximity, renewable resource base, need for energy and growth, and potential for private and multidevelopment bank funding of projects. 3 figs.

Sklar, S.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Late Paleozoic foreland deformation in northern Mexico: paleogeographic and tectonic implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deformation in north-central Mexico reflects the existence of an actively evolving foreland basin during the late Paleozoic. The Pedregosa and Orogrande basins formed the northern extensions of this north-northwest-trending foreland basin, which was flanked on the north and west by several large block uplifts. Deformation along the southeastern margin of the basin, in Coahuila, is postulated to represent part of a foreland fold-thrust belt, while structures in Chihuahua and adjacent parts of New Mexico and Texas are related to basement-involved block uplifts. The unconformities, sedimentation patterns and deformation styles of several localities in Chihuahua, southern New Mexico, and west Texas indicate similar, but not necessarily time-equivalent, deformational histories. Uplift began in Late Mississippian and culminated between latest Pennsylvanian (in the north) and Late Permian (in the south). The geographic distribution and sequential timing of deformation are consistent with our knowledge of the Ouachita system in the US. The distributions of the fold-thrust belt and basement-involved uplifts of the Ouachita foreland in northern Mexico is not only similar to other parts of the Ouachita system but also to portions of the Laramide in the northern Rocky Mountains. These similarities and distribution of late Paleozoic calcalkaline igneous rocks in the region suggest that a subduction zone and associated magmatic arc were present in eastern Mexico during the late Paleozoic.

Handschy, J.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

PP-60 Northern Electric Cooperative Association (NEC) | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 Northern Electric Cooperative Association (NEC) PP-60 Northern Electric Cooperative Association (NEC) Presidential Permit authorizing Northern Electric Cooperative Association...

266

Corrosion of aluminum alloys in a reactor disassembly basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document discusses storage of aluminum clad fuel and target tubes of the Mark 22 assembly takes place in the concrete-lined, light-water-filled, disassembly basins located within each reactor area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A corrosion test program has been conducted in the K-Reactor disassembly basin to assess the storage performance of the assemblies and other aluminum clad components in the current basin environment. Aluminum clad alloys cut from the ends of actual fuel and target tubes were originally placed in the disassembly water basin in December 1991. After time intervals varying from 45--182 days, the components were removed from the basin, photographed, and evaluated metallographically for corrosion performance. Results indicated that pitting of the 8001 aluminum fuel clad alloy exceeded the 30-mil (0.076 cm) cladding thickness within the 45-day exposure period. Pitting of the 1100 aluminum target clad alloy exceeded the 30-mil (0.076 cm) clad thickness in 107--182 days exposure. The existing basin water chemistry is within limits established during early site operations. Impurities such as Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} are controlled to the parts per million level and basin water conductivity is currently 170--190 {mu}mho/cm. The test program has demonstrated that the basin water is aggressive to the aluminum components at these levels. Other storage basins at SRS and around the US have successfully stored aluminum components for greater than ten years without pitting corrosion. These basins have impurity levels controlled to the parts per billion level (1000X lower) and conductivity less than 1.0 {mu}mho/cm.

Howell, J.P.; Zapp, P.E.; Nelson, D.Z.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Apacheta, A New Geothermal Prospect In Northern Chile | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apacheta, A New Geothermal Prospect In Northern Chile Apacheta, A New Geothermal Prospect In Northern Chile Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Apacheta, A New Geothermal Prospect In Northern Chile Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The discovery of two high-temperature fumaroles, with gas geochemistry compatible with an economic geothermal system, established Apacheta as one of the most attractive geothermal exploration prospects in northern Chile. These remote fumaroles at 5,150 m elevation were first sampled in 1999 by ENAP and its partners, following up on the reports of a CODELCO water exploration well that flowed small amounts of dry steam at 4,540 m elevation in the valley 4.5 km east of the fumaroles. The prospect is associated with a Plio-Pleistocene volcanic complex located within a

268

Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: From 1957 to 1961 a regional gravity survey was made over the northern part of the Great Salt Lake Desert and adjacent areas in Utah, eastern Nevada, and southeastern Idaho. A total of 1040 stations were taken over an area of about 7000 square miles. The results were compiled as a Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 2 mgal. The Bouguer values ranged from a high of about -120 mgal over the outcrop areas to a

269

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

OTRC Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OTRC Wave Basin OTRC Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name OTRC Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (OTRC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 45.7 Beam(m) 30.5 Depth(m) 5.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $300/hour (excluding labor) Special Physical Features 4.6m wide x 9.1m long x 16.8m deep pit with adjustable depth floor in test area Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.6 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 25 Wave Period Range(s) 4.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.6 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description GEDAP 3D wave generation software, 48 hinged flap wave generator

272

Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Northern Nevada Geothermal Exploration Strategy Analysis Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results of exploration techniques applied to geothermal resource investigations in northern Nevada were evaluated and rated by seven investigators involved in the work. A quantitative rating scheme was used to obtain estimates of technique effectiveness. From survey cost information we also obtained and compared cost-effectiveness estimates for the various techniques. Effectiveness estimates were used to develop an exploration strategy for the area. However, because no deep confirmatory drilling has been done yet, the technique evaluations and exploration

273

Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, Geodetic Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional to Basin-Scale Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures, Geoffrey Blewitt. The objectives of this project are to assess the use of inter-seismic crustal strain rates derived from GPS-stations as an exploration tool for non-magmatic high-temperature geothermal systems, and to use this technique to target potential geothermal resources in the Great Basin. Two potential target areas were identified in year one (FY03) by regional-scale studies: (1) the area

274

Water resources data for Hawaii and other Pacific areas, water year 1989. Volume 2. Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, federated states of Micronesia, Palau, and American Samoa. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1988-30 September 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water-resources data for the 1989 water year for other Pacific areas consist of records of discharge, and water quality of streams and stage of a lake and reservoir; water levels and water quality in wells; stage in a tide gage; and rainfall. This report volume 2 contains discharge records for 26 gaging stations; stage only for 2 gaging stations; water quality at 11 gaging stations, one streamflow partial record station, and 54 wells; water levels for 28 observations wells; and tide stages for one tide gage station. Also included are 2 crest-stage partial record stations, 4 miscellaneous partial-record stations, 15 low-flow partial-record stations, and 19 rainfall stations.

Fontaine, R.A.; Kunishige, V.E.; Lum, M.G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Data Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Basin Data Basin Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Data Basin Agency/Company /Organization: Conservation Biology Institute Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: databasin.org/ Data Basin Screenshot References: Data Basin [1] Overview "Data Basin is an innovative, online system that connects users with spatial datasets, tools, and expertise. Individuals and organization can explore and download a vast library of datasets, upload their own data, create and publish projects, form working groups, and produce customized maps that can be easily shared. The building blocks of Data Basin are: Datasets: A dataset is a spatially explicit file, currently Arcshape and ArcGrid files. These can be biological, physical, socioeconomic, (and

276

Geothermal Literature Review At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Literature Review At Nw Basin & Range Geothermal Literature Review At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Assembling Crustal Geophysical Data for Geothermal Exploration in the Great Basin, Louie and Coolbaugh. We have compiled velocity information from sources in the literature, results of previous seismic experiments and earthquake-monitoring projects, and data donated from mining, geothermal, and petroleum companies. We also collected (May 2002 and August 2004) two new crustal refraction profiles across western Nevada and the northern and central Sierra. These sections had not been well characterized previously.

277

Market Statistics Northern Colorado Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Market Statistics RE Northern Colorado Region #12;©2013 Everitt Real Estate Center, All Rights. The EREC Market Statistics for the Northern Colorado region details historical closing and inventory trends. The EREC Market Statistics report is available for download at http

278

Atlantic Basin Refining Dynamics from U.S. Perspective  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This presentation focuses on the current refining situation in the Atlantic Basin, This presentation focuses on the current refining situation in the Atlantic Basin, Page 1 including some discussion on how we got here, and on drivers that will influence the next 5 years. I will focus on three topics today that are critical to the petroleum product dynamics of Page 2 the Atlantic Basin over the next several years. The first is product demand growth - something that has been affected both by the recession and legislation. Next I will cover the supply situation for gasoline and distillates in the Atlantic Basin, since Europe and the U.S. are closely entwined in these markets. Last, we will visit the outlook for those drivers affecting profitability - an area of large uncertainty. I will begin today with a short discussion of important underlying long-term trends in U.S.

279

Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Details Activities (12) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy

280

EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64 Basin Electric...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Northern Colorado Clean Cities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Colorado Clean Cities Northern Colorado Clean Cities Jump to: navigation, search Name Northern Colorado Clean Cities Address PO Box 759 Place Johnstown, Colorado Zip 80534 Region Rockies Area Number of employees 1-10 Year founded 1996 Phone number 970-689-4845 Notes Non-profit with members and mission to reduce petroleum use in the transportation sector through use of alternative fuels and other strategies, through collaborative partnerships, now! Coordinates 40.2895951°, -104.9155243° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2895951,"lon":-104.9155243,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

282

K Basin sludge dissolution engineering study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this engineering study is to investigate the available technology related to dissolution of the K Basin sludge in nitric acid. The conclusion of this study along with laboratory and hot cell tests with actual sludge samples will provide the basis for beginning conceptual design of the sludge dissolver. The K Basin sludge contains uranium oxides, fragments of metallic U, and some U hydride as well as ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum oxides and hydroxides, windblown sand that infiltrated the basin enclosure, ion exchange resin, and miscellaneous materials. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be conditioned so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System waste acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the underground storage tanks. Sludge conditioning will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and then reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. There will be five distinct feed streams to the sludge conditioning process two from the K East (KE) Basin and three from the K West (KW) Basin. The composition of the floor and pit sludges which contain more iron oxides and sand than uranium is much different than the canister sludges which are composed of mostly uranium oxides. The sludge conditioning equipment will be designed to process all of the sludge streams, but some of the operating parameters will be adjusted as necessary to handle the different sludge stream compositions. The volume of chemical additions and the amount of undissolved solids will be much different for floor and pit sludge than for canister sludge. Dissolution of uranium metal and uranium dioxide has been studied quite thoroughly and much information is available. Both uranium metal and uranium dioxide have been dissolved on a large scale in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in Europe, Japan, and the USA. Ash and sludge containing uranium compounds also have been dissolved in reprocessing or plutonium scrap recovery plants, but only a limited amount of information is available on how the ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum compounds and silicates in the sand will behave during nitric acid dissolution. Laboratory work with simulants and hot cell work with actual K Basin sludge is in progress to obtain data in these areas.

Westra, A.G.

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

283

Northern U. K. NGL, ethylene systems expand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction culminated last year along a 994-mile, gas-liquids pipeline and processing system from the northern and central North Sea to the Stanlow petrochemical complex in the west of England. The paper describes the major additions to the system; plans for the Scottish Area Gas Evacuation (SAGE) system; the terminal facilities at St. Fergus, located north of Aberdeen, the hub for the gas-liquids system; the expansion of the Mossmorran NGL plant; and Shell's new 256-mile North Western Ethylene Pipeline from Grangemouth, Scotland to Stanlow, England.

True, W.R.

1993-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

284

Stratigraphy and depositional environments of Fox Hills Formation in Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fox Hills Formation (Maestrichtian), representing part of a regressive wedge deposited during the withdrawal of the sea from the Western Interior at the close of the Cretaceous, consists of marginal marine strata transitional between the offshore deposits of the underlying Pierre Shale and the terrestrial deltaic and coastal deposits of the overlying Hell Creek Formation. An investigation of outcrops of the Fox Hills Formation along the western and southern flanks of the Williston basin and study of over 300 oil and gas well logs from the central part of the basin indicate that the formation can be divided both stratigraphically and areally. Stratigraphically, the Fox Hills can be divided into lower and upper sequences; the lower includes the Trail City and Timber Lake Members, and the upper sequence includes the Colgate Member in the west and the Iron Lightning and Linton Members in the east. Areally, the formation can be divided into a northeastern and western part, where the strata are 30-45 m thick and are dominated by the lower sequence, and into a southeastern area where both the lower and upper sequences are well developed in a section 80-130 m thick. Typically, the lower Fox Hills consists of upward-coarsening shoreface or delta-front sequences containing hummocky bedding and a limited suite of trace fossils, most notably Ophiomorpha. In the southeast, however, these strata are dominated by bar complexes, oriented northeast-southwest, composed of cross-bedded medium to very fine-grained sand with abundant trace and body fossils. The upper Fox Hills represents a variety of shoreface, deltaic, and channel environments. The strata of the Fox Hills Formation exhibit facies similar to those reported for Upper Cretaceous gas reservoirs in the northern Great Plains.

Daly, D.J.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Why Sequencea Near-Shore Anoxic Basin?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Near-Shore Anoxic Basin? a Near-Shore Anoxic Basin? Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs; areas of low dissolved oxygen concentrations) play a major role in biogeochemical cycling within the world's oceans. They are major sinks for nitrogen and sources for the gases carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide. Microbially mediated biological activity associated with these systems affects the productivity of the deep blue sea and the balance of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Thus, studies aimed at evaluating the phylogenetic variation and metabolic capacity of microbial communities within these systems have great promise to enhance our understanding of the patterns and processes that drive global biogeochemical phenomena in both aquatic and atmospheric compartments of the biosphere. To this end, JGI and

286

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2002-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

Basin center - fractured source rock plays within tectonically segmented foreland (back-arc) basins: Targets for future exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production from fractured reservoirs has long been an industry target, but interest in this type play has increased recently because of new concepts and technology, especially horizontal drilling. Early petroleum exploration programs searched for fractured reservoirs from shale, tight sandstones, carbonates, or basement in anticlinal or fault traps, without particular attention to source rocks. Foreland basins are some of the best oil-generating basins in the world because of their rich source rocks. Examples are the Persian Gulf basin, the Alberta basin and Athabasca tar sands, and the eastern Venezuela basin and Orinoco tar sands. Examples of Cretaceous producers are the wrench-faulted La Paz-Mara anticlinal fields, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela; the active Austin Chalk play in an extensional area on the north flank of the Gulf of Mexico continental margin basin; and the Niobrara Chalk and Pierre Shale plays of the central Rocky Mountains, United States. These latter plays are characteristic of a foreland basin fragmented into intermontane basins by the Laramide orogeny. The Florence field, Colorado, discovered in 1862, and the Silo field, Wyoming, discovered in 1980, are used as models for current prospecting and will be described in detail. The technologies applied to fracture-source rock plays are refined surface and subsurface mapping from new log suites, including resistivity mapping; 3D-3C seismic, gravity, and aeromagnetic mapping; borehole path seismic mapping associated with horizontal drilling; fracture mapping with the Formation MicroScanner and other logging tools; measurements while drilling and other drilling and completion techniques; surface geochemistry to locate microseeps; and local and regional lineament discrimination.

Weimer, R.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

23.-THE FISHES OF THE COLORADO BASIN. By BARTON W. EVERMANN AND CLOUD. RUTTER.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23.-THE FISHES OF THE COLORADO BASIN. By BARTON W. EVERMANN AND CLOUD. RUTTER. In this paper we of the fishes in the basin of the Colorado River of the West. The approximate area drained by the Oolorado strip along the entire length of the western side of New Mexico, a large part of western polorado

290

Ammodiscus anulatus, a new species of benthic foraminifera from the Colombian Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ammodiscus anulatus, a new species of benthic foraminifera from the Colombian Basin Flavia Fiorini in seafloor sediment from the Colombian Caribbean continental slope. Ammodiscus anulatus n. sp of the sampling points along the continental slope of Fuerte area, Colombian Basin. #12;Research conducted

Bermingham, Eldredge

291

Comparative risk analysis of development of the lignite basins in Serbian part of the Danube region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper gives an overview of the global business risks and risks in the mining development in the Kolubara and Kostolac lignite basins in the area of the Danube river in Serbia. An identification of main risks is undertaken by application of a comprehensive ... Keywords: danube region, lignite basin, mining and energetics, strategic business risks, sustainable development

Slavka Zekovi?; Tamara Mari?i?

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Reforestation of abandoned pasture on Hokkaido, northern Japan: effect of plantations on the recovery of conifer-broadleaved mixed forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the 1850s, the total forest area in Japan has remained approximately constant. ... However, on Hokkaido, northern Japan, total forest area was reduced drastically in the last ... underway. Old-growth stands...

Kikuko Shoyama

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Magnetostratigraphy of Tertiary sediments from the Hoh Xil Basin: implications for the Cenozoic tectonic history of the Tibetan Plateau  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......consists mainly of the lake carbonate with some black oil shale (Liu Wang 1999). It disconformably overlies the Fenghuoshan...A, 326, 177-188. Liu Z. , Wang C., 1999. Oil shale in the Tertiary Hoh Xil basin, northern Qinghai-Tibet......

Zhifei Liu; Xixi Zhao; Chengshan Wang; Shun Liu; Haisheng Yi

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility. Fourth Quarter 1994, Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unlined settling basin operated from 1958 until 1985, receiving waste water that contained volatile organic solvents used for metal degreasing and chemical constituents and depleted uranium from fuel fabrication process in M Area. The underground process sewer line transported M-Area process waste waters to the basin. Water periodically overflowed from the basin through the ditch to the seepage area adjacent to the ditch and to Lost Lake.

Chase, J.A.

1995-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

295

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

296

Role of fault rejuvenation in hydrocarbon accumulation and structural evolution of Reconcavo Basin, Northeastern Brazil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a geometric analysis of the fault pattern in the Reconcavo basin, Brazil, supported by a reinterpretation of the early opening history of the South Atlantic Ocean, it is inferred that the basin formed as a result of Valanginian (Early Cretaceous) motion on a major N40/sup 0/E-striking left-lateral transform fault located offshore between Salvador and Recife. This left-lateral motion was due to the location of the Valanginian pole of South American - African plate rotation within northern Brazil, at 2.5 /sup 0/S, 45.0/sup 0/W, rather than farther north as interpreted previously. 13 figures, 2 tables.

Cohen, C.R.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Tectonic br Setting Host br Rock br Age Host br Rock br Lithology Mean br Capacity Mean br Reservoir br Temp Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics Mesozoic granite granodiorite MW K Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW K Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics triassic metasedimentary MW K Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Extensional Tectonics MW Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone

298

R-Area Reactor 1993 annual groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the following locations in R Area: Well cluster P20 east of R Area (one well each in the water table and the McBean formation), the R-Area Acid/Caustic Basin (the four water-table wells of the RAC series), the R-Area Ash Basin/Coal Pile (one well of the RCP series in the Congaree formation and one in the water table), the R-Area Disassembly Basin (the three water-table wells of the RDB series), the R-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (the four water-table wells of the RRP series), and the R-Area Seepage Basins (numerous water-table wells in the RSA, RSB, RSC, RSD, RSE, and RSF series). Lead was the only constituent detected above its 50{mu}g/L standard in any but the seepage basin wells; it exceeded that level in one B well and in 23 of the seepage basin wells. Cadmium exceeded its drinking water standard (DWS) in 30 of the seepage basin wells, as did mercury in 10. Nitrate-nitrite was above DWS once each in two seepage basin wells. Tritium was above DWS in six seepage basin wells, as was gross alpha activity in 22. Nonvolatile beta exceeded its screening standard in 29 wells. Extensive radionuclide analyses were requested during 1993 for the RCP series and most of the seepage basin wells. Strontium-90 in eight wells was the only specific radionuclide other than tritium detected above DWS; it appeared about one-half of the nonvolatile beta activity in those wells.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Regional tree growth and inferred summer climate in the Winnipeg River basin, Canada, since AD 1783  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of northwestern Ontario, northern Minnesota and southeastern Manitoba, and is a key area for hydroelectric power Scott St. George a,b,c,, David M. Meko b , Michael N. Evans b,c a GSC Northern Canada, Geological Survey tenets of dendroclimatology, and states that tree-ring samples should be collected from sites

Evans, Michael N.

300

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10`` to 20`` API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Supai salt karst features: Holbrook Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 300 sinkholes, fissures, depressions, and other collapse features occur along a 70 km (45 mi) dissolution front of the Permian Supai Formation, dipping northward into the Holbrook Basin, also called the Supai Salt Basin. The dissolution front is essentially coincident with the so-called Holbrook Anticline showing local dip reversal; rather than being of tectonic origin, this feature is likely a subsidence-induced monoclinal flexure caused by the northward migrating dissolution front. Three major areas are identified with distinctive attributes: (1) The Sinks, 10 km WNW of Snowflake, containing some 200 sinkholes up to 200 m diameter and 50 m depth, and joint controlled fissures and fissure-sinks; (2) Dry Lake Valley and contiguous areas containing large collapse fissures and sinkholes in jointed Coconino sandstone, some of which drained more than 50 acre-feet ({approximately}6 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3}) of water overnight; and (3) the McCauley Sinks, a localized group of about 40 sinkholes 15 km SE of Winslow along Chevelon Creek, some showing essentially rectangular jointing in the surficial Coconino Formation. Similar salt karst features also occur between these three major areas. The range of features in Supai salt are distinctive, yet similar to those in other evaporate basins. The wide variety of dissolution/collapse features range in development from incipient surface expression to mature and old age. The features began forming at least by Pliocene time and continue to the present, with recent changes reportedly observed and verified on airphotos with 20 year repetition. The evaporate sequence along interstate transportation routes creates a strategic location for underground LPG storage in leached caverns. The existing 11 cavern field at Adamana is safely located about 25 miles away from the dissolution front, but further expansion initiatives will require thorough engineering evaluation.

Neal, J.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range Province,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range Province, And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range Province, Western North America- Evidence For Deep Permeable Pathways Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range Province, Western North America- Evidence For Deep Permeable Pathways Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluids from the western margin of the Basin and Range have helium isotope ratios as high as ~6-7 Ra, indicating a strong mantle melt influence and consistent with recent and current volcanic activity. Moving away from these areas, helium isotope ratios decrease rapidly to 'background' values of around 0.6 Ra, and then gradually decrease toward the east to low values of ~0.1 Ra at the eastern margin of the Basin and

305

An analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study used several model-based tools to analyse the dynamics of the Arctic Basin between 1997 and 2006 as a linked system of land-ocean-atmosphere C exchange. The analysis estimates that terrestrial areas of the Arctic ...

McGUIRE, A. D.

306

Design criteria document, electrical system, K-Basin essential systems recovery, Project W-405  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Design Criteria Document provides the criteria for design and construction of electrical system modifications for 100K Area that are essential to protect the safe operation and storage of spent nuclear fuel in the K-Basin facilities.

Hoyle, J.R.

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Comparison Between Two Hydrodynamic Models for Flooding Simulations at River Lima Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to EU flood risks directive, flood hazard maps should include information on hydraulic ... Lima basin, Portugal. This river includes several flood-prone areas. Ponte Lima town is one of the places of hi...

Jos Pinho; Rui Ferreira; Lus Vieira; Dirk Schwanenberg

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Mapping Monkeypox Transmission Risk through Time and Space in the Congo Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monkeypox is a major public health concern in the Congo Basin area, with changing patterns of human case occurrences reported in recent years. Whether this trend results from better surveillance and detection methods, reduced proportions...

Nakazawa, Yoshinori; Lash, R. Ryan; Carroll, Darin S.; Damon, Inger K.; Karem, Kevin L.; Reynolds, Mary G.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Malekani, Jean M.; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Formenty, Pierre; Peterson, A. Townsend

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Thermal Regime Of The San Juan Basin Since Late Cretaceous...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Sources Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Heat-flow and coal-maturation data suggest that the thermal history of the San Juan Basin has been...

310

K Basin sludge treatment process description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K East (KE) and K West (KW) fuel storage basins at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site contain sludge on the floor, in pits, and inside fuel storage canisters. The major sources of the sludge are corrosion of the fuel elements and steel structures in the basin, sand intrusion from outside the buildings, and degradation of the structural concrete that forms the basins. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be treated so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the double-shell waste tanks. The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office accepted a recommendation by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., to chemically treat the sludge. Sludge treatment will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. A truck will transport the resulting slurry to an underground storage tank (most likely tank 241-AW-105). The undissolved solids will be treated to reduce the transuranic (TRU) and content, stabilized in grout, and transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal. This document describes a process for dissolving the sludge to produce waste streams that meet the TWRS acceptance criteria for disposal to an underground waste tank and the ERDF acceptance criteria for disposal of solid waste. The process described is based on a series of engineering studies and laboratory tests outlined in the testing strategy document (Flament 1998).

Westra, A.G.

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

311

Analysis Of Geothermal Resources In Northern Switzerland | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Northern Switzerland In Northern Switzerland Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Analysis Of Geothermal Resources In Northern Switzerland Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In Europe, geothermal energy becomes an attractive alternative for many conventional fuel based energy scenarios. In a time when actual political discussion favors regenerative energies, geothermal energy is an essential option since it offers the advantage of providing band energy. Recent studies provide evidence for large economical competitiveness of low-enthalpy, direct-use systems for heating and high-enthalpy systems for cogeneration (combined heat and power, CHP) or pure power generation. The study presented herein develops a detailed subsurface model of possible

312

Northern California Solar Energy Association | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern California Solar Energy Association Northern California Solar Energy Association Jump to: navigation, search Name Northern California Solar Energy Association Address PO Box 3008 Place Berkeley, California Zip 94703 Region Bay Area Website http://www.gosolarcalifornia.c Coordinates 37.8524741°, -122.2738958° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8524741,"lon":-122.2738958,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

313

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

314

Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP-371 Northern  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LLC LLC Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No: PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission LLC Northern Pass Transmission LLC (Northern Pass) has submitted an amended application for a Presidential permit to construct, operate, maintain, and connect an electric transmission line across the United States border with Canada. Amended Application of Northern Pass Transmission LLC for Presidential Permit Exhibit 1 - Opinion of Counsel Exhibit 2 - General Area Map of Proposed Route Exhibit 3 - Diagrams of Cross-Section of Underground Cables Exhibit 4 - Drawings of Typical Structure Configurations Exhibit 5 - Chart of Proposed Structure Heights Exhibit 6 - Drawing of Typical Converter Terminal Exhibit 7 - General Area Map of North Section Exhibit 8 - General Area Map of Central Section

315

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins. Topical report, January 1991-July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins was evaluated in the context of geologic and hydrologic characteristics identified in the San Juan Basin, the nation's leading coalbed methane producing basin. The major comparative criteria were (1) coalbed methane resources, (2) geologic and hydrologic factors that predict areas of high gas producibility and high coalbed reservoir permeability, and (3) coalbed thermal maturity. The technical criteria were expanded to include structure, depositional systems, and data base and then combined with economic criteria (production, industry activity, and pipeline availability) to evaluate the coalbed methane potential of the basins. The Greater Green River and Piceance Basins have primary potential to make a significant near-term contribution to the nation's gas supply. These basins have large gas resources, high-rank coals, high gas contents, and established coalbed methane production. The Greater Green River Basin has numerous coalbed methane targets, good coal-seam permeability, and extensive hydrologic areas favorable for production. The Powder River and Raton Basins were judged to have secondary potential. Coal beds in the Powder River Basin are thermally immature and produce large volumes of water; the Raton Basin has a poor data base and has no gas pipeline infrastructure. Low production and minimal industry activity further limit the near-term potential of the Raton Basin. However, if economic criteria are discounted and only major technical criteria are considered, the Greater Green River and Raton Basins are assigned primary potential. The Raton Basin's shallow, thermally mature coal beds of good permeability are attractive coalbed methane targets, but low coal-seam permeability limits the coalbed methane potential of the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

KE Basin Sludge Flocculant Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the revised path forward and schedule for the K Basins Sludge Retrieval and Disposal Project, the sludge in K East (KE) Basin will be moved from the floor and pits and transferred to large, free-standing containers located in the pits (so as to isolate the sludge from the basin). When the sludge is pumped into the containers, it must settle fast enough and clarify sufficiently that the overflow water returned to the basin pool will not cloud the water or significantly increase the radiological dose rate to the operations staff as a result of increased suspended radioactive material. The approach being evaluated to enhance sludge settling and speed the rate of clarification is to add a flocculant to the sludge while it is being transferred to the containers. In February 2004, seven commercial flocculants were tested with a specific K Basin sludge simulant to identify those agents that demonstrated good performance over a broad range of slurry solids concentrations. From this testing, a cationic polymer flocculant, Nalco Optimer 7194 Plus (7194+), was shown to exhibit superior performance. Related prior testing with K Basin sludge and simulant in 1994/1996 had also identified this agent as promising. In March 2004, four series of jar tests were conducted with 7194+ and actual KE Basin sludge (prepared by combining selected archived KE sludge samples). The results from these jar tests show that 7194+ greatly improves settling of the sludge slurries and clarification of the supernatant.

Schmidt, Andrew J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Gano, Sue

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

317

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r{sup 2}=0.95) and gas content (r{sup 2}=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. [Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Elements of environmental concern in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments: A perspective of Fort Union coals in northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The elements of environmental concern (EECs) named in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments include 12 trace elements consisting of antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, and uranium. Although all these trace elements are potentially hazardous, arsenic, mercury, lead, and selenium may be targeted in forthcoming Environmental Protection Agency regulations. Fort Union coals contain all the trace elements named in the Clean Air Act Amendments; however, the presence and amounts of individual trace elements vary from basin to basin. In the Powder River Basin, the major producing Fort Union coals (Wyodak-Anderson and equivalent coal beds, and Rosebud coal bed) contain the lowest (or statistically as low) amounts of EECs of any of the coal producing basins (i.e., Williston, Hanna, and Green River) in the region. In addition, when the arithmetic means of these trace elements in Powder River Basin coals are compared to other regions in the conterminous US, they are lower than those of Cretaceous coals in Colorado Plateau, Tertiary lignites in the Gulf Coast, and Pennsylvanian coals in the Illinois and Appalachian Basins. Thus, elements of environmental concern are generally low in Fort Union coals in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, and particularly low in the Powder River Basin. Projected increase in production of Powder River Basin coals will, therefore, be of greater benefit to the nation than an increase in development and production of coals in other basins.

Stricker, G.D.; Ellis, M.E.; Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Elements of environmental concern in the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments: A perspective of Fort Union coals in northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The elements of environmental concern (EECs) named in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments include 12 trace elements consisting of antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, and uranium. Although all these trace elements are potentially hazardous, arsenic, mercury, lead, and selenium may be targeted in forthcoming Environmental Protection Agency regulations. Fort Union coals contain all the trace elements named in the Clean Air Act Amendments; however, the presence and amounts of individual trace elements vary from basin to basin. In the Powder River Basin, the major producing Fort Union coals (Wyodak-Anderson and equivalent coal beds, and Rosebud coal bed) contain the lowest (or statistically as low) amounts of EECs of any of the coal producing basins (i.e. Williston, Hanna, and Green River) in the region. In addition, when the arithmetic means of these trace elements in Powder River Basin coals are compared to other regions in the conterminous U.S., they are lower than those of Cretaceous coals in Colorado Plateau, Tertiary lignites in the Gulf Coast, and Pennsylvanian coals in the Illinois and Appalachian Basins. Thus, elements of environmental concern are generally low in Fort Union coals in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, and particularly low in the Powder River Basin. Projected increase in production of Powder River Basin coals will, therefore, be of greater benefit to the nation than an increase in development and production of coals in other basins.

Stricker, G.D.; Ellis, M.E.; Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Williston basin Seislog study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of Seislog (trade name) processing and interpretation of an east-west line in the North Dakota region of the Williston basin. Seislog processing involves inversion of the seismic trace data to produce a set of synthetic sonic logs. These resulting traces, which incorporate low-frequency velocity information, are displayed in terms of depth and isotransit times. These values are contoured and colored, based on a standard stratigraphic color scheme. The section studied is located just north of a dual producing oil pool from zones in the Ordovician Red River and Devonian Duperow Formations. A sonic log from the Long Creek 1 discovery well was digitized and filtered to match the frequency content of the original seismic data. This allows direct comparison between units in the well and the pseudosonic log (Seislog) trace nearest the well. Porosity development and lithologic units within the lower Paleozoic stratigraphic section can be correlated readily between the well and Seislog traces. Anomalous velocity zones within the Duperow and Red River Formations can be observed and correlated to producing intervals in the nearby wells. These results emphasize the importance of displaying inversion products that incorporate low-frequency data in the search for hydrocarbons in the Williston basin. The accumulations in this region are local in extent and are difficult to pinpoint by using conventional seismic data or displays. Seislog processing and displays provide a tested method for identification and delineation of interval velocity anomalies in the Red River and Duperow stratigraphic sections. These techniques can significantly reduce risks in both exploration and delineation drilling of these types of targets.

Mummery, R.C.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Paluxy of the Central Basin-East Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paluxy Formation (Lower Cretaceous) has been a consistent sandstone exploration objective in the central East Texas basin, occurring at moderate depths on the order of 5000-8000 ft with oil in reservoirs with good permeability and porosity and reserves in the range of 200,000 to 500,000 bbl per well. Since the 1940s, the pace of Paluxy field discovery has been steady, generally a new field or two every one or two years, and there is every reason to believe that there is continued potential for the Paluxy in the future. The central part of the East Texas basin, in Smith County and adjacent areas, has complex structure with numerous salt domes and intervening sediment wedges (turtles) that formed during movement of the salt. Paluxy oil and gas in this area occurs mainly in combination structural-stratigraphic traps along normal faults that cut turtles. Major exploration trends in the central basin include (1) the Lindale turtle with a number of widely spaced fields, generally with only a few wells but with relatively good per-well reserves, (2) the Tyler turtle with the largest fields and some of the most prolific Paluxy production in the central basin, (3) the Flint and Irene turtles with relatively thin sandstones and modest production, (4) the Lane Chapel turtle with some exciting new Paluxy discoveries, and (5) the rim areas of salt domes.

Presley, M.W. (Pentra Research, McKinney, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Geology of the Wallula Gap Area, Washington. [Grande Ronde, Wanapum, and Saddle Mountains basalts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on the structure and stratigraphy of an 80-km/sup 2/ area at the southern margin of the Pasco Basin in Wallula Gap. Field stratigraphy, petrography, natural remanent magnetism, and major-element chemistry indicate that the tholeiitic basalt flows of the Wallula Gap area correlate with units of the Grande Ronde, Wanapum, and Saddle Mountains Formations of the Yakima Subgroup of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Flows of the Frenchman Springs, Umatilla, Pomona, Elephant Mountain, and Ice Harbor Mmebers are present in the area. The Frenchman Springs Member exposed in the Wallula Gap is more than 185 m thick and consists of eight to nine flows. Its thickness and possible contemporaneous structural deformation apparently prevented emplacement of both the Roza and Priest Rapids Members at this locality. Structural uplift of the Horse Heaven Hills began prior to extrusion of the Pomona flow. Both the Pomona and Elephant Mountain Members thin and pinch out over the crest of the uplift near Mound Pond. The Ice Harbor flow was apparently confined to the basin north of the Horse Heaven uplift, but an exposure at Mound Pond suggests it flowed through Wallula Gap as an intracanyon flow. The Wallula Gap fault zone trends N65/sup 0/W and can be traced for at least 11 km along the north flank of the Horse Heaven Hills uplift. Where the fault intersects the Olympic-Wallowa Lineament at Van Sycle Canyon 8 km east of Wallula Gap, it is a broad zone of normal faulting, 300 m wide, with as much as 310 m of displacement of the basalt stratigraphy. Two faults occur in the northern portion of Van Sycle Canyon and define a graben trending N45/sup 0/W. A third fault, roughly parallel to the Wallula Gap fault, transects the The Nub and offsets 14 m of Ice Harbor basalt.

Gardner, J.N.; Snow, M.G.; Fecht, K.R.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Rwanda

325

Numerical Modeling Of Basin And Range Geothermal Systems | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Numerical Modeling Of Basin And Range Geothermal Systems Numerical Modeling Of Basin And Range Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Numerical Modeling Of Basin And Range Geothermal Systems Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Basic qualitative relationships for extensional geothermal systems that include structure, heat input, and permeability distribution have been established using numerical models. Extensional geothermal systems, as described in this paper, rely on deep circulation of groundwater rather than on cooling igneous bodies for heat, and rely on extensional fracture systems to provide permeable upflow paths. A series of steady-state, two-dimensional simulation models is used to evaluate the effect of permeability and structural variations on an idealized, generic

326

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17- acre basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project was safely completed at a cost of $8.9 million, $2.9 million under budget. The manmade earthen basin received ash from the former R Area Pow- erhouse operations, which ended in 1964. The first of five reactors con- structed at SRS, the R Reactor produced nuclear materials for national defense. Recovery Act funding allowed SRS to accelerate cleanup of the basin and complete the project five years earlier than the target set in a regu- latory schedule. In late 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control determined the closure met all regulatory requirements after inspection

327

Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River extensional shear zone is exposed in the Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex. Several studies of ductile deformation have shown that it accommodated crustal stretching in Tertiary time during late orogenic collapse of the thickened Cordilleran crust. Progressive deformation that results from mixed pure and simple shear produces a complex strain pattern along the shear zone. The authors propose a numerical kinematic model that relates strain variations in the shear zone to the different amounts of extension between the brittlely

328

Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Lithium/magnesium, lithium/sodium, and to a lesser extent, potassium/magnesium ratios in calcium carbonate tufa columns provide a fingerprint for distinguishing tufa columns formed from thermal spring waters versus those formed from non-thermal spring waters. These ratios form the basis of the Mg/Li, Na/Li, and K/Mg fluid geothermometers commonly used in geothermal exploration, which are based on the fact that at elevated temperatures, due to mineral-fluid equilibria, lithium

329

Mississippian ''Warsaw'' play makes waves in Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent completions of relatively prolific wells in the mid-Missippian Ullin limestone have generated considerable excitement about this Illinois basin play. Reservoirs found within this limestone, commonly referred to by industry as the Warsaw, are scattered and are prolific oil producers in some areas of the basin. The widespread development of reservoir quality facies at depths ranging from 2,400--4,400 ft and the stratigraphic proximity of thermally mature New Albany shale, the primary Illinois basin source rock are factors that make the Warsaw an excellent exploration target. The paper discusses a depositional model, reservoir development, reservoir facies of the upper and lower Warsaw, factors controlling porosity and permeability, and regional and structural considerations.

Lasemi, Z.; Grube, J.P. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1995-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

330

South Atlantic sag basins: new petroleum system components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Newly discovered pre-salt source rocks, reservoirs and seals need to be included as components to the petroleum systems of both sides of the South Atlantic. These new components lie between the pre-salt rift strata and the Aptian salt layers, forming large, post-rift, thermal subsidence sag basins. These are differentiated from the older rift basins by the lack of syn-rift faulting and a reflector geometry that is parallel to the base salt regional unconformity rather than to the Precambrian basement. These basins are observed in deep water regions overlying areas where both the mantle and the crust have been involved in the extension. This mantle involvement creates post-rift subsiding depocenters in which deposition is continuous while proximal rift-phase troughs with little or no mantle involvement are bypassed and failed to accumulate potential source rocks during anoxic times. These features have been recognized in both West African Kwanza Basin and in the East Brasil Rift systems. The pre-salt source rocks that are in the West African sag basins were deposited in lacustrine brackish to saline water environment and are geochemically distinct from the older, syn-rift fresh to brackish water lakes, as well as from younger, post-salt marine anoxic environments of the drift phase. Geochemical analyses of the source rocks and their oils have shown a developing source rock system evolving from isolated deep rift lakes to shallow saline lakes, and culminating with the infill of the sag basin by large saline lakes to a marginally marine restricted gulf. Sag basin source rocks may be important in the South Atlantic petroleum system by charging deep-water prospects where syn-rift source rocks are overmature and the post-salt sequences are immature.

Henry, S.G. [GeoLearn, Houston, TX (United States)] Mohriak, W.U. [Petroleo Brasileiro, S.A., Exploration and Production, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Mello, M.R. [Petroleo Brasieiro, S.A., Research Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

332

Coal Supply Basin Destination State  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Implicit Price Deflators for Gross Domestic Product, as published by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. For the composition of coal basins, refer to the definition of...

333

Northern Lights Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Lights Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northern Lights Ethanol LLC Place: Big Stone City, South Dakota Zip: 57216 Product: 75mmgy (283.9m litresy) ethanol...

334

GRR/Section 19-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process 9-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Ground Water Commission Colorado Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies CRS 37-90-107 Application for Use of Ground Water 2 CCR 410-1 Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf

335

Compilation of data on strippable Fort Union coals in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region: A CD-ROM presentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fort Union Formation and equivalent formations of Paleocene age in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region contain 14 strippable coals that yielded more than 30 percent of the 1.03 billion short tons produced in the United States in 1996. These thick, low contaminant, compliant coals, which are utilized by electric power plants in 28 States, are being assessed by the US Geological Survey. The minable coals occur in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana, Hanna, Carbon and Greater Green River Basins in Wyoming, and Williston Basin in North Dakota. Production during the past 25 years of thick, high quality Fort Union and equivalent coal beds and zones in the region increased from 40 to more than 340 million short tons. The Powder River Basin is projected to produce 416 million short tons of coal in 2015. Major production in the Powder River Basin is from the Wyodak-Anderson, Anderson-Dietz, and Rosebud coal deposits. Producing Fort Union coals in the Williston Basin include the Beulah-Zap, Hagel, and Harmon coal deposits. Producing Fort Union coals in the Greater Green River Basin are in five beds of the Deadman coal zone. Coal production in the Hanna Basin is from eight beds in the Ferris and Hanna Formations. Coals in the Powder River Basin and Williston Basin contain much less sulfur and ash than coals produced in other regions in the conterminous US. When sulfur values are compared as pounds of SO{sub 2} per million Btu (as received basis), Powder River Basin and Williston Basin coals have the lowest amounts of any coals in the conterminous US.

Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R.; Cavaroc, V.V. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 'nested graben' structural model, in which multiple faults successively displace rocks downward to the deepest part of the basin, is supported by recent field geologic analysis and correlation of results to geophysical data for Dixie Valley. Aerial photographic analysis and detailed field mapping provide strong evidence for a deep graben separated from the ranges to the east and west by multiple normal faults that affect the Tertiary/Quaternary basin-fill sediments. Correlation with seismic

337

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

338

Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The Producing Geothermal System In Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Why Basin And Range Systems Are Hard To Find Ii- Structural Model Of The Producing Geothermal System In Dixie Valley, Nevada Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Dixie Valley is the hottest (> 285°C at 3 km) and one of the largest geothermal systems (63 MW power plant operated for over 20 years) in the Basin and Range province. The heat source is deep circulation in a high heat flow, highly fractured upper crust without a significant magmatic thermal input. Many hot springs in the Basin and Range Province share the characteristics of the Dixie Valley system. Major geothermal resource

339

Active Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Active Geothermal Systems And Associated Gold Deposits In The Great Basin Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In western North America, a number of geothermal systems derive their heat from magmas or cooling intrusions. The interior of the Great Basin however, is characterized by widespread amagmatic geothermal activity that owes its existence to high crustal heat flow and active extensional tectonics. Both the magmatically heated and extensional fluid types in the Great Basin have recently, or are currently, depositing gold. Quaternary to Pliocene-aged gold deposits with adjacent high-temperature (≤ 150°C)

340

A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: A 1:1,000,000 scale geothermal favorability map of the Great Basin is currently being published through the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (NBMG) and is now available at the web site (http://www.unr.edu/geothermal/geothermal_gis2. htm) of the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE). This map allows for separate assessment of the potential for magmatically heated and extensional-type geothermal systems. Added to the map are temperature gradient wells from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

K Basins Sludge Treatment Process | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basins Sludge Treatment Process K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Summary - K...

342

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Project...

343

Toxicity of Water Samples Collected in the Vicinity of F and H Seepage Basin 1990-1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water and contaminants from the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins outcrop as shallow groundwater seeps down gradient from the basins. In 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, and 1995, toxicity tests were performed on water collected from a number of these seeps, as well as from several locations in Fourmile Branch and several uncontaminated reference locations.

Specht, W.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bowers, B.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

66th Congress of the Ameriuln Anthropological Association, Chicago Session 'Pygmies of the Western Congo Basin", november 19, 1987  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Western Congo Basin", november 19, 1987 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE AKA AND BAKA PYGMIES IN THE WESTERN CONGO BASIN Serge BAHUCHET, CNRS, Paris Several ethnologic.al descriptions of some Pygmy groups and Mbomotaba in Congo. The area of the Akll is very large, covering nearly 100.000 km2 between the Lobaye

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

345

OligoceneMiocene tectonic evolution of the South Fiji Basin and Northland Plateau, SW Pacific Ocean: Evidence from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated parts of the southwest Pacific Ocean. It is a region of remnant volcanic arcs, plateaus and basins of the study area in the SW Pacific Ocean, showing geographic names and dredge locations from ChurkinOligocene­Miocene tectonic evolution of the South Fiji Basin and Northland Plateau, SW Pacific

Demouchy, Sylvie

346

3, 383408, 2006 The northern Red  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 3, 383­408, 2006 The northern Red Sea ­ A system in balance? C. H¨ase et al. Title Page in balance? ­ Implications of deep vertical mixing for the nitrogen budget in the northern Red Sea, including The northern Red Sea ­ A system in balance? C. H¨ase et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

347

Proceedings of the North Aleutian Basin information status and research planning meeting.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The North Aleutian Basin Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) is a large geographic area with significant ecological and natural resources. The Basin includes most of the southeastern part of the Bering Sea continental shelf including all of Bristol Bay. The area supports important habitat for a wide variety of species and globally significant habitat for birds and marine mammals including federally listed species. Villages and communities of the Alaska Peninsula and other areas bordering or near the Basin rely on its natural resources (especially commercial and subsistence fishing) for much of their sustenance and livelihood. The offshore area of the North Aleutian Basin is considered to have important hydrocarbon reserves, especially natural gas. In 2006, the MMS released a draft proposed program, Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program, 2007-2012 and an accompanying draft programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS). The draft proposed program identified two lease sales proposed in the North Aleutian Basin in 2010 and 2012, subject to restrictions. The area proposed for leasing in the Basin was restricted to the Sale 92 Area in the southwestern portion. Additional EISs will be needed to evaluate the potential effects of specific lease actions, exploration activities, and development and production plans in the Basin. A full range of updated multidisciplinary scientific information will be needed to address oceanography, fate and effects of oil spills, marine ecosystems, fish, fisheries, birds, marine mammals, socioeconomics, and subsistence in the Basin. Scientific staff at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) were contracted to assist the MMS Alaska Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region in identifying and prioritizing information needs related to the North Aleutian Basin and potential future oil and gas leasing and development activities. The overall approach focused on three related but separate tasks: (1) identification and gathering of relevant literature; (2) synthesis and summary of the literature; and (3) identification and prioritization of information needs. To assist in gathering this information, MMS convened the North Aleutian Basin Information Status and Research Planning Meeting, held in Anchorage, Alaska, from November 28 through December 1, 2006; this report presents a summary of that meeting. The meeting was the primary method used to gather input from stakeholders and identify information needs and priorities for future inventory, monitoring, and research related to potential leasing and oil and gas developments in the North Aleutian Basin.

LaGory, K. E.; Krummel, J. R.; Hayse, J. W.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Stull, E. A.; Gorenflo, L.; Environmental Science Division

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

348

GAMA-LLNL Alpine Basin Special Study: Scope of Work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For this task LLNL will examine the vulnerability of drinking water supplies in foothills and higher elevation areas to climate change impacts on recharge. Recharge locations and vulnerability will be determined through examination of groundwater ages and noble gas recharge temperatures in high elevation basins. LLNL will determine whether short residence times are common in one or more subalpine basin. LLNL will measure groundwater ages, recharge temperatures, hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, major anions and carbon isotope compositions on up to 60 samples from monitoring wells and production wells in these basins. In addition, a small number of carbon isotope analyses will be performed on surface water samples. The deliverable for this task will be a technical report that provides the measured data and an interpretation of the data from one or more subalpine basins. Data interpretation will: (1) Consider climate change impacts to recharge and its impact on water quality; (2) Determine primary recharge locations and their vulnerability to climate change; and (3) Delineate the most vulnerable areas and describe the likely impacts to recharge.

Singleton, M J; Visser, A; Esser, B K; Moran, J E

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evidence for natural gas hydrate occurrences in Colombia Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multichannel and selected single-channel seismic lines of the continental margin sediments of the Colombia basin display compelling evidence for large accumulations of natural gas hydrate. Seismic bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs), interpreted to mark the base of the hydrate stability zone, are pronounced and very widespread along the entire Panama-Colombia lower continental slope. BSRs have also been identified at two locations on the abyssal plain. Water depths for these suspected hydrate occurrences range from 900 to 4000 m. Although no gas hydrate samples have been recovered from this area, biogenic methane is abundant in Pliocene turbidites underlying the abyssal plain. More deeply buried rocks beneath the abyssal plain are thermally mature. Thermogenic gas from these rocks may migrate upward along structural pathways into the hydrate stability zone and form hydrate. Impermeable hydrate layers may form caps over large accumulations of free gas, accounting for the very well-defined BSRs in the area. The abyssal plain and the deformed continental margin hold the highest potential for major economic accumulations of gas hydrate in the basin. The extensive continuity of BSRs, relatively shallow water depths, and promixity to onshore production facilities render the marginal deformed belt sediments the most favorable target for future economic development of the gas hydrate resource within the Colombia basin. The widespread evidence of gas hydrates in the Colombia basin suggests a high potential for conventional hydrocarbon deposits offshore of Panama and Colombia.

Finley, P.D.; Krason, J.; Dominic, K.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Geologic setting and natural gas potential of Niobrara formation, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chalk units in the Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous) have potential for generation and accumulation of shallow, biogenic gas in the central and eastern Williston basin. Similar to area of Niobrara gas production in the eastern Denver basin, Niobrara chalks in South and North Dakota were deposited on carbonate ramps sloping westward off the stable eastern platform of the Western Interior seaway. Within the Williston basin, the Niobrara of the western Dakotas, eastern North Dakota, and central South Dakota has different stratigraphic relationships. These three areas can be further subdivided and ranked into six areas that have different exploration potential. The south margin of the Williston basin in central South Dakota is the most attractive exploration area. Niobrara chalk reservoirs, source rocks, and structural traps in the southern Williston basin are similar to those in the eastern Denver basin. Chalk porosities are probably adequate for gas production, although porosity is controlled by burial depth. Organic carbon content of the chalk is high and shows of biogenic gas are reported. Large, low-relief structural features, which could serve as traps, are present.

Shurr, G.W.; Rice, D.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

352

EIS-0477: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, 7: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New Mexico and La Plata County, Colorado EIS-0477: San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project, San Juan County, New Mexico and La Plata County, Colorado SUMMARY The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management is preparing this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a 230-kilovolt transmission line from the Farmington area in northwest New Mexico to Ignacio, Colorado, to relieve transmission constraints, serve new loads, and offer economic development through renewable energy development in the San Juan Basin. DOE's Western Area Power Administration is a cooperating agency; the proposed transmission line would require an interconnection with Western's Shiprock Substation, near Farmington.

353

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Agency/Company /Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.iisd.org/climate/de Program Start 2012

354

California basin study (CaBS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies of geochemical recycling processes in the upper water column in the Southern California Bight focused on the seasonal cycle. Inspection of satellite sea surface color images as well as information from studies in other areas suggest that the cycling processes have significant variability on time scales of hours and days. To allow our seasonal studies to be examined in the context of the higher frequency variability, an interdisciplinary mooring was maintained near the midpoint of Santa Monica basin (known as station 305) from January to July, 1990. The Hickey group had the primary responsibility of deploying and recovering the mooring. The mooring consisted of a vector measuring wind recorder mounted above a toroidal buoy, below which were suspended two current/temperature recorders, a trnasmissometer, and two PAR sensors. The PAR sensors, which provide an estimate of phytoplankton growth rates, were deployed as part of the Trees proposal. At two additional nearby moorings, sediment traps were deployed at selected depths throughout the water column by Landry and by Soutar. To allow some investigation of lateral advection of material, current meters were deployed at the same depths as several of the sediment traps both at this site and also at the site farther along the basin axis. The data from these experiments have not yet been processed. 6 refs., 10 figs.

Hickey, B.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Northern Illinois Gas Co IL  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Northern Northern Illinois Gas Co ............................ IL 254,574,988 4.60 Southern California Gas Co ...................... CA 233,632,354 6.89 Columbia Gas Dist Co............................... OH,KY,PA,MD 196,322,935 6.64 Pacific Gas and Elec Co............................ CA 190,864,262 5.83 Consumers Pwr Co ................................... MI 188,587,672 4.81 Michigan Consol Gas Co........................... MI 160,809,168 5.16 East Ohio Gas Co ..................................... OH 146,802,045 5.44 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co......................... NJ 140,712,209 6.62 Peoples Gas Lt and Coke Co.................... IL 126,356,925 6.40 Brooklyn Union Gas Co............................. NY 106,349,594 9.43 Atlanta Gas Lt Co ...................................... GA 106,075,815 6.66 Lone Star Gas Co......................................

356

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Mesozoic Granitic MW K Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones major range front fault Jurassic Basalt MW K Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone intrusion margin and associated fractures MW K Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Displacement Transfer Zone Caldera Margin Quaternary Rhyolite MW K

357

Neogene stratigraphic relationships within the Nam Con Son Basin, offshore Vietnam resulting from tectonics, eustasy, and sediment flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the East Nam Con Son Basin. Age constraints were assigned to key stratigraphic horizons by correlating sequence boundaries with published sea level curves. Accommodation in the study area is controlled by shelf -edge compaction, rift-related thermal...

Wright, Christine M.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Map Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Denver Basin Map Abstract This webpage contains a map of the Denver Basin. Published Colorado...

359

Origin and formation of neck in a basin landform: Examples from the Camargo volcanic field, Chihuahua (Mxico)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term neck in a basin (NIB) landform is proposed for volcanic structures characterized by nearly circular to elliptical open basins, located near the headwater of small streams or drainages, which contain small volcanic necks and/or erosion remnants of one (or more) cinder cones. NIB landforms are typically 400-1000m in diameter and 30-100m deep and are invariably surrounded by steep walls cut into one or more basaltic lava flows. NIB landforms lack evidence for a primary volcanogenic origin through either collapse or youthful eruptive activity. In the Pliocene portion (4 2Ma) of the Plio-Quaternary Camargo volcanic field of Chihuahua (Mxico), they are relatively numerous and are best developed at the margins of a gently sloping (3-5) basaltic lava plateau and near major fault scarps. Mature NIB landforms have ring-like circular drainage patterns and central elevations marked by small volcanic necks and associated radial dikes intruded into basaltic scoria-fall and /or agglutinate deposits. We interpret NIB landforms to be erosional in origin. They develop where a cinder cone is surrounded by one or more sheet-like lava flows from one or more separate subsequent vents. Once eruptive activity ceases at the younger volcano(es), fluvial erosion gradually produces a ring-like drainage pattern along the contact between the lava and the older cinder cone. As a response to a marked contrast in resistance to erosion between lava flows and unconsolidated or poorly lithified pyroclastic deposits, the older cinder cone is preferentially eroded. In this manner, a ring-shaped, steep sided erosional basin, preformed by the scoria cone, is produced; eventually fluvial erosion exposes the central neck and dikes. The volume, relief, and age of the volcanic field are key factors in the formation and preservation of a NIB landform. They form in volcanic fields where lava emissions are sufficiently vigorous to engulf earlier cinder cones. Relief and associated high rates of fluvial erosion play an important role in NIB development, as demonstrated by their locations in the Camargo volcanic field. Fully developed NIB landforms are not found in Quaternary volcanic fields, probably because erosion has not had sufficient time to generate their characteristics features. NIB landforms are also absent in Miocene fields, because erosion has proceeded too far, and thus has completely removed any NIB landform that may once have existed. The Camargo volcanic field is the only major area of Pliocene intraplate eruptive activity in northern Mxico, and the only place where NIB landforms are relatively abundant.

Jos Jorge Aranda-Gmez; Todd B. Housh; James F. Luhr; Cristina Noyola-Medrano; Marco Antonio Rojas-Beltrn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Design criteria document, Fire Protection Task, K Basin Essential Systems Recovery, Project W-405  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K Basin were constructed in the early 1950`s with a 20 year design life. The K Basins are currently in their third design life and are serving as a near term storage facility for irradiated N Reactor fuel until an interim fuel storage solution can be implemented. In April 1994, Project W-405, K Basin Essential Systems Recovery, was established to address (among other things) the immediate fire protection needs of the 100K Area. A Fire Barrier Evaluation was performed for the wall between the active and inactive areas of the 105KE and 105KW buildings. This evaluation concludes that the wall is capable of being upgraded to provide an equivalent level of fire resistance as a qualified barrier having a fire resistance rating of 2 hours. The Fire Protection Task is one of four separate Tasks included within the scope of Project W405, K Basin Essential systems Recovery. The other three Tasks are the Water Distribution System Task, the Electrical System Task, and the Maintenance Shop/Support Facility Task. The purpose of Project W-405`s Fire Protection Task is to correct Life Safety Code (NFPA 101) non-compliances and to provide fire protection features in Buildings 105KE, 105KW and 190KE that are essential for assuring the safe operation and storage of spent nuclear fuel at the 100K Area Facilities` Irradiated Fuel Storage Basins (K Basins).

Johnson, B.H.

1994-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cedar Creek: a significant paleotectonic feature of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cedar Creek is the major anticlinal structure demarcating the southwest flank of the Williston basin. This pronounced fold developed through a geologic history of recurrent tectonic movements along a northwest-southeast striking fault zone. The four major periods of tectonism documentable in the Cedar Creek area from early Paleozoic through mid-Tertiary affected the local and regional distribution, erosion, and/or preservation, and, though moderately, the depositional facies of sedimentary strata since Ordovician time.

Clement, J.H.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Juan Basin C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin Black Warrior Basin North Central Coal Region Arkoma Basin Denver Basin...

363

square-mile Black Warrior Basin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

will inject CO will inject CO 2 into a coalbed methane (CBM) well in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, to assess the capability of mature CBM reservoirs to receive and adsorb large volumes of CO 2 . Injection began at the test site on June 15; the site was selected because it is representative of the 23,000- square-mile Black Warrior Basin located in northwestern Alabama and northeastern Mississippi. It is estimated that this area has the potential to store in the range of 1.1 to 2.3 Gigatons of CO 2 , which is approximately the amount that Alabama's coal-fired power plants emit in two decades. The targeted coal seams range from 940 to 1,800 feet deep and are one to six feet thick. Approximately 240 tons of CO 2 will be injected over a 45- to 60-day period. More information

364

Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

365

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

366

Transition from alkaline to calc-alkaline volcanism during evolution of the Paleoproterozoic Francevillian basin of eastern Gabon (Western Central Africa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We report new geochemical data for the volcanic and subvolcanic rocks associated with the evolution of the Francevillian basin of eastern Gabon during Paleoproterozoic times (c. 2.12Ga). Filling of this basin has proceeded through four main sedimentary or volcano-sedimentary episodes, namely FA, FB, FC and FD. Volcanism started during the FB episode being present only in the northern part of the basin (Okondja sub-basin). This volcanism is ultramafic to trachytic in composition and displays a rather constant alkaline geochemical signature. This signature is typical of a within-plate environment, consistent with the rift-setting generally postulated for the Francevillian basin during the FB period. Following FB, the FC unit is 1020m-thick silicic horizon (jasper) attesting for a massive input of silica in the basin. Following FC, the FD unit is a c. 200400m-thick volcano-sedimentary sequence including felsic tuffs and epiclastic rocks. The geochemical signatures of these rocks are totally distinct from those of the FB alkaline lavas. High Th/Ta and La/Ta ratios attest for a calc-alkaline signature and slight fractionation between heavy rare-earth suggests melting at a rather low pressure. Such characteristics are comparable to those of felsic lavas associated with the Taupo zone of New Zealand, a modern ensialic back-arc basin. Following FD, the FE detrital unit is defined only in the Okondja region, probably associated with a late-stage collapse of the northern part of the basin. It is suggested that the alkaline to calc-alkaline volcanic transition reflects the evolution of the Francevillian basin from a diverging to a converging setting, in response to the onset of converging movements in the Eburnean Belt of Central Africa.

Denis Thiblemont; Pascal Bouton; Alain Prat; Jean-Christian Goujou; Monique Tegyey; Francis Weber; Michel Ebang Obiang; Jean Louis Joron; Michel Treuil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Atlas of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Atlas of the Columbia River Basin Oregon State University Computer-Assisted Cartography Course & GEOVISUALIZATION GROUP UNIVERSITY #12;2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin FOREWORDAtlas, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. 2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin

Jenny, Bernhard

368

LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

369

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Northern Virginia Electric Cooperative Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative Smart Grid Project Cooperative Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Northern Virginia Electric Cooperative Country United States Headquarters Location Manassas, Virginia Recovery Act Funding $5,000,000.00 Total Project Value $10,000,000.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Northern Virginia Electric Cooperative Smart Grid Project Coordinates 38.7509488°, -77.4752667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

372

Northern Westchester Energy Action Consortium (NY) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Action Consortium (NY) Energy Action Consortium (NY) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Northern Westchester Energy Action Consortium (NY) Name Northern Westchester Energy Action Consortium (NY) Address PO Box 681 Place Somers, New York Zip 10589 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded 2009 Website http://www.nweac.org Coordinates 41.3278772°, -73.6948234° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3278772,"lon":-73.6948234,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

373

Northern Power Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Power Systems Northern Power Systems Place Barre, VT Website http://www.northernpowersystem References Northern Power Systems[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type CRADA Partnering Center within NREL National Wind Technology Center Partnership Year 2000 Link to project description http://www.nrel.gov/news/press/2000/34three.html LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Northern Power Systems is a company located in Barre, VT. References ↑ "Northern Power Systems" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Northern_Power_Systems&oldid=379254" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

374

NILE BASIN INITIATIVE Claire Stodola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Climate Change #12;Upstream states · Low water needs Downstream states · High water needs #12;Historical #12;Research Question How has the Nile Basin Initiative influenced the riparian states' management states 1959 ­ Still only BILATERAL 1960s to 1990s - Increasing frustration by upstream states #12;What

New Hampshire, University of

375

GOLF COURSES FRASER RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practices (BMP's) for golf courses, entitled Greening your BC Golf Course. A Guide to Environmental. It also summarizes conditions and practices in the Fraser Basin, reviews best management practices.C. Prepared by: UMA ENVIRONMENTAL A Division of UMA Engineering Ltd. Burnaby, B.C. March 1996 #12;THIRD PARTY

376

Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands, began erupting in May-June 2003. A series of subplinian explosive eruptions of andesite magma began at the Eastern Crater in the eastern part of the summit caldera on the evening of 10 May. Brown tephra was sent mainly westward by strong winds. Small-scale pyroclastic surges were discharged eastward outside the caldera in late May. An andesite lava dome that had once filled the inner crater was fragmented by phreatomagmatic explosions in the middle of June.

377

Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Selected as Grand Winners of First Student Design Competition for Zero Energy Ready Homes Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected as Grand Winners of...

378

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

379

Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Queen Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Desert Queen Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

380

ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN C-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

C-reactor disassembly basin is being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated scrap components and structures in a grout-like formulation. The disassembly basin will be the first area of the C-reactor building that will be immobilized. The scrap components contain aluminum alloy materials. Any aluminum will corrode very rapidly when it comes in contact with the very alkaline grout (pH > 13), and as a result would produce hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) reviewed and evaluated existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints are necessary. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen above the surface of the water during the injection of grout into the C-reactor disassembly area is low if the assessment of the aluminum surface area is reliable. Conservative calculations estimate that there is insufficient aluminum present in the basin areas to result in significant hydrogen accumulation in this local region. The minimum safety margin (or factor) on a 60% LFL criterion for a local region of the basin (i.e., Horizontal Tube Storage) was greater than 3. Calculations also demonstrated that a flammable situation in the vapor space above the basin is unlikely. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the risk of developing a flammable condition during grouting operations.

Wiersma, B.

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Research Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

382

EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

17: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line 17: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration prepared this EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana, and the Basin-Lovell 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download

383

40 Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 40 Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal energy has been supplying heat to district networks in the Paris Basin for more than 40 years. The most serious difficulties have been corrosion and scaling related problems that occurred in many geothermal loops in the mid-1980s. The main target of all exploration and exploitation projects has been the Dogger aquifer. Most of the operating facilities use the "doublet" technology which consists of a closed loop with one production well and one injection well. Injection of the cooled

384

A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And Thermal Structure Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And Thermal Structure Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): K. Bauer, I. Moeck, B. Norden, A. Schulze, M. H. Weber Published: Publisher Unknown, 2009 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Case_Study_For_Geothermal_Exploration_In_The_Ne_German_Basin-_Integrated_Interpretation_Of_Seismic_Tomography,_Litho-Stratigraphy,_Salt_Tectonics,_And_Thermal_Structure&oldid=390106"

385

Compendium of basins for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geological and hydrological feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed formations in the San Juan, Powder River, Greater Green River, Piceance, Black Warrior, Appalachian and Michigan basins. Results from the surveys indicated that geology dominated research efforts for many of the basins. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the basins. All of the basins contain some potential for the use of Jack McIntyre`s patented production process. This process is designed specifically to separate produced water and produced gas in a downhole environment and may allow for more efficient and economical development of coalbed methane resources in this area.

Reed, P.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications EIS-0220: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0220: Final Environmental Impact Statement

387

L-Area Reactor - 1993 annual - groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the water table at the following locations in L Area: the L-Area Acid/Caustic Basin (four LAC wells), L-Area Research Wells in the southern portion of the area (outside the fence; three LAW wells), the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (four LCO wells), the L-Area Disassembly Basin (two LDB wells), the L-Area Burning/Rubble Pit (four LRP wells), and the L-Area Seepage Basin (four LSB wells). During 1993, tetrachloroethylene was detected above its drinking water standard (DWS) in the LAC, LAW, LCO, and LDB well series. Lead exceeded its 50 {mu}g/L standard in the LAW, LDB, and LRP series, and tritium was above its DWS in the LAW, LCO, and LSB series. Apparently anomalous elevated levels of the common laboratory contaminant bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate were reported during first quarter in one well each in the LAC series and LCO series, and during third quarter in a different LCO well. Extensive radionuclide analyses were performed during 1993 in the LAC, LAW, and LCO well series. No radionuclides other than tritium were reported above DWS or Flag 2 criteria.

Chase, J.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Research Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

389

coherence area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1....In an electromagnetic wave, such as a lightwave or a radio wave, the area of a surface (a) every point on which the surface is perpendicular to the direction of propagation, (b) over which the e...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

- The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

Faulds, James E.

391

DRINKING WATER TESTING CLINICS Northern Shenandoah Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRINKING WATER TESTING CLINICS Northern Shenandoah Valley JUNE 2013 Does your water come) 828-1120. #12; DRINKING WATER TESTING CLINICS Northern Shenandoah Valley JUNE 2013 County FollowUp Meeting Tuesday, August 6th , 78:30 p.m. Room 101 Page: VCEPage County, 215 West Main

Liskiewicz, Maciej

392

Surface deformation of Long Valley caldera and Mono Basin, California, investigated with the SBAS-InSAR approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the surface deformation of the eastern California area that includes Long Valley caldera and Mono Basin. We apply the SAR Interferometry (InSAR) algorithm referred to as Small \\{BAseline\\} Subset (SBAS) approach that allows us to generate mean deformation velocity maps and displacement time series for the investigated area. The results presented in this work represent an advancement of previous InSAR studies of the area that are mostly focused on the deformation affecting the caldera. In particular, the proposed analysis is based on 21 SAR data acquired by the ERS-1/2 sensors during the 19922000 time interval, and demonstrates the capability of the SBAS procedure to identify and analyze displacement patterns at different spatial scales for the overall area spanning approximately 5000km2. Two previously unreported localized deformation effects have been detected at Paoha Island, located within the Mono Lake, and in the McGee Creek area within the Sierra Nevada mountains, a zone to the south of the Long Valley caldera. In addition a spatially extended uplift effect, which strongly affects the caldera, has been identified and analyzed in detail. The InSAR results clearly show that the displacement phenomena affecting the Long Valley caldera have a maximum in correspondence of the resurgent dome and are characterized by the sequence of three different effects: a 19921997 uplift background, a 19971998 unrest phenomenon and a 19982000 subsidence phase. Moreover, the analysis of the retrieved displacement time series allows us to map the extent of the zone with a temporal deformation behavior highly correlated with the detected three-phases deformation pattern: background uplift-unrest-subsidence. We show that the mapped area clearly extends outside the northern part of the caldera slopes; accordingly, we suggest that future inversion models take this new evidence into account. The final discussion is dedicated to a comparison between the retrieved InSAR measurements and a set of GPS and leveling data, confirming the validity of the results achieved through the SBAS-InSAR analysis.

P. Tizzani; P. Berardino; F. Casu; P. Euillades; M. Manzo; G.P. Ricciardi; G. Zeni; R. Lanari

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

HEALTH IN FRAGILE STATES COUNTRY CASE STUDY: NORTHERN UGANDA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH IN FRAGILE STATES COUNTRY CASE STUDY: NORTHERN UGANDA JUNE 2006 This publication COUNTRY CASE STUDY: NORTHERN UGANDA The authors' views expressed in this publication do not necessarily States, Country Case Study: Northern Uganda. Arlington, Virginia, USA: Basic Support

Scharfstein, Daniel

394

Quantitative analysis of basin-scale heterogeneities using sonic-log data in the Yanchang Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A random medium is used to investigate reservoir heterogeneities in this study. Random media are characterized by autocorrelation functions that allow a construction of spatially anisotropic random structures with different correlation lengths and fluctuation standard deviations. Based on the analysis, we calculate a power spectrum using fast Fourier transform (FFT), which is observed in spatial wavelengths ranging from a few metres to a few thousand metres. Correlation distance and root mean square (RMS) height are directly obtained from the power spectrum. Numerical experiments show that the correlation length and fluctuation standard deviation can cause correlation distance and RMS height undergoing variations. Combining the characteristics of statistical parameters and sonic-log data, we quantitatively analyse the reservoir heterogeneities in the Yanchang Basin. The correlation distance and RMS height of coarse lithofacies in fluvial sandstones interpret a high-energy deposit and strong heterogeneity, affected by different lithological combinations. The correlation lengths decrease gradually from shales, tight sands to gas-bearing sands. Using the sonic-log data from 28 wells in the Yanchang Basin, we compute the isolines of correlation distances and RMS heights for both the He-8 and Shan-1 members in the studied area, which present a correlation with the distribution of gas. This offers an improved foundation for reservoir lateral prediction.

He-Zhen Wu; Li-Yun Fu; Hong-Kui Ge

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Evaluation of Devonian shale potential in the Michigan basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to inform interested oil and gas operators about EGSP results as they pertain to the Devonian gas shales of the Michigan basin. Geologic data and interpretations are summarized, and areas where the accumulation of gas may be large enough to justify commercial production are outlined. Because the data presented in this report are generalized and not suitable for evaluation of specific sites for exploration, the reader should consult the various reports cited for more detail and discussion of the data, concepts, and interpretations presented. However, a conservative estimate of in place resource for the Michigan basin is 76 TCF (Zielinski and McTver 1980. How much of this resource can be recovered using present technology has not been estimated. 27 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

397

Priority conservation areas for birds in El Salvador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Priority conservation areas for birds in El Salvador INTRODUCTION El Salvador is a small country (2100 km 2 ) situated in the heart of the northern Central America bioregion (southern Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and northern Nicaragua... in ecotourism in nearby countries (especially Belize and Costa Rica), led to renewed conservation efforts (Secretar?a Ejecutiva de Medio Ambiente, 1994). The environmental movement during the last decade has inspired wide- spread interest and support...

Komar, Oliver

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

EIS-0499: Great Northern Transmission Line Project, Minnesota...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

EIS-0499: Great Northern Transmission Line Project, Minnesota EIS-0499: Great Northern Transmission Line Project, Minnesota SUMMARY This EIS will evaluate the potential...

399

Amended Notice of Intent for the Northern Pass Transmission Line...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Amended Notice of Intent for the Northern Pass Transmission Line Project Published in the Federal Register Amended Notice of Intent for the Northern Pass Transmission Line Project...

400

Paraffin control in the Northern Michigan Niagaran reef trend  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wax deposition on downhole equipment and in chokes, flowlines, separators, dehydration and storage equipment is a costly problem in the northern Michigan area called the Niagaran Reef trend. A number of mechanical removal techniques have been used to treat for paraffin. Among these are paraffin cutters, plunger lift, rod scrapers, hot oil or water, plastic coatings, and flowline pigging. Improvements in chemical formulation, testing, and applications have resulted in a number of economically successful chemical programs for paraffin control. Examples of field problems and solutions are presented.

Newberry, M.E.; Addison, G.E.; Barker, K.M.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Rural electrification: Waste biomass Russian northern territories. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this pre-feasibility evaluation is to examine the economic and technical feasibility of replacing distillate fuel with local waste biomass in the village of Verkhni-Ozerski, Arkhangelsk Region, Russia. This village is evaluated as a pilot location representing the off-grid villages in the Russian Northern Territories. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has agreed to provide technical assistance to the Ministry of Fuel and Energy (MFE). MFE has identified the Northern Territories as a priority area requiring NREL`s assistance. The program initially affects about 900 off-grid villages. Biomass and wind energy, and to a lesser extent small hydro (depending on resource availability) are expected to play the dominant role in the program, Geothermal energy may also have a role in the Russian Far East. The Arkhangelsk, Kariela, and Krasnoyarsk Regions, all in the Russian Northern Territories, have abundant forest resources and forest products industries, making them strong candidates for implementation of small-scale waste biomass-to-energy projects. The 900 or so villages included in the renewable energy program span nine administrative regions and autonomous republics. The regional authorities in the Northern Territories proposed these villages to MFE for consideration in the renewable energy program according to the following selection criteria: (a) Remote off-grid location, (b) high cost of transporting fuel, old age of existing power generation equipment, and (d) preliminary determination as to availability of alternative energy resources. Inclusion of indigenous minorities in the program was also heavily emphasized. The prefeasibility study demonstrates that the project merits continuation and a full feasibility analysis. The demonstrated rate of return and net positive cash flow, the willingness of Onegales and local/regional authorities to cooperate, and the immense social benefits are all good reasons to continue the project.

Adamian, S. [ECOTRADE, Inc., Glendale, CA (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Trapping capacity of shear zones in the Eocene Wilcox formation, northern Gulf of Mexico basin, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Mercury-air capillary-pressure data were used to determine the displacement pressure and possible height of oil columns for both sheared and normal sections using Thomeer's (1960, 1963) correlation of displacement pressure, permeability, and porosity..., 1983) synthetic family of type curves with their appropriate geometric factor (Fg) as a plot of mercury-air capillary-pressure as a function of mercury saturation as a percent of pore volume. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 A...

Haveman, Alana Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

403

INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the structure task, the goals for this reporting period were to: (1) complete field work on the NNW-SSE transect along the west side of Cayuga Lake; (2) collect data at additional field sites in order to (a) trace structural trends between the two N-S transects and (b) fill in data gaps on the NS transect along the eastern shore of Seneca Lake; (3) enter the data gathered from the summer field work; (4) enter data from the previous field season that still had to be analyzed after a personnel change. We have completed data reduction for all the goals listed above, including the NNW-SSE transect on the west side of Cayuga Lake. In the soil gas task, the goals for this reporting period were to: (1) trace Trenton/Black River fault trends between the two N-S transects; and (2) enter the data gathered from the summer field work. We have completed data reduction for all the goals listed above, and have begun constructing maps that portray the data. These data continue to demonstrate that integration of aeromagnetic and Landsat lineaments, surface structure, soil gas and seismic allows us to extrapolate Trenton-Black River trends away from confirmatory seismic lines.

Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

404

Burial history and thermal evolution of the northern and eastern Saharan basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...geologic and geographic features in Africa. Figure 2 Map of geothermic degrees gamma (in meters per degree Celsius), Saharan platform...georef;2003074942 2003-074942 Economic geology, geology of energy sources American Association of Petroleum Geologists Tulsa...

M. Makhous; Yu. I. Galushkin

405

INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the structure task, we completed reducing the data we had collected from a N-S transect on the east of Seneca Lake. We have calculated the fracture frequency for all the fracture sets at each site, and constructed modified rose diagrams that summarize the fracture attributes at each site. These data indicate a N-striking fault near the southeastern shore of Seneca Lake, and also indicate NE and ENE-trending FIDs and faults north of Valois. The orientation and existence of the ENE-striking FIDs and faults are thought to be guided by faults in the Precambrian basement; these basement faults apparently were sufficiently reactivated to cause faulting in the Paleozoic section. Other faults are thrust ramps above the Silurian salt section that were controlled by a far-field Alleghanian stress field. Structure contour maps and isopach maps have been revised based on additional well log analyses. Except for the Glodes Corners Field, the well spacing generally is insufficient to definitively identify faults. However, relatively sharp elevational changes east of Keuka Lake support the contention that faults occur along the east side of Keuka Lake. Outcrop stratigraphy along the east side of Seneca Lake indicates that faults and gentle folds can be inferred from the some exposures along Seneca Lake, but the lensing nature of the individual sandstones can preclude long-distance definitive correlations and structure identification. Soil gas data collected during the 2000 field season was reduced and displayed in the previous semiannual report. The seismic data that Quest licensed has been reprocessed. Several grabens observed in the Trenton reflector are consistent with surface structure, soil gas, and aeromagnetic anomalies. In this report we display an interpreted seismic line that crosses the Glodes Corners and Muck Farm fields. The final report from the subcontractor concerning the completed aeromagnetic survey is included. Prominent magnetic anomalies suggest that faults in the Precambrian basement are located beneath regions where grabens in the Trenton are located. The trend and location of these faults based on aeromagnetics agrees with the location based on FIDs. These data indicate that integration of aeromagnetic and topographic lineaments, surface structure, soil gas with seismic and well logs allows us to extrapolate Trenton-Black River trends away from confirmatory seismic lines.

Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

THE INTRACONTINENTAL BASINS (ICONS) ATLAS APPLICATIONS IN EASTERN AUSTRALIA PESA Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium III Sydney, 1417 September, 2008 275  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INTRACONTINENTAL BASINS (ICONS) ATLAS ­ APPLICATIONS IN EASTERN AUSTRALIA PESA Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium III Sydney, 14­17 September, 2008 275 The IntraCONtinental basinS (ICONS) atlas of intracontinental basins (ICONS atlas), using freely available global and regional datasets. Firstly, we are trying

Müller, Dietmar

407

Assessing Naturalness in Northern Great Lakes Forests Based on Historical Land-Cover and Vegetation Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing Naturalness in Northern Great Lakes Forests Based on Historical Land-Cover and Vegetation was developed to assess to what degree landscapes represent a natural state. Protected areas are often regarded into naturalness assessments and the results provide useful information for future park management. More broadly

408

Validation of Surface Current Measurements in the Northern Adriatic Sea from High-Frequency Radars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performances of a shore-based high-frequency (HF) radar network deployed along the coast of the Venice lagoon (northern Adriatic Sea) are discussed based on a comparison with a single bottom-mounted ADCP deployed in the shallow-water area ...

Simone Cosoli; Andrea Mazzoldi; Miroslav Ga?i?

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

UPTAKE, DISTRIBUTION, AND DEPURATION OF 14C-BENZENE IN NORTHERN ANCHOVY, ENGRAULIS MORDAX, AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bay areas. Al- though the chronic levels are low, if fish ac- cumulate benzene over field products was studied in two species of marine fish. Mature northern anchovy, Engraulis mordax, and juvenile. Increased drilling, transportation, and refining of crude oils near or on coastal waters has led to the need

410

The epibenthic megafauna of the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The epibenthic megafauna of the continental slope and abyssal plain of the northern Gulf of Mexico have been investigated using multi-shot bottom photography. A total of 10,388 photographs were analyzed from 100 sites encompassing a total area...

Ziegler, Matthew Peek

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

411

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Delineate the subsurface geology Notes The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. The Raft River geothermal system is a hot water convective system relying on deep circulation of meteoric water in a region of high geothermal gradients and open fractures near the base of the Tertiary basin fill. References Covington, H. R. (1 September 1980) Subsurface geology of the

412

CD-1: Intracratonic Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal conductivity of salt rock, and might provide suitable geothermal reservoirs for district heating.4 Formations encountered in deeper parts of an intracratonic basin...

413

NMOSE Basin Guidelines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OtherOther: NMOSE Basin GuidelinesLegal Abstract The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (NMOSE) provides links to final rules and administrative guidelines for particular...

414

Transient hydrodynamics within intercratonic sedimentary basins during glacial cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ka B.P.), such as the Williston, Michigan, and Illinois basins. We show that in such basins fluid of the Williston and Alberta basins. Under such con- ditions fluid fluxes in aquifers can be expected

Bense, Victor

415

Sequence stratigraphic and sedimentologic analysis of the Permian San Andres Formation (upper Leonardian-lower Guadalupian), Northwest Shelf, Permian Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1958). The Tobosa Basin was the site of dominantly shallow water deposition until the late Paleozoic (Hills, 1972; Hills, 1984). Collision between Gondwana and the southern margin of North America caused reactivation of older zones of weakness during...) was deposited on carbonate platforms around Permian Basin region and is an extensive hydrocarbon reservoir in this area. The San Andres Formation on the Northwest Shelf is well exposed in southeastern New Mexico and West Texas. This study establishes sequence...

Beserra, Troy Brett

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

416

Radiological Areas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

417

Geology of the Salt Creek area, Mason County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to the entrapment of. surface water in the fractures. GEOLXiBPBOLOGY The Salt Creek area in @aeon County, Texas is located on the southwestern flank of the Llano Uplift, a structural dome which has been reduced to a topographic basin by erosional processes.... STSUCT "SALCEOL00Y IIegional Structure The Llano region, which includes the Salt Creek area, is a structural dome which has been reduced to a topographic basin by erosional processes. The dose is roughly elliptical with a maximum diameter...

Harwood, William Eugene

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Data Quality Objectives Process for Designation of K Basins Debris  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has developed a schedule and approach for the removal of spent fuels, sludge, and debris from the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins, located in the 100 Area at the Hanford Site. The project that is the subject of this data quality objective (DQO) process is focused on the removal of debris from the K Basins and onsite disposal of the debris at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). This material previously has been dispositioned at the Hanford Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) or Central Waste Complex (CWC). The goal of this DQO process and the resulting Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) is to provide the strategy for characterizing and designating the K-Basin debris to determine if it meets the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), Revision 3 (BHI 1998). A critical part of the DQO process is to agree on regulatory and WAC interpretation, to support preparation of the DQO workbook and SAP.

WESTCOTT, J.L.

2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thermal analysis of the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature and geologic data from over 3,000 oil and gas wells within a 180 km x 30 km area that transect across the southern Powder River Basin in Wyoming, U.S.A., were used to determine the present thermal regime of the basin. Three-dimensional temperature fields within the transect, based on corrected bottom-hole temperatures (BHTs) and other geologic information, were assessed using: (1) A laterally constant temperature gradient model in conjunction with an L{sub 1} norm inversion method, and (2) a laterally variable temperature gradient model in conjunction with a stochastic inversion technique. The mean geothermal gradient in the transect is 29 C/km, but important lateral variations in the geothermal gradient exist. The average heat flow for the southern Powder River Basin is 52 mW/m{sup 2} with systematic variations between 40 mW/m{sup 2} and 60 mW/m{sup 2} along the transect. Extremely high local heat flow (values up to 225 mW/m{sup 2}) in the vicinity of the Teapot Dome and the Salt Creek Anticline and low heat flow of 25 mW/m{sup 2} occurring locally near the northeast end of the transect are likely caused by groundwater movement.

McPherson, B.J.O.L.; Chapman, D.S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics] [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

James E. Faulds

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Big Brothers needed in Northern New Mexico  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Big Brothers Needed in Northern New Mexico Big Brothers Needed in Northern New Mexico Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Big Brothers needed in Northern New Mexico If you can spare one lunch hour per week for a year, you can make a real difference in the life of a child through the "Lunch Buddies" program. January 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives. Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Research reveals that having a "Big" can have a positive, long-term influence on the children ages five through 18 who participate. If you can spare one lunch hour per week for a year, you can make a real difference in the life of a child through the "Lunch Buddies" program

422

Clean Cities: Northern Colorado Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Northern Colorado Clean Cities Coalition Northern Colorado Clean Cities Coalition The Northern Colorado Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Northern Colorado Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Sheble McConnellogue 970-302-0914 northcolo@cleancitiescolorado.org Maria Eisemann 970-988-2996 marianccc@comcast.net Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinators Coord Sheble McConnellogue Coord Coord Maria Eisemann Coord Photo of Sheble McConnellogue Sheble McConnellogue was a Clean Cities Coordinator for NCCC when the coalition first began in 1996. Sheble has over two decades of experience in the field of community and environmental health education and environmental transportation planning. She earned a Master's degree in Urban and Regional Planning from CU at

423

Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of geologic and geophysical data from the offshore of India have revealed two geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences: the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 was designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. NGHP Expedition 01 established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna- Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. The expedition discovered one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented (Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin), documented the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known (Site 17 in Andaman Sea), and established the existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin (Site 19).

Collett, T.S. (USGS); Riedel, M. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec, Canada); Cochran, J.R. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY); Boswell, R.M.; Kumar, Pushpendra (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Navi Mumbai, India); Sathe, A.V. (Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd., Uttaranchal, INDIA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System...

425

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

426

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD,...

427

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section...

428

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

429

Dryland Winter Wheat and Grain Sorghum Cropping Systems: Northern High Plains of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sorghum and 2,031,000 acres of t~heat were planted on the Northern High Plains of Tes;ic. This area is bounded by the state line on the west, north and east 2nd by the southern boundary of Parmer, Castro, Swisher, Briscoe, Donley and Col- lingcwortli...- v~~estern Great Plains Reqearch Center, Ruchland. The Center, located about 14 miles west of Amarillo, lies in Potter ancl Randall counties. Its location is near the center of the Northern Nigh Plains of Texas. Soils at the Center...

Unger, Paul W.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Coping with changing water resources: The case of the Syr Darya river basin in Central Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coping with changing water resources: The case of the Syr Darya river basin in Central Asia A. Sorg adaptation measures will be needed to cope with changing water resources. In view of the geo, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan make up an area that is larger in size than India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh

Stoffel, Markus

431

NIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary Upper Colorado River Basin Pilot Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the past week which should decrease irrigation water demand from the Western Slope. Areas of SW Colorado of moisture moving over western Colorado on Tuesday will spark off widely scattered showers in the highNIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary Upper Colorado River Basin Pilot Project

432

Using Remote Sensing to Map the Principal Carrier of Monkeypox Virus in the Congo Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Remote Sensing to Map the Principal Carrier of Monkeypox Virus in the Congo Basin by Trevon consumed bushmeat species in rural areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Anne Rimoin, a CTR of Congo in Central Africa. Dr. Rimoin and her research teams are conducting clinical surveillance

Grether, Gregory

433

Ecology: Drought in the Congo Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... significantly expanded the tropical-forest research programme by focusing on chronic drought in Africa's Congo Basin, a region that has been the subject of much less investigation than the ... optical, microwave and gravity remote-sensing data to evaluate long-term drought response in the Congo Basin (Fig. 1). Annual precipitation in this region is bimodal, and the ...

Jeffrey Q. Chambers; Dar A. Roberts

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

434

6, 839877, 2006 Mexico City basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emitters of air pollutants leading to negative health effects and environmental degradation. The rate altitude basin with air pollutant concentrations above the health limits most days of the year. A mesoscale-dimensional wind patterns in25 the basin and found that the sea-breeze transports the polluted air mass up the moun

Boyer, Edmond

435

Lodgepole reef potential seen in Montana Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Williston basin Mississippian Lodgepole oil play has suffered a string of dry holes lately eroding the confidence of explorationists to find these prolific reefs, particularly in North Dakota. Detailed mapping of the Lodgepole trend suggests more Lodgepole reefs will be found in the Montana part of the trend than in North Dakota. Companies seeking impact plays should certainly give this area strong consideration. The paper discusses the delineation of a lower Lodgepole fairway extending into Montana with identification of reef facies in key wells (reef clusters), good source rocks, high quality seismic data, and impact reserve potential which makes Montana good hunting ground for significant new discoveries.

Brogdon, L. [H.A. Hedberg Trust, Fort Worth, TX (United States); Ball, S.M.; Ball, D.S. [Ball Exploration Inc., Fort Worth, TX (United States)

1996-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

Subsidence history of Williston basin in North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tectonic subsidence history of the Williston basin in North Dakota has been estimated through the examination of wireline logs from 30 wells that penetrated to Precambrian basement. The initial subsidence of the basin in North Dakota began at a time not later than during deposition of the middle portion of the Deadwood Formation (earliest Ordovician; about 495-490 Ma), significantly earlier than had been estimated by most workers. The initial subsidence was centered in a north-south-trending elongate area in western North Dakota; the maximum calculated tectonic subsidence rate for this event is about 15 m/m.y. Since the Early Ordovician, exclusive of the basin initiation event, the basin has undergone at least five distinct episodes of tectonic subsidence: (1) from about 450-420 Ma, (2) from 420-355 Ma, (3) from 355-315 Ma, (4) from 270-245 Ma, and (5) beginning in the interval between about 90 and 70 Ma. Each of the subsidence episodes was characterized by a rapid initial subsidence, followed by a decline to very low subsidence rates. The maximum calculated initial subsidence rates for these episodes are 26, 32, 16, 9, and 15 m/m.y, respectively. The time between episodes 4 and 5 seems to have been one of relative quiescence; the few rocks preserved from that time interval were deposited during highstands of sea level. The subsidence history curves for episodes 1-4 are consistent with a thermal expansion model; however, with the exception of episode 3 and possibly episode 4, none of the first four subsidence events appears to be temporally coincident with major tectonic events elsewhere in North America.

Lefever, R.D.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

SUPPLEMENTAL PACKAGE FOR THE SCOPING SUMMARY FOR THE P-AREA OPERABLE UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arsenic and selenium were tentatively identified as ecological RCOCs for the PAOU Ash Basin (PAOU Post-Characterization/Problem Identification Scoping Meeting, March 2007). Core Team agreed to consider eliminating these constituents as RCOCs based on a revised uncertainty discussion. The ecological risk tables and revised text (in its entirety) for the PAOU Ash Basin are provided in the Supplemental Information Package for the FS Scoping Meeting (June 2007). Arsenic and selenium have been traditionally carried through as ecological RCOCs (D-Area Ash Basin, A-Area Ash Pile).

Kupar, J; Sadika Baladi, S; Mark Amidon, M

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

438

Coordinated study of the Devonian black shale in the Illinois Basin: Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the resource potential of the Devonian shales, called the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) was begun. A study of the stratigraphy, structure, composition, and gas content of the Devonian shale in the Illinois Basin was undertaken by the State Geological Surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, under contract to the U.S. DOE as a part of the EGSP. Certain additional data were also developed by other research organizations (including Monsanto Research Corporation-Mound Facility and Battelle-Columbus Laboratory) on cores taken from the Illinois Basin. This report, an overview of geological data on the Illinois basin and interpretations of this data resulting from the EGSP, highlights areas of potential interest as exploration targets for possible natural gas resources in the Devonian shale of the basin. The information in this report was compiled during the EGSP from open file data available at the three State Geological surveys and from new data developed on cores taken by the DOE from the basin specifically for the EGSP. The organically richest shale is found in southeastern Illinois and in most of the Indiana and Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky. Natural fractures in the shale may aid in collecting gas from a large volume of shale. These fractures may be more abundant and interconnected to a greater degree in the vicinity of major faults. Major faults along the Rough Creek Lineament and Wabash Valley Fault System cross the deeper part of the basin.

Lineback, J.A.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Little Knife field - US Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Little Knife field is a combination structural and stratigraphic trap located near the structural center of the Williston basin, North Dakota. The field is approximately 12 mi (19.3 km) long and 2.5 to 5.5 mi (4 to 8.9 km) wide. Little Knife was discovered by Gulf Oil in 1976 as part of a regional exploration play involving a transition from impermeable to porous carbonate rocks. In 1987, ultimate recovery from the Mission Canyon (Mississippian) reservoir was estimated to be 97.5 MMBO. This included 57.5 MMBO primary, 27 MMBO secondary, and 13 MMBO tertiary (CO{sub 2}) oil. At present the field is still under primary recovery, since utilization efforts have not been successful. Approximately one-third of Little Knife's 130 ft (39.6 m) oil column is trapped by structural closure beneath a regional anhydrite seal in a north-south-trending anticline. The remaining two-thirds of the oil column is trapped where the reservoir beds change facies from porous dolostones and dolomitic limestones to nonporous limestones. Structural entrapment accounts for approximately 50% (127 MMBO) of the OOIP, but covers only 30% of the producing area. Production is from the upper portions of the Mission Canyon Formation, a regressive, shoaling-upward carbonate-anhydrite sequence deposited in a slowly shrinking epeiric sea. The Mission Canyon in the Little Knife area is divided into six zones that record predominantly cyclic, subtidal deposition. These are overlain by prograding lagoonal, tidal flat, and sabkha beds. The source of Mission Canyon oil is thought to be the Bakken Formation, an organic-rich shale at the base of the Mississippian.

Wittstrom, M.D.; Lindsay, R.F. (Chevron USA, Inc., Midland, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Diverse latest Pliocene volcanic and plutonic rocks in the north-central Caucasus Mountains of southern Russia are newly interpreted as components of a large caldera system that erupted a compositionally zoned rhyolite-dacite ash-flow sheet at 2.83 ± 0.02 Ma (sanidine and biotite 40Ar/39Ar). Despite its location within a cratonic collision zone, the Chegem system is structurally and petrologically similar to typical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area northern basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.