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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www from buildings. Ventilation, however, comes with a significant energy cost. Currently, heating, cooling and ventilating commercial buildings represents 29 percent of their total onsite energy use

2

California Energy Balance ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Balance Database ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www produced an energy balance for California with a database called California Energy Balance (CALEB--factors such as fuel prices, changes in type of industries located in California, and increased energy efficiency

3

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

4

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

5

Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the missions of the Department of Energy. The multidisciplinary BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) has already to their future contributions in this area of research. ORNL also established the Center for BioEnergy the sustainability (environmental, economic, and social) of current and future bioenergy production and distribution

6

Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 30, Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park natural areas and reference areas--Oak Ridge Reservation environmentally sensitive sites containing special plants, animals, and communities  

SciTech Connect

Areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) that contain rare plant or animal species or are special habitats are protected through National Environmental Research Park Natural Area (NA) or Reference Area (RA) designations. The US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park program is responsible for identifying species of vascular plants that are endangered, threatened, or rare and, as much as possible, for conserving those areas in which such species grow. This report includes a listing of Research Park NAs and RAs with general habitat descriptions and a computer-generated map with the areas identified. These are the locations of rare plant or animal species or special habitats that are known at this time. As the Reservation continues to be surveyed, it is expected that additional sites will be designated as Research Park NAs or RAs. This document is a component of a larger effort to identify environmentally sensitive areas on ORR. This report identifies the currently known locations of rare plant species, rare animal species, and special biological communities. Floodplains, wetlands (except those in RAs or NAs), and cultural resources are not included in this report.

Pounds, L.R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US); Parr, P.D.; Ryon, M.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

NONE

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada; Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guideline for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EA), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as of five sites suitable for characterization.

NONE

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Welcome to the Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) conducts research in...

11

Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BESC and throughout the scientific community. The Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI) has had its 2010 #12;Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts basic and applied research and development in the Biological and Environmental Sciences Directorate (BESD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) perform

12

Strategic Environmental Research and Development Project FY 1994: Assessing national remote sensing technologies for use in US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Activities, Oak Ridge Solid Waste Storage Area 4 case study  

SciTech Connect

During FY 1994, the Oak Ridge Environmental Restoration (ER) Remote Sensing Program teamed with members of the Oak Ridge National Security Program Office (NSPO), the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) under contract to the National Exploitation Laboratory (NEL), the Oak Ridge Waste Area Group 4 (WAG 4) ER Program, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Offices of Technology Development, Nonproliferation and National Security, and Environmental Restoration, to conduct a test and demonstration of the uses of national remote sensing technologies at DOE hazardous waste sites located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Objectives of the Oak Ridge study were to determine if national remote sensing technologies are useful in conducting prescreening, characterization, and/or monitoring activities to expedite the clean-up process at hazardous waste sites and to cut clean-up costs wherever possible. This project was sponsored by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Project (SERDP).

King, A.L.; Smyre, J.L.; Evers, T.K.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Summer Undergraduate Research Program: Environmental studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. The students are offered research topics at the Medical University in the scientific areas of pharmacology and toxicology, epidemiology and risk assessment, environmental microbiology, and marine sciences. Students are also afforded the opportunity to work with faculty at the University of Charleston, SC, on projects with an environmental theme. Ten well-qualified students from colleges and universities throughout the eastern United States were accepted into the program.

McMillan, J. [ed.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Alderwood Area Service Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) proposal to build a new 115-kV transmission line and 115-12.5-kV, 25-MW substation in the Alderwood, Oregon, area is discussed in the attached Environmental Assessment. The proposed substation site has been relocated about 500 feet east of the site outlined in the Environmental Assessment, but in the same field. This is not a substantial change relevant to environmental concerns. Environmental impacts of the new site differ only in that: Two residences will be visually affected. The substation will be directly across Highway 36 from two houses and would be seen in their primary views. This impact will be mitigated by landscaping the substation to create a vegetative screen. To provide access to the new site and provide for Blachly-Lane Cooperative's distribution lines, a 60-foot-wide right-of-way about 200 feet long will be needed. The total transmission line length will be less than originally planned. However, the tapline into the substation will be about 50 feet longer. 4 figs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and Environmental Research Abstracts Database. Please logon. Logon Name: Password: Logon CommentsEmail Us * SecurityDisclaimer Notices * BER Abstracts Last Updated: September 27...

16

Environmental Systems Research FY-99 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Systems Research (ESR) Program, a part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). The original portfolio of research activities was assembled after an analysis of the EM technology development and science needs as gathered by the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs) complex-wide. Current EM investments in science and technology throughout the research community were also included in this analysis to avoid duplication of efforts. This is a progress report for the second year of the ESR Program (Fiscal Year 99). A report of activities is presented for the five ESR research investment areas: (a) Transport Aspects of Selective Mass Transport Agents, (b) Chemistry of Environmental Surfaces, (c) Materials Dynamics, (d) Characterization Science, and (e) Computational Simulation of Mechanical and Chemical Systems. In addition to the five technical areas, activities in the Science and Technology Foundations element of the program, e.g., interfaces between ESR and the EM Science Program (EMSP) and the EM Focus Areas, are described.

Miller, D.L.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Environmental Systems Research, FY-99 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Systems Research (ESR) Program, a part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). The original portfolio of research activities was assembled after an analysis of the EM technology development and science needs as gathered by the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs) complex-wide. Current EM investments in science and technology throughout the research community were also included in this analysis to avoid duplication of efforts. This is a progress report for the second year of the ESR Program (Fiscal Year 99). A report of activities is presented for the five ESR research investment areas: (a) Transport Aspects of Selective Mass Transport Agents, (b) Chemistry of Environmental Surfaces, (c) Materials Dynamics, (d) Characterization Science, and (e) Computational Simulation of Mechanical and Chemical Systems. In addition to the five technical areas, activities in the Science and Technology Foundations element of the program, e.g., interfaces between ESR and the EM Science Program (EMSP) and the EM Focus Areas, are described.

Miller, David Lynn

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

TECHNICAL INTEGRATION ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOCUS AREAS  

SciTech Connect

This contract involved a team of companies led by WPI (formerly the Waste Policy Institute). In addition to WPI, the team included four subcontractors--TRW (formerly BDM Federal), SAIC, Energetics, and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The team of companies functioned as a ''seamless team'' assembled to support the Environmental Management Program Focus Areas. Staff resources were applied in the following offices: Richland, Washington, Idaho Falls, Idaho, Morgantown, West Virginia, Grand Forks, North Dakota, Aiken, South Carolina, Gaithersburg, Maryland, and Blacksburg, Virginia. These locations represented a mixture of site support offices at the field focus area locations and central staff to support across the focus areas. The management of this dispersed resource base relied on electronic communication links to allow the team to function as a ''virtual office'' to address tasks with the best qualified staff matched to the task assignments. A variety of tasks were assigned and successfully completed throughout the life of the contract that involved program planning and analysis, program execution, program information management and communication and data transmission.

Carey R. Butler

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

TECHNICAL INTEGRATION ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOCUS AREAS  

SciTech Connect

This contract involved a team of companies led by WPI (formerly the Waste Policy Institute). In addition to WPI, the team included four subcontractors--TRW (formerly BDM Federal), SAIC, Energetics, and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). The team of companies functioned as a ''seamless team'' assembled to support the Environmental Management Program Focus Areas. Staff resources were applied in the following offices: Richland, Washington, Idaho Falls, Idaho, Morgantown, West Virginia, Grand Forks, North Dakota, Aiken, South Carolina, Gaithersburg, Maryland, and Blacksburg, Virginia. These locations represented a mixture of site support offices at the field focus area locations and central staff to support across the focus areas. The management of this dispersed resource base relied on electronic communication links to allow the team to function as a ''virtual office'' to address tasks with the best qualified staff matched to the task assignments. A variety of tasks were assigned and successfully completed throughout the life of the contract that involved program planning and analysis, program execution, program information management and communication and data transmission.

Carey R. Butler

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Research Highlights Sorted by Research Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Area Research Area Radiation Processes | Cloud Distributions/Characterizations | Surface Properties | General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations | Aerosol Properties | Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures | Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) | Vertical Velocity | Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) | Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions | Cloud Processes | Aerosol Processes Radiation Processes Alexandrov, M. D. Optical Depth Measurements by Shadowband Radiometers and Their Uncertainties ARM Berg, L. Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP ARM Bergmann, D. The Influence of Regional Anthropogenic Emission Reductions on Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing ASR Bhattacharya, A. Burning on the Prairies ARM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sacramento Area Voltage Support Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E E R R A N E V A D A R E G I O N Sacramento Area Voltage Support DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT DOE/EIS-0323 NOVEMBER 2002 COVER SHEET Title: Sacramento Area Voltage Support Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration (Western) Location: Alameda, Contra Costa, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, and Sutter Counties, State of California. EIS Number: DOE/EIS-0323 Contact: Ms. Loreen McMahon, Environmental Project Manager Western Area Power Administration Sierra Nevada Region 114 Parkshore Drive Folsom, CA 95630 (916) 353-4460 (916) 985-1936 fax email: mcmahon@wapa.gov Website: Information is also available on our website: www.wapa.gov Hotline: 1-877-913-4440 (toll-free) Abstract The Western Area Power Administration's Central Valley Project transmission system forms an integral part of

22

NREL: Wind Research - Environmental Impacts Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Impacts Research Environmental Impacts Research Photo of a Greater Prairie-Chicken. Credit: James Shroyer. NREL is a partner in the Grassland Shrub Steppe Species Collaborative, a multi-year effort to study wind turbines in prairie chicken habitat. The Wind Program at NREL works to resolve environmental issues that may hinder acceptance of wind energy technologies. The program accomplishes this through activities that address the potential effects of wind development on wildlife and identifies corresponding mitigation strategies. As part of this effort, the program supports the work of the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative (NWCC) Wildlife Workgroup, which is focused on collaborative approaches for understanding and evaluating species- and habitat-specific impacts, mitigation tools, risk assessment, and nocturnal

23

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally Acceptable Shale Gas Development Selected by DOE Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to...

24

Health and Environmental Research. Summary of Accomplishments  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

1984-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

25

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park -- Parknotes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Return to Publications Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park Research Park Notes Research Park Notes was an informal mechanism, developed by Pat Parr, the Oak Ridge...

26

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park -- Research Park...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Return to Newsletter Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park Research Park Notes Issue 4, January 9, 2001 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information on...

27

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park -- Research Park...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Return to Newsletter Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park Research Park Notes Issue 3, December 19, 2000 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information...

28

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park -- Research Park...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Return to Newsletter Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park Research Park Notes Issue 7, February 20, 2001 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information...

29

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park -- Research Park...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Return to Newsletter Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park Research Park Notes Issue 9, March 20, 2001 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information on...

30

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park -- Research Park...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Return to Newsletter Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park Research Park Notes Issue 5, January 23, 2001 Welcome to Research Park Notes Look for tidbits of information on...

31

Utility stresses environmental programs, research projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B.C. Hydro, the provincial electric utility of British Columbia, views environmental programs and research projects as an important part of its business. Many of these activities stem from some aspect of hydroelectric generation as the utility relies on 39 reservoirs and 30 hydro stations for the bulk of its electricity production. These programs and research projects are featured in B.C. Hydro's first annual Report on the Environment, which summarizes the utility's work to minimize the effects of operations on the natural and social environment. Some programs and research projects were initiated some years ago, while others are new. B.C.'s environmental programs include environmental audits and fish and wildlife compensation (mitigation) programs. In 1988, the utility and the province's Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks began developing compensation programs to address water license requirements for B.C. Hydro's hydroelectric developments. Today, compensation programs for the Peace and Columbia river area serve as models for future programs. The utility also reports it is reviewing all operating orders for its water system to identify opportunities to make operations more sensitive to environmental concerns. Additionally, work is under way on a preliminary strategy for addressing fish and water quality issues and setting minimum flow requirements. And in an effort to control dust storms, B.C. Hydro reports it is studying native perennial plants that can endure the flooding/drawdown cycle typical of a water storage reservoir.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Center For Energy and Environmental Policy Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center For Energy and Environmental Policy Research What Should the Government do to Encourage for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR) is a joint center of the Department of Economics on behalf of the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR), (a joint centre

Deutch, John

33

Environmental Systems Research Candidates FY-01 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Systems Research Candidates (ESRC) Program ran from April 2000 through September 2001 as part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). ESRA provides key science and technology to meet the cleanup mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM), and performs research and development that will help solve current legacy problems and enhance the INEEL’s scientific and technical capability for solving longer-term challenges. This report documents the accomplishments of the ESRC Program. The ESRC Program consisted of 25 tasks subdivided within four research areas.

Miller, David Lynn; Piet, Steven James

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Environmental Compliance Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

56-2011 56-2011 June 2011 DOE STANDARD ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. (Unclassified Unlimited) DOE-STD-1156-2011 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1156-2011 iv TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT v PURPOSE 1 APPLICABILITY 1 IMPLEMENTATION 2 EVALUATION REQUIREMENTS 3 INITIAL QUALIFICATION AND TRAINING 5

35

Advanced materials research areas | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Theory and Simulation Energy Frontier Research Centers Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Science to Energy Solutions News & Awards Events and...

36

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), conducted December 14 through 18, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with SERI. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SERI, and interviews with site personnel. 33 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Research Areas | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Educational Outreach Publications and Reports News and Awards...

38

Neutron Science Research Areas | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and Soft Matter Chemical and Engineering Materials Quantum Condensed Matter Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities...

39

Environmental Assessment for moving the Pacific Northwest Laboratory radon generators from Life Sciences Laboratory II, Richland North Area, to Life Sciences Laboratory I, 300 Area, and their continued use in physical and biological research  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) radon generators are a core resource of the overall U. S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Radon Research Program and are administratively controlled within the ``Radon Hazards in Homes`` project. This project primarily focuses on radon exposures of animals and addresses the major biologic effects and factors influencing risks of indoor radon exposures. For example, the ``Mechanisms of Radon Injury`` and ``In vivo/In vitro Radon-Induced Cellular Damage`` projects specifically address the cytogenetic and DNA damage produced by radon exposure as part of a larger effort to understand radon carcinogenesis. Several other ongoing PNL projects, namely: ``Biological Effectiveness of Radon Alpha Particles: A Microbeam Study of Dose Rate Effects,`` ``Laser Measurements of Pb-210,`` ``Radon Transport Modeling in Soils,`` ``Oncogenes in Radiation Carcinogenesis,`` ``Mutation of DNA Targets,`` ``Dosimetry of Radon Progeny,`` and ``Aerosol Technology Development`` also use the radon exposure facilities in the conduct of their work. While most, but not all, studies in the PNL Radon Research Program are funded through DOE`s Office of Health and Environmental Research, PNL also has ongoing collaborative radon studies with investigators worldwide; many of these use the radon exposure facilities. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide for relocation of the radon generators to a DOE-owned facility and to continue to provide a controlled source of radon-222 for continued use in physical and biological research.

Nelson, I.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Distribution Research Area Strategic Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric distribution system has served customers effectively for more than 100 years. It continues to serve customers reliably, but it will face unprecedented challenges in the coming years, driven by such factors as increasing demands for energy, aging infrastructure, space and capacity limitations, environmental constraints, varying load types, new "smart" technologies, and distributed generation. Without a concerted effort by the industry to anticipate and respond to the impending challenges, the...

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Environmental Sciences Division: Summaries of research in FY 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Fiscal Year 1996 activities and products of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The report is organized into four main sections. The introduction identifies the basic program structure, describes the programs of the Environmental Sciences Division, and provides the level of effort for each program area. The research areas and project descriptions section gives program contact information, and provides descriptions of individual research projects including: three-year funding history, research objective and approach used in each project, and results to date. Appendixes provide postal and e-mail addresses for principal investigators and define acronyms used in the text. The indexes provide indexes of principal investigators, research institutions, and keywords for easy reference. Research projects are related to climatic change and remedial action.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to improve the safety and minimize the environmental impacts of oil and natural gas exploration and production. The projects will address research needs primarily in four...

43

Environmental History: Methods, Research, and Practice.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis has three parts, a historiography and original research into path of environmental history, culminating with the development of a website titled: Teaching… (more)

Barry, Gavin James

44

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park Available Data Habitat Management Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Some of the documents on this page are in...

45

LUSTER: wireless sensor network for environmental research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental wireless sensor network (EWSN) systems are deployed in potentially harsh and remote environments where inevitable node and communication failures must be tolerated. LUSTER---Light Under Shrub Thicket for Environmental Research---is a system ... Keywords: LiteTDMA, architecture, environmental science, implementation, mote, network protocol, storage, validation, wireless sensor network

L. Selavo; A. Wood; Q. Cao; T. Sookoor; H. Liu; A. Srinivasan; Y. Wu; W. Kang; J. Stankovic; D. Young; J. Porter

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park -- Research Park...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through September 30, 2000). Responses of Mature Forest Trees to Ozone and Climate - Sandy McLaughlin and Stan Wullschleger, Environmental Sciences Division, ORNL This research...

47

[Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Summer undergraduate research program: Environmental studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. Ten students from throughout the midwestern and eastern areas of the country were accepted into the program. These students selected projects in the areas of marine sciences, biostatistics and epidemiology, and toxicology. The research experience for all these students and their mentors was very positive. The seminars were well attended and the students showed their interest in the presentations and environmental sciences as a whole by presenting the speakers with thoughtful and intuitive questions. This report contains the research project written presentations prepared by the student interns.

McMillan, J. [ed.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Environmental Security and Restoration [EVS Program Area]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Security and Restoration Environmental Security and Restoration EVS focuses on environmental and human health aspects of homeland and national security, as well as restoration of sites contaminated with hazardous materials. Contamination in our environment - in air, water, and soil - contributes to health problems and affects the quality of our lives. The EVS Division confronts this challenge by addressing environmental and human health aspects of homeland and national security and by characterizing and restoring sites contaminated with hazardous materials. We integrate extensive expertise in engineering, health physics, hydrogeology, environmental science, chemistry, spatial analysis, database management, and computer programming to contribute to environmental security and restoration.

49

Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee  

Office of Science (SC) Website

October 28-29, 2013 October 28-29, 2013 Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (40KB) BER Committees of Visitors BER Home Meetings Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee October 28-29, 2013 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Agenda .pdf file (10KB) Presentations: Sharlene Weatherwax .pdf file (575KB) - Office of Biological and Environmental Research Update Todd Anderson .pdf file (3.3MB) - Biological Systems Science Division Update Gary Geernaert .pdf file (2.2MB) - Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Update Minghua Zhang .pdf file (215KB) - Climate and Environmental Research Division COV Gary Stacey .pdf file (16.8MB) - Biological Nitrogen Fixation:

50

Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research  

SciTech Connect

The topics considered in the seven sessions were nuclear methods in atmospheric research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in tracer applications; energy exploration, production, and utilization; nuclear methods in environmental monitoring; nuclear methods in water research; and nuclear methods in biological research. Individual abstracts were prepared for each paper. (JSR)

Vogt, J.R. (ed.)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Review: International Handbook of Research on Environmental Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: International Handbook of Research on Environmentaleditors. International Handbook of Research on Environmentalenormous International Handbook of Research on Environmental

Laberge, Yves

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Jones, A.T. [Jones (Anthony T.), Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Smith, C.R. [Smith (Craig R.), Kailna, HI (United States); Kalmijn, A.J. [Kalmijn (Adrianus J.), Encinitas, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research  

SciTech Connect

A total of 75 papers were presented on nuclear methods for analysis of environmental and biological samples. Sessions were devoted to software and mathematical methods; nuclear methods in atmospheric and water research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in biology and medicine; and nuclear methods in energy research.

Vogt, J R [ed.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Energy Crossroads: Research Institutions | Environmental Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Institutions Research Institutions Suggest a Listing American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) The ACEEE is a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing energy efficiency as a means of promoting both economic prosperity and environmental protection. California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) CIEE plans, coordinates, and implements applied research to advance productivity and competitiveness through energy efficiency. As a University of California research unit administered by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CIEE was established in 1988 in cooperation with the California utilities, the California Public Utilities Commission, the California Energy Commission, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

55

Environmental research program: FY 1987, annual report  

SciTech Connect

This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. The Program's Annual Report contains summaries of research performed during FY 1987 in the areas of atmospheric aerosols, flue gas chemistry, combustion, membrane bioenergetics, and analytical chemistry. The main research interests of the Atmospheric Aerosol Research group concern the chemical and physical processes that occur in haze, clouds, and fogs. For their studies, the group is developing novel analytical and research methods for characterizing aerosol species. Aerosol research is performed in the laboratory and in the field. Studies of smoke emissions from fires and their possible effects on climatic change, especially as related to nuclear winter, are an example of the collaboration between the Atmospheric Aerosol Research and Combustion Research Groups.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Cleanup Actions - Cleanup Actions Since the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was shut down in 1968, many actions have been taken as part of the complex decommissioning. The actions undertaken throughout the BGRR complex ensure that the structures that remain are in a safe and stable condition and prepared it for long-term surveillance and maintenance. Regulatory Requirements The decommissioning of the BGRR was conducted under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1992, an Interagency Agreement (PDF) among the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) became effective. The IAG provided the overall framework for conducting environmental restoration activities at

57

Environmental security planning : an application to the Longwood Medical Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis is a study of the security problems due to street crime in the Longwood Medical Area of Boston. The first part of the thesis defines the theories and practices of environmental security .planning, the urban ...

Garmaise, Miriam Gail

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Environmental Systems Research and Analysis FY 2000 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Systems Research (ESR) Program, a part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the INEEL. Strengthening the Technical capabilities of the INEEL will provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Office of Environmental Management (EM). This is a progress report for the third year of the ESR Program (FY 2000). A report of activities is presented for the five ESR research investment areas: (1) Transport Aspects of Selective Mass Transport Agents, (2) Chemistry of Environmental Surfaces, (3) Materials Dynamics, (4) Characterization Science, and (5) Computational Simulation of Mechanical and Chemical Systems. In addition to the five technical areas, the report describes activities in the Science and Technology Foundations element of the program, e.g., interfaces between ESR and the EM Science Program (EMSP) and the EM Focus Areas. The five research areas are subdivided into 18 research projects. FY 2000 research in these 18 projects has resulted in more than 50 technical papers that are in print, in press, in review, or in preparation. Additionally, more than 100 presentations were made at professional society meetings nationally and internationally. Work supported by this program was in part responsible for one of our researchers, Dr. Mason Harrup, receiving the Department of Energy’s “Bright Light” and “Energy at 23” awards. Significant accomplishments were achieved. Non-Destructive Assay hardware and software was deployed at the INEEL, enhancing the quality and efficiency of TRU waste characterization for shipment. The advanced tensiometer has been employed at numerous sites around the complex to determine hydrologic gradients in variably saturated vadose zones. An ion trap, secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS) was designed and fabricated to deploy at the INEEL site to measure the chemical speciation of radionuclides and toxic metals on the surfaces of environmentally significant minerals. The FY 2001 program will have a significantly different structure and research content. This report presents the final summary of projects coming to an end in FY 2000 and is a bridge to the FY 2001 program.

David L. Miller; Castle, Peter Myer; Steven J. Piet

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Ashland Area Support Substation Project : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power & Light Company`s (PP&L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP&L`s Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP&L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW`s) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP&L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

National Environmental Research Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name National Environmental Research Institute Name National Environmental Research Institute Address Box. 358 Frederiksborgvej 399 DK 4000 Place Roskilde, Denmark Phone number +45 46 30 12 00 Coordinates 55.6932396°, 12.1039227° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.6932396,"lon":12.1039227,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

63

Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD participants believe that the platform concept could have far-reaching applications in the Arctic as a drilling and production platform, as originally intended, and as a possible staging area. The overall objective of this project was to document various potential applications, locations, and conceptual designs for the inland platform serving oil and gas operations on the Alaska North Slope. The University of Alaska Fairbanks assisted the HARC/TerraPlatforms team with the characterization of potential resource areas, geotechnical conditions associated with continuous permafrost terrain, and the potential end-user evaluation process. The team discussed the various potential applications with industry, governmental agencies, and environmental organizations. The benefits and concerns associated with industry's use of the technology were identified. In this discussion process, meetings were held with five operating companies (22 people), including asset team leaders, drilling managers, HSE managers, and production and completion managers. Three other operating companies and two service companies were contacted by phone to discuss the project. A questionnaire was distributed and responses were provided, which will be included in the report. Meetings were also held with State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources officials and U.S. Bureau of Land Management regulators. The companies met with included ConcoPhillips, Chevron, Pioneer Natural Resources, Fairweather E&P, BP America, and the Alaska Oil and Gas Association.

Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project 921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental Assessment, Esmeralda County, Nevada EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental Assessment, Esmeralda County, Nevada SUMMARY The Bureau of Land Management (BLM)(lead agency) and DOE are jointly preparing this EA, which evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a project proposed by Rockwood Lithium Inc (Rockwood), formerly doing business as Chemetall Foote Corporation. Rockwood has submitted to the BLM, Tonopah Field Office, an Operations Plan for the construction, operation, and maintenance of the Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project within Esmeralda County, Nevada. The purpose of the project is to determine subsurface temperatures, confirm the existence of geothermal resources, and

65

EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project 921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental Assessment, Esmeralda County, Nevada EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental Assessment, Esmeralda County, Nevada SUMMARY The Bureau of Land Management (BLM)(lead agency) and DOE are jointly preparing this EA, which evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a project proposed by Rockwood Lithium Inc (Rockwood), formerly doing business as Chemetall Foote Corporation. Rockwood has submitted to the BLM, Tonopah Field Office, an Operations Plan for the construction, operation, and maintenance of the Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project within Esmeralda County, Nevada. The purpose of the project is to determine subsurface temperatures, confirm the existence of geothermal resources, and

66

Health and Environmental Research: summary of accomplishments. Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an account of some of the accomplishments of the health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Both direct and indirect societal benefits emerged from the new knowledge provided by the health and environmental research program. In many cases, the private sector took this knowledge and applied it well beyond the mission of supporting the defense and energy needs of the Nation. Industrial and medical applications, for example, have in several instances provided annual savings to society of $100 million or more. The form of this presentation is, in fact, through ''snapshots'' - examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of the areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The program's worth is not necessarily confined to such accomplishments; it extends, rather, to its ability to identify and help solve potential health and environmental problems before they become critical. This anticipatory mission has been pursued with an approach that combines applied problem solving with a commitment to fundamental research that is long-term and high-risk. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc. annual technical report: Calendar year 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Annual Technical Report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), by the Environmental Science and Research Foundation (Foundation). The Foundation`s mission to DOE-ID provides support in several key areas. The Foundation conducts an environmental monitoring and surveillance program over an area covering much of the upper Snake River Plain, and provides environmental education and support services related to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) natural resource issues. Also, the Foundation, with its University Affiliates, conducts ecological and radioecological research on the Idaho National Environmental Research Park. This research benefits major DOE-ID programs including Waste Management, Environmental Restoration, Spent Nuclear Fuels, and Land Management Issues. Summaries are included of the individual research projects.

Reynolds, R.D.; Warren, R.W. [eds.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Environmental Systems Research Candidates Program--FY2000 Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Systems Research Candidates (ESRC) Program, which is scheduled to end September 2001, was established in April 2000 as part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to provide key science and technology to meet the clean-up mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, and perform research and development that will help solve current legacy problems and enhance the INEEL’s scientific and technical capability for solving longer-term challenges. This report documents the progress and accomplishments of the ESRC Program from April through September 2000. The ESRC Program consists of 24 tasks subdivided within four research areas: A. Environmental Characterization Science and Technology. This research explores new data acquisition, processing, and interpretation methods that support cleanup and long-term stewardship decisions. B. Subsurface Understanding. This research expands understanding of the biology, chemistry, physics, hydrology, and geology needed to improve models of contamination problems in the earth’s subsurface. C. Environmental Computational Modeling. This research develops INEEL computing capability for modeling subsurface contaminants and contaminated facilities. D. Environmental Systems Science and Technology. This research explores novel processes to treat waste and decontaminate facilities. Our accomplishments during FY 2000 include the following: • We determined, through analysis of samples taken in and around the INEEL site, that mercury emissions from the INEEL calciner have not raised regional off-INEEL mercury contamination levels above normal background. • We have initially demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence to image uranium and heavy metal concentrations in soil samples. • We increased our understanding of the subsurface environment; applying mathematical complexity theory to the problem of transport of subsurface contaminants. • We upgraded the INEEL’s high-speed computer link to offsite supercomputers from T1 (1.5 MB/s) to DS3 (45 MB/s). Procurements have initiated a further upgrade to OC3 (155 MB/s) with additional onsite computational power that should put the INEEL on the Top 500 Supercomputing Sites list. • We developed advanced decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement techniques, including the Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Remediation Optimal Planning System.

Piet, Steven James

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Correlation of AES FY 1978 program with energy-related environmental research needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has a two-fold objective: (1) to identify major energy-related environmental concerns, needs, and problem areas, and (2) to show the relationship of the planned FY 1978 research program of the ERDA Assistant Administrator of Environment and Safety (AES) to those environmental issues. The document is organized into sections addressing each major energy form. Each section identifies environmental issues of an energy form and indicates the level of planned FY 78 AES research addressing each issue, thus delineating the links between environmental research and the needs of energy research, development, and demonstration (RD and D).

Not Available

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Environmental Science and Research Foundation annual technical report: Calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Technical Report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), by the Environmental Science and Research Foundation (Foundation). The Foundation`s mission to DOE-ID provides support in several key areas. The authors conduct an environmental monitoring and surveillance program over an area covering much of the upper Snake River Plain, and provide environmental education and support services related to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) natural resource issues. Also, the Foundation, with its University Affiliates, conducts ecological and radioecological research in the Idaho National Environmental Research Park. This research benefits major DOE-ID programs including Waste Management, Environmental Restoration, Spent Nuclear Fuels, and Land Management Issues. The major accomplishments of the Foundation and its University Affiliates during the calendar year 1996 are discussed.

Morris, R.C.; Blew, R.D. [eds.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Research Areas - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data, Statistical Analysis and Geo-Spatial Information Tools Defense Transportation Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis Highway Safety Intelligent Transportation Systems...

72

Environmental Science and Research Foundation annual technical report to DOE-ID, January , 1995--December 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The foundation conducts an environmental monitoring and surveillance program over an area covering much of the upper Snake River Plain and provide environmental education and support services related to INEL natural resource issues. Also, the foundation, with its university affiliates, conducts ecological and radioecological research on the Idaho National Environmental Research Park. This research benefits major DOE-ID programs including waste management, environmental restoration, spent nuclear fuels, and land management issues. Major accomplishments during CY1995 can be divided into five categories: environmental surveillance program, environmental education, environmental services and support, ecological risk assessment, and research benefitting the DOE-ID mission.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Environmental Survey preliminary report, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Team members are being provided by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NIPER. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NIPER and interviews with site personnel. 35 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Research Areas | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Research Research Areas Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Scientific Highlights Reports & Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page To meet the challenge of supporting basic research programs that are also energy relevant, the Division manages portfolio components that consist of distinct Core Research Activities (CRAs), which align with the Division's organizational and budget structures. The CRAs are structured as scientific disciplines, rather than as technology areas, to facilitate the cross-cutting nature of basic research and to align our programs with the

75

Sacramento Area Voltage Support Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration's Central Valley Project transmission system forms an integral part of the interconnected Sacramento area transmission grid. Western is contractually responsible to oversee that the system is operated in accordance with strict reliability standards. Growth in the greater Sacramento, California area and power imported from generation outside the region, have increased the demand on the interconnected electric transmission system, leading to transmission system overloads and reducing the reliability and security of the area power system. Western has prepared this Sacramento Area Voltage Support (SVS) Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in compliance with Federal laws, regulations and guidelines, principally the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA). This Draft EIS evaluates the potential environmental effects of physical improvements to the area's power system. Enhancements are needed to improve system reliability and provide voltage support for the Sacramento area. The results of public scoping meetings, workshops, meetings with agencies, and earlier studies by Western and area utilities helped to develop a range of alternatives for analysis. The Proposed Action involves: Constructing a new double-circuit, 230-kV transmission line paralleling the existing double-circuit, 230-kV line from the O'Banion Substation to the Elverta Substation; Realigning a portion of the existing Cottonwood-Roseville single-circuit, 230-kV transmission line north of Elverta Substation; and Reconductoring the existing double-circuit, 230-kV transmission line from the Elverta Substation to the Tracy Substation. Public Hearings on the Draft EIS will be held between December 9-12, 2002. Comments on this Draft EIS are encouraged and should be sent to Ms. Loreen McMahon (above). Comments must be received by December 30, 2002.

N /A

2002-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Sacramento Area Voltage Support Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration's Central Valley Project transmission system forms an integral part of the interconnected Sacramento area transmission grid. Western is contractually responsible to oversee that the system is operated in accordance with strict reliability standards. Growth in the greater Sacramento, California area and power imported from generation outside the region, have increased the demand on the interconnected electric transmission system, leading to transmission system overloads and reducing the reliability and security of the area power system. Western has prepared this Sacramento Area Voltage Support (SVS) Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in compliance with Federal laws, regulations and guidelines, principally the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This Draft EIS evaluates the potential environmental effects of physical improvements to the area's power system. Enhancements are needed to improve system reliability and provide voltage support for the Sacramento area. The results of public scoping meetings, workshops, meetings with agencies, and earlier studies by Western and area utilities helped to develop a range of alternatives for analysis. The Proposed Action involves: (1) Constructing a new double-circuit, 230-kV transmission line paralleling the existing double-circuit, 230-kV line from the O'Banion Substation to the Elverta Substation; (2) Realigning a portion of the existing Cottonwood-Roseville single-circuit, 230-kV transmission line north of Elverta Substation; and (3) Reconductoring the existing double-circuit, 230-kV transmission line from the Elverta Substation to the Tracy Substation. Public Hearings on the Draft EIS will be held between December 9-12, 2002. Comments on this Draft EIS are encouraged and should be sent to Ms. Loreen McMahon (above). Comments must be received by December 30, 2002.

N /A

2003-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Sacramento Area Voltage Support Driaft Supplement Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sacramento Area Voltage Support Draft SEIS/EIR * Western Area Power Administration * Sierra Nevada Region Sacramento Area Voltage Support Draft SEIS/EIR * Western Area Power Administration * Sierra Nevada Region A-1 APPEN DIX A Alternatives Development A.1 INTRODUCTION Appendix A summarizes the process used to identify and screen project alternatives for the joint, draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report (Sacramento Area Voltage Support (SVS) Draft SEIS and EIR). Public involvement was used to develop and refine alternatives. Engineering considerations were the primary factor in eliminating several alternatives. A.2 ALTERNATIVES SELECTED FOR DETAILED ANALYSIS Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), and the City of Roseville (Roseville) identified three transmission line segments between Western's

78

Clean Energy Research Areas | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Climate & Environment Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Research Highlights Facilities and Centers...

79

Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > University Partnerships Academic Alliances > National...

80

Area Guide - National Transportation Research Center (NTRC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Guide Area Guide Recreational & Cultural Opportunities Some Things To Do In and Around the NTRC Area Area Attractions Big South Fork The following links offer general information about parks, cultural events, and recreational opportunities available. All locations listed are within a few hours' drive. Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area of the U.S. National Park Service, located near Oak Ridge. Biltmore Estate- A 250-room historical chateau in located in Asheville, North Carolina (about 3 hours from Oak Ridge); open all year Knoxville, Tennessee Women's Basketball Hall of Fame, Knoxville Star of Knoxville Riverboat Ice Rinks Ice Chalet Icearium Korrnet - Website for area nonprofit organizations Big South Fork Park - Canoeing, fishing, camping, hiking; located near

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

energy density plasmas at the quantum electrodynamic (QED) limit, relativistic thermal plasmas, and relativistic shocks. Warm Dense Matter Specific areas of interest...

82

Environmental regulatory drivers for coal bed methane research and development.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1999, the National Petroleum Council (NPC) stated that the resource base for meeting growing natural gas demands in the United States is adequate. A significant and increasing portion of natural gas production (8% by 2015) is expected to come from coal bed methane (CBM). The NPC cautions that for this to occur, certain factors, including compliance with environmental requirements, must be addressed. Numerous federal, state, and local programs address a variety of environmental issues, including water quality and quantity, air quality, wildlife, noise, and visibility. This paper examines existing and potential environmental regulatory requirements that could affect the timely development and production of CBM resources in the United States. Such an examination can help technology developers and policy makers target areas for research and development (R&D), demonstration, and implementation to help facilitate cost-effective CBM development and production to meet the nation's natural gas demands. It can also help identify R&D areas that will give rule-making bodies the information they need to incorporate more science into the regulatory development process.

Elcock, D.; Gasper, J.; Moses, D. O.

2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Puget Sound area electric reliability plan. Draft environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power & Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound`s power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Available Data -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park Home Habitat Management Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Available Data Some of the documents on this page are in...

86

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects aimed at addressing the technical challenges of producing natural gas from shales and tight sands, while simultaneously reducing environmental footprints and risks,...

87

Environmental-performance research priorities: Wood products. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a research plan to establish environmental, energy, and economic performance measures for renewable building materials, and to identify management and technology alternatives to improve environmental performance in a cost-effective manner. The research plan is designed to: (1) collect environmental and economic data on all life-cycle stages of the materials, (2) ensure that the data follows consistent definitions and collection procedures, and (3) develop analytical procedures for life-cycle analysis to address environmental performance questions. The research will be subdivided into a number of individual project modules. The five processing stages of wood used to organize the research plan are: (1) resource management and harvesting; (2) processing; (3) design and construction of structures; (4) use, maintenance, and disposal; and (5) waste recycling. Individual research module descriptions are provided in the report, as well as assessment techniques, research standards and protocol, and research management. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

NONE

1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Packaging Research and Routing Optimization - Research Area - National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Packaging Research Packaging Research The Packaging Research Facility conducts research for DOE National Nuclear Security Administration, as well as for commercial customers. The facility specializes in testing packaging systems for the transportation of nuclear fuel. Once a package design has been successfully tested, it can then be certified by one of several regulatory authorities, usually DOE, the National Nuclear Security Administration, or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, for use on the road. Welcome EESD Programs EES Directorate ORNL Web Contact Disclaimer Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a national multi-program research and development facility managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy UT-Battelle, LLC U.S. Department of Energy Contact Scott Ludwig

89

Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park -- Research Park...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of a proposed long-term study led by Paul Hanson, Phillip Jardine, Mac Post, Chuck Garten, Pat Mulholland, and Mac Callaham of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental...

90

Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Socioeconomics (DRAFT)  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background information on socioeconomic resources collected during the preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regis. 5925638), withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 57:5433), of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGPEIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This document provides background information on socioeconomic resources in Hawaii County, with particular emphasis on the Puna District (Fig. 1). Information is being made available for use by others in conducting future socioeconomic impact assessments in this area. This report describes existing socioeconomic resources in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. The socioeconomic resources described are primarily those that would be affected by employment and population growth associated with any future large-scale development. These resource categories are (1) population, (2) housing, (3) land use, (4) economic structure (primarily employment and income), (5) infrastructure and public services (education, ground transportation, police and fire protection, water, wastewater, solid waste disposal, electricity, and emergency planning), (6) local government revenues and expenditures, and (7) tourism and recreation.

Saulsbury, J.W.; Sorensen, B.M.; Schexnayder, S.M.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Socioeconomics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background information on socioeconomic resources collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3--4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The USDOE published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This document provides background information on socioeconomic resources in Hawaii County, with particular emphasis on the Puna District. Information is being made available for use by others in conducting future socioeconomic impact assessments in this area. this report describes existing socioeconomic resources in the areas studied and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. The socioeconomic resources described are primarily those that would be affected by employment and population growth associated with any future large-scale development. These resource categories are population, housing, land use, economic structure, infrastructure and public services, local government revenues and expenditures, and tourism and recreation.

Saulsbury, J.W.; Sorensen, B.M.; Reed, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexnayder, S.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Research Areas | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Research Areas Research Areas Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs BES Funding Opportunities The Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network (CMCSN) Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Scientific Highlights Reports and Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page To meet the challenge of supporting basic research programs that are also energy relevant, the Division manages portfolio components that consist of distinct Core Research Activities (CRAs), which align with the Division's organizational .pdf file (51KB) and budget structures. The CRAs are structured as scientific disciplines, rather than as technology

93

Research Areas - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

http://www.msd.anl.gov/research-areas Sun, 12 Jan 2014 01:06:27 +0000 Joomla! 1.6 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Dynamics of Active Self-Assemble Materials http://www.msd.anl.gov/research-areas/dynamics-of-active-self-assemble-materials http://www.msd.anl.gov/research-areas/dynamics-of-active-self-assemble-materials krajniak@anl.gov (Ken Krajniak) Fri, 13 May 2011 17:17:28 +0000 Elastic Relaxation and Correlation of Local Strain Gradients with Ferroelectric Domains in (001) BiFeO3 Nanostructures http://www.msd.anl.gov/research-areas/elastic-relaxation-and-correlation-of-local-strain-gradients-with-ferroelectric-domains-in-001-bifeo3-nanostructures http://www.msd.anl.gov/research-areas/elastic-relaxation-and-correlation-of-local-strain-gradients-with-ferroelectric-domains-in-001-bifeo3-nanostructures

94

Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Abstracts Database...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

is closely aligned with DOE's mission goals and focuses on two main areas: the Nation's Energy Security (developing cost-effective cellulosic biofuels) and the Nation's...

95

Applied Science Division annual report, Environmental Research Program FY 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary concern of the Environmental Research Program is the understanding of pollutant formation, transport, and transformation and the impacts of pollutants on the environment. These impacts include global, regional, and local effects on the atmosphere and hydrosphere, and on certain aspects of human health. This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. During FY 1983, research concentrated on atmospheric physics and chemistry, applied physics and laser spectroscopy, combustion theory and phenomena, environmental effects of oil shale processing, freshwater ecology and acid precipitation, trace element analysis for the investigation of present and historical environmental impacts, and a continuing survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring.

Cairns, E.J.; Novakov, T.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE AARHUS UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROjECTION Of GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS 2009 TO 2030 #12;[Blank page] #12;AU Projection of Greenhouse title and no.: NERI Technical Report no. 792 Title: Projection of Greenhouse Gas Emissions 2009 to 2030., Hjelgaard, K. & Fauser, P., 2010: Projection of Greenhouse Gas Emissions 2009 to 2030 National Environmental

97

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Environmental Research Division technical progress report: January 1986--October 1987  

SciTech Connect

Technical process in the various research activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1986-1987. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Organic Geochemistry and Environmental Instrumentation Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter. Individual projects under each division are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Environmental Research Division technical progress report, January 1984-December 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical progress in the various research and assessment activities of Argonne National Laboratory's Environmental Research Division is reported for the period 1984 to 1985. Textual, graphic, and tabular information is used to briefly summarize (in separate chapters) the work of the Division's Atmospheric Physics, Environmental Effects Research, Environmental Impacts, Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry, and Waste Management Programs. Information on professional qualifications, awards, and outstanding professional activities of staff members, as well as lists of publications, oral presentations, special events organized, and participants in educational programs, are provided in appendices at the end of each chapter.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

Freshley, Mark D.

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Research at the Institute for Environmental Science & Policy - University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research at the Institute for Environmental Science & Policy - University Research at the Institute for Environmental Science & Policy - University of Illinois at Chicago August 8, 2013 Speakers: Thomas L. Theis Director, Institute for Environmental Science & Policy (IESP) University of Illinois at Chicago David H. Wise Associate Director, IESP University of Illinois at Chicago Date: Thursday, August 8, 2013 Time: 2:00-3:00 pm Location: Argonne National Laboratory TCS Building 240 Room 1404/1405 The Institute for Environmental Science and Policy (IESP) at the University of Illinois at Chicago was created in 1999 to catalyze interdisciplinary research addressing the increasingly complex environmental problems of the 21st century. IESP envisions an academy in which the constraints and limitations imposed by disciplinary perspectives are eased, while their

103

Environmental research needs for geothermal resources development. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed analysis was conducted to determine the adequacy of the total research efforts regarding the potential environmental impacts related to the exploration, drilling, production, and transmission stages of vapor-dominated, liquid-dominated, geopressured, and hot-dry-rock geothermal resources. The following environmental considerations were selected and analyzed in detail: air emissions (hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, mercury, boron, radon, etc.); liquid emissions (brine, and toxic chemicals); land subsidence; seismic activity; and noise. Following the definition of the problem and the assessment of the past and ongoing research efforts, environmental research needs were then recommended based on: (1) the severity of the environmental problems as perceived by literature and contacts with the research community; (2) probability of occurrence; (3) and the research dependency for a solution to that particular problem. The recommended research needs consisted of: (1) an evaluation of the past and ongoing research efforts to ascertain gaps in knowledge for a particular pollutant, process, or control technology; (2) baseline studies of air, soil, water, and ecology around the existing geothermal facilities and in the locations scheduled for future geothermal development; (3) need for the development of appropriate models for predicting concentration and dispersion of pollutants; (4) development of predictive models for potential health and environmental effects associated with geothermal operations; and (5) development of appropriate control technology to destroy, remove or reduce harmful emissions in order to prevent the occurrence of environmental and health hazards and to comply with existing standards and criteria.

Carstea, D.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

competition of the National Ocean Sciences Bowl and is closely interacting with NOAA and CU public affairsThe Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) Annual Report on NOAA Dynamics Cryospheric and Polar Processes Environmental Chemistry and Biology Solid Earth Sciences The five

Colorado at Boulder, University of

105

NETL Publications - Journal of Energy and Environmental Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2002 Full Issue PDF-19MB PDF Linked Version PDF-411KB (See NOTE Below) Journal of Energy and Environmental Research - Vol. 2 No. 1 IN THIS ISSUE: Journal Papers, Geologic...

106

Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Homepage |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BERAC Home BERAC Home Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (40KB) BER Committees of Visitors BER Home Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) provides advice on a continuing basis to the Director of the Office of Science, Department of Energy, on the many complex scientific and technical issues that arise in the development and implementation of the biological and environmental research program. The Designated Federal Officer is Dr. David Thomassen of the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Last modified: 8/14/2013 4:31:35 PM Share Page Share with Facebook Facebook External link Share with Twitter Twitter External link

107

Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ABBREVIATION DESCRIPTION ABBREVIATION DESCRIPTION AAVP ARM Aerial Vehicles Program ACP Atmospheric Chemistry Program ACP - CE ACP - Capital Equipment AmeriFlux AmeriFlux ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) ARM - CE ARM - Capital Equipment ARM – Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility ARM – Facility- CCRI Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (Climate Change Research Initiative) ARM - Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Science Program ARM-CCRI ARM-CCRI ARM-Infrastr Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Infrastructure Artificial Retina ASP Atmospheric Science Program

108

Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and Environmental Management Science Program research award abstracts. Volume 2 of 3 -- Appendix B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation`s nuclear complex. Appendix B provides details about each of the 202 research awards funded by the EMSP. This information may prove useful to researchers who are attempting to address the Department`s environmental management challenges in their work, program managers who are planning, integrating, and prioritizing Environmental Management projects, and stakeholders and regulators who are interested in the Department`s environmental challenges. The research award information is organized by the state and institution in which the lead principal investigator is located. In many cases, the lead principal investigator is one of several investigators at a number of different institutions. In these cases, the lead investigator (major collaborator) at each of the additional institutions is listed. Each research award abstract is followed by a list of high cost projects that can potentially be impacted by the research results. High cost projects are Environmental Management projects that have total costs greater than $50 million from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and have costs or quantities of material associated with an Environmental Management problem area. High cost projects which must remain active in the year 2007 and beyond to manage high risk are also identified. Descriptions of these potentially related high cost Environmental Management projects can be found in Appendix C. Additional projects in the same problem area as a research award can be located using the Index of High Cost Environmental Management Projects by Problem Area, at the end of Appendices B and C.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Documents Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Documents Feasibility Study (PDF) Proposed Remedial Action Plan (PDF) Record of Decision (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the BGRR Pile (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the Bioshield (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the BGRR Cap (PDF) Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Explanation of Significant Differences (PDF) (4/12) NYSDEC Approval Letter for BGRR ESD (PDF) (5/12) USEPA Approval Letter for BGRR ESD (PDF) (6/12) DOE BGRR ESD Transmittal Letter (PDF) (7/12) Remedial Design Implementation Report (PDF) (12/11) Completion Reports Removal of the Above-Ground Ducts and Preparation of the Instrument House (708) for Removal (PDF) - April 2002 Below-Ground Duct Outlet Air Coolers, Filters and Primary Liner Removal (PDF) - April 2005 Canal and Deep Soil Pockets Excavation and Removal (PDF) - August

110

Technologies development for environmental restoration and waste management: International university and research institution and industry partnerships  

SciTech Connect

The Institute for Central and Eastern European Cooperative Environmental Research (ICEECER) at Florida State University was formed in 1990 soon after the end of the Cold War. ICEECER consists of a number of joint centers which link FSU, and US as well as international funding agencies, to academic and research institutions in Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, Russia, and the other countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Newly Independent States. Areas of interest include risk assessment, toxicology, contaminated site remediation/characterization, waste management, emergency response, environmental technology development/demonstration/transfer, and some specialized areas of research (e.g., advanced chemical separations). Through ICEECER, numerous international conferences, symposia, training courses, and workshops have also been conducted on a variety of environmental topics. This paper summarizes the mission, structure, and administration of ICEECER and provides information on the projects conducted through this program at FSU.

Herndon, R.C.; Moerlins, J.E.; Kuperberg, J.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

ENVIRONMENTAL IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1975 Nonitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. AT(26-1)-539 for the U . S . ENERGY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION EMSL-LV-5 39-4 May 1976 ENVIRONMENTAL 14ONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December I975 Monitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of

112

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, Oklahoma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. EPA's Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, Oklahoma, has reduced its annual energy consumption by 45% by upgrading its building mechanical system and incorporating renewable energy.

Farrar-Nagy, S.; Voss, P.; Van Geet, O.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Was the BGRR Decommissioned? Why Was the BGRR Decommissioned? BGRR The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was decommissioned to ensure the complex is in a safe and stable condition and to reduce sources of groundwater contamination. The BGRR contained over 8,000 Curies of radioactive contaminants from past operations consisting of primarily nuclear activation products such as hydrogen-3 (tritium) and carbon-14 and fission products cesium-137 and strontium-90. The nature and extent of contamination varied by location depending on historic uses of the systems and components and releases, however, the majority of the contamination (over 99 percent) was bound within the graphite pile and biological shield. Radioactive contamination was identified in the fuel handling system deep

114

EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

which evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a project proposed by Rockwood Lithium Inc (Rockwood), formerly doing business as Chemetall Foote Corporation. Rockwood has...

115

Geothermal heating for the Arizona Environmental Research Laboratory greenhouses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the technical and economic feasibility of installing a retrofit geothermal heating system is analyzed for the Environmental Research Laboratory Farms greenhouse facility located in Tucson, Arizona. The facility consists of 10.6 acres of greenhouse area, of which 7.4 acres are currently operational. Natural gas or diesel fuel are presently used for heating. The maximum heating load is estimated to be 28,620,000 Btu/hr. Average annual heating energy consumption between 1974 and 1979 was 35,684 million But/year for 7.4 acres of greenhouse, costing an estimated $96,703 at 1981 natural gas prices. Two 2500 foot geothermal production wells are required, each capable of producing 1500 gpm of 130{sup 0}F water. The geothermal water is expected to contain 500 ppM total dissolved solids. Total estimated capital cost for installing the system is $902,946. The expected first year geothermal energy cost savigs are estimated to be $58,920. A simple payback of 9.1 years is calculated and the project has a net present value of $961,751. Geothermal heat could be supplied at a cost of $5.39 per million Btu in the first year of operation. The project as herein presented is marginally economic. However, it became clear after the study that an attractive economic case could be made for providing about 50 to 60 percent of the required heating load as a base load using geothermal energy.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hamilton, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Search Term(s) Search Term(s) (supports AND and OR operators and phrase in "double quotes") Register Number Title Abstract Principal Investigator PI Lookup Institution Institution Lookup City Adelaide SA 5001 Aiken Albany Albuquerque Alcoa Center Alexandria Ames Amherst Anchorage Ann Arbor Ardmore Argonne Arlington Asheville Athens Atlanta Auburn Auburn University Augusta Aurora Austin Bailrigg, Lancaster UK, LA1 4Y Baltimore Bar Harbor Batavia Baton Rouge Beaufort Beaverton Belleville Bellevue Bellingham Beltsville Berkeley Bern Bethesda Billerica Bilthoven Binghamton Birmingham Blacksburg Bloomington Boise Boston Bothell Boulder Bozeman Bronx Bronxville Brooklyn Buffalo Burlington Calverton Cambridge Cambridge CB1 4RN Canal Point Carbondale Champaign Chapel Hill Charleston Charlottesville Chestnut Hill Chicago Chico Cincinnati Claremont Clayton Clemson Cleveland Clifton Park Colchester Cold Spring Harbor College Park College Station Colorado Springs Columbia Columbus Concord Cookeville Copenhagen Coral Gables Corvallis Dallas Danville Davis Dayton DeBilt DeKalb Delft Denton Denver Des Plaines Detroit Docklands, Victoria Downsview Duarte Durham East Lansing El Paso Esch-sur-Alzette Essen Eugene Evanston Fairbanks Fairfax Falmouth Flagstaff Fort Collins Gainesville Gaithersburg Galveston Germantown Gloucester Point Golden Grand Forks Grand Junction Great Falls Greenbelt Greenville Guelph Halifax Hamburg Hamilton, Ontario Hampton Hanover Hattiesburg Helsinki Hershey Honolulu Houghton Houston Hunt Valley Huntsville Hyde Park Idaho Falls Indianapolis Iowa City Irvine Ithaca Jerusalem Kalamazoo Kansas City Kennewick Kent Keystone Kingston Kingsville Klamath Falls Knoxville LS2 9JT La Jolla La Jolla, Lafayette Lake Placid Lakewood Lanham Laramie Las Cruces Las Vegas Lausanne Lawrence Lawrenceville Leawood Lethbridge Lewes Lexington Lincoln Little Rock Livermore Loma Linda London London NW1 2BE Los Alamos Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Lutherville Lyngby Madison Manchester Manhattan Mayaguez McLean Medford Melbourne Memphis Menands Menlo Park Merced Mercer Island Miami Middlesex Middletown Millbrook Milwaukee Minneapolis Mississippi State Missoula Moab Mobile Modena Moffett Field Monash, Australia Monterey Montreal Montreal (Quebec) Morgantown Moscow Moss Landing Mountain View Nashua Nashville New Brunswick New Haven New Orleans New York Newark Newport News Newtown Square Norfolk Norman North Dartmouth Norwich Notre Dame Oak Brook Oak Ridge Oakdale Oakland Oklahoma City Old Westbury Omaha Ontario Ontario K1N 6N5 Orlando Orono Ottawa Oxford Oxon Palisades Palo Alto Pasadena Pasco Peoria Philadelphia Phoenix Piscataway Pittsburgh Placitas Plymouth Portland Potsdam Princeton Providence Pullman Radnor Raleigh Rapid City Reading Redmond Reno Rensselaer Research Triangle Pk Reston Richland Richmond Riverside Roanoke Rochester Rockville Rohnert Park Rome Royal Oak Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Fransisco San Jose San Marcos Santa Barbara Santa Cruz Santa Fe Santa Monica Santiago Savannah Scranton Seattle Sequims Sharon Hill Shreveport Silver Spring Silverthorne Sioux Falls Socorro Sonoma St. Louis St. Paul St. Petersburg Stanford State College Stennis Space Center Stennis Space Ctr. Stillwater Stockholm Stockton Stony Brook Storrs Storrs Mansfield Stowe Syracuse Tallahassee Tampa Tempe Thousand Oaks Toledo Toronto Toronto, ON Troy Tucson Tulsa Tuscaloosa Tuskegee Ulm University University Park Upton Urbana Victoria Walpole Waltham Washington Watkinsville West Kingston West Lafayette Westhampton Beach Wheeling Winston-Salem Woodland Park Woods Hole Worcester Yorktown Heights

118

Storminess and Environmental Changes in the Mediterranean Central Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earth ecosystems are not static, and they respond to environmental changes, particularly climatic and anthropogenic. Precipitation varying in its extremeness, with shifts to greater or lesser intensity of individual storms and/or to change in the ...

Nazzareno Diodato; Gianni Bellocchi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Research Specialist/Laboratory Manager Stable Isotope Laboratory for Earth and Environmental Science Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Specialist/Laboratory Manager Stable Isotope Laboratory for Earth and Environmental Science Research Department of Geology & Planetary Science, University of Pittsburgh We invite applications for a full-time Research Specialist/Laboratory Manager position for the Stable Isotope Laboratory

Sibille, Etienne

120

Environmental Research Institute Tokyo ERIT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Research Institute Tokyo ERIT Research Institute Tokyo ERIT Jump to: navigation, search Name Environmental Research Institute Tokyo (ERIT) Place Tokyo, Japan Product Japanese research institute analysing the country's energy and environmental policy. Coordinates 35.670479°, 139.740921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.670479,"lon":139.740921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Cultural environment and aesthetic resources  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on the cultural environment and aesthetic resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The cultural environment in the Geothermal Resource Zone (GRZ) and associated study area consists of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious practices and both Native Hawaiian and non-Native Hawaiian cultural resources. This report consists of three sections: (1) a description of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious rights, practices, and values; (2) a description of historic, prehistoric, and traditional Native Hawaiian sites; and (3) a description of other (non-native) sites that could be affected by development in the study area. Within each section, the level of descriptive detail varies according to the information currently available. The description of the cultural environment is most specific in its coverage of the Geothermal Resource Subzones in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii and the study area of South Maui. Ethnographic and archaeological reports by Cultural Advocacy Network Developing Options and International Archaeological Research Institute, Inc., respectively, supplement the descriptions of these two areas with new information collected specifically for this study. Less detailed descriptions of additional study areas on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and the island of Hawaii are based on existing archaeological surveys.

Trettin, L.D. [Univ. of Tennessee (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee (United States); Petrich, C.H.; Saulsbury, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Oil shale: potential environmental impacts and control technology. Environmental research brief  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory in Cincinnati, Ohio (IERL-Ci) has performed research related to oil shale processing and disposal since 1973. This research is in support of the Clean Air Act, The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, and the Toxic Substances Control Act. Potential environmental impacts from oil shale development activities have been identified and potential control technologies are being evaluated through a combination of laboratory and field tests on actual oil shale waste streams. This paper discusses recent results from this program. Included are field test results on control of sulfur gases at Occidental Oil Shale's Logan Wash Site and Geokinetic's Kamp Kerogen Site, wastewater treatability studies on retort water and gas condensate at Logan Wash, and results of laboratory and field testing on raw and retorted oil shales.

Bates, E.R.; Liberick, W.W.; Burckle, J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

Langland, R. T.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Health and environmental effects of synthetic fuel technologies: research priorities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an assessment of the health and environmental effects research priorities related to coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale development. It reflects the subjective judgements of well chosen research scientists in relevant disciplines. These scientists reviewed the results of workshops conducted in 1978 on coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale (see PB-296 708, PB-297 096, and PB-297 618), background information on related Federal research, and comments by relevant Federal agencies. The scientists prepared a listing of current research needs according to major areas of concern. These were categorized as to generic, region-specific, or process specific research. For the latter category, various scales of development were addressed for two exemplary processes: SRC (solvent refined coal) II and above ground oil shale retorting. Subjective judgements were used to prioritize the research tasks and assess the adequacy of current research.

Brown, R.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site`s total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside.

Davis, C.E.; Janecek, L.L.

1997-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Castle Creek known geothermal resource area: an environmental analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Castle Creek known geothermal resource area (KGRA) is part of the large Bruneau-Grand View thermal anomaly in southwestern Idaho. The KGRA is located in the driest area of Idaho and annual precipitation averages 230 mm. The potential of subsidence and slope failure is high in sediments of the Glenns Ferry Formation and Idaho Group found in the KGRA. A major concern is the potential impact of geothermal development on the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area which overlaps the KGRA. Any significant economic growth in Owyhee County may strain the ability of the limited health facilities in the county. The Idaho Archaeological survey has located 46 archaeological sites within the KGRA.

Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F. (eds.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

PIER Demand Response Research Center SCOPING STUDY ROUNDTABLE RESEARCH TARGET AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, there are two fundamental problems with existing rate and incentive options that this research areas intends. Development of new, innovative and more equitable rate and incentive designs. There are fundamental conceptual Report Handbook of rate design options. #12;PIER Demand Response Research Center SCOPING STUDY ROUNDTABLE

130

Vulcan Hot Springs known geothermal resource area: an environmental analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Vulcan Hot Springs known geothermal resource area (KGRA) is one of the more remote KGRAs in Idaho. The chemistry of Vulcan Hot Springs indicates a subsurface resource temperature of 147/sup 0/C, which may be high enough for power generation. An analysis of the limited data available on climate, meteorology, and air quality indicates few geothermal development concerns in these areas. The KGRA is located on the edge of the Idaho Batholith on a north-trending lineament which may be a factor in the presence of the hot springs. An occasional earthquake of magnitude 7 or greater may be expected in the region. Subsidence or elevation as a result of geothermal development in the KGRA do not appear to be of concern. Fragile granitic soils on steep slopes in the KGRA are unstable and may restrict development. The South fork of the Salmon River, the primary stream in the region, is an important salmon spawning grounds. Stolle Meadows, on the edge of the KGRA, is used as a wintering and calving area for elk, and access to the area is limited during this period. Socioeconomic and demographic surveys indicate that facilities and services will probably not be significantly impacted by development. Known heritage resources in the KGRA include two sites and the potential for additional cultural sites is significant.

Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F. (eds.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Environmental assessment for operations, upgrades, and modifications in SNL/NM Technical Area IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed action for this EA for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area IV, includes continuing existing operations, modification of an existing accelerator (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II) to support defnese-related Z-pinch experiments, and construction of two transformer oil storage tanks to support the expansion of the Advanced Pulsed Power Research Module, a single pulse accelerator. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE believes that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA and CEQ NEPA implementing regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and a Finding of No Significant Impact is issued.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Bruneau Known Geothermal Resource Area: an environmental analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bruneau Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) is part of the Bruneau-Grandview thermal anomaly, the largest geothermal area in the western US. This part of Owyhee County is the driest part of Idaho. The KGRA is associated with the southern boundary fault zone of the Snake River Plain. Thermal water, produced from numerous artesian wells in the region, is supplied from two major aquifers. Ecological concerns include the threatened Astragalus mulfordiae and the numerous birds of prey nesting in the Snake River canyon northwest of the KGRA. Extensive geothermal development may strain the limited health care facilities in the county. Ethnographic information suggests that there is a high probability of prehistoric cultural materials being remnant in the Hot Spring locality.

Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F. (eds.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Crane Creek known geothermal resource area: an environmental analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Crane Creek known geothermal resource area (KGRA) is located in Washington County, in southwestern Idaho. Estimated hydrothermal resource temperatures for the region are 166/sup 0/C (Na-K-Ca) and 176/sup 0/C (quartz). The KGRA is situated along the west side of the north-south trending western Idaho Fault Zone. Historic seismicity data for the region identify earthquake activity within 50 km. The hot springs surface along the margin of a siliceous sinter terrace or in adjacent sediments. Approximately 75% of the KGRA is underlain by shallow, stony soils on steep slopes indicating topographic and drainage limitations to geothermal development. Species of concern include sage grouse, antelope, and mule deer. There is a high probability of finding significant prehistoric cultural resources within the proposed area of development.

Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F. (eds.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect

A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, and during certain conditions, there is more demand for power in the Puget Sound area than the transmission system and existing generation can reliably supply. This high demand, called peak demand occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Environmental Restoration Functional Area Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Restoration Functional Area Qualification Restoration Functional Area Qualification Job Task Analysis CONDUCTING THE JOB / TASK ANALYSIS Identify and evaluate tasks - Develop a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job. o A great starting point is the list of Duties and Responsibilities from the FAQS. o Give careful thought to additional tasks that could be considered. o Don't worry about deleting tasks at this point - that is a part of the process further down. - List the tasks (and their sources, e.g., Duties and Responsibilities #1) in the chart below. - Discuss each task as a group and come to a consensus pertaining to Importance and Frequency of the task (i.e., each team member can consent to the assigned value, even if they don't exactly agree with it). - When all values have been assigned, consider as a group deleting tasks

136

A Small-Area Study of Environmental Risk Assessment of Outdoor Falls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Falls in public places are an issue of great health concern especially for the elderly. Falls among the elderly is also a major health burden in many countries. This study describes a spatial approach to assess environmental causes of outdoor falls using ... Keywords: Environmental risk assessment, GIS, Outdoor falls, Small-area study, Spatial clustering

Poh-Chin Lai; Wing-Cheung Wong; Chien-Tat Low; Martin Wong; Ming-Houng Chan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Environmental Survey Report for ORNL: Small Mammal Abundance and Distribution Survey Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park 2009 - 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a 1-year small mammal biodiversity survey conducted on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The task was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division, interns in the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Higher Education Research Experiences Program, and ORNL Environmental Protection Services staff. Eight sites were surveyed reservation wide. The survey was conducted in an effort to determine species abundance and diversity of small mammal populations throughout the reservation and to continue the historical inventory of small mammal presence for biodiversity records. This data collection effort was in support of the approved Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, a major goal of which is to maintain and enhance wildlife biodiversity on the Reservation. Three of the sites (Poplar Creek, McNew Hollow, and Deer Check Station Field) were previously surveyed during a major natural resources inventory conducted in 1996. Five new sites were included in this study: Bearden Creek, Rainy Knob (Natural Area 21), Gum Hollow, White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. The 2009-2010 small mammal surveys were conducted from June 2009 to July 2010 on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The survey had two main goals: (1) to determine species abundance and diversity and (2) to update historical records on the OR Research Park. The park is located on the Department of Energy-owned Oak Ridge Reservation, which encompasses 13,580 ha. The primary focus of the study was riparian zones. In addition to small mammal sampling, vegetation and coarse woody debris samples were taken at certain sites to determine any correlations between habitat and species presence. During the survey all specimens were captured and released using live trapping techniques including Sherman and pitfall traps. In total 227 small mammals representing nine species were captured during the course of the study. The most common species found in the study was the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus). The least common species found were the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius), woodland vole (Microtus pinetorum), and northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda).

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Reasor, R. Scott [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Campbell, Claire L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Preliminary environmental assessment of selected geopressured - geothermal prospect areas: Louisiana Gulf Coast Region. Volume II. Environmental baseline data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A separate section is presented for each of the six prospect areas studied. Each section includes a compilation and discussion of environmental baseline data derived from existing sources. The data are arranged as follows: geology and geohydrology, air quality, water resources and flood hazards, ecological systems, and land use. When data specific to the prospect were not available, regional data are reported. (MHR)

Newchurch, E.J.; Bachman, A.L.; Bryan, C.F.; Harrison, D.P.; Muller, R.A.; Newman, J.P. Jr.; Smith, C.G. Jr.; Bailey, J.I. Jr.; Kelly, G.G.; Reibert, K.C.

1978-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Mountain home known geothermal resource area: an environmental analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Mountain Home KGRA encompasses an area of 3853 hectares (ha) at the foot of the Mount Bennett Hills in Elmore County, Idaho. The site is associated with an arid climate and high winds that generate an acute dust problem. The KGRA lies adjacent to the northwest-southeast trending fault zone that reflects the northern boundary of the western Snake River Plain graben. Data indicate that a careful analysis of the subsidence potential is needed prior to extensive geothermal development. Surface water resources are confined to several small creeks. Lands are utilized for irrigated farmlands and rangeland for livestock. There are no apparent soil limitations to geothermal development. Sage grouse and mule deer are the major species of concern. The potential of locating significant heritage resources other than the Oregon Trail or the bathhouse debris appears to be relatively slight.

Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F. (eds.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Vital Legacy - Biological and Environmental Research in the Atomic Age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Research in the Atomic Age S e p t e m b e rEnvironmental Research in the Atomic Age September T o thesense that ours would be the Atomic Age. By the time of the

Vaughan editor, Douglas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Waste Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC), National Environmental Design. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The 4th Annual Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) for National Environmental Design was held on April 10--14 in Las Cruces, New Mexico. The purpose of the WERC is to train students in the area of site remediation and restoration. Consistent with the Cooperative Agreement`s 3rd Task, the ultimate goal of WERC is to provide training for potential engineers and scientists for the DOE`s remediation and restoration efforts. WERC is sponsored by the Department of Energy and is housed at New Mexico State University. Two student groups from West Virginia University`s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering traveled to New Mexico. Group 1 was composed of graduate students and Group 2 was composed of undergraduate students. Students who participated in this program were exposed to all aspects of the solution of a real life environmental problem.

Reed, B.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Comprehensive baseline environmental audit of former underground test areas in Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of Former Underground Test Areas (FUTAS) in the States of Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico. DOE and contractor systems for management of environmental protection activities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were not within the scope of the audit. The audit was conducted May 16-May 26, 1994, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program{close_quotes}, establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is to enhance environmental protection and minimize risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission using systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE`s environmental programs within line organizations and supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. These evaluations function as a vehicle through which the Secretary and program managers are apprised of the status and vulnerabilities of Departmental environmental activities and environmental management systems. Several types of evaluations are conducted, including: (1) comprehensive baseline environmental audits; (2) routine environmental audits; (3) environmental management assessments; and (4) special issue reviews.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Clear Skies S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. A. Clough S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 The objective of this research effort is to develop radiative transfer models that are consistent with Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program spectral radiance measurements for clear and cloudy atmospheres. Our approach is to develop the model physics and related databases with a line-by-line model in the context of available spectral radiance measurements. The line-by- line mode! then functions as an intermediate standard to both develop and validate rapid radiative transfer models appropriate to GCM applications. consistent with downlooking data taken with the high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) (Smith et al. 1983) from 20 km and with simultaneous data taken

144

FUNDAMENTAL FLUIDIZATION RESEARCH PROJECT DOE/E~0575 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FUNDAMENTAL FLUIDIZATION RESEARCH PROJECT FUNDAMENTAL FLUIDIZATION RESEARCH PROJECT DOE/E~0575 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT JANUARY 1994 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 q e!" .t= I \, F= ··-0 Nov 1 5 19911a n V \) r I Iv,ASTER tJ :DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNL~ITe:> Jf DISCLAIMER This report was .. prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

145

Research Areas - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanostructured Thin Films Nanostructured Thin Films Theme: The Nanostructured Thin Films program is focused on the synthesis, characterization, and modeling of dimensionally constrained materials systems in which a nano-scale trait of the material (e.g. grain size, film thickness, interfacial boundary, etc.) fundamentally determines its structure-property relationships. The work performed in this program falls primarily into two areas: (1) studies of thin-film growth phenomena and film properties, with emphasis on diamond and multicomponent oxides; and (2) first principles quantum-mechanical calculations that model thin film growth processes and electronic structure. Frequently, the experimental and theoretical efforts are coordinated on common scientific issues in a particular material system. Current research is devoted to (a) growth

146

Research Areas - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry http://www.msd.anl.gov 2014-01-12T01:07:26+00:00 Joomla! Chemistry http://www.msd.anl.gov 2014-01-12T01:07:26+00:00 Joomla! 1.6 - Open Source Content Management Nanostructured Thin Films 2011-03-24T15:53:27+00:00 2011-03-24T15:53:27+00:00 http://www.msd.anl.gov/research-areas/nanostructured-thin-films Lacey Bersano lbersano@anl.gov Nanostructured Thin Films Staff Principal Investigator John A. Carlisle Larry A. Curtiss Dieter M. Gruen Postdoc Paola Bruno Chao Liu Nevin Naguib Bing Shi Michael Sternberg Jian

147

Research Areas - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

http://www.msd.anl.gov http://www.msd.anl.gov 2014-01-12T01:06:27+00:00 Joomla! 1.6 - Open Source Content Management Dynamics of Active Self-Assemble Materials 2011-05-13T17:17:28+00:00 2011-05-13T17:17:28+00:00 http://www.msd.anl.gov/research-areas/dynamics-of-active-self-assemble-materials Ken Krajniak krajniak@anl.gov Self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex architectures is a unique opportunity for materials science. In-depth understanding of self-assembly paves the way for design of tailored smart materials for emerging energy technologies. However, self-assembled materials pose a formidable challenge: they are intrinsically complex, with an often hierarchical organization occurring on many nested length and time scales. This program

148

Plutonium Focus Area research and development plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) committed to a research and development program to support the technology needs for converting and stabilizing its nuclear materials for safe storage. The R and D Plan addresses five of the six material categories from the 94-1 Implementation Plan: plutonium (Pu) solutions, plutonium metals and oxides, plutonium residues, highly enriched uranium, and special isotopes. R and D efforts related to spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stabilization were specifically excluded from this plan. This updated plan has narrowed the focus to more effectively target specific problem areas by incorporating results form trade studies. Specifically, the trade studies involved salt; ash; sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C); combustibles; and scrub alloy. The plan anticipates possible disposition paths for nuclear materials and identifies resulting research requirements. These requirements may change as disposition paths become more certain. Thus, this plan represents a snapshot of the current progress and will continue to be updated on a regular basis. The paper discusses progress in safeguards and security, plutonium stabilization, special isotopes stabilization, highly-enriched uranium stabilization--MSRE remediation project, storage technologies, engineered systems, core technology, and proposed DOE/Russian technology exchange projects.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The framework and tools for the Western Area Power Administration`s Environmental Risk Management Program  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is working with various government agencies to develop and implement environmental risk management programs. One such program is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Western Area Power Administration (Western). In this paper, we describe the risk framework and assessment tools being developed by Western and PNL to help Western`s management staff make effective and defensible decisions on issues that involve environmental risk.

Di Massa, F.V.; Glantz, C.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Roybal, A.L. [Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW IN BRAZIL- ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL LICENSING OF WIND POWER PLANTS IN PERMANENT PRESERVATION AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brazilian electric energy matrix is mostly renewable. According to the Generation Information Base (BIG) of the Brazilian Electricity Regulatory Agency (ANEEL), hydroelectricity is responsible for 67.31 % of the country's energy. The additional generation comes mostly from fossil fuels, which’s use is questioned when it comes to environmental quality and climate change. Despite its abundance, hydroelectric power generation has physical, socioeconomic and environmental limitations. Thus, it is essential to develop alternative technologies, providing security in the supply of electric energy and the maintenance of a clean matrix. Among the alternative technologies available, wind power is the one that has been gaining prominence, domestically and internationally speaking. In the last auction of renewable sources held in August 2010 in Brazil, the energy produced by the plants of sugarcane bagasse (biomass) was traded at an average of R $ 144.20 MWh; wind energy, which was the cheapest, was traded at R $ 130.86, and the energy from small hydropower plants (PCH), at R $ 141.93 MWh. The wind power plants accounted for 70 % of the auction, which resulted in a plan for increasing its installed capacity by fivefold, by the year 2013. Brazil has great potential to be explored (estimated 143,000 MW), yet despite being appealing, wind energy still

Cristiano Abijaode Amaral; Adriana Coli Pedreira

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scope of the audit at the ITRI was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; soils, sediments, and biota; surface water/drinking water; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; quality assurance; radiation; inactive waste sites; environmental management; and environmental monitoring programs. Specifically assessed was the compliance of ITRI operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; internal operating standards; and best management practices. Onsite activities included inspection of ITRI facilities and operations; review of site documents; interviews with DOE and contractor personnel, as well as representatives from state regulatory agencies; and reviews of previous appraisals. Using these sources of information, the environmental audit team developed findings, which fell into two general categories: compliance findings and best management practice findings. Each finding also identifies apparent causal factor(s) that contributed to the finding and will assist line management in developing ``root causes`` for implementing corrective actions.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Kansas Energy 2000. [Inventory of Energy Related Assets. Research Area Summary  

SciTech Connect

The Inventory of Energy Related Assets: Research Area Summary is a compilation of resume-type information on energy researchers in the state of Kansas. Researchers are placed in one of four categories: Fossil Energy Research, Alternative Energy Sources, Electric Power Generation and Usage, and Other Energy Research. Each research biography includes a synopsis of recent research, sources of support, and areas of research emphasis.

Legg, J.; Nellis, D.; Simons, G.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Environmental Assessment for the Replacement Source of Steam for A Area at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 OCTOBER 2006 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE REPLACEMENT SOURCE OF STEAM FOR A AREA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1568 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE REPLACEMENT SOURCE OF STEAM FOR A AREA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE OCTOBER 2006 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................1 1.1 Background ..............................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Proposed Action.....................................................1 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES

154

DOE/EA-0965 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT CANCER RESEARCH CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65 65 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT CANCER RESEARCH CENTER INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE PREPARED BY U.S. DEPARTMENT O F ENERGY, CHICAGO FIELD OFFICE PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT D I V I S I O N AUGUST 1994 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product. process, or service by trade name, trademark,

155

Health and environmental effects of synthetic fuel technologies: research priorities. Report to the Federal Interagency Committee on the health and environmental effects of energy technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an assessment of the health and environmental effects research priorities related to coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale development. It reflects the subjective judgments of well chosen research scientists in relevant disciplines. These scientists reviewed the results of workshops conducted in 1978 on coal gasification and liquefaction and oil shale, background information on related federal research, and comments by relevant federal agencies. The scientists prepared a listing of current research needs according to major areas of concern. These were categorized as to generic, region-specific, or process specific research. For the latter category, various scales of development were addressed for two exemplary processes: SRC (solvent refined coal) II and above ground oil shale retorting. Subjective judgments were used to prioritize the research tasks and assess the adequacy of current research.

Brown, R.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BER Home BER Home Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » BER Accomplishments BSSD / CESD Timeline Take an interactive look at a century of scientific accomplishments in BER's Climate and Environmental Sciences / Biological Systems Science DivisionsRead More BER Interactive Accomplishments Timeline Understanding Complex Biological and Environmental Systems

157

Habitat Management -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Habitat Management Some of the documents on this page are in Portable Document Format (PDF) and can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is covered with mostly contiguous native eastern deciduous hardwood forest. Within that framework are found many ecological communities (e.g., cedar barrens, river bluffs, wetlands) with unique biota, often including rare species. Many research park habitats are managed to protect their ecosystem values, furnish food and shelter for wildlife, and provide sites for research and monitoring. Habitats that receive special attention include prairies, forests, and wetlands and riparian areas.

158

Is Europe Evolving Toward an Integrated Research Area?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integrated European Research Area (ERA) is a critical component for a more competitive and open European R&D system. However, the impact of EU-specific integration policies aimed at overcoming innovation barriers associated with national borders is not well understood. Here we analyze 2.4 x 10^6 patent applications filed with the European Patent Office (EPO) over the 25-year period 1986-2010 along with a sample of 2.6 x 10^5 records from the ISI Web of Science to quantitatively measure the role of borders in international R&D collaboration and mobility. From these data we construct five different networks for each year analyzed: (i) the patent co-inventor network, (ii) the publication co-author network, (iii) the co-applicant patent network, (iv) the patent citation network, and (v) the patent mobility network. We use methods from network science and econometrics to perform a comparative analysis across time and between EU and non-EU countries to determine the "treatment effect" resulting from EU i...

Chessa, Alessandro; Pammolli, Fabio; Penner, Orion; Petersen, Alexander M; Riccaboni, Massimo; 10.1126/science.1227970

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

EA-1081: Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center Facility, Carlsbad, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to continue U.S. Department of Energy funding of the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center in the Waste Isolation Pilot...

160

Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D. [comps.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01eis0150_cov.html[6/24/2011 2:58:48 PM] 01eis0150_cov.html[6/24/2011 2:58:48 PM] COVER SHEET Title: Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0150 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Reclamation Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy Written comments on this environmental impact statement (EIS) should be addressed to: For general information on the U.S. Department of Energy EIS process, contact: Mr. David Sabo Western Area Power Administration Colorado River Storage Project Customer Service Office P.O. Box 11606 Salt Lake City, Utah 84147-0606 Telephone: (801) 524-5392 Ms. Carol Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance (EH-42)

162

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2, Environmental sciences  

SciTech Connect

The 1992 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year 1992. This report consists of four volumes oriented to particular segments of the PNL program, describing research performed for the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research in the Office of Energy Research. The parts of the 1992 Annual Report are: Biomedical Sciences; Environmental Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences; and Physical Sciences. This Report is Part 2: Environmental Sciences. Included in this report are developments in Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development, Interactions with Educational Institutions, Technology Transfer, Publications, and Presentations. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. The Technology Transfer section of this report describes a number of examples in which fundamental research is laying the groundwork for the technology needed to resolve important environmental problems. The Interactions with Educational Institutions section of the report illustrates the results of a long-term, proactive program to make PNL facilities available for university and preuniversity education and to involve educational institutions in research programs. The areas under investigation include the effect of geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in deep subsurface environments, ways to address subsurface heterogeneity, and ways to determine the key biochemical and physiological pathways (and DNA markers) that control nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and the response of these systems to disturbance and climatic change.

Grove, L.K. [ed.; Wildung, R.E.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

2001 Gordon Research Conference on Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Final progress report [agenda and attendee list  

SciTech Connect

The Gordon Research Conference on Applied and Environmental Microbiology was held at Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut, July 22-27, 2001. The conference was attended by 121 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and included US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Session topics included the following: Environmental and applied genomics, Cell-to-cell signaling and multicellular behavior, Emerging technologies and methods, Novel metabolisms and ecosystems, Directed evolution of enzymes and pathways, Symbiotic and trophic relationships, Synthesis and application of novel biopolymers, and Microbes at the oxic-anoxic interface. There was also a special lecture titled ''Under the umbrella of the big tree: microbial biology into the 21st century.''

Drake, Harold

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

164

Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Reclamation Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Department of Interior Department of Army U.S. Department of Defense January 2003 Final Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agencies: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Richland Operations Office (RL); U.S. Department of Defense, Department of Army (USDOA); U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Title of Proposed Project: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project - DOE/EIS-0325 State Involved: Washington Abstract: BPA proposes to construct a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in central Washington. This project

165

Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

This summary covers the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the BPA Schultz-Hanford Transmission Project proposed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project involves constructing a new 500-kilovolt (kV) line in central Washington, north of Hanford. The new line would connect to an existing line at the Schultz Substation near Ellensburg and to a new or existing substation in the Hanford area (see Map 2 in EIS). The project may also involve constructing a new substation to accommodate the new transmission line. As a federal agency, BPA is required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to take into account potential environmental consequences of its proposal and take action to protect, restore, and enhance the environment during and after construction. Preparation of this EIS assists in meeting those requirements.

N /A

2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

166

Best management practices plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Best Management Practices (BMP) Plan has been developed as part of the environmental monitoring program at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. The BMP Plan describes the requirements for personnel training, spill prevention and control, environmental compliance, and sediment/erosion control as they relate to environmental monitoring activities and installation of Monitoring Station 4 at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Technical Memorandum To: File From: Jim Eidem Subject: Environmental Soil Data, Proposed Turbine Area, UMore Park  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Memorandum Technical Memorandum To: File From: Jim Eidem Subject: Environmental Soil Data, Proposed Turbine Area, UMore Park Date: October 1, 2010 Project: 23191060.00 c: Brian Kombrink (Ryan Co.), Janet Dalgleish (UMN), Dan Mielke (UMN), Jeff Marr (UMN), John Wachtler (Barr) Attached is a table summarizing the analytical data from the proposed wind turbine area and a map showing the locations of the test trenches. On May 19, 2010, a total of seventeen soil samples were collected from the original proposed turbine location, turbine laydown area, met tower location, and the area in the immediate vicinity of the met tower. Fourteen of the samples were collected at the ground surface (to evaluate soil disturbed during initial site clearing) and three samples were collected at depth in

168

Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary second quarter 1996 100, 200, 300 and 600 areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of the radiological surveys performed in support of the operational environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site. The Second Quarter 1996 survey results and the status of actions required from current and past reports are summarized below: All the routine environmental radiological surveys scheduled during April, May, and June 1996 were completed. One Hundred twenty- five environmental radiological surveys were performed during the second quarter of 1996, twenty nine at the active waste sites and ninety six at the inactive waste sites. Contamination above background levels Wag found at three of the active waste sites and fifteen of the inactive waste sites. Contamination levels as high as 65,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) were reported. Of these contaminated surveys seven were in Underground Radioactive Material (URM) areas and one was in an unposted area. The contamination found within three of the URM areas was immediately cleaned up and no further action was required. In the remaining four sites the areas were posted and will require decontamination. At the site where there was no posting, the contamination was below action levels, however, Site Support Services was notified. Radiological Problem Reports (RPR`s) were issued and the sites were turned over to the landlord for further action if required. During the second quarter 1996, 0. 7 hectares (1.7 acres) were stabilized and radiologically down posted from Surface Contamination (SC) to URM. No Compliance Assessment Reports (CARS) were issued for sites found out of compliance with standards identified in WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance. No Surveillance Compliance/Inspection Reports (SCIR) were closed during the Second Quarter of 1996. Five open SCIRB had not been resolved.

Dorian, J.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

Measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates from Vernita, Hanford Reach, and Richland area shores. Addendum 1  

SciTech Connect

Environmental radiation exposure rate measurements are taken on and around the Hanford Site for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. In 1992, environmental radiation exposure rate measurements were taken from shoreline and island areas ranging from Vernita, along the Hanford Reach, down to the Richland Pumphouse. Measurements were taken primarily at locations known or expected to have elevated exposure rates as determined by examination of aerial photographs depicting radiation exposure measurements. Results from the 1992 survey indicated radiation exposure rates taken from the Hanford Reach area were elevated in comparison to the measurements taken from the Vernita area with ranges of 8 to 28 {mu}R/hr and 4 to 11 {mu}R/hr, respectively. In January 1994, additional shoreline radiation exposure rate measurements were taken from the Vernita, Hanford Reach, and Richland areas to determine the relationship of radiation exposure rates along the Richland area shores when compared to Vernita and Hanford Reach area exposure rates (measurements along the Richland area were not collected during the 1992 survey). This report discusses the 1994 results and is an addendum to the report that discussed the 1992 survey. An analysis of variance indicated a significant location interaction at a p-value of 0.0014. To determine differences between paried locations a post-hoc comparison of location means was performed on log transformed data using the Scheff{acute e}`s F-test. This test indicated a significant difference between Hanford Reach and Richland area means with a mean difference of 0.075 /{mu}R/hr and a p-value of 0.0014. No significant difference was found between Hanford Reach and Vernita area means: The mean difference was 0.031 {mu}R/hr and the p-value was 0.3138. No significant difference was found between Vernita and Richland area means with a mean difference of 0.044 {mu}R/hr and a p-value of 0.1155.

Cooper, A.T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Health and environmental effects of oil and gas technologies: research needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses health and environmental issues associated with oil and gas technologies as they are currently perceived - both those that exist and those that are expected to emerge over the next two decades. The various sections of this report contain discussions of specific problem areas and relevant new research activities which should be pursued. This is not an exhaustive investigation of all problem areas, but the report explores a wide range of issues to provide a comprehensive picture of existing uncertainties, trends, and other factors that should serve as the focus of future research. The problem areas of major concern include: effects of drilling fluids, offshore accidents, refineries and worker health, and biota and petroleum spills, indoor air pollution, information transfer, and unconventional resources. These are highlighted in the Executive Summary because they pose serious threats to human health and the environment, and because of the sparcity of accumulated knowledge related to their definition. Separate abstracts have been prepared for selected sections of this report for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

Brown, R. D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Proposed framework for the Western Area Power Administration Environmental Risk Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) views environmental protection and compliance as a top priority as it manages the construction, operation, and maintenance of its vast network of transmission lines, substations, and other facilities. A recent Department of Energy audit of Western`s environmental management activities recommends that Western adopt a formal environmental risk program. To accomplish this goal, Western, in conjunction with Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is in the process of developing a centrally coordinated environmental risk program. This report presents the results of this design effort, and indicates the direction in which Western`s environmental risk program is heading. Western`s environmental risk program will consist of three main components: risk communication, risk assessment, and risk management/decision making. Risk communication is defined as an exchange of information on the potential for threats to human health, public safety, or the environment. This information exchange provides a mechanism for public involvement, and also for the participation in the risk assessment and management process by diverse groups or offices within Western. The objective of risk assessment is to evaluate and rank the relative magnitude of risks associated with specific environmental issues that are facing Western. The evaluation and ranking is based on the best available scientific information and judgment and serves as input to the risk management process. Risk management takes risk information and combines it with relevant non-risk factors (e.g., legal mandates, public opinion, costs) to generate risk management options. A risk management tool, such as decision analysis, can be used to help make risk management choices.

Glantz, C.S.; DiMassa, F.V.; Pelto, P.J.; Brothers, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Roybal, A.L. [Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Atmospheric Science and Climate Research [EVS Program Area]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Science and Climate Research Atmospheric Science and Climate Research EVS research, combined with portable, high-performance climate and weather applications, offers a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. In an ever-changing, dynamic climate, we measure, model, and analyze atmospheric processes that are vital to understanding our planet. Our measurement capabilities range from remote sensing and surface meteorology instruments to instrumentation designed to quantify the land-atmosphere exchange of energy, water, and greenhouse gases. Modeling capabilities begin with regional-scale climate, air quality, and aerosol modeling and extend to global chemical transport models, general circulation models of the atmosphere, models of the biosphere, and coupled Earth system models.

173

Research Areas, Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science Department,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Studies of Nanoscale Structure and Structural Defects in Advanced Materials: The goal of this program is to study property sensitive structural defects in technologically-important materials such as superconductors, magnets, and other functional materials at nanoscale. Advanced quantitative electron microscopy techniques, such as coherent diffraction, atomic imaging, spectroscopy, and phase retrieval methods including electron holography are developed and employed to study material behaviors. Computer simulations and theoretical modeling are carried out to aid the interpretation of experimental data. Electron Spectroscopy Group's primary focus is on the electronic structure and dynamics of condensed matter systems. The group carries out studies on a range materials including strongly correlated systems and thin metallic films. A special emphasis is placed on studies of high-Tc superconductors and related materials.

174

ERRATA Sheet for ''Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada''  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Appendix A the second sentence of the first paragraph on Page A-1-1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, erroneously cites the EPA DQO guidance outline as (EPA, 1994). The correct citation is (EPA, 2000).

K. B. Campbell

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Environmental Science and Research Foundation. Annual technical report, April 11, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Technical Report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, by the Environmental Science and Research Foundation (Foundation) for work under contract DE-AC07-94ID13268. The Foundation began, on April 11, 1994, to conduct environmental surveillance near to and distant from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, provide environmental public relations and education related to INEL natural resource issues, and conduct ecological and radioecological research benefiting major DOE-ID programs including Waste Management, Environmental Restoration, Spent Nuclear Fuels, and Infrastructure.

Reynolds, T.D.; Morris, R.C.; Markham, O.D. [eds.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

An aerial radiological survey of the Fernald Environmental Management Project and surrounding area, Fernald, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted from May 17--22, 1994, over a 36 square mile (93 square kilometer) area centered on the Fernald Environmental Management Project located in Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to detect anomalous gamma radiation in the environment surrounding the plant. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) with a line spacing of 250 feet (76 meters). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter (3.3 feet) above ground was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the area. Analysis of the data for man made sources showed five sites within the boundaries of the Fernald Environmental Management Project having elevated readings. The exposure rates outside the plant boundary were typical of naturally occurring background radiation. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to supplement the aerial data. It was concluded that although the radionuclides identified in the high-exposure-rate areas are naturally occurring, the levels encountered are greatly enhanced due to industrial activities at the plant.

Phoenix, K.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Research overview of biological and chemical conversion methods and identification of key research areas for SERI. Final task report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A qualitative overview of the current and future research areas of the Biological and Chemical Conversion Branch is presented. The goals of the Branch and the general areas of Branch activities are mapped out: energy and petrochemical substitutes from biomass, thermochemical conversion, and photoconversion. Each of these three areas in some detail are discussed in some detail in a general overview. Specific parts of the three major areas which have been selected are discussed in the context of present Department of Energy sponsored research including the Fuels from Biomass and Office of Basic Energy Sciences programs, for initial SERI in-house research emphasis. Finally, the Branch research efforts planned through FY 79 are outlined.

Milne, T. A.; Connolly, J. S.; Inman, R. E.; Reed, T. B.; Seibert, M.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

NLM Web Resources for Environmental Health and Biomedical Research  

SciTech Connect

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is sponsoring this course to increase awareness of the availability and value of NLM’s online environmental health and toxicology information resources that provide invaluable tools to address these issues—for professionals and consumers alike. Participants will receive hands-on practice with selected NLM resources, and demonstrations of other valuable resources will be provided.

Foster, R.

2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Groundwater in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on groundwater during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the withdrawing its notice of intent of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report were collected for the geothermal resource subzones in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge with respect to groundwater in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii. Groundwater quality in and adjacent to Kilauea`s east rift zone (KERZ), is compared with that of meteoric water, seawater, and geothermal fluid. Two segments of KERZ lie within the Puna District. These segments are the middle east rift zone (KERZ) and lower east rift zone (LERZ). The degree of mixing between meteoric water, seawater, and geothermal water in and adjacent to the also is discussed.

Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Field Operations Procedures Manual for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Meteorological monitoring of various climatological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

DOE-STD-1156-2002; Environmental Compliance Function Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-2002 6-2002 October 2002 DOE STANDARD ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1156-2002 This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1156-2002

183

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Assessment of research and development (R and D) needs in ammonia safety and environmental control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report characterizes the ammonia industry operations, reviews current knowledge of ammonia release and subsequent impacts, summarizes the status of release prevention and control methods and identify research and development needs for safety and environmental control. Appendices include: accidental spills and human exposure; adiabatic mixing of liquid nitrogen and air; fire and explosion hazards; and environmental impact rating tables. (PSB)

Brenchley, D.L.; Athey, G.F.; Bomelburg, H.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K. (comps.)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision  

SciTech Connect

The interactions and feedbacks among plants, animals, microbes, humans, and the environment ultimately form the world in which we live. This world is now facing challenges from a growing and increasingly affluent human population whose numbers and lifestyles are driving ever greater energy demand and impacting climate. These and other contributing factors will make energy and climate sustainability extremely difficult to achieve over the 20-year time horizon that is the focus of this report. Despite these severe challenges, there is optimism that deeper understanding of our environment will enable us to mitigate detrimental effects, while also harnessing biological and climate systems to ensure a sustainable energy future. This effort is advanced by scientific inquiries in the fields of atmospheric chemistry and physics, biology, ecology, and subsurface science - all made possible by computing. The Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science has a long history of bringing together researchers from different disciplines to address critical national needs in determining the biological and environmental impacts of energy production and use, characterizing the interplay of climate and energy, and collaborating with other agencies and DOE programs to improve the world's most powerful climate models. BER science focuses on three distinct areas: (1) What are the roles of Earth system components (atmosphere, land, oceans, sea ice, and the biosphere) in determining climate? (2) How is the information stored in a genome translated into microbial, plant, and ecosystem processes that influence biofuel production, climate feedbacks, and the natural cycling of carbon? (3) What are the biological, geochemical, and physical forces that govern the behavior of Earth's subsurface environment? Ultimately, the goal of BER science is to support experimentation and modeling that can reliably predict the outcomes and behaviors of complex biological and environmental systems, leading to robust solutions for DOE missions and strategic goals. In March 2010, the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee held the Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision workshop to identify scientific opportunities and grand challenges for BER science in the coming decades and to develop an overall strategy for drafting a long-term vision for BER. Key workshop goals included: (1) Identifying the greatest scientific challenges in biology, climate, and the environment that DOE will face over a 20-year time horizon. (2) Describing how BER should be positioned to address those challenges. (3) Determining the new and innovative tools needed to advance BER science. (4) Suggesting how the workforce of the future should be trained in integrative system science. This report lays out grand research challenges for BER - in biological systems, climate, energy sustainability, computing, and education and workforce training - that can put society on a path to achieve the scientific evidence and predictive understanding needed to inform decision making and planning to address future energy needs, climate change, water availability, and land use.

Arkin, A.; Baliga, N.; Braam, J.; Church, G.; Collins, J; Cottingham, R.; Ecker, J.; Gerstein, M.; Gilna, P.; Greenberg, J.; Handelsman, J.; Hubbard, S.; Joachimiak, A.; Liao, J.; Looger, L.; Meyerowitz, E.; Mjolness, E.; Petsko, G.; Sayler, G.; Simpson, M.; Stacey, G.; Sussman, M.; Tiedje, J.; Bader, D.; Cessi, P.; Collins, W.; Denning, S.; Dickinson, R.; Easterling, D.; Edmonds, J.; Feddema, J.; Field, C.; Fridlind, A.; Fung, I.; Held, I.; Jackson, R.; Janetos, A.; Large, W.; Leinen, M.; Leung, R.; Long, S.; Mace, G.; Masiello, C.; Meehl, G.; Ort, D.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Penner, J.; Prather, M.; Randall, D.; Rasch, P.; Schneider, E.; Shugart, H.; Thornton, P.; Washington, W.; Wildung, R.; Wiscombe, W.; Zak, D.; Zhang, M.; Bielicki, J.; Buford, M.; Cleland, E.; Dale, V.; Duke, C.; Ehleringer, J.; Hecht, A.; Kammen, D.; Marland, G.; Pataki, D.; Riley, M. Robertson, P.; Hubbard, S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

EGI: an open e-infrastructure ecosystem for the digital european research area and the humanities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European Grid Infrastructure (EGI) is a federation of computing resource providers set up to support collaborative and innovative research projects from all fields of science. Building on a decade of experience in managing distributed computing resources, ... Keywords: European research area, digital research, e-infrastructure

Steven J. Newhouse; Stephen Brewer

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Addressing transportation energy and environmental impacts: technical and policy research directions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is establishing a local chapter of the University of California Energy Institute (UCEI). In order to most effectively contribute to the Institute, LLNL sponsored a workshop on energy and environmental issues in transportation. This workshop took place in Livermore on August 10 and brought together researchers from throughout the UC systems in order to establish a joint LLNL-UC research program in transportation, with a focus on energy and environmental impacts.

Weissenberger, S.; Pasternak, A.; Smith, J.R.; Wallman, H.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COWI is leading a research project named `Valuation of External costs of Air Pollution' under objective of the project is to improve the existing Danish monetary estimates of the costs of air pollution that established damage costs for transport emissions. The ExternE Tranport project was EU funded and

190

E.U. environmental policies: a document - based qualitative research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change has become a reality with many consequences in different fields. The European Union (EU) has been at the forefront of international action to combat climate change since 1990, when the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) ... Keywords: EU policy, European legislation, climate change, environment, greenhouse gas emissions, qualitative research

Iuliana Pop; Madalina-Teodora Andrei; Charlotte Valentine Ene; Florin Vartolomei; Petronela-Sonia Nedea; Radita Alexe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Invasive Species -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Wildlife What's New Publications Wildlife What's New Invasive Species Some of the links on this page are to documents in Portable Document Format (PDF) that can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. Non-native plants and animals cause problems for many native species on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Protected and relatively undisturbed for the past 60 years, the ORR has changed considerably since 1942 when it was acquired as part of the Manhattan project. At that time about half of the land was cleared and cultivated. Those cleared areas have gradually returned to forest through plantings and natural succession. Now about 70% of the reservation is in mature or maturing native habitats. However, invasive, non-native plants and animals often impact these areas.

192

Environmental Assessment for Proposed Corrective Measures at Material Disposal Area H within Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

64 64 Environmental Assessment for Proposed Corrective Measures at Material Disposal Area H within Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico June 14, 2004 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office EA for the Proposed Corrective Measures at MDA H within TA-54 at LANL DOE LASO June 14, 2004 iii Contents Acronyms and Terms..................................................................................................................................v Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................................vii 1.0 Purpose and Need ..............................................................................................................................1

193

STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Environmental geology workshop for the Geysers--Calistoga known geothermal resources area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) is studying ways in which the environmental quality of The Geysers-Calistoga known geothermal resources area may be protected from any significant harmful consequences of future geothermal development. The LLL study includes the effects of development on air and water quality, geology, the ecosystem, socioeconomics, and noise. The Geothermal Resource Impact Projection Study (GRIPS) has grants to undertake similar work. On 28 and 29 November 1977, LLL and GRIPS jointly sponsored a workshop at Sonoma State College at which knowledgeable earth scientists presented their views on the potential geological hazards of geothermal development. The workshop produced recommendations for studies in geological mapping, slope stability, subsidence, seismicity, and groundwater hydrology. These recommendations will be evaluated along with other considerations and in conjunction with the other subjects of the LLL study. The results of the study will be contained in a preplanning report of final recommendations to the Department of Energy.

Ledbetter, G.; Crow, N.B.

1978-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

195

Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Nonvolatile Residue (NVR) in Environmentally Controlled Areas for Spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the determination of nonvolatile residue (NVR) fallout in environmentally controlled areas used for the assembly, testing, and processing of spacecraft. 1.2 The NVR of interest is that which is deposited on sampling plate surfaces at room temperature: it is left to the user to infer the relationship between the NVR found on the sampling plate surface and that found on any other surfaces. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) oil-shale research activities  

SciTech Connect

The paper is an overview of EPA's oil shale research activities. In spite of substantial cutbacks in the program, several new projects should not only be of interest to developers and researchers but also support future regulatory and permitting decisions by the Agency. New activities include: evaluation of the potential for using combusted Green River shale to adsorb SO2 as a primary sulfur control technology, preparation of a new Pollution Control Technical Manual on the Unishale B and C processes, and preparation of two state-of-the-art reports addressing planning and designs for retorted oil shale disposal and control of gaseous emissions from retorting. Activities that have been ongoing for some time include: investigation of leaching and hydraulic properties of retorted shales (including co-disposal of wastewater and shale), field tests of Stretford and caustic scrubbing for control of H2S in shale offgas, a compilation of available information on solid-waste characteristics for various retorting technologies, and assessment of retorted-shale as a liner for retorted shale disposal sites.

Bates, E.R.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Program director`s overview report for the Office of Health & Environmental Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LBL performs basic and applied research and develops technologies in support of the Office of Health and Environmental Research`s mission to explore and mitigate the long-term health and environmental consequences of energy use and to advance solutions to major medical challenges. The ability of the Laboratory to engage in this mission depends upon the strength of its core competencies. In addition, there are several key capabilities that are cross-cutting, or underlie, many of the core competencies. Attention is focused on the following: Facilities and resources; research management practices; research in progress; program accomplishments and research highlights; program orientation; work for non-OHER organizations DOE; critical issues; and resource orientation.

Gilbert, D. [ed.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Research and ecology semiannual progress report, January--June 1972. Chemistry research and development  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported in the following areas: chemistry research and development, chemistry instrumentation, process chemistry, chemical technology, and environmental research. (DHM)

Thompson, M.A.

1973-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

NASA Research Areas of Interest Released by NASA HQ April 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA Research Areas of Interest Released by NASA HQ April 2013 NASA EPSCoR research priorities - studies and comparisons of responses of whole organisms and their systems; and · Developmental Biology-cellular organisms, as described in NASA's > Fundamental Space Biology Science Plan (PDF, 7.4 MB). Further details

Maxwell, Bruce D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Defining a taxonomy for research areas on ICT for governance and policy modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As governments across the world provide more and more support to open data initiatives and web 2.0 channels for engaging citizens, researchers orient themselves towards future internet, wisdom of crowds and virtual world experiments. In this context, ... Keywords: ICT for governance and policy modelling, future internet, open government, research areas, safeguard against misuse, social computing, taxonomy

Fenareti Lampathaki; Yannis Charalabidis; Spyros Passas; David Osimo; Melanie Bicking; Maria A. Wimmer; Dimitris Askounis

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Class 1 overview of cultural resources for the Western Area Power Administration Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects electric power marketing environmental impact statement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory conducted an inventory of known archaeological and historic sites in areas that could be affected by the hydropower operation alternatives under analysis in the power marketing environmental impact statement for the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects. The study areas included portions of the Green River (Flaming Gorge Dam to Cub Creek) in Utah and Colorado and the Gunnison River (Blue Mesa Reservoir to Crystal Dam) in Colorado. All previous archaeological surveys and previously recorded prehistoric and historic sites, structures, and features were inventoried and plotted on maps (only survey area maps are included in this report). The surveys were classified by their level of intensity, and the sites were classified according to their age, type, and contents. These data (presented here in tabular form) permit a general assessment of the character and distribution of archaeological remains in the study areas, as well as an indication of the sampling basis for such an assessment. To provide an adequate context for the descriptions of the archaeological and historic sites, this report also presents overviews of the environmental setting and the regional prehistory, history, and ethnography for each study area.

Moeller, K.L.; Malinowski, L.M.; Hoffecker, J.F.; Walitschek, D.A.; Shogren, L.; Mathews, J.E.; Verhaaren, B.T.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Development of New User REsearch Capabilities in Environmental Molecular Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0654 0654 PNNL-16054 1 The Development of New User Research Capabilities in Environmental Molecular Science: Workshop Report Held August 1-2, 2006 W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Richland, WA Executive Summary On August 1, and 2, 2006, 104 scientists representing 40 institutions including 24 Universities and 5 National Laboratories gathered at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a National scientific user facility, to outline important science challenges for the next decade and identify major capabilities needed to pursue advanced research in the environmental molecular sciences. EMSL's four science themes served as the framework for the workshop. The four science themes are 1) Biological Interactions and Interfaces, 2) Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Surface

204

Programs director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research  

SciTech Connect

Since its establishment, the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has had responsibility for conducting biological research to develop the knowledge needed to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy use and development, including the potential health impacts of radiation. The Health Effects Research Program has established the basis for understanding the health consequences of radiation for humans, developed radiation dosimetry methodology, characterized and evaluated the health impacts of fossil fuels, and developed and conducted research to determine the health impacts of inhaled toxicants. The results of this research have provided input for setting genetic standards for radiation and chemical exposure.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A vital legacy: Biological and environmental research in the atomic age  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This booklet presents a summary of the five decades of biological and environmental research in the atomic age. It commemorates the contributions to science and society during these decades and concludes with a view to the years ahead. The Contents includes `Safety First: in the Shadow of a New Technology; A Healthy Citizenry: Gifts of the New Era; and Environmental Concerns: From Meteorology to Ecology`. The conclusion is titled `An Enduring Mandate: Looking to the Future`.

Vaughan, D. [ed.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Program director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LBNL performs basic and applied research and develops technologies in support of the Department of Energy Office of Health and Environmental Research`s mission to explore and mitigate the long-term health and environmental consequences of energy use and to advance solutions to major medical challenges. The ability of the Laboratory to engage in this mission depends upon the strength of its core competencies. In addition, there are several key capabilities that are crosscutting, or underlie, many of the core competencies. They are: bioscience and biotechnology; environmental assessment and remediation; advanced detector systems; materials characterization and synthesis; chemical dynamics, catalysis, and surface science; advanced technologies for energy supply and energy efficiency; particle and photon beams; national research facilities; computation and information management; engineering design and fabrication technologies; and education of future scientists and engineers. Research in progress and major accomplishments are summarized for projects in analytical technology; environmental research; health effects; molecular carcinogenesis; general life sciences; human genome project; medical applications; and imaging of E-binding proteins.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

An Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. J. S. Delamere, S. A. Clough, E. J. Mlawer, Sid-Ahmed Boukabara, K. Cady-Pereira, and M. Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Maine Introduction Over the last decade, a suite of radiative transfer models has been developed at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) with support from the Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. These models span the full spectral regime from the microwave to the ultraviolet, and range from monochromatic to band calculations. Each model combines the latest spectroscopic advancements with radiative transfer algorithms to efficiently compute radiances, fluxes, and cooling

208

Source Release Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A source release model was developed to determine the release of contaminants into the shallow subsurface, as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) evaluation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The output of the source release model is used as input to the subsurface transport and biotic uptake models. The model allowed separating the waste into areas that match the actual disposal units. This allows quantitative evaluation of the relative contribution to the total risk and allows evaluation of selective remediation of the disposal units within the SDA.

Becker, Bruce Harley

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A multispectral scanner survey of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and surrounding area, Golden, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Aerial multispectral scanner imagery was collected of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden, Colorado, on June 3, 5, 6, and 7, 1994, using a Daedalus AADS1268 multispectral scanner and coincident aerial color and color infrared photography. Flight altitudes were 4,500 feet (1372 meters) above ground level to match prior 1989 survey data; 2,000 feet (609 meters) above ground level for sitewide vegetation mapping; and 1,000 feet (304 meters) above ground level for selected areas of special interest. A multispectral survey was initiated to improve the existing vegetation classification map, to identify seeps and springs, and to generate ARC/INFO Geographic Information System compatible coverages of the vegetation and wetlands for the entire site including the buffer zone. The multispectral scanner imagery and coincident aerial photography were analyzed for the detection, identification, and mapping of vegetation and wetlands. The multispectral scanner data were processed digitally while the color and color infrared photography were manually photo-interpreted to define vegetation and wetlands. Several standard image enhancement techniques were applied to the multispectral scanner data to assist image interpretation. A seep enhancement was applied and a color composite consisting of multispectral scanner channels 11, 7, and 5 (thermal infrared, mid-infrared, and red bands, respectively) proved most useful for detecting seeps, seep zones, and springs. The predawn thermal infrared data were also useful in identifying and locating seeps. The remote sensing data, mapped wetlands, and ancillary Geographic Information System compatible data sets were spatially analyzed for seeps.

Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Brickey, D.W.; Ross, S.L.; Shines, J.E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Directory of Federal Agencies and University Research Centers conducting R D in Environmental and Waste Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 1990 PAR Enterprises, Incorporated was awarded a contract by the Department of Energy to conduct a survey and prepare a Directory of Federal Agencies and University Research Centers involved in environmental restoration and waste management research and development. To conduct the survey and organize the Directory, data from 50 Federal agencies and 100 universities was collected, evaluated and summarized. The purpose of the survey and Directory is to describe the activities and provide a reference base of Federal Agencies and University Research Cantors involved in environmental restoration and waste management research and development. The Directory contains (1) the Foreword, (2) an Introduction, (3) a Description of the Survey Organization and Research Approach, (4) the EM/OTD Key Word Networks, (5) a series of matrices that show the relationship between the OTD technical requirements and the Federal Agency/University EM capabilities, (6) the Federal Agency and University Research Center EM R D Capabilities Profiles, (7) a Glossary, and (8) an Appendix that describes the EM activities of the DOE National Laboratories and related research facilities. The survey and Directory was prepared for the Office of Technology Development (OTD), a major R D component of DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E. (eds.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Accelerating Ocean Energy to the Marketplace – Environmental Research at the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) has mobilized its National Laboratories to address the broad range of environmental effects of ocean and river energy development. The National Laboratories are using a risk-based approach to set priorities among environmental effects, and to direct research activities. Case studies will be constructed to determine the most significant environmental effects of ocean energy harvest for tidal systems in temperate estuaries, for wave energy installations in temperate coastal areas, wave installations in sub-tropical waters, and riverine energy installations in large rivers. In addition, the National Laboratories are investigating the effects of energy removal from waves, tides and river currents using numerical modeling studies. Laboratory and field research is also underway to understand the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), acoustic noise, toxicity from anti-biofouling coatings, effects on benthic habitats, and physical interactions with tidal and wave devices on marine and freshwater organisms and ecosystems. Outreach and interactions with stakeholders allow the National Laboratories to understand and mitigate for use conflicts and to provide useful information for marine spatial planning at the national and regional level.

Copping, Andrea E.; Cada, G. F.; Roberts, Jesse; Bevelhimer, Mark

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

213

EA-0921; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research and Education Center, Oregon Health Sciences University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research 21; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research and Education Center, Oregon Health Sciences University TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Proposed Action 3.2 Project Description 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operations Activities 3.3 No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS 5.1 Construction 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources 5.1.1.1 Historic/Archeological Resources 5.1.1.2 Federal/State-Listed or Proposed Protected Species or Critical Habitats 5.1.1.3 Flood Plains/Wetlands 5.1.1.4 National Forest, Parks, Trails, etc. 5.1.1.5 Prime Farmland 5.1.1.6 Special Sources of Water

214

Evaluation of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Investment Areas at Sandia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a variety of research projects each year under its Laboratory Research and Development (LDRD) program. Recently, information visualization techniques have been used with corporate data to map several LDRD investment areas for the purpose of understanding strategic overlaps and identifying potential opportunities for future development outside of our current technologies. Tools, techniques, and specific analyses are presented here. We find that these tools and techniques hold great promise for aiding future direction of the science and technology enterprise.

Evaluation Of Laboratory; Kevin W. Boyack; Nabeel Rahal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1980. Atmospheric physics  

SciTech Connect

Contained are twenty-six abstracts of on-going research programs at Argonne National Laboratory concerning the modeling of environmental air pollutants concentration and transport for January-December 1980. Studies on pollutant transport modeling, fluid flow models, and atmospheric precipitations chemistry are included. (DLS)

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Introduction Aerial surveys from aircraft are a critical component of many environmental research,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Aerial surveys from aircraft are a critical component of many environmental research an ability to directly estimate detection probability. By bringing the ground sampling and aerial survey more safety concerns because of low altitude flights and tight maneuvers necessary for such surveys

Mazzotti, Frank

217

DOE/EIS-0325; Environmental Impact Statement for Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project (02/2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Reclamation Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Department of Interior Department of Army U.S. Department of Defense February 2002 Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary Bonneville Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Reclamation Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Department of Interior Department of Army U.S. Department of Defense February 2002 Summary S-1 Summary In this Summary: * The Purposes and Need for Action * Alternatives * Affected Environment * Impacts This summary covers the major points of the Draft Environmental

218

FY 1991 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office: Work plan and quarterly reports, first and second quarter reports  

SciTech Connect

The work carried out on behalf of the DOE by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies, site mitigation plans, compliance activities, and historical research; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to stat and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design, laboratory, field, and administrative activities. In addition to these, archaeological site characterization, flood hazards for rail transportation, and paleofaunal investigations will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, review and classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports, e.g., quarterly reports, not included in the requirements of the individual projects. A new set of programs funded by the Office of Technology Development will be in place by the third quarter of FY 1991. These projects will address environmental restoration and waste management concerns, among other related topics. This document contains the Work Plan, including project descriptions, tasks, deliverables and quarterly progress reports on each project for FY 1991.

NONE

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Final Closeout Report University Research Program in Robotics for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report covers the 2003-04 contract period, with a retrospective of the 11 years for the contract, from 1993 to 2004. This includes personnel, technical publications and reports, plus research laboratories employed. Specific information is given in eight research areas, reporting on all technology developed and/or deployed by the University of Florida.

James S. Tulenko; Carl Crane

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

Leveraging IS theory by exploiting the isomorphism between different research areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discipline of Information Systems is sometimes accused of being heavy on practical technology but light on conceptual theory. Identifying 'isomorphisms' between specialist research areas in other disciplines (especially mathematics) has produced ... Keywords: enterprise modelling, frameworks, isomorphism, theory, theory building, website analysis

Jean-Paul Van Belle

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering.

Langland, R.T.; Minichino, C. [eds.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and high out-year cost environmental management project descriptions. Volume 3 of 3 -- Appendix C  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation`s nuclear complex. Appendix C provides details about each of the Department`s 82 high cost projects and lists the EMSP research awards with potential to impact each of these projects. The high cost projects listed are those having costs greater than $50 million in constant 1998 dollars from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and having costs of quantities of material associated with an environmental management problem area. The high cost project information is grouped by operations office and organized by site and project code. Each operations office section begins with a list of research needs associated with that operations office. Potentially related research awards are listed by problem area in the Index of Research Awards by Environmental Management Problem Area, which can be found at the end of appendices B and C. For projects that address high risks to the public, workers, or the environment, refer also the Health/Ecology/Risk problem area awards. Research needs are programmatic or technical challenges that may benefit from knowledge gained through basic research.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Environmental Restoration of Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Funded by the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act)  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Environmental Restoration Program is to address the environmental impacts of weapons testing conducted on the Nevada National Security Site and the Nevada Test and Training Range. The large physical size of these sites, along with limits on funding and other resources available for remediation efforts, means that environmental restoration activities must be prioritized and accomplished incrementally over time. The remediation of a bomblet target area on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), which is located within the Nevada Test and Training Range, was originally planned in 2007 but was not carried out until funding became available in the summer of 2009 through the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act. This activity was implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order established between NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. This activity which was complete by the end of Fiscal Year 2010, involved the excavation of disposal pits suspected of containing submunitions and the surface clearance of submunitions on seven target areas amounting to approximately 6.7 square kilometers of land at the TTR. The TTR was used by Sandia National Laboratories from the late 1960s through the mid-1980s to conduct research into the deployment of submunitions. Although there were efforts to identify, collect, and dispose various amounts of unexploded ordnance on the TTR in the past, no comprehensive effort to remediate the entire flightline area for submunitions was undertaken before this project.

Kevin Cabble (NSO), Mark Burmeister and Mark Krauss (N-I)

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

224

Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, Brazoria and Kenedy Counties, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary environmental data, including current land use, substrate lithology, soils, natural hazards, water resources, biological assemblages, meteorological data, and regulatory considerations have been collected and analyzed for approximately 150 km/sup 2/ of land: (1) near Chocolate Bayou, Brazoria County, Texas, where a geopressured-geothermal test well was drilled in 1978, and (2) near the rural community of Armstrong, Kenedy County, Texas, where future geopressured-geothermal test well development may occur. The study was designed to establish an environmental data base and to determine, within spatial constraints set by subsurface reservoir conditions, environmentally suitable sites for geopressured-geothermal wells.

White, W.A.; McGraw, M.; Gustavson, T.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Current environmental, health, safety, and socioeconomic research activities related to oil shale: draft  

SciTech Connect

This document was prepared for DOE Resource Applications. It provides a compilation of information on current environmental, health, safety and socioeconomic research activities related to oil shale. The information is the most recent available through August 29, 1980. Included are the following: (1) project title; (2) adminstering agency; (3) contractor; (4) project status; (5) funding level; (6) project schedule; (7) deliverable; and (8) key personnel. The data contained in these reports can be used in environmental impact analyses relating oil shale to various incentives given in the Alternative Fuels Bill. The information provided was obtained from computer search printouts, review of respective agency documents and communication with agency personnel. A complete list of references is provided. The sponsoring organizations include the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Agriculture, and the Department of Interior.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425, Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area. This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This site will be cleaned up under the SAFER process since the volume of waste exceeds the 23 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (30 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) limit established for housekeeping sites. CAU 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 09-08-001-TA09, Construction Debris Disposal Area (Figure 1). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 is an area that was used to collect debris from various projects in and around Area 9. The site is located approximately 81 meters (m) (265 feet [ft]) north of Edwards Freeway northeast of Main Lake on the TTR. The site is composed of concrete slabs with metal infrastructure, metal rebar, wooden telephone poles, and concrete rubble from the Hard Target and early Tornado Rocket sled tests. Other items such as wood scraps, plastic pipes, soil, and miscellaneous nonhazardous items have also been identified in the debris pile. It is estimated that this site contains approximately 2280 m{sup 3} (3000 yd{sup 3}) of construction-related debris.

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

BNL | Environmental Sciences Department | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences Department Environmental Sciences Department Home Atmospheric System Group Overview Research Areas Aerosol Life Cycle Cloud Life Cycle Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions ARM Group Overview Facilities MAOS External Data Center Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure Field Campaigns MAGIC Biomass Burns (BBOP) TCAP Aerosol Life Cycle IOP RACORO MC3E FASTER Tracer Tech Environmental Tech Carbon Cycle Group Overview Research Areas Climate Change Experimental Facility Design and Management Plant Physiology and High Throughput Biochemical Phenotyping Soil Carbon Monitoring Publications Staff EBC Environmental, Biological, and Computational Sciences Directorate Environmental Sciences Image Sampling equipment BATS II ARM SGP Facility meteorology data MAGIC program Environmental Sciences Environmental research at Brookhaven focuses on atmospheric physics and

228

Global environmental security: Research and policy strategies for the 1990s  

SciTech Connect

The subject of global environmental change is emerging as one of the most hotly debated international issues for the 1990s. In fact, our earth system has undergone a nature-induced gradual change in climate on both a temporal scale that spans over millions of years and a spatial scale ranging from regional to transcontinental. Pollutant emissions associated with population growth and industrial activities manifest the anthropogenic climatic forcing that has been superimposed on the background of natural climate fluctuations. Our incomplete understanding of the global impacts of environmental pollution on the earth systems (atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and lithosphere), however, make the prediction of the timing, magnitude, and patterns of future global change uncertain. This paper examines the science and policy background of global environmental change. The major scientific uncertainties and policy issues confronting decision makers are identified; and the scientific framework, as well as current national and international research programs aimed at resolving the scientific uncertainties, are discussed. A coherent, stable, and flexible policy is needed to provide a foundation for coordinated international-interagency programs of observation, research, analysis, and international negotiation toward a policy consensus concerning global environmental security. On the basis of what is currently known about global change, recommendations are presented on both near-term and long-term policy option decisions.

Lazaro, M.A.; Wang, Hua.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Global environmental security: Research and policy strategies for the 1990s  

SciTech Connect

The subject of global environmental change is emerging as one of the most hotly debated international issues for the 1990s. In fact, our earth system has undergone a nature-induced gradual change in climate on both a temporal scale that spans over millions of years and a spatial scale ranging from regional to transcontinental. Pollutant emissions associated with population growth and industrial activities manifest the anthropogenic climatic forcing that has been superimposed on the background of natural climate fluctuations. Our incomplete understanding of the global impacts of environmental pollution on the earth systems (atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and lithosphere), however, make the prediction of the timing, magnitude, and patterns of future global change uncertain. This paper examines the science and policy background of global environmental change. The major scientific uncertainties and policy issues confronting decision makers are identified; and the scientific framework, as well as current national and international research programs aimed at resolving the scientific uncertainties, are discussed. A coherent, stable, and flexible policy is needed to provide a foundation for coordinated international-interagency programs of observation, research, analysis, and international negotiation toward a policy consensus concerning global environmental security. On the basis of what is currently known about global change, recommendations are presented on both near-term and long-term policy option decisions.

Lazaro, M.A.; Wang, Hua

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems. Volume 1 of 3 -- Report and Appendix A  

SciTech Connect

This report is submitted in response to a Congressional request and is intended to communicate the nature, content, goals, and accomplishments of the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to interested and affected parties in the Department and its contractors, at Federal agencies, in the scientific community, and in the general public. The EMSP was started in response to a request to mount an effort in longer term basic science research to seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective. Section 1, ``Background of the Program,`` provides information on the evolution of the EMSP and how it is managed, and summarizes recent accomplishments. Section 2, ``Research Award Selection Process,`` provides an overview of the ongoing needs identification process, solicitation development, and application review for scientific merit and programmatic relevance. Section 3, ``Linkages to Environmental Cleanup Problems,`` provides an overview of the major interrelationships (linkages) among EMSP basic research awards, Environmental Management problem areas, and high cost projects. Section 4, ``Capitalizing on Science Investments,`` discusses the steps the EMSP plans to use to facilitate the application of research results in Environmental Management strategies through effective communication and collaboration. Appendix A contains four program notices published by the EMSP inviting applications for grants.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of 1100 AREA, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's proposed action: the transfer of the 1100 Area, southern rail connection and rolling stock to a non-federal entity. Impact information contained herein will be used by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1508.27. This EA was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The following is a description of each section of the EA. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S. Department of Energy is addressing with the proposed action. As necessary, background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. A description with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts is provided. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. Reasonable alternative actions, which would address the Purpose and Need, are described. A no action alternative, as required by 10 CFR 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This provides a brief description of the locale in which the proposed action takes place, and which may be environmentally impacted. (5) Environmental Impacts. The range of environmental impacts, beneficial and adverse, are described for the proposed action. Impacts of alternatives briefly are discussed. (6) Permits and Regulatory Requirements. A brief description of permits and regulatory requirements for the proposed action is provided. (7) Organizations Consulted. Any outside agencies, groups, or individuals contacted as part of environmental assessment documentation preparation are listed. (8) References. Documents used to provide information or data are listed. The appendices contain additional information necessary to support an understanding of the proposed action, alternatives, and potential impacts is provided. Comments resulting from review of the environmental assessment by states and tribes or other stakeholders and the response to those comments will be included in the appendices.

N /A

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Stacy C. Davis - Research Staff - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specialty Research Areas: Data, Statistical Analysis and Information Tools Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis Current or Recent Work: Transportation Energy...

233

FY 1990 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office. Work plan and quarterly reports, first through fourth quarter reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies and site mitigation plans; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to state and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design activities. In addition to these, archaeological and other activities will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, derivative classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports not included in the requirements of the individual projects.

NONE

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Environmental, safety, and health plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document outlines the environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) approach to be followed for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 10 at Oak at Ridge National Laboratory. This ES&H Plan addresses hazards associated with upcoming Operable Unit 3 field work activities and provides the program elements required to maintain minimal personnel exposures and to reduce the potential for environmental impacts during field operations. The hazards evaluation for WAG 10 is presented in Sect. 3. This section includes the potential radiological, chemical, and physical hazards that may be encountered. Previous sampling results suggest that the primary contaminants of concern will be radiological (cobalt-60, europium-154, americium-241, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, cesium-134, cesium-137, and curium-244). External and internal exposures to radioactive materials will be minimized through engineering controls (e.g., ventilation, containment, isolation) and administrative controls (e.g., procedures, training, postings, protective clothing).

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Governor Brown's Research Priorities in the areas of Clean Energy and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Governor Brown's Research Priorities in the areas of Clean Energy and Governor Brown's Research Priorities in the areas of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency Speaker(s): Clifford Rechtschaffen Edward Randolph Heather Sanders Laurie ten Hope Date: October 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Jodi Bellacicco Karen Salvini The Brown Administration has been pursuing numerous clean energy policies. These include developing 20,000 megawatts of renewable energy, including 12,000 megawatts of distributed renewable generation by 2020, aggressive building and appliance efficiency standards, including aggressive targets for zero net energy homes and businesses, new financing tools to incentivize widespread energy retrofits of existing buildings, development of energy storage to meet peak load demand and to provide

236

Hydrothermal Geothermal Subprogram, Hawaii Geothermal Research Station, Hawaii County, Hawaii: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This environmental impact assessment addresses the design, construction, and operation of an electric generating plant (3 to 4 MWe) and research station (Hawaii Geothermal Research Station (HGRS)) in the Puna district on the Island of Hawaii. The facility will include control and support buildings, parking lots, cooling towers, settling and seepage ponds, the generating plant, and a visitors center. Research activities at the facility will evaluate the ability of a successfully flow-tested well (42-day flow test) to provide steam for power generation over an extended period of time (two years). In future expansion, research activities may include direct heat applications such as aquaculture and the effects of geothermal fluids on various plant components and specially designed equipment on test modules. 54 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

238

Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide-Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document serves as the final report documenting work completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Fraunhofer Institute in Building Physics (Holzkirchen, Germany) under an international CRADA No. 0575 with Fraunhofer Institute of Bauphysics of the Federal Republic of Germany for Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads. This CRADA required a multi-faceted approach to building envelope research that included a moisture engineering approach by blending extensive material property analysis, laboratory system and sub-system thermal and moisture testing, and advanced moisture analysis prediction performance. The Participant's Institute for Building physics (IBP) and the Contractor's Buildings Technology Center (BTC) identified potential research projects and activities capable of accelerating and advancing the development of innovative, low energy and durable building envelope systems in diverse climates. This allowed a major leverage of the limited resources available to ORNL to execute the required Department of Energy (DOE) directives in the area of moisture engineering. A joint working group (ORNL and Fraunhofer IBP) was assembled and a research plan was executed from May 2000 to May 2005. A number of key deliverables were produced such as adoption of North American loading into the WUFI-software. in addition the ORNL Weather File Analyzer was created and this has been used to address environmental loading for a variety of US climates. At least 4 papers have been co-written with the CRADA partners, and a chapter in the ASTM Manual 40 on Moisture Analysis and Condensation Control. All deliverables and goals were met and exceeded making this collaboration a success to all parties involves.

Karagiozis, A.N.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Area G Perimeter Surface-Soil Sampling Environmental Surveillance for Fiscal Year 1998 Hazardous and Solid Waste Group (ESH-19)  

SciTech Connect

Material Disposal Area G (Area G) is at Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Area G has been the principal facility for the disposal of low-level, solid-mixed, and transuranic waste since 1957. It is currently LANL's primary facility for radioactive solid waste burial and storage. As part of the annual environmental surveillance effort at Area G, surface soil samples are collected around the facility's perimeter to characterize possible radionuclide movement off the site through surface water runoff During 1998, 39 soil samples were collected and analyzed for percent moisture, tritium, plutonium-238 and 239, cesium-137 and americium-241. To assess radionuclide concentrations, the results from these samples are compared with baseline or background soil samples collected in an undisturbed area west of the active portion Area G. The 1998 results are also compared to the results from analogous samples collected during 1996 and 1997 to assess changes over this time in radionuclide activity concentrations in surface soils around the perimeter of Area G. The results indicate elevated levels of all the radionuclides assessed (except cesium-137) exist in Area G perimeter surface soils vs the baseline soils. The comparison of 1998 soil data to previous years (1996 and 1997) indicates no significant increase or decrease in radionuclide concentrations; an upward or downward trend in concentrations is not detectable at this time. These results are consistent with data comparisons done in previous years. Continued annual soil sampling will be necessary to realize a trend if one exists. The radionuclide levels found in the perimeter surface soils are above background but still considered relatively low. This perimeter surface soil data will be used for planning purposes at Area G, techniques to prevent sediment tm.nsport off-site are implemented in the areas where the highest radionuclide concentrations are indicated.

Marquis Childs

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Supplemental Environmental Analysis, Schultz Substation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the purpose, function, and the environmental consequences of the proposed Schultz substation near Ellensburg, Washington. The affected environment is described in detail, including aerial survey photographs. The impacts on vegetation, fish and wildlife, soils, and water resources are described. (GHH)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research conducted in conjunction with a project entitled “Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center”, which was funded through the Integrative Studies Element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. William Burgos (The Pennsylvania State University) was the overall PI/PD for the project, which included Brian Dempsey (Penn State), Gour-Tsyh (George) Yeh (Central Florida University), and Eric Roden (formerly at The University of Alabama, now at the University of Wisconsin) as separately-funded co-PIs. The project focused on development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. The work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and was directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. ORNL FRC Field Project at Area 2.

Burgos, W.D.

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

242

Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Summary of work completed under the Environmental and Dynamic Equipment Qualification research program (EDQP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the main projects undertaken under the Environmental and Dynamic Equipment Qualification Research Program (EDQP) sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under FIN A6322. Lasting from fiscal year 1983 to 1987, the program dealt with environmental and dynamic (including seismic) equipment qualification issues for mechanical and electromechanical components and systems used in nuclear power plants. The research results have since been used by both the NRC and industry. The program included seven major research projects that addressed the following issues: (a) containment purge and vent valves performing under design basis loss of coolant accident loads, (b) containment piping penetrations and isolation valves performing under seismic loadings and design basis and severe accident containment wall displacements, (c) shaft seals for primary coolant pumps performing under station blackout conditions, (d) electrical cabinet internals responding to in-structure generated motion (rattling), and (e) in situ piping and valves responding to seismic loadings. Another project investigating whether certain containment isolation valves will close under design basis conditions was also started under this program. This report includes eight main section, each of which provides a brief description of one of the projects, a summary of the findings, and an overview of the application of the results. A bibliography lists the journal articles, papers, and reports that document the research.

Steele, R. Jr.; Bramwell, D.L.; Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental management assessment of the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the environmental management assessment of the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), located in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The assessment was conducted August 15-26, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The assessment included reviews of documents and reports, as well as inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. Further, the team conducted interviews with management and staff from the Bartlesville Project Office (BPO), the Office of Fossil Energy (FE), the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC), state and local regulatory agencies, and BDM Oklahoma (BDM-OK), which is the management and operating (M&O) contractor for NIPER. Because of the transition from a cooperative agreement to an M&O contract in January 1994, the scope of the assessment was to evaluate (1) the effectiveness of BDM-OK management systems being developed and BPO systems in place and under development to address environmental requirements; (2) the status of compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and (3) conformance with accepted industry management practices. An environmental management assessment was deemed appropriate at this time in order to identify any systems modifications that would provide enhanced effectiveness of the management systems currently under development.

NONE

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Environmental enchancement using short-rotation tree crops: research results and directions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) and perennial grasses used as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber can provide multiple economic and environmental benefits. Site-specific environmental studies are providing information needed to help evaluate the economic and environmental impacts of biomass production at both local and regional scales. Erosion and chemical movement from an annual row crop, switchgrass, and tree crop with and without a groundcover are being compared in the Southeast. Studies of SRWC productivity on the South Carolina coastal plain are comparing surface and subsurface movement of chemicals applied under different fertilization and irrigation regimes, and addressing use of mill and agricultural residues to enhance crop production. Results are helping to assess the effects of biomass crops produced on different principal soil types and to match tree species with appropriate sites to maximize productivity and minimize environmental impacts. Studies are comparing wildlife use of biomass crops to row crops, grasslands, and natural forests. Results to date show that SRWCs support greater bird diversity than row crops, but less than natural forests; switchgrass plantings extend habitat for grasslands birds. Collaboration with an industrial partner on diverse SRWC plantings in the Southeast is addressing the relationship between plantings of different acreage, age, tree species, and landscape context and breeding bird use. Information from wildlife diversity, water, and soil quality studies can be used by the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP), researchers, producers, and industry to identify management strategies to maintain productivity While enhancing the environment.

Tolbert, V.R.; Schiller, A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Environmental sciences  

SciTech Connect

This 1993 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US DOE describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year (FY) 1993. The report is divided into four parts, each in a separate volume. This part, Volume 2, covers Environmental Sciences. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. There are sections on Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Technology Transfer, Interactions with Educational Institutions, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge Quality Assurance Project Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a group of expert collaborators are using the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site 300 Area uranium plume within the footprint of the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit as a site for an Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC). The IFRC is entitled Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on the Hanford Site 300 Area Uranium Plume Project. The theme is investigation of multi-scale mass transfer processes. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research that relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements/approaches needed to characterize and model a mass transfer-dominated system. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the 300 Area IFRC Project. This plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

Fix, N. J.

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

248

Surveillance Plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Surveillance Plan has been developed as part of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental monitoring will be conducted in two phases: the baseline monitoring phase and the routine annual monitoring phase. The baseline monitoring phase will be conducted to establish the baseline contaminant release conditions at the Waste Area Grouping (WAG), to confirm the site-related chemicals of concern (COC), and to gather data to confirm the site hydrologic model The baseline monitoring phase is expected to begin in 1994 and continue for 12--18 months. The routine annual monitoring phase will consist of continued sampling and analyses of COC to determine off-WAG contaminant flux, to identify trends in releases, and to confirm the COC The routine annual monitoring phase will continue for {approximately}4 years after completion of the baseline monitoring phase. This Surveillance Plan presents the technical and quality assurance surveillance activities for the various WAG 6 environmental monitoring and data evaluation plans and implementing procedures.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Compendium of selected references on air emissions; health, risk, and valuation research; and environmental externalities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In preparing to develop a cost-benefit methodology that could be applied to potential projects abroad involving new coal-fired power plants that make use of US clean coal technologies, the author reviewed a wide variety of reference sources. These are listed in this publication. Before this review, the author had conducted a number of literature searches that identified source material in the newly rediscovered field of environmental externalities and related topics that might also be of value to other energy and environmental researchers. Those sources that appeared to be appropriate but that the author was unable to review are also listed in this document. Thus, this document serves as a comprehensive compendium of source material on these subjects, arranged alphabetically within categories.

Szpunar, C.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Biological and Environmental Research User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BER User Facilities BER User Facilities User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities BER User Facilities FES User Facilities HEP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 BER User Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Biological & Environmental Research program supports the operation of the following national scientific user facilities: William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL): External link The mission of the EMSL at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) External link in Richland, Washington, is to provide integrated experimental and

251

Subsurface Pathway Flow and Transport Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

Migration of contaminants through the complex subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area was simulated for an ongoing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability (CERCLA) assessment. A previously existing model for simulating flow and transport through the vadose zone for this site was updated to incorporate information obtained from recent characterization activities. Given the complexity of the subsurface at this site, the simulation results were acknowledged to be uncertain. Rather than attempt parametric approaches to quantify uncertainty, it was recognized that conceptual uncertainty involving the controlling processes was likely dominant. So, the effort focused on modeling different scenarios to evaluate the impact of the conceptual uncertainty.

Magnuson, S.O.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K. (comps.)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Canby Area Service Project : Substation and Associated Transmission Line : Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides power to Surprise Valley Electrification Corporation (SVEC) in Modoc County, California. BPA uses PacificCorp's substation and transmission facilities between Alturas and Canby, California to transfer power to SVEC's Canby Substation. In the next year, SVEC expects increased industrial, agricultural, and residential electric loads on their 69-kV transmission system south of Canby. SVEC's substation can accommodate only about 10 percent of the expected additional electric load. BPA's proposed action is intended to meet SVEC's increasing electric load. BPA proposes to meet SVEC's increasing energy load by tapping into BPA's existing BPA Malin-Warner 230-kV transmission line, and building an 7.9-mile transmission line to a new BPA substation. BPA proposes to build the new substation next to the west side of SVEC's Canby Substation (Figure 1). This new substation will allow SVEC to move the additional power over their existing transmission or distribution lines. This report is the environmental assessment of the potential impact of the proposed project. The assessment determined that no environmental impact statement'' is not required.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Canby Area Service Project substation and associated transmission line. Environmental Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides power to Surprise Valley Electrification Corporation (SVEC) in Modoc County, California. BPA uses PacificCorp`s substation and transmission facilities between Alturas and Canby, California to transfer power to SVEC`s Canby Substation. In the next year, SVEC expects increased industrial, agricultural, and residential electric loads on their 69-kV transmission system south of Canby. SVEC`s substation can accommodate only about 10 percent of the expected additional electric load. BPA`s proposed action is intended to meet SVEC`s increasing electric load. BPA proposes to meet SVEC`s increasing energy load by tapping into BPA`s existing BPA Malin-Warner 230-kV transmission line, and building an 7.9-mile transmission line to a new BPA substation. BPA proposes to build the new substation next to the west side of SVEC`s Canby Substation (Figure 1). This new substation will allow SVEC to move the additional power over their existing transmission or distribution lines. This report is the environmental assessment of the potential impact of the proposed project. The assessment determined that no ``environmental impact statement`` is not required.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director`s Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director's Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Study of the Environmental Impact of Wired and Wireless Local Area Network Access  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumed and greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacture of Ethernet switches and WiFi access points. INTRODUCTION Network access through local area networks (LANs) is ubiquitous in residential, commercial, along with the greenhouse gas emissions they are responsible for. In addition, this paper also aims

Sikdar, Biplab

258

Authorizing appropriations to the Office of Research and Development, Environmental Protection Agency. Report together with additional views, 95th Congress, 1st Session  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the bill is to authorize appropriations to the Office of Research and Development, Environmental Protection Agency for fiscal year 1978, to improve the direction and quality of environmental research within the EPA, to promote the coordination of environmental research and development efforts, and to establish the EPA Science Advisory Board by law.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Groundwater quality sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of energy and managed by martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary.html[6/24/2011 3:03:56 PM] Summary.html[6/24/2011 3:03:56 PM] SUMMARY S.1 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION The Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to establish the level of its commitment (sales) of long- term firm electrical capacity and energy from the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) hydroelectric power plants. Power generated by the SLCA/IP facilities or purchased by Western from other sources is provided to Western's customers under contracts that establish the terms for how capacity (generation capacity) and energy (quantity of electrical energy) are to be sold. The contracts also specify amounts of capacity and energy that Western agrees to offer for long-term (greater than 12 months) sale to its customers. These amounts constitute Western's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix B : Local Generation Evaluation : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect

The information and data contained in this Appendix was extracted from numerous sources. The principle sources used for technical data were Bonneville Power Administration's 1990 Resource Program along with its technical appendix, and Chapter 8 of the Draft 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan. All cost data is reported 1988 dollars unless otherwise noted. This information was supplemented by other data developed by Puget Sound utilities who participated on the Local Generation Team. Identifying generating resources available to the Puget Sound area involved a five step process: (1) listing all possible resources that might contribute power to the Puget Sound area, (2) characterizing the technology/resource status, cost and operating characteristics of these resources, (3) identifying exclusion criteria based on the needs of the overall Puget Sound Electric Reliability Plan study, (4) applying these criteria to the list of resources, and (5) summarizing of the costs and characteristics of the final list of resources. 15 refs., 20 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix B : Local Generation Evaluation : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The information and data contained in this Appendix was extracted from numerous sources. The principle sources used for technical data were Bonneville Power Administration's 1990 Resource Program along with its technical appendix, and Chapter 8 of the Draft 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan. All cost data is reported 1988 dollars unless otherwise noted. This information was supplemented by other data developed by Puget Sound utilities who participated on the Local Generation Team. Identifying generating resources available to the Puget Sound area involved a five step process: (1) listing all possible resources that might contribute power to the Puget Sound area, (2) characterizing the technology/resource status, cost and operating characteristics of these resources, (3) identifying exclusion criteria based on the needs of the overall Puget Sound Electric Reliability Plan study, (4) applying these criteria to the list of resources, and (5) summarizing of the costs and characteristics of the final list of resources. 15 refs., 20 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Environmental Research Division: fundamental molecular physics and chemistry. Annual report, January-December 1983. Part I  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) photoionization of radicals or excited states; (2) molecular spectroscopy by resonant multiphoton ionization; (3) studies conducted with the synchrotron radiation facility at the National Bureau of Standards; (4) theoretical studies on molecular photoabsorption; (5) analysis of photoabsorption spectra of open-shell atoms; (6) the electron energy-loss spectra of molecules; and (7) cross sections and stopping powers. Items have been individually abstracted for the data base. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, De Witt and Colorado counties, Texas. Final report, March 1 - August 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information collected and analyzed for a preliminary environmental analysis of geopressured geothermal prospect areas in Colorado and DeWitt Counties, Texas is presented. Specific environmental concerns for each geopressured geothermal prospect area are identified and discussed. Approximately 218 km/sup 2/(85 mi/sup 2/) were studied in the vicinity of each prospect area to: (1) conduct an environmental analysis to identify more and less suited areas for geopressured test wells; and (2) provide an environmental data base for future development of geopressured geothermal energy resources. A series of maps and tables are included to illustrate environmental characteristics including: geology, water resources, soils, current land use, vegetation, wildlife, and meteorological characteristics, and additional relevant information on cultural resources, power- and pipelines, and regulatory agencies. A series of transparent overlays at the scale of the original mapping has also been produced for the purposes of identifying and ranking areas of potential conflict between geopressured geothermal development and environmental characteristics. The methodology for ranking suitability of areas within the two prospect areas is discussed in the appendix. (MHR)

Gustavson, T.C.; Reeder, F.S.; Badger, E.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

HISTORICAL AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD - IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, TEST AREA NORTH, HAER NO. ID-33-E  

SciTech Connect

Test Area North (TAN) was a site of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) Project of the U.S. Air Force and the Atomic Energy Commission. Its Cold War mission was to develop a turbojet bomber propelled by nuclear power. The project was part of an arms race. Test activities took place in five areas at TAN. The Assembly & Maintenance area was a shop and hot cell complex. Nuclear tests ran at the Initial Engine Test area. Low-power test reactors operated at a third cluster. The fourth area was for Administration. A Flight Engine Test facility (hangar) was built to house the anticipated nuclear-powered aircraft. Experiments between 1955-1961 proved that a nuclear reactor could power a jet engine, but President John F. Kennedy canceled the project in March 1961. ANP facilities were adapted for new reactor projects, the most important of which were Loss of Fluid Tests (LOFT), part of an international safety program for commercial power reactors. Other projects included NASA's Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power and storage of Three Mile Island meltdown debris. National missions for TAN in reactor research and safety research have expired; demolition of historic TAN buildings is underway.

Susan Stacy; Hollie K. Gilbert

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

SARNET: Integrating Severe Accident Research in Europe - Safety Issues in the Source Term Area  

SciTech Connect

SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network) is a Network of Excellence of the EU 6. Framework Programme that integrates in a sustainable manner the research capabilities of about fifty European organisations to resolve important remaining uncertainties and safety issues concerning existing and future nuclear plant, especially water-cooled reactors, under hypothetical severe accident conditions. It emphasises integrating activities, spreading of excellence (including knowledge transfer) and jointly-executed research. This paper summarises the main results obtained at the middle of the current 4-year term, highlighting those concerning radioactive release to the environment. Integration is pursued through different methods: the ASTEC integral computer code for severe accident modelling, development of PSA level 2 methods, a means for definition, updating and resolution of safety issues, and development of a web database for storing experimental results. These activities are helped by an evolving Advanced Communication Tool, easing communication amongst partners. Concerning spreading of excellence, educational courses covering severe accident analysis methodology and level 2 PSA have been organised for early 2006. A text book on Severe Accident Phenomenology is being written. A mobility programme for students and young researchers has started. Results are disseminated mainly through open conference proceedings, with journal publications planned. The 1. European Review Meeting on Severe Accidents in November 2005 covered SARNET activities during its first 18 months. Jointly executed research activities concern key issues grouped in the Corium, Containment and Source Term areas. In Source Term, behaviour of the highly radio-toxic ruthenium under oxidising conditions, including air ingress, is investigated. Models are proposed for fuel and ruthenium oxidation. Experiments on transport of oxide ruthenium species are performed. Reactor scenario studies assist in defining conditions for new experiments. Regarding predictability of iodine species exiting the Reactor Coolant System (RCS), which affects the amount entering the containment, iodine behaviour in the circuit and silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) release have been reviewed. New experiments are being discussed and performed, and SIC degradation and release models are being improved. For the radioactive aerosol source term, work is conducted in the risk-relevant areas of steam generator (SG) tube rupture, transport through cracks in containment walls and revaporization from previous deposits in the RCS that could lead to a delayed source term. Models for aerosol retention in containment cracks and interpretation of data on retention in the SG secondary side are proposed. For radioactive iodine release to the environment, many physical and chemical processes affect the iodine concentration in the containment atmosphere; of these effects, mass transfer phenomena and radiolytic oxidation are being investigated first. (authors)

Haste, T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Giordano, P.; Micaelli, J.-C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de S et Nucl ire, IRSN, BP 3 13115 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Herranz, L. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medio Ambientales y Tecnologica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BER-funded research over the subsequent three to five years. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. Chief among them: scientific progress in BER-funded research is limited by current allocations of computational resources. Additionally, growth in mission-critical computing -- combined with new requirements for collaborative data manipulation and analysis -- will demand ever increasing computing, storage, network, visualization, reliability and service richness from NERSC. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. It also presents a number of"case studies" as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BER. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this"case study" format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and 3-5 year computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel,"multi-core" environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years.

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office (BER),

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Nuclear Material Focus Area Roadmapping Process Utilizing Environmental Management Complex-Wide Nuclear Material Disposition Pathways  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the process that the Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) has developed and utilizes in working with individual Department of Energy (DOE) sites to identify, address, and prioritize research and development efforts in the stabilization, disposition, and storage of nuclear materials. By associating site technology needs with nuclear disposition pathways and integrating those with site schedules, the NMFA is developing a complex wide roadmap for nuclear material technology development. This approach will leverage technology needs and opportunities at multiple sites and assist the NMFA in building a defensible research and development program to address the nuclear material technology needs across the complex.

Sala, D. R.; Furhman, P.; Smith, J. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

269

ENVIRONMENTAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

797 797 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR THE AGUA CALIENTE SOLAR PROJECT IN YUMA COUNTY, ARIZONA U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 November 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page Executive Summary .................................................................................................................ES-1 Introduction ..........................................................................................................................ES-1 Purpose and Need ...............................................................................................................ES-1 Proposed Action and Alternatives........................................................................................ES-2

270

Research Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Gallery Research Gallery Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element Research Gallery Science serving society The Laboratory conducts leading-edge research in many areas of science and technology to help solve national problems related to energy, the environment, infrastructure, and health. Basic research conducted here enhances national defense and economic security. Exhibits you'll find in this gallery: Understanding Radiation LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Space Science Research Viewspace Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community Experience

271

Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

Harmon, Harry D.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA)to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

Harmon, Harry D.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 2, Environmental sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1986. The program is focused on terrestrial, subsurface, and coastal marine systems, and this research forms the basis, in conjunction with remote sensing, for definition and quantification of processes leading to impacts at the global level. This report is organized into sections devoted to Detection and Management of Change in Terrestrial Systems, Biogeochemical Phenomena, Subsurface Microbiology and Transport, Marine Sciences, and Theoretical (Quantitative) Ecology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual projects.

Not Available

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Application of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model for Air Quality Modeling in the San Francisco Bay Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is evaluated by conducting various sensitivity experiments over central California including the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA), with the goal of establishing a WRF model configuration to be used by ...

Raphael E. Rogers; Aijun Deng; David R. Stauffer; Brian J. Gaudet; Yiqin Jia; Su-Tzai Soong; Saffet Tanrikulu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Application of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model for Air Quality Modeling in the San Francisco Bay Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is evaluated by conducting various sensitivity experiments over central California (CA) including the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA), with the goal of establishing a WRF model configuration to be ...

Raphael E. Rogers; Aijun Deng; David R. Stauffer; Brian J. Gaudet; Yiqin Jia; Su-Tzai Soong; Saffet Tanrikulu

276

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 17 Biological Effects of Phytosterol Oxidation Products, Future Research Areas and Concluding Remarks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 17 Biological Effects of Phytosterol Oxidation Products, Future Research Areas and Concluding Remarks Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology

277

Gas Research Institute environment and safety research program. Status report  

SciTech Connect

The 1992 status report describes ongoing planned activities in the Environment and Safety Research Program. The objectives and goals, accomplishments, and strategies are discussed for the supply, end use, and gas operations subprograms. Contract status summaries are presented for the following project areas: Gas Supply Environmental and Safety Research, Air Quality Research, Combustion Systems Emissions Control, End Use Equipment Safety Research, Gas Operations Safety Research, Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety Research, Gas Operations Environmental Research, and End Use Bioengineering.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR REMOVAL ACTIONS AT THE TECHNICAL AREA III CLASSIFIED WASTE LANDFILL, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, NEW MEXICO - DOE/EA-1729  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR REMOVAL FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR REMOVAL ACTIONS AT THE TECHNICAL AREA III CLASSIFIED WASTE LANDFILL, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, NEW MEXICO DOE/EA-1729 August 2010 National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Site Office P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5400 DOE/EA-1729: Environmental Assessment for Removal Actions at the Technical Area III August 2010 Classified Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico i TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION .................................................................... Page 1 1.1 Background .................................................................................................................................. 1

279

Environmental research brief: Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of components for outboard motors  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a Pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacture who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lac the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) we established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures outboard motors for water craft. Three basic subunits received from other manufacturing plants undergo primarily painting and assembly operations in order to produce the final product. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that paint overspray waste and spent clean-up solvent are generated in large quantities and that significant cost savings could be achieved by installing robotic paint application equipment. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

Jendrucko, R.J.; Coleman, T.N. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics; Looby, G.P. [University City Science Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Environmental research brief: Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of automotive lighting equipment and accessories  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a Pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacture who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lac the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) we established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures outboard motors for water craft. Three basic subunits received from other manufacturing plants undergo primarily painting and assembly operations in order to produce the final product. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that paint overspray waste and spent clean-up solvent are generated in large quantities and that significant cost savings could be achieved by installing robotic paint application equipment. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

Fleischman, M.; Couch, B.; Handmaker, A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics; Looby, G.P. [University City Science Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Environmental research brief: Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of outboard motors  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a Pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacture who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lac the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) we established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures outboard motors for water craft. Three basic subunits received from other manufacturing plants undergo primarily painting and assembly operations in order to produce the final product. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that paint overspray waste and spent clean-up solvent are generated in large quantities and that significant cost savings could be achieved by installing robotic paint application equipment. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

Jendrucko, R.J.; Coleman, T.N. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics; Looby, G.P. [University City Science Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Advanced Technology Section semiannual progress report, April 1-September 30, 1977. Volume 1. Biotechnology and environmental programs. [Lead Abstract  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research efforts in six areas are reported. They include: centrifugal analyzer development; advanced analytical systems; environmental research; bioengineering research;bioprocess development and demonstration; and, environmental control technology. Individual abstracts were prepared for each section for ERA/EDB. (JCB)

Pitt, W.W. Jr.; Mrochek, J.E. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 4, Appendixes B-D  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 2, Sections 1-16  

SciTech Connect

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 3, Appendix A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Sensors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Cady-Pereira, K. E., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Shephard, M. W., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, S. A., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Cady-Pereira, K, M Shephard, E Mlawer, D Turner, S Clough, and T Wagner. 2008. "Improved daytime column-integrated precipitable water vapor from Vaisala radiosonde humidity sensors." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology doi: 10.1175/2007JTECHA1027.1.

287

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix E: Transmission Reinforcement Analysis : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five transmission line options and several reactive (voltage support) options are presently being considered as possible solutions to the PSAERP by the Transmission Team. The first two line options would be built on new rights-of way adjacent (as much as possible) to existing corridors. The reactive options would optimize the existing transmission system capability by adding new stations for series capacitors and/or switchgear. The other three line options are rebuilds or upgrades of existing cross mountain transmission lines. These options are listed below and include a preliminary assessment of the additional transmission system reinforcement required to integrate the new facilities into the existing transmission system. These options were derived from earlier study work that was summarized in Puget Sound Reinforcement Transmission Options'' and New Cross Mountain Transmission Line Alternative: The Crosstie'', which are attached. The initial Transmission Options study report recognized the value to system performance of adding an entirely new circuit rather than rebuilding an existing one. However, siting realities require that rebuild options be considered. Typically, the most attractive rebuild options would be the lowest capacity (lowest voltage) circuits. But because of corridor location, length and terminal proximity, the rebuild options listed below appear to be the most promising. Schematic diagrams and QV Curves of each option are also attached. It should be noted that Snoqualmie and Echo Lake refer to the same station east of Puget Sound and Naneum and Kittitas refer to the same station in the Ellensburg area. 100 figs., 20 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Marysville, Montana, Geothermal Project: Environmental Analysis of the Deep Geothermal Research Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to investigate a geothermal anomaly of high heat flow discovered in 1969 in central Montana, and to determine how this natural resource might be developed as a source of useful energy. Under Phase I, the natural resource will be explored, drilled, and modeled at an estimated cost of $2,588,935 over a 3-year period. Phase II, depending upon the nature of the heat source, will be developing the resource under a cooperative effort of government and private industry. This environmental analysis is intended to cover the drilling and logging operations noted under Phase I, the only work being undertaken at this time. As can be seen from Figure 1, further tests may be run at this site in later phases of the study. But since the nature of these tests are highly dependent on the results of Phase I, it is not considered productive to speculate on their environmental impact. As is show, however, any later experiments would cover a range of underground experiments, some of which consume water and others which would produce water. Before a meaningful analysis of such work can be written, it will be necessary to analyze the results of Phase I findings.

None

1973-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Research and institutional dimensions of environmental justice: Implications for NEPA documentation  

SciTech Connect

Satisfying the environmental justice requirements imposed on the NEPA process is a challenging imperative. Among the challenges for NEPA documentation are: (1) adapting existing disciplinary methodologies that address distributional effects to the dictates of the executive order; (2) determining operational and, perhaps, threshold values for policy directives (e.g., disproportionately high and adverse effects); (3) identifying and involving representatives of minority, Native American, and low-income communities and populations in the NEPA process without jeopardizing their independence and integrity; (4) developing strategies, approaches, and methodologies that are more responsive to the consideration of multiple and cumulative exposures; and (5) developing professional standards for environmental justice assessment that are consistent with the letter and intent of the executive order, protective of the environments of minority, Native American, and low-income populations and communities, and useful to decision makers. This report will address current research and institutional activities associated with these issues, present alternative approaches available for their resolution, and identify the implications of those alternative approaches.

Carnes, S.A.; Wolfe, A.K.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Technical Sessions Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 Introduction The availability of a rapid highly accurate multiple scattering radiative transfer model is essential to meet the objectives of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The model must be capable of computing radiance at spectral intervals consistent with the monochromatic spectral variation of the atmospheric molecular absorption. The resolution of the spectrometers to be deployed at the ARM sites, 0.1 cm-1 and less, will provide an important assessment of our capability to perform radiative transfer calculations in the multiply scattered environment. A second important application forthe high-accuracy high-resolution model is to provide parameterizations and validations for

291

Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI?s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. Also, several installation activities were initiated this month for the testing of a new EPRI/ADA Technologies sorbent sampling system in December. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future work is identified.

None

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and a simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). At the end of the month, a series of Duct Injection tests began in a study to determine the efficiencies of alkaline injection for removing trace elements (mercury). On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, low temperature performance testing continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the SCR reactor. This report describes the status of the facilities and test activities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation J.-F. Louis Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J.-F. Louis J.-F. Louis Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 The main purpose of the ARM program is to provide the necessary data to develop, test and validate the parameterization of clouds and of their interactions with the radiation field, and the computation of radiative transfer in climate models. For the most part, however, the ARM observations will be imperfect, incomplete, redundant, indirect, and unrepresentative. This is unavoidable, despite the best efforts at equipping the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site with the best instruments. To understand these limitations, we must consider the structure of a climate model and the observation constraints. The basic prognostic variables of any climate mode! are atmospheric temperature, horizontal wind components

294

Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal -- Task 3.10, Gas separation and hot-gas cleanup  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Catalytic gasification of coal to produce H{sub 2}-, CO-, and CH{sub 4}-rich mixtures of gases for consumption in molten carbonate fuel cells is currently under development; however, to optimize the fuel cell performance and extend its operating life, it is desired to separate as much of the inert components (i.e., CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) and impurities (i.e., H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}) as possible from the fuel gas before it enters the fuel cell. In addition, the economics of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) can be improved by separating as much of the hydrogen as possible from the fuel, since hydrogen is a high-value product. Researchers at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Bend Research, Inc., investigated pressure-driven membranes as a method for accomplishing this gas separation and hot-gas cleanup. These membranes are operated at temperatures as high as 800 C and at pressures up to 300 psig. They have very small pore sizes that separate the undesirable gases by operating in the Knudsen diffusion region of mass transport or in the molecular sieving region of mass transport phenomena. In addition, H{sub 2} separation through a palladium metal membrane proceeds via a solution-diffusion mechanism for atomic hydrogen. This allows the membranes to exhibit extremely high selectivity for hydrogen separation. Specific questions to be answered in this project include: what are the effects of membrane properties (i.e., surface area, pore size, and coating thickness) on permeability and selectivity of the desired gases; what are the effects of operating conditions (i.e., temperature, pressure, and flow rate) on permeability and selectivity; what are the effects of impurities (i.e., small particulate, H{sub 2}S, HCl, NH{sub 3}, etc.) on membrane performance?

Swanson, M.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 398: Area 25 Spill Sites. CAU 398, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996), and consists of the following 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (Figure 1): (1) CAS 25-44-01 , a fuel spill on soil that covers a concrete pad. The origins and use of the spill material are unknown, but the spill is suspected to be railroad bedding material. (2) CAS 25-44-02, a spill of liquid to the soil from leaking drums. (3) CAS 25-44-03, a spill of oil from two leaking drums onto a concrete pad and surrounding soil. (4) CAS 25-44-04, a spill from two tanks containing sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide used for a water demineralization process. (5) CAS 25-25-02, a fuel or oil spill from leaking drums that were removed in 1992. (6) CAS 25-25-03, an oil spill adjacent to a tipped-over drum. The source of the drum is not listed, although it is noted that the drum was removed in 1991. (7) CAS 25-25-04, an area on the north side of the Engine-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility, where oils and cooling fluids from metal machining operations were poured directly onto the ground. (8) CAS 25-25-05, an area of oil and/or hydraulic fluid spills beneath the heavy equipment once stored there. (9) CAS 25-25-06, an area of diesel fuel staining beneath two generators that have since been removed. (10) CAS 25-25-07, an area of hydraulic oil spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside X-Tunnel. (11) CAS 25-25-08, an area of hydraulic fluid spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside Y-Tunnel. (12) CAS 25-25-16, a diesel fuel spill from an above-ground storage tank located near Building 3320 at Engine Test Stand-1 (ETS-1) that was removed in 1998. (13) CAS 25-25-17, a hydraulic oil spill associated with the historical operations of a vacuum pump oil recovery system at the E-MAD facility.

K. B. Campbell

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Information Retrieval Information retrieval is a dynamic area of research, which forms the basis for many of today's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Retrieval Information retrieval is a dynamic area of research, which forms the basis contains a selection of the papers accepted for the annually organized Dutch-Belgian Information Retrieval of information retrieval and related disciplines, can exchange information and present new research developments

Hiemstra, Djoerd

297

Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 7.2, Resource data evaluation. Topical report, July 1994--May 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Data Evaluation subtask of the US Department of Energy (DOE) base program represents an Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) initiative to promote the integration of geographic information system (GIS) technologies with other ongoing and planned EERC research in the areas of resource utilization, remediation, land use planning, and regulatory and policy assessment. Significant demand for GIS-based information already exists for energy resource evaluation, interpretation of remote sensing data, environmental assessment at the state and local levels, and use in strategic planning. The objective of this task was to determine the appropriate platform and approach upon which to develop GIS applications for optimizing resource evaluation and integrating this information with related areas of interest. Activities associated with Task 7.2, Resource Data Evaluation, were conducted primarily during the first half of the project year. These activities included tasks associated with the development and implementation of GIS databases and construction of digitized files for research pertaining to energy studies. As previously noted, database design was undertaken for two EERC projects: 1) coal occurrence in Bowman and adjacent counties in the Fort Union Coal Region of southwestern North Dakota and 2) energy resource utilization concerns for selected sites in Alaska.

Hartman, J.H.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Corrective Action Decision Document, Area 15 Environmental Protection Agency Farm Laboratory Building, Corrective Action Unit No. 95, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 15 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, Laboratory Building (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 95), at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The scope of this CADD is to identify and evaluate potential corrective action alternatives for the decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) of the Laboratory Building, which were selected based on the results of investigative activities. Based on this evaluation, a preferred corrective action alternative is recommended. Studies were conducted at the EPA Farm from 1963 to 1981 to determine the animal intake and retention of radionuclides. The main building, the Laboratory Building, has approximately 370 square meters (4,000 square feet) of operational space. Other CAUS at the EPA Farm facility that will be investigated and/or remediated through other environmental restoration subprojects are not included in this CADD, with the exception of housekeeping sites. Associated structures that do not require classification as CAUS are considered in the evaluation of corrective action alternatives for CAU 95.

NONE

1997-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

299

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

302

DOE/EA-1622: Final Environmental Assessment for University of Nevada, Las Vegas Research Foundation Solar Technology Center (January 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University of Nevada, Las Vegas University of Nevada, Las Vegas Research Foundation SOLAR TECHNOLOGY CENTER January 2009 Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact DOE/EA-1622 U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 This Environmental Assessment was prepared on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Research Foundation with contractual assistance from Ninyo & Moore, Inc. and MBP Consulting, LLC. Finding of No Significant Impact Solar Technology Center January 2009 Finding of No Significant Impact Solar Technology Center January 2009 Finding of No Significant Impact Solar Technology Center

303

Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlights Members of ARM's science team are major contributors to radiation and cloud research. ARM investigators publish about 150 refereed journal articles per year, and ARM data are used in many studies published by other scientific organizations. These documented research efforts represent tangible evidence of ARM's contribution to advances in almost all areas of atmospheric radiation and cloud research. Below is a selection of summaries highlighting recently-published ARM research. The entire collection of ARM

304

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan provides the details for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408, Bomblet Target Area. CAU 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. One Corrective Action Site (CAS) is included in CAU 408: {lg_bullet} CAS TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, process knowledge, site visits, aerial photography, multispectral data, preliminary geophysical surveys, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), clean closure will be implemented for CAU 408. CAU 408 closure activities will consist of identification and clearance of bomblet target areas, identification and removal of depleted uranium (DU) fragments on South Antelope Lake, and collection of verification samples. Any soil containing contaminants at concentrations above the action levels will be excavated and transported to an appropriate disposal facility. Based on existing information, contaminants of potential concern at CAU 408 include explosives. In addition, at South Antelope Lake, bomblets containing DU were tested. None of these contaminants is expected to be present in the soil at concentrations above the action levels; however, this will be determined by radiological surveys and verification sample results. The corrective action investigation and closure activities have been planned to include data collection and hold points throughout the process. Hold points are designed to allow decision makers to review the existing data and decide which of the available options are most suitable. Hold points include the review of radiological, geophysical, and analytical data and field observations.

NSTec Environmental Management

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Conceptualizing learning for sustainability through environmental assessment: critical reflections on 15 years of research  

SciTech Connect

Numerous scholars are now directing their attention to the education and learning implications of participatory resource and environmental governance because of the potential implications of these for generating the social mobilization necessary to achieve sustainability trajectories. Our work, and that of other researchers, establishes that public participation in environmental assessment (EA) provides fertile ground for considering the intricacies of governance as they relate to participation, and for examining the education and learning implications of participation. Since EA law requires in many cases that public voices be part of the decision process, it has resulted in the creation of fascinating, state-sanctioned, deliberative spaces for civic interactions. Our purpose here is to share, and build upon, a framework that conceptualizes the relationships among participation, education, learning and sustainability in an EA context. We do so by considering findings from studies we have undertaken on participation in EA in Canada since the early 90's. Our approach was interactive and collaborative. We each considered in detail the key results of our earlier work as they relate to education, learning and EA process design. The findings illuminate aspects of the conceptual framework for which there is considerable empirical evidence, such as the link between meaningful participation and critical education and the diversity of individual learning outcomes associated with public participation in EA. The findings also highlight those parts of the framework for which the empirical evidence is relatively sparse, such as the range of possible social learning outcomes, their congruence with sustainability criteria, and the roles of monitoring and cumulative and strategic assessments in shaping EA into an adaptive, learning system.

Sinclair, A. John [Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba, Sinnott Building, 70 Dysart Road, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 (Canada)], E-mail: jsincla@ms.umanitoba.ca; Diduck, Alan [Environmental Studies Program, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada)], E-mail: a.diduck@uwinnipeg.ca; Fitzpatrick, Patricia [Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada)], E-mail: p.fitzpatrick@uwinnipeg.ca

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Directory of Federal Agencies and University Research Centers conducting R&D in Environmental and Waste Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 1990 PAR Enterprises, Incorporated was awarded a contract by the Department of Energy to conduct a survey and prepare a Directory of Federal Agencies and University Research Centers involved in environmental restoration and waste management research and development. To conduct the survey and organize the Directory, data from 50 Federal agencies and 100 universities was collected, evaluated and summarized. The purpose of the survey and Directory is to describe the activities and provide a reference base of Federal Agencies and University Research Cantors involved in environmental restoration and waste management research and development. The Directory contains (1) the Foreword, (2) an Introduction, (3) a Description of the Survey Organization and Research Approach, (4) the EM/OTD Key Word Networks, (5) a series of matrices that show the relationship between the OTD technical requirements and the Federal Agency/University EM capabilities, (6) the Federal Agency and University Research Center EM R&D Capabilities Profiles, (7) a Glossary, and (8) an Appendix that describes the EM activities of the DOE National Laboratories and related research facilities. The survey and Directory was prepared for the Office of Technology Development (OTD), a major R&D component of DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office BER,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Savannah River Laboratory environmental transport and effects research. Annual report, 1974  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of environmental transport research at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is to develop, apply, adapt, use, test, and verify models that predict the directions and magnitude of ecosystem processes. Since an ecosystem is understood to be a complex ecological unit composed of physical, chemical, and biotic components interacting in the cycling and transport of matter and the flow of energy, the understanding of ecosystem processes demands integrated study by scientists of differing disciplines. Data are included from studies on factors that affect the atmospheric transport and dispersion of radionuclides and chemical effluents; surface and groundwater transport of various pollutants following release to the soil surface or a flowing stream; the uptake and retention of tritium oxide by pine trees; calculations of the radiation dose commitment for human populations from $sup 14$C released by the nuclear industry; the effects of thermal effluents on aquatic organisms, including plankton productivity, the population dynamics of freshwater snails, and the growth and respiration rates of the sand-burrowing mayfly (Dolania americana). Data are included from a survey of seismic activity in South Carolina. (CH)

Crawford, T.V.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

area | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

area area Dataset Summary Description These estimates are derived from a composite of high resolution wind resource datasets modeled for specific countries with low resolution data originating from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (United States) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (United States) as processed for use in the IMAGE model. The high resolution datasets were produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (United States), Risø DTU National Laboratory (Denmark), the National Institute for Space Research (Brazil), and the Canadian Wind Energy Association. The data repr Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords area capacity clean energy international National Renewable Energy Laboratory

310

Groundwater level monitoring sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater level monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Groundwater level monitoring will be conducted at 129 sites within the WAG. All of the sites will be manually monitored on a semiannual basis. Forty-five of the 128 wells, plus one site in White Oak Lake, will also be equipped with automatic water level monitoring equipment. The 46 sites are divided into three groups. One group will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level, conductivity, and temperature. The other two groups will be equipped for continuous monitoring of water level only. The equipment will be rotated between the two groups. The data collected from the water level monitoring will be used to support determination of the contaminant flux at WAG 6.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Biological and Environmental Research: Climate and Environmental Sciences Division: U.S./European Workshop on Climate Change Challenges and Observations  

SciTech Connect

The workshop aimed to identify outstanding climate change science questions and the observational strategies for addressing them. The scientific focus was clouds, aerosols, and precipitation, and the required ground- and aerial-based observations. The workshop findings will be useful input for setting priorities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and the participating European centers. This joint workshop was envisioned as the first step in enhancing the collaboration among these climate research activities needed to better serve the science community.

Mather, James [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; McCord, Raymond [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Sisterson, Doug [Argonne National Laboratory] [Argonne National Laboratory; Voyles, Jimmy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

312

RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2, Sections 4 through 9: Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU`s) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart The Status Chart provides the status of ongoing NEPA documents at the Department of Energy, including the dates of important milestones in the NEPA process and references to more information (updated monthly). This chart represents anticipated activity and is not a commitment for documentation or date. Last Revised: 12/19/2013 StatusChart_December2013revised.pdf More Documents & Publications 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Western Area Power Administration 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Western Area Power Administration 2011 ANNUAL PLANNING SUMMARY FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH AND PROJECTS AGENCY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION

314

Recent research efforts in the area of biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Poster session papers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents research presented at the poster session of the Symposium covering a wide spectrum of current biotechnological research activities. Research focused mostly on ethanol production and methane generation from biomass material via microbial processing, as well as on enhanced hydrogen yield from algae. Several of the posters dealt with the pretreatment of cellulosic materials, and enzyme production/characterization, while a good number of papers displayed research efforts on bioremediation, photosynthesis, production of various useful chemicals from biomass by bioprocessing, and on other miscellaneous subjects. One of the papers treated a very interesting topic of cellulose-cellulase complexes. Many of the poster papers are included in this volume, and a synopsis of all the poster/papers presented is the subject of this article.

Antonopoulos, A.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Grohmann, K. [US Citrus and Subtropical Products Lab., Winter Haven, FL (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Recent research efforts in the area of biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Poster session papers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents research presented at the poster session of the Symposium covering a wide spectrum of current biotechnological research activities. Research focused mostly on ethanol production and methane generation from biomass material via microbial processing, as well as on enhanced hydrogen yield from algae. Several of the posters dealt with the pretreatment of cellulosic materials, and enzyme production/characterization, while a good number of papers displayed research efforts on bioremediation, photosynthesis, production of various useful chemicals from biomass by bioprocessing, and on other miscellaneous subjects. One of the papers treated a very interesting topic of cellulose-cellulase complexes. Many of the poster papers are included in this volume, and a synopsis of all the poster/papers presented is the subject of this article.

Antonopoulos, A.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Grohmann, K. (US Citrus and Subtropical Products Lab., Winter Haven, FL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Research directions in the area of USN (ubiquitous sensor network) towards practical UE (ubiquitous environments)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

“Ubiquitous” has been the key buzzword in the research community as well as in everyday life these days. In Korea, ubiquitous become decorative words for many new products, which has not necessarily enough link to the world of ubiquitous. ...

Young Yong Kim

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area amorphous silicon based modules -- Task B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents progress in developing a stable, high- efficiency, four-terminal hybrid tandem module. The module consists of a semi-transparent, thin-film silicon:hydrogen alloy (TFS) top circuit and a copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) bottom circuit. Film deposition and patterning processes were successfully extended to 0.4-m{sup 2} substrates. A 33.2-W (8.4% efficient) module with a 3970-cm{sup 2} aperture area and a white back reflector was demonstrated; without the back reflector, the module produced 30.2 W (7.6% efficient). Placing a laminated, 31.6-W, 8.1%-efficient CuInSe{sub 2} module underneath this TFS module, with an air gap between the two, produces 11.2 W (2.9% efficient) over a 3883-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Therefore, the four-terminal tandem power output is 41.4 W, translating to a 10.5% aperture-area efficiency. Subsequently, a 37.8-W (9.7% aperture-area efficiency) CuInSe{sub 2} module was demonstrated with a 3905-cm{sup 2} aperture area. Future performances of single-junction and tandem modules of this size were modeled, and predicted power outputs exceed 50 W (13% efficient) for CuInSe{sub 2} and 65 W (17% efficient) for TFS/CuInSe{sub 2} tandem modules.

Mitchell, K.W.; Willet, D.R. (Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Low Cost Solar Array Project cell and module formation research area. Process research of non-CZ silicon material. Final report, November 26, 1980-September 30, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the work reported was to investigate high-risk, high-payoff research areas associated with the Westinghouse process for producing photovoltaic modules using non-Czochralski sheet material. These tasks were addressed: technical feasibility study of forming front and back junctions using liquid dopant techniques, liquid diffusion mask feasibility study, application studies of antireflective material using a meniscus coater, ion implantation compatibility/feasibility study, and cost analysis. (LEW)

Campbell, R.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

NETL: Geological and Environmental Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological & Environmental Systems Geological & Environmental Systems Onsite Research Geological and Environmental Sciences Geological and Environmental Sciences (GES) is a focus area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development (ORD). ORD's other focus areas are Energy System Dynamics, Computational and Basic Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. Scientists and engineers in ORD conduct research at NETL's advanced research facilities in Morgantown, WV; Pittsburgh, PA; and Albany, OR, and at various offsite locations. GES tackles the challenge of clean energy production from fossil energy sources by focusing on the behavior of natural systems at both the earth's surface and subsurface, including prediction, control, and monitoring of fluid flow in porous and fractured media. Efforts include

320

Reaction-based Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research sought to examine biogeochemical processes likely to take place in the less conductive materials above and below the gravel during the in situ ethanol biostimulation experiment conducted at Area 2 during 2005-2006. The in situ experiment in turn examined the hypothesis that injection of electron donor into this layer would induce formation of a redox barrier in the less conductive materials, resulting in decreased mass transfer of uranium out these materials and attendant declines in groundwater U(VI) concentration. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This report summarizes research activities conducted at The University of Central Florida (2004-2007), the development of biogeochemical and reactive transport models and the conduction of numerical simulations at laboratory, column, and field scales.

Tsyh Yeh, Gour

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area, amorphous-silicon-based submodules  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this subcontract is to develop the technology for same bandgap, amorphous silicon tandem junction photovoltaic modules having an area of at least 900 cm{sup 2} with the goal of achieving an aperture area efficiency of 9%. A further objective is to demonstrate modules that retain 95% of their under standard light soaking conditions. Our approach to the attainment of these objective is based on the following distinctive technologies: (a) in-house deposition of SiO{sub 2}/SnO{sub 2}:F onto soda lime glass by APCVD to provide a textured, transparent electrode, (b) single chamber r.f. flow discharge deposition of the a-Si:H layers onto vertical substrates contained with high package density in a box carrier'' to which the discharge is confined (c) sputter deposition of highly reflecting, ZnO-based back contacts, and (d) laser scribing of the a-Si:H and electrodes with real-time scribe tracking to minimize area loss. Continued development of single junction amorphous silicon was aggressively pursued as proving ground for various optical enhancement schemes, new p-layers, and i-layers quality. We have rigorously demonstrated that the introduction of a transitional i-layer does not impair stability and that the initial gain in performance is retained. We have demonstrated a small improvement in cell stability through a post-fabrication treatment consisting of multiple, intense light flashes followed by sufficient annealing. Finally, several experiments have indicated that long term stability can be improved by overcoating the SnO{sub 2} with ZnO. 25 refs., 17 figs.

Delahoy, A.E.; Tonon, T.; Macneil, J. (Chronar Corp., Princeton, NJ (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Research on stable, high-efficiency, large-area, amorphous-silicon-based submodules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this subcontract is to develop the technology for same bandgap, amorphous silicon tandem junction photovoltaic modules having an area of at least 900 cm{sup 2} with the goal of achieving an aperture area efficiency of 9%. A further objective is to demonstrate modules that retain 95% of their under standard light soaking conditions. Our approach to the attainment of these objective is based on the following distinctive technologies: (a) in-house deposition of SiO{sub 2}/SnO{sub 2}:F onto soda lime glass by APCVD to provide a textured, transparent electrode, (b) single chamber r.f. flow discharge deposition of the a-Si:H layers onto vertical substrates contained with high package density in a box carrier'' to which the discharge is confined (c) sputter deposition of highly reflecting, ZnO-based back contacts, and (d) laser scribing of the a-Si:H and electrodes with real-time scribe tracking to minimize area loss. Continued development of single junction amorphous silicon was aggressively pursued as proving ground for various optical enhancement schemes, new p-layers, and i-layers quality. We have rigorously demonstrated that the introduction of a transitional i-layer does not impair stability and that the initial gain in performance is retained. We have demonstrated a small improvement in cell stability through a post-fabrication treatment consisting of multiple, intense light flashes followed by sufficient annealing. Finally, several experiments have indicated that long term stability can be improved by overcoating the SnO{sub 2} with ZnO. 25 refs., 17 figs.

Delahoy, A.E.; Tonon, T.; Macneil, J. (Chronar Corp., Princeton, NJ (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Research Article: Environmental adaptation of proteins: Regression models with simple physicochemical properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bio-sequences from ortholog proteins are well suited for statistical inference when the sequences can be divided into ordinal groups based on known environmental features or traits of the host organisms. In this paper two new regression models are described ... Keywords: Comparative genomics, False discovery rate, Mann-Kendall test, Non-parametric regression, Psychrophiles

Steinar Thorvaldsen; Elinor Ytterstad

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Assessment of research and development (R and D) needs in LPG safety and environmental control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report characterizes the LPG industry covering all operations from production to end use, reviews current knowledge of LPG release phenomenology, summarizes the status of current LPG release prevention and control methodology, and identifies any remaining safety and environmental problems and recommends R and D strategies that may mitigate these problems. (ACR)

DeSteese, J.G.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Draft Supplement to the Environmental Statement Fiscal Year 1976 Proposed Program : Facility Location Evaluation for Cheney-Four Lakes Area Service Study Area 76-7.  

SciTech Connect

Proposed is construction of approximately 26 miles of 230-kV transmission line from the Four Mounds Area west of Spokane to either Cheney or Four Lakes Substation. Proposed also is construction of a new substation in the Four Mounds area. Depending upon final route location chosen, between 20 and 27 miles of new right-of-way would be required between the proposed Greenwood Substation and either Cheney or Four Lakes Substation. Between 25 and 41 miles of access road would also be required. Depending upon the final route selected, the amount of impact upon forest land would range from zero to 97 acres permanently removed. The amount of land temporarily disrupted for rangeland and cropland would be 8 to 13 acres and 30 to 40 acres, respectively. In addition, between approximately 4 and 8 acres of rangeland would be removed due to construction of the proposed new substation. Other impacts would include the removal of wildlife habitat associated with the above mentioned right-of-way requirements. Disturbance to wildlife during construction would occur. Some erosion and sedimentation would occur. Visual impacts would result from clearing rights-of-way through heavily forested areas. Noise and other disturbances to residents will occur, primarily during construction.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1975-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Final Environmental Assessment for Proposed Closure of the Airport Landfills Within Technical Area 73 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 15 Final Environmental Assessment for Proposed Closure of the Airport Landfills Within Technical Area 73 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico May 22, 2005 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office Final EA for Proposed Closure of the Airport Landfills within TA-73 at LANL Page iii of viii Contents Acronyms and Terms .................................................................................................................. vi 1.0 Purpose and Need ................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Introduction.............................................................................................................

327

Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of Iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947: Draft. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or biotransform hazardous organic contaminants to environmentally safe levels in soils, subsurface materials, water, sludges, and residues.. While bioremediation technology is promising, DOE managers and non-DOE scientists have recognized that the fundamental scientific information needed to develop effective bioremediation technologies for cleanup of the legacy waste sites is lacking in many cases. DOE believes that field-based research is needed to realize the full potential of bioremediation. The Department of Energy faces a unique set of challenges associated with cleaning up waste at its former weapons production and research sites. These sites contain complex mixtures of contaminants in the subsurface, including radioactive compounds. In many cases, the fundamental field-based scientific information needed to develop safe and effective remediation and cleanup technologies is lacking. DOE needs fundamental research on the use of microorganisms and their products to assist DOE in the decontamination and cleanup of its legacy waste sites. The existing NABIR program to-date has focused on fundamental scientific research in the laboratory. Because subsurface hydrologic and geologic conditions at contaminated DOE sites cannot easily be duplicated in a laboratory, however, the DOE needs a field component to permit existing and future laboratory research results to be field-tested on a small scale in a controlled outdoor setting. Such field-testing needs to be conducted under actual legacy waste field conditions representative of those that DOE is most in need of remediating. Ideally, these field conditions should be as representative as practicable of the types of subsurface contamination conditions that resulted from legacy wastes from the nuclear weapons program activities. They should also be representative of the types of hydrologic and geologic conditions that exist across the DOE complex.

N /A

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office (BER), DOE Office of Science National Energy ResearchDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced ScientificDirectors of the Office of Science, Office of Biological &

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office BER,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Review of US Department of Energy health and environmental research and development program support to SRC-II technology development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document outlines the technical framework of DOE's overall synthetic fuels health and environmental characterization program. Current project environmental activities directly associated with SRC-II technology development are summarized for the convenience of the Environmental Impact Statement reviewers. An extended, technically detailed statement of the SRC-II health and environmental program, activities, and plans was released in late 1980, as part of the final Environmental Impact Statement of the SRC-II Demonstration Project. Program development is necessarily iterative. Early screening results on a small scale equipment suggest the need for further screening studies on a larger-scale system. Results of screening studies set the priorities for more extensive and costly long-term baseline biological and ecological studies. Parametric studies establish the sensitivity of measured screening and baseline characteristics to changes in processing conditions and also provide a basis for correlating low- and high-tier biological and ecological test information. Monitoring system development is stimulated by findings in screening and baseline characterization efforts. Choice of monitoring systems is dependent upon screening and baseline biological and ecological test results and results of initial site analyses. As a result, the overall characterization program necessarily emerges in phases, each with a distribution of activities in the four component areas. Characterization efforts on PDU- and pilot-scale equipment focus on screening and baseline studies of steady state and non-steady state production. At the demonstration scale, these activities are expanded to include extensive monitoring and the investigation of large-scale steady state and non-steady state effluent production and control characteristics.

Massey, M.J.; Fillo, J.P.; Kreisher, J.H.; Sgro, G.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Site investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendixes: Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the UltraSonic Ranging and Data Systems (USRADS) survey conducted for radiological characterization of approximately 5 acres located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4. The survey was conducted by Chemrad Tennessee Corporation under subcontract No. 7908-RS-00902 to CDM Federal Programs Corporation. The field survey began June 23, 1994 (Chemrad survey team was unable to actually enter field until June 24 awaiting sign-off of CDM plans by MMES) and was terminated on June 29, 1994. The designated survey area is located on the DOE X-10 facility and South of the main X-10 building complex. The entire north boundary of the site is adjacent to SWSA 4, with the Bath Tubbing Trench Seep Area (BTT) actually being a part of that SWSA (See Figure 1). Approximately one-third of the designated area was actually surveyed. The BTT area slopes moderately eastward toward a small stream in the WAG 4 area. The area is open and had recently been trimmed for the survey. The balance of the designated survey area lies along the small stream within WAG 4 and is densely wooded with heavy underbrush. The area had not been cleared or brushed. Survey reference points for the BTT area mere directly tied into the X-10 coordinate system while the t bale,ice of the designated survey area mere tied into an existing relative metric grid system. The designated area was surveyed for radiological characterization using near-surface gamma and beta detectors as well as an energy independent dosimeter. This report describes the survey method and presents the survey findings.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Climate & Environmental Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Science Institute Earth and Aquatic Sciences Ecosystem Science Environmental Data Science and Systems Energy, Water and Ecosystem Engineering Human Health Risk and Environmental Analysis Renewable Energy Systems Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Scientists Scott Brooks and Carrie Miller collect water quality data, East Fork Poplar Creek, November 15, 2012. Sampling site for mercury. Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including

333

A study of seismology as a dynamic, distributed area of scientific research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismology has several features that suggest it is a highly internationalized field: the subject matter is global, the tools used to analyse seismic waves are dependent upon information technologies, and governments are interested in funding cooperative research. We explore whether an emerging field like seismology has a more internationalised structure than the older, related field of geophysics. Using aggregated journal-journal citations, we first show that, within the citing environment, seismology emerged from within geophysics as its own field in the 1990s. The bibliographic analysis, however, does not show that seismology is more internationalised than geophysics: in 2000, seismology had a lower percentage of all articles co-authored on an international basis. Nevertheless, social network analysis shows that the core group of cooperating countries within seismology is proportionately larger and more distributed than that within geophysics. While the latter exhibits an established network with a hierarch...

Wagner, Caroline S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Environmentally Assisted Fatigue Gap Analysis and Roadmap for Future Research: Gap Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past two decades, there has been growing recognition of the effects of light water reactor (LWR) environments on fatigue initiation life and fatigue crack growth in nuclear power plant components, and environmentally assisted fatigue (EAF) has emerged as a significant issue affecting assessments to justify component lifetimes. Generally speaking, revised assessments are likely to predict reduced fatigue life and enhanced crack growth rates, as compared to corresponding predictions ...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

335

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408, Bomblet Target Area (TTR). Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 408 comprises Corrective Action Site TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. Clean closure of CAU 408 will be accomplished by removal of munitions and explosives of concern within seven target areas and potential disposal pits. The target areas were used to perform submunitions related tests for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of CAU 408 is limited to submunitions released from DOE activities. However, it is recognized that the presence of other types of unexploded ordnance and munitions may be present within the target areas due to the activities of other government organizations. The CAU 408 closure activities consist of: • Clearing bomblet target areas within the study area. • Identifying and remediating disposal pits. • Collecting verification samples. • Performing radiological screening of soil. • Removing soil containing contaminants at concentrations above the action levels. Based on existing information, contaminants of potential concern at CAU 408 include unexploded submunitions, explosives, Resource Conservation Recovery Act metals, and depleted uranium. Contaminants are not expected to be present in the soil at concentrations above the action levels; however, this will be determined by radiological surveys and verification sample results.

Mark Krauss

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

University Launches Website for FIU Research Sponsored by EM | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University Launches Website for FIU Research Sponsored by EM University Launches Website for FIU Research Sponsored by EM University Launches Website for FIU Research Sponsored by EM July 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Applied Research Center at Florida International University covers four major environmental cleanup areas: radioactive waste processing, facility deactivation and decommissioning, soil and groundwater remediation and information technology development for environmental management. The Applied Research Center at Florida International University covers four major environmental cleanup areas: radioactive waste processing, facility deactivation and decommissioning, soil and groundwater remediation and information technology development for environmental management. MIAMI - A new website features research performed under a cooperative

337

Reaction-Based Transport Modeling of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization at Area 2 of the NABIR Field Research Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to The Pennsylvania State University, University of Central Florida, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Dr. Eric Roden, formerly at The University of Alabama, is now at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

Yeh, Gour-Tsyh

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 1, 2011 February 1, 2011 EA-1705: Draft Environmental Assessment Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, Mascoma Corporation, Kinross Charter Township, Michigan February 1, 2011 EA-1700: Final Environmental Assessment Computational Research and Theory Facility Project February 1, 2011 EA-1816: Final Environmental Assessment Town of Hempstead Wind-to-Hydrogen Project, Point Lookout, New February 1, 2011 EA-1815: Final Environmental Assessment Cuyahoga County Agricultural Society Wind Energy Project, Berea, Cuyahoga County, Ohio February 1, 2011 EA-1820: Final Environmental Assessment Archbold Area Local School Wind Project Archbold, Fulton County, Ohio February 1, 2011 EA-1818: Final Environmental Assessment Pettisville Local Schools Wind Energy Project, Pettisville, Fulton County,

339

A Vital Legacy - Biological and Environmental Research in the Atomic Age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the cell. 1956 At Brookhaven W. L. (Pete) Hughes syn-research today. N w at Brookhaven, he is o shown here withone strand of their 1956 at Brookhaven, when W. L double-

Vaughan editor, Douglas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Microsoft PowerPoint - BNL Solar PV Environmental Research.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Energy Research Center (NSERC) Planning Workshop March 8-9, 2011 1 web: www.bnl.govpv A Solar Grand Plan A Solar Grand Plan A Solar Grand Plan A Solar Grand Plan By 2050...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Construction of a Solid State Research Facility, Building 3150. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct a new facility to house the Materials Synthesis Group (MSG) and the Semiconductor Physics Group (SPG) of the Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The location of the proposed action is Roane County, Tennessee. MSG is involved in the study of crystal growth and the preparation and characterization of advanced materials, such as high-temperature superconductors, while SPG is involved in semiconductor physics research. All MSG and a major pardon of SPG research activities are now conducted in Building 2000, a deteriorating structure constructed in the 1940. The physical deterioration of the roof; the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system; and the plumbing make this building inadequate for supporting research activities. The proposed project is needed to provide laboratory and office space for MSG and SPG and to ensure that research activities can continue without interruption due to deficiencies in the building and its associated utility systems.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Area G perimeter surface-soil and single-stage water sampling: Environmental surveillance for fiscal year 95. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

ESH-19 personnel collected soil and single-stage water samples around the perimeter of Area G at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) during FY 95 to characterize possible radionuclide movement out of Area G through surface water and entrained sediment runoff. Soil samples were analyzed for tritium, total uranium, isotopic plutonium, americium-241, and cesium-137. The single-stage water samples were analyzed for tritium and plutonium isotopes. All radiochemical data was compared with analogous samples collected during FY 93 and 94 and reported in LA-12986 and LA-13165-PR. Six surface soils were also submitted for metal analyses. These data were included with similar data generated for soil samples collected during FY 94 and compared with metals in background samples collected at the Area G expansion area.

Childs, M.; Conrad, R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Environmental Binorganic Chemistry 2008 Gordon Research Conference (June 18-20, 2008)  

SciTech Connect

This highly interdisciplinary conference is known for rigorous and wide-ranging consideration of the roles of elements traditionally called 'inorganic' in living systems at scales from the molecular to the global. EBIC brings together those studying the biotic-inorganic interface across the Periodic Table, mingling chemists, ecologists, geneticists, oceanographers, and computational biologists, among others. Topics range from transport, enzymology, and homeostasis in individual cells and organisms to the environmental processes they experience and influence, as well as the latest techniques enabling observation of these phenomena. This conference is distinct from other metallobiology meetings in having a substantial environmental theme and a broader view of the Periodic Table, regularly including radionuclides, metalloids, the halides, silicon, and non-metal essential nutrients. When possible we mix speakers working at the nanometer-nanosecond scale in the same session with those working at the kilometer-megayear scale, a practice demanding high quality introductory material from each speaker and discussion leader. EBIC provides a forum for leading scientists (many of whom will never have met before) with expertise in the inorganic dimensions of life to identify fundamental cross-cutting themes and unrecognized anomalies and share the latest on acquiring, analyzing, and applying bioinorganic chemical concepts to real world issues from public health to climate change.

Anne O. Summers

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

344

Post-Closure Evaluation of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site in Support of the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The post-closure performance of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and Area 5 RWMS are evaluated for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement using current performance assessment and composite analysis methods and models. Two alternatives with different future waste volumes and inventories are evaluated. The No Action Alternative evaluates the inventory disposed through fiscal year (FY) 2010 plus an additional 4.5E5 cubic meters (m3) (1.59E7 cubic feet [ft3]) of waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS. The Expanded Operations Alternative evaluates the FY 2010 inventory plus an additional 1.42E6 m3 (5.03E7 ft3) of waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS and 4.93E4 m3 (1.74E6 ft3) disposed at the Area 3 RWMS. Both the No Action and Expanded Operations Alternatives have a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, “Radioactive Waste Management.” No significant difference between the two alternatives was found because the waste concentrations are similar. The performance assessment model assesses radiological risk for residents at the RWMS boundary where risk is more closely related to waste concentration than total waste inventory. Results for the composite analysis also indicate that the dose constraint and dose limit can be met for both alternatives.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

345

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C (TCC) Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 116 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (as amended February 2008) and consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping; and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 is described in the FFACO as the TCC Facility but actually includes Building 3210 and attached concrete shield wall only. CAU 116 will be closed by demolishing Building 3210, the attached concrete shield wall, and the nuclear furnace piping. In addition, as a best management practice (BMP), Building 3211 (moveable shed) will be demolished due to its close proximity to Building 3210. This will aid in demolition and disposal operations. Radiological surveys will be performed on the demolition debris to determine the proper disposal pathway. As much of the demolition debris as space allows will be placed into the Building 3210 basement structure. After filling to capacity with demolition debris, the basement structure will be mounded or capped and closed with administrative controls. Prior to beginning demolition activities and according to an approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), representative sampling of surface areas that are known, suspected, or have the potential to contain hazardous constituents such as lead or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be performed throughout all buildings and structures. Sections 2.3.2, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.3, and 6.2.6.1 address the methodologies employed that assure the solid debris placed in the basement structure will not contain contaminants of concern (COCs) above hazardous waste levels. The anticipated post-closure-posting requirements for the mounded/capped basement structure, as well as for the entire CAU, are addressed in Section 4.2.10. The site contains radiologically impacted surfaces and hazardous materials. Based on review of the historical information for CAU 116 and recent site inspections, there is sufficient process knowledge to close CAU 116 using the SAFER process. CAUs that may be closed using the SAFER process have conceptual corrective actions that are clearly identified. Consequently, corrective action alternatives can be chosen prior to completing a corrective action investigation, given anticipated investigation results. The SAFER process combines elements of the data quality objective (DQO) process and the observational approach to plan and conduct closure activities. The DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the SAFER process. The purpose of the investigation phase is to verify the adequacy of existing information used to determine the chosen corrective action. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty during the planning and decision-making phases of the project. The SAFER process allows for technical decisions to be made based on information gathered during site visits, interviews, meetings, research, and a consensus of opinion by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) team members. Any uncertainties are addressed by documented assumptions that are verified by sampling and analysis, data evaluation, onsite observations, and contingency plans, as necessary. Closure activities may proceed simultaneously with site characterization as sufficient data are gathered to confirm or disprove the assumptions made during selection of the corrective action. If, at any time during the closure process, new information is discovered that indicates that closure activities should be revised, closure activities will be reevaluated as appropriate. Based on a detailed review of historical documentation, there is sufficient process know

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

NOx Emissions Reduction from CPS Energy's "Save For Tomorrow Energy Plan" Within the Alamo Area Council of Governments Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESL used the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality’s (TCEQ) Guide for Incorporating Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Projects into the SIP for local entities dated February 6, 2004 to survey potential projects in the AACOG area that occurred after the State’s base period (September 1, 2001) for their local Clean Air Plan. CPS Energy retained Nexant, Inc. (Nexant) to conduct a comprehensive, independent measurement and verification (M&V) evaluation of CPS Energy’s 2009 DSM programs. Nexant surveyed the energy and demand savings achieved by CPS Energy’s 2009 DSM programs. In 2009, the programs offered by CPS Energy had two sectors: residential and non-residential (commercial). To determine net program impacts, Nexant conducted market research of evaluations for other utility-sponsored DSM programs around the country. From the survey conducted in 2009, total net energy and demand savings from the residential and non-residential sectors are 86,712,978 kWh (residential subtotal is 62,369,566 kWh and non-residential subtotal is 24,343,412 kWh). Nexant calculated CPS Energy’s DSM potential through 2020 and found there to be significant room for program growth. Total cumulative achievable savings through the 2020 program year are expected to be 2,543 GWh of electricity savings (based on the aggressive incentive scenario and exception of industrial sector). According to the TCEQ/ESL, the total annual NOx emissions reductions estimated through 2009 energy savings were 114.03 ton/year. Annual NOx emissions reductions of residential sector were 82.02 ton/yr and annual NOx emissions reductions of non-residential sector were 32.01 Ton/yr. The NOx emissions reductions estimated through 2020 energy savings potential were 3,344 ton/year. Annual NOx emissions reductions of residential sector were 1,873 ton/yr and annual NOx emissions reductions of non-residential sector, except of industrial sector, were 1,471 ton/yr.

Do, S. L.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Argonne TDC: Environmental Technologies  

Emergency Response. Engineering. Environmental Research. Fuel Cells. Imaging Technology. Material Science. Nanotechnology. Physical Sciences. Sensor ...

348

Crosscutting Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crosscutting Research Crosscutting Research Crosscutting Research Crosscutting Research The Crosscutting Research program serves as a bridge between basic and applied research by fostering the development of innovative systems for improving availability, efficiency, and environmental performance of fossil energy systems with carbon capture and storage. This crosscutting effort is implemented through the research and development of sensors, controls, and advanced materials. This program area also develops computation, simulation, and modeling tools focused on optimizing plant design and shortening developmental timelines. In addition, the Crosscutting Research program area supports science and engineering education in minority colleges and universities. Plant Optimization Technologies

349

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Environment and safety research status report: 1993  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 status report discusses ongoing and planned research activities in the GRI Environment and Safety Program. The objectives and goals, accomplishments, and strategy along with the basis for each project area are presented for the supply, end use, and gas operations subprograms. Within the context of these subprograms, contract status summaries under their conceptual titles are given for the following project areas: Gas Supply Environmental and Safety Research, Air Quality Research, End Use Equipment Safety Research, Gas Operations Safety Research, Liquefied Natural Gas, Safety Research, and Gas Operations Environmental Research.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (Tonopah Test Range). CAU 484 consists of sites located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 484 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites: (1) CAS RG-52-007-TAML, Davis Gun Penetrator Test; (2) CAS TA-52-001-TANL, NEDS Detonation Area; (3) CAS TA-52-004-TAAL, Metal Particle Dispersion Test; (4) CAS TA-52-005-TAAL, Joint Test Assembly DU Sites; (5) CAS TA-52-006-TAPL, Depleted Uranium Site; and (6) CAS TA-54-001-TANL, Containment Tank and Steel Structure

Bechel Nevada

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

CNST Research Area Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... edges of graphene devices, J. Chae, S. Jung, S. Woo, H. Baek, J. Ha, YJ Song, Y.-W. Son, NB Zhitenev, JA Stroscio, and Y. Kuk, Nano Letters 12 ...

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

NIST Boulder Research Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... systems. Quantum physics—atomic and chemical physics, precision measurement, and laser and optical physics. Statistical ...

355

Environmental Microbiology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Microbiology Environmental Microbiology Environmental Microbiology Los Alamos working to identify genetic regulatory systems in single microorganisms. Get Expertise Cheryl Kuske DOE BER Biological System Science Division Program Manager Email Srinivas Iyer Bioscience Group Leader Email Rebecca McDonald Bioscience Communications Email Examining the soil beneath our feet Environmental microbiology Read caption + Many environmental molecular biology studies begin with purified DNA and RNA extracted from the soil. Overview of Research and Highlights Learning about microorganisms-bacteria, algae, and fungi-is essential to understanding how living things interact with their environments. Exploration of environmental microbiology at Los Alamos crosses broad scales of investigation that span from identification of genetic regulatory

356

NETL: News Release - Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection Operations in Illinois 2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded Injection Operations in Illinois 2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded Project Publications News Release Release Date: November 28, 2012 Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally Acceptable Shale Gas Development Selected by DOE Washington, D.C. - Fifteen research projects aimed at addressing the technical challenges of producing natural gas from shales and tight sands, while simultaneously reducing environmental footprints and risks, have been selected to receive a total of $28 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The projects, valued at just over $36.6 million over two years, add to the research portfolio for FE's Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research Program, which develops technologies and strategies to improve the safety and minimize the environmental impacts of oil and natural gas exploration and production.

357

www.friendsofthefox.org Fox?Wisconsin Heritage Parkway iAbstract National Heritage Area Feasibility Study Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 2009This study has been prepared to provide U.S. Congress and the public with information about the resources in the Fox?Wisconsin Heritage Parkway and their feasibility to become a National Heritage Area. Publication and transmittal of this report should not be considered an endorsement or commitment by the National Park Service. Authorization and funding for any commitments by the National Park Service will be considered with competing priorities for existing park system unites and programs.

Candice Mortara

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

DEEP VADOSE ZONE APPLIED FIELD RESEARCH CENTER: TRANSFORMATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

DOE-EM, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation and DOE Richland, in collaboration with the Hanford site and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, have established the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Center (DVZ-AFRC). The DVZ-AFRC leverages DOE investments in basic science from the Office of Science, applied research from DOE EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development, and site operation (e.g., site contractors [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Contractor and Washington River Protection Solutions], DOE-EM RL and ORP) in a collaborative effort to address the complex region of the deep vadose zone. Although the aim, goal, motivation, and contractual obligation of each organization is different, the integration of these activities into the framework of the DVZ-AFRC brings the resources and creativity of many to provide sites with viable alternative remedial strategies to current baseline approaches for persistent contaminants and deep vadose zone contamination. This cooperative strategy removes stove pipes, prevents duplication of efforts, maximizes resources, and facilitates development of the scientific foundation needed to make sound and defensible remedial decisions that will successfully meet the target cleanup goals for one of DOE EM's most intractable problems, in a manner that is acceptable by regulators.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Gephart, Roy E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Chronister, Glen B.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Skip; Marble, Justin; Ramirez, Rosa

2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

359

Simple Modifications to Improve Fifth-Generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model Performance for the Phoenix, Arizona, Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal temperature cycle in the Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan area, as represented in the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5), is examined using a high-resolution 2-...

Joseph A. Zehnder

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

Tooman, T.P. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Exploratory Systems Technology Dept.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Research programs on enhanced recovery are briefly described. Major areas include: chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery processes, resource assessment technology, geoscience technology, microbial technology, and environmental technology.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

HIAPER: The Next Generation NSF/NCAR Research Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) will make possible a wealth of new geophysical research opportunities in the areas of atmospheric chemistry, climate forcing, weather ...

Krista K. Laursen; David P. Jorgensen; Guy P. Brasseur; Susan L. Ustin; James R. Huning

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Jointly sponsored research program. Annual report, January 1995--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a brief summary of research, carried out by the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center, in areas pertaining to coal, pollution control, petroleum wastes, and gasoline.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

365

Environmental research on a modified in situ oil shale task process. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the US Department of Energy's Oil Shale Task Force in its research program at the Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. facility at Logan Wash, Colorado. More specifically, the Task Force obtained samples from Retort 3E and Retort 6 and submitted these samples to a variety of analyses. The samples collected included: crude oil (Retort 6); light oil (Retort 6); product water (Retort 6); boiler blowdown (Retort 6); makeup water (Retort 6); mine sump water; groundwater; water from Retorts 1 through 5; retort gas (Retort 6); mine air; mine dust; and spent shale core (Retort 3E). The locations of the sampling points and methods used for collection and storage are discussed in Chapter 2 (Characterization). These samples were then distributed to the various laboratories and universities participating in the Task Force. For convenience in organizing the data, it is useful to group the work into three categories: Characterization, Leaching, and Health Effects. While many samples still have not been analyzed and much of the data remains to be interpreted, there are some preliminary conclusions the Task Force feels will be helpful in defining future needs and establishing priorities. It is important to note that drilling agents other than water were used in the recovery of the core from Retort 3E. These agents have been analyzed (see Table 12 in Chapter 2) for several constituents of interest. As a result some of the analyses of this core sample and leachates must be considered tentative.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE`s preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site`s MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years.

Chapman, T.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S&H) issues. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water This plan explains additional site-specific health and safety requirements such as Site Specific Hazards Evaluation Addendums (SSHEAs) to the Site Safety and Health Plan which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

Van Hoesen, S.D.; Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manis, L.W.; Barre, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Environmental Biology | Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Biology BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Environmental...

369

Waste Management Plan for the Remedial Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Waste Management Plan (WMP) supplements the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project WMP and defines the criteria and methods to be used for managing and characterizing waste generated during activities associated with the RI of 23 wells near the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF). These wells are within the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 area of contamination (AOC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Field activities for the limited RI of Operable Unit (OU) 3 of WAG 10 will involve sampling and measurement of various environmental media (e.g., liquids and gases). Many of these activities will occur in areas known to be contaminated with radioactive materials or hazardous chemical substances, and it is anticipated that contaminated solid and liquid wastes and noncontaminated wastes will be generated as a result of these activities. On a project-wide basis, handling of these waste materials will be accomplished in accordance with the RI/FS Project WMP and the procedures referenced throughout the plan.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Environmental Microbiology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Microbiology Environmental Microbiology Examining the soil beneath our feet Read caption + Many environmental molecular biology studies begin with purified DNA and RNA extracted from the soil. Overview of Research and Highlights Learning about microorganisms-bacteria, algae, and fungi-is essential to understanding how living things interact with their environments. Exploration of environmental microbiology at Los Alamos crosses broad scales of investigation that span from identification of genetic regulatory systems in single microorganisms to comprehensive studies of the complex microbial communities resident in soil, water and air. The long term goals of this research are to understand microbial processes and interactions, and the genomic traits underlying these activities, toward:

371

DOE/EA-1374: Environmental Assessment for the Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project (04/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Final Environmental Assessment Bonneville Power Administration April 2001 Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Final Environmental Assessment B o n n e v i l l e P o w e r A d m i n i s t r a t i o n i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION .....................................................................1 1.1 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Need for Action .................................................................................................................................................... 2 1.3 Purposes

372

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix D, Conservation, Load Management and Fuel Switching Analysis : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect

Various conservation, load management, and fuel switching programs were considered as ways to reduce or shift system peak load. These programs operate at the end-use level, such as residential water heat. Figure D-1a shows what electricity consumption for water heat looks like on normal and extreme peak days. Load management programs, such as water heat control, are designed to reduce electricity consumption at the time of system peak. On the coldest day in average winter, system load peaks near 8:00 a.m. In a winter with extremely cold weather, electricity consumption increases fr all hours, and the system peak shifts to later in the morning. System load shapes in the Puget Sound area are shown in Figure D-1b for a normal winter peak day (February 2, 1988) and extreme peak day (February 3, 1989). Peak savings from any program are calculated to be the reduction in loads on the entire system at the hour of system peak. Peak savings for all programs are measured at 8:00 a.m. on a normal peak day and 9:00 a.m. on an extreme peak day. On extremely cold day, some water heat load shifts to much later in the morning, with less load available for shedding at the time of system peak. Models of hourly end-use consumption were constructed to simulate the impact of conservation, land management, and fuel switching programs on electricity consumption. Javelin, a time-series simulating package for personal computers, was chosen for the hourly analysis. Both a base case and a program case were simulated. 15 figs., 7 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Research Input Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HighlightsSubmit HighlightsSubmit Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlight Submittal Form Tell us about your research! This form is designed to collect summary information about working group research results. If you have any questions or comments, please contact the administrators. Journal or Book Reference(s) (if applicable): Look Up Your reference from the Publications Database. Limit two references. If you have not submitted the references, please Add it now. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Surface Properties General Circulation and Single Column

374

Meteorological Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Meterological monitoring of various climatological parameters (eg., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four structures: (1) Building 5400A, Reactor High Bay; (2) Building 5400, Reactor Building and access tunnel; (3) Building 5410, Mechanical Building; and (4) Wooden Shed, a.k.a. ''Brock House''. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and site confirmation data collected in 2005 and 2006 to recommend closure of CAU 118 using the SAFER process. The Data Quality Objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure option: closure in place with use restrictions. This expected closure option was selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine the nature of contaminants of concern in environmental media or potential source material that could impact human health or the environment. Decision II is to determine whether or not sufficient information has been obtained to confirm that closure objectives were met. This decision includes determining whether the extent of any contamination remaining on site has been defined, and whether actions have been taken to eliminate exposure pathways.

David Strand

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 DOE/EA-1791 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE UNVIERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM PROJECT ROSEMOUNT, MINNESOTA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office MARCH 2011 U.S. Department of Energy University of Minnesota Wind Energy Research Consortium Project Golden Field Office Environmental Assessment March 2011 Page i Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1

377

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility • 25-99-20, EMAD Facility Exterior Releases This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 114. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 114: • Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, radiological surveys). • Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) as necessary to supplement existing information. • Collect samples of materials to determine whether potential source material (PSM) is present that may cause the future release of a COC to environmental media. • If no COCs or PSMs are present at a CAS, establish no further action as the corrective action. • If COCs exist, collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. • If a COC or PSM is present at a CAS, either: - Establish clean closure as the corrective action. The material to be remediated will be removed, disposed of as waste, and verification samples will be collected from remaining soil, or - Establish closure in place as the corrective action and implement the appropriate use restrictions. • Confirm the selected closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

Mark Burmeister

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Environmental Assessment for the Closure of the High-Level Waste Tanks in F- & H-Areas at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the closure of 51 high-level radioactive waste tanks and tank farm ancillary equipment (including transfer lines, evaporators, filters, pumps, etc) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The waste tanks are located in the F- and H-Areas of SRS and vary in capacity from 2,839,059 liters (750,000 gallons) to 4,921,035 liters (1,300,000 gallons). These in-ground tanks are surrounded by soil to provide shielding. The F- and H-Area High-Level Waste Tanks are operated under the authority of Industrial Wastewater Permits No.17,424-IW; No.14520, and No.14338 issued by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). In accordance with the Permit requirements, DOE has prepared a Closure Plan (DOE, 1996) and submitted it to SCDHEC for approval. The Closure Plan identifies all applicable or relevant and appropriate regulations, statutes, and DOE Orders for closing systems operated under the Industrial Wastewater Permits. When approved by SCDHEC, the Closure Plan will present the regulatory process for closing all of the F- and H-Area High Level Waste Tanks. The Closure Plan establishes performance objectives or criteria to be met prior to closing any tank, group of tanks, or ancillary tank farm equipment. The proposed action is to remove the residual wastes from the tanks and to fill the tanks with a material to prevent future collapse and bind up residual waste, to lower human health risks, and to increase safety in and around the tanks. If required, an engineered cap consisting of clay, backfill (soil), and vegetation as the final layer to prevent erosion would be applied over the tanks. The selection of tank system closure method will be evaluated against the following Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) criteria described in 40 CFR 300.430(e)(9): ( 1) overall protection of human health and the environment; (2) compliance with applicable or relevant and appropriated requirement: (ARARs); (3) long-term effectiveness and permanence; (4) reduction of toxicity, mobility, or volume through treatment; (5) short-term effectiveness; (6) implementability; (7) cost; (8) state acceptable; and (9) community acceptance. Closure of each tank involves two separate operations after bulk waste removal has been accomplished: (1) cleaning of the tank (i.e., removing the residual contaminants), and (2) the actual closure or filling of the tank with an inert material, (e.g., grout). This process would continue until all the tanks and ancillary equipment and systems have been closed. This is expected to be about year 2028 for Type I, II, and IV tanks and associated systems. Subsequent to that, Type III tanks and systems will be closed.

N /A

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

This paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University (http://www.hvac.okstate.edu).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"model execution, data gathering, analysis prediction, and control algo- rithms."4 The model-based control systems presented in two of the papers here are partial realizations of the DDDAS concept. AnotherThis paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group

380

Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Environmental Research Center to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy. Projects range from developing autonomous vehicles, and transportation systems of the future, sustainable fuels, transportation systems, and solar energy By Sean Nealon On MAY 10, 2012 The world's largest and presentations from student alumni on atmospheric processes, emissions, transportation systems and sustainable

382

Ecological Research Division, Marine Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents program summaries of the various projects sponsored during 1979 by the Marine Research Program of the Ecological Research Division. Program areas include the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the marine environment; a study of the baseline ecology of a proposed OTEC site near Puerto Rico; the environmental impact of offshore geothermal energy development; the movement of radionuclides through the marine environment; the environmental aspects of power plant cooling systems; and studies of the physical and biological oceangraphy of the continental shelves bordering the United States.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

United States Environmental Monitoring EPA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

United United States Environmental Monitoring EPA 600/R-93/141 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory January 1992 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 89193-3478 Research and Development _EPA Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1991 Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientificand Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak ridge,TN 39831; pricesavailablefrom (615) 576-8401 Availableto the publicfrom the NationalTechnicalInformationService, U.S. Departmentof Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 Price Code: PrintedCopyof MicroficheA01 Frontand back cover: CommunityMonitorStation (front) and Whole BodyLaboratory(back), Craig A. Tsosle EnvironmentalMonitoringSystemsLaboratory-LasVegas, Nevada Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report:

384

Sí Se Puede: Using Participatory Research to Promote Environmental Justice in a Latino Community in San Diego, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meredith Minkler, Analilia P. Garcia, Joy Williams, TonyWilliams and Lilly are with the Environmental Health Coalition, Old Town National City, CA, USA. Correspondence: Meredith

Minkler, Meredith; Garcia, Analilia P.; Williams, Joy; LoPresti, Tony; Lilly, Jane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada With Errata Sheets, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117, Pluto Disassembly Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 117 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 26-41-01, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 26-41-01. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 117 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before finalizing the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary following SAFER activities. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated to meet the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 27, 2007, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117.

Pat Matthews

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The National Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Environmental Serving an Essential Research Park at Mission for 25 Years Savannah River Site This document is PL^LICLY EAWidg r _ Autho ing Official Daft " / 2 a_"7 Savannah River Site South Carolina Aiken * Augusta Georgia Miles 10 0 10 20 30 The University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Dear Reader, Early in 1970, President Richard M. Nixon endorsed and ordered the implementation of 10 recommendations he had received from the Office of Science and Technology sub- sequent to the concurrence of the newly formed Council on Environmental Quality. The tenth recommendation included the following statement: "In view of the importance of preserving natural areas throughout the world, the con- cerned Federal agencies should accelerate their efforts to set aside representative loca-

387

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. It has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. A SAFER may be performed when the following criteria are met: (1) Conceptual corrective actions are clearly identified (although some degree of investigation may be necessary to select a specific corrective action before completion of the Corrective Action Investigation [CAI]); (2) Uncertainty of the nature, extent, and corrective action must be limited to an acceptable level of risk; (3) The SAFER Plan includes decision points and criteria for making data quality objective (DQO) decisions. The purpose of the investigation will be to document and verify the adequacy of existing information; to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action. The actual corrective action selected will be based on characterization activities implemented under this SAFER Plan. This SAFER Plan identifies decision points developed in cooperation with the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP), where the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) will reach consensus with the NDEP before beginning the next phase of work. Corrective Action Unit 553 is located in Areas 19 and 20 of the NTS, approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 553 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: 19-99-01, Mud Spill; 19-99-11, Mud Spill; 20-09-09, Mud Spill; and 20-99-03, Mud Spill. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites (i.e., the expected nature and extent of contaminants of potential concern [COPCs]) to recommend closure of CAU 553 using the SAFER process (FFACO, 1996).

Boehlecke, Robert F.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPENDIX A ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS METHODOLOGIES This appendix briefly describes the methods used to assess the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of the alternatives in this Environmental Impact Statement for the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (CMRR EIS). Included are impact assessment methods for land use and visual resources, site infrastructure, air quality, noise, geology and soils, surface and groundwater, water quality, ecological resources, cultural and paleontological resources, socioeconomics, waste management and pollution prevention, and cumulative impacts. Each section includes descriptions of the affected resources, region of influence, and impact assessment methods. Descriptions of the

389

EA-0896; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center For Nuclear Medicine Research In Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West 6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 1.1. Description 1.2 Alternatives 1.3 Affected Environment 1.4 Construction Impacts 1.5 Operating Impacts 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Description of the Proposed Action 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operation Activities 3.3 The No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources

390

Environmental Impact of Smart Grid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Smart Grid Impact of Smart Grid January 10, 2011 2 Agenda * Review of Paper - Introduction - Key Areas of Impact - Findings - Conclusions - Recommended Topics for Further Research 3 3 Introduction Provide background for the current state of environmental impact of Smart Grid * Summarize key components of criteria pollutants from electricity and transportation sectors * Define the Smart Grid and how it can be used to reduce pollutants * Evaluate impact from Smart Grid on reducing pollutants through: - Demand Response - Electric Vehicles - Demand Side Management - Renewables and Distributed Energy Resources - Transmission and Distribution Systems Use this knowledge to address topics for further research Key Areas of Impact 5 Key Areas of Review and Consideration for Environmental Impacts *

391

NREL: Biomass Research - Thomas Foust  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thomas Foust Thomas Foust Photo of Thomas Foust Dr. Thomas Foust is an internationally recognized expert in the biomass field. His areas of expertise include feedstock production, biomass-to-fuels conversion technologies, and environmental and societal sustainability issues associated with biofuels. He has more than 20 years of research and research management experience, specializing in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. As National Bioenergy Center Director, Dr. Foust guides and directs NREL's research efforts to develop biomass conversion technologies via biochemical and thermochemical routes, as well as critical research areas addressing the sustainability of biofuels. This research focuses on developing the necessary science and technology for converting biomass to biofuels,

392

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Energy and Environmental Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheets & Brochures Fact Sheets & Brochures Organization Charts Contact Us Divisions Biosciences Electrical and Electronics Systems Research Energy & Transportation Science Environmental Sciences Programs Advanced Manufacturing Bioenergy Program Center for BioEnergy Sustainability Energy Efficiency & Electricity Technologies Transportation Technology Areas Advanced Manufacturing Sensors & Signal Processing Electronics & Electric Machines Energy Supply & Distribution Systems Energy Efficiency Engineering User Facilities News & Highlights Advisory Committee Contact Us Staff Only ORNL Research Areas Advanced Computing Advanced Materials Biological Systems Energy Science Nanotechnology National Security Neutron Sciences Research Facilities Additional Areas Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate

393

Environmental Protection Agency research authorization for appropriations for fiscal year 1978. Ninety-Fifth Congress, First Session, House of Representatives, October 19, 1977  

SciTech Connect

A conference report was issued on the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 5101) to authorize appropriations for activities of the Environmental Protection Agency. The differences between the House bill and the Senate amendment were noted and the substitute agreed to in conference was discussed. The conference report authorized a total of $253,603,000 for the Environmental Protection Agency's environmental research and development program for fiscal year 1978. This compares to a House authorization of $313,064,000 and a Senate authorization of $185,330,000. A significant difference between the House and Senate bills was that that Senate bill does not authorize research under the Clean Air Act. Rather, the Senate carried this authorization separately in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 (Public Law 95-95). For this reason, the conference substitute contains only an additional authorization of $35 million to cover the environmental protection Protection Agency's supplemental appropriations request for fiscal year 1978. The Senate has also included authorization for research, development and demonstration in support of the Safe Drinking Water Act in the bill S. 1528, the Safe Drinking Water Act amendments, and for research, development, and demonstration in support of the Noise Control Act in the bill S. 1511, Noise Control Act amendments. Both of these bills passed the Senate. There was also an authorization for fiscal year 1978 of 45 million for research, development and demonstration related to solid waste contained in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Public Law 94-580) passed in the last Congress.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fundamental molecular physics and chemistry. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, October 1981-December 1982. Pt. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the twelfth Annual Report of our Fundamental Molecular Physics and Chemistry Program. Scientifically, the work of the program deals with aspects of the physics and chemistry of molecules related to their interactions with photons, electrons, and other external agents. We chose these areas of study in view of our matic goals; that is to say, we chose them so that the eventual outcome of our work meets some of the needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and of other government agencies that support our research. First, we endeavor to determine theoretically and experimentally cross sections for electron and photon interactions with molecules, because those cross sections are indispensable for detailed microscopic analyses of the earliest processes of radiation action on any molecular substance, including biological materials. Those analyses in turn provide a sound basis for radiology and radiation dosimetry. Second, we study the spectroscopy of certain molecules and of small clusters of molecules because this topic is fundamental to the full understanding of atmospheric-pollutant chemistry.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

397

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Environmental Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Environmental Interface Science at SSRL Environmental Remediation Science at SSRL Science Focus Area: SSRL Environmental Remediation Program X-ray Science at SLAC...

398

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Oreopoulos L, E Mlawer, J Delamere, T Shippert, J Cole, B Fomin, M Iacono, Z Jin, J Li, J Manners, P Raisanen, F Rose, Y Zhang, MJ Wilson, and WB Rossow. 2012. "The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: results from Phase I." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, doi:10.1029/2011JD016821. The total error of each participating radiation code for all LW (left) and SW (right) cases in the CIRC intercomparison. The identity of each participating code can be found in the paper; codes built due to ARM

399

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Simulation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, A Merrelli, D Vimont, and EJ Mlawer. 2012. "Impact of modifying the longwave water vapor continuum absorption model on community Earth system model simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D04106, doi:10.1029/2011JD016440. The mean difference profiles (experiment minus control) for clear-sky longwave radiative heating (QRLC); shortwave clear-sky radiative heating (QRSC); the longwave cloud radiative forcing (QRLCF); the precipitation

400

Environmental Survey preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

Not Available

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "area environmental research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

U.S. Department of Energy and Polish Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas Joint Coordinating Committee for Environmental Systems FY00 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The complexity of environmental pollution, not reported all over the world, increases the demand for novel, highly efficient and cost-effective rehabilitation technologies.

Altman, D.J.

2001-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

402

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Construction and Operation of a Proposed Biogas Anaerobic Digestion Facility at an Ethanol Plant Western Plains Energy, LLC Grinnell Township (Oakley), Gove County, Kansas U. S. Department of Agriculture Rural Business Cooperative Service 1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20250-3225 August 29, 2011 Environmental Assessment Western Plains Energy, LLC Gove County, Kansas ii TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page I. PROPOSAL DESCRIPTION AND NEED .................................................................... 1 II. PRIMARY BENEFICIARIES AND RELATED ACTIVITIES .................................. 2 III. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSAL AREA .............................................................. 2

403

Gulf of Mexico Sales 147 and 150: Central and western planning areas. Volume 2, Sections 4.D. through 9: Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume II contains: environmental consequences, part D which includes environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives for the proposed Central Gulf sale 147 and for the proposed Western Gulf sale 150; consultation and coordination; bibliography and special references; preparers; glossary; and appendices.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Agency/Company /Organization: International Food Policy Research Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01018.pdf RelatedTo: Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Screenshot

405

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

406

Environmental Intelligence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intelligence Intelligence Answering big questions about environmental change begins with many small measurements (continued on next page) NEWSLETTER OF Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate E nvironmental intelligence is the wealth of information on the physical, biological, and chemical processes that drive Earth's ecosystems (its organisms, soil, air, and water) and the impact humans have on these ecosystems through our practices and developments. Such intelligence is often gathered though small, precise efforts to monitor complex environmental processes with sensing and measurement systems. By collecting new or more detailed observational data from a greater number of locations across the globe, researchers can improve scientific

407

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico...

408

Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27, 1998 27, 1998 EA-1236: Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, Wyoming December 1, 1997 EA-1175: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Title Transfer of East Tennessee Park Land and Facilities November 21, 1997 EA-1170: Final Environmental Assessment Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Access Improvement at the Nevada Test Site October 16, 1997 EA-1219: Final Environmental Assessment Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation October 8, 1997 EA-1212: Final Environmental Assessment Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory July 28, 1997 EA-1203: Final Environmental Assessment Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site,

409

Changzheng Liu - Research Staff - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(T) 865.946.1306 (F) 865.946.1541 liuc2@ornl.gov Specialty Research Areas: Modeling, Optimization and Simulation Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis Data, Statistical...

410

Life sciences and environmental sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Life sciences and environmental sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Modelling environmental risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As environmental issues have become increasingly important in economic research and policy for sustainable development, firms in the private sector have introduced environmental and social issues in conducting their business activities. Such behaviour ... Keywords: Asymmetry, Conditional volatility, Dow Jones Sustainability Indexes, Environmental risk, Environmental sustainability index, GARCH, GJR, Log-moment condition, Moment condition, Persistence, Shocks

Suhejla Hoti; Michael McAleer; Laurent L. Pauwels

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended by the Secretary of Energy and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the requirements of the Nulcear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of the site characterization plan are oulined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

NONE

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain site in Neavada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining hte geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare and environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site chara